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Sample records for patellar tendon injury

  1. Atraumatic patellar prosthesis dislocation with patellar tendon injury following a total knee arthroplasty: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Alka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Total knee arthroplasty is a well-established procedure with gratifying results. There is no consensus in the literature whether to routinely resurface the patella while performing total knee arthroplasty or not. Although an extremely rare occurrence in clinical practice, patellar prosthesis dislocation is a possible complication resulting from total knee arthroplasty. Case presentation We report a rare case of atraumatic spontaneous dislocation of patellar prosthesis in a 63-year-old Caucasian man of British origin with patellar tendon injury. The patient was treated successfully through a revision of the patellar component and tendon repair. In two years follow-up the patient is asymptomatic with no sign of loosening of his patellar prosthesis. Conclusions A thorough understanding of knee biomechanics is imperative in performing total knee arthroplasty in order to achieve a better functional outcome and to prevent early prosthetic failure.

  2. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture ?

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, Jos? Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a s...

  3. Floating knee injury associated with patellar tendon rupture: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Singaravadivelu; Panchanathan Ganesan, Jagannath; Moongilpatti Sengodan, Mugundhan

    2012-01-01

    Floating knee injuries are frequently associated with other concomitant injuries to the ipsilateral limb or other parts of body of which injury to the ipsilateral knee ligaments carries significance for various reasons. A middle-aged man sustained a floating knee injury following RTA. DCS fixation by bridge plating technique for the distal femur and lateral buttress plating by MIPO technique for proximal tibia were planned and executed under spinal anesthesia with image intensifier. In addition, there were patellar tendon rupture along with avulsion of VMO from the medial border of patella and torn MPFL, which we have missed initially. To the best of our knowledge no similar case has been reported in English literature so far. We have reviewed the literature and proposed a different interpretation of Blake and McBride classification.

  4. Floating Knee Injury Associated with Patellar Tendon Rupture: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singaravadivelu Vaidyanathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Floating knee injuries are frequently associated with other concomitant injuries to the ipsilateral limb or other parts of body of which injury to the ipsilateral knee ligaments carries significance for various reasons. A middle-aged man sustained a floating knee injury following RTA. DCS fixation by bridge plating technique for the distal femur and lateral buttress plating by MIPO technique for proximal tibia were planned and executed under spinal anesthesia with image intensifier. In addition, there were patellar tendon rupture along with avulsion of VMO from the medial border of patella and torn MPFL, which we have missed initially. To the best of our knowledge no similar case has been reported in English literature so far. We have reviewed the literature and proposed a different interpretation of Blake and McBride classification.

  5. The prevalence of Achilles and patellar tendon injuries in Australian football players beyond a time-loss definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docking, S I; Rio, E; Cook, J; Orchard, J W; Fortington, L V

    2018-03-23

    Little is known about the prevalence and associated of morbidity of tendon problems. With only severe cases of tendon problems missing games, players that have their training and performance impacted are not captured by traditional injury surveillance. The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of Achilles and patellar tendon problems in elite male Australian football players using the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre (OSTRC) overuse questionnaire, compared to a time-loss definition. Male athletes from 12 professional Australian football teams were invited to complete a monthly questionnaire over a 9-month period in the 2016 pre- and competitive season. The OSTRC overuse injury questionnaire was used to measure the prevalence and severity of Achilles and patellar tendon symptoms and was compared to traditional match-loss statistics. A total of 441 participants were included. Of all participants, 21.5% (95% CI: 17.9-25.6) and 25.2% (95% CI 21.3-29.4) reported Achilles or patellar tendon problems during the season, respectively. Based on the traditional match-loss definition, a combined 4.1% of participants missed games due to either Achilles or patellar tendon injury. A greater average monthly prevalence was observed during the pre-season compared to the competitive season. Achilles and patellar tendon problems are prevalent in elite male Australian football players. These injuries are not adequately captured using a traditional match-loss definition. Prevention of these injuries may be best targeted during the off- and pre-season due to higher prevalence of symptoms during the pre-season compared to during the competitive season. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, José Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  7. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Lino Moura

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  8. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) KidsHealth / For Parents / Jumper's Knee (Patellar ... prevent continued damage to the knee. How the Knee Works To understand how jumper's knee happens, it ...

  9. Patellar Sleeve Fracture With Ossification of the Patellar Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damrow, Derek S; Van Valin, Scott E

    2017-03-01

    Patellar sleeve fractures make up greater than 50% of all patellar fractures. They are essentially only seen in the pediatric population because of the thick periosteum and the distal patellar pole apophysis in this group. These fractures can lead to complications if not treated appropriately and in a timely fashion. Complications of missed or untreated patellar sleeve fractures include patella alta, anterior knee pain, and quadriceps atrophy. These can all result in severe limitations in activity. The authors describe a case of a 16-year-old boy who sustained a patellar sleeve fracture 3 years prior to presentation. On presentation, he had patella alta, diminished strength, 5° of extensor lag, and radiographs that revealed bone formation along the patellar tendon. Despite this, he was able to maintain a high level of activity. This case report explores how the patient could have maintained a high level of activity despite having a patellar sleeve fracture. Also, because of the delayed presentation, the patella was ossified and the quadriceps was retracted, which led to a novel approach to reconstructing his distal extensor mechanism. This approach included a V-Y advancement of the quadriceps tendon and patellar tendon reconstruction using the patient's hamstring tendon (semitendinosus). This technique, combined with physical therapy postoperatively, resulted in his return to varsity high school soccer. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this technique has not been reported for this rare condition. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e357-e359.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Clinical evaluation of bone- patellar tendon- bone grafts for anterior cruciate ligament injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    One thousand and thirty-eight cases of Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) rupture were treated between January 2002 and November 2010. Eight hundred sixty-six cases (83.9%) were observed for at least six months. All cases were reconstructed with a bone to tendon to bone (BTB) graft from the patella. Much effort was made to return the patient to a competitive sports activity level within one year. The age at suffering from the initial injury ranged from 9 to 74 years old with a mean of 24.7 years old. There were 493 female (50.7%) and 427 male (49.3%) cases. The injured side was right in 408 cases and left in 458 cases. The mean postoperative observation period was 449.2 days. The number of patients who felt 80% or more certain that they could return to competitive sports activities was 538 (61.9%). From the MRI findings, continuity of the reconstructed graft was observed in 793 cases (98.5%). Arthroscopy after reconstruction was performed in 775 cases (89.5%). The reconstructed ACL was observed to be covered with an adequate synovium in 629 cases (81.2%). The medial meniscus and lateral meniscus showed no changes in 657 cases (84.8%) and 666 cases (85.9%) respectively. Reconstructions performed less than two weeks after injury showed no significant differences in terms of Range Of Motion (ROM), arthroscopic findings, or the number of patients who could return to competitive sports activities. Statistically significantly more patients who underwent their reconstruction at an age over forty experienced a loss motion of five degree in extension or ten degree in flexion and resumed a lower level of sports activities. Patients who underwent the reconstruction could return to exercises for muscle strengthening and ROMs within 2 weeks. Patients over forty years old who underwent their reconstruction could prevent their menisci from fraying, tearing, or undergoing osteoarthritic changes. (author)

  11. Radiographic Features of Acute Patellar Tendon Rupture.

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    Fazal, Muhammad Ali; Moonot, Pradeep; Haddad, Fares

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess soft tissue features of acute patellar tendon rupture on lateral knee radiograph that would facilitate early diagnosis. The participants were divided into two groups of 35 patients each. There were 28 men and seven women with a mean age of 46 years in the control group and 26 men and nine women with a mean age of 47 years in the rupture group. The lateral knee radiograph of each patient was evaluated for Insall-Salvati ratio for patella alta, increased density of the infrapatellar fat pad, appearance of the soft tissue margin of the patellar tendon and bony avulsions. In the rupture group there were three consistent soft tissue radiographic features in addition to patellar alta. These were increased density of infrapatellar fat pad; loss of sharp, well-defined linear margins of the patellar tendon and angulated wavy margin of the patellar tendon while in the control group these features were not observed. The soft tissue radiographic features described in the rupture group are consistent and reliable. When coupled with careful clinical assessment, these will aid in early diagnosis and further imaging will be seldom required. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Effect of eccentric exercise on the healing process of injured patellar tendon in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kenichi; Kitaoka, Katsuhiko; Tomita, Katsuro

    2008-01-01

    Background. Earlier studies have reported positive results from eccentric training in patients with tendon disorders. The reasons for the beneficial clinical effects of eccentric training are not known. Vascularization followed by regression of the vasculature enhances the healing response of injured tendons. Eccentric exercise induces a more beneficial healing response than concentric exercise. Methods. Sixty rats with patellar tendon injuries were divided into three groups: nonexercise cont...

  13. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald; Silbernagel, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Hamstring muscles play a major role in knee-joint stabilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Weakness of the knee extensors after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) graft, and in the knee flexors after reconstruction with hamstring tendons (HT) graft has been observed ...

  14. Sex Variation in Patellar Tendon Kinetics During Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether female recreational runners exhibit distinct patellar tendon loading patterns in relation to their male counterparts. Methods. Twelve male (age 26.55 ± 4.11 years, height 1.78 ± 0.11 m, mass 77.11 ± 5.06 kg and twelve female (age 26.67 ± 5.34 years, height 1.67 ± 0.12 m, mass 63.28 ± 9.75 kg runners ran over a force platform at 4.0 m · s-1. Lower limb kinematics were collected using an eight-camera optoelectric motion capture system which operated at 250 Hz. Patellar tendon loads were examined using a predictive algorithm. Sex differences in limb, knee and ankle joint stiffness were examined statistically using independent samples t tests. Results. The results indicate that patellar tendon force (male = 6.49 ± 2.28, female = 7.03 ± 1.35 and patelllar tendon loading rate (male = 92.41 ± 32.51, female = 111.05 ± 48.58 were significantly higher in female runners. Conclusions. Excessive tendon loading in female runners indicates that female runners may be at increased risk of patellar tendon pathologies.

  15. Effect of eccentric exercise on the healing process of injured patellar tendon in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenichi; Kitaoka, Katsuhiko; Tomita, Katsuro

    2008-07-01

    Earlier studies have reported positive results from eccentric training in patients with tendon disorders. The reasons for the beneficial clinical effects of eccentric training are not known. Vascularization followed by regression of the vasculature enhances the healing response of injured tendons. Eccentric exercise induces a more beneficial healing response than concentric exercise. Sixty rats with patellar tendon injuries were divided into three groups: nonexercise controls (group N; n = 20); concentric exercise group (group C; n = 20); eccentric exercise group (group E; n = 20). Each rat was taught to run uphill or downhill for 14 days. Patellar tendons were removed 1, 4, 7, 10, and 14 days following injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-1, and angiopoietin-2 were measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In group C, VEGF mRNA was increased 1 and 4 days following injury but was decreased on days 7, 10, and 14. In group E, VEGF mRNA was elevated only on day 1. In group N, VEGF mRNA remained at a low level throughout all 14 days. The angiopoietin-2/angiopoietin-1 ratio was higher for group C than for group E. In the presence of VEGF, angiopoietin-1 promotes vessel stability, whereas angiopoietin-2 has the opposite effect. Eccentric exercise contributes to stabilized angiogenesis during the early phase of tendon injury. Conversely, concentric exercise, which induces destabilized angiogenesis, leads to a delayed healing response. Initiation of eccentric exercise immediately after tendon injury may help improve healing by reducing vascularity.

  16. Effect of prostaglandin E2 injection on the structural properties of the rat patellar tendon

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    Ferry Scott T

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased tendon production of the inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 has been suggested to be a potential etiologic agent in the development of tendinopathy. Repeated injection of PGE2 into tendon has been proposed as a potential animal model for studying treatments for tendinopathy. In contrast, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs which inhibit PGE2 production and are commonly prescribed in treating tendinopathy have been shown to impair the healing of tendon after acute injury in animal models. The contradictory literature suggests the need to better define the functional effects of PGE2 on tendon. Our objective was to characterize the effects of PGE2 injection on the biomechanical and biochemical properties of tendon and the activity of the animals. Our hypothesis was that weekly PGE2 injection to the rat patellar tendon would lead to inferior biomechanical properties. Methods Forty rats were divided equally into four groups. Three groups were followed for 4 weeks with the following peritendinous injection procedures: No injection (control, 4 weekly injections of saline (saline, 4 weekly injections of 800 ng PGE2 (PGE2-4 wks. The fourth group received 4 weekly injections of 800 ng PGE2 initially and was followed for a total of 8 weeks. All animals were injected bilaterally. The main outcome measurements included: the structural and material properties of the patellar tendon under tensile loading to failure, tendon collagen content, and weekly animal activity scores. Results The ultimate load of PGE2-4 wks tendons at 4 weeks was significantly greater than control or saline group tendons. The stiffness and elastic modulus of the PGE2 injected tendons at 8 weeks was significantly greater than the control or saline tendons. No differences in animal activity, collagen content, or mean fibril diameter were observed between groups. Conclusions Four weekly peritendinous injections of PGE2 to the rat patellar

  17. Mechanical Properties of Human Patellar Tendon at the Hierarchical levels of Tendon and Fibril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Hansen, Philip; Hassenkam, Tue

    2012-01-01

    Tendons are strong hierarchical structures, but how tensile forces are transmitted between different levels remains incompletely understood. Collagen fibrils are thought to be primary determinants of whole tendon properties, and therefore we hypothesized that the whole human patellar tendon and its...... distinct collagen fibrils would display similar mechanical properties. Human patellar tendons (n=5) were mechanically tested in vivo by ultrasonography. Biopsies were obtained from each tendon and individual collagen fibrils were dissected and tested mechanically by atomic force microscopy. The Young...... that of tendon supports that fibrillar rather than interfibrillar properties govern sub-failure tendon response, making the fibrillar level a meaningful target of intervention. The lower modulus found in vitro suggests a possible adverse effect of removing the tissue from its natural environment. In addition...

  18. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction using Bone Patellar Tendon Bone autograft in ACL deficient Knee

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    Navin Kumar Karn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Injury to Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL reconstruction has increased because of increased interest in sports. There are various grafts used for reconstruction of ACL, for example, Bone Patellar Tendon Bone, Hamstring etc. The study was conducted to evaluate the results of Bone Patellar Tendon Bone graft used for reconstruction of Anterior Cruciate Ligament.Materials & Methods: 40 patients with chronic ACL deficient knee presenting to Neuro Hospital from July 2011 to June 2013 were included in the study. The patients with intraarticular fracture of knee, severe OA knee, local active or suspected infection and systemic disease that might influence the study results were excluded from the study. Bone patellar tendon bone graft was harvested from ipsilateral knee in all the cases. The patient was followed till 2 year with specified programme of rehabilitation. The pain was assessed using VAS and the function of the knee was assessed using Modified WOMAC knee index.Results: The long term satisfactory results in terms of functional stability, symptom relief and return to preinjury level of activity was seen in 32 cases (80%. Two knees got infected out of which one required arthroscopic debridement. Mean visual analogue scale was 8 and modified WOMAC knee score was 3 at 2 year follow up.Conclusion: Bone patellar tendon bone graft is useful in high demand patients and cost effective option with high patient satisfaction rate for reconstruction of ACL.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:12-15.

  19. Foot Posture and Patellar Tendon Pain Among Adult Volleyball Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Reinier; Malliaras, Peter; Munteanu, Shannon; Payne, Craig; Morrissey, Dylan; Maffulli, Nicola

    Objective: We hypothesized that individuals with a normal foot posture would be less likely to experience patellar tendon pain and pathology than those with a pronated or supinated foot. Design: Observational study. Setting: Field-based study among competing athletes. Participants: Volleyball

  20. Foot posture and patellar tendon pain among adult volleyball players.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, R. de; Malliaras, P.; Munteanu, S.; Payne, C.; Morrissey, D.; Maffulli, N.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that individuals with a normal foot posture would be less likely to experience patellar tendon pain and pathology than those with a pronated or supinated foot. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Field-based study among competing athletes. PARTICIPANTS: Volleyball

  1. Does the adolescent patellar tendon respond to 5 days of cumulative load during a volleyball tournament?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ark, M.; Docking, S.I.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.; Rudavsky, A.; Rio, E.; Zwerver, J.; Cook, J.L.

    Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) has a high prevalence in jumping athletes. Excessive load on the patellar tendon through high volumes of training and competition is an important risk factor. Structural changes in the tendon are related to a higher risk of developing patellar tendinopathy. The

  2. Effects of habitual loading on patellar tendon mechanical and morphological properties in basketball and volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z J; Ng, G Y F; Fu, S N

    2015-11-01

    Tendon mechanical properties are linked to sports performance and tendon-related injuries, such as tendinopathy. Whether habitual loading, such as participation in regular jumping activities, would induce adaptation on tendon mechanical properties remains unclear. Forty healthy subjects (10 sedentary, 15 volleyball players, and 15 basketball players) aged between 18 and 35 years were recruited. Supersonic shearwave imaging was used to measure the shear elastic modulus and thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the proximal patellar tendons of both knees at 30° of flexion. Significant group differences in tendon shear elastic modulus were found among the three groups. In the dominant leg, reduction in tendon shear elastic modulus by 18.9 % (p = 0.018) and 48.7 % (p = 0.000) were observed in the basketball and volleyball players, respectively, when compared with sedentary subjects. In the non-dominant leg, reduction in tendon shear elastic modulus were 27.3 % (p = 0.034) and 47.1 % (p = 0.02) in the basketball and volleyball players, respectively. The athlete groups were found to have larger CSA but with similar tendon thickness than sedentary group. The CSA were larger by 24-29 % and by 22-24 % in the basketball players and volleyball players, for the dominant and non-dominant legs, respectively (all p < 0.05). Age and body mass are related to tendon stiffness and CSA, particularly in the sedentary subjects. The proximal patellar tendon can undergo substantial adaptation on tendon mechanical and morphological properties when exposed in jumping sports. Intrinsic factors such as age and body mass could influence tendon properties.

  3. Patellar tendon load in different types of eccentric squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohm, A; Halvorsen, K; Thorstensson, A

    2007-07-01

    Differences in mechanical loading of the patellar tendon have been suggested as a reason for varying effects in rehabilitation of patellar tendinopathy using different eccentric squat exercises and devices. The aim was to characterize the magnitude and pattern of mechanical load at the knee and on the patellar tendon during four types of eccentric squat. Subjects performed squats with a submaximal free weight and with maximal effort in a device for eccentric overloading (Bromsman), on a decline board and horizontal surface. Kinematics was recorded with a motion-capture system, reaction forces with force plates, and electromyography from three leg muscles with surface electrodes. Inverse dynamics was used to calculate knee joint kinetics. Eccentric work, mean and peak patellar tendon force, and angle at peak force were greater (25-30%) for squats on decline board compared to horizontal surface with free weight, but not in Bromsman. Higher knee load forces (60-80%), but not work, were observed with Bromsman than free weight. Angular excursions at the knee and ankle were larger with decline board, particularly with free weight, and smaller in Bromsman than with free weight. Mean electromyography was greater on a decline board for gastrocnemius (13%) and vastus medialis (6%) with free weight, but in Bromsman only for gastrocnemius (7%). The results demonstrated clear differences in the biomechanical loading on the knee during different squat exercises. Quantification of such differences provides information that could be used to explain differences in rehabilitation effects as well as in designing more optimal rehabilitation exercises for patellar tendinopathy.

  4. Regional strain variations in the human patellar tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Stephen J; Ritchings, Tim; Mohamed, Azlan S A

    2014-07-01

    Characteristics of localized tendon strain in vivo are largely unknown. The present study examines local tendon strain between the deep, middle, and surface structures at the proximal and distal aspects of the patellar tendon during ramped isometric contractions. Male subjects (age 28.0 ± 6.3 yr) were examined for patellar tendon excursion (anterior, midsection, and posterior) during ramped isometric voluntary contractions using real-time B-mode ultrasonography and dynamometry. Regional tendon excursion measurements were compared using an automated pixel tracking method. Strain was determined from the tendon delta length normalized to initial/resting segment length. Strain increased from 10% to 100% of force for all regions. Significantly greater mean strain was seen for the anterior proximal region compared to the posterior and mid layer of the tendon (7.5% ± 1.1% vs 3.7% ± 0.5% vs 5.5% ± 1.0%; P < 0.05). Similarly, the distal posterior region showed greater mean strain compared to the mid and anterior regions (7.9% ± 0.6% vs 5.0% ± 0.6% vs 5.4% ± 0.6%; P < 0.05). Relative changes in strain differences from 50% to 100% of force for the proximal region were greatest for the anterior to midline regions (4.6% ± 0.6% and 5.6% ± 0.6%, respectively) and those for the distal region were also greatest for the anterior to midline regions (4.4% ± 0.2% and 5.3% ± 0.2%, respectively). The largest mean strain for the proximal region was at the anterior layer (7.5% ± 1.1%) and that for the distal tendon region was at the posterior layer (7.9% ± 0.9%). This study shows significant regional differences in strain during ramped isometric contractions for the patellar tendon. Lower proximal strains in the posterior tendon compared to the anterior region may be associated with the suggestion of "stress shielding" as an etiological factor in insertional tendinopathy.

  5. Differences in tendon properties in elite badminton players with or without patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Kongsgaard, M; Aagaard, Per

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the structural and mechanical properties of the patellar tendon in elite male badminton players with and without patellar tendinopathy. Seven players with unilateral patellar tendinopathy (PT group) on the lead extremity (used for forward lunge) and nine players...

  6. Extensor Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Extensor Tendon Injuries Email to a friend * required ...

  7. Fibrocartilage in the attachment zones of the quadriceps tendon and patellar ligament of man.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, E J; Benjamin, M; Pemberton, D J

    1990-01-01

    Differences are reported in the quantities and distribution of uncalcified fibrocartilage at the attachment sites of the quadriceps tendon and the patellar ligament. The largest quantity of fibrocartilage was characteristic of the quadriceps tendon. A prominent wedge of fibrocartilage was seen in the proximal part of the tibial attachment of the patellar ligament, though there was no fibrocartilage in the most superficial fibres. Little fibrocartilage was seen at the patellar attachment of th...

  8. Do peak torque angles of muscles change following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring or patellar tendon graft?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosmaoğlu, Hayri Baran; Baltacı, Gül; Sönmezer, Emel; Özer, Hamza; Doğan, Deha

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to compare the effects of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using autogenous hamstring or patellar tendon graft on the peak torque angle. The study included 132 patients (103 males, 29 females; mean age 29±9 year) who were performed ACL reconstruction with autogenous hamstring or patellar tendon graft. The peak torque angles in the quadriceps and hamstring muscles were recorded using an isokinetic dynamometer. Angle of peak knee flexion torque occurred significantly earlier within the range of motion on the operated side than nonoperated side at 180°/second in the hamstring tendon group. Angle of peak knee extension torque occurred significantly earlier within the range of motion on the operated side than nonoperated side at 180°/second in the patellar tendon group. There were no statistically significant differences in the flexion and extension peak torque angles between the operated and nonoperated knees at 60°/second in both groups. The angle of peak torque at relatively high angular velocities is affected after ACL reconstruction in patients with hamstring or patellar tendon grafts. The graft donor site directly influences this parameter. This finding may be important for clinicians in terms of preventing re-injury.

  9. Does the adolescent patellar tendon respond to 5 days of cumulative load during a volleyball tournament?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ark, M; Docking, S I; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Rudavsky, A; Rio, E; Zwerver, J; Cook, J L

    2016-02-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) has a high prevalence in jumping athletes. Excessive load on the patellar tendon through high volumes of training and competition is an important risk factor. Structural changes in the tendon are related to a higher risk of developing patellar tendinopathy. The critical tendon load that affects tendon structure is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate patellar tendon structure on each day of a 5-day volleyball tournament in an adolescent population (16-18 years). The right patellar tendon of 41 players in the Australian Volleyball Schools Cup was scanned with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) on every day of the tournament (Monday to Friday). UTC can quantify structure of a tendon into four echo types based on the stability of the echo pattern. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to test for change of echo type I and II over the tournament days. Participants played between eight and nine matches during the tournament. GEE analysis showed no significant change of echo type percentages of echo type I (Wald chi-square = 4.603, d.f. = 4, P = 0.331) and echo type II (Wald chi-square = 6.070, d.f. = 4, P = 0.194) over time. This study shows that patellar tendon structure of 16-18-year-old volleyball players is not affected during 5 days of cumulative loading during a volleyball tournament. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Acute traumatic rupture of the patellar tendon in pediatric population: Case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Yousef, Mohamed Abdelhamid; Rosenfeld, Scott

    2017-11-01

    Intact knee extensor mechanism is required for the normal function of the lower extremity. Patellar tendon rupture is a relatively rare injury with peak age incidence around 40 years and usually occurs midsubstance. The occurrence of pure patellar tendon rupture without bony avulsion is an extremely rare injury in the pediatric population with few cases reported in the literature with limited information regarding frequency, complications, and outcomes in children. However, due to increased participation in sports and high-energy recreational activities during childhood, the frequency of such injuries has progressively increased. To evaluate the frequency of pediatric patellar tendon rupture injuries and describe the radiological findings, treatment modalities, and outcome of such injuries. Demographic and clinical data on a series of patients who sustained patellar tendon rupture were reviewed. These data included age at time of injury, sex, laterality, mechanism of injury, associated injuries, complications, presence or absence of Osgood-Schlatter disease, diagnostic imaging such as plain radiographs and magnetic resonance images (MRI), surgical technique, method of fixation, period of postoperative immobilization, total duration of physiotherapy, time to return to sports activities and follow-up duration. Insall-Salvati ratio was calculated on the preoperative lateral x-ray. The functional outcome was evaluated with regard to final knee active range of motion (AROM), manual quadriceps muscle testing, and presence or the absence of terminal extension lag. Clinical outcome rating using knee society score (KSS) was performed and functional outcome was further classified according to the calculated score. Five male patients with patellar tendon rupture (7%) were identified among 71 pediatric patients who sustained acute traumatic injury of the knee extensor mechanism. The mean age at the time of injury was 13.6 years (range: 12-15 years). The injury occurred in

  11. Reproducibility and clinical utility of tendon palpation to detect patellar tendinopathy in young basketball players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J; Khan, K; Kiss, Z; Purdam, C; Griffiths, L

    2001-01-01

    Background—Palpation is an important clinical test for jumper's knee. Objectives—To (a) test the reproducibility of palpation tenderness, (b) evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of palpation in subjects with clinical symptoms of jumper's knee, and (c) determine whether tenderness to palpation may serve as a useful screening test for patellar tendinopathy. The yardstick for diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy was ultrasonographic abnormality. Methods—In 326 junior symptomatic and asymptomatic athletes' tendons, palpation was performed by a single examiner before ultrasonographic examination by a certified ultrasound radiologist. In 58 tendons, palpation was performed twice to test reliability. Tenderness to palpation was scored on a scale from 0 to 3 where 0 represented no pain, and 1, 2, and 3 represented mild, moderate, and severe tenderness respectively. Results—Patellar tendon palpation was a reliable examination for a single examiner (Pearson r = 0.82). In symptomatic tendons, the positive predictive value of palpation was 68%. As a screening examination in asymptomatic subjects, the positive predictive value of tendon palpation was 36–38%. Moderate and severe palpation tenderness were better predictors of ultrasonographic tendon pathology than absent or mild tenderness (ppatellar tendinopathy in a preparticipation examination. In symptomatic tendons, palpation is a moderately sensitive but not specific test. Mild tenderness in the patellar tendons in asymptomatic jumping athletes should be considered normal. Key Words: patellar tendon; ultrasound; palpation; reliability; athletes PMID:11157466

  12. Differences in tendon properties in elite badminton players with or without patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couppé, C; Kongsgaard, M; Aagaard, P; Vinther, A; Boesen, M; Kjaer, M; Magnusson, S P

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the structural and mechanical properties of the patellar tendon in elite male badminton players with and without patellar tendinopathy. Seven players with unilateral patellar tendinopathy (PT group) on the lead extremity (used for forward lunge) and nine players with no current or previous patellar tendinopathy (CT group) were included. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess distal patellar tendon dimensions. Patellar tendon mechanical properties were assessed using simultaneous tendon force and deformation measurements. Distal tendon cross-sectional area (CSA) normalized for body weight (mm(2) /kg(2/3) ) was lower in the PT group compared with the CT group on both the non-lead extremity (6.1 ± 0.3 vs 7.4 ± 0.2, P < 0.05) and the lead extremity (6.5 ± 0.6 vs 8.4 ± 0.3, P < 0.05). Distal tendon stress was higher in the PT group compared with the CT group for both the non-lead extremity (31 ± 1 vs 27 ± 1 MPa, P < 0.05) and the lead extremity (32 ± 3 vs 21 ± 3 MPa, P < 0.01). Conclusively, the PT group had smaller distal patellar tendon CSA on both the injured (lead extremity) and the uninjured side (non-lead extremity) compared with the CT group. Subsequently, the smaller CSA yielded a greater distal patellar tendon stress in the PT group. Therefore, a small tendon CSA may predispose to the development of tendinopathy. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. In vivo Evaluation of Patellar Tendon Stiffness in Individuals with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Yi Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to utilise an ultrasonic technique to assess the effect of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS on the mechanical properties of the patellar tendon. Seven subjects with PFPS and seven matched control subjects volunteered to participate in this study. Subjects were asked to perform isometric maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors while their knee extension torque was monitored and the displacement of the patellar tendon was recorded with an ultrasonic system. Our results showed significantly lower tendon stiffness (by ∼30% in the PFPS subjects. Although tendon secant modulus was lower by 34% in the PFPS subjects, the difference was not statistically significant. Therefore, we conclude that the ultrasonic technique was able to detect a decrease in the structural stiffness of the patellar tendon associated with PFPS. The decrease in tendon stiffness was moderately correlated with the length of symptoms in these individuals.

  14. The wrinkled patellar tendon: An indication of abnormality in the extensor mechanism of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlin, R.C.; Levinsohn, E.M.; Chrisman, H.

    1991-01-01

    Rupture of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon condition which requires early diagnosis and treatment to avert prolonged disability. In four patients who had surgically confirmed quadriceps tendon rupture, lateral radiographs of the knee and/or sagittal magnetic resonance (MR) images demonstrated a corrugated appearance to the patellar tendon. Sagittal MR images of the knee following patellectomy in one patient and radiographs of a transverse fracture of the patella in another also demonstrated this appearance. MRI has superb contrast resolution which provides optimal visualization of the contour of the patellar tendon on sagittal images. A retrospective review of 50 consecutive knee MRI examinations was carried out to evaluate the appearance of the normal patellar tendon. In 49 of 50 patients, the sagittal images demonstrated a straight or nearly straight patellar tendon. A corrugated appearance of the patellar tendon on sagittal images indicates a reduction in the normal tensile force applied to it and indicates the need for careful evaluation of the patella and quadriceps tendon mechanism. (orig.)

  15. The effect of eccentric exercise on injured patellar tendon healing in rats: a gene expression study

    OpenAIRE

    Yagishita, Masafumi

    2011-01-01

    Recently, clinical studies have suggested that eccentric exercise can be beneficial for patellar tendinopathy. It is known that loading induces collagen synthesis in tendon, but the mechanisms responsible for mediating this effect are still unclear. We hypothesized that loading-induced expression of collagen depends on a specific contraction type. Eccentric exercise induces a more beneficial healing response than concentric exercise. Two longitudinal incisions were made in rat patellar tendon...

  16. An Isolated Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction with Patellar Tendon Autograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Witoński

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of the medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction with a medial strip of patellar tendon autograft after a minimum 2-year followup. Ten patients (10 knees were operated on by one surgeon, according to the modified technique, described by Camanho, without any bone plug at free graft end. The mean age of the patients was 27.2 years (ranging from 18 to 42 years. The mean follow-up period was 3 years and 7 months. All patients were reviewed prospectively. At the last follow-up visit, all the patients demonstrated a significant improvement in terms of patellofemoral joint stability, all aspects of the KOOS questionnaire, and Kujala et al.’s score (59.7 points preoperatively and 84.4 points at the last followup. No patient revealed recurrent dislocation. The SF-36 score revealed a significant improvement in bodily pain, general health, physical role functioning, social role functioning, and physical functioning domains. The described MPFL reconstruction with the use of the medial 1/3rd of patella tendon is an effective procedure that gives satisfactorily patellofemoral joint functions, improves the quality of life, and provides much pain relief. It is relatively simple, surgically not extensive, and economically cost-effective procedure.

  17. Factors associated with the presence of patellar tendon abnormalities in male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Luciana D; Verhagen, Evert; Bittencourt, Natália F N; Gonçalves, Gabriela G P; Ocarino, Juliana M; Fonseca, Sérgio T

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the association between lower limb alignment, range of motion/flexibility and muscle strength with the presence of patellar tendon abnormalities in male athletes. This was a cross-sectional study. Thirty-one male basketball and volleyball athletes were assessed for ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, shank-forefoot alignment, iliotibial band flexibility, hip external rotators and abductors isometric torque, passive hip internal rotation range of motion and frontal plane knee and patellar alignment (McConnell and Arno angles). Ultrasonographic evaluations of hypoechoic areas of the patellar tendons were performed in longitudinal and transverse planes. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine clinically relevant cut-off point for each variable. When the area under the curve was statistically significant, Prevalence Ratio (PR) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to indicate the strength of the association between the independent variable and the presence of patellar tendon abnormalities. Receiver operating characteristic curve showed that iliotibial band flexibility (p=0.006), shank-forefoot alignment (p=0.013) and Arno angle (p=0.046) were associated with patellar tendon abnormalities. Cut-off points were established and only the Prevalence Ratio of iliotibial band flexibility (cut-off point=-0.02°/kg; PR=5.26) and shank-forefoot alignment (cut-off point=24°; PR=4.42) were statistically significant. Athletes with iliotibial band or shank-forefoot alignment above the clinically relevant cut-off point had more chance to have patellar tendon abnormalities compared to athletes under the cut-off point values. These results suggest that such factors could contribute to patellar tendon overload, since patellar tendon abnormalities indicate some level of tissue damage. Both factors might be considered in future prospective studies. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Decline eccentric squats increases patellar tendon loading compared to standard eccentric squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsgaard, M; Aagaard, P; Roikjaer, S; Olsen, D; Jensen, M; Langberg, H; Magnusson, S P

    2006-08-01

    Recent studies have shown excellent clinical results using eccentric squat training on a 25 degrees decline board to treat patellar tendinopathy. It remains unknown why therapeutic management of patellar tendinopathy using decline eccentric squats offer superior clinical efficacy compared to standard horizontal eccentric squats. This study aimed to compare electromyography activity, patellar tendon strain and joint angle kinematics during standard and decline eccentric squats. Thirteen subjects performed unilateral eccentric squats on flat-and a 25 degrees decline surface. During the squats, electromyography activity was obtained in eight representative muscles. Also, ankle, knee and hip joint goniometry was obtained. Additionally, patellar tendon strain was measured in vivo using ultrasonography as subjects maintained a unilateral isometric 90 degrees knee angle squat position on either flat or 25 degrees decline surface. Patellar tendon strain was significantly greater (Psquat position on the decline surface compared to the standard surface. The stop angles of the ankle and hip joints were significantly smaller during the decline compared to the standard squats (Psquats (Psquats. The use of a 25 degrees decline board increases the load and the strain of the patellar tendon during unilateral eccentric squats. This finding likely explains previous reports of superior clinical efficacy of decline eccentric squats in the rehabilitative management of patellar tendinopathy.

  19. Effect of androgenic-anabolic steroids and heavy strength training on patellar tendon morphological and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seynnes, Olivier R; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Kairaitis, Ramutis; Helland, Christian; Campbell, Emma-Louise; Brazaitis, Marius; Skurvydas, Albertas; Narici, Marco V

    2013-07-01

    Combined androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) and overloading affects tendon collagen metabolism and ultrastructure and is often associated with a higher risk of injury. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate whether such effects would be reflected in the patellar tendon properties of individuals with a history of long-term resistance training and AAS abuse (RTS group), compared with trained (RT) and untrained (CTRL) nonsteroids users. Tendon cross-sectional area (CSA), stiffness, Young's modulus, and toe limit strain were measured in vivo, from synchronized ultrasonography and dynamometry data. The patellar tendon of RT and RTS subjects was much stiffer and larger than in the CTRL group. However, stiffness and modulus were higher in the RTS group (26%, P < 0.05 and 30%, P < 0.01, respectively) than in the RT group. Conversely, tendon CSA was 15% (P < 0.05) larger in the RT group than in RTS, although differences disappeared when this variable was normalized to quadriceps maximal isometric torque. Yet maximal tendon stress was higher in RTS than in RT (15%, P < 0.05), without any statistical difference in maximal strain and toe limit strain between groups. The present lack of difference in toe limit strain does not substantiate the hypothesis of changes in collagen crimp pattern associated with AAS abuse. However, these findings indicate that tendon adaptations from years of heavy resistance training are different in AAS users, suggesting differences in collagen remodeling. Some of these adaptations (e.g., higher stress) could be linked to a higher risk of tendon injury.

  20. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION: A COMPARISON BETWEEN BONE PATELLAR TENDON BONE GRAFT AND LIPSCOMB PROCEDURE - A FOLLOWUP STUDY OF 7 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamohan S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Anterior Cruciate Ligament injury has become more common and the demand by the patients to return to pre-injury level of activity has made reconstruction of the ligament very crucial. Though there are various techniques in reconstructing the anterior cruciate ligament, in this study, we compare two most commonly used techniques to see whether there is any significant difference in the outcome. METHODS Study included 25 patients in the age group of 19-36 years, of which 23 were males. The patients were divided randomly into 2 groups, and 15 patients underwent Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction using Bone Patellar Tendon Bone Graft and 10 patients had Hamstring graft. RESULTS Patients were followed up at regular intervals monthly for the first six months and then at three monthly intervals. Patients were assessed using Knee Scoring Scale of Lysholm and Gillquist and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC scoring system. In addition, activity level, harvest site pain, thigh atrophy, kneeling pain and hamstring pain were assessed. All patients were followed up for a minimum period of 2 years. 20% of both groups were able to return to strenuous activity level, and 67% of Patellar tendon group and 50% of the Hamstring tendon group were able to return to moderate level of activity. 55% of patients in the patellar tendon group and 20% of patients in the hamstring tendon group had donor site pain in the first 6 months. 73% of patients in the hamstring group had at least 10 mm of thigh wasting. Pain on kneeling was seen only in the patellar tendon group (35% while hamstring pain was found only in the hamstring group (20%. CONCLUSIONS Patients in the patellar tendon group had increased anterior stability and were able to return to strenuous occupation. The difference in thigh atrophy between the two groups was not significant. The hamstring group had lower graft harvest site morbidity. Lachman test was the single most accurate

  1. Anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction improves walking economy: hamstrings tendon versus patellar tendon grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Efthymios; Galanis, Nikiforos; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Iosifidis, Michael; Papadopoulos, Pericles; Potoupnis, Michael; Geladas, Nikolaos; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Kirkos, John

    2017-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is associated with a pathologic gait pattern and increased energy cost during locomotion. ACL reconstruction could improve the gait pattern. Hamstrings tendon (HAM) and bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts are usually used for reconstruction. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of anatomic ACL reconstruction with HAM and BPTB grafts on improving and normalizing the energy cost and physiologic reserves during flat, uphill, and downhill walking. Twenty male subjects with unilateral ACL injuries were randomly assigned to ACL reconstruction with a HAM (n = 10) or BPTB (n = 10) graft. Ten matched controls were also enrolled. All participants performed three 8-min walking tasks at 0, +10, and -10 % gradients before and 9 months after surgery. Energy cost (oxygen consumption, VO 2 ), heart rate (HR), and ventilation (VE) were measured. Lysholm/IKDC scores were recorded. Pre-operatively, VO 2 , HR, and VE were higher in the HAM and BPTB groups than in controls during walking at 0, +10, and -10 % gradients (p energy cost and nearly normalized locomotion economy and cardiorespiratory reserves during flat, uphill, and downhill walking. The improved locomotion economy is an additional benefit of anatomic ACL reconstruction, irrespective of the type of graft used, that the orthopaedic surgeons should consider. II.

  2. Anthropometry, physical performance, and ultrasound patellar tendon abnormality in elite junior basketball players: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, J; Kiss, Z; Khan, K; Purdam, C; Webster, K

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Patellar tendinopathy has been reported to be associated with many intrinsic risk factors. Few have been fully investigated. This cross-sectional study examined the anthropometric and physical performance results of elite junior basketball players with normal or abnormal patellar tendons to see if any measures were associated with changes in tendon morphology.

  3. Fibril morphology and tendon mechanical properties in patellar tendinopathy: effects of heavy slow resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, Mads; Qvortrup, Klaus; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patellar tendinopathy is characterized by pathologic abnormalities. Heavy slow resistance training (HSR) is effective in the management of patellar tendinopathy, but the underlying functional mechanisms remain elusive. PURPOSE: To investigate fibril morphology and mechanical properties...... assessed symptoms/function and maximal tendon pain during activity. Tendon biopsy samples were analyzed for fibril density, volume fraction, and mean fibril area. Tendon mechanical properties were assessed using force and ultrasonography samplings. RESULTS: Patients improved in symptoms/function (P = .02...... area decreased (-26% +/- 21%, P = .04) in tendinopathic tendons after HSR. CONCLUSION: Fibril morphology is abnormal in tendinopathy, but tendon mechanical properties are not. Clinical improvements after HSR were associated with changes in fibril morphology toward normal fibril density and mean fibril...

  4. Patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome: MR imaging in 42 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C.B.; Skaf, A.; Campos, J.; Stump, X.; Resnick, D.; Roger, B.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the MR imaging findings that occur between the posterior inferolateral patellar tendon and the lateral femoral condyle in patients with chronic anterior and or lateral knee pain. Patients and design: A retrospective review of the MR images in 42 patients who presented with chronic anterior or lateral knee pain was performed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. In 15 patients, post-contrast images were available. Results: Sagittal and axial imaging planes best demonstrated the patellar tendon and its relationship with the lateral femoral condyle. In 40 patients, there was obliteration of the fat planes and abnormal signal intensity in the lateral soft tissues of the inferior patellofemoral joint. Enhancement after administration of gadolinium was noted in all cases in which contrast was administered. Eighteen patients showed cystic changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the lateral femoral condyle in addition to fat plane obliteration. In two patients, only cystic changes were noted in the lateral soft tissues. Abnormal patellar alignment was noted in 37 patients. Patellar tendon pathology was seen in nine patients. Conclusion: In evaluating anterior knee symptoms, MR imaging allows identification of changes that may be related to patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome and that should be distinguished from other causes of anterior or lateral knee pain. (orig.)

  5. Patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome: MR imaging in 42 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, C.B.; Skaf, A.; Campos, J.; Stump, X.; Resnick, D. [Dept. of Radiology, University of California, San Diego (United States); Roger, B. [Service de Radiologie Polyvalente, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the MR imaging findings that occur between the posterior inferolateral patellar tendon and the lateral femoral condyle in patients with chronic anterior and or lateral knee pain. Patients and design: A retrospective review of the MR images in 42 patients who presented with chronic anterior or lateral knee pain was performed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. In 15 patients, post-contrast images were available. Results: Sagittal and axial imaging planes best demonstrated the patellar tendon and its relationship with the lateral femoral condyle. In 40 patients, there was obliteration of the fat planes and abnormal signal intensity in the lateral soft tissues of the inferior patellofemoral joint. Enhancement after administration of gadolinium was noted in all cases in which contrast was administered. Eighteen patients showed cystic changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the lateral femoral condyle in addition to fat plane obliteration. In two patients, only cystic changes were noted in the lateral soft tissues. Abnormal patellar alignment was noted in 37 patients. Patellar tendon pathology was seen in nine patients. Conclusion: In evaluating anterior knee symptoms, MR imaging allows identification of changes that may be related to patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome and that should be distinguished from other causes of anterior or lateral knee pain. (orig.)

  6. Changes in water content in response to an acute bout of eccentric loading in a patellar tendon with a history of tendinopathy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kai-Yu; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-10-01

    This case-based report assessed resting water content and exercise-driven water exchange within a tendon with a history of tendinopathy and compared the response to that of a healthy uninvolved tendon. Case Report. University imaging center. The participant was a 27-year-old female basketball player 39 months following knee trauma. Patellar tendinopathy developed 12 months after the injury episode and was treated with eccentric exercises. Eighteen months from the beginning of the first eccentric training bout, the participant reported full resolution of symptoms and returned to her pre-injury sport participation without symptoms. Eccentric decline squat exercise. Tendon water content obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI acquired 39 months post-injury demonstrated increased resting water content of the involved tendon (involved: 91.1% vs. uninvolved: 84.6%). Immediately after the eccentric squat maneuver, water content decreased on both involved and uninvolved tendons (involved: 89.5% vs. uninvolved: 83.3%). Elevated resting water content of the involved tendon found in this report may be indicative of reduced tendon stiffness. A similar amount of water content reduction was observed on both sides following mechanical loading, suggesting that the involved tendon may respond to the eccentric exercise similarly to the uninvolved tendon. Future investigations are needed to study the relationships among tendon water exchanges, mechanical properties, patient symptoms, and tissue injuries.

  7. Mechanical properties and collagen cross-linking of the patellar tendon in old and young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, C; Hansen, P; Kongsgaard, M

    2009-01-01

    were higher in OM than in YM (73 +/- 13 vs. 11 +/- 2 mmol/mol; P appreciably influence the dimensions or mechanical properties of the human patellar tendon in vivo. Collagen concentration was reduced, whereas both enzymatic......Age-related loss in muscle mass and strength impairs daily life function in the elderly. However, it remains unknown whether tendon properties also deteriorate with age. Cross-linking of collagen molecules provides structural integrity to the tendon fibrils and has been shown to change with age...... in animals but has never been examined in humans in vivo. In this study, we examined the mechanical properties and pyridinoline and pentosidine cross-link and collagen concentrations of the patellar tendon in vivo in old (OM) and young men (YM). Seven OM (67 +/- 3 years, 86 +/- 10 kg) and 10 YM (27 +/- 2...

  8. Immediate effects of whole body vibration on patellar tendon properties and knee extension torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, F; Wiesinger, H-P; Kösters, A; Müller, E; Seynnes, O R

    2016-03-01

    Reports about the immediate effects of whole body vibration (WBV) exposure upon torque production capacity are inconsistent. However, the changes in the torque-angle relationship observed by some authors after WBV may hinder the measurement of torque changes at a given angle. Acute changes in tendon mechanical properties do occur after certain types of exercise but this hypothesis has never been tested after a bout of WBV. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether tendon compliance is altered immediately after WBV, effectively shifting the optimal angle of peak torque towards longer muscle length. Twenty-eight subjects were randomly assigned to either a WBV (n = 14) or a squatting control group (n = 14). Patellar tendon CSA, stiffness and Young's modulus and knee extension torque-angle relationship were measured using ultrasonography and dynamometry 1 day before and directly after the intervention. Tendon CSA was additionally measured 24 h after the intervention to check for possible delayed onset of swelling. The vibration intervention had no effects on patellar tendon CSA, stiffness and Young's modulus or the torque-angle relationship. Peak torque was produced at ~70° knee angle in both groups at pre- and post-test. Additionally, the knee extension torque globally remained unaffected with the exception of a small (-6%) reduction in isometric torque at a joint angle of 60°. The present results indicate that a single bout of vibration exposure does not substantially alter patellar tendon properties or the torque-angle relationship of knee extensors.

  9. Patellar tendinopathy in junior basketball players: a controlled clinical and ultrasonographic study of 268 patellar tendons in players aged 14-18 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Khan, K M; Kiss, Z S; Griffiths, L

    2000-08-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common presenting complaint amongst adolescent athletes. We hypothesised that patellar tendinopathy may occur at a younger age than is generally recognised. Thus, we studied the patellar tendons in 134 elite 14- to 18-year-old female (n=64) and male (n=70) basketball players and 29 control swimmers (17 female, 12 male) clinically and with ultrasonography. We found that of 268 tendons, 19 (7%) had current patellar tendinopathy on clinical grounds (11% in males, 2% in females). Twenty-six percent of the basketball players' patellar tendons contained an ultrasonographic hypoechoic region. Ultrasonographic abnormality was more prevalent in the oldest tertile of players (17-18 years) than the youngest tertile (14-15.9 years). Of tendons categorised clinically as 'Never patellar tendinopathy', 22% had an ultrasonographic hypoechoic region nevertheless. This study indicates that patellar tendinopathy can occur in 14- to 18-year-old basketball players. Ultrasonographic tendon abnormality is 3 times as common as clinical symptoms.

  10. [Successive ruptures of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E

    2008-01-01

    Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, ruptures of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for rupture of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his strength. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon ruptures.

  11. Patellar Tendon Repair Augmentation With a Knotless Suture Anchor Internal Brace: A Biomechanical Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothfeld, Alex; Pawlak, Amanda; Liebler, Stephenie A H; Morris, Michael; Paci, James M

    2018-04-01

    Patellar tendon repair with braided polyethylene suture alone is subject to knot slippage and failure. Several techniques to augment the primary repair have been described. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to evaluate a novel patellar tendon repair technique augmented with a knotless suture anchor internal brace with suture tape (SAIB). The hypothesis was that this technique would be biomechanically superior to a nonaugmented repair and equivalent to a standard augmentation with an 18-gauge steel wire. Controlled laboratory study. Midsubstance patellar tendon tears were created in 32 human cadaveric knees. Two comparison groups were created. Group 1 compared #2 supersuture repair without augmentation to #2 supersuture repair with SAIB augmentation. Group 2 compared #2 supersuture repair with an 18-gauge stainless steel cerclage wire augmentation to #2 supersuture repair with SAIB augmentation. The specimens were potted and biomechanically loaded on a materials testing machine. Yield load, maximum load, mode of failure, plastic displacement, elastic displacement, and total displacement were calculated for each sample. Standard statistical analysis was performed. There was a statistically significant increase in the mean ± SD yield load and maximum load in the SAIB augmentation group compared with supersuture alone (mean yield load: 646 ± 202 N vs 229 ± 60 N; mean maximum load: 868 ± 162 N vs 365 ± 54 N; P augmented repairs (mean yield load: 495 ± 213 N vs 566 ± 172 N; P = .476; mean maximum load: 737 ± 210 N vs 697 ± 130 N; P = .721). Patellar tendon repair augmented with SAIB is biomechanically superior to repair without augmentation and is equivalent to repair with augmentation with an 18-gauge stainless steel cerclage wire. This novel patellar tendon repair augmentation is equivalent to standard 18-gauge wire augmentation at time zero. It does not require a second surgery for removal, and it is biomechanically superior to primary repair alone.

  12. Influence of acetaminophen and ibuprofen on in vivo patellar tendon adaptations to knee extensor resistance exercise in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, C C; Dickinson, J M; LeMoine, J K

    2011-01-01

    adults induces modest changes in the mechanical properties of the patellar tendon. Over-the-counter doses of acetaminophen, but not ibuprofen, have a strong influence on tendon mechanical and material property adaptations to resistance training. These findings add to a growing body of evidence......Millions of older individuals consume acetaminophen or ibuprofen daily and these same individuals are encouraged to participate in resistance training. Several in vitro studies suggest that cyclooxygenase-inhibiting drugs can alter tendon metabolism and may influence adaptations to resistance...... tendon properties were assessed with MRI [cross-sectional area (CSA) and signal intensity] and ultrasonography of patellar tendon deformation coupled with force measurements to obtain stiffness, modulus, stress, and strain. Mean patellar tendon CSA was unchanged (P > 0.05) with training in the placebo...

  13. Pathophysiology of overuse tendon injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannus, P.; Paavola, M.; Paakkala, T.; Parkkari, J.; Jaervinen, T.; Jaervinen, M.

    2002-01-01

    Overuse tendon injury is one of the most common injuries in sports.The etiology as well as the pathophysilogical mechanisms leading to tendinopathy are of crucial medical importance.At the moment intrinsic and extrinsic factors are assumed as mechanisms of overuse tendon injury. Except for the acute, extrinsic trauma, the chronic overuse tendon injury is a multifactorial process. There are many other factors, such as local hypoxia, less of nutrition, impaired metabolism and local inflammatory that may also contribute to the development of tissue damage.The exact interaction of these factors cannot be explained entirely at the moment.Further studies will be necessary in order to get more information. (orig.) [de

  14. Patellar tendinopathy : physical therapy and injection treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ark, Mathijs

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy, commonly known as jumper’s knee, is an overuse injury of the patellar tendon. It is a frequent injury, particularly in jumping athletes such as volleyball and basketball players. Jumper’s knee is often a long-lasting injury and can have a major impact on sports and even work

  15. Anthropometry, physical performance, and ultrasound patellar tendon abnormality in elite junior basketball players: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Kiss, Z S; Khan, K M; Purdam, C R; Webster, K E

    2004-04-01

    Patellar tendinopathy has been reported to be associated with many intrinsic risk factors. Few have been fully investigated. This cross-sectional study examined the anthropometric and physical performance results of elite junior basketball players with normal or abnormal patellar tendons to see if any measures were associated with changes in tendon morphology. Agility, leg strength, endurance, and flexibility were measured in 71 male and 64 female players. A blinded radiologist ultrasonographically examined their patellar tendons and athletes were grouped as having normal or abnormal tendons. One-way ANOVA was used to test for differences in anthropometric and physical performance data for athletes whose tendons were normal or abnormal (unilateral or bilateral tendinopathy) on ultrasound. Results show that females with abnormalities in their tendons had a significantly better vertical jump (50.9+/-6.8 cm) than those with normal tendons (46.1+/-5.4 cm) (p = 0.02). This was not found in males. In males, the mean sit and reach in those with normal tendons (13.2+/-6.7 cm) was greater (ptendinopathy (10.3+/-6.2 cm) or in bilateral tendinopathy (7.8+/-8.3 cm). In females, those with normal tendons (13.3+/-4.8 cm) and bilateral tendinopathy (15.8+/-6.2 cm) were distinctly different from those with unilateral tendinopathy (7.9+/-6.6 cm). Flexibility and vertical jump ability are associated with patellar tendinopathy and the findings warrant consideration when managing young, jumping athletes.

  16. Acute Traumatic Patellar Tendon Rupture at the Tibial Tuberosity Attachment without Avulsion Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Miyamoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patellar tendon rupture in children is especially rare. The fact that the area of traumatic rupture has wide variations makes surgical treatment difficult. We present an 11-year-old boy with acute traumatic patellar tendon rupture at the tibial tuberosity attachment without avulsion fracture. Primary end-to-end repair and reinforcement using 1.5 mm stainless steel wires as a surgical strategy were undertaken. Early range of motion began with a functional knee brace and the reinforced stainless wire was removed 3 months after surgery. Knee function at the final follow-up was satisfactory. We suggest that this strategy may provide a useful option for surgical treatment.

  17. Ablating hedgehog signaling in tenocytes during development impairs biomechanics and matrix organization of the adult murine patellar tendon enthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenbach, Andrew P; Aschbacher-Smith, Lindsey; Lu, Yinhui; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Liu, Chia-Feng; Liu, Han; Wylie, Chris; Rao, Marepalli; Shearn, Jason T; Rowe, David W; Kadler, Karl E; Jiang, Rulang; Butler, David L

    2015-08-01

    Restoring the native structure of the tendon enthesis, where collagen fibers of the midsubstance are integrated within a fibrocartilaginous structure, is problematic following injury. As current surgical methods fail to restore this region adequately, engineers, biologists, and clinicians are working to understand how this structure forms as a prerequisite to improving repair outcomes. We recently reported on the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a novel enthesis marker, in regulating early postnatal enthesis formation. Here, we investigate how inactivating the Hh pathway in tendon cells affects adult (12-week) murine patellar tendon (PT) enthesis mechanics, fibrocartilage morphology, and collagen fiber organization. We show that ablating Hh signaling resulted in greater than 100% increased failure insertion strain (0.10 v. 0.05 mm/mm, p<0.01) as well as sub-failure biomechanical deficiencies. Although collagen fiber orientation appears overtly normal in the midsubstance, ablating Hh signaling reduces mineralized fibrocartilage by 32%, leading to less collagen embedded within mineralized tissue. Ablating Hh signaling also caused collagen fibers to coalesce at the insertion, which may explain in part the increased strains. These results indicate that Ihh signaling plays a critical role in the mineralization process of fibrocartilaginous entheses and may be a novel therapeutic to promote tendon-to-bone healing. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The patellar tendon in junior elite volleyball players and an Olympic elite weightlifter

    OpenAIRE

    Gisslén, Karl

    2006-01-01

    The principal aim of the present thesis was to prospectively follow (clinical status and ultrasound + Doppler findings) the patellar tendons in the young elite volleyball players at the Swedish National Centre for high school volleyball in Falköping. In an Olympic weightlifter with chronic painful jumper´s knee, the effects of treatment with sclerosing injections followed by early instituted very heavy weightlifting training, was also evaluated. First, in a prevalence study, we demonstrated t...

  19. Reproducibility and clinical utility of tendon palpation to detect patellar tendinopathy in young basketball players. Victorian Institute of Sport tendon study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Khan, K M; Kiss, Z S; Purdam, C R; Griffiths, L

    2001-02-01

    Palpation is an important clinical test for jumper's knee. To (a) test the reproducibility of palpation tenderness, (b) evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of palpation in subjects with clinical symptoms of jumper's knee, and (c) determine whether tenderness to palpation may serve as a useful screening test for patellar tendinopathy. The yardstick for diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy was ultrasonographic abnormality. In 326 junior symptomatic and asymptomatic athletes' tendons, palpation was performed by a single examiner before ultrasonographic examination by a certified ultrasound radiologist. In 58 tendons, palpation was performed twice to test reliability. Tenderness to palpation was scored on a scale from 0 to 3 where 0 represented no pain, and 1, 2, and 3 represented mild, moderate, and severe tenderness respectively. Patellar tendon palpation was a reliable examination for a single examiner (Pearson r = 0.82). In symptomatic tendons, the positive predictive value of palpation was 68%. As a screening examination in asymptomatic subjects, the positive predictive value of tendon palpation was 36-38%. Moderate and severe palpation tenderness were better predictors of ultrasonographic tendon pathology than absent or mild tenderness (ppatellar tendinopathy in a preparticipation examination. In symptomatic tendons, palpation is a moderately sensitive but not specific test. Mild tenderness in the patellar tendons in asymptomatic jumping athletes should be considered normal.

  20. Flexor Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy ... fields From * To * DESCRIPTION The muscles that bend (flex) the fingers are called flexor ...

  1. A soft patellar tendon on ultrasound elastography is associated with pain and functional deficit in volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Chin Chin; Richards, Paula J; Maffulli, Nicola; Ede, David; Schneider, Michal E; Connell, David; Morrissey, Dylan; Malliaras, Peter

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of grey scale Ultrasound (US), power Doppler (PD) and US elastography for diagnosing painful patellar tendinopathy, and to establish their relationship with Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) scores in a group of volleyball players with and without symptoms of patellar tendinopathy. Cross-sectional study. Thirty-five volleyball players (70 patellar tendons) were recruited during a national university volleyball competition. Players were imaged with conventional US followed by elastography. The clinical findings of painful patellar tendons were used as the reference standard for diagnosing patellar tendinopathy. In addition, all participants completed the VISA-P questionnaires. Of the 70 patellar tendons, 40 (57.1%) were clinically painful. The diagnostic accuracy of grey scale US, PD and elastography were 60%, 50%, 62.9%, respectively, with sensitivity/specificity of 72.5%/43.3%, 12.5%/100%, and 70%/53.3%, respectively. Combined US elastography and grey scale imaging achieved 82.5% sensitivity, 33.3% specificity and 61.4% accuracy while routine combination technique of PD and grey scale imaging revealed 72.5% sensitivity, 43.3% specificity and 60.0% accuracy. Tendons in players categorized as soft on elastography had statistically significantly greater AP thickness (p<0.001) and lower VISA-P scores (p=0.004) than those categorized as hard. There was no significant association between grey scale US abnormalities (hypoechogenicities and/or fusiform swelling) and VISA-P scores (p=0.098). Soft tendon properties depicted by US elastography may be more related to patellar tendon symptoms compared to grey scale US abnormalities. The supplementation of US elastography to conventional US may enhance the sensitivity for diagnosing patellar tendinopathy in routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lower strength of the human posterior patellar tendon seems unrelated to mature collagen cross-linking and fibril morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Philip; Haraldsson, Bjarki Thor; Aagaard, Per

    2010-01-01

    The human patellar tendon is frequently affected by tendinopathy, but the etiology of the condition is not established, although differential loading of the anterior and posterior tendon may be associated with the condition. We hypothesized that changes in fibril morphology and collagen cross-lin...

  3. Clinical improvements are not explained by changes in tendon structure on UTC following an exercise program for patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ark, Mathijs; Rio, Ebonie; Cook, Jill; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Gaida, James E; Zwerver, Johannes; Docking, Sean

    2018-04-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 4-week in-season exercise program of isometric or isotonic exercises on tendon structure and dimensions as quantified by Ultrasound Tissue Characterization (UTC). Randomized clinical trial. Volleyball and basketball players (16-31 years, n=29) with clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy were randomized to a 4-week isometric or isotonic exercise program. The programs were designed to decrease patellar tendon pain. A baseline and 4-week UTC scan was used to evaluate change in tendon structure. No significant change in tendon structure or dimensions on UTC was detected after the exercise program, despite patellar tendinopathy symptoms improving. The percentage and mean cross-sectional area (mCSA) of aligned fibrillar structure (echo-types I+II) (Z=-0.414,p=0.679) as well as disorganized structure (echo-types III + IV) (Z=-0.370,p=0.711) did not change over the 4-week exercise program. Change in tendon structure and dimensions on UTC did not differ significantly between the groups. Structural properties and dimensions of the patellar tendon on UTC did not change after a 4-week isometric or isotonic exercise program for athletes with patellar tendinopathy in-season, despite an improvement of symptoms. It seems that structural improvements are not required for a positive clinical outcome.

  4. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Bremer Hinckel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. METHOD: The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM, apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10 and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. RESULTS: Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07. Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. CONCLUSION: Reconstruction of the

  5. Tensile force transmission in human patellar tendon fascicles is not mediated by glycosaminoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, René B; Hassenkam, Tue; Hansen, Philip

    2011-01-01

    suggested that the proteoglycan-associated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) found on the surface of the collagen fibrils may be an important transmitter of load, but existing results are ambiguous and have not investigated human tendons. We have used a small-scale mechanical testing system to measure...... change the tendon modulus, relative energy dissipation, peak stress, or peak strain. The effect of deformation rate was not modulated by the treatment either, indicating no effect on viscosity. These results suggest that GAGs cannot be considered mediators of tensile force transmission in the human...... patellar tendon, and as such, force transmission must either take place through other matrix components or the fibrils must be mechanically continuous at least to the tested length of 7 mm....

  6. High volume ultrasound guided injections at the interface between the patellar tendon and Hoffa's body are effective in chronic patellar tendinopathy: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Tom; Khan, Faisal; Padhiar, Nat; Morrissey, Dylan; King, John; Jalan, Rosy; Maffulli, Nicola; Frcr, Otto Chan

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a novel conservative management modality for patellar tendinopathy. We recruited nine patients with patellar tendinopathy who had failed conservative management and showed evidence of neovascularisation on power Doppler scanning. A high volume ultrasound guided injection at the interface between the patellar tendon and Hoffa's body. The injection contained 10 ml 0.5% Bupivacaine, 25 mg Hydrocortisone, and between 12 and 40 ml normosaline. 100 mm visual analogue scales (VAS) for pain and for function, and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment - Patellar tendon (VISA-P) questionnaires at an average of 9 months from the injection. All but one patient (whose pain was unchanged) improved (p = 0.028). The mean improvement in function 2 weeks after injection was 58 mm on VAS (interquartile range 27 - 88, p = 0.018). The mean improvement in pain 2 weeks after injection was 56 mm on a VAS scale (interquartile range 32 - 80, p = 0.018). At a mean follow up of 9 months, an improvement of 22 points from a baseline score of 46 on the VISA-P questionnaire (100 being normal) was established. High volume injections to mechanically disrupt the neovascularisation in patellar tendinopathy are helpful in the management of this condition. Controlled trials would be warranted to investigate in a more conclusive fashion this management modality.

  7. Outcomes of the patellar tendon and hamstring graft anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions in patients aged above 50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Bali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury consists of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring graft. Satisfactory results have been reported so far in the younger age group. Dilemma arises regarding the suitability of ACL reconstruction in the patients aged 50 years and above. This retrospective analyses the outcome of ACL reconstruction in patients aged 50 years and above at the time of presentation. Materials and Methods: 55 patients aged 50 years and above presented to our institution with symptomatic ACL tear and were managed with arthroscopic reconstruction with patellar tendon/hamstring graft. 22 patients underwent ACL reconstruction with bone- patellar tendon-bone graft and the remaining 33 with a hamstring graft. Evaluation of functional outcome was performed using International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC and Lysholm scoring in the preoperative period, at the end of 1 year and at the final followup. Radiographic evaluation was performed using the Kellgren–Lawrence grading system. Results: The mean preoperative IKDC score was 39.7 ± 3.3. At the end of 1-year following the operation, the mean IKDC score was 73.6 ± 4.9 and at the final followup was 67.8 ± 7.7. The mean preoperative Lysholm score was 40.4 ± 10.3. At the end of 1-year following the intervention, the mean Lysholm score was 89.7 ± 2.1 and at final followup was 85.3 ± 2.5. Overall, 14 out of 42 patients who underwent radiographic assessment showed progression of osteoarthritis changes at the final followup after the intervention. Conclusion: In our study, there was a statistically significant improvement in the IKDC and Lysholm scores following the intervention. There was a slight deterioration in the scores at the final followup but the overall rate of satisfaction was still high and most of the patients were able to do their routine chores and light exercises suitable for their age group. Around one-third of

  8. Peroneal Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Where do you hurt? Interactive Foot Diagram Baseball Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Your feet and ankles take a beating when you’re playing baseball. Baseball players should be aware of the following risks. Ankle sprains may occur while running, fielding balls... Ankle Pain Ankle pain is often ...

  9. Sport-Specific Capacity to Use Elastic Energy in the Patellar and Achilles Tendons of Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesinger, Hans-Peter; Rieder, Florian; Kösters, Alexander; Müller, Erich; Seynnes, Olivier R

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: During running and jumping activities, elastic energy is utilized to enhance muscle mechanical output and efficiency. However, training-induced variations in tendon spring-like properties remain under-investigated. The present work extends earlier findings on sport-specific profiles of tendon stiffness and cross-sectional area to examine whether years of distinct loading patterns are reflected by tendons' ability to store and return energy. Methods: Ultrasound scans were performed to examine the morphological features of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle-tendon units in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players, and sedentary controls. Tendon strain energy and hysteresis were measured with combined motion capture, ultrasonography, and dynamometry. Results: Apart from the fractional muscle-to-tendon cross-sectional area ratio being lower in the knee extensors of ski jumpers (-31%) and runners (-33%) than in water polo players, no difference in the considered muscle-tendon unit morphological features was observed between groups. Similarly, no significant difference in tendon energy storage or energy return was detected between groups. In contrast, hysteresis was lower in the patellar tendon of ski jumpers (-33%) and runners (-30%) compared to controls, with a similar trend for the Achilles tendon (significant interaction effect and large effect sizes η 2 = 0.2). Normalized to body mass, the recovered strain energy of the patellar tendon was ~50% higher in ski jumpers than in water polo players and controls. For the Achilles tendon, recovered strain energy was ~40% higher in ski jumpers and runners than in controls. Discussion: Advantageous mechanical properties related to tendon spring-like function are observed in elite athletes whose sport require effective utilization of elastic energy. However, the mechanisms underpinning the better tendon capacity of some athletes to retain elastic energy could not be ascribed to intrinsic or

  10. [Isokinetic assessment with two years follow-up of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring tendons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condouret, J; Cohn, J; Ferret, J-M; Lemonsu, A; Vasconcelos, W; Dejour, D; Potel, J-F

    2008-12-01

    This retrospective multicentric study was designed to assess the outcome of quadriceps and hamstrings muscles two years after Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction and compare muscles recovery depending on the type of graft and individual variables like age, gender, level of sport, but also in terms of discomfort, pain and functional score. The results focused on the subjective and objective IKDC scores, SF36, the existence or not of subjective disorders and their location. The review included isokinetic muscle tests concentric and eccentric extensors/flexors but also internal rotators/external rotators with analysis of mean work and mean power. One hundred and twenty-seven patients were included with an average age 29 years (+/-10). They all had an ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring tendon with single or double bundles. In the serie, the average muscles deficit at two years was 10% for the flexors and extensors but with a significant dispersion. Significant differences were not noted in the mean values of all parameters in term of sex or age (over 30 years or not), neither the type of sport, nor of clinical assessment (Class A and B of objective IKDC score), nor the existence of anterior knee pain. There was a relationship between the level of extensor or flexor recovery and the quality of functional results with minimal muscle deficits close to 5% if the IKDC score was over 90 and deficits falling to 15% in the group with IKDC score less than 90. The type of reconstruction (patellar tendon versus hamstrings) had an influence on the muscle deficit. For extensors, the recovery was the same in the two groups, more than 90% at two years and the distribution of these two populations by level of deficit was quite the same. For flexors, residual deficits were significantly higher in the hamstrings group on the three studied parameters whatever the speed and the type of contraction (concentric or eccentric) with an average deficit of 14 to 18

  11. Local trauma in human patellar tendon leads to widespread changes in the tendon gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Lorentzen, Marc P; Kildevang Jensen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Low cellular activity and slow tissue turnover in human tendon may prolong resolution of tendinopathy. This may be stimulated by moderate localized traumas such as needle penetrations, but whether this results in a widespread cellular response in tendons is unknown. In an initial hypothesis-gener...

  12. Press-fit Femoral Fixation in ACL Reconstruction using Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaseb Mohammad Hasan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone-patellar tendon auto graft is probably the most widely used graft for ACL reconstruction. Several methods for graft fixation have been described. To avoid intra-articular hardware we adopt biological fixation with a femoral trapezoidal press-fit fixation. A prospective study was performed on 30 consecutive active people who underwent ACL reconstruction with this technique by two surgeons between september2004 and march2007 (mean follow-up 15.2 months. Results were evaluated by an independent examiner using radiography, subjective and objective evaluation. Assessment using the IKDC knee scoring revealed 92% of the patients with a normal or nearly normal knee joint. Lysholm's score was 63.6(40- 86 preoperatively and 91.88(73-100 at the latest follow up (P < 0.005. No patient complained of instability at latest follow up. The quadriceps muscle showed mild atrophy at 3 and 6 months and at final follow-up. Five Patients complained of anterior knee pain and had a positive kneeling test. We found no graft displacement on follow up radiographs. All cases showed radiological evidence of graft osteointegration at last follow up. Our results show that press-fit fixation of trapezoidal bone graft in femoral tunnel is a simple, reliable, and cost-effective alternative for ACL recon-struction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft.

  13. The effects of test environment and cyclic stretching on the failure properties of human patellar tendons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haut, R.C.; Powlison, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    There is a need to document the mechanical properties of patellar tendon allografts used for reconstructive surgery of the damaged anterior cruciate ligament, especially the effects of irradiation sterilization. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influences of in vitro test environment and low-level cyclic stretching prior to failure tests on nonirradiated and irradiated human graft tissues. Bilateral patellar tendons were split and each half processed accordingly. Some graft tissues were stretched cyclically at 2.5 mm deformation before failure. Experiments were performed in a 37 degrees C saline bath or with tissues moistened with a drip of the same. The irradiated grafts relaxed less and generated less slack length in the drip environment than the nonirradiated controls. Cyclic stretching did not alter failure characteristics of either graft tissue. While no significant differences in the tensile responses or failure characteristics were noted for irradiated and nonirradiated grafts in the drip, in the bath environment the nonirradiated tissues had greater strength and modulus. This resulted in there being a significant difference between irradiated and nonirradiated tissue responses in a heated saline bath environment. These experimental results exemplify the need to control in vitro test environments in the evaluation of various sterilization and preservation protocols for soft tissue allografts

  14. Patellar tendinopathy : Causes, consequences and the use of orthoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Astrid Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT), also known as jumper’s knee, is a painful overuse injury of the patellar tendon. This injury is common in jumping athletes. There are numerous treatment options currently available for PT, yet none of them guarantee full recovery. As a result, many athletes have

  15. Magnetic resonance evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament repair using the patellar tendon double bone block technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autz, G.; Singson, R.D.; Goodwin, C.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was determined in 20 clinically stable and 2 clinically unstable knees for a total of 22 examinations. All patients studied had undergone knee reconstruction using the patellar tendon as graft material. The reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament varies in appearance. It appeared as a thick, well-defined, low signal band on T1- and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images in 14 of 22 examinations. The remaining 8 knees showed a graft having one or more thin and attenuated, low signal intensity bands in the sagittal and/or coronal plane. Arthroscopy confirmed an intact but lax graft in the clinically unstable knees. (orig.)

  16. X-ray computed tomography of the anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Tom; Rawson, Shelley; Castro, Simon Joseph; Balint, Richard; Bradley, Robert Stephen; Lowe, Tristan; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Lee, Peter David; Cartmell, Sarah Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Summary The effect of phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and iodine solution (IKI) staining was investigated as a method of enhancing contrast in the X-ray computed tomography of porcine anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) and patellar tendons (PT). We show that PTA enhanced surface contrast, but was ineffective at penetrating samples, whereas IKI penetrated more effectively and enhanced contrast after 70 hours of staining. Contrast enhancement was compared when using laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources. Using the laboratory source, PT fascicles were tracked and their alignment was measured. Individual ACL fascicles could not be identified, but identifiable features were evident that were tracked. Higher resolution scans of fascicle bundles from the PT and ACL were obtained using synchrotron imaging techniques. These scans exhibited greater contrast between the fascicles and matrix in the PT sample, facilitating the identification of the fascicle edges; however, it was still not possible to detect individual fascicles in the ACL. PMID:25332942

  17. Magnetic resonance evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament repair using the patellar tendon double bone block technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autz, G.; Singson, R.D. (St. Luke' s Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Goodwin, C. (St. Luke' s Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Orthopedics)

    1991-11-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was determined in 20 clinically stable and 2 clinically unstable knees for a total of 22 examinations. All patients studied had undergone knee reconstruction using the patellar tendon as graft material. The reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament varies in appearance. It appeared as a thick, well-defined, low signal band on T1- and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images in 14 of 22 examinations. The remaining 8 knees showed a graft having one or more thin and attenuated, low signal intensity bands in the sagittal and/or coronal plane. Arthroscopy confirmed an intact but lax graft in the clinically unstable knees. (orig.).

  18. Effects of a peracetic acid disinfection protocol on the biocompatibility and biomechanical properties of human patellar tendon allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, R J; Jennings, L M; Fisher, J; Kearney, J N

    2004-01-01

    Patellar tendon allografts, retrieved from cadaveric human donors, are widely used for replacement of damaged cruciate ligaments. In common with other tissue allografts originating from cadaveric donors, there are concerns regarding the potential for disease transmission from the donor to the recipient. Additionally, retrieval and subsequent processing protocols expose the graft to the risk of environmental contamination. For these reasons, disinfection or sterilisation protocols are necessary for these grafts before they are used clinically. A high-level disinfection protocol, utilising peracetic acid (PAA), has been developed and investigated for its effects on the biocompatibility and biomechanics of the patellar tendon allografts. PAA disinfection did not render the grafts either cytotoxic or liable to provoke an inflammatory response as assessed in vitro . However, the protocol was shown to increase the size of gaps between the tendon fibres in the matrix and render the grafts more susceptible to digestion with collagenase. Biomechanical studies of the tendons showed that PAA treatment had no effect on the ultimate tensile stress or Young's modulus of the tendons, and that ultimate strain was significantly higher in PAA treated tendons.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Patellar Tendon Abnormality in Asymptomatic Professional “Pallapugno” Players: A Texture-Based Ultrasound Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Meiburger

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in B-mode ultrasound images of the patellar tendon often take place in asymptomatic athletes but it is still not clear if these modifications forego or can predict the development of tendinopathy. Subclinical tendinopathy can be arbitrarily defined as either (1 the presence of light structural changes in B-mode ultrasound images in association with mild neovascularization (determined with Power Doppler images or (2 the presence of moderate/severe structural changes with or without neovascularization. Up to now, the structural changes and neovascularization of the tendon are evaluated qualitatively by visual inspection of ultrasound images. The aim of this study is to investigate the capability of a quantitative texture-based approach to determine tendon abnormality of “pallapugno” players. B-mode ultrasound images of the patellar tendon were acquired in 14 players and quantitative texture parameters were calculated within a Region of Interest (ROI of both the non-dominant and the dominant tendon. A total of 90 features were calculated for each ROI, including 6 first-order descriptors, 24 Haralick features, and 60 higher-order spectra and entropy features. These features on the dominant and non-dominant side were used to perform a multivariate linear regression analysis (MANOVA and our results show that the descriptors can be effectively used to determine tendon abnormality and, more importantly, the occurrence of subclinical tendinopathy.

  20. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament repair with patellar and hamstring tendon autografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, K.A.; Karjalainen, P.T.; Harilainen, A.; Sandelin, J.; Tallroth, K.; Soila, K.; Aronen, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. Several MRI sequences were used to evaluate the 2-year postoperative appearance of asymptomatic knee with a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) and semitendinosus and gracilis (STG) tendon autografts.Design and patients. Two groups with successful repair of ACL tear with BTB (n=10) or STG (n=10) autografts were imaged at 1.5 T with sagittal and oblique coronal proton density-, T2-weighted and sagittal STIR sequences and plain and contrast-enhanced oblique coronal T1-weighted sequences. The appearance of the graft and periligamentous tissues was evaluated.Results. In all 20 cases, the ACL graft showed homogeneous, low signal intensity with periligamentous streaks of intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In 10 cases, localised areas of intermediate signal intensity were seen in the intra-articular segment of the graft on proton density- and T1-weighted images. The graft itself did not show enhancement in either of the two groups, but mild to moderate periligamentous enhancement was detected in 10 cases.Conclusion. The MRI appearance of ACL autograft is variable on proton density- and T1-weighted images. Periligamentous tissue showing contrast enhancement is a typical MRI finding after clinically successful ACL reconstruction. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of Patellar Tendon Reflex Responses Using Second-Order System Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett D. Steineman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep tendon reflex tests, such as the patellar tendon reflex (PTR, are widely accepted as simple examinations for detecting neurological disorders. Despite common acceptance, the grading scales remain subjective, creating an opportunity for quantitative measures to improve the reliability and efficacy of these tests. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of quantified measurement variables; however, little work has been done to correlate experimental data with theoretical models using entire PTR responses. In the present study, it is hypothesized that PTR responses may be described by the exponential decay rate and damped natural frequency of a theoretical second-order system. Kinematic data was recorded from both knees of 45 subjects using a motion capture system and correlation analysis found that the mean R2 value was 0.99. Exponential decay rate and damped natural frequency ranges determined from the sample population were −5.61 to −1.42 and 11.73 rad/s to 14.96 rad/s, respectively. This study confirmed that PTR responses strongly correlate to a second-order system and that exponential decay rate and undamped natural frequency are novel measurement variables to accurately measure PTR responses. Therefore, further investigation of these measurement variables and their usefulness in grading PTR responses is warranted.

  2. Association between incision technique for hamstring tendon harvest in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and the risk of injury to the infra-patellar branch of the saphenous nerve: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Alberto; Perdisa, Francesco; Samuelsson, Kristian; Svantesson, Eleonor; Romagnoli, Matteo; Raggi, Federico; Gaziano, Teide; Mosca, Massimiliano; Ayeni, Olufemi; Zaffagnini, Stefano

    2018-02-08

    To determine how the incision technique for hamstring tendon (HT) harvest in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction affects the risk of injury to the IPBSN and clinical outcome. A systematic literature search of the MEDLINE/Pubmed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and EBSCOhost electronic databases and clinicaltrials.gov for unpublished studies was performed to identify comparative studies investigating injury to the IPBSN after HT ACL reconstruction by comparing at least two different incision techniques. Data were extracted for the number of patients with evidence of any neurologic deficit corresponding to injury to the IPBSN, area of sensory deficit, the Lysholm score and patient satisfaction. The mean difference (MD) in study outcome between incision groups was assessed. The relative risk (RR) and the number needed to treat (NNT) were calculated. The Chi-square and Higgins' I 2 tests were applied to test heterogeneity. Data were pooled using a Mantel-Haenszel random-effects model if the statistical heterogeneity was > 50% and a fixed-effects model if the statistical heterogeneity was < 50%. The risk of bias was evaluated according to the Cochrane Database questionnaire and the quality of evidence was graded according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) guidelines. A total of eight studies (three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and five comparative studies) were included, of which six compared vertical and oblique incisions, one horizontal and vertical incisions, and one compared all three techniques. HT harvest was performed through a vertical incision in 329 patients, through an oblique incision in 195 patients and through a horizontal incision in 151 patients. Considering the meta-analysis of the RCTs, the performance of a vertical incision significantly increased the risk of causing IPBSN deficiency compared with both oblique and horizontal incision [RR 1.65 (CI 1

  3. Changes on Tendon Stiffness and Clinical Outcomes in Athletes Are Associated With Patellar Tendinopathy After Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wai-Chun; Ng, Gabriel Yin-Fat; Zhang, Zhi-Jie; Malliaras, Peter; Masci, Lorenzo; Fu, Siu-Ngor

    2017-12-19

    Eccentric exercise is commonly used as a form of loading exercise for individuals with patellar tendinopathy. This study investigated the change of mechanical properties and clinical outcomes and their interrelationships after a 12-week single-legged decline-board exercise with and without extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT). Randomized controlled trial. Outpatient clinic of a university. Thirty-four male in-season athletes with patellar tendinopathy for more than 3 months were randomized into exercise and combined groups. The exercise group received a 12-week single-legged decline-squat exercise, and the combined group performed an identical exercise program in addition to a weekly session of ESWT in the initial 6 weeks. Tendon stiffness and strain were examined using ultrasonography and dynamometry. Visual analog scale and Victoria Institute of Sports Assessment-patella (VISA-p) score were used to assess pain and dysfunction. These parameters were measured at preintervention and postintervention. Significant time effect but no significant group effect on the outcome measures; significant reduction in tendon stiffness (P = 0.02) and increase in tendon strain (P = 0.00); and reduction of intensity of pain (P = 0.00) and dysfunction (P = 0.00) were observed. Significant correlations between changes in tendon stiffness and VISA-p score (ρ = -0.58, P = 0.05); alteration in tendon strain, pain intensity (ρ = -0.63, P = 0.03); and VISA-p score (ρ = 0.60, P = 0.04) were detected after the exercise program. Eccentric exercise-induced modulation on tendon mechanical properties and clinical symptoms are associated in athletes with patellar tendinopathy.

  4. [Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament with transposition of great adductor muscular tendon for the treatment of teenagers' recurrent patellar dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chuan-Qiang; Chen, Chang-Chun; Zhao, Chun-Cheng; Yang, Hong-Mei; Kang, Yan-Zhong

    2017-06-25

    To investigate surgical method and clinical curative effects of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction with great adductor muscular tendon in treating teenagers' recurrent patellar dislocation. From May 2012 to September 2014, 19 patients with recurrent dislocation of patellar, including 6 males and 13 females with an average of 16 years old (ranged from 13 to 17 years), the courses of disease ranged from 3 to 18 months(averaged 6 months). All patients were underwent great adductor muscular tendon transposition to reconstruct medial patellofemoral ligament. The curative effects were evaluated by preoperative and postoperative with Lysholm scores and Patellofemoral angle and Q angle. All patients were followed up from 12 to 18 months with an average of 16.5 months. Primary healing was achieved at stage I. No pain, swelling and patellar dislocation or subluxation occurred. Patellofemoral angle increased from preoperative (-3.8±4.9)° to (10.3±4.1)° postoperatively. Q angle decreased from preoperative(16.4±3.1)° to(10.5±1.2)° postoperatively; Lysholm scores were improved from preoperative (68.6±8.5) to (93.7±6.5) final follow-up ( P teenagers' recurrent patellar dislocation.

  5. Effect of acute resistance exercise and sex on human patellar tendon structural and regulatory mRNA expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sullivan, B.E.; Carroll, C.C.; Jemiolo, B.

    2009-01-01

    Sullivan BE, Carroll CC, Jemiolo B, Trappe SW, Magnusson SP, Dossing S, Kjaer M, Trappe TA. Effect of acute resistance exercise and sex on human patellar tendon structural and regulatory mRNA expression. J Appl Physiol 106: 468-475, 2009. First published November 20, 2008; doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.......91341.2008.-Tendon is mainly composed of collagen and an aqueous matrix of proteoglycans that are regulated by enzymes called matrix metalloproteinases ( MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Although it is known that resistance exercise (RE) and sex influence tendon metabolism...... and mechanical properties, it is uncertain what structural and regulatory components contribute to these responses. We measured the mRNA expression of tendon's main fibrillar collagens (type I and type III) and the main proteoglycans (decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, and versican) and the regulatory enzymes MMP...

  6. Influence of acetaminophen and ibuprofen on in vivo patellar tendon adaptations to knee extensor resistance exercise in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Chad C; Dickinson, Jared M; Lemoine, Jennifer K

    2011-01-01

    Millions of older individuals consume acetaminophen or ibuprofen daily and these same individuals are encouraged to participate in resistance training. Several in vitro studies suggest that cyclooxygenase-inhibiting drugs can alter tendon metabolism and may influence adaptations to resistance...... training. Thirty-six individuals were randomly assigned to a Placebo (67±2y), Acetaminophen (64±1y; 4000mg(.)d(-1)), or Ibuprofen (64±1y; 1200mg(.)d(-1)) group in a double-blind manner and completed 12-weeks of knee extensor resistance-training. Before and after training in vivo patellar tendon properties......, and this response was not influenced with ibuprofen consumption. Mean tendon CSA increased with training in the Acetaminophen group (3%, p0.05) with training in the Placebo group. These responses were generally uninfluenced by ibuprofen consumption. In the Acetaminophen group, tendon deformation and strain...

  7. A role for hedgehog signaling in the differentiation of the insertion site of the patellar tendon in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Feng Liu

    Full Text Available Tendons are typically composed of two histologically different regions: the midsubstance and insertion site. We previously showed that Gli1, a downstream effector of the hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway, is expressed only in the insertion site of the mouse patellar tendon during its differentiation. To test for a functional role of Hh signaling, we targeted the Smoothened (Smo gene in vivo using a Cre/Lox system. Constitutive activation of the Hh pathway in the mid-substance caused molecular markers of the insertion site, e.g. type II collagen, to be ectopically expressed or up-regulated in the midsubstance. This was confirmed using a novel organ culture method in vitro. Conversely, when Smo was excised in the scleraxis-positive cell population, the development of the fibrocartilaginous insertion site was affected. Whole transcriptome analysis revealed that the expression of genes involved in chondrogenesis and mineralization was down-regulated in the insertion site, and expression of insertion site markers was decreased. Biomechanical testing of murine adult patellar tendon, which developed in the absence of Hh signaling, showed impairment of tendon structural properties (lower linear stiffness and greater displacement and material properties (greater strain, although the linear modulus of the mutant group was not significantly lower than controls. These studies provide new insights into the role of Hh signaling during tendon development.

  8. Patellar tendinopathy: physical therapy and injection treatments

    OpenAIRE

    van Ark, Mathijs

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy, commonly known as jumper’s knee, is an overuse injury of the patellar tendon. It is a frequent injury, particularly in jumping athletes such as volleyball and basketball players. Jumper’s knee is often a long-lasting injury and can have a major impact on sports and even work participation. The development of jumper’s knee and the best treatment for it are still unclear. The general aim of this thesis was to investigate the development and management of patellar tendinop...

  9. Decline eccentric squats increases patellar tendon loading compared to standard eccentric squats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Aagaard, P; Roikjaer, S

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have shown excellent clinical results using eccentric squat training on a 25 degrees decline board to treat patellar tendinopathy. It remains unknown why therapeutic management of patellar tendinopathy using decline eccentric squats offer superior clinical efficacy compared...

  10. The effect of dynamic knee-extension exercise on patellar tendon and quadriceps femoris muscle glucose uptake in humans studied by positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Langberg, Henning; Ryberg, Ann Kathrine

    2005-01-01

    Both tendon and peritendinous tissue show evidence of metabolic activity, but the effect of acute exercise on substrate turnover is unknown. We therefore examined the influence of acute exercise on glucose uptake in the patellar and quadriceps tendons during dynamic exercise in humans. Glucose...... that tendon glucose uptake is increased during exercise. However, the increase in tendon glucose uptake is less pronounced than in muscle and the increases are uncorrelated. Thus tendon glucose uptake is likely to be regulated by mechanisms independently of those regulating skeletal muscle glucose uptake....... uptake was measured in five healthy men in the patellar and quadriceps tendons and the quadriceps femoris muscle at rest and during dynamic knee-extension exercise (25 W) using positron emission tomography and [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG). Glucose uptake index was calculated by dividing...

  11. Ultrasound diagnostics of muscle and tendon injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stević Ruža

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sonography is a useful technique for the investigation of a number of musculoskeletal disorders. The most common indication for ultrasonography of muscles and tendons is the diagnosis of traumatic lesions, distinguishing them from other disorders and follow-up of healing process. Objective. The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of ultrasound in the diagnosis of muscle and tendon injuries. Methods. The study included 170 patients (148 male and 22 female, mean age 29.6 years (range 14-60 years. All examinations were performed by linear transducer of 7.5-10 MHz, with longitudinal and transverse scanning. Ultrasound examination followed physical examination. Results. Traumatic lesions of muscles were diagnosed in 113 patients (66.7% and tendon injuries in 57 cases (33.2%. The muscle changes detected by ultrasonography were the following: 70 (61.9% partial and two (1.76% complete ruptures, 22 (19.46% haematoma, 9 (7.96% strains grade I, 4 fibroses and 4 ossifying myositis 4 (3.5%, respectively. Complications of muscle injuries were diagnosed in two cases, a muscular hernia and an arteriovenous fistula. Among tendon injuries, 21 (33.8% ruptures and 36 (66.1% tendinitis were diagnosed. Accompanying effusion in the bursa of patients with tendon injuries was found in 9 cases. Conclusion. Ultrasonography allowed visualization and objective assessment of the type and the extent of traumatic pathomorphological changes of muscles and tendons. Such diagnostic possibilities of ultrasonography are especially important in the choice of appropriate therapy.

  12. Moderate treadmill running exercise prior to tendon injury enhances wound healing in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianying; Yuan, Ting; Wang, James H-C

    2016-02-23

    The effect of exercise on wound healing in aging tendon was tested using a rat moderate treadmill running (MTR) model. The rats were divided into an MTR group that ran on a treadmill for 4 weeks and a control group that remained in cages. After MTR, a window defect was created in the patellar tendons of all rats and wound healing was analyzed. We found that MTR accelerated wound healing by promoting quicker closure of wounds, improving the organization of collagen fibers, and decreasing senescent cells in the wounded tendons when compared to the cage control. MTR also lowered vascularization, increased the numbers of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs) and TSC proliferation than the control. Besides, MTR significantly increased the expression of stem cell markers, OCT-4 and Nanog, and tenocyte genes, Collagen I, Collagen III and tenomodulin, and down-regulated PPAR-γ, Collagen II and Runx-2 (non-tenocyte genes). These findings indicated that moderate exercise enhances healing of injuries in aging tendons through TSC based mechanisms, through which exercise regulates beneficial effects in tendons. This study reveals that appropriate exercise may be used in clinics to enhance tendon healing in aging patients.

  13. Open extensor tendon injuries: an epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patillo, Dominic; Rayan, Ghazi M

    2012-01-01

    To report the epidemiology, mechanism, anatomical location, distribution, and severity of open extensor tendon injuries in the digits, hand, and forearm as well as the frequency of associated injuries to surrounding bone and soft tissue. Retrospective chart review was conducted for patients who had operative repair of open digital extensor tendon injuries in all zones within an 11-year period. Data was grouped according to patient characteristics, zone of injury, mechanism of injury, and presence of associated injury. Statistical analysis was used to determine the presence of relevant associations. Eighty-six patients with 125 severed tendons and 105 injured digits were available for chart reviews. Patients were predominantly males (83%) with a mean age of 34.2 years and the dominant extremity was most often injured (60%). The thumb was the most commonly injured (25.7%), followed by middle finger (24.8), whereas small finger was least affected (10.5%). Sharp laceration was the most common mechanism of injury (60%), and most of these occurred at or proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joints. Most saw injuries occurred distal to the metacarpophalangeal joint. Zone V was the most commonly affected in the fingers (27%) while zone VT was the most commonly affected in the thumb (69%). Associated injuries to bone and soft tissue occurred in 46.7% of all injuries with saw and crush/avulsions being predictive of fractures and damage to the underlying joint capsule. The extensor mechanism is anatomically complex, and open injuries to the dorsum of the hand, wrist, and forearm, especially of crushing nature and those inflicted by saws, must be thoroughly evaluated. Associated injuries should be ruled out in order to customize surgical treatment and optimize outcome.

  14. Impact of oral contraceptive use and menstrual phases on patellar tendon morphology, biochemical composition and biomechanical properties in female athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Damborg; Couppe, Christian; Hansen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Gender differences exist with regards to ligament and tendon injuries. Lower collagen synthesis has been observed in exercising females vs. males, and in users of oral contraceptives (OC) vs non-users, but it is unknown if OC will influence tendon biomechanics of females undergoing...

  15. management of open achilles tendon injury: primary repair and early ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is attributable to increase in both competitive and recreational sports. In most of the literature written on Achilles tendon injuries there were rarely any information about open Achilles tendon ... The most common aetiology was motorbike spoke.

  16. Fresh osteochondral allograft transplantation for isolated patellar cartilage injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracitelli, Guilherme C; Meric, Gokhan; Pulido, Pamela A; Görtz, Simon; De Young, Allison J; Bugbee, William D

    2015-04-01

    The treatment of patellofemoral cartilage injuries can be challenging. Osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation has been used as a treatment option for a range of cartilage disorders. To evaluate functional outcomes and survivorship of the grafts among patients who underwent OCA for patellar cartilage injuries. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. An institutional review board-approved OCA database was used to identify 27 patients (28 knees) who underwent isolated OCA transplantation of the patella between 1983 and 2010. All patients had a minimum 2-year follow-up. The mean age of the patients was 33.7 years (range, 14-64 years); 54% were female. Twenty-six (92.9%) knees had previous surgery (mean, 3.2 procedures; range, 1-10 procedures). The mean allograft area was 10.1 cm(2) (range, 4.0-18.0 cm(2)). Patients returned for clinical evaluation or were contacted via telephone for follow-up. The number and type of reoperations were assessed. Any reoperation resulting in removal of the allograft was considered a failure of the OCA transplantation. Patients were evaluated pre- and postoperatively using the modified Merle d'Aubigné-Postel (18-point) scale, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) pain, function, and total scores, and the Knee Society function (KS-F) score. Patient satisfaction was assessed at latest follow-up. Seventeen of the 28 knees (60.7%) had further surgery after the OCA transplantation; 8 of the 28 knees (28.6%) were considered OCA failures (4 conversions to total knee arthroplasty, 2 conversions to patellofemoral knee arthroplasty, 1 revision OCA, 1 patellectomy). Patellar allografting survivorship was 78.1% at 5 and 10 years and 55.8% at 15 years. Among the 20 knees (71.4%) with grafts in situ, the mean follow-up duration was 9.7 years (range, 1.8-30.1 years). Pain and function improved from the preoperative visit to latest follow-up, and 89% of patients were extremely satisfied or satisfied with the results of the OCA

  17. Bifocal osseous avulsion of the patellar tendon from the distal patella and tibial tuberosity in a child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Hermansen, Lars; Gade Freund, Knud

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a 12-year-old boy, who suffered an injury to the right knee in a skateboard accident. Radiographs and surgery confirmed the extremely rare bifocal avulsion fracture including the distal patellar pole and tibial tuberosity. Open reduction and internal fixation was accomp...... was accomplished, and 4-month follow-up demonstrated a good outcome. © 2015, European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery, Arthroscopy (ESSKA)....

  18. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy in volleyball and basketball players : A survey-based prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A. J.; van der Worp, H.; Diercks, R. L.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.; Zwerver, J.

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) is a common overuse injury of the patellar tendon in jumping athletes. In a recent large cross-sectional study from 2008 several factors were identified that may be associated with the etiology of PT. However, because of the study design no conclusions could be drawn about

  19. Anterior-Posterior Instability of the Knee Following ACL Reconstruction with Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Ligament in Comparison with Four-Strand Hamstrings Autograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Angoules

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate anterior-posterior knee laxity using two different autografts. Material-Methods. 40 patients, (34 males and 6 women, 17–54 years old (mean: 31, were included in the present study. Group A (4SHS = 20 underwent reconstruction using four-strand hamstrings, and group B (BPBT = 20 underwent reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft. Using the KT-1000 arthrometer, knee instability was calculated in both knees of all patients preoperatively and 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery at the ACL-operated knee. The contralateral healthy knee was used as an internal control group. Results. Anterior-posterior instability using the KT1000 Arthrometer was found to be increased after ACL insufficiency. The recorded laxity improved after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in both groups. However, statistically significant greater values were detected in the bone-patellar tendon-bone group, which revealed reduction of anteroposterior stability values to an extent, where no statistical significance with the normal values even after 3 months after surgery was observed. Conclusions. Anterior-Posterior instability of the knee improved significantly after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. The bone-patellar tendon-bone graft provided an obvious greater stability.

  20. [Histomorphological analyse of accelerating the fibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction in rabbits by low intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoliang; Lü, Hongbin; Hu, Jianzhong; Xu, Daqi; Zhou, Jingyong; Wang, Ye

    2013-08-01

    To analyse the effect of low intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation (LIPUS) on accelerating the fibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction. A total of 60 mature female New Zealand white rabbits undergoing standard partial patellectomy were divided into 2 groups randomly. The control group was given comfort treatment and the treatment group was given LIPUS treatment starting from day 3 to the end of week 6 postoperatively. The scheduled time points of animal euthanization would be at week 6, week 12 and week 18 postoperatively. The patella-patellar tendon (PPT) complex would be harvested and cut into sections after decalcification for H&E staining, Safranine o/fast green staining. The thickness and gray value of fibrocartilage layer were analyzed by SANO Microscope Partner image analyzer. At week 6, week 12 and week 18 postoperatively, the fibrocartilage layer in the treatment group was significantly thicker than that in the control group (Pfibrocartilage layer was significantly smaller than that in the control group (Pfibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction in rabbit models.

  1. CT of peroneal tendon injury in patients with calcaneal fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Z.S.; Feldman, F.; Singson, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Injury to the peroneal tendons is a major complication of intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Heretofore, the injury has been difficult to diagnose by routine imaging modalities. However, CT studies of 24 intraarticular calcaneal fractures revealed evidence of peroneal tendon injury in 22 cases. The pathologic conditions included lateral displacement, subluxation, dislocation, and impingement on the tendons by bony fragments, hematomas, and scar tissue. Patients studied 6-12 months after injury had CT evidence consistent with clinical symptoms of peroneal tenosynovitis. Since peroneal tendon injury is surgically correctable, it should be differentiated from other known and more obvious complications, of calcaneal fractures. CT therefore serves as a valuable, noninvasive tool in evaluating these otherwise nonvisualized soft tissue structures in the immediate posttraumatic period as well as during long-term follow up

  2. BIOMECHANICAL STUDY OF RISK FACTORS INVOLVED IN THE OCCURANCE OF PATELLAR TENDONITIS – APLICATIONS IN PERFORMANCE SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilinca Ilona

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim – this study consists in the constructing of a tridimensional musculoskeletal model for the attack hit and the quantification of mechanical stress, in order to prevent traumatism in the knee joint.Goal: Minimizing the risk of patellar tendonitis through prophylactic exercises that improve the muscular pattern.Material and methods. This study was conducted for a 9 month period on the feminine batch pertaining to the volley team of the Sport Club “Universities Craiova”. For this research we used the AMTI MSA 6 force platformand the software application “Anybody”. By using the force platform AMTI MSA 6 it became possible todetermine the reaction force of the ground according to the position of the centre of gravity at the time of the jumping and landing, after executing an attack hit. The software “Anybody” allowed the 3D musculoskeletal modelling and the calculation of the forces of the muscles involved, prior and after the application of theprophylactic exercises.Conclusions. The improvement of the values of muscular forces demonstrates the efficiency of the prophylactic exercises: for the quadriceps femoris we obtain an increase of 13,79%, for gastrocnemius 14,76%, for hamstring muscles a value of 14%, for rectus femoris 15,06% and for the gluteus major 14,63%.For the entire experimental batch, at the moment of jumping, there was a reduction of the compression force by38,48% for the dominant inferior limb, by 34,06% for the non-dominant inferior limb.At the moment of landing, there was a difference of 38,51% for the dominant limb and a difference of 28,82% for the non-dominant limb. By analyzing the evolution of compression forces, after Z, at the level of knee joint, after the application of prophylactic program. We find a decreasing of pressure forces by a better distribution of this force for the entire inferior limb joint, decreasing in this way the risk of trauma production by overtraining.Key words - risk factors

  3. Characterising the proximal patellar tendon attachment and its relationship to skeletal maturity in adolescent ballet dancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudavsky, Aliza; Cook, Jillianne; Magnusson, Stig Peter

    2017-01-01

    gain an understanding of how and when the tendon attachment matures. Methods: Sixty adolescent elite ballet students (ages 11-18) and eight mature adults participated. Peak height velocity (PHV) estimated skeletal maturity. Ultrasound tissue characterisation (UTC) scan was taken of the left knee...

  4. Assessment of rotatory instability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Yasutaka; Okazaki, Ken; Miura, Hiromasa

    2010-01-01

    Anatomically oriented anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been advocated recently, but its effect on rotatory instability remains to be cleared objectively. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate rotatory instability in ACL reconstructed knees with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft using an open MRI system. Eighteen subjects underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with a BTB graft. The tibial tunnel was placed in the center of the ACL footprint. The femoral tunnel was drilled transtibially at the 10:00 to 10:30-o'clock position for the right knees. Subjects were examined using a Slocum anterolateral rotatory instability test in open MRI. Anterior tibial translation was measured at the medial and lateral compartments by evaluating sagittal images. Anterior knee stability was evaluated using the KT-2000 arthrometer. The clinical knee function was assessed with the Lysholm and Tegner scoring scales before and after the surgery. Side-to-side differences of anterolateral tibial translation was 0.1 mm. Side-to-side difference on KT-2000 arthrometer measurement was 1.8 mm. The Lysholm score improved to 96 and the latest Tegner score reached substantially the preinjury level. ACL reconstruction with a BTB graft was successful in restoring rotatory stability as well as anterior stability and knee function. (author)

  5. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ARTHROSCOPIC ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION BONE PATELLAR TENDON BONE GRAFT V/S HAMSTRING GRAFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyank

    2015-08-01

    fulfilling the predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. STATISTICAL METHODS : Intergroup comparison was analysed by K - Independent sample t test. Intragroup comparison was analysed by Paired t - test. RESULTS : Patients were divided into two groups and treated with using Bone - patellar tendon - bone graft and Hamstring graft respectively. Mean age group of patients was 29.16 yrs. (range 16 - 51yrs and 30.88 yrs. (range 19 - 48yrs in group A and B respectively we found the incidence of ACL injury in 15 - 44 years age group to be greater than twice the general population. A mean delay in surgery of 4.66 months (range 2 - 12 months since the time of injury in group A and 4.46 months (range 2 - 7 months in group B was observed. Subjective IKDC evaluation was done at the end of 12 months. Ther e was no difference in both the groups in the terms of effusion, passive motion, knee compartment findings, ligament examination, X - ray findings. Functional test and IKDC grade of both the groups showed statistically very highly significant improvement. Ho wever, there was statistically very high Harvest site pathology in group A. CONCLUSION : We found that there is statistically no significant difference in the overall clinical outcome between hamstring autograft with transfix and bone - patellar tendon bone autograft with interference screw except that the patellar tendon group had a greater tendency of having donor site morbidity compared to the hamstring tendon group.

  6. The TOPSHOCK study : Effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - Design of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Worp, H.; Zwerver, J.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.; Diercks, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of

  7. Patellar tendon properties distinguish elite from non-elite soccer players and are related to peak horizontal but not vertical power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, Conall F; Stubbs, Michael; Vanrenterghem, Jos; O'Boyle, Andrew; Morgans, Ryland; Drust, Barry; Erskine, Robert M

    2018-06-02

    To investigate potential differences in patellar tendon properties between elite and non-elite soccer players, and to establish whether tendon properties were related to power assessed during unilateral jumps performed in different directions. Elite (n = 16; age 18.1 ± 1.0 years) and non-elite (n = 13; age 22.3 ± 2.7 years) soccer players performed vertical, horizontal-forward and medial unilateral countermovement jumps (CMJs) on a force plate. Patellar tendon (PT) cross-sectional area, elongation, strain, stiffness, and Young's modulus (measured at the highest common force interval) were assessed with ultrasonography and isokinetic dynamometry. Elite demonstrated greater PT elongation (6.83 ± 1.87 vs. 4.92 ± 1.88 mm, P = 0.011) and strain (11.73 ± 3.25 vs. 8.38 ± 3.06%, P = 0.009) than non-elite soccer players. Projectile range and peak horizontal power during horizontal-forward CMJ correlated positively with tendon elongation (r = 0.657 and 0.693, P < 0.001) but inversely with Young's modulus (r = - 0.376 and - 0.402; P = 0.044 and 0.031). Peak medial power during medial CMJ correlated positively with tendon elongation (r = 0.658, P < 0.001) but inversely with tendon stiffness (r = - 0.368, P = 0.050). Not only does a more compliant patellar tendon appear to be an indicator of elite soccer playing status but it may also facilitate unilateral horizontal-forward and medial, but not vertical CMJ performance. These findings should be considered when prescribing talent selection and development protocols related to direction-specific power in elite soccer players.

  8. Are unilateral and bilateral patellar tendinopathy distinguished by differences in anthropometry, body composition, or muscle strength in elite female basketball players?

    OpenAIRE

    Gaida, J; Cook, J; Bass, S; Austen, S; Kiss, Z

    2004-01-01

    Background: Overuse injury to the patellar tendon (patellar tendinopathy) is a major reason for interrupted training and competition for elite athletes. In both sexes, the prevalence of unilateral and bilateral tendinopathy has been shown to differ. It has been proposed that bilateral pathology may have a different aetiology from unilateral pathology. Investigation of risk factors that may be unique to unilateral and bilateral patellar tendinopathy in female athletes may reveal insights into ...

  9. The TOPSHOCK study: Effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van der Worp, Henk; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: ...

  10. The prevalence and clinical significance of sonographic tendon abnormalities in asymptomatic ballet dancers: a 24-month longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin, Jules; Cook, Jill L; Malliaras, Peter; McCormack, Moira; Calleja, Michelle; Clarke, Andrew; Connell, David

    2013-01-01

    Sonographic abnormalities of the achilles and patellar tendons are common findings in athletes, and tendinopathy is a common cause of pain and disability in athletes. However, it is unclear whether the sonographic changes are pathological or adaptive, or if they predict future injury. We undertook a cohort study to determine what sonographic features of the achilles and patellar tendons are consistent with changes as a result of ballet training, and which may be predictive of future development of disabling tendon symptoms. The achilles and patellar tendons of 79 (35 male, 44 female) professional ballet dancers (members of the English Royal Ballet) were examined with ultrasound, measuring proximal and distal tendon diameters and assessing for the presence of hypoechoic change, intratendon defects, calcification and neovascularity. All subjects were followed for 24 months for the development of patellar tendon or achilles-related pain or injury severe enough to require time off from dancing. Sonographic abnormalities were common among dancers, both male and female, and in both achilles and patellar tendons. Disabling tendon-related symptoms developed in 10 dancers and 14 tendons: 7 achilles (3 right, 4 left) and 7 patellar (2 right, 5 left). The presence of moderate or severe hypoechoic defects was weakly predictive for the development of future disabling tendon symptoms (p=0.0381); there was no correlation between any of the other sonographic abnormalities and the development of symptoms. There was no relationship between achilles or patellar tendons' diameter, either proximal or distal, with an increased likelihood of developing tendon-related disability. The presence of sonographic abnormalities is common in ballet dancers, but only the presence of focal hypoechoic changes predicts the development of future tendon-related disability. This suggests that screening of asymptomatic individuals may be of use in identifying those who are at higher risk of developing

  11. MRI after patellar dislocation. Assessment of risk factors and injury to the joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederichs, G.

    2013-01-01

    Patellar dislocation is the lateral displacement of the patella from the femoral trochlea. Affected individuals typically have underlying anatomic risk factors of variable magnitude, which, in conjunction with leg rotation, cause the event. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits straightforward diagnosis of the typical features of recent patellar dislocation: contusion edema of the inferomedial patella and the lateral femoral condyle as well as rupture of the medial patellofemoral ligament. In case of concomitant osteochondral injury, early surgical refixation may be indicated, depending on the size. After a first dislocation, which can damage the capsuloligamentous stabilizers, subjects may sustain further dislocations or even develop chronic patellofemoral instability, depending on the presence and severity of anatomic variants. A wide range of conservative and surgical treatments are available. While a first patellar dislocation is often treated conservatively, surgical strategies after a second dislocation depend on the pattern of injury and the severity of underlying anatomic risk factors. The most relevant predisposing variants are trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, and an abnormal tibial tubercle to trochlear groove distance (TT-TG). The radiologist's report should give a quantitative estimate of both the injuries resulting from dislocation and the underlying anatomic risk factors. An accurate characterization of the individual pathomechanism is crucial for tailoring treatment. (orig.)

  12. Isometric Contractions Are More Analgesic Than Isotonic Contractions for Patellar Tendon Pain: An In-Season Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, Ebonie; van Ark, Mathijs; Docking, Sean; Moseley, G Lorimer; Kidgell, Dawson; Gaida, Jamie E; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Zwerver, Johannes; Cook, Jill

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the immediate analgesic effects of 2 resistance programs in in-season athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT). Resistance training is noninvasive, a principle stimulus for corticospinal and neuromuscular adaptation, and may be analgesic. Within-season randomized clinical trial. Data analysis was conducted blinded to group. Subelite volleyball and basketball competitions. Twenty jumping athletes aged more than 16 years, participating in games/trainings 3 times per week with clinically diagnosed PT. Two quadriceps resistance protocols were compared; (1) isometric leg extension holds at 60 degrees knee flexion (80% of their maximal voluntary isometric contraction) or (2) isotonic leg extension (at 80% of their 8 repetition maximum) 4 times per week for 4 weeks. Time under load and rest between sets was matched between groups. (1) Pain (0-10 numerical rating score) during single leg decline squat (SLDS), measured preintervention and postintervention sessions. (2) VISA-P, a questionnaire about tendon pain and function, completed at baseline and after 4 weeks. Twenty athletes with PT (18 men, mean 22.5 ± 4.7 years) participated (isotonic n = 10, isometric n = 10). Baseline median SLDS pain was 5/10 for both groups (isotonic range 1-8, isometric range 2-8). Isometric contractions produced significantly greater immediate analgesia (P < 0.002). Week one analgesic response positively correlated with improvements in VISA-P at 4 weeks (r = 0.64). Both protocols appear efficacious for in-season athletes to reduce pain, however, isometric contractions demonstrated significantly greater immediate analgesia throughout the 4-week trial. Greater analgesia may increase the ability to load or perform.

  13. Proximal patellar tendinosis and abnormalities of patellar tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.M.; Tauro, P.G.; Ostlere, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To assess whether an association exists between patellar tendinosis and abnormal patellar tracking. Design and patients. The MRI examinations of 630 patients (i.e. 860 knees) referred with anterior knee pain over a 4-year period were assessed in retrospect for the presence of patellar tendinosis and abnormal patellar tracking. The images of the patients with patellar tendinosis were reviewed and the location within the patellar tendon was recorded. Results. There were 44 knees with proximal patellar tendinosis. Twenty-four of these were considered to have normal patellar tracking and 20 to have abnormal patellar tracking. In the group of 816 knees without proximal patellar tendinosis, 581 were considered to have normal patellar tracking and 235 knees to have abnormal patellar tracking. When the two groups were compared there was a statistically significant difference in the ratio of patients with and without abnormal tracking. Conclusion. In patients referred with anterior knee pain or suspected abnormal patellar tracking there is a significant association between proximal patellar tendinosis and abnormal patellar tracking. (orig.)

  14. Injury patterns of medial patellofemoral ligament after acute lateral patellar dislocation in children: Correlation analysis with anatomical variants and articular cartilage lesion of the patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guang-ying; Ding, Hong-yu; Zheng, Lei; Ji, Bing-jun; Shi, Hao; Feng, Yan

    2017-01-01

    To assess the relationship between injury patterns of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and anatomical variants and patellar cartilage lesions after acute lateral patellar dislocation (LPD) in children. MR images were obtained in 140 children with acute LPD. Images were acquired and evaluated using standardised protocols. Fifty-eight cases of partial MPFL tear and 75 cases of complete MPFL tear were identified. Injuries occurred at an isolated patellar insertion (PAT) in 52 cases, an isolated femoral attachment (FEM) in 42 cases and an isolated mid-substance (MID) in five cases. More than one site of injury was identified in 34 cases. Compared with Wiberg patellar type C, Wiberg patellar type B predisposed to complete MPFL tear (P = 0.042). No correlations were identified between injury patterns of MPFL and trochlear dysplasia, patellar height and tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (P > 0.05). Compared with partial MPFL tear, complete MPFL tear predisposed to Grade-IV and Grade-V patellar chondral lesion (P = 0.02). There were no correlations between incidence of patellar cartilage lesion and injury locational-subgroups of MPFL (P = 0.543). MPFL is most easily injured at the PAT in children. Wiberg patellar type B predisposes to complete MPFL tear. Complete MPFL tear predisposes to a higher grade of patellar chondral lesion. (orig.)

  15. Injury patterns of medial patellofemoral ligament after acute lateral patellar dislocation in children: Correlation analysis with anatomical variants and articular cartilage lesion of the patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang-ying; Ding, Hong-yu [Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong University, Department of Ultrasonography, Jinan (China); Zheng, Lei; Ji, Bing-jun [Shandong Provincial Corps Hospital of Chinese People' s Armed Police Force, Department of Radiology, Jinan (China); Shi, Hao [Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Jinan (China); Feng, Yan [Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical College, Department of Radiology, Binzhou (China)

    2017-03-15

    To assess the relationship between injury patterns of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and anatomical variants and patellar cartilage lesions after acute lateral patellar dislocation (LPD) in children. MR images were obtained in 140 children with acute LPD. Images were acquired and evaluated using standardised protocols. Fifty-eight cases of partial MPFL tear and 75 cases of complete MPFL tear were identified. Injuries occurred at an isolated patellar insertion (PAT) in 52 cases, an isolated femoral attachment (FEM) in 42 cases and an isolated mid-substance (MID) in five cases. More than one site of injury was identified in 34 cases. Compared with Wiberg patellar type C, Wiberg patellar type B predisposed to complete MPFL tear (P = 0.042). No correlations were identified between injury patterns of MPFL and trochlear dysplasia, patellar height and tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (P > 0.05). Compared with partial MPFL tear, complete MPFL tear predisposed to Grade-IV and Grade-V patellar chondral lesion (P = 0.02). There were no correlations between incidence of patellar cartilage lesion and injury locational-subgroups of MPFL (P = 0.543). MPFL is most easily injured at the PAT in children. Wiberg patellar type B predisposes to complete MPFL tear. Complete MPFL tear predisposes to a higher grade of patellar chondral lesion. (orig.)

  16. Anti-inflammatory management for tendon injuries - friends or foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Kai-Ming

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute and chronic tendon injuries are very common among athletes and in sedentary population. Most physicians prescribe anti-inflammatory managements to relieve the worst symptoms of swelling and pain, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and physical therapies. However, experimental research shows that pro-inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandins may play important regulatory roles in tendon healing. Noticeably nearly all cases of chronic tendon injuries we treat as specialists have received non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs by their physician, suggesting that there might be a potential interaction in some of these cases turning a mild inflammatory tendon injury into chronic tendinopathy in predisposed individuals. We are aware of the fact that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids may well have a positive effect on the pain control in the clinical situation whilst negatively affect the structural healing. It follows that a comprehensive evaluation of anti-inflammatory management for tendon injuries is needed and any such data would have profound clinical and health economic importance.

  17. Patellar Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Aaron; Watson, Jonathan N; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common condition. There are a wide variety of treatment options available, the majority of which are nonoperative. No consensus exists on the optimal method of treatment. PubMed spanning 1962-2014. Clinical review. Level 4. The majority of cases resolve with nonoperative therapy: rest, physical therapy with eccentric exercises, cryotherapy, anti-inflammatories, corticosteroid injections, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, glyceryl trinitrate, platelet-rich plasma injections, and ultrasound-guided sclerosis. Refractory cases may require either open or arthroscopic debridement of the patellar tendon. Corticosteroid injections provide short-term pain relief but increase risk of tendon rupture. Anti-inflammatories and injectable agents have shown mixed results. Surgical treatment is effective in many refractory cases unresponsive to nonoperative modalities. Physical therapy with an eccentric exercise program is the mainstay of treatment for patellar tendinopathy. Platelet-rich plasma has demonstrated mixed results; evidence-based recommendations on its efficacy cannot be made. In the event that nonoperative treatment fails, surgical intervention has produced good to excellent outcomes in the majority of patients. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Diagnosing Achilles tendon injuries in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, Lynda

    2013-09-01

    Achilles tendon (AT) injury is an overuse injury often seen in professional and recreational athletes. It tends to affect men, particularly those in their thirties and forties, more than women, and is typically seen in people who are intermittently active. To ensure AT ruptures are identified and treated effectively, early intervention in emergency departments (EDs) is crucial. This article discusses how advanced nurse practitioners can use their comprehensive problem-solving, clinical decision-making and clinical judgement skills to manage patients who present with suspected AT injury. It also describes the anatomy of tendon rupture, the aetiology and mechanism of injuries, and the importance of assessment and diagnostic tools, therapeutic techniques and management strategies. Finally, it considers the psychological effect this injury can have on patients, while in the ED and after discharge. A case study is included as an example of ED management.

  19. Primary traumatic patellar dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Chun-Hao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute traumatic patellar dislocation is a common injury in the active and young adult populations. MRI of the knee is recommended in all patients who present with acute patellar dislocation. Numerous operative and non-operative methods have been described to treat the injuries; however, the ideal management of the acute traumatic patellar dislocation in young adults is still in debate. This article is intended to review the studies to the subjects of epidemiology, initial examination and management.

  20. Systematics of injuries of the rotator cuff and biceps tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Pones, M.; Breitenseher, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Injuries of the rotator cuff and the biceps tendon demonstrate different patterns, which can be recognized clinically and radiologically. These patterns are impingement syndrome with additional trauma, isolated trauma of the rotator cuff and shoulder dislocation causing rotator cuff tears. Furthermore, it is clinically crucial to evaluate the extent of a rotator cuff injury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice to differentiate these patterns. (orig.) [de

  1. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF ACCELERATED REHABILITATION IN ARTHROSCOPIC ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH BONE PATELLAR TENDON BONE GRAFT A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranyakumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION An ideal rehabilitation program post anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction enables an individual to return to pre injury levels at a faster rate with minimal to no risk of reinjury to the graft. Rehabilitation protocols have changed considerably over time in the past. It has become “aggressive”, meaning an intensive rehabilitation which includes greater variety of exercises and sports related training. AIM OF THE STUDY The aim of our study is to assess the outcome of accelerated rehabilitation post anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. METHODOLOGY 106 patients were operated by a single surgeon underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone patella tendon bone graft and partial meniscectomy for associated meniscal tear. Patients were put on an accelerated rehabilitation protocol designed in our institute on first post-operative day, under the guidance of a physical therapist in consultation with the operated surgeon. Patients were followed up at 3 weeks, 6 months and 9 months, post onset of rehabilitation, patients were assessed using KT1000 Arthrometer and Lysholm knee scoring system. RESULTS Out of 106 patients, who were selected, 96(91% were males and 10(9% were females. The mean pre-operative Lysholm score was 55.09. Post operatively, while on accelerated rehabilitation program the Lysholm scores were 69.73 at 3 weeks, 89.13 at 6 months and 89.19 at 9 months. In our pre-operative evaluation mean KT 1000 arthrometer score was 10.53 and post-operative at six months was 3.49. At nine months 105 patients had excellent results whereas 1 patient had good result. CONCLUSION Accelerated rehabilitation protocol enables the patient to functionally recover faster to pre injury levels. A rehabilitation protocol for 6 months is sufficient in enabling a patient to get back to pre-injury levels. Functional outcome is the same with or without associated meniscal injuries.

  2. Pathophysiology of overuse tendon injury; Pathophysiologie des Sehnenueberlastungsschadens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannus, P. [Accident and Trauma Research Center and Tampere Research Center of Sports Medicine, President Urho Keleva Kekkonen Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere (Finland); Department of Surgery and Institute of Medical Technology, Tampere University Medical School and University Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Paavola, M. [Department of Surgery and Institute of Medical Technology, Tampere University Medical School and University Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Paakkala, T. [Department of Radiology, Tampere University Medical School and University Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Parkkari, J.; Jaervinen, T.; Jaervinen, M. [Accident and Trauma Research Center and Tampere Research Center of Sports Medicine, President Urho Keleva Kekkonen Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere (Finland)

    2002-10-01

    Overuse tendon injury is one of the most common injuries in sports.The etiology as well as the pathophysilogical mechanisms leading to tendinopathy are of crucial medical importance.At the moment intrinsic and extrinsic factors are assumed as mechanisms of overuse tendon injury. Except for the acute, extrinsic trauma, the chronic overuse tendon injury is a multifactorial process. There are many other factors, such as local hypoxia, less of nutrition, impaired metabolism and local inflammatory that may also contribute to the development of tissue damage.The exact interaction of these factors cannot be explained entirely at the moment.Further studies will be necessary in order to get more information. (orig.) [German] Der Sehnenueberlastungsschaden ist eine der haeufigsten Ursachen fuer Verletzungen im Spitzen- und Breitensport. Die Aetiologie sowie die pathophysiologischen Mechanismen, die zu dieser Sehnenverletzung fuehren, sind fuer das Verstaendnis von grosser medizinischer Bedeutung.Grundsaetzlich werden intrinsische (individuelle) und extrinsische (von aussen einwirkende) Faktoren als Mechanismen fuer Sehnenueberlastung angenommen, wobei bis auf das akute, extrinsisch einwirkende Trauma der chronische Ueberlastungsschaden multifaktoriell hervorgerufen wird. Viele andere Faktoren, wie lokale Hypoxie, zu geringe Naehrstoffzufuhr und herabgesetzter Metabolismus sowie eine lokale Entzuendung spielen in der Entstehung eines manifesten Gewebeschadens ebenfalls eine entscheidende Rolle. Das genaue Zusammenspiel der einzelnen Faktoren mit der jeweiligen individuellen Physis laesst noch eine ganze Reihe von Fragen offen. Weitere Studien sind notwendig, um genauere Aufschluesse zu gewinnen. (orig.)

  3. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Jumper's Knee KidsHealth / For Teens / Jumper's Knee What's in this ... continued damage to the knee. How Does the Knee Work? To understand how jumper's knee happens, it ...

  4. Isometric Contractions Are More Analgesic Than Isotonic Contractions for Patellar Tendon Pain : An In-Season Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rio, Ebonie; van Ark, Mathijs; Docking, Sean; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Kidgell, Dawson; Gaida, Jamie E.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Zwerver, Johannes; Cook, Jill

    Objective: This study aimed to compare the immediate analgesic effects of 2 resistance programs in in-season athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT). Resistance training is noninvasive, a principle stimulus for corticospinal and neuromuscular adaptation, and may be analgesic. Design: Within-season

  5. Incidence and Association of CT Findings of Ankle Tendon Injuries in Patients Presenting With Ankle and Hindfoot Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshani, Ashkahn; Zhu, Liang; Cai, Chunyan; Beckmann, Nicholas M

    2017-02-01

    Tendon injuries are a commonly encountered finding in ankle CT examinations performed for fractures. This study was designed to identify the incidence and associations of tendon injuries in ankle CT examinations performed for fractures. A retrospective review was performed of 410 patients who underwent ankle CT during a 6-year period. Tendon injuries were common, seen in 25% of all ankle CT examinations. Tendon subluxation-dislocation accounted for most of the tendon injuries (77 of 196 total injuries). Pilon fractures carried 2.2 times increased risk of tibialis posterior tendon injury (p = 0.0094). Calcaneus fractures carried 11.86 times increased risk of peroneus brevis tendon and 10.71 times increased risk of peroneus longus tendon injury (p < 0.0001). Calcaneus fractures also carried 5.21 times increased risk of flexor hallucis longus tendon injury (p = 0.0024). Talus fracture was associated with injury to all flexor compartment tendons. Talus fractures carried 3.43 times increased risk of tibialis posterior tendon injury (p < 0.0001), 4.51 times increased risk of flexor digitorum longus tendon injury (p = 0.0005), and 6.97 times increased risk of flexor hallucis longus tendon injury (p < 0.0001). Calcaneal fractures are prone to peroneal tendon injury, and talus fractures are prone to flexor tendon injury. In patients with pilon fractures, it is important to look for tibialis posterior tendon injury, specifically for entrapment. Overall, the most common type of injury is tendon malalignment, so it is imperative to know the normal tendon paths and associated bony landmarks to identify tendon injury.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of ankle ligaments and tendon injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.; Trattnig, S.; Kukla, C.; Daebler, C.; Helbich, T.; Haller, J.; Imhof, H.

    1995-01-01

    Today MRI allows evaluation of the integrity of injured ankle ligaments. The major difficulty in MRI is inconsistency in visualization by inadequate appreciation of the three-dimensional orientation of each ankle ligament. Using this technique, 52 patients with sprained ankles underwent MRI. The integrity of rupture of the collateral lateral ligaments was obtained in all 52 ankles. Full-lenght visualization is essential for evaluation of the ankle ligaments with MRI. In these 52 patients the angle of tilt on the stress X-ray was compared with the rate of MRI findings showing an injury affecting two ligaments. We found that none of the patients in whom the angle of lateral tilt was less than 5 had rupture of two laterial ligaments, while 32% of patients with angles of tilt of 6-14 and 42% of those with angles of tilt over 15 on stress X-ray had two ruptured lateral ligaments. The advantages of MRI are that it offers the best visualization of the extent of the tendon lesion. MRI, however, seems to be superior to US in detecting and quantifying lesions of the Achilles tendon. Therefore, MRI may be indicated in particularly difficult cases of tendons injuries in the foot. (orig.) [de

  7. Effect of patellar strap and sports tape on pain in patellar tendinopathy: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A.; Zwerver, J.; Diercks, R.; Tak, I.; van Berkel, S.; van Cingel, R.; van der Worp, H.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT) use a patellar strap or sports tape during sports. This study's aim was to investigate the short-term effect of these orthoses on patellar tendon pain. Participants performed the single-leg decline squat, vertical jump test, and triple-hop test under

  8. Effect of patellar strap and sports tape on pain in patellar tendinopathy : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries , de A.; Zwerver, J.; Diercks, R.; Tak, I.; van Berkel, S.; van Cingel, R.; van der Worp, H.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT) use a patellar strap or sports tape during sports. This study's aim was to investigate the short-term effect of these orthoses on patellar tendon pain. Participants performed the single-leg decline squat, vertical jump test, and triple-hop test under

  9. Central Tendon Injuries of Hamstring Muscles: Case Series of Operative Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempainen, Lasse; Kosola, Jussi; Pruna, Ricard; Puigdellivol, Jordi; Sarimo, Janne; Niemi, Pekka; Orava, Sakari

    2018-02-01

    As compared with injuries involving muscle only, those involving the central hamstring tendon have a worse prognosis. Limited information is available regarding the surgical treatment of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings. To describe the operative treatment and outcomes of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings among athletes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Eight athletes (6 top level, 2 recreational) with central hamstring tendon injuries underwent magnetic resonance imaging and surgical treatment. The indication for surgery was recurrent (n = 6) or acute (n = 2) central hamstring tendon injury. All patients followed the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol, and return to play was monitored. Magnetic resonance imaging found a central tendon injury in all 3 hamstring muscles (long head of the biceps femoris, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus) with disrupted tendon ends. In acute and recurrent central tendon injuries, full return to play was achieved at 2.5 to 4 months. There were no adverse events during follow-up. Central tendon injuries of the hamstrings can be successfully repaired surgically after acute and recurrent ruptures.

  10. Central Tendon Injuries of Hamstring Muscles: Case Series of Operative Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempainen, Lasse; Kosola, Jussi; Pruna, Ricard; Puigdellivol, Jordi; Sarimo, Janne; Niemi, Pekka; Orava, Sakari

    2018-01-01

    Background: As compared with injuries involving muscle only, those involving the central hamstring tendon have a worse prognosis. Limited information is available regarding the surgical treatment of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings. Purpose: To describe the operative treatment and outcomes of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings among athletes. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Eight athletes (6 top level, 2 recreational) with central hamstring tendon injuries underwent magnetic resonance imaging and surgical treatment. The indication for surgery was recurrent (n = 6) or acute (n = 2) central hamstring tendon injury. All patients followed the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol, and return to play was monitored. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging found a central tendon injury in all 3 hamstring muscles (long head of the biceps femoris, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus) with disrupted tendon ends. In acute and recurrent central tendon injuries, full return to play was achieved at 2.5 to 4 months. There were no adverse events during follow-up. Conclusion: Central tendon injuries of the hamstrings can be successfully repaired surgically after acute and recurrent ruptures. PMID:29479545

  11. The impact of physically demanding work of basketball and volleyball players on the risk for patellar tendinopathy and on work limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, H; Zwerver, J; Kuijer, P P F M; Frings-Dresen, M H W; van den Akker-Scheek, I

    2011-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common injury in jumping athletes. Little is known about work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and related work limitations. The aim of this study was to identify work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and to determine the relation between patellar tendinopathy and work limitations. Basketball and volleyball players between 18 and 35 years were invited to complete an online-questionnaire concerning knee complaints, etiological risk factors for patellar tendinopathy and related work limitations. A total of 1505 subjects were included in the analysis. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy were gender and heavy physically demanding work. The odds for having patellar tendinopathy were significantly higher for heavy physically demanding occupations compared to mentally demanding occupations. 30% of subjects with patellar tendinopathy with a physically demanding job reported to be impaired in their work and 17% reported to be less productive. Basketball and volleyball players with heavy physically demanding work seem to have an increased risk for developing patellar tendinopathy. This finding has important clinical relevance in the treatment of this injury. Working activities should be adjusted in order to reduce the total load on the patellar tendon and help prevention and recovery.

  12. Imaging the infrapatellar tendon in the elite athlete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peace, K.A.L.; Lee, J.C.; Healy, J.

    2006-01-01

    Extensor mechanism injuries constitute a major cause of anterior knee pain in the elite athlete. Sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the imaging methods of choice when assessing the infrapatellar tendon. A comprehensive imaging review of infrapatellar tendon normal anatomy, tendinopathy, and partial/full-thickness tendon tears is provided. The value of imaging the infrapatellar tendon in clinical practice, including whether sonography can predict symptoms in asymptomatic athletes, is discussed. Acute avulsion fractures, including periosteal sleeve avulsion, and chronic avulsion injuries, including Sinding-Larsen-Johansson and Osgood-Schlatter syndromes, are shown. Mimics of infrapatellar tendon pathology, including infrapatellar plica injury, patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome, and Hoffa's syndrome, are illustrated

  13. Achilles Tendonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... almost impossible. Achilles tendonitis is a very common running injury. But it can also affect basketball players, dancers, ... Proximal Biceps Tendonitis Safety Tips: Basketball Safety Tips: Running Repetitive Stress Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Dealing With Sports Injuries ...

  14. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture and Contralateral Patella Tendon Avulsion Post Primary Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extensor mechanism failure secondary to knee replacement could be due to tibial tubercle avulsion, Patellar tendon rupture, patellar fracture or quadriceps tendon rupture. An incidence of Patella tendon rupture of 0.17% and Quadriceps tendon rupture of around 0.1% has been reported after Total knee arthroplasty. These are considered a devastating complication that substantially affects the clinical results and are challenging situations to treat with surgery being the mainstay of the treatment. Case Description: We report here an interesting case of a patellar tendon rupture of one knee and Quadriceps tendon rupture of the contralateral knee following simultaneous bilateral knee replacement in a case of inflammatory arthritis patient. End to end repair for Quadriceps tear and augmentation with Autologous Hamstring tendon graft was done for Patella tendon rupture. OUTCOME: Patient was followed up for a period of 1 year and there was no Extension lag with a flexion of 100 degrees in both the knees. DISCUSSION: The key learning points and important aspects of diagnosing these injuries early and the management techniques are described in this unique case of bilateral extensor mechanism disruption following knee replacements.

  15. Effect of tendon vibration during wide-pulse neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on muscle force production in people with spinal cord injury (SCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkezanian, Vanesa; Newton, Robert U; Trajano, Gabriel S; Vieira, Amilton; Pulverenti, Timothy S; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2018-02-13

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly used in skeletal muscles in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) with the aim of increasing muscle recruitment and thus muscle force production. NMES has been conventionally used in clinical practice as functional electrical stimulation (FES), using low levels of evoked force that cannot optimally stimulate muscular strength and mass improvements, and thus trigger musculoskeletal changes in paralysed muscles. The use of high intensity intermittent NMES training using wide-pulse width and moderate-intensity as a strength training tool could be a promising method to increase muscle force production in people with SCI. However, this type of protocol has not been clinically adopted because it may generate rapid muscle fatigue and thus prevent the performance of repeated high-intensity muscular contractions in paralysed muscles. Moreover, superimposing patellar tendon vibration onto the wide-pulse width NMES has been shown to elicit further increases in impulse or, at least, reduce the rate of fatigue in repeated contractions in able-bodied populations, but there is a lack of evidence to support this argument in people with SCI. Nine people with SCI received two NMES protocols with and without superimposing patellar tendon vibration on different days (i.e. STIM and STIM+vib), which consisted of repeated 30 Hz trains of 58 wide-pulse width (1000 μs) symmetric biphasic pulses (0.033-s inter-pulse interval; 2 s stimulation train; 2-s inter-train interval) being delivered to the dominant quadriceps femoris. Starting torque was 20% of maximal doublet-twitch torque and stimulations continued until torque declined to 50% of the starting torque. Total knee extensor impulse was calculated as the primary outcome variable. Total knee extensor impulse increased in four subjects when patellar tendon vibration was imposed (59.2 ± 15.8%) but decreased in five subjects (- 31.3 ± 25.7%). However, there were no

  16. The effect of a patellar strap on knee joint proprioception in healthy participants and athletes with patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Astrid J; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L; Zwerver, Johannes; van der Worp, Henk

    2016-04-01

    The primary aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of a patellar strap on knee joint proprioception in both healthy participants and in patients with patellar tendinopathy (PT). Secondary aims are to examine whether there is a difference in effectiveness of the use of a patellar strap between participants with low and high proprioceptive acuity and if possible predictors of effectiveness can be determined. Case-control. The threshold to detect passive motion with and without a patellar strap was assessed in 22 healthy participants and 21 unilateral PT patients. The results from the mixed model analysis show that in both groups of participants a small but statistically significant improvement in proprioception was found, primarily in those who had low proprioceptive acuity. A notable finding was that in the symptomatic leg of the PT group no improvement in proprioception by wearing a strap could be determined. Male gender and having fewer symptoms were possible predictors of effectiveness in PT patients. As proprioception plays a role in optimising movements and reducing load to joint-related structures like tendons and ligaments, it is considered an important protection mechanism. Although the improvements in proprioception as a result of wearing the strap are small, it might be that the use of a patellar strap can potentially play a role in injury prevention since poor proprioception can be a risk factor for (re)-injury. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Previously identified patellar tendinopathy risk factors differ between elite and sub-elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, I; Steele, J R; Munro, B J; Brown, N A T

    2015-06-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is the most common knee injury incurred in volleyball, with its prevalence in elite athletes more than three times that of their sub-elite counterparts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patellar tendinopathy risk factors differed between elite and sub-elite male volleyball players. Nine elite and nine sub-elite male volleyball players performed a lateral stop-jump block movement. Maximum vertical jump, training history, muscle extensibility and strength, three-dimensional landing kinematics (250 Hz), along with lower limb neuromuscular activation patterns (1500 Hz), and patellar tendon loading were collected during each trial. Multivariate analyses of variance (P volleyball players. Interventions designed to reduce landing frequency and improve quadriceps extensibility are recommended to reduce patellar tendinopathy prevalence in volleyball players. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The differential effects of leukocyte-containing and pure platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on tendon stem/progenitor cells - implications of PRP application for the clinical treatment of tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yiqin; Zhang, Jianying; Wu, Haishan; Hogan, MaCalus V; Wang, James H-C

    2015-09-15

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is widely used to treat tendon injuries in clinics. These PRP preparations often contain white blood cells or leukocytes, and the precise cellular effects of leukocyte-rich PRP (L-PRP) on tendons are not well defined. Therefore, in this study, we determined the effects of L-PRP on tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs), which play a key role in tendon homeostasis and repair. TSCs isolated from the patellar tendons of rabbits were treated with L-PRP or P-PRP (pure PRP without leukocytes) in vitro, followed by measuring cell proliferation, stem cell marker expression, inflammatory gene expression, and anabolic and catabolic protein expression by using immunostaining, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Cell proliferation was induced by both L-PRP and P-PRP in a dose-dependent manner with maximum proliferation at a 10 % PRP dose. Both PRP treatments also induced differentiation of TSCs into active tenocytes. Nevertheless, the two types of PRP largely differed in several effects exerted on TSCs. L-PRP induced predominantly catabolic and inflammatory changes in differentiated tenocytes; its treatment increased the expression of catabolic marker genes, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-13, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and their respective protein expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2) production. In contrast, P-PRP mainly induced anabolic changes; that is, P-PRP increased the gene expression of anabolic genes, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen types I and III. These findings indicate that, while both L-PRP and P-PRP appear to be "safe" in inducing TSC differentiation into active tenocytes, L-PRP may be detrimental to the healing of injured tendons because it induces catabolic and inflammatory effects on tendon cells and may prolong the effects in healing tendons. On the other hand, when P-PRP is used to

  19. Increased signal intensity at the proximal patellar tendon: correlation between MR imaging and histology in eight cadavers and clinical MR imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Seong Jong; Jin, Wook; Yoon, So Hee; Park, So Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong-Koo [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gou Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Eun; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    We set out to investigate the cause of persistently increased signal intensity (SI) in the posterior portion of the proximal patellar tendon (pPT) on T1-weighted images (T1WI). MR imaging was performed in eight cadavers, followed by gross histological examination. In addition, 84 patients without trauma history or anterior knee pain were included to compare the SI of the PTs. The patients were divided according to their age, sex, and Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grades. The length and thickness of the increased SI portion in the pPT and whole PT (wPT) on T1WI were recorded. Histological specimens demonstrated that the adipose tissue, vessels, and perivascular connective tissue invaginated into the posterior portion of the pPT. This histological anatomy corresponded to the pPT signal change on MR imaging. There was linear and interdigitating increased SI of the pPT in all of the 84 patients (100 %). There were no differences in the lengths and thicknesses of the increased SI portion of pPTs and wPTs according to age, sex, and KL grade (all p > 0.05). The increased SI of the pPT on T1WI and fluid-sensitive MR images results from invaginating fat, vessels, and perivascular connective tissue. It is not pathological, but a normal and common finding. (orig.)

  20. Lacerations to Zones VIII and IX: It Is Not Just a Tendon Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charla R. Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensor tendon injuries are widely believed to be straightforward problems that are relatively simple to manage. However, these injuries can be complex and demand a thorough understanding of anatomy to achieve the best functional outcomes. When lacerations occur in the forearm as in Zones VIII and IX injury, the repair of the extensor tendon and muscle, and posterior interosseous nerve (PIN is often challenging. A review of the literature shows little guidance and attention for these injuries. We present four patients with injuries to Zones VIII and IX as well as a review of surgical technique, postoperative rehabilitation, and pearls that may be of benefit to those managing these injuries.

  1. Extensor Tendon Instability Due to Sagittal Band Injury in a Martial Arts Athlete: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochevar, Andrew; Rayan, Ghazi

    2017-03-01

    A Taekwondo participant sustained a hand injury from punching an opponent that resulted in painful instability of the ring finger extensor digitorum communis tendon due to sagittal band damage. His symptoms resolved after reconstructive surgery on the sagittal band (SB) with stabilization of the extensor tendon over the metacarpophalangeal joint.

  2. Abduction in Proximal Hamstring Tendon Avulsion Injury Mechanism-A Report on 3 Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Made, Anne D.; Peters, Rolf W.; Verheul, Claire; Maas, Mario; Kerkhoffs, Gino M.

    2017-01-01

    Proximal hamstring tendon avulsions are typically sustained during forced hip hyperflexion combined with knee extension. We present 3 cases of athletes with a proximal hamstring tendon avulsion caused by an alternative injury mechanism that also involves a considerable hip abduction component

  3. Ethinyl oestradiol administration in women suppresses synthesis of collagen in tendon in response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Koskinen, Satu O; Petersen, Susanne G

    2008-01-01

    24 h post-exercise through microdialysis catheters placed anterior to the patellar tendon in both legs and subsequently analysed for the amino-terminal propeptide of type I collagen (PINP), a marker of tendon collagen synthesis. To determine the long-term effect of OC usage, patellar tendon cross......-OC 24 h post-exercise is consistent with the hypothesis that oestradiol inhibits exercise-induced collagen synthesis in human tendon. The mechanism behind this is either a direct effect of oestradiol, or an indirect effect via a reduction in levels of free IGF-I. However, the data did not indicate any......Women are at greater risk than men of sustaining certain kinds of injury and diseases of collagen-rich tissues. To determine whether a high level of oestradiol has an acute influence on collagen synthesis in tendons at rest and in response to exercise, one-legged kicking exercise was performed...

  4. A lower limb assessment tool for athletes at risk of developing patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Kerry J; Edwards, Suzi; Drinkwater, Eric J; Bird, Stephen P

    2013-03-01

    Patellar tendon abnormality (PTA) on diagnostic imaging is part of the diagnostic criteria for patellar tendinopathy. PTA and altered landing strategies are primary risk factors that increase the likelihood of asymptomatic athletes developing patellar tendinopathy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the risk factors that are predictors of the presence and severity of a PTA in junior pre-elite athletes. Ten junior pre-elite male basketball athletes with a PTA were matched with 10 athletes with normal patellar tendons. Participants had patellar tendon morphology, Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment (VISA) score, body composition, lower limb flexibility, and maximum vertical jump height measured before performing five successful stop-jump tasks. During each stop-jump task, both two-dimensional and three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces were recorded. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify factors for estimating PTA presence and severity, and discriminate analysis was used to classify PTA presence. Sixty-eight percent of variance for presence of a PTA was accounted for by hip joint range of motion (ROM) and knee joint angle at initial foot-ground contact (IC) during stop-jump task and quadriceps flexibility, whereas hip joint ROM during stop-jump task and VISA score accounted for 62% of variance for PTA severity. Prediction of the presence of a PTA was achieved with 95% accuracy and 95% cross-validation. An easily implemented, reliable, and valid movement screening tool composed of three criteria enables coaches and/or clinicians to predict the presence and severity of a PTA in asymptomatic athletes. This enables identification of asymptomatic athletes at higher risk of developing patellar tendinopathy, which allows the development of effective preventative measures to aid in the reduction of patellar tendinopathy injury prevalence.

  5. Pullout strength of bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft bone plugs: a comparison of cadaver tibia and rigid polyurethane foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan

    2013-09-01

    To compare the load-to-failure pullout strength of bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allografts in human cadaver tibias and rigid polyurethane foam blocks. Twenty BPTB allografts were trimmed creating 25 mm × 10 mm × 10 mm tibial plugs. Ten-millimeter tunnels were drilled in 10 human cadaver tibias and 10 rigid polyurethane foam blocks. The BPTB anterior cruciate ligament allografts were inserted into these tunnels and secured with metal interference screws, with placement of 10 of each type in each material. After preloading (10 N), cyclic loading (500 cycles, 10 to 150 N at 200 mm/min) and load-to-failure testing (200 mm/min) were performed. The endpoints were ultimate failure load, cyclic loading elongation, and failure mode. No difference in ultimate failure load existed between grafts inserted into rigid polyurethane foam blocks (705 N) and those in cadaver tibias (669 N) (P = .69). The mean rigid polyurethane foam block elongation (0.211 mm) was less than that in tibial bone (0.470 mm) (P = .038), with a smaller standard deviation (0.07 mm for foam) than tibial bone (0.34 mm). All BPTB grafts successfully completed 500 cycles. The rigid polyurethane foam block showed less variation in test results than human cadaver tibias. Rigid polyurethane foam blocks provide an acceptable substitute for human cadaver bone tibia for biomechanical testing of BPTB allografts and offer near-equivalent results. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Treatment of peroneal nerve injuries with simultaneous tendon transfer and nerve exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Bryant; Khan, Zubair; Switaj, Paul J; Ochenjele, George; Fuchs, Daniel; Dahl, William; Cederna, Paul; Kung, Theodore A; Kadakia, Anish R

    2014-08-06

    Common peroneal nerve palsy leading to foot drop is difficult to manage and has historically been treated with extended bracing with expectant waiting for return of nerve function. Peroneal nerve exploration has traditionally been avoided except in cases of known traumatic or iatrogenic injury, with tendon transfers being performed in a delayed fashion after exhausting conservative treatment. We present a new strategy for management of foot drop with nerve exploration and concomitant tendon transfer. We retrospectively reviewed a series of 12 patients with peroneal nerve palsies that were treated with tendon transfer from 2005 to 2011. Of these patients, seven were treated with simultaneous peroneal nerve exploration and repair at the time of tendon transfer. Patients with both nerve repair and tendon transfer had superior functional results with active dorsiflexion in all patients, compared to dorsiflexion in 40% of patients treated with tendon transfers alone. Additionally, 57% of patients treated with nerve repair and tendon transfer were able to achieve enough function to return to running, compared to 20% in patients with tendon transfer alone. No patient had full return of native motor function resulting in excessive dorsiflexion strength. The results of our limited case series for this rare condition indicate that simultaneous nerve repair and tendon transfer showed no detrimental results and may provide improved function over tendon transfer alone.

  7. Region-specific mechanical properties of the human patella tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, B T; Aagaard, P; Krogsgaard, M

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the mechanical properties of tendon fascicles from the anterior and posterior human patellar tendon. Collagen fascicles from the anterior and posterior human patellar tendon in healthy young men (mean +/- SD, 29.0 +/- 4.6 yr, n = 6) were tested in a mechanical rig...... portion of the tendon, indicating region-specific material properties....

  8. High-resolution US and MR imaging of peroneal tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Alcala, Jennifer N; Gimber, Lana H; Rieke, Joshua D; Chilvers, Margaret M; Latt, L Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Injuries of the peroneal tendon complex are common and should be considered in every patient who presents with chronic lateral ankle pain. These injuries occur as a result of trauma (including ankle sprains), in tendons with preexisting tendonopathy, and with repetitive microtrauma due to instability. The peroneus brevis and peroneus longus tendons are rarely torn simultaneously. Several anatomic variants, including a flat or convex fibular retromalleolar groove, hypertrophy of the peroneal tubercle at the lateral aspect of the calcaneus, an accessory peroneus quartus muscle, a low-lying peroneus brevis muscle belly, and an os peroneum, may predispose to peroneal tendon injuries. High-resolution 1.5-T and 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with use of dedicated extremity coils and high-resolution ultrasonography (US) with high-frequency linear transducers and dynamic imaging are proved to adequately depict the peroneal tendons for evaluation and can aid the orthopedic surgeon in injury management. An understanding of current treatment approaches for partial- and full-thickness peroneal tendon tears, subluxation and dislocation of these tendons with superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR) injuries, intrasheath subluxations, and peroneal tendonopathy and tenosynovitis can help physicians achieve a favorable outcome. Patients with low functional demands do well with conservative treatment, while those with high functional demands may benefit from surgery if nonsurgical treatment is unsuccessful. Radiologists should recognize the normal anatomy and specific pathologic conditions of the peroneal tendons at US and MR imaging and understand the various treatment options for peroneal tendon and SPR superior peroneal retinaculum injuries. Online supplemental material is available for this article. RSNA, 2015

  9. Extrusion of bone anchor suture following flexor digitorum profundus tendon avulsion injury repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2011-09-01

    Flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) zone I tendon avulsion injury is traditionally repaired with a pullout suture technique. More recently, bone anchor sutures have been used as a viable alternative and have largely replaced areas in hand surgery where pullout suture technique was once required. To date, there have been very few complications reported related to bone anchor suture use in FDP tendon reattachment to the bone. We report a very unusual case of extrusion of bone anchor through the nailbed, 6 years after zone I FDP tendon avulsion injury repair and a brief review of literature.

  10. Acute flexor tendon injury following midshaft radius and ulna fractures in a paediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Williams

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Delayed rupture of the extensor and flexor tendons are recognised complications of distal radius fractures. However, acute flexor tendon rupture in the context of forearm fractures is rare. A twelve-year-old female sustained midshaft fractures of the radius and ulna. Intra-operatively the flexor pollicis longus (FPL was found to be stripped from its musculotendinous junction at the level of the fracture fragment. The ruptured tendon was repaired using a modified Krackow technique at the time of fracture fixation. The repair was protected in plaster of Paris prior to referral to the paediatric hand clinic. The patient made a full recovery. Flexor tendon injury is a rare but potentially devastating consequence of acute forearm fractures. High energy trauma, significant volar angulation of the fracture fragment and clinical signs of flexor tendon injury should raise suspicion of this injury. A high index of suspicion in conjunction with repeat clinical examination of flexor tendon function should be performed before opting for closed management or intramedullary nailing in paediatric patients. Keywords: Acute, Flexor, Tendon, Fracture, Radius, Paediatric

  11. Patellar dislocations in children, adolescents and adults: A comparative MRI study of medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns and trochlear groove anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcarek, Peter; Walde, Tim Alexander; Frosch, Stephan; Schuettrumpf, Jan P.; Wachowski, Martin M.; Stuermer, Klaus M.; Frosch, Karl-Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The first aim was to compare medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns in children and adolescents after first-time lateral patellar dislocations with the injury patterns in adults. The second aim was to evaluate the trochlear groove anatomy at different developmental stages of the growing knee joint. Materials and methods: Knee magnetic resonance (MR) images were collected from 22 patients after first-time patellar dislocations. The patients were aged 14.2 years (a range of 11-15 years). The injury pattern of the medial patellofemoral ligament was analysed, and trochlear dysplasia was evaluated with regard to sulcus angle, trochlear depth and trochlear asymmetry. The control data consisted of MR images from 21 adult patients who were treated for first-time lateral patellar dislocation. Results: After patellar dislocation, injury to the medial patellofemoral ligament was found in 90.2% of the children and in 100% of the adult patients. Injury patterns of the medial patellofemoral ligament were similar between the study group and the control group with regard to injury at the patellar attachment site (Type I), to the midsubstance (Type II) and to injury at the femoral origin (Type III) (all p > 0.05). Combined lesions (Type IV) were significantly less frequently observed in adults when compared to the study group (p = 0.02). The magnitude of trochlear dysplasia was similar in children, adolescents and adults with regard to all three of the measured parameter-values (all p > 0.05). In addition, the articular cartilage had a significant effect on the distal femur geometry in both paediatrics and adults. Conclusion: First, the data from our study indicated that the paediatric medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns, as seen on MR images, were similar to those in adults. Second, the trochlear groove anatomy and the magnitude of trochlear dysplasia, respectively, did not differ between adults and paediatrics with patellar instability. Thus

  12. Patellar dislocations in children, adolescents and adults: A comparative MRI study of medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns and trochlear groove anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcarek, Peter, E-mail: peter.balcarek@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Medicine, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Walde, Tim Alexander; Frosch, Stephan; Schuettrumpf, Jan P.; Wachowski, Martin M.; Stuermer, Klaus M. [Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Medicine, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Frosch, Karl-Heinz [Department of Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Asklepios Clinic St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The first aim was to compare medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns in children and adolescents after first-time lateral patellar dislocations with the injury patterns in adults. The second aim was to evaluate the trochlear groove anatomy at different developmental stages of the growing knee joint. Materials and methods: Knee magnetic resonance (MR) images were collected from 22 patients after first-time patellar dislocations. The patients were aged 14.2 years (a range of 11-15 years). The injury pattern of the medial patellofemoral ligament was analysed, and trochlear dysplasia was evaluated with regard to sulcus angle, trochlear depth and trochlear asymmetry. The control data consisted of MR images from 21 adult patients who were treated for first-time lateral patellar dislocation. Results: After patellar dislocation, injury to the medial patellofemoral ligament was found in 90.2% of the children and in 100% of the adult patients. Injury patterns of the medial patellofemoral ligament were similar between the study group and the control group with regard to injury at the patellar attachment site (Type I), to the midsubstance (Type II) and to injury at the femoral origin (Type III) (all p > 0.05). Combined lesions (Type IV) were significantly less frequently observed in adults when compared to the study group (p = 0.02). The magnitude of trochlear dysplasia was similar in children, adolescents and adults with regard to all three of the measured parameter-values (all p > 0.05). In addition, the articular cartilage had a significant effect on the distal femur geometry in both paediatrics and adults. Conclusion: First, the data from our study indicated that the paediatric medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns, as seen on MR images, were similar to those in adults. Second, the trochlear groove anatomy and the magnitude of trochlear dysplasia, respectively, did not differ between adults and paediatrics with patellar instability. Thus

  13. Tendinography for diagnosing injuries to tendons and ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grevsten, S.; Eriksson, K.

    1979-01-01

    A radiographic method of tendinography is described. In rabbits no inflammatory reaction in the Achilles tendon was observed 12 to 15 days after injection of contrast medium. Effects of examination of two healthy subjects and a patient with a traumatic condition are described. Suitable amounts and concentrations of contrast medium for examinations of Achilies tendon and cruciate ligaments are discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Intramuscular tendon involvement on MRI has limited value for predicting time to return to play following acute hamstring injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Made, Anne D; Almusa, Emad; Whiteley, Rod; Hamilton, Bruce; Eirale, Cristiano; van Hellemondt, Frank; Tol, Johannes L

    2018-01-01

    Hamstring injury with intramuscular tendon involvement is regarded as a serious injury with a delay in return to play (RTP) of more than 50 days and reinjury rates up to 63%. However, this reputation is based on retrospective case series with high risk of bias. Determine whether intramuscular tendon involvement is associated with delayed RTP and elevated rates of reinjury. MRI of male athletes with an acute hamstring injury was obtained within 5 days of injury. Evaluation included standardised MRI scoring and scoring of intramuscular tendon involvement. Time to RTP and reinjury rate were prospectively recorded. Out of 70 included participants, intramuscular tendon disruption was present in 29 (41.4%) injuries. Injuries without intramuscular tendon disruption had a mean time to RTP of 22.2±7.4 days. Injuries with Injuries with full-thickness disruption took longer to RTP compared with injuries without disruption (p=0.025). Longitudinal intramuscular tendon disruption was not significantly associated with time to RTP. Waviness was present in 17 (24.3%) injuries. Mean time to RTP for injuries without and with waviness was 22.6±7.5 and 30.2±10.8 days (p=0.014). There were 11 (15.7%) reinjuries within 12 months, five (17.2%) in the group with intramuscular tendon disruption and six (14.6%) in the group without intramuscular tendon disruption. Time to RTP for injuries with full-thickness disruption of the intramuscular tendon and waviness is significantly longer (by slightly more than 1 week) compared with injuries without intramuscular tendon involvement. However, due to the considerable overlap in time to RTP between groups with and without intramuscular tendon involvement, its clinical significance for the individual athlete is limited. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. COMPARISON OF FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITIES ON STRUCTURAL CHANGES OF THE INFERIOR PATELLAR POLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmann, Harvey; Stalcup, Patrick; DiTommaso, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Background It is well known that eccentric and concentric exercise produce varied amounts of stress on the connective tissues. Diagnostic ultrasound has been used to measure these structural changes by observing fascicle length, angle, and thickness; however, there is a lack of evidence comparing the structural changes as it relates to eccentric, concentric, and stretching protocols. Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of static stretching, eccentric, concentric, and a combination of eccentric/concentric exercises on structural changes of the muscle tendon unit at the inferior patellar pole utilizing the diagnostic ultrasound. Study Design A repeated measures 2 × 4 within factorial study design with repeated measures on both factors was used to determine the differences in patellar tendon thickness within and between groups. Methods Forty-seven healthy subjects were screened for any lower extremity deficits or orthopaedic pathology. Forty-four (N=44) subjects completed all four protocols; the attrition was due to injuries to the lower extremity, occurring unrelated to the study. A baseline measurement of the anterior inferior patellar tendon was performed with the diagnostic ultrasound prior to each participant completing one of the four interventions per week over a four-week period. Interventions completed by each participant included static stretching, concentric, eccentric, and combined concentric and eccentric exercises. Immediately following each intervention, a post-intervention inferior patellar tendon measurement was recorded using the diagnostic ultrasound. Results Significant differences in anterior to posterior tendon thickness of the inferior patellar tendon were observed between pre (4.983 ± 0.041mm) and post (5.198 ± 0.055mm) measurements (peffect of time. However, no differences in tendon thickness were noted comparing each intervention to one another (p=0.351). Conclusion Differences in tendon thickness

  16. Sports Injury-Related Fingers and Thumb Deformity Due to Tendon or Ligament Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Jie Bai

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Sports injury-related fingers and thumb deformity are relatively common. MRI is an accurate method for evaluation of the anatomy and pathologic conditions of the fingers and thumb. It is a useful tool for accurate diagnosis of the sports-related ligaments and tendons injuries in hand.

  17. Infra Patellar Branch of Saphenous Nerve Injury during Hamstring Graft Harvest: Vertical versus Oblique Incisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, A; Kayasth, N; Shrestha, S; Kc, B R

    2016-09-01

    Autologous hamstring grafts are commonly used for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The injury of infrapatellar branch of saphenous nerve is one of the concerns leading to various pattern of sensory loss in the operated leg. An oblique incision to harvest the graft has been reported to be better than the vertical one.The aim of this study was to compare the incidence, recovery of nerve injury and final outcome in patients with hamstring harvest of vertical or oblique incision. A total of 146 patients who underwent hamstring graft harvest for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, were included in the study. They were randomized into two (Vertical and Oblique) groups as per the incisions used. The sensory loss along the Infra Patellar Branch of Saphenous Nerve was documented on 3rd day. Recovery of the nerve injury was monitoredat three, six and 12 months follow-ups. At final follow up Tegner Lysholm score and scale was recorded to compare between two groups. The incidence of infrapatellar branch of saphenous nerve injury was 25% in vertical group and 16.36% in oblique group. Recovery of nerve injury started earlier in oblique group compared to vertical group. The mean TegnerLyshom score was not significantly different in both the groups. Oblique incision to harvest hamstring graft has lesser incidence of infrapatellar branch of saphenous nerve injury, recovers earlier and does not have any adverse effect on final outcome compared to the vertical incision.

  18. Sports Injury-Related Fingers and Thumb Deformity Due to Tendon or Ligament Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Rong-Jie; Zhang, Hui-Bo; Zhan, Hui-Li; Qian, Zhan-Hua; Wang, Nai-Li; Liu, Yue; Li, Wen-Ting; Yin, Yu-Ming

    2018-05-05

    Hand injuries are very common in sports, such as skiing and ball sports. One of the major reasons causing hand and finger deformity is due to ligament and tendon injury. The aim of this study was to investigate if the high-resolution 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can demonstrate the complex anatomy of the fingers and thumb, especially the tendons and ligaments, and provide the accurate diagnosis of clinically important fingers and thumbs deformity due to ligamentous and tendinous injuries during sport activities. Sixteen fresh un-embalmed cadaveric hands were harvested from eight cadavers. A total of 20 healthy volunteers' hands and 44 patients with fingers or thumb deformity due to sports-related injuries were included in this study. All subjects had MR examination with T1-weighted images and proton density-weighted imaging with fat suppression (PD FS) in axial, coronal, and sagittal plane, respectively. Subsequently, all 16 cadaveric hands were sliced into 2-mm thick slab with a band saw (six in coronal plane, six in sagittal plane, and four in axial plane). The correlation of anatomic sections and the MRI characteristics of tendons of fingers and the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) at the metacarpal phalangeal joint (MCPJ) of thumb between 20 healthy volunteers and 44 patients (confirmed by surgery) were analyzed. The normal ligaments and tendons in 16 cadaveric hands and 20 volunteers' hands showed uniform low-signal intensity on all the sequences of the MRI. Among 44 patients with tendinous and ligamentous injuries in the fingers or thumb, 12 cases with UCL injury at MCPJ of the thumb (Stener lesion = 8 and non-Stener lesion = 4), 6 cases with the central slip injury, 12 cases with terminal tendon injury, and 14 cases with flexor digitorum profundus injury. The ligaments and tendons disruption manifested as increased signal intensity and poor definition, discontinuity, and heterogeneous signal intensity of the involved ligaments and tendons. Sports

  19. A rare knee extensor mechanism injury: Vastus intermedius tendon rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Cetinkaya

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: We report the first case of isolated rupture of the vastus intermedius tendon in the literature and we claim that disorder may be succesfully treated with conservative treatment and adequate physiotheraphy.

  20. Rat rotator cuff muscle responds differently from hindlimb muscle to a combined tendon-nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael R; Ravishankar, Bharat; Laron, Dominique; Kim, Hubert T; Liu, Xuhui; Feeley, Brian T

    2015-07-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries seen by orthopaedic surgeons. Clinically, massive cuff tears lead to unique pathophysiological changes in rotator cuff muscle, including atrophy, and massive fatty infiltration, which are rarely seen in other skeletal muscles. Studies in a rodent model for RCT have demonstrated that these histologic findings are accompanied by activation of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways following combined tendon-nerve injury. The purpose of this study was to compare the histologic and molecular features of rotator cuff muscle and gastrocnemius muscle--a major hindlimb muscle, following combined tendon-nerve injury. Six weeks after injury, the rat gastrocnemius did not exhibit notable fatty infiltration compared to the rotator cuff. Likewise, the adipogenic markers SREBP-1 and PPARγ as well as the TGF-β canonical pathway were upregulated in the rotator cuff, but not the gastrocnemius. Our study suggests that the rat rotator cuff and hindlimb muscles differ significantly in their response to a combined tendon-nerve injury. Clinically, these findings highlight the unique response of the rotator cuff to injury, and may begin to explain the poor outcomes of massive RCTs compared to other muscle-tendon injuries. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Suture anchor tenodesis in repair of distal Achilles tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçoğlu, Onder; Türker, Mehmet; Yildız, Fatih; Akalan, Ekin; Temelli, Yener

    2014-01-01

    Distal Achilles tendon avulsions are in the form of either bony and nonbony avulsion of Achilles tendon from its calcaneal insertion. Four patients with distal Achilles tendon avulsions or ruptures which were treated with tendon to bone repair using suture anchors are presented here. Operated leg was immobilized in above-knee cast for 4 weeks while the patient walked non-weight-bearing. Then, cast was changed to below knee, and full weight-bearing was allowed. Patients underwent gait analysis minimum at first postoperative year. Mean American Orthopedics Foot Ankle Society ankle/hindfoot score of patients at last visit was 88.75 (range 85-100), and Achilles tendon total rupture score was 77.75 (range 58-87). Mean passive dorsiflexion of injured ankles (14° ± 5°) was lower than uninjured ankles (23° ± 9°). All the kinematic parameters of gait analysis were comparable to the uninjured side. Maximum plantar flexion power of injured ankle was 1.40 W/kg, and this was significantly lower than the contralateral side value 2.38 W/kg; (P = 0.0143). There were no visually altered gait or problems in daily life. Suture anchor tenodesis technique of distal Achilles tendon avulsions was successful in achieving durable osteotendinous repairs.

  2. Sonoelastography can be used to monitor the restoration of Achilles tendon elasticity after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehmert, S; Jung, E M; Kügler, T; Klein, S; Gehmert, S; Zeitler, K; Loibl, M; Prantl, L

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate an ultrasound approach for depicting elastic recovery after stem cell application on injured Achilles tendons. A rabbit Achilles tendon injury model was used and randomized hind limbs received an extracellular matrix either with autologous mesenchymal stem cells (group 2, n = 6) or without (group 3, n = 6). The cells were harvested from the rabbits' nuchal fat body. Untreated Achilles tendons (group 1, n = 6) served as controls. Specimens were harvested after 8 weeks and analyzed longitudinally for elasticity using a high resolution 6-15 MHz matrix linear probe. For each tendon, real-time color-coded sonoelastography sequences were recorded for 20 seconds and 10 color histogram frames were obtained. Defined regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on the injury (n = 3) and on the adjacent uninjured tendon tissue (n = 3). In total, 180 measurements were obtained for semi-quantitative analysis. Repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated a higher elasticity for the stem cell-seeded matrix (group 2) in comparison to the unseeded matrix (group 3) (p tendon tissue treated with stem cell-seeded matrix (group 2) and the uninjured Achilles tendons (group 1) (p > 0.05). Moreover, no differences were found between the measurements at different points in time (p > 0.05). Our results indicate that autologous mesenchymal stem cell application successfully restores the mechanical properties of injured tendon tissue. Furthermore, sonoelastography makes it possible to monitor the elasticity of injured Achilles tendons. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells to treat Achilles tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, M H C; Oliveira, R J; Eça, L P M; Pereira, I S O; Hermeto, L C; Matuo, R; Fernandes, W S; Silva, R A; Antoniolli, A C M B

    2014-12-12

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon diminishes quality of life. The gold-standard therapy is a surgical suture, but this presents complications, including wound formation and inflammation. These complications spurred evaluation of the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue. New Zealand rabbits were divided into 6 groups (three treatments with two time points each) evaluated at either 14 or 28 days after surgery: cross section of the Achilles tendon (CSAT); CSAT + Suture; and CSAT + MSC. A comparison between all groups at both time points showed a statistically significant increase in capillaries and in the structural organization of collagen in the healed tendon in the CSAT + Suture and CSAT + MSC groups at the 14-day assessment. Comparison between the two time points within the same group showed a statistically significant decrease in the inflammatory process and an increase in the structural organization of collagen in the CSAT and CSAT + MSC groups. A study of the genomic integrity of the cells suggested a linear correlation between an increase of injuries and culture time. Thus, MSC transplantation is a good alternative for treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures because it may be conducted without surgery and tendon suture and, therefore, has no risk of adverse effects resulting from the surgical wound or inflammation caused by nonabsorbable sutures. Furthermore, this alternative treatment exhibits a better capacity for wound healing and maintaining the original tendon architecture, depending on the arrangement of the collagen fibers, and has important therapeutic potential.

  4. Towards a staged evidence-based approach for the treatment of tendon injuries in the horse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, G.

    2009-01-01

    Healing of tendon lesions, a common disorder in the equine species, is slow and often inadequate because the resulting scar tissue cannot meet the functional demands posed by the everyday athletic activity of many horses, making re-injury the most common and often fatal complication after initial

  5. [Evaluation of early physiotherapy in patients after surgical treatment of cruciate ligament injury by bone-tendon-bone method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupiński, Kamil; Krekora, Katarzyna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most important structures of the knee joint. It has a stabilizing function and causes sliding movement between the articular surfaces. Most frequently there comes to the anterior cruciate ligament injury during practicing sports such as skiing, football, sports which require sudden turns and those which are associated with jumps for height like basketball and volleyball. The aim of study was to evaluate of the outcomes of complex physiotherapy after reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament by bone -tendon-bone (BTB) method. The study involved 41 patients, 8 women and 33 men, aged 20 to 45 years, body height 1.60-1.90 cm and body weight 50-100 kg. The patients were divided into two groups. Group I included 26 patients (3 women and 23 men) after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. Group II--control-group included 15 patients (5 women and 10 men) after ACL injury but not subjected to the ligament reconstruction. The patients from both groups underwent rehabilitation according to the same rehabilitation program suggested by the Medical Magnus Clinic in Lodz, which consisted in performing daily exercises in open and closed kinetic chains. All group I and II patients were examined three times: after surgery (before the start of the rehabilitation), in the sixth week of rehabilitation and 12 weeks afterwards. The clinical examination included: measurement of the range of movement in the knee joint, the measurement of musculoskeletal strength with Lovett scale, knee pain assessment using Visual Analog Scale (VAS), transpatellar anthropometric measurement of the knee joint, linear measurements of the thigh and shin (at two points: 5 and 10 cm above the patellar apex and at two points: 5 and 10 cm below the patellar base). Introduction of early highly specialized physiotherapy has been demonstrated to contribute to the improvement of the rehabilitation outcomes and to the shortening of the therapy. A statistically significant

  6. Doppler ultrasonography of the anterior knee tendons in elite badminton players: colour fraction before and after match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, M J; Torp-Pedersen, S; Boesen, M I; Holm, C C; Bliddal, H

    2010-02-01

    Anterior knee tendon problems are seldom reported in badminton players although the game is obviously stressful to the lower extremities. Painful anterior knee tendons are common among elite badminton players. The anterior knee tendons exhibit colour Doppler activity. This activity increases after a match. Painful tendons have more Doppler activity than tendons without pain. Cohort study. 72 elite badminton players were interviewed about training, pain and injuries. The participants were scanned with high-end ultrasound equipment. Colour Doppler was used to examine the tendons of 64 players before a match and 46 players after a match. Intratendinous colour Doppler flow was measured as colour fraction (CF). The tendon complex was divided into three loci: the quadriceps tendon, the proximal patellar tendon and the insertion on the tibial tuberosity. Interview: Of the 72 players, 62 players had problems with 86 tendons in the lower extremity. Of these 86 tendons, 48 were the anterior knee tendons. Ultrasound: At baseline, the majority of players (87%) had colour Doppler flow in at least one scanning position. After a match, the percentage of the knee complexes involved did not change. CF increased significantly in the dominant leg at the tibial tuberosity; single players had a significantly higher CF after a match at the tibial tuberosity and in the patellar tendon both before and after a match. Painful tendons had the highest colour Doppler activity. Most elite badminton players had pain in the anterior knee tendons and intratendinous Doppler activity both before and after match. High levels of Doppler activity were associated with self-reported ongoing pain.

  7. Effects of In-Season Inertial Resistance Training With Eccentric Overload in a Sports Population at Risk for Patellar Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gual, Gabriel; Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe, Azahara; Romero-Rodríguez, Daniel; Tesch, Per A

    2016-07-01

    Gual, G, Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe, A, Romero-Rodríguez, D, and Tesch, PA. Effects of in-season inertial resistance training with eccentric overload in a sports population at risk for patellar tendinopathy. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1834-1842, 2016-Volleyball and basketball players can be considered as a population at risk for patellar tendinopathy. Given the paradox that eccentric training elicits therapeutic benefits yet might provoke such injury, we investigated the influence of a weekly bout of inertial squat resistance exercise offering eccentric overload on lower limb muscle power and patellar tendon complaints. Players of 8 (4 basketball and 4 volleyball) teams (38 women and 43 men) were randomly assigned to either the intervention (IG) or control (CG) group. Although IG and CG maintained scheduled in-season training routines over 24 weeks, IG, in addition, performed 1 weekly session of eccentric overload by 4 sets of 8 repetitions of the squat using flywheel inertial resistance. Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment patellar tendinopathy questionnaire (VISA-p), vertical countermovement jump, and squat power, both concentric (Squat-Con) and eccentric (Squat-Ecc), tests were performed before (T1), during (T2), and after (T3) the 24 weeks of intervention. Neither group suffered from patellar tendinopathy during the study period. VISA-p displayed no differences across groups at any measurement period. Countermovement jump scores significantly (p ≤ 0.05) differed between groups in favor of the IG. Both Squat-Con and Squat-Ecc mean scores from the IG were significantly (p training bout to a regular basketball and volleyball exercise routine enhances lower limb muscle power without triggering patellar tendon complaints. Future studies, using the current exercise paradigm, aim to explore its efficacy to prevent or combat patellar tendinopathy in sports calling for frequent explosive jumps.

  8. Proteomic analysis reveals age-related changes in tendon matrix composition, with age- and injury-specific matrix fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peffers, Mandy J; Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Collins, John A; Eong, Robin; Wei, Timothy K J; Screen, Hazel R C; Clegg, Peter D

    2014-09-12

    Energy storing tendons, such as the human Achilles and equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), are highly prone to injury, the incidence of which increases with aging. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that result in increased injury in aged tendons are not well established but are thought to result in altered matrix turnover. However, little attempt has been made to fully characterize the tendon proteome nor determine how the abundance of specific tendon proteins changes with aging and/or injury. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess the protein profile of normal SDFTs from young and old horses using label-free relative quantification to identify differentially abundant proteins and peptide fragments between age groups. The protein profile of injured SDFTs from young and old horses was also assessed. The results demonstrate distinct proteomic profiles in young and old tendon, with alterations in the levels of proteins involved in matrix organization and regulation of cell tension. Furthermore, we identified several new peptide fragments (neopeptides) present in aged tendons, suggesting that there are age-specific cleavage patterns within the SDFT. Proteomic profile also differed between young and old injured tendon, with a greater number of neopeptides identified in young injured tendon. This study has increased the knowledge of molecular events associated with tendon aging and injury, suggesting that maintenance and repair of tendon tissue may be reduced in aged individuals and may help to explain why the risk of injury increases with aging. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. MRI after patellar dislocation. Assessment of risk factors and injury to the joint; MRT nach Patellaluxation. Quantifizierung der Risikofaktoren und Beschreibung der Folgeschaeden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederichs, G. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany). Radiologie; Scheffler, S. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany). Zentrum fuer Muskuloskeletale Chirurgie; Chirurgisch Orthopaedischer PraxisVerbund, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Patellar dislocation is the lateral displacement of the patella from the femoral trochlea. Affected individuals typically have underlying anatomic risk factors of variable magnitude, which, in conjunction with leg rotation, cause the event. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits straightforward diagnosis of the typical features of recent patellar dislocation: contusion edema of the inferomedial patella and the lateral femoral condyle as well as rupture of the medial patellofemoral ligament. In case of concomitant osteochondral injury, early surgical refixation may be indicated, depending on the size. After a first dislocation, which can damage the capsuloligamentous stabilizers, subjects may sustain further dislocations or even develop chronic patellofemoral instability, depending on the presence and severity of anatomic variants. A wide range of conservative and surgical treatments are available. While a first patellar dislocation is often treated conservatively, surgical strategies after a second dislocation depend on the pattern of injury and the severity of underlying anatomic risk factors. The most relevant predisposing variants are trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, and an abnormal tibial tubercle to trochlear groove distance (TT-TG). The radiologist's report should give a quantitative estimate of both the injuries resulting from dislocation and the underlying anatomic risk factors. An accurate characterization of the individual pathomechanism is crucial for tailoring treatment. (orig.)

  10. Patella tendon injuries secondary to cement spacers used at first-stage revision of infected total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasim S Khan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a series of three patients who sustained patella tendon injuries in infected TKAs following the use of a static cement spacer at first-stage knee revision. The patella tendon injuries resulted in significant compromise to wound healing and knee stability requiring multiple surgeries. The mid-term function was poor with an Oxford score at 24 months ranging from 12-20. Based on our experience, we advise caution in the use of static cement spacer blocks. If they are to be used, we recommend that they should be keyed in the bone to prevent patella tendon injuries.

  11. Achilles tendon injuries in elite athletes: lessons in pathophysiology from their equine counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson-Kane, Janet C; Rich, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) injury in equine athletes is one of the most well-accepted, scientifically supported companion animal models of human disease (i.e., exercise-induced Achilles tendon [AT] injury). The SDFT and AT are functionally and clinically equivalent (and important) energy-storing structures for which no equally appropriate rodent, rabbit, or other analogues exist. Access to equine tissues has facilitated significant advances in knowledge of tendon maturation and aging, determination of specific exercise effects (including early life), and definition of some of the earliest stages of subclinical pathology. Access to human surgical biopsies has provided complementary information on more advanced phases of disease. Importantly, equine SDFT injuries are only a model for acute ruptures in athletes, not the entire spectrum of human tendonopathy (including chronic tendon pain). In both, pathology begins with a potentially prolonged phase of accumulation of (subclinical) microdamage. Recent work has revealed remarkably similar genetic risk factors, including further evidence that tenocyte dysfunction plays an active role. Mice are convenient but not necessarily accurate models for multiple diseases, particularly at the cellular level. Mechanistic studies, including tendon cell responses to combinations of exercise-associated stresses, require a more thorough investigation of cross-species conservation of key stress pathway auditors. Molecular evidence has provided some context for the poor performance of mouse models; equines may provide better systems at this level. The use of horses may be additionally justifiable based on comparable species longevity, lifestyle factors, and selection pressure by similar infectious agents (e.g., herpesviruses) on general cell stress pathway evolution. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions

  12. Postoperative US of leg tendon reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draghi, F.; Calliada, F.; Fulle, I.; Madonia, L.; Bottinelli, O.; Campani, R.

    1999-01-01

    The role of ultrasound (US) in the postoperative assessment of tendon reconstruction is not clearly defined and there is non systematic arrangement of US patterns. The authors examined 34 patients submitted to surgery or conservative treatment for total/partial tear or musculotendinous detachment of patellar or Achilles tendon in the last 5 years. All patients underwent physical and US examinations. The surgical tendon exhibited the same US patterns in 23/28 patients: it was markedly enlarged (three-/fourfold the normal diameter) and more rounded, with inhomogeneous and hypoechoic appearance not only at the tear/surgical site but also above and below it, for some cm. Small hyperechoic images, mainly dots, were seen in 19 cases, which were referable to small calcifications and stitches. More and larger calcifications were found in 8 patients, where they were associated with anechoic degeneration areas. Color Doppler US showed moderate or strong hypervascularization around the tear in the first months post injury. US patterns did not correlate with physical findings, but color Doppler patterns did. In 6 cases of musculotendinous detachment submitted to conservative treatment, US showed enlargement and hypoechogenicity in the injury site only, with no involvement of the remaining tendon. US was also used to time and guide drainage of perilesional hematomas, which were often quite large. US is the method of choice in the postoperative follow-up of tendon tears and musculotendinous detachments because it shows abnormal signs which are missed at clinics and provides additional information needed for treatment planning [it

  13. Changes in tendon spatial frequency parameters with loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Stephen J; Engel, Aaron J; Bashford, Gregory R

    2017-05-24

    To examine and compare the loading related changes in micro-morphology of the patellar tendon. Fifteen healthy young males (age 19±3yrs, body mass 83±5kg) were utilised in a within subjects matched pairs design. B mode ultrasound images were taken in the sagittal plane of the patellar tendon at rest with the knee at 90° flexion. Repeat images were taken whilst the subjects were carrying out maximal voluntary isometric contractions. Spatial frequency parameters related to the tendon morphology were determined within regions of interest (ROI) from the B mode images at rest and during isometric contractions. A number of spatial parameters were observed to be significantly different between resting and contracted images (Peak spatial frequency radius (PSFR), axis ratio, spatial Q-factor, PSFR amplitude ratio, and the sum). These spatial frequency parameters were indicative of acute alterations in the tendon micro-morphology with loading. Acute loading modifies the micro-morphology of the tendon, as observed via spatial frequency analysis. Further research is warranted to explore its utility with regard to different loading induced micro-morphological alterations, as these could give valuable insight not only to aid strengthening of this tissue but also optimization of recovery from injury and treatment of conditions such as tendinopathies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rupture Following Biceps-to-Triceps Tendon Transfer in Adolescents and Young Adults With Spinal Cord Injury:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenda, Lisa A.; Rutter, Laure; Curran, Kimberly; Kozin, Scott H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tendon transfer surgery can restore elbow extension in approximately 70% of persons with tetraplegia and often results in antigravity elbow extension strength. However, we have noted an almost 15% rupture/attenuation rate. Objective: This investigation was conducted to analyze potential causes in adolescents/young adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) who experienced tendon rupture or attenuation after biceps-to-triceps transfer. Methods: Medical charts of young adults with SCI who underwent biceps-to-triceps transfer and experienced tendon rupture or attenuation were reviewed. Data collected by retrospective chart review included general demographics, surgical procedure(s), use and duration of antibiotic treatment, time from tendon transfer surgery to rupture/attenuation, and method of diagnosis. Results: Twelve subjects with tetraplegia (mean age, 19 years) who underwent biceps-to-triceps reconstruction with subsequent tendon rupture or attenuation were evaluated. Mean age at time of tendon transfer was 18 years (range, 14-21 years). A fluoroquinolone was prescribed for 42% (n=5) of subjects. Tendon rupture was noted in 67% (n=8), and attenuation was noted in 33% (n=4). Average length of time from surgery to tendon rupture/attenuation was 5.7 months (range, 3-10 months). Conclusion: Potential contributing causes of tendon rupture/attenuation after transfer include surgical technique, rehabilitation, co-contraction of the transfer, poor patient compliance, and medications. In this cohort, 5 subjects were prescribed fluoroquinolones that have a US Food and Drug Administration black box concerning tendon ruptures. Currently, all candidates for upper extremity tendon transfer reconstruction are counseled on the effects of fluoroquinolones and the potential risk for tendon rupture. PMID:23459326

  15. Imaging patellar complications after knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melloni, Pietro; Valls, Rafael; Veintemillas, Maite

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe complications affecting the patella in patients with total or partial knee arthroplasty. We respectively analysed plain-film radiographs, as well as ultrasound images when acquired, in a consecutive series of 1272 patients. The mean interval from knee replacement to patellar complications was 5 years and 7 months (range, 5 months to 14 years). The complications described include fracture, instability, dislocation or luxation, necrosis of the patella, infection of the patella, erosion of the patella, patellar impingement on the prosthesis and patellar or quadricipital tendon tear. We discuss the pathological imaging findings in the patella and their differential diagnosis after knee arthroplasty. Patellar complications after knee arthroplasty are uncommon but often potentially serious

  16. Imaging patellar complications after knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melloni, Pietro [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)], E-mail: pmelloni@cspt.es; Valls, Rafael; Veintemillas, Maite [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe complications affecting the patella in patients with total or partial knee arthroplasty. We respectively analysed plain-film radiographs, as well as ultrasound images when acquired, in a consecutive series of 1272 patients. The mean interval from knee replacement to patellar complications was 5 years and 7 months (range, 5 months to 14 years). The complications described include fracture, instability, dislocation or luxation, necrosis of the patella, infection of the patella, erosion of the patella, patellar impingement on the prosthesis and patellar or quadricipital tendon tear. We discuss the pathological imaging findings in the patella and their differential diagnosis after knee arthroplasty. Patellar complications after knee arthroplasty are uncommon but often potentially serious.

  17. Are unilateral and bilateral patellar tendinopathy distinguished by differences in anthropometry, body composition, or muscle strength in elite female basketball players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, J E; Cook, J L; Bass, S L; Austen, S; Kiss, Z S

    2004-10-01

    Overuse injury to the patellar tendon (patellar tendinopathy) is a major reason for interrupted training and competition for elite athletes. In both sexes, the prevalence of unilateral and bilateral tendinopathy has been shown to differ. It has been proposed that bilateral pathology may have a different aetiology from unilateral pathology. Investigation of risk factors that may be unique to unilateral and bilateral patellar tendinopathy in female athletes may reveal insights into the aetiology of this condition. To examine whether anthropometry, body composition, or muscle strength distinguished elite female basketball players with unilateral or bilateral patellar tendinopathy. Body composition, anthropometry, and muscle strength were compared in elite female basketball players with unilateral (n = 8), bilateral (n = 7), or no (n = 24) patellar tendinopathy. Body composition was analysed using a dual energy x ray absorptiometer. Anthropometric measures were assessed using standard techniques. Knee extensor strength was measured at 180 degrees /s using an isokinetic dynamometer. z scores were calculated for the unilateral and bilateral groups (using the no tendinopathy group as controls). z scores were tested against zero. The tibia length to stature ratio was approximately 1.3 (1.3) SDs above zero in both the affected and non-affected legs in the unilateral group (ppatellar tendinopathy has identifiable risk factors whereas bilateral patellar tendinopathy may not. This suggests that the aetiology of these conditions may be different. However, interpretation must respect the limitation of small subject numbers.

  18. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Using the Hamstring Tendon for Patellofemoral Joint Instability in an 81-Year-Old Female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsuneari; Takeshita, Katsushi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic patellofemoral instability occurs mainly in adolescent females and can also be induced by medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) injury. There are no case reports of MPFL reconstruction for chronic patellofemoral instability due to MPFL injury in aged populations. 81-year-old female presented with left knee pain, giving way, and patellar instability while climbing stairs, which continued for 18 months. Patellar apprehension test was positive, and roentgenogram showed lateral patellar subluxation. Conservative therapy was not successful; hence, we performed a lateral release and MPFL reconstruction surgery. After arthroscopic lateral release, the hamstring tendon was harvested, and a graft composite made of doubled hamstring tendon and polyester tape with a suspensory fixation device was prepared. Then, a femoral bone tunnel was constructed in a socket shape at the anatomical footprint of the MPFL. The graft was passed through the femoral tunnel, and free ends of the graft composite were sutured to the periosteum of the patella, using two suture anchors at 60° of knee flexion with patellar reduction. Physiotherapy was gradually started using a patella-stabilizing orthosis on the first postoperative day. Her Kujala score improved from 66 to 97 points, and Barthel index score improved from 70 to 100 points at 1 year after surgery. She neither developed patellofemoral joint OA nor had any recurrence of symptoms at the 5-year postoperative follow up. MPFL reconstruction using the hamstring tendon is an effective procedure for patients with chronic patellofemoral instability even after the age of 80 years.

  19. Patellar Tendinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Aaron; Watson, Jonathan N.; Hutchinson, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patellar tendinopathy is a common condition. There are a wide variety of treatment options available, the majority of which are nonoperative. No consensus exists on the optimal method of treatment. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed spanning 1962-2014. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The majority of cases resolve with nonoperative therapy: rest, physical therapy with eccentric exercises, cryotherapy, anti-inflammatories, corticosteroid injections, extrac...

  20. Early integration of a bone plug in the femoral tunnel in rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft: a prospective computed tomography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Shino, Konsei; Nakagawa, Shigeto; Nakata, Ken; Iwahashi, Takehiko; Kinugasa, Kazutaka; Otsubo, Hidenori; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate how early the bone plug was integrated into the rectangular femoral tunnel after anatomical ACL reconstruction using a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft via a rectangular tunnel (RT BTB ACL-R). Twenty consecutive patients who had undergone the reconstruction procedure were evaluated by CT scans at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively. In each scan, 30 slices for multiplanar reconstruction were collected parallel to the long axis of the parallelepiped femoral tunnel and perpendicular to the tendinous plane of the bone plug. Each slice was classified as "complete," indicating no visible gap between the plug and the tunnel wall or trabecular continuity or "incomplete," showing a visible gap. Bone plug-tunnel integration was evaluated as "excellent," "good," "fair," or "poor" for >20, 11-20, 5-10, and values at the anterior interface between the bone plug and the tunnel wall were also measured on both scans. The mean changes in CT value at 8 weeks were significantly lower than those at 4 weeks. This study shows that bone plug-femoral tunnel integration was almost complete by 8 weeks after surgery using RT BTB ACL-R.

  1. Effect of a patellar strap on the joint position sense of the symptomatic knee in athletes with patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Astrid J; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Haak, Svenja L; Diercks, Ron L; van der Worp, Henk; Zwerver, Johannes

    2017-11-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a patellar strap on the proprioception of the symptomatic leg in PT. Secondary aims were to investigate a possible difference in effectiveness between athletes with high and low proprioceptive acuity, and whether predictors of effectiveness could be found. Randomised cross-over pilot study. 24 athletes with PT (age 27.3±9.0, VISA-P 50.6±11.2) performed a joint position sense test with and without a patellar strap. The difference between both conditions was analysed using linear mixed-model analysis. No improvement in the joint position sense using the strap for the whole group was found, while those classified as having low proprioceptive acuity did improve using the strap (p=0.015, 17.2%). A larger knee girth, longer duration of symptoms and more tendon abnormalities were negatively associated with the strap's effectiveness. The use of a patellar strap improves the knee joint proprioception - measured with joint position sense - of the symptomatic leg in athletes with poor proprioceptive acuity. Especially athletes with relatively small knee girth, short duration of symptoms and small tendon abnormalities might benefit from the strap. As proprioception plays an important role in motor control, and deficits in proprioception may put an athlete at risk for (re-)injury, these findings may be relevant for prevention as well as rehabilitation purposes in those PT athletes with low proprioceptive acuity. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Direct Radiofrequency Application Improves Pain and Gait in Collagenase-Induced Acute Achilles Tendon Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Pu Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency (RF is often used as a supplementary and alternative method to alleviate pain for chronic tendinopathy. Whether or how it would work for acute tendon injury is not addressed in the literatures. Through detailed pain and gait monitoring, we hypothesized that collagenase-induce acute tendinopathy model may be able to answer these questions. Gait parameters, including time, distance, and range of motion, were recorded and analyzed using a walking track equipped with a video-based system. Expression of substance P (SP, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, and galanin were used as pain markers. Beta-III tubulin and Masson trichrome staining were used as to evaluate nerve sprouting, matrix tension, and degeneration in the tendon. Of fourteen analyzed parameters, RF significantly improved stance phase, step length, preswing, and intermediary toe-spread of gait. Improved gait related to the expression of substance P, CGRP, and reduced nerve fiber sprouting and matrix tension, but not galanin. The study indicates that direct RF application may be a valuable approach to improve gait and pain in acute tendon injury. Altered gait parameters may be used as references to evaluate therapeutic outcomes of RF or other treatment plan for tendinopathy.

  3. Tendon injury and repair - A perspective on the basic mechanisms of tendon disease and future clinical therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snedeker, J.G.; Foolen, J.

    2017-01-01

    Tendon is an intricately organized connective tissue that efficiently transfers muscle force to the bony skeleton. Its structure, function, and physiology reflect the extreme, repetitive mechanical stresses that tendon tissues bear. These mechanical demands also lie beneath high clinical rates of

  4. Nintendo Wii related Achilles tendon rupture: first reported case and literature review of motion sensing video game injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rohit; Manoharan, Gopikanthan; Moores, Thomas Steven; Patel, Amit

    2014-05-14

    Achilles tendon ruptures tend to occur more commonly in healthy men between the ages of 30 and 50 years who have had no previous injury or problem reported in the affected leg. The injury is usually due to sudden forced plantar flexion of the foot, unexpected dorsiflexion of the foot and violent dorsiflexion of a plantar flexed foot, all of which occur during high impact activities. We present the first reported case of interactive activity with Nintendo Wii games that have resulted in Achilles tendon rupture in a 46-year-old man. There have been no previous reports of Achilles tendon rupture with Nintendo Wii usage; it is a relatively uncommon mode of injury and is rare in terms of epidemiology of motion sensing video game injuries. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. MR imaging of subscapularis tendon injury in the setting of anterior shoulder dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Carpenter, Elizabeth; Kazam, Jonathan; Babb, James; Bencardino, Jenny [NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate the degree and location patterns of subscapularis tendon injury in patients with prior anterior shoulder dislocation (ASD). Forty-five consecutive MR shoulder examinations in patients with a history of ASD and 20 consecutive MR examinations in patients without prior dislocation were reviewed. Two readers assessed for the presence and location of tendinosis and tearing in the subscapularis tendon, which was divided into three segments: superior, middle, and inferior. The readers also documented the presence of anterior labral tears, osseous Bankart defects and Hill-Sachs lesions. Fisher's exact tests were performed to analyze the different types of pathology and their locations. Subscapularis tendinosis, and partial thickness and full thickness tears were more common in patients with a history of ASD. Tendinosis was found in 60-64.4% of the dislocation patients compared with 40% of the non-dislocation group. When stratified by location, the middle and inferior thirds were the most commonly affected with statistical significance (p < 0.05) found in tearing of the inferior third. Anterior labral tears, osseous Bankart defects, and Hill-Sachs lesions were more common in the dislocation group with statistically significant associations with tendinosis in the middle and inferior thirds and tearing of the middle third (p < 0.05). Our study suggests an association between middle and inferior subscapularis tendon pathology and prior anterior shoulder dislocation. Based on our results, careful MR assessment of the subscapularis tendon by the radiologist is indicated in the setting of ASD as injury of this structure can be symptomatic and may be amenable to treatment. (orig.)

  6. MR imaging of subscapularis tendon injury in the setting of anterior shoulder dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Carpenter, Elizabeth; Kazam, Jonathan; Babb, James; Bencardino, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the degree and location patterns of subscapularis tendon injury in patients with prior anterior shoulder dislocation (ASD). Forty-five consecutive MR shoulder examinations in patients with a history of ASD and 20 consecutive MR examinations in patients without prior dislocation were reviewed. Two readers assessed for the presence and location of tendinosis and tearing in the subscapularis tendon, which was divided into three segments: superior, middle, and inferior. The readers also documented the presence of anterior labral tears, osseous Bankart defects and Hill-Sachs lesions. Fisher's exact tests were performed to analyze the different types of pathology and their locations. Subscapularis tendinosis, and partial thickness and full thickness tears were more common in patients with a history of ASD. Tendinosis was found in 60-64.4% of the dislocation patients compared with 40% of the non-dislocation group. When stratified by location, the middle and inferior thirds were the most commonly affected with statistical significance (p < 0.05) found in tearing of the inferior third. Anterior labral tears, osseous Bankart defects, and Hill-Sachs lesions were more common in the dislocation group with statistically significant associations with tendinosis in the middle and inferior thirds and tearing of the middle third (p < 0.05). Our study suggests an association between middle and inferior subscapularis tendon pathology and prior anterior shoulder dislocation. Based on our results, careful MR assessment of the subscapularis tendon by the radiologist is indicated in the setting of ASD as injury of this structure can be symptomatic and may be amenable to treatment. (orig.)

  7. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, PPY; Zhang, P; Chan, KM; Qin, L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis") which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be ...

  8. Achilles and Patellar Tendinopathy Loading Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malliaras, Peter; Barton, Christian J; Reeves, Neil D

    2013-01-01

    . Eccentric-concentric progressing to eccentric (Silbernagel combined) and eccentric-concentric isotonic (heavy-slow resistance; HSR) loading have also been investigated. In order for clinicians to make informed decisions, they need to be aware of the loading options and comparative evidence. The mechanisms...... mechanism that was consistently associated with improved clinical outcomes in both Achilles and patellar tendon rehabilitation was improved neuromuscular performance (e.g. torque, work, endurance), and Silbernagel-combined (Achilles) HSR loading (patellar) had an equivalent or higher level of evidence than...... isolated eccentric loading. In the Achilles tendon, a majority of studies did not find an association between improved imaging (e.g. reduced anteroposterior diameter, proportion of tendons with Doppler signal) and clinical outcomes, including all high-quality studies. In contrast, HSR loading...

  9. Intramuscular tendon involvement on MRI has limited value for predicting time to return to play following acute hamstring injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Made, Anne D.; Almusa, Emad; Whiteley, Rod; Hamilton, Bruce; Eirale, Cristiano; van Hellemondt, Frank; Tol, Johannes L.

    2018-01-01

    Background Hamstring injury with intramuscular tendon involvement is regarded as a serious injury with a delay in return to play (RTP) of more than 50 days and reinjury rates up to 63%. However, this reputation is based on retrospective case series with high risk of bias. Objective Determine whether

  10. Medial patellar ossification after patellar instability: a radiographic finding indicative of prior patella subluxation/dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerabek, Seth A. [Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program, Boston, MA (United States); Asnis, Peter D.; Poon, Steven K.; Gill, Thomas J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A.; Ouellette, Hugue A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    To describe the correlation between medial patellar ossification and prior patella subluxation and/or dislocation. A retrospective billing database search identified 544 patients who had been diagnosed with patellar instability over a 13-year period. One hundred twenty-eight patients met the inclusion criteria. After review by a staff orthopedic surgeon and two musculoskeletal radiologists, 28 patients were found to have medial patellar ossification. The size and location of medial patellar ossification was recorded. Of the 28 patients (20 males, eight females, age 13-66 years, mean 28 years) who were found to have medial patellar ossification, 22 had radiographs, 16 had magnetic resonance imaging, and ten had both. The medial patellar ossification ranged in size from 2 to 18 mm with an average of 6.8 mm. Twelve were located in the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), 14 in the medial joint capsule, and two in both the MPFL and joint capsule. Twenty-seven of 28 patients had a single ossification, and one patient had two ossifications. The timing from injury to first imaging of the lesion ranged from 10 days to a chronic history ({>=}35 years) of patellar instability. Medial patellar ossification correlates with a history of prior patella subluxation and/or dislocation. The medial ossification can be seen within the MPFL or the medial joint capsule, suggesting remote injury to these structures. The presence of this lesion will prompt physicians to evaluate for patellar instability. (orig.)

  11. Medial patellar ossification after patellar instability: a radiographic finding indicative of prior patella subluxation/dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerabek, Seth A.; Asnis, Peter D.; Poon, Steven K.; Gill, Thomas J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Ouellette, Hugue A.

    2009-01-01

    To describe the correlation between medial patellar ossification and prior patella subluxation and/or dislocation. A retrospective billing database search identified 544 patients who had been diagnosed with patellar instability over a 13-year period. One hundred twenty-eight patients met the inclusion criteria. After review by a staff orthopedic surgeon and two musculoskeletal radiologists, 28 patients were found to have medial patellar ossification. The size and location of medial patellar ossification was recorded. Of the 28 patients (20 males, eight females, age 13-66 years, mean 28 years) who were found to have medial patellar ossification, 22 had radiographs, 16 had magnetic resonance imaging, and ten had both. The medial patellar ossification ranged in size from 2 to 18 mm with an average of 6.8 mm. Twelve were located in the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), 14 in the medial joint capsule, and two in both the MPFL and joint capsule. Twenty-seven of 28 patients had a single ossification, and one patient had two ossifications. The timing from injury to first imaging of the lesion ranged from 10 days to a chronic history (≥35 years) of patellar instability. Medial patellar ossification correlates with a history of prior patella subluxation and/or dislocation. The medial ossification can be seen within the MPFL or the medial joint capsule, suggesting remote injury to these structures. The presence of this lesion will prompt physicians to evaluate for patellar instability. (orig.)

  12. The role of aqueous extract of pineapple fruit parts on the healing of acute crush tendon injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyegbusi, A I; Duru, F I O; Awelimobor, D; Noronha, C C; Okanlawon, A O

    2010-01-01

    The Pineapple plant contains the enzyme bromelain which has been acclaimed to reduce pain and swellings following acute muscle injuries as well as carotenoids and polyphenols which are powerful antioxidants. It is yet to be determined if these constituents are distributed throughout the plant and what effect they have on the healing of acute tendon injuries. This study therefore investigated the effects of the aqueous extract of different parts of the pineapple plant on tenoblast proliferation and the tendon Malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the early stage of healing in a crush injury to the achilles tendon of Sprague-Dawley rats. Forty male rats were divided randomly into five groups; all had induced crush injury to the left Achilles tendon. Group 1; injury and nil treatment, Group 2; leaves extract, Group 3; fruit flesh extract, Group 4; bark extract, Group 5; core extract. The extract was given at a dosage of 30 mg/kg body weight daily over the first 14 days post-injury. On the 15th day post injury, the animals were sacrificed and the tendons excised and processed for histological study and MDA assay. The flesh and bark extract induced a proliferation of tenoblasts which however was not significantly different from that of the untreated tendon while the leaves and core extracts reduced the population of the tenocytes. The flesh extract significantly (p leaves and core extract significantly (p pineapple plant are concentrated in the flesh while the bark and flesh extracts have the potential to promote healing by stimulating tenoblast proliferation.

  13. The effect of mechanical stimulation on the maturation of TDSCs-poly(L-lactide-co-e-caprolactone)/collagen scaffold constructs for tendon tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Dong, Shiwu; Zhou, Qiang; Mo, Xiumei; Song, Lei; Hou, Tianyong; Wu, Jinglei; Li, Songtao; Li, Yudong; Li, Pei; Gan, Yibo; Xu, Jianzhong

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical stimulation plays an important role in the development and remodeling of tendons. Tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) are an attractive cell source for tendon injury and tendon tissue engineering. However, these cells have not yet been fully explored for tendon tissue engineering application, and there is also lack of understanding to the effect of mechanical stimulation on the maturation of TDSCs-scaffold construct for tendon tissue engineering. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of TDSCs in a poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone)/collagen (P(LLA-CL)/Col) scaffold under mechanical stimulation for tendon tissue engineering both in vitro and in vivo, and evaluated the utility of the transplanted TDSCs-scaffold construct to promote rabbit patellar tendon defect regeneration. TDSCs displayed good proliferation and positive expressed tendon-related extracellular matrix (ECM) genes and proteins under mechanical stimulation in vitro. After implanting into the nude mice, the fluorescence imaging indicated that TDSCs had long-term survival, and the macroscopic evaluation, histology and immunohistochemistry examinations showed high-quality neo-tendon formation under mechanical stimulation in vivo. Furthermore, the histology, immunohistochemistry, collagen content assay and biomechanical testing data indicated that dynamically cultured TDSCs-scaffold construct could significantly contributed to tendon regeneration in a rabbit patellar tendon window defect model. TDSCs have significant potential to be used as seeded cells in the development of tissue-engineered tendons, which can be successfully fabricated through seeding of TDSCs in a P(LLA-CL)/Col scaffold followed by mechanical stimulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments using patellar tendon ligament grafts: diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced MRI in a 2-year follow-up regimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Schmitt, J.; Lubrich, J.; Hochmuth, K.; Diebold, T. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Del Tredici, K. [Dept. of Clinical Neuroanatomy, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Suedkamp, N. [Dept. of Traumatology and Orthopedics, Humboldt University, Berlin (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    We analyzed prospectively the diagnostic efficacy of contrast-enhanced MRI following anterior cruciate neoligament (ACL) reconstruction. One hundred fifty-six MR examinations were performed 2, 12, 52, 76, and 104 weeks post-operatively on 68 patients with ACL transplants. Sagittal, parasagittal, and coronal images using unenhanced T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences, and post-contrast images utilizing T1-weighted spin-echo and fat-saturated sequences, were acquired. Results were correlated with those of the pivot shift, Lachman, and a mechanical test. The MR examination criteria included morphological analysis, signal intensity, transplant contrast enhancement, secondary signs (e.g., elongation of normal ligaments), and comparison with clinically standardized test results. Two weeks post-operatively all neoligaments showed homogeneous low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences indistinguishable from that of normal cruciate or patellar ligaments [contrast-to-noise ratio (C/N) on T1:1.6], with a 9% percentile enhancement. At 12-52 weeks, signal intensity increased (C/N:6.7), with a mean 50% percentile enhancement. The 1-year follow-up allowed no definite assessment of the neoligament's course. At 76 and 104 weeks, significant decrements in signal intensity (C/N:3.0) and ligamentous percentile enhancement (25%) occurred. All patients tested displayed stable transplants 2 years post-operatively. Contrast-enhanced MRI allows accurate evaluation of morphology and function up to 3 months post-operatively and 1-2 years following ACL reconstructive surgery. (orig.)

  15. The effect of butyric acid with autogenous omental graft on healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani, S; Moslemi, H R; Dehghan, M M; Sedaghat, R; Mazaheri Nezhad, R; Rezaee Moghaddam, D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the role of local injection of butyric acid (BA) with autogenous omental graft was evaluated in healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits. Nine adult male New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized and a partial thickness tenotomy was created on both hindlimbs. In treated group, omental graft was secured in place using BA soaked polygalactin 910 suture. In control group, the graft was sutured without BA. Butyric acid and normal saline were injected daily to treatment and control groups for three days, respectively. Based on the findings, on day 15 after injury, the tendon sections showed that healing rate in BA treated group was higher than that in control group. Furthermore, at days 28 and 45, comparison between BA treated and control groups demonstrated that BA increased the healing rate but with no significance. In summary, results of this study show that application of BA with autogenous omental graft can improve healing process of damaged Achilles tendon.

  16. Achilles and patellar tendinopathy display opposite changes in elastic properties: A shear wave elastography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, B K; Tucker, K; Vicenzino, B; Vuvan, V; Mellor, R; Heales, L; Nordez, A; Hug, F

    2018-03-01

    To compare tendon elastic and structural properties of healthy individuals with those with Achilles or patellar tendinopathy. Sixty-seven participants (22 Achilles tendinopathy, 17 patellar tendinopathy, and 28 healthy controls) were recruited between March 2015 and March 2016. Shear wave velocity (SWV), an index of tissue elastic modulus, and tendon thickness were measured bilaterally at mid-tendon and insertional regions of Achilles and patellar tendons by an examiner blinded to group. Analysis of covariance, adjusted for age, body mass index, and sex was used to compare differences in tendon thickness and SWV between the two tendinopathy groups (relative to controls) and regions. Tendon thickness was included as a covariate for analysis of SWV. Compared to controls, participants with Achilles tendinopathy had lower SWV at the distal insertion (Mean difference MD; 95% CI: -1.56; -2.49 to -0.62 m/s; P < .001) and greater thickness at the mid-tendon (MD 0.19; 0.05-0.33 cm; P = .007). Compared to controls, participants with patellar tendinopathy had higher SWV at both regions (MD 1.25; 0.40-2.10 m/s; P = .005) and greater thickness proximally (MD 0.17; 0.06-0.29 cm; P = .003). Compared to controls, participants with Achilles and patellar tendinopathy displayed lower Achilles tendon elastic modulus and higher patellar tendon elastic modulus, respectively. More research is needed to explore whether maturation, aging, or chronic load underlie these findings and whether current management programs for Achilles and patellar tendinopathy need to be tailored to the tendon. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The TOPSHOCK study: effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, Henk; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L

    2011-10-11

    Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: radial shockwave therapy. Studies that investigate the effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy as treatment for patellar tendinopathy are scarce. Therefore the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy as treatments for patellar tendinopathy. The TOPSHOCK study (Tendinopathy Of Patella SHOCKwave) is a two-armed randomised controlled trial in which the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy are directly compared. Outcome assessors and patients are blinded as to which treatment is given. Patients undergo three sessions of either focused shockwave therapy or radial shockwave therapy at 1-week intervals, both in combination with eccentric decline squat training. Follow-up measurements are scheduled just before treatments 2 and 3, and 1, 4, 7 and 12 weeks after the final treatment. The main outcome measure is the Dutch VISA-P questionnaire, which asks for pain, function and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Secondary outcome measures are pain determined with a VAS during ADL, sports and decline squats, rating of subjective improvement and overall satisfaction with the treatment. Patients will also record their sports activities, pain during and after these activities, and concurrent medical treatment on a weekly basis in a web-based diary. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The TOPSHOCK study is the first randomised controlled trial that

  18. Using of Tendinous Plasty in Treatment of Patients with Flexor Tendons of 2–5 Fingers Injury in “Critical” Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Kireev

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Injury of both superficial and deep tendons of fingers flexors needs to carry out tendinous plasty with excision of distal part of superficial flexor muscle tendon. Use of length measuring method for tendinous transplant allows us to avoid the flexion contracture in future and appearance of functional insufficiency of flexion during postoperative period and rehabilitation of patient.

  19. Effect of acute exercise on patella tendon protein synthesis and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Kasper; Sindby, Ann Kathrine Ryberg; Krogsgaard, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that habitual loading can result in patellar tendon hypertrophy, especially at the proximal and distal parts of the patellar tendon. The underlying protein kinetic changes and its regulation remains controversial and human data, investigating this topic, are limited. The present...

  20. Calcaneal tendon: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montandon, Cristiano; Fonseca, Cristiano Rezio; Montandon Junior, Marcelo Eustaquio; Lobo, Leonardo Valadares; Ribeiro, Flavia Aparecida de Souza; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos

    2003-01-01

    We reviewed the radiological and clinical features of 23 patients with calcaneal tendon diseases, who were submitted to ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. The objective of this study was to characterize the lesions for a precise diagnosis of calcaneal tendon injuries. A wide range of calcaneal tendon diseases include degenerative lesions, inflammation of the peritendinous tissue such as peritendinitis and bursitis, and rupture. Imaging methods are essential in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of calcaneal tendon diseases. (author)

  1. Are Sport-Specific Profiles of Tendon Stiffness and Cross-Sectional Area Determined by Structural or Functional Integrity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Wiesinger

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine whether distinct sets of tendon properties are seen in athletes engaged in sports with contrasting requirements for tendon function and structural integrity. Patellar and Achilles tendon morphology and force-deformation relation were measured by combining ultrasonography, electromyography and dynamometry in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players and sedentary individuals. Tendon cross-sectional area normalized to body mass2/3 was smaller in water polo players than in other athletes (patellar and Achilles tendon; -28 to -24% or controls (patellar tendon only; -9%. In contrast, the normalized cross-sectional area was larger in runners (patellar tendon only; +26% and ski jumpers (patellar and Achilles tendon; +21% and +13%, respectively than in controls. Tendon stiffness normalized to body mass2/3 only differed in ski jumpers, compared to controls (patellar and Achilles tendon; +11% and +27%, respectively and to water polo players (Achilles tendon only; +23%. Tendon size appears as an adjusting variable to changes in loading volume and/or intensity, possibly to preserve ultimate strength or fatigue resistance. However, uncoupled morphological and mechanical properties indicate that functional requirements may also influence tendon adaptations.

  2. VEGF and BFGF Expression and Histological Characteristics of the Bone-Tendon Junction during Acute Injury Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone-tendon junction (BTJ injuries are common and may be caused by acute trauma and delayed healing during exercise or work. To understand the nature of the healing process of BTJ injuries would help to prevent injuries and improve treatment. Thirty-three mature female rabbit hindlimbs were assigned to normal control (CON, n = 7 and injury groups (n = 26. The acute injury was established by administering one 7 plum-blossom needle puncture. Specimens were harvested post injury at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks (ND1W, n = 6; ND2W, n = 6; ND4W, n = 7; and ND8W, n = 7. The injury existed in all of the injury groups. Compared with the CON group, all of the animals in the injury group showed poor cell profiles, an unclear or undetectable tide mark, a proteoglycan area and profile changes; the BTJ cell density diminished significantly in the ND1W (p 0.05. The basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF expression in the CON group was significantly less than in the ND1W group (p 0.05. The bFGF and VEGF expression levels indicated that the healing process stopped at 8 weeks post injury or was not activated, although the injury had not healed by histological examination. A repeatable animal model of BTJ acute injury was established in this study, and the results described the BTJ acute injury healing difficult concerned with the repairing stop.

  3. A mini-invasive adductor magnus tendon transfer technique for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: a technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, Petri J; Mäenpää, Heikki M; Mattila, Ville M; Visuri, Tuomo; Pihlajamäki, Harri

    2009-05-01

    Patellar dislocations are associated with injuries to the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL). Several techniques for MPFL reconstruction have been recently published with some disadvantages involved, including large skin incisions and donor site morbidity. Arthroscopic stabilizing techniques carry the potential of inadequate restoration of MPFL function. We present a minimally invasive technique for MPFL reconstruction using adductor magnus tendon autograft. This technique is easily performed, safe, and provides a stabilizing effect equal to current MPFL reconstructions. Skin incision of only 3-4 cm is located at the level of the proximal half of the patella. After identifying the distal insertion of the adductor magnus tendon, a tendon harvester is introduced to harvest the medial two-thirds of the tendon, while the distal insertion is left intact. The adductor magnus tendon is cut at 12-14 cm from its distal insertion and transferred into the patellar medial margin. Two suture anchors are inserted through the same incision at the superomedial aspect of the patella in the anatomic MPFL origin. The graft is tightened at 30 degrees knee flexion. Aftercare includes 4 weeks of brace treatment with restricted range of motion.

  4. Achillodynia. Radiological imaging of acute and chronic overuse injuries of the Achilles tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syha, R.; Springer, F.; Grosse, U.; Tuebingen Univ.; Ketelsen, D.; Kramer, U.; Horger, M.; Ipach, I.; Schick, F.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades the incidence of acute and chronic disorders of the Achilles tendon associated with sport-induced overuse has steadily increased. Besides acute complete or partial ruptures, achillodynia (Achilles tendon pain syndrome), which is often associated with tendon degeneration, represents the most challenging entity regarding clinical diagnostics and therapy. Therefore, the use of imaging techniques to differentiate tendon disorders and even characterize structure alterations is of growing interest. This review article discusses the potential of different imaging techniques with respect to the diagnosis of acute and chronic tendon disorders. In this context, the most commonly used imaging techniques are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), B-mode ultrasound, and color-coded Doppler ultrasound (US). These modalities allow the detection of acute tendon ruptures and advanced chronic tendon disorders. However, the main disadvantages are still the low capabilities in the detection of early-stage degeneration and difficulties in the assessment of treatment responses during follow-up examinations. Furthermore, differentiation between chronic partial ruptures and degeneration remains challenging. The automatic contour detection and texture analysis may allow a more objective and quantitative interpretation, which might be helpful in the monitoring of tendon diseases during follow-up examinations. Other techniques to quantify tendon-specific MR properties, e.g. based on ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences, also seem to have great potential with respect to the precise detection of degenerative tendon disorders and their differentiation at a very early stage. (orig.)

  5. Tendon neuroplastic training reduces tendon pain and muscle inhibition in-season: Changing the way we think about exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rio, E.; Kidgell, D.; Van Ark, M.; Zwerver, J; Sheek, I.; Moseley, G.L.; Gaida, J.; Docking, S.; Cook, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patellar tendon pain is at its highest in-season but there are no published data of successful management when athletes are playing and training. Furthermore, there are changes to the cortical control of the quadriceps in patellar tendinopathy (including excess quadriceps inhibition)

  6. The role of ultrasound in the management of flexor tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyapalan, K; Bisson, M A; Dias, J J; Griffin, Y; Bhatt, R

    2008-08-01

    The use of ultrasound scanning to establish tendon pathologies was assessed retrospectively in 17 patients in 18 digits. The ultrasound scan demonstrated four patterns: (1) normal intact tendons in four, (2) ruptured tendons in three, (3) tendons in continuity but attenuated in five and (4) tendons in continuity but thickened with fibrosis and decreased movement representing adhesions in five patients. Surgery was undertaken in only three cases, confirming the ultrasound diagnosis in two. Surgery was offered to all three patients with ruptures but was declined by two. Ultrasound imaging helped to avoid surgery in 14 cases by excluding flexor tendon re-ruptures. This allowed on-going mobilisation, leading to recovery of function.

  7. Comparison of patellar distraction with patellar glides in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, S.; Chaudhary, M.A.; Noor, R.; Bashir, M.S.; Manzoor, B.

    2017-01-01

    To analyse effectiveness of patellar glides and patellar distraction in the patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methodology: This longitudinal interventional comparative study was conducted at Physiotherapy Department, Mayo Hospital Lahore, Pakistan from September 2015 to March 2016. A total of 70 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly; group A received hot pack, quadriceps strengthening exercises and patellar distraction whereas group B received hot pack, quadriceps strengthening exercises and patellar glides. Age of the female patients was 18-40 years. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Knee Injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) questionnaire were used to compare the effectiveness of both treatments. The data were analysed using SPSS v. 21.0. Results: There was reduction in pain at VAS and KOOS showed improvement in function as well as the range of motion also increased in both groups. Both treatment techniques were effective in reducing pain in PFPS (P <0.005). Pre-treatment KOOS score in patellar glides group was 34.77+10.84 and post-treatment KOOS score was 62.155+15.75 and for patellar distraction group pre-treatment KOOS score was 35.42+10.07 that increased to 55.77+14.66 after treatment which showed that patellar glides had better effect on PFPS. Conclusion: Both treatments were effective in managing PFPS in terms of decreasing pain and increasing ROM as there was no significant difference between two techniques, however patellar glides were superior as compared to patellar distraction in decreasing pain and increasing ROM. (author)

  8. Effectiveness of the Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (EPI®) technique and isoinertial eccentric exercise in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy at two years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, Ferran; Diesel, Wayne-J; Gelber, Pablo-E; Polidori, Fernando; Monllau, Joan-Carles; Sanchez-Ibañez, Jose-Manuel

    2014-04-01

    to show the effect of Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (EPI®) combined with eccentric programme in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy. prospective study of 33 athlete-patients consecutively treated for insertional tendinopathy with Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (EPI®) and followed for 2 years. Functional assessment was performed at the first visit, at three months and two years with the Tegner scale and VISA-P. an average improvement in the VISA-P of 35 points was obtained. The mean duration of treatment was 4.5 weeks. Some 78.8% of the patients returned to the same level of physical activity as before the injury by the end of treatment, reaching 100% at two years. intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI®) combined with an eccentric-based rehab program offers excellent results in terms of the clinical and functional improvement of the patellar tendon with low morbidity in a short-term period. Therapy, level 4.

  9. Collagen V haploinsufficiency in a murine model of classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is associated with deficient structural and mechanical healing in tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jessica M; Connizzo, Brianne K; Shetye, Snehal S; Robinson, Kelsey A; Huegel, Julianne; Rodriguez, Ashley B; Sun, Mei; Adams, Sheila M; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2017-12-01

    Classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) patients suffer from connective tissue hyperelasticity, joint instability, skin hyperextensibility, tissue fragility, and poor wound healing due to heterozygous mutations in COL5a1 or COL5a2 genes. This study investigated the roles of collagen V in establishing structure and function in uninjured patellar tendons as well as in the injury response using a Col5a1 +/- mouse, a model for classic EDS. These analyses were done comparing tendons from a classic EDS model (Col5a1 +/- ) with wild-type controls. Tendons were subjected to mechanical testing, histological, and fibril analysis before injury as well as 3 and 6 weeks after injury. We found that Col5a1 +/- tendons demonstrated diminished recovery of mechanical competency after injury as compared to normal wild-type tendons, which recovered their pre-injury values by 6 weeks post injury. Additionally, the Col5a1 +/- tendons demonstrated altered fibril morphology and diameter distributions compared to the wild-type tendons. This study indicates that collagen V plays an important role in regulating collagen fibrillogenesis and the associated recovery of mechanical integrity in tendons after injury. In addition, the dysregulation with decreased collagen V expression in EDS is associated with a diminished injury response. The results presented herein have the potential to direct future targeted therapeutics for classic EDS patients. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2707-2715, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Lateral force transmission between human tendon fascicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, Bjarki T; Aagaard, Per; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Whether adjacent collagen fascicles transmit force in parallel is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to examine the magnitude of lateral force transmission between adjacent collagen fascicles from the human patellar and Achilles tendon. From each sample two adjacent strands of fascicles...... was transversally cut while the other fascicle and the fascicular membrane were kept intact. Cycle 3: both fascicles were cut in opposite ends while the fascicular membrane was left intact. A decline in peak force of 45% and 55% from cycle 1 to cycle 2, and 93% and 92% from cycle 2 to cycle 3 was observed...... in the patellar and Achilles tendon fascicles, respectively. A decline in stiffness of 39% and 60% from cycle 1 to cycle 2, and of 93% and 100% from cycle 2 to cycle 3 was observed in the patellar and Achilles tendon fascicles, respectively. The present data demonstrate that lateral force transmission between...

  11. MRI of traumatic patellar dislocation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaidi, A.; Cole, W. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada). Diagnostic Imaging; Babyn, P. [Mater Children' s, Brisbane (Australia). Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgery; Astori, I. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada). Diagnostic Imaging; White, L. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada). Orthopaedic Surgery; Doria, A.

    2006-11-15

    Traumatic patellar dislocations (TPD) are common injuries in children, and MRI is useful in evaluation of pediatric musculoskeletal injuries. However, no pediatric studies on the MR features of TPD have been reported. To review the injuries after TPD in children. Patients with clinical or radiological recognition of TPD and those with suggestive MR findings were selected. Bone, cartilage and soft-tissue injuries and patellofemoral relationships were assessed. Results A total of 26 patients (age range 10-18 years) were identified. The following injuries were seen: bone bruising of the inferomedial patella (81% of patients) and the lateral femoral condyle (81% of patients), cartilage injuries of the inferomedial patella (38% of patients) and the lateral femoral condyle (38% of patients), osteochondral fragments (42% of patients) and injuries of the medial patellar restraints (81% of patients). Pediatric manifestations of TPD seen on MRI are similar to those in adults. TPD is often occult in children. Early recognition of bone bruising of the patella and lateral femoral condyle, associated osteochondral injuries, and medial patellar stabilizer injury is important for timely diagnosis.

  12. MRI of traumatic patellar dislocation in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, A.; Cole, W.; Babyn, P.; Astori, I.; White, L.; Doria, A.

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic patellar dislocations (TPD) are common injuries in children, and MRI is useful in evaluation of pediatric musculoskeletal injuries. However, no pediatric studies on the MR features of TPD have been reported. To review the injuries after TPD in children. Patients with clinical or radiological recognition of TPD and those with suggestive MR findings were selected. Bone, cartilage and soft-tissue injuries and patellofemoral relationships were assessed. Results A total of 26 patients (age range 10-18 years) were identified. The following injuries were seen: bone bruising of the inferomedial patella (81% of patients) and the lateral femoral condyle (81% of patients), cartilage injuries of the inferomedial patella (38% of patients) and the lateral femoral condyle (38% of patients), osteochondral fragments (42% of patients) and injuries of the medial patellar restraints (81% of patients). Pediatric manifestations of TPD seen on MRI are similar to those in adults. TPD is often occult in children. Early recognition of bone bruising of the patella and lateral femoral condyle, associated osteochondral injuries, and medial patellar stabilizer injury is important for timely diagnosis

  13. Prospective imaging study of asymptomatic patellar tendinopathy in elite junior basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Khan, K M; Kiss, Z S; Purdam, C R; Griffiths, L

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate the ability of ultrasonography to predict eventual symptoms in an at-risk population, 52 elite junior basketball players' patellar tendons were studied at baseline and again 16 months later. The group consisted of 10 study tendons (ultrasonographically hypoechoic at baseline) and 42 control tendons (ultrasonographically normal at baseline). By design, all tendons were asymptomatic at baseline. No differences were noted between subjects and controls at baseline for age, height, weight, training hours, and vertical jump. Functional (P patellar tendon changes may resolve, but this is not necessary for an athlete to become asymptomatic. Qualitative or quantitative analysis of baseline ultrasonographic images revealed it was not possible to predict which tendons would develop symptoms or resolve ultrasonographically.

  14. Risk of iatrogenic injury to the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve during hamstring tendon harvesting: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pękala, Przemysław A; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Henry, Brandon Michael; Ramakrishnan, Piravin Kumar; Roy, Joyeeta; Mizia, Ewa; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2017-11-01

    Our goal was to conduct a comprehensive analysis of studies reporting data on the rate of injury to the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve following hamstring tendon graft harvesting with respect to the type of incision over the pes anserinus. A broad search through all major electronic databases was conducted to identify articles eligible for inclusion. All available data were extracted and pooled into the analysis. Eleven studies (n = 1,050 patients) were included in the meta-analysis. The study revealed that a vertical incision during hamstring tendon harvesting over the pes anserinus was associated with the highest rate of injury with a pooled rate of 51.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 34.6-67.2%). This was followed by oblique and horizontal incisions with pooled rates of 26.0% (95% CI,1.3-61.3%) and 22.4% (95% CI, 5.4-45.5%), respectively. We highly recommend the use of the shortest possible oblique incision during hamstring tendon harvesting over the pes anserinus. Muscle Nerve 56: 930-937, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Patellar tendinopathy - recent developments toward treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Robert A; Rossy, William H; Sherman, Orrin H

    2014-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) is a clinical and chronic overuse condition of unknown pathogenesis and etiology marked by anterior knee pain typically manifested at the inferior pole of the patella. PT has been referred to as "jumper's knee" since it is particularly common among populations of jumping athletes, such as basketball and volleyball players. Due to its common refractory response to conservative treatment, a variety of new treatments have emerged recently that include dry-needling, sclerosing injections, platelet-rich plasma therapy, arthroscopic surgical procedures, surgical resection of the inferior patellar pole, extracorporeal shock wave treatment, and hyperthermia thermotherapy. Since PT has an unknown pathogenesis and etiology, PT treatment is more a result of physician experience than evidence-based science. This review will summarize the current literature on this topic, identify current research efforts aimed to understand the pathological changes in abnormal tendons, provide exposure to the emerging treatment techniques, and provide suggested direction for future research.

  16. Patellar subluxation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Tomonori; Sasaki, Tetsuto; Susuda, Koichi; Moji, Junichi

    1983-01-01

    Clinical symptoms of patellar subluxation syndrome associated with pain were investigated for 24 knees of 20 patients, and the state of patella dislocation was observed by CT-scan. The patients had high incidence of an apprehension sign, showing their fear of patellar luxation. Many of them complained of patello-femoral joint pain due to chondromalacia patellae. In order to derive patellar subluxation, the method of CT-Q-contraction was carried out at the extended position of the patellar joint. In patients with patellar subluxation syndrome, the rate of shift in the diseased side was significantly higher than that of the other side, suggesting decreased muscular strength of the musculus vastus of the diseased side. Improvement of the symptoms was seen in all except one of 12 knees operated by the combined method of Green's method with Blauth's more than 6 months before. Availability of this operation was verified by the CT-Q-contraction. (Ueda, J.)

  17. Sensitivity of physical examination versus arthroscopy in diagnosing subscapularis tendon injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqui, Sami; Wijdicks, Coen; Foad, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of physical examination in the detection of subscapularis tendon tears and compare it with the gold standard of arthroscopy to determine whether clinical examination can reliably predict the presence of subscapularis tendon tears. This was a retrospective analysis of 52 patients (52 shoulders) who underwent arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repairs between September 2008 and April 2012. Positive findings on any combination of the belly press, lift-off, and bear hug tests constituted a positive physical examination result. There was a positive finding on physical examination in 42 of 52 patients. The sensitivity of the physical examination as a whole was 81%. The literature has shown that the belly press, bear hug, and lift-off tests are specific to the subscapularis tendon. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the sensitivity of these 3 separate clinical tests as a composite. Knowledge regarding the sensitivity of the subscapularis-specific physical examination as a composite can lead practitioners to implement all 3 components, even when 1 test has a negative finding, thus promoting a more thorough physical examination. Because unrepaired subscapularis tendon tears can result in poor outcomes in the repair of other rotator cuff tendons, a complete physical examination would be beneficial to patients with shoulder pathology. The authors conclude that physical examination, when performed consistently by an experienced practitioner, can reliably predict the presence of subscapularis tendon tears.

  18. Sex Hormones and Tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The risk of overuse and traumatic tendon and ligament injuries differ between women and men. Part of this gender difference in injury risk is probably explained by sex hormonal differences which are specifically distinct during the sexual maturation in the teenage years and during young adulthood....... The effects of the separate sex hormones are not fully elucidated. However, in women, the presence of estrogen in contrast to very low estrogen levels may be beneficial during regular loading of the tissue or during recovering after an injury, as estrogen can enhance tendon collagen synthesis rate. Yet...... has also been linked to a reduced responsiveness to relaxin. The present chapter will focus on sex difference in tendon injury risk, tendon morphology and tendon collagen turnover, but also on the specific effects of estrogen and androgens....

  19. Miscellaneous conditions of tendons, tendon sheaths, and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, S J; Dik, K J

    1995-08-01

    The use of diagnostic ultrasonography has greatly enhances our ability to diagnose injuries of tendons and tendon sheaths that were previously either unrecognized or poorly understood. For may of these injuries, there is currently only a small amount of follow-up data. This article considers injuries of the deep digital flexor tendon and its accessory ligament, the carpal tunnel syndrome soft tissue swellings on the dorsal aspect of the carpus, intertubercular (bicipital) bursitis and bicipital tendinitis, injuries of the gastrocnemius tendon, common calcaneal tendinitis, rupture of peroneus (fibularis tertius) and ligaments injuries of the back.

  20. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy in volleyball and basketball players: A survey-based prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, A J; van der Worp, H; Diercks, R L; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Zwerver, J

    2015-10-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) is a common overuse injury of the patellar tendon in jumping athletes. In a recent large cross-sectional study from 2008 several factors were identified that may be associated with the etiology of PT. However, because of the study design no conclusions could be drawn about causal relations. The primary aim of the current study is to investigate whether the factors identified in the previous 2008 study can also be prospectively recognized as predictors of symptomatic PT in 2011. Nine hundred twenty-six Dutch elite and non-elite basketball and volleyball players from the previous study were invited again to complete an online survey about knee complaints and risk factors for PT in 2011. The logistic regression included 385 athletes of which 51 (13%) developed PT since 2008. Male gender [odds ratio (OR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-3.5] was found to be a risk factor for developing PT. No sports-related variables could be identified to increase the risk of developing PT, but some evidence was found for performing heavy physically demanding work, like being a nurse or a physical education teacher (OR 2.3, 95% CI 0.9-6.3). These findings indicate that, when considering preventive measures, it is important to take into account the total tendon load. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on new trabecular bone during bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model: a synchrotron radiation micro-CT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Lu

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on bone regeneration during the bone-tendon junction healing process and to explore the application of synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography in three dimensional visualization of the bone-tendon junction to evaluate the microarchitecture of new trabecular bone. Twenty four mature New Zealand rabbits underwent partial patellectomy to establish a bone-tendon junction injury model at the patella-patellar tendon complex. Animals were then divided into low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment (20 min/day, 7 times/week and placebo control groups, and were euthanized at week 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 6 for each group and time point. The patella-patellar tendon specimens were harvested for radiographic, histological and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography detection. The area of the newly formed bone in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that of control group at postoperative week 8 and 16. The high resolution three dimensional visualization images of the bone-tendon junction were acquired by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment promoted dense and irregular woven bone formation at week 8 with greater bone volume fraction, number and thickness of new trabecular bone but with lower separation. At week 16, ultrasound group specimens contained mature lamellar bone with higher bone volume fraction and thicker trabeculae than that of control group; however, there was no significant difference in separation and number of the new trabecular bone. This study confirms that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment is able to promote bone formation and remodeling of new trabecular bone during the bone-tendon junction healing process in a rabbit model, and the synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography could be applied for three dimensional visualization to quantitatively evaluate

  2. Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy with Multiple-Ligament Knee Injury and Distal Avulsion of the Biceps Femoris Tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Oshima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiple-ligament knee injury that includes posterolateral corner (PLC disruption often causes palsy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN, which occurs in 44% of cases with PLC injury and biceps femoris tendon rupture or avulsion of the fibular head. Approximately half of these cases do not show functional recovery. This case report aims to present a criteria-based approach to the operation and postoperative management of CPN palsy that resulted from a multiple-ligament knee injury in a 22-year-old man that occurred during judo. We performed a two-staged surgery. The first stage was to repair the injuries to the PLC and biceps femoris. The second stage involved anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The outcomes were excellent, with a stable knee, excellent range of motion, and improvement in the palsy. The patient was able to return to judo competition 27 weeks after the injury. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a return to sports following CPN palsy with multiple-ligament knee injury.

  3. Estudo prospectivo randomizado sobre a luxação traumática de patela: tratamento conservador versus reconstrução do ligamento femoropatelar medial com tendão patelar - mínimo de dois anos de seguimento Randomized prospective study on traumatic patellar dislocation: conservative treatment versus reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the patellar tendon, with a minimum of two years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Carneiro Bitar

    2011-01-01

    results were evaluated with a minimum follow-up of two years. The Kujala questionnaire was applied to assess pain and quality of life, and recurrences were evaluated. Pearson's chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were used in the statistical evaluation. RESULTS: The statistical analysis showed that the mean Kujala score was significantly lower in the conservative group (70.8, compared with the mean value in the surgical group (88.9, with p = 0.001. The surgical group presented a higher percentage of "good/excellent" Kujala score results (71.43% than in the conservative group (25.0%, with p = 0.003. The conservative group presented a greater number of recurrences (35% of the cases, while in the surgical group there were no reports of recurrences and/or subluxation. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the patellar tendon produced better results, based on the analysis of post-treatment recurrences and the better final results from the Kujala questionnaire after a minimum follow-up period of two years.

  4. Using chemical-shift MR imaging to quantify fatty degeneration within supraspinatus muscle due to supraspinatus tendon injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan; Yildirim, Nalan; Yazici, Zeynep [Uludag University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Ercan, Ilker [Uludag University Medical Faculty, Department of Biostatistics, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    The objective of this study was to prospectively quantify the fatty degeneration of supraspinatus (SSP) muscle due to SSP tendon injuries by using chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (CS-MRI). Forty-one patients with suspected rotator cuff tear or impingement examined with MR arthrography were included in the study. The following images were obtained after injection of diluted gadolinium chelate into glenohumeral joint: fat-saturated T1-weighted spin echo in the coronal, axial, and sagittal-oblique plane; fat-saturated T2-weighted and intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo in the coronal-oblique plane; and T1-weighted spin echo in the sagittal-oblique plane. CS-MRI was performed in the coronal plane using a double-echo fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence. SSP tendon changes were classified as normal, tendinosis, and partial and complete tear according to MR arthrography findings. Fatty degeneration was quantified after measurement of signal intensity values within the region of interest (ROI) placed over SSP muscle. Signal intensity (SI) suppression ratio and SI index were calculated with the values obtained. Degrees of fatty degeneration depicted in normal subjects and subjects with rotator cuff injuries were compared. Median (min:max) was used as descriptive values. SI suppression ratio was -3.5% (-15.5:3.03) in normal subjects, whereas it was -13.5% (-28.55:-6.60), -30.7% (-41.5:-20.35), and -43.75% (-62:-24.90) in tendinosis, partial and complete tears, respectively. SI index was 0.75% (-6:11.5) in normal subjects. It was 10% (4.50:27), 26.5% (19.15:35.5), and 41% (23.9:57) in tendinosis, partial and complete tears, respectively. The increase in degree of fatty degeneration parallels the seriousness of tendon pathology. CS-MRI is a useful method for grading fat accumulation within SSP muscle. (orig.)

  5. Using chemical-shift MR imaging to quantify fatty degeneration within supraspinatus muscle due to supraspinatus tendon injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokalp, Gokhan; Yildirim, Nalan; Yazici, Zeynep; Ercan, Ilker

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to prospectively quantify the fatty degeneration of supraspinatus (SSP) muscle due to SSP tendon injuries by using chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (CS-MRI). Forty-one patients with suspected rotator cuff tear or impingement examined with MR arthrography were included in the study. The following images were obtained after injection of diluted gadolinium chelate into glenohumeral joint: fat-saturated T1-weighted spin echo in the coronal, axial, and sagittal-oblique plane; fat-saturated T2-weighted and intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo in the coronal-oblique plane; and T1-weighted spin echo in the sagittal-oblique plane. CS-MRI was performed in the coronal plane using a double-echo fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence. SSP tendon changes were classified as normal, tendinosis, and partial and complete tear according to MR arthrography findings. Fatty degeneration was quantified after measurement of signal intensity values within the region of interest (ROI) placed over SSP muscle. Signal intensity (SI) suppression ratio and SI index were calculated with the values obtained. Degrees of fatty degeneration depicted in normal subjects and subjects with rotator cuff injuries were compared. Median (min:max) was used as descriptive values. SI suppression ratio was -3.5% (-15.5:3.03) in normal subjects, whereas it was -13.5% (-28.55:-6.60), -30.7% (-41.5:-20.35), and -43.75% (-62:-24.90) in tendinosis, partial and complete tears, respectively. SI index was 0.75% (-6:11.5) in normal subjects. It was 10% (4.50:27), 26.5% (19.15:35.5), and 41% (23.9:57) in tendinosis, partial and complete tears, respectively. The increase in degree of fatty degeneration parallels the seriousness of tendon pathology. CS-MRI is a useful method for grading fat accumulation within SSP muscle. (orig.)

  6. Systematics of injuries of the rotator cuff and biceps tendon; Systematik der Verletzungen von Rotatorenmanschette und Bizepssehne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Landesklinikum Horn, Institut fuer Radiologie und interventionelle Radiologie, Horn (Austria); Pones, M.; Breitenseher, J.B. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2015-03-01

    Injuries of the rotator cuff and the biceps tendon demonstrate different patterns, which can be recognized clinically and radiologically. These patterns are impingement syndrome with additional trauma, isolated trauma of the rotator cuff and shoulder dislocation causing rotator cuff tears. Furthermore, it is clinically crucial to evaluate the extent of a rotator cuff injury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice to differentiate these patterns. (orig.) [German] Bei der Verletzung von Rotatorenmanschette und Bizepssehne koennen verschiedene Muster klinisch und radiologisch erkannt werden. Diese Muster sind das Impingementsyndrom mit einem zusaetzlichen Trauma, das isolierte Trauma und die Verletzung der Rotatorenmanschette im Rahmen einer Schulterluxation. Darueber hinaus ist die Beurteilung des Ausmasses einer Verletzung von zentraler klinischer Relevanz. Die MRT kann die Differenzierung dieser Muster bestmoeglich durchfuehren. (orig.)

  7. Injury to the Infrapatellar Branch of the Saphenous Nerve during ACL Reconstruction with Hamstring Tendon Autograft: A Comparison between Oblique and Vertical Incisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mousavi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injury to the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve (IPBSN is common after arthroscopic ACLreconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft, as reported in up to 88% of the cases. Due to close relationshipbetween the IPBSN with pes anserine tendons insertion skin incision may sever IPBSN while harvesting gracillis andsemitendinous tendons. As the IPBSN course at the anterior of knee is oblique, we hypothesized a parallel skin incisionwith nerve passage may decrease nerve injury.Methods: Vertical and oblique incisions were compared in 79 patients in this clinical trial. The sensory loss area andpatients’ complain of numbness were measured at 2 and 8 weeks as well as 6 months after surgery.Results: Both the sensory loss area and patients’ complain of numbness decreased significantly in the oblique incisiongroup (P

  8. Human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells improve healing after collagenase tendon injury in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová-Urdzíková, Lucia; Sedláček, R.; Suchý, T.; Amemori, Takashi; Růžička, Jiří; Lesný, P.; Havlas, V.; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 42 (2014) ISSN 1475-925X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/0326; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Achilles tendon * mesenchymal stromal cells * osteogenesis Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 1.427, year: 2014

  9. Human growth hormone may be detrimental when used to accelerate recovery from acute tendon-bone interface injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Keith M; Oliver, Harvey A; Foley, Jack; Chen, Ding-Geng; Autenried, Peter; Duan, Shanzhong; Heiser, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    There have been few scientific studies that have examined usage of human growth hormone to accelerate recovery from injury. The hypothesis of this study was that human growth hormone would accelerate tendon-to-bone healing compared with control animals treated with placebo in a rat model of acute rotator cuff injury repair. Seventy-two rats underwent repair of acute rotator cuff injuries and were randomized into the following postoperative dosing regimens: placebo, and human growth hormone at 0.1, 1, 2, 5, and 10 mg/kg/day, administered subcutaneously once per day for fourteen days (Protocol 1). An additional twenty-four rats were randomized to receive either (1) placebo or (2) human growth hormone at 5 mg/kg, administered subcutaneously twice per day for seven days preoperatively and twenty-eight days postoperatively (Protocol 2). All rats were killed twenty-eight days postoperatively. Mechanical testing was performed. Ultimate stress, ultimate force, stiffness, energy to failure, and ultimate distension were determined. For Protocol 1, analysis of variance testing showed no significant difference between the groups with regard to ultimate stress, ultimate force, stiffness, energy to failure, or ultimate distension. In Protocol 2, ultimate force to failure was significantly worse in the human growth hormone group compared with the placebo group (21.1 ± 5.85 versus 26.3 ± 5.47 N; p = 0.035). Failure was more likely to occur through the bone than the tendon-bone interface in the human growth hormone group compared with the placebo group (p = 0.001). No significant difference was found for ultimate stress, ultimate force, stiffness, energy to failure, or ultimate distension between the groups in Protocol 2. In this rat model of acute tendon-bone injury repair, daily subcutaneous postoperative human growth hormone treatment for fourteen days failed to demonstrate a significant difference in any biomechanical parameter compared with placebo. Furthermore, subcutaneous

  10. Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score at 3 months can predict patients' ability to return to sport 1 year after injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Swennergren; Christensen, Marianne; Budolfsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate how the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) at 3 months and 1 year after injury is associated with a patient's ability to return to work and sports as well as to investigate whether sex and age influence ATRS after 3 months and 1 year. METHOD: This is a retrospectiv...

  11. Impact of combinatory growth factor application on rabbit Achilles tendon injury with operative versus conservative treatment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konerding, Moritz A; Arlt, Friederike; Wellmann, Axel; Li, Vincent; Li, William

    2010-02-01

    Acute Achilles tendon (AT) rupture is a common injury with a comparatively high complication rate. Presently, surgical treatments compete with nonoperative treatment modalities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the possible beneficial effects of short-term combinatory application of growth factors on tendon healing during operative or conservative treatment. In this controlled laboratory study, the left ATs of 40 adult New Zealand White rabbits were transected and either sutured or treated conservatively. Half of the animals from each treatment modality group repetitively received a mixture of VEGF165, bFGF, and rPDGF which was administered peritendineally. The left legs were immobilized with external fixateurs for 6 weeks. The ATs were harvested 3 months after intervention. Tensile strength tests revealed no significant differences between operative and conservative treatments. Compared to the normal right ATs, 60% of the average breaking strength was reached 3 months after surgery. Growth factor application did not result in significant improvements. Only a tendency towards higher blood vessel densities was noted in the groups treated with the factors. Collagen type I/III ratios also displayed no significant differences. This study indicates that there is no difference in the biomechanical outcome of conservative versus operative AT rupture treatment and only a marginal impact of short-term combinatory growth and angiogenesis factor application.

  12. Reconstrucción y restauración de la rotura aguda del tendón rotuliano con aumento del tendon semitendinoso preservando su inserción distal. Reporte de un caso.[Reconstruction and repair of acute patellar tendon ruptures with semitendinosus autograft].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Andres Ciccarello

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de ruptura aguda de tendon rotuliano con mala calidad de tejido remanente , en la que se realiza una tecnica de restauración y aumentación con injerto del tendon semitendinoso ipsilateral , preservando su inseríón distal.

  13. Tendinopatia patelar Patellar tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Cohen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A tendinopatia do patelar ou jumper's knee (joelho do saltador é uma afecção que acomete freqüentemente atletas praticantes de atividades de salto ou aquelas que exigem força de impacto repetitivo. Histologicamente, a sobrecarga excessiva no tendão pode provocar alterações na matriz extracelular, resultando em pequenas lesões que, cronicamente, poderão levar a um quadro de tendinose, principalmente na região do pólo inferior da patela. A dor na região anterior do joelho é o primeiro sintoma relatado pelo paciente portador dessa afecção. Seu início é insidioso e gradual, principalmente após atividade física, mas, com a progressão da doença, pode tornar-se freqüente durante ou já no início da atividade. O diagnóstico de tendinopatia do patelar é eminentemente clínico, caracterizado por dor à palpação no pólo inferior da patela e adjacências e, nos casos mais avançados, nódulo palpável e edema associado podem ser visualizados. Exames complementares, como radiografia, ultra-sonografia (US e ressonância magnética (RM auxiliam no diagnóstico. O US e a RM são os mais indicados, pois podem definir o local exato da lesão, sua extensão, como também identificar a presença ou não de alterações degenerativas, sendo a RM o que fornece melhor resolução. O tratamento inicial da tendinopatia é clínico, com repouso relativo, correção dos fatores etiológicos, além de crioterapia e medidas fisioterápicas. A utilização da medicação analgésica e antiinflamatória é controversa. Nos casos que não respondem ao tratamento clínico, o cirúrgico é opção, e várias técnicas são descritas, a literatura demonstrando índices variados de bons resultados.Patellar tendinopathy, or jumper's knee, is often seen in athletes that practice jumping modalities, or modalities that require repetitive impact strength. Histologically, the excessive load on the tendon may cause changes in the extracellular matrix and

  14. The TOPSHOCK study: Effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diercks Ron L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: radial shockwave therapy. Studies that investigate the effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy as treatment for patellar tendinopathy are scarce. Therefore the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy as treatments for patellar tendinopathy. Methods/design The TOPSHOCK study (Tendinopathy Of Patella SHOCKwave is a two-armed randomised controlled trial in which the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy are directly compared. Outcome assessors and patients are blinded as to which treatment is given. Patients undergo three sessions of either focused shockwave therapy or radial shockwave therapy at 1-week intervals, both in combination with eccentric decline squat training. Follow-up measurements are scheduled just before treatments 2 and 3, and 1, 4, 7 and 12 weeks after the final treatment. The main outcome measure is the Dutch VISA-P questionnaire, which asks for pain, function and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Secondary outcome measures are pain determined with a VAS during ADL, sports and decline squats, rating of subjective improvement and overall satisfaction with the treatment. Patients will also record their sports activities, pain during and after these activities, and concurrent medical treatment on a weekly basis in a web-based diary. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion

  15. The TOPGAME-study: effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy. Design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerver, Johannes; Verhagen, Evert; Hartgens, Fred; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L

    2010-02-08

    Patellar tendinopathy is a major problem for many athletes, especially those involved in jumping activities. Despite its frequency and negative impact on athletic careers, no evidence-based guidelines for management of this overuse injury exist. Since functional outcomes of conservative and surgical treatments remain suboptimal, new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have to be developed and evaluated. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) appears to be a promising treatment in patients with chronic patellar tendinopathy. ESWT is most often applied after the known conservative treatments have failed. However, its effectiveness as primary therapy has not been studied in athletes who keep playing sports despite having patellar tendon pain. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of ESWT in athletes with patellar tendinopathy who are still in training and competition. The TOPGAME-study (Tendinopathy of Patella Groningen Amsterdam Maastricht ESWT) is a multicentre two-armed randomised controlled trial with blinded participants and outcome assessors, in which the effectiveness of patient-guided focussed ESWT treatment (compared to placebo ESWT) on pain reduction and recovery of function in athletes with patellar tendinopathy will be investigated. Participants are volleyball, handball and basketball players with symptoms of patellar tendinopathy for a minimum of 3 to a maximum duration of 12 months who are still able to train and compete. The intervention group receives three patient-guided focussed medium-energy density ESWT treatments without local anaesthesia at a weekly interval in the first half of the competition. The control group receives placebo treatment. The follow-up measurements take place 1, 12 and 22 weeks after the final ESWT or placebo treatment, when athletes are still in competition. Primary outcome measure is the VISA-P (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment - patella) score. Data with regard to pain during function tests (jump

  16. The TOPGAME-study: effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy. Design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diercks Ron L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellar tendinopathy is a major problem for many athletes, especially those involved in jumping activities. Despite its frequency and negative impact on athletic careers, no evidence-based guidelines for management of this overuse injury exist. Since functional outcomes of conservative and surgical treatments remain suboptimal, new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have to be developed and evaluated. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT appears to be a promising treatment in patients with chronic patellar tendinopathy. ESWT is most often applied after the known conservative treatments have failed. However, its effectiveness as primary therapy has not been studied in athletes who keep playing sports despite having patellar tendon pain. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of ESWT in athletes with patellar tendinopathy who are still in training and competition. Methods/design The TOPGAME-study (Tendinopathy of Patella Groningen Amsterdam Maastricht ESWT is a multicentre two-armed randomised controlled trial with blinded participants and outcome assessors, in which the effectiveness of patient-guided focussed ESWT treatment (compared to placebo ESWT on pain reduction and recovery of function in athletes with patellar tendinopathy will be investigated. Participants are volleyball, handball and basketball players with symptoms of patellar tendinopathy for a minimum of 3 to a maximum duration of 12 months who are still able to train and compete. The intervention group receives three patient-guided focussed medium-energy density ESWT treatments without local anaesthesia at a weekly interval in the first half of the competition. The control group receives placebo treatment. The follow-up measurements take place 1, 12 and 22 weeks after the final ESWT or placebo treatment, when athletes are still in competition. Primary outcome measure is the VISA-P (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment - patella score

  17. The use of ionising radiation for the treatment of injuries to flexor tendons and supporting ligaments in horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, P.W.

    1979-01-01

    A technique was developed using radioactive isotopes as a source of radiation for the treatment of injuries to the superficial and deep flexor tendons and the associated ligaments in the horse. The treatment area was sub-divided so that different dosages could be applied over the limb as necessary. A plaster of Paris impression was taken on the whole area to be treated. In the isotope laboratory a plaster negative was made and loaded with the dose of radioactive isotope. The loaded cast was then strapped to the horse's limb for the calculated time, usually about three days. A total of 42 horses were treated and follow up information was obtained from 28. Twenty-five animals raced again: two relapsed before racing and one was destroyed with navicular disease. Ten of the 42 horses had been treated by firing before irradiation. Five of these returned to racing but the history of four of them was not known. (author)

  18. The impact of physically demanding work of basketball and volleyball players on the risk for patellar tendinopathy and on work limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Worp, H.; Zwerver, J.; Kuijer, P. P. F. M.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.

    2011-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common injury in jumping athletes. Little is known about work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and related work limitations. The aim of this study was to identify work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and to determine the relation

  19. The impact of physically demanding work of basketball and volleyball players on the risk for patellar tendinopathy and on work limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Worp, H.; Zwerver, J.; Kuijer, P.P.F.M.; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.; Van Den Akker-Scheek, I.

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common injury in jumping athletes. Little is known about work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and related work limitations. The aim of this study was to identify work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and to determine the relation

  20. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake; Smith, David W.; Lloyd, David G.; Zheng, Ming H.

    2012-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a s...

  1. Physical therapists' role in prevention and management of patellar tendinopathy injuries in youth, collegiate, and middle-aged indoor volleyball athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, Kornelia; Noceti-DeWit, Lisa M.; Reischl, Stephen F.; Landel, Rob F.

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is highly prevalent in all ages and skill levels of volleyball athletes. To illustrate this, we discuss the clinical, biomechanical, and ultrasound imaging presentation and the intervention strategies of three volleyball athletes at different stages of their athletic career: youth, middle-aged, and collegiate. We present our examination strategies and interpret the data collected, including visual movement analysis and dynamics, relating these findings to the probable causes of their pain and dysfunction. Using the framework of the EdUReP concept, incorporating Education, Unloading, Reloading, and Prevention, we propose intervention strategies that target each athlete's specific issues in terms of education, rehabilitation, training, and return to sport. This framework can be generalized to manage patellar tendinopathy in other sports requiring jumping, from youth to middle age, and from recreational to elite competitive levels. PMID:26537811

  2. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy for patellar tendinopathy: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, M T; Zwerver, J; van den Akker-Scheek, I

    2009-03-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (EWST) has become a popular treatment for patellar tendinopathy. The purpose of this review was to study the effectiveness of ESWT treatment for patellar tendinopathy; to draft guidelines for an effective treatment protocol of ESWT treatment; and to identify topics for further research. A computerised search of the Medline and Embase databases was conducted on 1 August 2007, to identify studies dealing with the effectiveness of ESWT for patellar tendinopathy. Seven articles describing the effectiveness of ESWT on patellar tendinopathy, all published after 2000, were included. These studies included a total of 283 patients (298 tendons), 204 of whom (215 tendons) were assigned to ESWT treatment. The treatment results were positive but most studies had methodological deficiencies, small numbers and/or short follow-up periods. Method of application and shockwave generation, energy level, number and frequency of treatments, use of (local) anaesthesia and method of localisation were variable. ESWT seems to be a safe and promising treatment for patellar tendinopathy with a positive effect on pain and function. Based on current knowledge it is impossible to recommend a specific treatment protocol. Further basic and clinical research into the working mechanism and effectiveness of ESWT for patellar tendinopathy are necessary.

  3. Brachial biceps tendon injuries in young female high-level tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, A; Gillson, S

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate brachial biceps tendon lesions in four young female tennis players who complained about anterior shoulder pain on their dominant side. Medical and sport's activity history, palpation of the painful zone, Ghilchrist (palm-up) test, and brachial biceps contraction against resistance were performed. The two girls who suffered from mild tenderness in the bicipital groove and over the anterior aspect of the upper arm and the shoulder joint, had tendinitis of the long biceps head. The two girls who suffered from severe tenderness just under the groove, had a partial tear in the long head of the biceps. Ghilchrist test was positive in all girls. Tennis players can have shoulder pain without clear history of trauma. Pain occurred probably as a result of technical errors or use of inadequate equipment.

  4. Patellar osteochondroma: case report,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Barra de Moraes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to report on a rare case of patellar osteochondroma. A 60-year-old man presented a tumor on his left patella that had developed over a 10-year period, which is a rare occurrence, considering the patient's age and the site at which the tumor appeared. The clinical condition comprised mild pain and the presence of a mass, without limitation of flexion-extension or any neurovascular deficit. The tumor dimensions were 8 cm longitudinally × 6 cm transversally × 3 cm anteroposteriorly. It was hardened and was adhering to the patellar bone plane. On radiographs and tomographic scans, we observed areas of greater density corresponding to bone and other less dense areas that could correspond to slow-growing cartilage, with irregularities on the patellofemoral joint surface. Simple resection of the tumor was performed, and the anatomopathological examination confirmed that it was a patellar osteochondroma. Osteochondroma, or osteocartilaginous exostosis, includes a large proportion of the benign bone tumors. It results from cell alterations that trigger unregulated production of spongy bone. It is basically treated by means of surgical removal of the tumor mass. This is not essential, but is recommended in order to avoid lesions caused by contiguity and the risk of malignant transformation.

  5. Region specific patella tendon hypertrophy in humans following resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M.; Reitelseder, S; Pedersen, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine if cross-sectional area (CSA) differs along the length of the human patellar tendon (PT), and if there is PT hypertrophy in response to resistance training. METHODS: Twelve healthy young men underwent baseline and post-training assessments. Maximal isometric knee extension strength...... (MVC) was determined unilaterally in both legs. PT CSA was measured at the proximal-, mid- and distal PT level and quadriceps muscle CSA was measured at mid-thigh level using magnetic resonance imaging. Mechanical properties of the patellar tendons were determined using ultrasonography. Subsequently....... CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this study is the first to report tendon hypertrophy following resistance training. Further, the data show that the human PT CSA varies along the length of the tendon....

  6. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lui PPY

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis" which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be paid to augment tendon to bone insertion (TBI healing. Apart from surgical fixation, biological and biophysical interventions have been studied aiming at regeneration of TBI healing complex, especially the regeneration of interpositioned fibrocartilage and new bone at the healing junction. This paper described the biology and the factors influencing TBI healing using patella-patellar tendon (PPT healing and tendon graft to bone tunnel healing in ACL reconstruction as examples. Recent development in the improvement of TBI healing and directions for future studies were also reviewed and discussed.

  7. Modified Pectoralis Major Tendon Transfer for Reanimation of Elbow Flexion as a Salvage Procedure in Complete Brachial Plexus Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Taran

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brachial plexus injuries rarely recover spontaneously and if the window period for neurotisation has elapsed, the only option for restoration of function lies in a salvage procedure. Many such salvage procedures have been described in the literature with variable functional results. We report the case of a 16-year-old boy who presented after unsuccessful treatment for a complete brachial plexus injury; we performed a pectoralis major tendon transfer to attain elbow flexion. Postoperatively, the elbow was splinted with flexion at 100°. After 4 weeks of immobilization the splint was removed and the patient could actively flex his elbow from 30° to 100°.

  8. Biceps Tendon Lengthening Surgery for Failed Serial Casting Patients With Elbow Flexion Contractures Following Brachial Plexus Birth Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of surgical outcomes of biceps tendon lengthening (BTL) surgery in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients with elbow flexion contractures, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Serial casting and splinting have been shown to be effective in correcting elbow flexion contractures in OBPI. However, the possibilities of radial head dislocations and other complications have been reported in serial casting and splinting. Literature indicates surgical intervention when such nonoperative techniques and range-of-motion exercises fail. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction of the contractures of the affected elbow and improvement in arm length to more normal after BTL in these patients, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Ten OBPI patients (6 girls and 4 boys) with an average age of 11.2 years (4-17.7 years) had BTL surgery after unsuccessful serial casting. Mean elbow flexion contracture was 40° before and 37° (average) after serial casting. Mean elbow flexion contracture was reduced to 8° (0°-20°) post-BTL surgical procedure with an average follow-up of 11 months. This was 75% improvement and statistically significant (P casting. These OBPI patients in our study had 75% significant reduction in elbow flexion contractures and achieved an improved and more normal length of the affected arm after the BTL surgery when compared to only 7% insignificant reduction and no improvement in arm length after serial casting.

  9. Relationship between landing strategy and patellar tendinopathy in volleyball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisseling, Rob W.; Hof, At L.; Bredeweg, Steef W.; Zwerver, Johannes; Mulder, Theo

    Objective: The aetiology of patellar tendinopathy ( jumper's knee) remains unclear. To see whether landing strategy might be a risk factor for the development of this injury, this study examined whether landing dynamics from drop jumps differed among healthy volleyball players ( CON) and volleyball

  10. Upper limb joint muscle/tendon injury and anthropometric adaptations in French competitive tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Genevois, Cyril; Klouche, Shahnaz; Rahme, Michel; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the upper limb anthropometric dimensions and a history of dominant upper limb injury in tennis players. Dominant and non-dominant wrist, forearm, elbow and arm circumferences, along with a history of dominant upper limb injuries, were assessed in 147 male and female players, assigned to four groups based on location of injury: wrist (n = 9), elbow (n = 25), shoulder (n = 14) and healthy players (n = 99). From anthropometric dimensions, bilateral differences in circumferences and in proportions were calculated. The wrist group presented a significant bilateral difference in arm circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between wrist and forearm, as well as between elbow and arm, compared to the healthy group (6.6 ± 3.1% vs. 4.9 ± 4.0%, P elbow group displayed asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and arm compared to the healthy group (-0.4 ± 4.3% vs. 1.5 ± 4.0%, P elbow circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and elbow when compared to the healthy group (5.8 ± 4.7% vs. 3.1 ± 4.8%, P tennis injury and asymmetry in upper limb proportions using high-tech measurements in symptomatic tennis players.

  11. Collagenolytic activity is produced by rabbit ligaments and tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.; Amiel, D.; Harper, E.

    1986-01-01

    The authors examined the patellar tendon (PT), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) from normal rabbits for collagenase activity. All three connective tissues contain large amounts of collagen and the catabolism of this structural protein is important to their integrity. The authors cultured each tissue in serum free medium for 14 days. Collagenase was produced by all three connective tissues after a lag period of up to 7 days, as detected by the 14 C-glycine peptide-release assay. Culture media that did not express enzyme the authors found to contain inhibitory activity. The collagenases and inhibitors from each tissue have been quantitated and characterized. After 9 days the collagenase activity for the rabbit periarticular tissues was 6.1 (PT), 4.4 (MCL) and 8.6 (ACL) units per milligram of secreted protein. The cleavage site of all three collagenases was found to be similar to that observed for rabbit skin collagenase, and generation of reaction products TC/sup A/ and TC/sup B/ was demonstrated by collagenases from PT, MCL and ACL. These results suggest that the metabolism of ligaments and tendon is regulated by the production of zymogen, active collagenase and inhibitor, similar to other connective tissues. The role of these components in joint injury and joint diseases is currently being investigated

  12. Metabolic and cytoprotective effects of in vivo peri-patellar hyaluronic acid injections in cultured tenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanna, F; Frizziero, A; Pagani, S; Giavaresi, G; Curzi, D; Falcieri, E; Marini, M; Abruzzo, P M; Martini, L; Fini, M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate tenocyte mechanobiology after sudden-detraining and to examine the hypothesis that repeated peri-patellar injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) on detrained patellar tendon (PT) may reduce and limit detrained-associated damage in tenocytes. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Untrained, Trained and Detrained. In the Detrained rats, the left tendon was untreated while the right tendon received repeated peri-patellar injections of either HA or saline (NaCl). Tenocyte morphology, metabolism and synthesis of C-terminal-propeptide of type I collagen, collagen-III, fibronectin, aggrecan, tenascin-c, interleukin-1β, matrix-metalloproteinase-1 and-3 were evaluated after 1, 3, 7 and 10 days of culture. Transmission-electronic-microscopy showed a significant increase in mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum in cultured tenocytes from Detrained-HA with respect to those from Detrained-NaCl. Additionally, Detrained-HA cultures showed a significantly higher proliferation rate and viability, and increased synthesis of C-terminal-Propeptide of type I collagen, fibronectin, aggrecan, tenascin-c and matrix-metalloproteinase-3 with respect to Detrained-NaCl ones, whereas synthesis of matrix-metalloproteinase-1 and interleukin-1β was decreased. Our study demonstrates that discontinuing training activity in the short-term alters tenocyte synthetic and metabolic activity and that repeated peri-patellar infiltrations of HA during detraining allow the maintenance of tenocyte anabolic activity.

  13. Can PRP effectively treat injured tendons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James H-C

    2014-01-01

    PRP is widely used to treat tendon and other tissue injuries in orthopaedics and sports medicine; however, the efficacy of PRP treatment on injured tendons is highly controversial. In this commentary, I reason that there are many PRP- and patient-related factors that influence the outcomes of PRP treatment on injured tendons. Therefore, more basic science studies are needed to understand the mechanism of PRP on injured tendons. Finally, I suggest that better understanding of the PRP action mechanism will lead to better use of PRP for the effective treatment of tendon injuries in clinics.

  14. Comparative validation of the radiographic and tomographic measurement of patellar height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Schueda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and validate the radiographic measurement of patellar height with computerized tomography scans. METHODS: Measured the patellar height through the lateral radiographic image supported by one foot and sagittal tomographic view of the knee in extension, flexion of 20°, and quadriceps contraction of 40 patients (80 knees, asymptomatic and no history of knee injuries using Insall-Salvati index. There were 20 adult females and 20 adult males. RESULTS: The height patellar index was higher in women of all images taken, in proportion. There was no statistical difference of patellar height index between the radiographics and tomographics images. CONCLUSION: The Insall-Salvati index in females was higher in all cases evaluated. Furthermore, it is possible to measure the patellar height index during tomographic study without distorting the results obtained, using to define the presence of patella alta or patella baja.

  15. THE EFFECTS OF AN EARLY RETURN TO TRAINING ON THE BONE-TENDON JUNCTION POST-ACUTE MICRO-INJURY HEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone-tendon junction (BTJ overuse injuries are common athletic and occupational problems. BTJ injuries may sometimes be caused by resuming training too early after injury. To study the effects of post-injury resuming training within 48 hours on the acute injury healing process, as it is often the case for athletes. Twelve mature female rabbits were assigned to one of the following groups: acute injury (AI, n = 6, post-injury early return to training (PIERT, n = 6 and normal control (CON, n = 6. Tissue specimens were harvested at week 4. The radiological and histological characteristics of the AI and PIERT groups were compared among the groups. The trabecular thickness of the PIERT group was significantly different from those of the AI and CON group. A histological evaluation revealed poor collagen fibre alignment, extensive scar tissue and lowered cell density in the AI and PIERT groups compared with the CON group, but no significant differences were observed between the AI group and the PIERT group. The fibrocartilage zone and proteoglycan area in the PIERT group were significantly different from those in AI group. No differences were observed in the Total VOI volume (TV, Object volume (OBV, Percent object volume (BV/TV and trabecular number (Tb.N among the AI, PIERT and CON groups. In conclusion, a repeatable animal model of bone-tendon junction acute micro-damage by puncture was established. Resuming training in 48 hours did not significantly deteriorate the BTJ injury healing, but improved bone remodelling and increased fibrocartilage zone thickness

  16. Venous thromboembolism rates in patients with lower limb immobilization after Achilles tendon injury are unchanged after the introduction of prophylactic aspirin: audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, I; Dunbar, L; Eathorne, A; Weatherall, M; Beasley, R

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: We audited venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Achilles injuries after the use of prophylactic aspirin. We audited 218 patients with Achilles injury requiring lower limb immobilization for ≥ 1 week. Fourteen patients (6.4%, 95% CI 3.6% to 10.5%) developed symptomatic and confirmed VTE. The incidence was similar to the 6.3% identified in the same patient group prior to the use of aspirin. We report a follow-up audit of the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients requiring lower limb immobilization because of Achilles tendon injury, since the introduction of a policy to routinely prescribe 100 mg of aspirin daily. We studied 218 patients aged 18-65 years who attended the Orthopaedic Assessment Unit at Wellington Hospital between January 2013 and December 2014 with Achilles tendon injury requiring lower limb immobilization for ≥ 1 week. Information on assessment of VTE risk, prescription of aspirin and symptomatic VTE occurring within 70 days of immobilization was obtained and compared with the same information collected with the same method in the same patient group between January 2006 and December 2007, before the policy to routinely prescribe aspirin was introduced. A total of 189 of 218 (93%) patients were prescribed aspirin, as compared with 0.5% previously. Fourteen patients (6.4%, 95% confidence interval 3.6-10.5%) developed symptomatic radiologically confirmed VTE (10 distal deep vein thromboses [DVTs], two proximal DVTs, one pulmonary embolism [PE], and one PE with distal DVT). Aspirin was prescribed to all patients who subsequently developed a VTE; in one of 14, a recognized risk factor was documented. The VTE incidence was similar to the 6.3% identified in the previous audit. Lower limb immobilization following Achilles tendon injury confers a high risk of VTE even with aspirin prophylaxis. Consideration should be given to prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin during lower limb immobilization following Achilles tendon

  17. The mechanism for efficacy of eccentric loading in Achilles tendon injury; an in vivo study in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, J D; Lichtwark, G A; Wolman, R L; Wilson, A M

    2008-10-01

    Degenerative disorders of tendons present an enormous clinical challenge. They are extremely common, prone to recur and existing medical and surgical treatments are generally unsatisfactory. Recently eccentric, but not concentric, exercises have been shown to be highly effective in managing tendinopathy of the Achilles (and other) tendons. The mechanism for the efficacy of these exercises is unknown although it has been speculated that forces generated during eccentric loading are of a greater magnitude. Our objective was to determine the mechanism for the beneficial effect of eccentric exercise in Achilles tendinopathy. Seven healthy volunteers performed eccentric and concentric loading exercises for the Achilles tendon. Tendon force and length changes were determined using a combination of motion analysis, force plate data and real-time ultrasound. There was no significant difference in peak tendon force or tendon length change when comparing eccentric with concentric exercises. However, high-frequency oscillations in tendon force occurred in all subjects during eccentric exercises but were rare in concentric exercises (P < 0.0001). These oscillations provide a mechanism to explain the therapeutic benefit of eccentric loading in Achilles tendinopathy and parallels recent evidence from bone remodelling, where the frequency of the loading cycles is of more significance than the absolute magnitude of the force.

  18. No effect of extracorporeal shockwave therapy on patellar tendinopathy in jumping athletes during the competitive season : A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, Johannes; Hartgens, Fred; Verhagen, Evert; van der Worp, Henk; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ronald

    Background: Patellar tendinopathy is a common overuse injury among jumping athletes. No evidence-based treatment guidelines exist. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) appears to be a promising treatment but its effectiveness has not been studied in athletes with patellar tendinopathy who have

  19. Patient guided Piezo-electric Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy as treatment for chronic severe patellar tendinopathy : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.; Dekker, F.; Pepping, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patellar tendinopathy is a common overuse injury for which no evidence-based treatment guidelines exist. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) seems to be an effective treatment for patellar tendinopathy but the most beneficial treatment strategies still need to be

  20. Jumper's Knee or Lander's Knee? : A Systematic Review of the Relation between Jump Biomechanics and Patellar Tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Worp, Henk; de Poel, H. J.; Diercks, R. L.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.; Zwerver, J.

    Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) is a common injury in sports that comprise jump actions. This article systematically reviews the literature examining the relation between patellar tendinopathy and take-off and landing kinematics in order to uncover risk factors and potential prevention

  1. Hip proprioceptors preferentially modulate reflexes of the leg in human spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onushko, Tanya; Hyngstrom, Allison

    2013-01-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferent feedback from hip muscles has been shown to trigger long-lasting, multijoint reflex responses in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). These reflexes could have important implications for control of leg movements during functional activities, such as walking. Because the control of leg movement relies on reflex regulation at all joints of the limb, we sought to determine whether stretch of hip muscles modulates reflex activity at the knee and ankle and, conversely, whether knee and ankle stretch afferents affect hip-triggered reflexes. A custom-built servomotor apparatus was used to stretch the hip muscles in nine chronic SCI subjects by oscillating the legs about the hip joint bilaterally from 10° of extension to 40° flexion. To test whether stretch-related feedback from the knee or ankle would be affected by hip movement, patellar tendon percussions and Achilles tendon vibration were delivered when the hip was either extending or flexing. Surface electromyograms (EMGs) and joint torques were recorded from both legs. Patellar tendon percussions and Achilles tendon vibration both elicited reflex responses local to the knee or ankle, respectively, and did not influence reflex responses observed at the hip. Rather, the movement direction of the hip modulated the reflex responses local to the joint. The patellar tendon reflex amplitude was larger when the perturbation was delivered during hip extension compared with hip flexion. The response to Achilles vibration was modulated by hip movement, with an increased tonic component during hip flexion compared with extension. These results demonstrate that hip-mediated sensory signals modulate activity in distal muscles of the leg and appear to play a unique role in modulation of spastic muscle activity throughout the leg in SCI. PMID:23615544

  2. Partial rupture of the Achilles tendon during a simulated fire ground task: insights obtained from a case report for the prevention and reporting of musculoskeletal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooyers, Chad E; Frost, David M; McGill, Stuart M; Callaghan, Jack P

    2013-04-01

    In this case report an incumbent firefighter partially ruptured his right Achilles tendon during a study of the physical demands of firefighting. Kinematics and kinetics of the lower limbs and trunk were collected while the firefighter performed two simulated fire ground tasks. From this unexpected event, two insights were obtained that should be considered in all future injury prevention and reporting efforts. (i) Consider the full anatomical linkage--the right ankle and knee kinematics leading up to the onset of injury trial were comparable to all preceding repetitions. However, there was a notable difference in the left knee starting position before the initiation of movement of the 37th hose-advance trial. (ii) Consider the cumulative load--the task in question comprised forward and backward phases. A marked difference was observed in the frontal-plane ankle moment during the return phase of the trial preceding the injury. Additionally, the magnitude of the left side vertical ground reaction force was comparable across all trials, suggesting that loads experienced by the right limb were also similar. This would indicate that the tolerance of the Achilles tendon and not the magnitude of the loading was altered. The unfortunate injury captured in this work provides insight into the complexity of characterizing the pathways of injury. It is recommended that future injury prevention and reporting efforts consider individuals' physical demands (at work and in life) and document the nature of loading (i.e., frequency, duration, magnitude, type) when considering the mechanism for injury. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shengkun; Ma, Kui; Li, Hong; Jiang, Jia; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired w...

  4. Neglected locked vertical patellar dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Gupta, Vinay; Sangwan, Sukhbir Singh; Kamboj, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Patellar dislocations occurring about the vertical and horizontal axis are rare and irreducible. The neglected patellar dislocation is still rarer. We describe the clinical presentation and management of a case of neglected vertical patellar dislocation in a 6 year-old boy who sustained an external rotational strain with a laterally directed force to his knee. Initially the diagnosis was missed and 2 months later open reduction was done. The increased tension generated by the rotation of the lateral extensor retinaculum kept the patella locked in the lateral gutter even with the knee in full extension. Traumatic patellar dislocation with rotation around a vertical axis has been described earlier, but no such neglected case has been reported to the best of our knowledge. PMID:23162154

  5. Neglected locked vertical patellar dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patellar dislocations occurring about the vertical and horizontal axis are rare and irreducible. The neglected patellar dislocation is still rarer. We describe the clinical presentation and management of a case of neglected vertical patellar dislocation in a 6 year-old boy who sustained an external rotational strain with a laterally directed force to his knee. Initially the diagnosis was missed and 2 months later open reduction was done. The increased tension generated by the rotation of the lateral extensor retinaculum kept the patella locked in the lateral gutter even with the knee in full extension. Traumatic patellar dislocation with rotation around a vertical axis has been described earlier, but no such neglected case has been reported to the best of our knowledge.

  6. Neovascularity in patellar tendinopathy and the response to eccentric training: a case report using Power Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreesh, Karen M; Riley, Sara J; Crotty, James M

    2013-12-01

    This report describes the case of an amateur soccer player with chronic patellar tendinopathy who underwent ultrasound imaging before and after engaging in an 8-week programme of eccentric exercise. On initial assessment, greyscale ultrasound imaging demonstrated tendon thickening and reduced echogenicity, while Power Doppler imaging demonstrated a large amount of neovascularity. After 8 weeks of an eccentric loading programme, the patient reported significantly improved symptoms and functional scores, while follow-up imaging demonstrated improvement in the echo appearance of the tendon and complete resolution of the neovascularity. The association between neovascularity and symptoms in tendinopathy research is conflicting, with a paucity of research in the area of patellar tendinopathy. While further research is needed to clarify the significance of greyscale and Power Doppler ultrasound changes in relation to symptoms in patellar tendinopathy, ultrasound imaging was shown to be a useful adjunct to diagnosis and outcome assessment in this case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Free Bone Plug Quadriceps Tendon Harvest and Suspensory Button Attachment for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Adrian; Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel; Khallouki, Youssef

    2016-06-01

    The most commonly used autografts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendons. Each has its advantages and limitations. The bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft can lead to more donor-site morbidity, and the hamstring autograft can be unpredictable in size. The quadriceps tendon, with or without a bone block, has been described as an alternative graft source and has been used especially in revision cases, but in recent years, it has attracted attention even for primary cases. We report a technique for harvesting a free bone quadriceps tendon graft and attaching an extracortical button for femoral fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  8. Patellar tendinopathy in young elite soccer- clinical and sonographical analysis of a German elite soccer academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Gerrit; Hammer, Thorsten; Karvouniaris, N; Feucht, M J; Konstantinidis, L; Südkamp, N P; Hirschmüller, A

    2017-08-08

    The prevalence of patellar tendinopathy is elevated in elite soccer compared to less explosive sports. While the burden of training hours and load is comparably high in youth elite players (age soccer academy. One hundred nineteen male youth soccer players (age 15,97 ± 2,24 years, height 174, 60 ± 10,16 cm, BMI 21, 24 ± 2,65) of the U-13 to U-23 teams were part of the study. Data acquisition included sport specific parameters such as footwear, amount of training hours, leg dominance, history of tendon pathologies, and clinical examination for palpatory pain, indurations, muscular circumference, and range of motion. Subjective complaints were measured with the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment Patellar (VISA-P) Score. Furthermore, sonographical examinations (Aplio SSA-770A/80; Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan) with 12-MHz multifrequency linear transducers (8-14 MHz) of both patellar tendons were performed with special emphasis on hyper- and hypo echogenic areas, diameter and neovascularization. The prevalence of patellar tendinopathies was 13.4%. Seventy-five percent of the players complained of pain of their dominant leg with onset of pain at training in 87.5%. The injured players showed a medium amount of 10.34 ± 3.85 training hours and a medium duration of symptoms of 11.94 ± 18.75 weeks. Two thirds of players with patellar tendinopathy were at the age of 15-17 (Odds ratio 1.89) while no differences between players of the national or regional league were observed. In case of patellar tendinopathy, VISA-P was significantly lower in comparison to healthy players (mean ± SD 76.80 ± 28.56 points vs. 95.85 ± 10.37). The clinical examination revealed local pain at the distal patella, pain at stretching, and thickening of the patellar tendon (p = 0.02). The mean tendon diameter measured 2 cm distally to the patella was 4.10 ± 0.68 mm with a significantly increased diameter of 0.15 mm in case of an underlying tendinopathy (p = 0.00). The

  9. Treatment of Patellar Lower Pole Fracture with Modified Titanium Cable Tension Band Plus Patellar Tibial Tunnel Steel "8" Reduction Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaming; Wang, Decheng; He, Zhiliang; Shi, Hao

    2018-01-08

    To determine the efficacy of modified titanium tension band plus patellar tendon tunnel steel 8 "reduction band" versus titanium cable tension band fixation for the treatment of patellar lower pole fracture. 58 patients with lower patella fracture were enrolled in this study, including 30 patients treated with modified titanium cable tension band plus patellar tibial tunnel wire "8" tension band internal fixation (modified group), and 28 patients with titanium cable tension band fixation. All patients were followed up for 9∼15 months with an average of 11.6 months. Knee flexion was significantly improved in the modified group than in the titanium cable tension band group (111.33 ± 13 degrees versus 98.21 ± 21.70 degrees, P = 0.004). The fracture healing time showed no significant difference. At the end of the follow-up, the improvement excellent rate was 93.33% in the modified group, and 82.14% in the titanium cable tension band group. Titanium cable tension band internal fixation loosening was found in 2 cases, including 1 case of treatment by two surgeries without loose internal fixation. The modified titanium cable tension band with "8" tension band fixation showed better efficacy for lower patella fractures than titanium cable tension band fixation.

  10. One-stage bilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with use of hamstring tendon autografts: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Sajovic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bilateral ACL rupture is not a common clinical problem, but the incidence of the bilateral knee injuries is increasing especially within highly sports active population. Mechanism of the injury rarely causes simultaneous bilateral ACL tear. Usually unilateral injury of the knee has occurred and later on contralateral injury has taken place.Patient and methods: Case report presented an unusual problem of a patient with chronic bilateral ACL – deficient knees and constitutionally very thin patellar tendons. Author decided to perform onestage bilateral ACL reconstructions using hamstring tendon autographs so as not too weaken his quadriceps muscles by compromising his extensor mechanism.Results: At three years follow-up the patient’s opinion was that both ACL reconstructed knees had normal function, and he had returned to his preinjury activity level. The overall result of the Lysholm knee score for left knee was 100 and for right one 95. Both knees had full range of motion, Lachman and pivot shift signs were negative.Conclusions: Two-stage bilateral ACL reconstruction is much more time consuming for the patient and expensive for health insurance, so one-stage bilateral ACL reconstruction is a logical solution of the problem.

  11. High-resolution MRI using a microscopy coil for the diagnosis of recurrent lateral patellar dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Yuki; Fujii, Masahiko; Muratsu, Hirotsugu; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kawamitsu, Hideaki; Sugimura, Kazuro; Shibanuma, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been commonly used for the preoperative evaluation of recurrent lateral patellar dislocation (RLPD). The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of high-resolution MRI (HR-MRI) with a microscopy coil for diagnosing RLPD. The study group consisted of 15 patients with clinically diagnosed RLPD and 10 normal volunteers. All studies were performed on a 1.5-T MR system. First, conventional MRIs of the whole knee joint were obtained using the knee coil. Then HR-MRI scans using a microscopy coil in the medial aspect of the patella were obtained at the level of the superior pole of the patella, targeting the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL). The acquired HR-MRIs with RLPD were reviewed concerning the MPFL injury and the patellar injury. The MPFL was distinguished as a separate ligament, and the layer structure of the patellar cartilage was visualized clearly in all volunteers. The MPFL injury was visualized in 12 cases (87%); it included discontinuity, thickening, and loosening. The patellar injury was visualized in 11 cases (73%), which included dissecans of the medial margin and cartilage injuries. HR-MRI with a microscopy coil provides precise information of the MPFL and patellar cartilage injury for the diagnosis of RLPD. (author)

  12. [Achilles tendon rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermann, H; Hüfner, T; Tscherne, H

    2000-03-01

    The treatment of acute of Achilles tendon rupture experienced a dynamic development in the last ten years. Decisive for this development was the application of MRI and above all the ultrasonography in the diagnostics of the pathological changes and injuries of tendons. The question of rupture morphology as well as different courses of healing could be now evaluated objectively. These advances led consequently to new modalities in treatment concepts and rehabilitation protocols. The decisive input for improvements of the outcome results and particularly the shortening of the rehabilitation period came with introduction of the early functional treatment in contrast to immobilizing plaster treatment. In a prospective randomized study (1987-1989) at the Trauma Dept. of the Hannover Medical School could show no statistical differences comparing functional non-operative with functional operative therapy with a special therapy boot (Variostabil/Adidas). The crucial criteria for therapy selection results from the sonographically measured position of the tendon stumps in plantar flexion (20 degrees). With complete adaptation of the tendons' ends surgical treatment does not achieve better results than non-operative functional treatment in term of tendon healing and functional outcome. Regarding the current therapeutic standards each method has is advantages and disadvantages. Both, the operative and non-operative functional treatment enable a stable tendon healing with a low risk of re-rupture (1-2%). Meanwhile there is consensus for early functional after-treatment of the operated Achilles' tendons. There seems to be a trend towards non-operative functional treatment in cases of adequate sonographical findings, or to minimal invasive surgical techniques.

  13. Treatment of recurrent patellar dislocation via knee arthroscopy combined with C-arm fluoroscopy and reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wang, Hongbo; He, Yun; Si, Yu; Zhou, Hongyu; Wang, Xin

    2018-06-01

    Recurrent patellar dislocations were treated via knee arthroscopy combined with C-arm fluoroscopy, and reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligaments. Between October 2013 and March 2017, 52 cases of recurrent patellar dislocation [27 males and 25 females; age, 16-47 years (mean, 21.90 years)] were treated. Arthroscopic exploration was performed and patellofemoral joint cartilage injuries were repaired. It was subsequently determined whether it was necessary to release the lateral patellofemoral support belt. Pre-operative measurements were used to decide whether tibial tubercle osteotomy was required. Medial patellofemoral ligaments were reconstructed using autologous semitendinosus tendons. Smith and Nephew model 3.5 line anchors were used to double-anchor the medial patellofemoral margin. On the femoral side, the medial patellofemoral ligament was fixed using 7-cm, absorbable, interfacial compression screws. All cases were followed for 1-40 months (average, 21 months). The Q angle, tibial tuberosity trochlear groove distance, Insall-Salvati index, patellofemoral angle, lateral patellofemoral angle and lateral shift were evaluated on X-Ray images using the picture archiving and communication system. Subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) knee joint functional scores and Lysholm scores were recorded. Post-operative fear was absent, and no patellar re-dislocation or re-fracture was noted during follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the patellofemoral angle (0.22±4.23°), lateral patellofemoral angle (3.44±1.30°), and lateral shift (0.36+0.14°) differed significantly from the pre-operative values (all, Ppatellofemoral ligament was effective.

  14. [Overuse injury syndromes of the knee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećina, M; Bojanić, I; Haspl, M

    2001-12-01

    Overuse injuries are frequent in the knee joint. The reason for this is that the knee joint is engaged in all sports activities. Furthermore, the joint area has numerous attachment points for muscles and tendons and numerous bursae. Another reason is that the specific joint between the patella and femur (patellofemoral joint) constitutes a part of the knee joint. Speaking in general terms, all overuse injuries in the knee joint can be divided in four groups according to the aspect: anterior aspect--patellofemoral pain syndrome, patellar tendinitis (jumper's knee), Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding Larson Johanson disease, stress fracture of the patella, fat pad syndrome; medial aspect--plica syndrome, semimembranosus tendinitis, pes anserinus tendinitis (bursitis), breaststroker's knee, medial retinaculitis; lateral aspect--Iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee), Popliteal Tendinitis, Bicipital tendinitis; posterior aspect--fabellitis, medial gastrocnemius strain. There are numerous possible reasons for pain caused by overuse injuries around the knee joint, but two are the most frequent: patellar tendinitis (jumper's knee) and Iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee). This paper gives a brief overview of overuse injuries of the knee joint including their definition, anatomy, aetiology, clinical symptoms and signs, and non-operative and surgical treatment.

  15. Partial tear of the quadriceps tendon in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, George

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of partial rupture of the quadriceps tendon in an 8-year-old girl. This is one of the youngest patients reported with a quadriceps tendon rupture, an entity seen predominantly in middle-aged people. The strength of the muscle tendon unit in a child makes tendon injuries extremely unusual as compared to apophyseal avulsions. The MR imaging findings of this unusual pediatric injury are illustrated. (orig.)

  16. Tendon overuse syndrome: imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, W.; Nehrer, S.; Muellner, T.; Kainberger, F.; Ulreich, N.; Bernhard, C.; Imhof, H.

    2001-01-01

    Injuries of muscles and tendons occur commonly during various sporting activities and in most cases the athletes feel such an accident to be sudden and unavoidable. The rupture of a tendon, however, has to be considered in many cases as the final stage of a long-standing progressive degeneration of collagen fibers. This process con be described as 'tendon overuse syndrome (TOS)'. Diagnostic imaging modalities, especially sonography and MRI, are suitable to detect and analyse the different stages of this syndrome and the degree of morphological abnormalities. The first stage is painful functional derangement, followed by tendovaginitis, peritendinitis, or bursitis. The third stage is tendinosis resulting from biomechanical or ischaemic injury of tendon fibers which may eventually be followed by partial or complete rupture. Regional or individual specifications of these four stages may occur at anatomically predisposing sites, so-called critical zones, or during periods of specific proneness, the vulnerable phases. (author)

  17. Quadriceps tendon autograft for arthroscopic knee ligament reconstruction: use it now, use it often.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheean, Andrew J; Musahl, Volker; Slone, Harris S; Xerogeanes, John W; Milinkovic, Danko; Fink, Christian; Hoser, Christian

    2018-04-28

    Traditional bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon ACL grafts are not without limitations. A growing body of anatomic, biomechanical and clinical data has demonstrated the utility of quadriceps tendon autograft in arthroscopic knee ligament reconstruction. The quadriceps tendon autograft provides a robust volume of tissue that can be reliably harvested, mitigating the likelihood of variably sized grafts and obviating the necessity of allograft augmentation. Modern, minimally invasive harvest techniques offer the advantages of low rates of donor site morbidity and residual extensor mechanism strength deficits. New data suggest that quadriceps tendon autograft may possess superior biomechanical characteristics when compared with bone-patella tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft. However, there have been very few direct, prospective comparisons between the clinical outcomes associated with quadriceps tendon autograft and other autograft options (eg, hamstring tendon and bone-patellar tendon-bone). Nevertheless, quadriceps tendon autograft should be one of the primary options in any knee surgeon's armamentarium. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Accuracy of MRI technique in measuring tendon cross-sectional area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, R. B.; Elbrønd (Bibs), Vibeke Sødring

    2014-01-01

    , but the accuracy in relation to actual tendon dimensions has never been investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare tendon CSA measured by MRI with that measured in vitro with the mould casting technique. The knee of a horse was MRI-scanned with 1.5 and 3 tesla, and two examiners measured the patellar...... tendon CSA. Thereafter, the patellar tendon of the horse was completely dissected and embedded in an alginate cast. The CSA of the embedded tendon was measured directly by optical imaging of the cast impression. 1.5 tesla grey tendon CSA and 3 tesla grey tendon CSA were 16.5% and 13.2% lower than...... the mould tendon CSA, respectively. Also, 3 tesla tendon CSA, based on the red-green border on the National Institute of Health (NIH) colour scale, was lower than the mould tendon CSA by 2.8%. The typical error between examiners was below 2% for all the measured CSA. The typical error between examiners...

  19. Patellar Tendinopathy: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, David; Figueroa, Francisco; Calvo, Rafael

    2016-12-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common cause of pain in athletes' knees. Historically, it has been related to jumping sports, such as volleyball and basketball. Repetitive jumping generates a considerable load of energy in the extensor mechanism, leading to symptoms. The main pathophysiologic phenomenon in patellar tendinopathy is tendinosis, which is a degenerative disorder rather than an inflammatory disorder; therefore, the other popular term for this disease, tendinitis, is not appropriate. The nonsurgical treatment of patellar tendinopathy is focused on eccentric exercises and often has good results. Other experimental options, with variable levels of evidence, are available for recalcitrant cases. Surgical treatment is indicated for cases that are refractory to nonsurgical treatment. Open or arthroscopic surgery can be performed; the two methods are comparable, but arthroscopic surgery results in a faster recovery time.

  20. A systematic review of the concept and clinical applications of bone marrow aspirate concentrate in tendon pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Mohamed A.

    2017-01-01

    , augmentation of tendo-achilles tendon (n = 1, treatment of gluteal tendon injuries (n = 1, management of elbow epicondylitis (n = 2, management of patellar tendinopathy (n = 1 and complications related to BMAC (n = 5. Multiple experimental studies investigated the use of BMAC for tendon repair; nonetheless, there are only limited clinical studies available in this field. Unfortunately, due to the scarcity of studies, which were mainly case series, the current level of evidence is weak. We strongly recommend further future randomised controlled studies in this field to allow scientists and clinicians make evidence-based conclusions.

  1. Bioreactor design for tendon/ligament engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake; Smith, David W; Lloyd, David G; Zheng, Ming H

    2013-04-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments.

  2. Patient guided Piezo-electric Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy as treatment for chronic severe patellar tendinopathy: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerver, Johannes; Dekker, Femke; Pepping, Gert-Jan

    2010-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common overuse injury for which no evidence-based treatment guidelines exist. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) seems to be an effective treatment for patellar tendinopathy but the most beneficial treatment strategies still need to be ascertained. Aim of this pilot study was to investigate if patient guided Piezo-electric, focused ESWT, without local anesthesia is a safe and well tolerated treatment which improves pain and function in patients with patellar tendinopathy. Nineteen male athletes with severe chronic patellar tendinopathy received 3 patient guided focused medium to high energy ESWT treatments at a weekly interval. Before and after 3 months VISA-P and VAS (pain) scores were recorded. Data on side effects and complications of treatment were also collected. No serious complications were reported and patients tolerated the treatment well. Mean VISA-P score improved from 36.1 to 50.1 (p patellar tendinopathy.

  3. Mechanical properties of the human Achilles tendon, in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Nielsen, C H; Hegnsvad, S

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography has been widely applied for in vivo measurements of tendon mechanical properties. Assessments of human Achilles tendon mechanical properties have received great interest. Achilles tendon injuries predominantly occur in the tendon region between the Achilles-soleus myotendinous...... junction and Achilles-calcaneus osteotendinous junction i.e. in the free Achilles tendon. However, there has been no adequate ultrasound based method for quantifying the mechanical properties of the free human Achilles tendon. This study aimed to: 1) examine the mechanical properties of the free human...

  4. Concurrent patellar fracture and lateral collateral ligament avulsion as a result of trauma in three horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Jonathan; Plevin, Sarah; Taylor, Elizabeth

    2012-05-15

    3 horses were evaluated because of lameness and swelling of the stifle joint subsequent to trauma. All horses had characteristic clinical signs of stifle joint pain and effusion. A medial patellar fracture and lateral collateral ligament avulsion fracture were visible ultrasonographically in each. Radiography, including standard as well as flexed lateromedial, cranioproximal-craniodistal oblique (skyline patellar), and laterally stressed caudocranial views, revealed similar findings. Arthroscopic surgery to remove the patellar fracture was attempted in 1 horse with severe desmitis of the lateral collateral ligament; it remained lame afterward. The other 2 horses, with less severe collateral ligament damage, were managed conservatively and returned to athletic use, despite the lack of surgical intervention to repair the patellar fractures. Special radiographic views were necessary for diagnosis of medial patellar fracture and lateral collateral ligament avulsion fracture in the 3 horses. Ultrasonographic findings pertaining to the collateral ligament may be prognostically important in such situations. The severity of a fracture involving ligament avulsion may be the limiting factor in horses with this combined injury, and this factor should be considered prior to attempting surgical correction of patellar fractures.

  5. Calcaneal tendon: imaging findings; Tendao calcaneo: avaliacao por imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montandon, Cristiano; Fonseca, Cristiano Rezio; Montandon Junior, Marcelo Eustaquio [Colegio Brasileiro de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: crismontandon@hotmail.com; Lobo, Leonardo Valadares; Ribeiro, Flavia Aparecida de Souza; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos [Goias Univ., Goiania, GO (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem e Anatomia Patologica

    2003-12-01

    We reviewed the radiological and clinical features of 23 patients with calcaneal tendon diseases, who were submitted to ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. The objective of this study was to characterize the lesions for a precise diagnosis of calcaneal tendon injuries. A wide range of calcaneal tendon diseases include degenerative lesions, inflammation of the peritendinous tissue such as peritendinitis and bursitis, and rupture. Imaging methods are essential in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of calcaneal tendon diseases. (author)

  6. Histological Changes in the Proximal and Distal Tendon Stumps Following Transection of Achilles Tendon in the Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Mawlana, Ola Helmi; Mohammed Ahmed, Raeesa Abdel-Twab; Hawary, Khalid

    2016-05-01

    To determine tendon stump changes following unrepaired Achilles tendon lacerations in an animal model. An experimental study. King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from October 2013 to January 2014. Arabbit model was developed and studied tendon retraction and histological changes in the proximal and distal stumps following transection of the Achilles tendon. Over a period of 12 weeks, retraction of the distal tendon stump was minimal (2 - 3 mm). In contrast, retraction of the proximal tendon stump peaked to reach 6 mm at 4 weeks post-injury and plateaued to reach 7 - 8 mm at the 12-week interval. Following complete transection of the Achilles tendon, tendon retraction correlated with the density of myofibroblast expression within the tendon stump. Further research is needed to investigate the pathophysiology of these findings.

  7. Histological Changes in the Proximal and Distal Tendon Stumps Following Transection of Achilles Tendon in the Rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qattan, M. M.; Hawary, K.; Mawlana, O. H.; Ahmed, R. A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine tendon stump changes following unrepaired Achilles tendon lacerations in an animal model. Study Design: An experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from October 2013 to January 2014. Methodology: Arabbit model was developed and studied tendon retraction and histological changes in the proximal and distal stumps following transection of the Achilles tendon. Result: Over a period of 12 weeks, retraction of the distal tendon stump was minimal (2 - 3 mm). In contrast, retraction of the proximal tendon stump peaked to reach 6 mm at 4 weeks post-injury and plateaued to reach 7 - 8 mm at the 12-week interval. Conclusion: Following complete transection of the Achilles tendon, tendon retraction correlated with the density of myofibroblast expression within the tendon stump. Further research is needed to investigate the pathophysiology of these findings. (author)

  8. [Patellar instability : diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Trieu Hoai Nam; Martin, Robin

    2017-12-13

    The aim of this paper is to present recent advances in surgical management of patellar instability. Several anatomical factors were reported to promote instability. We propose to classify them in two groups. Extra articular factors are valgus and torsion deformity. Articular factors include trochlea and patella dysplasia, tibial tubercle lateralization and medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) insufficiency. Acute patellar dislocations are treated conservatively, with exception for osteochondral and MPFL avulsion fractures that require acute reinsertion. Surgery is considered for recurrent instability. As we aim for a correction of all contributing elements, we prefer a two stages approach. Extra articular factors are treated first by osteotomy, followed by articular factors after 4-6 months. This allows separate rehabilitation protocols.

  9. Magnetotherapy: The quest for tendon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesqueira, Tamagno; Costa-Almeida, Raquel; Gomes, Manuela E

    2018-05-09

    Tendons are mechanosensitive tissues that connect and transmit the forces generated by muscles to bones by allowing the conversion of mechanical input into biochemical signals. These physical forces perform the fundamental work of preserving tendon homeostasis assuring body movements. However, overloading causes tissue injuries, which leads us to the field of tendon regeneration. Recently published reviews have broadly shown the use of biomaterials and different strategies to attain tendon regeneration. In this review, our focus is the use of magnetic fields as an alternative therapy, which has demonstrated clinical relevance in tendon medicine because of their ability to modulate cell fate. Yet the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms still need to be elucidated. While providing a brief outlook about specific signalling pathways and intracellular messengers as framework in play by tendon cells, application of magnetic fields as a subcategory of physical forces is explored, opening up a compelling avenue to enhance tendon regeneration. We outline here useful insights on the effects of magnetic fields both at in vitro and in vivo levels, particularly on the expression of tendon genes and inflammatory cytokines, ultimately involved in tendon regeneration. Subsequently, the potential of using magnetically responsive biomaterials in tendon tissue engineering is highlighted and future directions in magnetotherapy are discussed. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Serial superficial digital flexor tendon biopsies for diagnosing and monitoring collagenase-induced tendonitis in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. de Lacerda Neto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of a biopsy technique by performing serial evaluations of tissue samples of the forelimb superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT in healthy horses and in horses subjected to superficial digital flexor tendonitis induction. Eight adult horses were evaluated in two different phases (P, control (P1 and tendonitis-induced (P2. At P1, the horses were subjected to five SDFT biopsies of the left forelimb, with 24 hours (h of interval. Clinical and ultrasonographic (US examinations were performed immediately before the tendonitis induction, 24 and 48 h after the procedure. The biopsied tendon tissues were analyzed through histology. P2 evaluations were carried out three months later, when the same horses were subjected to tendonitis induction by injection of bacterial collagenase into the right forelimb SDFT. P2 clinical and US evaluations, and SDFT biopsies were performed before, and after injury induction at the following time intervals: after 24, 48, 72 and 96 h, and after 15, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 days. The biopsy technique has proven to be easy and quick to perform and yielded good tendon samples for histological evaluation. At P1 the horses did not show signs of localised inflammation, pain or lameness, neither SDFT US alterations after biopsies, showing that the biopsy procedure per se did not risk tendon integrity. Therefore, this procedure is feasible for routine tendon histological evaluations. The P2 findings demonstrate a relation between the US and histology evaluations concerning induced tendonitis evolution. However, the clinical signs of tendonitis poorly reflected the microscopic tissue condition, indicating that clinical presentation is not a reliable parameter for monitoring injury development. The presented method of biopsying SDFT tissue in horses enables the serial collection of material for histological analysis causing no clinical signs and tendon damage seen

  11. Imaging assessment of patellar instability and its treatment in children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Arthur B.; Sharafinski, Mark [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Medical College of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 1997, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Laor, Tal; Zbojniewicz, Andrew M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Transient patellar dislocation is a common entity in children and adolescents, characterized by lateral dislocation of the patella, usually with spontaneous reduction. Many predisposing conditions have been described, including trochlear dysplasia, excessive lateral patellar tilt, patella alta and lateralization of the tibial tuberosity. Associated injuries are bone bruises of the patella and lateral femoral condyle, tears of the medial retinaculum that include the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), tears of the vastus medialis obliquus muscle, injuries of articular cartilage, and intra-articular bodies. Children who are refractory to conservative management, have a large cartilage defect, or are at substantial risk for recurrent dislocations are candidates for surgical procedures to prevent future dislocations. Procedures can include MPFL repair or reconstruction, tibial tubercle repositioning and lateral retinacular release. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the imaging findings of transient patellar dislocation in the acute setting, the normal imaging appearance after surgical intervention, and post-surgical complications. (orig.)

  12. Imaging assessment of patellar instability and its treatment in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, Arthur B.; Sharafinski, Mark; Laor, Tal; Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Transient patellar dislocation is a common entity in children and adolescents, characterized by lateral dislocation of the patella, usually with spontaneous reduction. Many predisposing conditions have been described, including trochlear dysplasia, excessive lateral patellar tilt, patella alta and lateralization of the tibial tuberosity. Associated injuries are bone bruises of the patella and lateral femoral condyle, tears of the medial retinaculum that include the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), tears of the vastus medialis obliquus muscle, injuries of articular cartilage, and intra-articular bodies. Children who are refractory to conservative management, have a large cartilage defect, or are at substantial risk for recurrent dislocations are candidates for surgical procedures to prevent future dislocations. Procedures can include MPFL repair or reconstruction, tibial tubercle repositioning and lateral retinacular release. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the imaging findings of transient patellar dislocation in the acute setting, the normal imaging appearance after surgical intervention, and post-surgical complications. (orig.)

  13. The Influence of External Load on Quadriceps Muscle and Tendon Dynamics during Jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Jacob E; Newton, Robert U; Cormie, Prue; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2017-11-01

    Tendons possess both viscous (rate-dependent) and elastic (rate-independent) properties that determine tendon function. During high-speed movements external loading increases both the magnitude (FT) and rate (RFDT) of tendon loading. The influence of external loading on muscle and tendon dynamics during maximal vertical jumping was explored. Ten resistance-trained men performed parallel-depth, countermovement vertical jumps with and without additional load (0%, 30%, 60%, and 90% of maximum squat lift strength), while joint kinetics and kinematics, quadriceps tendon length (LT) and patellar tendon FT and RFDT were estimated using integrated ultrasound, motion analysis and force platform data and muscle tendon modelling. Estimated FT and RFDT, but not peak LT, increased with external loading. Temporal comparisons between 0% and 90% loads revealed that FT was greater with 90% loading throughout the majority of the movement (11%-81% and 87%-95% movement duration). However, RFDT was greater with 90% load only during the early movement initiation phase (8%-15% movement duration) but was greater in the 0% load condition later in the eccentric phase (27%-38% movement duration). LT was longer during the early movement (12%-23% movement duration) but shorter in the late eccentric and early concentric phases (48%-55% movement duration) with 90% load. External loading positively influenced peak FT and RFDT but tendon strain appeared unaffected, suggesting no additive effect of external loading on patellar tendon lengthening during human jumping. Temporal analysis revealed that external loading resulted in a large initial RFDT that may have caused dynamic stiffening of the tendon and attenuated tendon strain throughout the movement. These results suggest that external loading influences tendon lengthening in both a load- and movement-dependent manner.

  14. Achillodynia. Radiological imaging of acute and chronic overuse injuries of the Achilles tendon; Achillodynie. Radiologische Bildgebung bei akuten und chronischen Ueberlastungsschaeden der Achillessehne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syha, R.; Springer, F.; Grosse, U. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology; Ketelsen, D.; Kramer, U.; Horger, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Ipach, I. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Orthopaedic Surgery; Schick, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology

    2013-11-15

    In the past decades the incidence of acute and chronic disorders of the Achilles tendon associated with sport-induced overuse has steadily increased. Besides acute complete or partial ruptures, achillodynia (Achilles tendon pain syndrome), which is often associated with tendon degeneration, represents the most challenging entity regarding clinical diagnostics and therapy. Therefore, the use of imaging techniques to differentiate tendon disorders and even characterize structure alterations is of growing interest. This review article discusses the potential of different imaging techniques with respect to the diagnosis of acute and chronic tendon disorders. In this context, the most commonly used imaging techniques are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), B-mode ultrasound, and color-coded Doppler ultrasound (US). These modalities allow the detection of acute tendon ruptures and advanced chronic tendon disorders. However, the main disadvantages are still the low capabilities in the detection of early-stage degeneration and difficulties in the assessment of treatment responses during follow-up examinations. Furthermore, differentiation between chronic partial ruptures and degeneration remains challenging. The automatic contour detection and texture analysis may allow a more objective and quantitative interpretation, which might be helpful in the monitoring of tendon diseases during follow-up examinations. Other techniques to quantify tendon-specific MR properties, e.g. based on ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences, also seem to have great potential with respect to the precise detection of degenerative tendon disorders and their differentiation at a very early stage. (orig.)

  15. Does patellar rim electrocautery have deleterious effects on patellar cartilage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Niloofar; Jaberi, Fereidoon Mojtahed; Pakbaz, Sara; Vosoughi, Amir Reza; Jaberi, Mahrad Mojtahed

    2014-03-01

    Circumpatellar electrocauterization to destroy pain receptors during total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing is commonly used to decrease postoperative knee pain. We aimed to evaluate the effect of denervation with electrocauterization on patellar cartilage. Twenty rabbits were randomly assigned to two equally sized case and control groups. The rabbits in the case group underwent surgery via the anterior midline skin incision and medial parapatellar arthrotomy, followed by denervation electrocauterization at a depth of 1 mm and a distance of 3 mm from the outer border of the patella. In the control group, surgery was identical to that performed in the case group, but without patellar denervation. Twelve weeks after surgery, all rabbits were sacrificed. Range of motion, macroscopic evaluation of cartilage using modified Outerbridge scoring, and histopathological assessment using a modified histologic scoring system for cartilage were evaluated. Three rabbits died during the study. Nine cases and eight animals from the control group were included in the final evaluation. All rabbits had passive full range of motion. Mean Outerbridge score was 2.0 in the case group and 0.37 in the control group (p=0.002). There were statistically significant differences in cellularity (p=0.016), loss of matrix (p=0.004), and clustering of chondrocytes (p=0.008) between the two groups. Microscopic variables as a whole were statistically significant (p=0.001). Circumpatellar electrocauterization may result in cartilage destruction. So, we encourage caution in using routine electrocauterization in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. level II. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Routine patellar resurfacing using an inset patellar technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurson, Conor

    2012-02-01

    The management of the patella in total knee arthroplasty still causes controversy. Whether or not to resurface the patella in primary total knee arthroplasty remains unclear. In this study we examined 220 consecutive total knee replacements, by a single surgeon, where the patella was routinely resurfaced using the inset technique. All patellae were suitable for resurfacing. Patellar thickness was not altered in 54.5% of patellae. In 97.2% the patella was within 2 mm of the original thickness. There were no significant complications. In this study we have found that the inset technique of patella resurfacing in total knee replacement is a simple and safe resurfacing procedure.

  17. The impact of patellar tendinopathy on sports and work performance in active athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, Astrid J; Koolhaas, Wendy; Zwerver, Johannes; Diercks, Ron L.; Nieuwenhuis, Kari; Van Der Worp, Henk; Brouwer, Sandra; Van Den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Greater insight into sports and work performance of athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT) will help establish the severity of this common overuse injury. Primary aim of this study is to investigate the impact of PT on sports and work performance. Seventy seven active athletes with PT (50 males;

  18. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy : A systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Worp, Henk; van Ark, Mathijs; Roerink, Saskia; Pepping, Gert-Jan; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Zwerver, Johannes

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) is an injury with a high prevalence in sports. Knowledge of risk factors is essential for developing preventive measures and rehabilitation programmes. However, risk factors associated with PT have not yet been systematically studied. This review was undertaken to identify

  19. Mechanical properties of human bone-tendon-bone grafts preserved by different methods and radiation sterilised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, A.; Gut, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Patellar tendon auto and allografts are commonly used in orthopaedic surgery for reconstruction of the anterior crucial ligaments (ACL). Autografts are mainly used for primary reconstruction, while allografts are useful for revision surgery. To avoid the risk of infection diseases transmission allografts should be radiation-sterilised. As radiation-sterilisation is supposed to decrease the mechanical strength of tendon tissue, it is important to establish methods of allografts preservation and sterilisation resulting in their best quality and safety. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to compare the tensile strength of the central one third of human patellar tendon (as used for ACL reconstruction), preserved by different methods (deep fresh freezing, lyophilisation) and subsequently radiation-sterilised with doses of 0 (control), 25, 50 or 100 kGy. Bone-tendon-bone grafts were prepared from cadaveric human patella tendon with both patellar and tibial attachments. BTB grafts were preserved by deep freezing, glicerolisation or lyophilisation and radiation-sterilised with doses of 0 (control), 25, 50 or 100 kGy. To estimate mechanical properties all samples were subjected to tensile tests to failure using Instron system. Before these tests all lyophilised grafts were rehydrated. We found decrease of tensile strength of irradiated grafts compared to non-irradiated controls. Obtained results of the mechanical testing of studied grafts indicate their potential usefulness for clinical applications.(Author)

  20. IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee report 2014: from the IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee (Chairman: Jin Bo Tang).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jin Bo; Chang, James; Elliot, David; Lalonde, Donald H; Sandow, Michael; Vögelin, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Hand surgeons continue to search for the best surgical flexor tendon repair and treatment of the tendon sheaths and pulleys, and they are attempting to establish postoperative regimens that fit diverse clinical needs. It is the purpose of this report to present the current views, methods, and suggestions of six senior hand surgeons from six different countries - all experienced in tendon repair and reconstruction. Although certainly there is common ground, the report presents provocative views and approaches. The report reflects an update in the views of the committee. We hope that it is helpful to surgeons and therapists in treating flexor tendon injuries.

  1. Comparing the effects of eccentric training with eccentric training and static stretching exercises in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy. A controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos; Pantelis, Manias; Kalliopi, Stasinopoulou

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of eccentric training and eccentric training with static stretching exercises in the management of patellar tendinopathy. Controlled clinical trial. Rheumatology and rehabilitation centre. Forty-three patients who had patellar tendinopathy for at least three months. They were allocated to two groups by alternative allocation. Group A (n = 22) was treated with eccentric training of patellar tendon and static stretching exercises of quadriceps and hamstrings and Group B (n = 21) received eccentric training of patellar tendon. All patients received five treatments per week for four weeks. Pain and function were evaluated using the VISA-P score at baseline, at the end of treatment (week 4), and six months (week 24) after the end of treatment. At the end of treatment, there was a rise in VISA-P score in both groups compared with baseline (Peccentric training and static stretching exercises produced the largest effect (PEccentric training and static stretching exercises is superior to eccentric training alone to reduce pain and improve function in patients with patellar tendinopathy at the end of the treatment and at follow-up.

  2. [Treatment options for patellar tendinopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthon, V B; Borloz, S; Ziltener, J-L

    2012-07-25

    Patellar tendinopathy is also called jumper's knee because of its high incidence in athletes with jumping or cutting activities as soccer, basketball, volleyball. Many different treatment methods have been described. However, no consensus exists regarding the optimal treatment for this condition. According to the literature, eccentric exercise-based physical therapy should be proposed first because of its strong scientific evidence. Shockwave therapy and injections may be useful but their real efficacy still has to be proven by randomized controlled study. For patients recalcitrant to more conservative options, operative management may be indicated.

  3. Relationship between patellar mobility and patellofemoral joint cartilage degeneration after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Susumu; Kurokouchi, Kazutoshi; Takahashi, Shigeo; Yoda, Masaki; Yamamoto, Ryuichiro; Sakai, Tadahiro

    2017-11-01

    Patellofemoral cartilage degeneration is a potential complication of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) surgery. Hypomobility of the patella in the coronal plane is often observed after ACLR. Few studies, however, have examined the relationship between cartilage degeneration in the patellofemoral joint and mobility after ACLR. The present study investigated 1) the coronal mobility of the patella after ACLR, 2) the relationship between patellar mobility and cartilage degeneration of the patellofemoral joint, and 3) the relationship between patellar mobility and knee joint function after ACLR. Forty patients who underwent medial hamstring-based ACLR participated in the study. Lateral and medial patellar displacements were assessed with a modified patellofemoral arthrometer, and the absolute values of the displacements were normalized to patient height. The International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) cartilage injury classification of the patellar and femoral (trochlear) surfaces, and the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale were used to evaluate knee function. Lateral and medial patellar displacements were reduced compared with the non-operated knee at the second-look arthroscopy and bone staple extraction operation (second operation; 24.4 ± 7.9 months after ACLR, Ppatellofemoral joint (patella and trochlea) were significantly worse than those pre-ACLR. Neither lateral nor medial patellar mobility, however, were significantly correlated with the ICRS grade or the Lysholm score. Although patellar mobility at approximately 2 years after ACLR was decreased compared to the non-operated knee, small displacement of the patella was not related to cartilage degeneration or knee joint function at the time of the second operation.

  4. Are Tendinopathies really a common injury in volleyball?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Aldo; Locaso, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a description of tendinopathies as an injury in volleyball high performance. Methods: An observational and prospective study was conducted from 2014-2016 in the senior Argentinian volleyball team. The same was held by two observers. Moreover, 78 athletes were evaluated. We support Dvorak’s claims that an injury is determined by the loss of at least one training session or a match. Results: 78 players were exposed to 21812 hours of training and matches. As a result 37 injuries were evaluated in 31 players. Taking into account tendinopathies, it can be said that 34 players consulted 412 times, showing a prevalence of 43.5% of the whole enquires but when we refer to the same pathology as injury the average lowers, presenting 8 lesions in 6 players and showing a prevalence of 7.6% as injuries. Incidence of tendon injuries is 0.32 per 1000 hours of exposure Tendon Injuries: 5 were patellar, 2 supraspinatus, 1 aquiles. 5 Slight, 2 moderate, 1 severe. Conclusion: Clearly, tendinopathy is a common problem in this sport but it is not a common cause of injury. This is demonstrated in prevalence rates whereas 43.5 % just consulted and 7,6 % suffer from real injuries. We think this might be due to several factors such as, advances in medical therapy, preventive protocols and increase in thresholds of pain that high-performance athletes can bear. In our experience this pathology was shown to be the third leading cause of injuries. In 2016 we did not deal with any case of injury for tendinopathy.

  5. A pilot study of the eccentric decline squat in the management of painful chronic patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdam, C R; Jonsson, P; Alfredson, H; Lorentzon, R; Cook, J L; Khan, K M

    2004-08-01

    This non-randomised pilot study investigated the effect of eccentric quadriceps training on 17 patients (22 tendons) with painful chronic patellar tendinopathy. Two different eccentric exercise regimens were used by subjects with a long duration of pain with activity (more than six months). (a) Nine consecutive patients (10 tendons; eight men, one woman; mean age 22 years) performed eccentric exercise with the ankle joint in a standard (foot flat) position. (b) Eight patients (12 tendons; five men, three women; mean age 28 years) performed eccentric training standing on a 25 degrees decline board, designed to increase load on the knee extensor mechanism. The eccentric training was performed twice daily, with three sets of 15 repetitions, for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures were (a) 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS), where the subject recorded the amount of pain during activity, and (b) return to previous activity. Follow up was at 12 weeks, with a further limited follow up at 15 months. Good clinical results were obtained in the group who trained on the decline board, with six patients (nine tendons) returning to sport and showing a significantly reduced amount of pain over the 12 week period. Mean VAS scores fell from 74.2 to 28.5 (p = 0.004). At 15 months, four patients (five tendons) reported satisfactory results (mean VAS 26.2). In the standard squat group the results were poor, with only one athlete returning to previous activity. Mean VAS scores in this group were 79.0 at baseline and 72.3 at 12 weeks (p = 0.144). In a small group of patients with patellar tendinopathy, eccentric squats on a decline board produced encouraging results in terms of pain reduction and return to function in the short term. Eccentric exercise using standard single leg squats in a similar sized group appeared to be a less effective form of rehabilitation in reducing pain and returning subjects to previous levels of activity.

  6. Highly Unusual Tendon Abnormality: Spontaneous Rupture of the Distal Iliopsoas Tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokcen Coban

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Iliopsoas tendon injuries are not common and usually occur due to avulsion of the iliopsoas tendon with detachment of the lesser trochanter, secondary to an athletic injury or trauma. In the absence of a trauma, avulsion of the lesser trochanter in an adult is regarded as a sign of metastatic disease until proven otherwise. Complete iliopsoas tendon tears have thus far only been described in elderly women, and without trauma or an underlying systemic disease, a hormonal basis may be a reason for the gender differences. In this article, we present an 87-year-old woman with spontaneous rupture of the left distal iliopsoas tendon unassociated with fracture of the lesser trochanter and in the absence of a recent trauma history. This elderly patient presented with acute groin pain and normal plain radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging must be kept in mind as a modality of choice for identifying iliopsoas tendon abnormalities.

  7. Critically evaluate techniques for the in situ testing of steel tendon grouting effectiveness as a basis for reducing fall of ground injuries and fatalities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kelly, AM

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available The quality of installation and grouting of rock reinforcing tendons is seen as a serious problem by the mining industry. Up to half of all full-column grouted steel tendons or rock bolts installed in South African gold and platinum mines...

  8. The adaptability of tendon to loading differs in men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, Peter S; Hansen, Philip; Langberg, Henning

    2007-01-01

    The reason why women sustain more soft tissue injury than men during physical activity is unknown. Connective tissue properties and extracellular matrix adaptability in human tendon were investigated in models that addressed biochemical, physiological and biomechanical aspects of tendon connectiv...

  9. Proximo-distal patellar position in three small dog breeds with medial patellar luxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangdee, C; Theyse, L F H; Hazewinkel, H A W

    2015-01-01

    Medial patellar luxation is thought to be associated with a high proximal position of the patella in the trochlear groove. To determine whether the ratio of patellar ligament length and patellar length (L:P) is influenced by the stifle angle (75°, 96°, 113°, 130°, and 148°) in small dog breeds and to compare the L:P ratio in dogs of three small dog breeds with and without medial patellar luxation. A mediolateral radiograph of the stifle joint was used to measure the L:P ratio in the stifle joints of dogs of three small breeds with and without medial patellar luxation. The L:P ratio was evaluated at five stifle angles (75°, 96°, 113°, 130°, and 148°) in 14 cadavers (26 stifle joints) of small dog breeds in order to identify the best stifle angle to measure the L:P ratio. Then the mean ± SD L:P ratio was calculated for normal stifles and stifles with medial patellar luxation grades 1, 2, and 3 in 194 Pomeranians, 74 Chihuahuas, and 41 Toy or Standard Poodles. The L:P ratio was the same for all five stifle angles in the cadavers (p = 0.195). It was also not significantly different in the three breeds (p = 0.135), in normal and medial patellar luxation-affected stifles overall (p = 0.354), and in normal and medial patellar luxation-affected joints within each breed (p = 0.19). We conclude that a proximo-distal patellar position is not associated with medial patellar luxation in Pomeranians, Chihuahuas, and Toy or Standard Poodles. Thus a longer patellar ligament length does not play a role in the pathophysiology of medial patellar luxation in these small dog breeds.

  10. Simultaneous MPFL and LPFL reconstruction for recurrent lateral patellar dislocation with medial patellofemoral instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Kusano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an extremely rare case of both recurrent lateral patella dislocation and medial patellofemoral instability, following prior operations to correct patella maltracking. Manual translation of the patella revealed medial and lateral instability with a positive apprehension sign. 3-D computer modelling of kinematics based on MRI data demonstrated that the patella deviated laterally at full extension and translated medially with knee flexion. The medial and lateral patellofemoral ligaments were reconstructed simultaneously with hamstring tendons, alleviating peripatellar pain and patellar instability in both directions.

  11. The iliotibial band in acute knee trauma: patterns of injury on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, Ramy; Yoong, Philip; McKean, David; Teh, James L. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    To delineate the spectrum of knee injuries associated with sprains and tears of the distal iliotibial band (ITB). A retrospective review of 200 random MRI scans undertaken for acute knee trauma was performed. Scans were excluded if there was a history of injury over 4 weeks from the time of the scan, septic arthritis, inflammatory arthropathy, previous knee surgery, or significant artefact. In each scan, the ITB was scored as normal, minor sprain (grade 1), severe sprain (grade 2), and torn (grade 3). The menisci, ligaments, and tendons of each knee were also assessed. The mean age was 27.4 years (range, 9-69 years) and 71.5 % (n = 143) of the patients were male. The ITB was injured in 115 cases (57.5 %). The next most common soft tissue structure injured was the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in 53.5 % of cases (n = 107). Grade 1 ITB injury was seen in 90 of these 115 cases (45 %), grade 2 injury in 20 cases, and grade 3 injury in only five cases. There is a significant association between ITB injury and ACL rupture (p < 0.05), as well as acute patellar dislocation (p < 0.05). There were ten cases of significant posterolateral corner injury, and all were associated with ITB injury, including four ITB tears. Only two cases of isolated ITB injury were seen (1 %). ITB injury is common in acute knee trauma and is associated with significant internal derangement of the knee, especially cruciate ligament rupture, posterolateral corner injury, and patellar dislocation. (orig.)

  12. MRI of the Achilles tendon: A comprehensive review of the anatomy, biomechanics, and imaging of overuse tendinopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Moncayo, Valeria; Terk, Michael R. (Dept. of Radiology, Emory Univ. Orthopedics and Spine Center, Atlanta, GA (United States)), e-mail: cpierr3@emory.edu

    2010-05-15

    The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body; it plays an important role in the biomechanics of the lower extremity. It can withstand great forces, especially during sporting exercises and pivoting. The pathologies related to the Achilles tendon are diverse and many carry undesirable consequences. We retrospectively analyzed the images of patients who underwent examinations of the ankle/foot region to review the anatomy of the Achilles tendon and its surroundings and to search for pathologies consistent with overuse injuries. The anatomy of the tendon is described from origin to insertion. The imaging characteristics of the Achilles tendon including pitfalls are reviewed. We also describe the Achilles overuse injuries: paratenonitis, tendinosis, tendon tear, atypical tear, tendon re-tear, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retro-Achilles bursitis, Haglund's deformity, and tendon calcification. We present other entities like tendon ossification and failed transplanted Achilles tendon, with emphasis on MRI

  13. MRI of the Achilles tendon: A comprehensive review of the anatomy, biomechanics, and imaging of overuse tendinopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Moncayo, Valeria; Terk, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body; it plays an important role in the biomechanics of the lower extremity. It can withstand great forces, especially during sporting exercises and pivoting. The pathologies related to the Achilles tendon are diverse and many carry undesirable consequences. We retrospectively analyzed the images of patients who underwent examinations of the ankle/foot region to review the anatomy of the Achilles tendon and its surroundings and to search for pathologies consistent with overuse injuries. The anatomy of the tendon is described from origin to insertion. The imaging characteristics of the Achilles tendon including pitfalls are reviewed. We also describe the Achilles overuse injuries: paratenonitis, tendinosis, tendon tear, atypical tear, tendon re-tear, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retro-Achilles bursitis, Haglund's deformity, and tendon calcification. We present other entities like tendon ossification and failed transplanted Achilles tendon, with emphasis on MRI

  14. Iliopsoas Tendon Reformation after Psoas Tendon Release

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    K. Garala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal snapping hip syndrome, or psoas tendonitis, is a recognised cause of nonarthritic hip pain. The majority of patients are treated conservatively; however, occasionally patients require surgical intervention. The two surgical options for iliopsoas tendinopathy are step lengthening of the iliopsoas tendon or releasing the tendon at the lesser trochanter. Although unusual, refractory snapping usually occurs soon after tenotomy. We report a case of a 47-year-old active female with internal snapping and pain following an open psoas tenotomy. Postoperatively she was symptom free for 13 years. An MRI arthrogram revealed reformation of a pseudo iliopsoas tendon reinserting into the lesser trochanter. The pain and snapping resolved after repeat iliopsoas tendon release. Reformation of tendons is an uncommon sequela of tenotomies. However the lack of long-term studies makes it difficult to calculate prevalence rates. Tendon reformation should be included in the differential diagnosis of failed tenotomy procedures after a period of symptom relief.

  15. Characterization of differential properties of rabbit tendon stem cells and tenocytes

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    Wang James

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tendons are traditionally thought to consist of tenocytes only, the resident cells of tendons; however, a recent study has demonstrated that human and mouse tendons also contain stem cells, referred to as tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs. However, the differential properties of TSCs and tenocytes remain largely undefined. This study aims to characterize the properties of these tendon cells derived from rabbits. Methods TSCs and tenocytes were isolated from patellar and Achilles tendons of rabbits. The differentiation potential and cell marker expression of the two types of cells were examined using histochemical, immunohistochemical, and qRT-PCR analysis as well as in vivo implantation. In addition, morphology, colony formation, and proliferation of TSCs and tenocytes were also compared. Results It was found that TSCs were able to differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes in vitro, and form tendon-like, cartilage-like, and bone-like tissues in vivo. In contrast, tenocytes had little such differentiation potential. Moreover, TSCs expressed the stem cell markers Oct-4, SSEA-4, and nucleostemin, whereas tenocytes expressed none of these markers. Morphologically, TSCs possessed smaller cell bodies and larger nuclei than ordinary tenocytes and had cobblestone-like morphology in confluent culture whereas tenocytes were highly elongated. TSCs also proliferated more quickly than tenocytes in culture. Additionally, TSCs from patellar tendons formed more numerous and larger colonies and proliferated more rapidly than TSCs from Achilles tendons. Conclusions TSCs exhibit distinct properties compared to tenocytes, including differences in cell marker expression, proliferative and differentiation potential, and cell morphology in culture. Future research should investigate the mechanobiology of TSCs and explore the possibility of using TSCs to more effectively repair or regenerate injured tendons.

  16. Flexor digitorum profundus tendon anatomy in the forearm

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    Teoman Dogan

    2012-04-01

    Methods: We used 11 forearms belonging to cadavers and fixed with formaldehyde. The forearms numbered 1, 2, 8, 9, 10, 11 were the left and right arms of the same cadavers. Those numbered 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 belonged to different cadavers. Dissections were made by using the atraumatic surgical technique. The tendons were studied to identify the structure and number of the fibers forming them. Results: The presence of a large common tendon was found in 10 of the 11 forearms. In 4 of these, the common tendon included the tendons of all four fingers. While the common tendon included 3 fingers in four forearms, it only included tendons belonging to 2 fingers in two forearms. It was not possible in one forearm to separate the common tendon into its fibers. In another forearm, tendons belonging to each digit were separate and independent starting at the muscle-tendon junction to the attachment points. Conclusion: The majority of the cadaver forearms used in the study displayed a single large FDP tendon in the zone between the muscle-tendon joint to the carpal tunnel entry prior to being distributed into each index. This anatomical feature should be considered in choosing materials and surgical technique for Zone V FDP tendon injuries, as well as in planning the rehabilitation process. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(1.000: 25-29

  17. Dynamic ultrasound of peroneal tendon instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesquer, Lionel; Guillo, Stéphane; Poussange, Nicolas; Pele, Eric; Meyer, Philippe; Dallaudière, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    Ankle snapping may be caused by peroneal tendon instability. Anterior instability occurs after traumatic superior peroneal retinaculum injury, whereas peroneal tendon intrasheath subluxation is atraumatic. Whereas subluxation is mainly dynamic, ultrasound allows for the diagnosis and classification of peroneal instability because it allows for real-time exploration. The purpose of this review is to describe the anatomic and physiologic bases for peroneal instability and to heighten the role of dynamic ultrasound in the diagnosis of snapping.

  18. Impact of Patellar Tendinopathy on Knee Proprioception: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rui; Ferreira, João; Silva, Diogo; Rodrigues, Elisa; Bessa, Isabel M; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether high-level athletes with patellar tendinopathy have diminished knee proprioceptive acuity. Cross-sectional study. University research laboratory (institutional). Twenty-one basketball and volleyball players with patellar tendinopathy (13 men and 8 women; mean age 24.5 ± 3.6; body mass index = 22.5 ± 2.0 kg/m) and an equal number of athletes without symptoms of patellar tendinopathy injury were included in this study. Participants underwent knee proprioception assessments on a single day. Furthermore, age, sex, height, weight, VISA-P (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment) questionnaire sports participation, medical history, knee injuries, previous treatment, and medication were obtained. Knee proprioception was evaluated by assessing sense of resistance, using a weight discrimination protocol, and joint position sense (JPS). No significant differences were observed in JPS at 30 and 60 degrees of knee flexion between groups (P = 0.165 and 0.481, respectively). In regard to the ability to discriminate weight, significant differences between the 2 groups were found with the tendinopathy group showing a higher percentage of error (P = 0.009), namely when the set of incremental weights varied by 10% from the standard weight. Athletes with patellar tendinopathy have a diminished perception of force signals required for weight discrimination, whereas JPS remains unaffected in these athletes.

  19. Ultrasound-guided sclerosis of neovessels in painful chronic patellar tendinopathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoksrud, Aasne; Ohberg, Lars; Alfredson, Håkan; Bahr, Roald

    2006-11-01

    Color Doppler ultrasound examination frequently reveals neovascularization in chronic painful Achilles and patellar tendinopathy. Sclerosing the area with vascular ingrowth using polidocanol has shown promising clinical results in patients with Achilles tendinopathy. To investigate sclerosing treatment using polidocanol on a group of elite athletes with patellar tendinopathy. Randomized controlled trial/cross-over study; Level of evidence, 1. The authors recruited 33 patients (42 tendons), mainly from the Norwegian elite divisions in basketball, team handball, and volleyball. Seventeen patients (23 knees) were randomized to the treatment group (polidocanol injections in the area of neovascularization) and 16 patients (20 knees) to the control group (similar injections with lidocaine/epinephrine). After 4 months of treatment, the control group was crossed over to active treatment. Pain and function were recorded using the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment score before the start of treatment and 4, 8, and 12 months after the first injection. Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment scores between groups were compared using multivariate analysis of variance for repeated measures. The treatment group reported a significant improvement in Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment score from 51 to 62 after 4 months; there was no change for the control group (group by time interaction, P = .052). After 8 months, when the control group had also received active treatment with polidocanol, they had a greater improvement in Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment score (58-79) than did the treatment group (54-70; group by time interaction, P = .022; time effect, P patellar tendinopathy.

  20. Achilles tendon rupture in badminton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaalund, S; Lass, P; Høgsaa, B; Nøhr, M

    1989-01-01

    The typical badminton player with an Achilles tendon rupture is 36 years old and, despite limbering up, is injured at the rear line in a sudden forward movement. He resumes work within three months and has a slight lack of dorsiflexion in the ankle as the main complication. Most patients resume badminton within one year, but some finish their sports career, mainly due to fear of a new injury. The investigation discusses predisposing factors and prophylactic measures. PMID:2605439

  1. Tendon Reattachment to Bone in an Ovine Tendon Defect Model of Retraction Using Allogenic and Xenogenic Demineralised Bone Matrix Incorporated with Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanujan Thangarajah

    Full Text Available Tendon-bone healing following rotator cuff repairs is mainly impaired by poor tissue quality. Demineralised bone matrix promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface but its role in the treatment of tendon tears with retraction has not been investigated. We hypothesized that cortical demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells will result in improved function and restoration of the tendon-bone interface with no difference between xenogenic and allogenic scaffolds.In an ovine model, the patellar tendon was detached from the tibial tuberosity and a complete distal tendon transverse defect measuring 1 cm was created. Suture anchors were used to reattach the tendon and xenogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5, or allogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5 were used to bridge the defect. Graft incorporation into the tendon and its effect on regeneration of the enthesis was assessed using histomorphometry. Force plate analysis was used to assess functional recovery.Compared to the xenograft, the allograft was associated with significantly higher functional weight bearing at 6 (P = 0.047, 9 (P = 0.028, and 12 weeks (P = 0.009. In the allogenic group this was accompanied by greater remodeling of the demineralised bone matrix into tendon-like tissue in the region of the defect (p = 0.015, and a more direct type of enthesis characterized by significantly more fibrocartilage (p = 0.039. No failures of tendon-bone healing were noted in either group.Demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface in an ovine model of acute tendon retraction, with superior mechanical and histological results associated with use of an allograft.

  2. THE ROLE OF DETRAINING IN TENDON MECHANOBIOLOGY

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    Antonio eFrizziero

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several conditions such as training, aging, estrogen deficiency and drugs could affect the biological and anatomo-physiological characteristics of the tendon. Additionally, recent preclinical and clinical studies examined the effect of detraining on tendon, showing alterations in its structure and morphology and in tenocyte mechanobiology. However, there is a paucity of data examining the impact that cessation of training may have on tendon. In practice, we do not fully understand how tendons respond to a period of training followed by sudden detraining. Therefore, within this review, we summarize the studies where tendon detraining was examined.Materials and methods: A descriptive systematic literature review was conducted by searching three databases (PubMed, Scopus and Web of Knowledge on tendon detraining. Original articles in English from 2000 to 2015 were included. In addition, the search was extended to the reference lists of the selected articles. A public reference manager (www.mendeley.com was used to delete duplicate articles.Results: An initial literature search yielded 134 references (www.pubmed.org: 53; www.scopus.com: 11; www.webofknowledge.com: 70. 15 publications were extracted based on the title for further analysis by two independent reviewers. Abstracts and whole articles were then reviewed to detect if they met inclusion criteria.Conclusions: The revised literature comprised 4 clinical studies and an in vitro and three in vivo reports. Overall, the results showed that tendon structure and properties after detraining are compromised, with an alteration in the tissue structural organization and mechanical properties. Clinical studies usually showed a lesser extent of tendon alterations, probably because preclinical studies permit an in-depth evaluation of tendon modifications, which is hard to perform in human subjects. In conclusion, after a period of sudden detraining (e.g. after an injury, physical activity

  3. Historical Patterns and Variation in Treatment of Injuries in NFL (National Football League) Players and NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Eric C; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Langner, Paula; Cook, Shane; Ellis, Byron; Godfrey, Jenna M

    We conducted a study to identify and contrast patterns in the treatment of common injuries that occur in National Football League (NFL) players and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I football players. Orthopedic team physicians for all 32 NFL and 119 NCAA Division I football teams were asked to complete a survey regarding demographics and preferred treatment of a variety of injuries encountered in football players. Responses were received from 31 (97%) of the 32 NFL and 111 (93%) of the 119 NCAA team physicians. Although patellar tendon autograft was the preferred graft choice for both groups of team physicians, the percentage of NCAA physicians who allowed return to football 6 months or less after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was significantly (P = .03) higher than that of NFL physicians. Prophylactic knee bracing, which may prevent medial collateral ligament injuries, was used at a significantly (P football players.

  4. Plantar tendons of the foot: MR imaging and US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T; Velez, Zoraida Restrepo; Blonder, David B; Ciavarra, Gina A; Adler, Ronald Steven

    2013-01-01

    Tendon disorders along the plantar aspect of the foot may lead to significant symptoms but are often clinically misdiagnosed. Familiarity with the normal anatomy of the plantar tendons and its appearance at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and ultrasonography (US) is essential for recognizing plantar tendon disorders. At MR imaging, the course of the plantar tendons is optimally visualized with dedicated imaging of the midfoot and forefoot. This imaging should include short-axis images obtained perpendicular to the long axis of the metatarsal shafts, which allows true cross-sectional evaluation of the plantar tendons. Normal plantar tendons appear as low-signal-intensity structures with all MR sequences. At US, accurate evaluation of the tendons requires that the ultrasound beam be perpendicular to the tendon. The normal tendon appears as a compact linear band of echogenic tissue that contains a fine, mixed hypoechoic and hyperechoic internal fibrillar pattern. Tendon injuries can be grouped into six major categories: tendinosis, peritendinosis, tenosynovitis, entrapment, rupture, and instability (subluxation or dislocation) and can be well assessed with both MR imaging and US. The radiologist plays an important role in the diagnosis of plantar tendon disorders, and recognizing their imaging appearances at MR imaging and US is essential.

  5. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengkun; Ma, Kui; Li, Hong; Jiang, Jia; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired with PET were assigned to PET group; the other eight rabbits repaired with PET along with injection of HE were assigned to HA-PET group. All rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biomechanical and histological examination. The HA-PET group revealed higher biomechanical property compared with the PET group. Histologically, more collagen tissues grew into the HA-PET group compared with PET group. In conclusion, application of sodium hyaluronate can improve the healing of Achilles tendon reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament.

  6. Can we improve tendon healing in the horse? A multi-angle study of a multi-facet problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadby, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Tendon problems are frequent among horses and humans as both species face athletic challenges. Repetitive exercise often leads to overuse injuries in tendons and the number of reported cases of tendon injuries has increased enormously during the last decades, due to changes in demographics and

  7. In-vivo patellar tracking in individuals with patellofemoral pain and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiarpour, Fateme; Lebrun, Constance M; Dhillon, Sukhvinder; Boulanger, Pierre

    2018-02-28

    Understanding of the exact cause of patellofemoral pain has been limited by methodological challenges to evaluate in-vivo joint motion. This study compared six degree-of-freedom patellar motion during a dynamic lunge task between individuals with patellofemoral pain and healthy individuals. Knee joints of eight females with patellofemoral pain and ten healthy females were imaged using a CT scanner in supine lying position, then by a dual-orthogonal fluoroscope while they performed a lunge. To quantify patellar motion, the three-dimensional models of the knee bones, reconstructed from CT scans, were registered on the fluoroscopy images using the Fluomotion registration software. At full knee extension, the patella was in a significantly laterally tilted (PFP: 11.77° ± 7.58° vs. healthy: 0.86° ± 4.90°; p = 0.002) and superiorly shifted (PFP: 17.49 ± 8.44 mm vs. healthy: 9.47 ± 6.16 mm, p = 0. 033) position in the patellofemoral pain group compared with the healthy group. There were also significant differences between the groups for patellar tilt at 45°, 60°, and 75° of knee flexion, and for superior-inferior shift of the patella at 30° flexion (p ≤ 0.031). In the non-weight-bearing knee extended position, the patella was in a significantly laterally tilted position in the patellofemoral pain group (7.44° ± 6.53°) compared with the healthy group (0.71° ± 4.99°). These findings suggest the critical role of passive and active patellar stabilizers as potential causative factors for patellar malalignment/maltracking. Future studies should investigate the associations between patellar kinematics with joint morphology, muscle activity, and tendon function in a same sample for a thorough understanding of the causes of patellofemoral pain. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Heel-Rise Height Deficit 1 Year After Achilles Tendon Rupture Relates to Changes in Ankle Biomechanics 6 Years After Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsson, Annelie; Willy, Richard W; Tranberg, Roy; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin

    2017-11-01

    It is unknown whether the height of a heel-rise performed in the single-leg standing heel-rise test 1 year after an Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) correlates with ankle biomechanics during walking, jogging, and jumping in the long-term. To explore the differences in ankle biomechanics, tendon length, calf muscle recovery, and patient-reported outcomes at a mean of 6 years after ATR between 2 groups that, at 1-year follow-up, had less than 15% versus greater than 30% differences in heel-rise height. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Seventeen patients with less than 15% (30% group) side-to-side difference in heel-rise height at 1 year after ATR were evaluated at a mean (SD) 6.1 (2.0) years after their ATR. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were sampled via standard motion capture procedures during walking, jogging, and jumping. Patient-reported outcome was evaluated with Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), Physical Activity Scale (PAS), and Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS). Tendon length was evaluated by ultrasonography. The Limb Symmetry Index (LSI = [Injured Side ÷ Healthy Side] × 100) was calculated for side differences. The >30% group had significantly more deficits in ankle kinetics during all activities compared with patients in the 30% group, compared with the biomechanics. Minimizing tendon elongation and regaining heel-rise height may be important for the long-term recovery of ankle biomechanics, particularly during more demanding activities such as jumping.

  9. Exercise following a short immobilization period is detrimental to tendon properties and joint mechanics in a rat rotator cuff injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltz, Cathryn D; Sarver, Joseph J; Dourte, Leann M; Würgler-Hauri, Carola C; Williams, Gerald R; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2010-07-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common clinical problem that can result in pain and disability. Previous studies in a rat model showed enhanced tendon to bone healing with postoperative immobilization. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of postimmobilization activity level on insertion site properties and joint mechanics in a rat model. Our hypothesis was that exercise following a short period of immobilization will cause detrimental changes in insertion site properties compared to cage activity following the same period of immobilization, but that passive shoulder mechanics will not be affected. We detached and repaired the supraspinatus tendon of 22 Sprague-Dawley rats, and the injured shoulder was immobilized postoperatively for 2 weeks. Following immobilization, rats were prescribed cage activity or exercise for 12 weeks. Passive shoulder mechanics were determined, and following euthanasia, tendon cross-sectional area and mechanical properties were measured. Exercise following immobilization resulted in significant decreases compared to cage activity in range of motion, tendon stiffness, modulus, percent relaxation, and several parameters from both a structurally based elastic model and a quasi-linear viscoelastic model. Therefore, we conclude that after a short period of immobilization, increased activity is detrimental to both tendon mechanical properties and shoulder joint mechanics, presumably due to increased scar production. (c) 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  10. Acceleration of tendon healing using US guided intratendinous injection of bevacizumab: First pre-clinical study on a murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallaudière, Benjamin; Lempicki, Marta; Pesquer, Lionel; Louedec, Liliane; Preux, Pierre Marie; Meyer, Philippe; Hess, Agathe; Durieux, Marie Hèlène Moreau; Hummel, Vincent; Larbi, Ahmed; Deschamps, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Tendinopathy shows early disorganized collagen fibers with neo-angiogenesis on histology. Peri-tendinous injection of corticosteroid is the commonly accepted strategy despite the abscence of inflammation in tendinosis. The aim of our study was to assess the potential of intratendinous injection of an anti-angiogenic drug (bevacizumab, AA) to treat tendinopathy in a murine model of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy, and to evaluate its local toxicity. Materials and method: Forty rats (160 patellar and Achilles tendons) were used for this study. We induced tendinosis (T+) in 80 tendons by injecting under ultrasonography (US) guidance Collagenase 1 ® (day 0 = D0, patellar = 40 and Achilles = 40). Clinical examination and tendon US were performed at D3, immediately followed by either AA (AAT+, n = 40) or physiological serum (PST+, n = 40, control) US-guided intratendinous injection. Follow-up at D6 and D13 using clinical, US and histology, and comparison between the 2 groups were performed. To study AA toxicity we compared the 80 remaining normal tendons (T−) after injecting AA in 40 (AAT−). Results: All AAT+ showed a better joint mobilization compared to PST+ at D6 (p = 0.004) with thinner US tendon diameters (p < 0.004), and less disorganized collagen fibers and neovessels on histology (p < 0.05). There was no difference at D13 regarding clinical status, US tendon diameter and histology (p > 0.05). Comparison between AAT− and T− showed no AA toxicity on tendon (p = 0.18). Conclusion: Our study suggests that high dose mono-injection of AA in tendinosis, early after the beginning of the disease, accelerates tendon's healing, with no local toxicity

  11. Acceleration of tendon healing using US guided intratendinous injection of bevacizumab: First pre-clinical study on a murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallaudière, Benjamin, E-mail: bendallau64@hotmail.fr [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Inserm U698, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Lempicki, Marta [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Pesquer, Lionel [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Louedec, Liliane [Inserm U698, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Preux, Pierre Marie [Laboratoire de Biostatistiques, Faculté de médecine, Limoges (France); Meyer, Philippe [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Hess, Agathe [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Durieux, Marie Hèlène Moreau [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Hummel, Vincent; Larbi, Ahmed [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Deschamps, Lydia [Service d’ Anatomopathologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Tendinopathy shows early disorganized collagen fibers with neo-angiogenesis on histology. Peri-tendinous injection of corticosteroid is the commonly accepted strategy despite the abscence of inflammation in tendinosis. The aim of our study was to assess the potential of intratendinous injection of an anti-angiogenic drug (bevacizumab, AA) to treat tendinopathy in a murine model of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy, and to evaluate its local toxicity. Materials and method: Forty rats (160 patellar and Achilles tendons) were used for this study. We induced tendinosis (T+) in 80 tendons by injecting under ultrasonography (US) guidance Collagenase 1{sup ®} (day 0 = D0, patellar = 40 and Achilles = 40). Clinical examination and tendon US were performed at D3, immediately followed by either AA (AAT+, n = 40) or physiological serum (PST+, n = 40, control) US-guided intratendinous injection. Follow-up at D6 and D13 using clinical, US and histology, and comparison between the 2 groups were performed. To study AA toxicity we compared the 80 remaining normal tendons (T−) after injecting AA in 40 (AAT−). Results: All AAT+ showed a better joint mobilization compared to PST+ at D6 (p = 0.004) with thinner US tendon diameters (p < 0.004), and less disorganized collagen fibers and neovessels on histology (p < 0.05). There was no difference at D13 regarding clinical status, US tendon diameter and histology (p > 0.05). Comparison between AAT− and T− showed no AA toxicity on tendon (p = 0.18). Conclusion: Our study suggests that high dose mono-injection of AA in tendinosis, early after the beginning of the disease, accelerates tendon's healing, with no local toxicity.

  12. Metabolic activity and collagen turnover in human tendon in response to physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, M; Langberg, H; Miller, B F

    2005-01-01

    Connective tissue of the human tendon plays an important role in force transmission. The extracellular matrix turnover of tendon is influenced by physical activity. Blood flow, oxygen demand, and the level of collagen synthesis and matrix metalloproteinases increase with mechanical loading. Gene...... of overuse tendon injuries occurring during sport, work or leisure-related activities....

  13. CT patellar cortex tilt angle: A radiological method to measure patellar tilt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza Toluei, F.; Afshar, A.; Salarilak, S.; Sina, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background/Objectives: the role of patellar tilt in the anterior knee pain is indisputable. Traditionally. the lateral patello-femoral angle of Laurin has been defined in both the axial view and CT images for measuring the tilt of patella. We present a new angle. which is independent of the morphology of patella and directly relates to clinical assessment of the tilt. which is appreciated from palpation of the edges of the patella. Patients and Methods: 38 patients with anterior knee pain and forty normal control subjects were examined using CT scan of patello-femoral joint in 15 degrees of knee flexion. The amount of lateral patellar tilt was quantitatively assessed using the lateral patello-femoral angle, as described by Laurin et al, and the newly defined patellar cortex tilt angle. This angle is subtended by the line drawn along the posterior femoral condyles and the one parallel to the subchondral bone of patellar cortex. The fifteen-degree tilt was taken as normal cut-off point for patellar cortex tilt angle in the control group. Results: in patients, the average tilt of patella. using the patellar cortex tilt angle was 15.26 versus 7.05 in the control group. Using Student's t test, the difference between the two means was significant (P<0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of patellar cortex tilt angle were 40 and 90 percent, respectively There was a moderate agreement between our presented test and the lateral tilt angle test (kappa=0.40. P<0.001). Conclusion: our results indicate that patellar tilt can also be detected using patellar cortex tilt angle. We need more specific studies ta determine the validity of the test

  14. Mechanoactive scaffold induces tendon remodeling and expression of fibrocartilage markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Vyner, Moira C; Jacobs, Matthew T; Moffat, Kristen L; Lu, Helen H

    2008-08-01

    Biological fixation of soft tissue-based grafts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction poses a major clinical challenge. The ACL integrates with subchondral bone through a fibrocartilage enthesis, which serves to minimize stress concentrations and enables load transfer between two distinct tissue types. Functional integration thus requires the reestablishment of this fibrocartilage interface on reconstructed ACL grafts. We designed and characterized a novel mechanoactive scaffold based on a composite of poly-alpha-hydroxyester nanofibers and sintered microspheres; we then used the scaffold to test the hypothesis that scaffold-induced compression of tendon grafts would result in matrix remodeling and the expression of fibrocartilage interface-related markers. Histology coupled with confocal microscopy and biochemical assays were used to evaluate the effects of scaffold-induced compression on tendon matrix collagen distribution, cellularity, proteoglycan content, and gene expression over a 2-week period. Scaffold contraction resulted in over 15% compression of the patellar tendon graft and upregulated the expression of fibrocartilage-related markers such as Type II collagen, aggrecan, and transforming growth factor-beta3 (TGF-beta3). Additionally, proteoglycan content was higher in the compressed tendon group after 1 day. The data suggest the potential of a mechanoactive scaffold to promote the formation of an anatomic fibrocartilage enthesis on tendon-based ACL reconstruction grafts.

  15. Semiextended approach for intramedullary nailing via a patellar eversion technique for tibial-shaft fractures: Evaluation of the patellofemoral joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Obara, Shu; Hayashi, Junji; Arai, Masayuki; Sato, Kaoru

    2017-06-01

    Intramedullary nail fixation is a common treatment for tibial-shaft fractures, and it offers a better functional prognosis than other conservative treatments. Currently, the primary approach employed during intramedullary nail insertion is the semiextended position is the suprapatellar approach, which involves a vertical incision of the quadriceps tendon Damage to the patellofemoral joint cartilage has been highlighted as a drawback associated with this approach. To avoid this issue, we perform surgery using the patellar eversion technique and a soft sleeve. This method allows the articular surface to be monitored during intramedullary nail insertion. We arthroscopically assessed the effect of this technique on patellofemoral joint cartilage. The patellar eversion technique allows a direct view and protection of the patellofemoral joint without affecting the patella. Thus, damage to the patellofemoral joint cartilage can be avoided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tendon Transfer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy ... DESCRIPTION The tendon is the strong cord at either end of a muscle that is attached to bone. Tendons , combined with ...

  17. Aetiology and prevention of injuries in elite young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Sport participation confers many varied benefits in children and adolescents, such as self-esteem, confidence, team play, fitness, agility and strength. Nevertheless, the age of initiation of intense training is decreasing and programmes which expose children to excessive amounts of exercise increase the risk of injury. We review sports injuries in young athletes and the long-term outcomes. Sports injuries can lead to disturbances in growth such as limb length discrepancy, caused by traumatised physeal growth induced by injury. Osgood-Schlatter lesion may also cause some sequelae such as painful ossicles in the distal patellar tendon. The apophysis can be fragmentised or separated, and this could be an adaptive change to the increased stress typical of overuse activities. These changes produce an osseous reaction even though they are not disabling. Participation in physical exercise at a young age should be encouraged, because of the health benefits, but decreasing the incidence and severity of sports injuries in young athletes is an important component of any athletic programme and may generate a long-term economic impact in health care costs. Active prevention measures are the main weapon to decrease the (re-)injury rate and to increase athletic performance. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Primary patellar dislocations without surgical stabilization or recurrence: how well are these patients really doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Robert A; Verlage, Megan; Stock, Elizabeth; Zurek, Lauren; Flanigan, David C; Tompkins, Marc; Agel, Julie; Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2017-08-01

    While a significant research has gone into identifying patients at highest risk of recurrence following primary patellar dislocation, there has been little work exploring the outcomes of patients who do not have a recurrent patellar dislocation. We hypothesize that patients without recurrent dislocation episodes will exhibit significantly higher KOOSs than those who suffer recurrent dislocations, but lower scores than published age-matched normative data. A retrospective review of patients with nonoperatively treated primary lateral patellar dislocations was carried out, and patients were contacted at a mean of 3.4 years (range 1.3-5.5 years) post-injury. Information regarding subsequent treatment and recurrent dislocations along with patient-reported outcome scores and activity level was collected. One hundred and eleven patients (29.8 %) of 373 eligible patients agreed to study participation, seven of whom were excluded because they underwent subsequent patellar stabilization surgery on the index knee. Seventy-six patients (73.1 %) reported no further dislocation events, and the mean KOOS subscales at follow-up were: symptoms-80.2 ± 18.8, pain-81.8 ± 16.2, ADL-88.7 ± 15.9, sport/recreation-72.1 ± 24.4, and QOL-63.9 ± 23.8 at a mean follow-up of 3.3 years (range 1.3-5.5 years). No significant differences in any of the KOOS subscales were noted between these patients and the group that reported recurrent patellar dislocations. Only 26.4 % of the patients without further dislocations reported they were able to return to desired sport activities without limitations following their dislocation. Patients who do not report recurrent patellar dislocations following nonoperative treatment of primary patellar dislocations are in many cases limited by this injury 3 years following the initial dislocation event. Retrospective cohort study, Level III.

  19. Elastic modulus of muscle and tendon with shear wave ultrasound elastography: variations with different technical settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Chin Wing Kot

    Full Text Available Standardization on Shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWUE technical settings will not only ensure that the results are accurate, but also detect any differences over time that may be attributed to true physiological changes. The present study evaluated the variations of elastic modulus of muscle and tendon using SWUE when different technical aspects were altered. The results of this study indicated that variations of elastic modulus of muscle and tendon were found when different transducer's pressure and region of interest (ROI's size were applied. No significant differences in elastic modulus of the rectus femoris muscle and patellar tendon were found with different acquisition times of the SWUE sonogram. The SWUE on the muscle and tendon should be performed with the lightest transducer's pressure, a shorter acquisition time for the SWUE sonogram, while measuring the mean elastic modulus regardless the ROI's size.

  20. Are the take-off and landing phase dynamics of the volleyball spike jump related to patellar tendinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisseling, R.W.; Hof, A.L.; Bredeweg, S.W.; Zwerver, J.; Mulder, T.

    Objective: The causal mechanism of the chronic sports injury patellar tendinopathy is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to compare ankle and knee joint dynamics during the performance of the volleyball spike jump between healthy volleyball players (n = 8) and asymptomatic

  1. Nanoparticles for tendon healing and regeneration: literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Domenico Parchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries are commonly met in the emergency department. Unfortunately, tendon tissue has limited regeneration potential and usually the consequent formation of scar tissue causes inferior mechanical properties Nanoparticles could be used in different way to improve tendon healing and regeneration, ranging from scaffolds manufacturing (increasing the strength and endurance or anti-adhesions, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties to gene therapy. This paper aims to summarize the most relevant studies showing the potential application of nanoparticles for tendon tissue regeneration

  2. Tendon surveillance requirements - average tendon force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed Rev. 3 to USNRC Reg. Guide 1.35 discusses the need for comparing, for individual tendons, the measured and predicted lift-off forces. Such a comparison is intended to detect any abnormal tendon force loss which might occur. Recognizing that there are uncertainties in the prediction of tendon losses, proposed Guide 1.35.1 has allowed specific tolerances on the fundamental losses. Thus, the lift-off force acceptance criteria for individual tendons appearing in Reg. Guide 1.35, Proposed Rev. 3, is stated relative to a lower bound predicted tendon force, which is obtained using the 'plus' tolerances on the fundamental losses. There is an additional acceptance criterion for the lift-off forces which is not specifically addressed in these two Reg. Guides; however, it is included in a proposed Subsection IWX to ASME Code Section XI. This criterion is based on the overriding requirement that the magnitude of prestress in the containment structure be sufficeint to meet the minimum prestress design requirements. This design requirement can be expressed as an average tendon force for each group of vertical hoop, or dome tendons. For the purpose of comparing the actual tendon forces with the required average tendon force, the lift-off forces measured for a sample of tendons within each group can be averaged to construct the average force for the entire group. However, the individual lift-off forces must be 'corrected' (normalized) prior to obtaining the sample average. This paper derives the correction factor to be used for this purpose. (orig./RW)

  3. Evaluation and Management of Patellar Instability in Pediatric and Adolescent Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Khormaee, Sariah; Kramer, Dennis E.; Yen, Yi-Meng; Heyworth, Benton E.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The rising popularity and intensity of youth sports has increased the incidence of patellar dislocation. These sports-related injuries may be associated with significant morbidity in the pediatric population. Treatment requires understanding and attention to the unique challenges in the skeletally immature patient. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed searches spanning 1970-2013. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Although nonoperative approaches are most oft...

  4. Fracture of an uncemented tantalum patellar component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan L. Grimm, MD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old man presented with the acute, atraumatic onset of pain 3 years after uncemented right total knee arthroplasty. He complained of new mechanical locking with the knee held in extension on examination and unable to flex the knee. On the plain radiographs, the patellar component peg was fractured and the plate was dislocated. The knee was immobilized, and revision to a cemented 3-peg component was performed. Fracture of a single-peg, tantalum-backed uncemented patellar component has not been described. Clinical suspicion for this should be given in the setting of acute locking. We recommend revision with a cemented polyethylene component.

  5. Lateral patellar luxation: magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armesto, V.; Pulpeiro, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this article is to present the magnetic resonance (MR) findings associated with lateral patellar luxation. The series consisted of eight patients, all of whom presented joint effusion, damage to the medical retinaculum and cortical contusion or fracture of medical aspect of the patella or of anterolateral surface of the outer condyle. Five patients also presented patellar sub luxation. Diagnosis depends on the technique employed, with axial planes being very useful. Thus, it is recommended that they be used as the standard plane, especially in pathologies that are clinically unsuspicious as in this case. MR can also provide information that leads to surgical treatment rather than the standard conservative treatment. (Author)

  6. Bone bruise in acute traumatic patellar dislocation: volumetric magnetic resonance imaging analysis with follow-up mean of 12 months

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paakkala, Antti; Paakkala, Timo [Tampere University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tampere (Finland); Sillanpaeae, Petri; Maeenpaeae, Heikki [Tampere University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Tampere (Finland); Huhtala, Heini [University of Tampere, School of Public Health, Tampere (Finland)

    2010-07-15

    The aim of the study was to assess volumetric analysis of bone bruises in acute primary traumatic patellar dislocation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resolving resolution of bruises in follow-up MRI. MRI was performed in 23 cases. A follow-up examination was done at a mean of 12 months after dislocation. Volumes of patellar and femur bruises for every patient were evaluated separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists, and mean values of the bruises were assessed. Other MRI findings were evaluated, together with agreement by consensus. Bone bruise volumes were compared with other MR findings. In the acute study 100% of patients showed bruising of the lateral femoral condyle and 96% bruising of the patella. The bruise was located at the medial femoral condyle in 30% and at the patellar median ridge in 74% of patients. The median volume of the femoral bruise was 25,831 mm{sup 3} and of the patellar bruise 2,832 mm{sup 3}. At the follow-up study 22% of patients showed bruising of the lateral femoral condyle and 39% bruising of the patella, the median volumes of the bruises being 5,062 mm{sup 3} and 1,380 mm{sup 3}, respectively. Larger patellar bruise volume correlated with larger femur bruise volume in the acute (r=0.389, P=0.074) and the follow-up (r=1.000, P<0.01) studies. Other MRI findings did not correlate significantly with bone bruise volumes. Bone bruising is the commonest finding in cases of acute patellar dislocation, being seen even 1 year after trauma and indicating significant bone trabecular injury in the patellofemoral joint. A large bruise volume may be associated with subsequent chondral lesion progression at the patella. We concluded that the measurement of bone bruise volume in patients with acute patellar dislocation is a reproducible method but requires further studies to evaluate its clinical use. (orig.)

  7. Bone bruise in acute traumatic patellar dislocation: volumetric magnetic resonance imaging analysis with follow-up mean of 12 months

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paakkala, Antti; Paakkala, Timo; Sillanpaeae, Petri; Maeenpaeae, Heikki; Huhtala, Heini

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess volumetric analysis of bone bruises in acute primary traumatic patellar dislocation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resolving resolution of bruises in follow-up MRI. MRI was performed in 23 cases. A follow-up examination was done at a mean of 12 months after dislocation. Volumes of patellar and femur bruises for every patient were evaluated separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists, and mean values of the bruises were assessed. Other MRI findings were evaluated, together with agreement by consensus. Bone bruise volumes were compared with other MR findings. In the acute study 100% of patients showed bruising of the lateral femoral condyle and 96% bruising of the patella. The bruise was located at the medial femoral condyle in 30% and at the patellar median ridge in 74% of patients. The median volume of the femoral bruise was 25,831 mm 3 and of the patellar bruise 2,832 mm 3 . At the follow-up study 22% of patients showed bruising of the lateral femoral condyle and 39% bruising of the patella, the median volumes of the bruises being 5,062 mm 3 and 1,380 mm 3 , respectively. Larger patellar bruise volume correlated with larger femur bruise volume in the acute (r=0.389, P=0.074) and the follow-up (r=1.000, P<0.01) studies. Other MRI findings did not correlate significantly with bone bruise volumes. Bone bruising is the commonest finding in cases of acute patellar dislocation, being seen even 1 year after trauma and indicating significant bone trabecular injury in the patellofemoral joint. A large bruise volume may be associated with subsequent chondral lesion progression at the patella. We concluded that the measurement of bone bruise volume in patients with acute patellar dislocation is a reproducible method but requires further studies to evaluate its clinical use. (orig.)

  8. Computed tomographic evaluation of realignment surgery for patellar subluxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masahiro; Shino, Konsei; Maeda, Akira; Nakata, Ken; Ono, Hiroo.

    1994-01-01

    Forty-two patients with patellar subluxation underwent realignment surgery of the knee extensor mechanism. The surgery included, lateral release, advancement and reefing of the vastus medialis and the medial capsule and tibial tubercle transfer (Elmslie-Trillat procedure). The effect of surgery was evaluated using computed tomograms of the pre- and post-operative knees at 0, 15, 30 and 45 degrees of knee flexion. The degree of patellofemoral incongruence on CT was expressed using two parameters of patellar tilt and patellar shift. Thirty-three volunteers without any patello-femoral symptoms served as controls. Postoperatively both the patellar tilt and the patellar shift improved significantly. The average patellar tilt and the patellar shift of the patient group at 45 degrees were comparable with those of controls. However, it was found by CT that the realignment surgery was less effective between 0 and 30 degrees of knee flexion. (author)

  9. Computed tomographic evaluation of realignment surgery for patellar subluxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Masahiro (Kansai Rosai Hospital, Amagasaki (Japan)); Shino, Konsei; Maeda, Akira; Nakata, Ken; Ono, Hiroo

    1994-01-01

    Forty-two patients with patellar subluxation underwent realignment surgery of the knee extensor mechanism. The surgery included, lateral release, advancement and reefing of the vastus medialis and the medial capsule and tibial tubercle transfer (Elmslie-Trillat procedure). The effect of surgery was evaluated using computed tomograms of the pre- and post-operative knees at 0, 15, 30 and 45 degrees of knee flexion. The degree of patellofemoral incongruence on CT was expressed using two parameters of patellar tilt and patellar shift. Thirty-three volunteers without any patello-femoral symptoms served as controls. Postoperatively both the patellar tilt and the patellar shift improved significantly. The average patellar tilt and the patellar shift of the patient group at 45 degrees were comparable with those of controls. However, it was found by CT that the realignment surgery was less effective between 0 and 30 degrees of knee flexion. (author).

  10. FIBRILLINS IN TENDON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betti Giusti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tendons among connective tissue, mainly collagen, contain also elastic fibres made of fibrillin 1, fibrillin 2 and elastin that are broadly distributed in tendons and represent 1-2% of the dried mass of the tendon. Only in the last years, studies on structure and function of elastic fibres in tendons have been performed. Aim of this review is to revise data on the organization of elastic fibres in tendons, in particular fibrillin structure and function, and on the clinical manifestations associated to alterations of elastic fibres in tendons. Indeed, microfibrils may contribute to tendon mechanics; therefore, their alterations may cause joint hypermobility and contractures which have been found to be clinical features in patients with Marfan syndrome and Beals syndrome. The two diseases are caused by mutations in genes FBN1 and FBN2 encoding fibrillin 1 and fibrillin 2, respectively.

  11. [Simultaneous Traumatic Rupture of Patellar Ligament and Contralateral Rupture of Quadriceps Femoris Muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladký, V; Havlas, V

    2017-01-01

    Our paper presents a unique case of a 64-year-old patient after a fall, treated with oral antidiabetic drugs for type II diabetes mellitus. Following a series of examinations, a bilateral injury was diagnosed - patellar ligament tear on the right side and rupture of quadriceps femoris muscle on the left side. It is a rare injury, complicated by simultaneous involvement of both knee joints. The used therapy consisted of a bilateral surgery followed by gradual verticalisation, first with the support of a walking frame and later with the use of forearm crutches. During the final examination, the patient demonstrated full flexion at both knees, while an extension deficit of approx. 5 degrees was still present on the left side. The right knee X-ray showed a proper position of the patella after the removal of temporary tension band wire. Although the clinical results of operative treatment of both the patellar ligament rupture and rupture of quadriceps femoris muscle are in most cases good, early operative treatment, proper technique and post-operative rehabilitation are a prerequisite for success. Key words: knee injuries, patellar ligament, quadriceps muscle, rupture.

  12. Excessive lateral patellar translation on axial computed tomography indicates positive patellar J sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhe; Song, Guan-Yang; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Guan; Qian, Yi; Feng, Hua

    2018-03-20

    The purpose of the study was to quantify the patellar J sign using traditional computed tomography (CT) scans. Fifty-three patients (fifty-three knees) who suffered from recurrent patellar instability were included and analyzed. The patellar J sign was evaluated pre-operatively during active knee flexion and extension. It was defined as positive when there was obvious lateral patellar translation, and negative when there was not. The CT scans were performed in all patients with full knee extension; and the parameters including bisect offset index (BOI), patellar-trochlear-groove (PTG) distance, and patellar lateral tilt angle (PLTA) were measured on the axial slices. All the three parameters were compared between the J sign-positive group (study group) and the J sign-negative group (control group). In addition, the optimal thresholds of the three CT scan parameters for predicting the positive patellar J sign were determined with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and the diagnostic values were assessed by the area under the curve (AUC). Among the fifty-three patients (fifty-three knees), thirty-seven (70%) showed obvious lateral patellar translation, which were defined as positive J sign (study group), and the remaining sixteen (30%) who showed no lateral translation were defined as negative J sign (control group). The mean values of the three CT parameters in the study group were all significantly larger compared to the control group, including BOI (121 ± 28% vs 88 ± 12%, P = 0.038), PTG distance (5.2 ± 6.6 mm vs - 4.4 ± 5.2 mm, P J sign was 97.5% (Sensitivity = 83.3%, Specificity = 87.5%). In this study, the prevalence of positive patellar J sign was 70%. The BOI measured from the axial CT scans of the knee joint can be used as an appropriate predictor to differentiate the positive J sign from the negative J sign, highlighting that the excessive lateral patellar translation on axial CT scan indicates positive

  13. Repair of full-thickness tendon injury using connective tissue progenitors efficiently derived from human embryonic stem cells and fetal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Shahar; Leshansky, Lucy; Zussman, Eyal; Burman, Michael; Srouji, Samer; Livne, Erella; Abramov, Natalie; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2010-10-01

    The use of stem cells for tissue engineering (TE) encourages scientists to design new platforms in the field of regenerative and reconstructive medicine. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have been proposed to be an important cell source for cell-based TE applications as well as an exciting tool for investigating the fundamentals of human development. Here, we describe the efficient derivation of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from hESC lines and fetal tissues. The CTPs were significantly expanded and induced to generate tendon tissues in vitro, with ultrastructural characteristics and biomechanical properties typical of mature tendons. We describe a simple method for engineering tendon grafts that can successfully repair injured Achilles tendons and restore the ankle joint extension movement in mice. We also show the CTP's ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and fat both in vitro and in vivo. This study offers evidence for the possibility of using stem cell-derived engineered grafts to replace missing tissues, and sets a basic platform for future cell-based TE applications in the fields of orthopedics and reconstructive surgery.

  14. Nonoperative, dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne Bloch

    2015-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture alters the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex that can affect functional performance and the risk of repeat injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon comp......Acute Achilles tendon rupture alters the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex that can affect functional performance and the risk of repeat injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle...... in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was found in the non-weightbearing group. The altered stiffness and strength in the affected limb could affect the coordination of gait and running....

  15. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture After Statin Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesselroade, Ryan D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury. We report the case of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture sustained with minimal force while refereeing a football game. The injury was suspected to be associated with statin use as the patient had no other identifiable risk factors.The diagnosis was confirmed using bedside ultrasound. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(4:306-309.

  16. Vertical Patellar Dislocation: Reduction by the Push Up and Rotate Method, A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Khan, Hayat; Bashir Shah, Adil; Kamal, Younis

    2016-11-01

    Patellar dislocation is an emergency. Vertical patellar dislocation is rare, often seen in adolescents and mostly due to sports injuries or high-velocity trauma. Few cases have been reported in the literature. Closed or open reduction under general anesthesia is often needed. We report a case of vertical locked patellar dislocation in a 26-year-old male, which was reduced by a simple closed method under spinal anaesthesia. A literature review regarding the various methods of treatment is also discussed. A 26-year-old male experienced a trivial accident while descending stairs, sustaining patellar dislocation. The closed method of reduction was attempted, using a simple technique. Reduction was confirmed and postoperative rehabilitation was started. Follow-up was uneventful. Vertical patellar dislocations are encountered rarely in the emergency department. Adolescents are not the only victims, and high-velocity trauma is not the essential cause. Unnecessary manipulation should be avoided. The closed reduction method is simple, but the surgeon should be prepared for open reduction.

  17. Estudo das propriedades mecânicas do ligamento cruzado posterior e do ligamento patelar de cadáveres de seres humanos após utilização de radiofreqüência Study of the mechanical properties of the posterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon on fresh human cadavers after radiofrequency shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Fazzolari Dota

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visou estudar os efeitos da radiofreqüência sobre os ligamentos patelares (LP e ligamentos cruzados posteriores (LCP de cadáveres, levando em conta as características de rigidez e deformação máxima. Foram utilizados 11 LCP e 14 LP, sendo feitas as aferições com o aparelho Kratos® K5002 . Foi realizada a termoabrasão das estruturas, com encurtamento obtido entre 15 e 20% do comprimento inicial. Observou-se que essas deformações (encurtamento não se mantiveram no ensaio pós RF. Conclusão: A radiofreqüência permite o encurtamento do LP e LCP. O encurtamento obtido não se mantém completamente quando os ligamentos são submetidos a cargas tensionais padronizadas neste ensaio biomecânico. O uso de radiofrequência causa redução da rigidez do tecido (LP e LCP.This study intended to examine the effects of radiofrequency shrinkage (RF on patellar ligament (PL and posterior cruciate ligaments (PCL of fresh human cadavers, measuring stiffness and maximum deformation. Eleven PCLs and 14 PLs were studied with traction tests being performed with the aid of a Kratos® K5002 machine. The structures were reduced by 15-20%, after the shrinkage. However, this reduction was partially lost after the traction test. Conclusion: RF was successful in reducing the length of the structures studied, in spite of the statistically significant stiffness loss. Then, RF was not fully successful in maintaining the reduction of ligament length under the traction forces of the test.

  18. Faster Movement Speed Results in Greater Tendon Strain during the Loaded Squat Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Jacob E.; Newton, Robert U.; Cormie, Prue; Blazevich, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tendon dynamics influence movement performance and provide the stimulus for long-term tendon adaptation. As tendon strain increases with load magnitude and decreases with loading rate, changes in movement speed during exercise should influence tendon strain. Methods: Ten resistance-trained men [squat one repetition maximum (1RM) to body mass ratio: 1.65 ± 0.12] performed parallel-depth back squat lifts with 60% of 1RM load at three different speeds: slow fixed-tempo (TS: 2-s eccentric, 1-s pause, 2-s concentric), volitional-speed without a pause (VS) and maximum-speed jump (JS). In each condition joint kinetics, quadriceps tendon length (LT), patellar tendon force (FT), and rate of force development (RFDT) were estimated using integrated ultrasonography, motion-capture, and force platform recordings. Results: Peak LT, FT, and RFDT were greater in JS than TS (p < 0.05), however no differences were observed between VS and TS. Thus, moving at faster speeds resulted in both greater tendon stress and strain despite an increased RFDT, as would be predicted of an elastic, but not a viscous, structure. Temporal comparisons showed that LT was greater in TS than JS during the early eccentric phase (10–14% movement duration) where peak RFDT occurred, demonstrating that the tendon's viscous properties predominated during initial eccentric loading. However, during the concentric phase (61–70 and 76–83% movement duration) differing FT and similar RFDT between conditions allowed for the tendon's elastic properties to predominate such that peak tendon strain was greater in JS than TS. Conclusions: Based on our current understanding, there may be an additional mechanical stimulus for tendon adaptation when performing large range-of-motion isoinertial exercises at faster movement speeds. PMID:27630574

  19. A Rare Case of Simultaneous Acute Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture and Unilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yee Leong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There have been multiple reported cases of bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures (QTR in the literature. These injuries frequently associated with delayed diagnosis, which results in delayed surgical treatment. In very unusual cases, bilateral QTRs can be associated with other simultaneous tendon ruptures. Case Report: We present a rare case of bilateral QTR with a simultaneous Achilles Tendon Rupture involving a 31 years old Caucasian man who is a semi-professional body builder taking anabolic steroids. To date bilateral QTR with additional TA rupture has only been reported once in the literature and to our knowledge this is the first reported case of bilateral QTR and simultaneous TA rupture in a young, fit and healthy individual. Conclusion: The diagnosis of bilateral QTR alone can sometimes be challenging and the possibility of even further tendon injuries should be carefully assessed. A delay in diagnosis could result in delay in treatment and potentially worse outcome for the patient. Keywords: Quadriceps tendon rupture; Achilles tendon rupture; Bilateral.

  20. The effects of mechanical loading on tendons--an in vivo and in vitro model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianying Zhang

    Full Text Available Mechanical loading constantly acts on tendons, and a better understanding of its effects on the tendons is essential to gain more insights into tendon patho-physiology. This study aims to investigate tendon mechanobiological responses through the use of mouse treadmill running as an in vivo model and mechanical stretching of tendon cells as an in vitro model. In the in vivo study, mice underwent moderate treadmill running (MTR and intensive treadmill running (ITR regimens. Treadmill running elevated the expression of mechanical growth factors (MGF and enhanced the proliferative potential of tendon stem cells (TSCs in both patellar and Achilles tendons. In both tendons, MTR upregulated tenocyte-related genes: collagen type I (Coll. I ∼10 fold and tenomodulin (∼3-4 fold, but did not affect non-tenocyte-related genes: LPL (adipocyte, Sox9 (chondrocyte, Runx2 and Osterix (both osteocyte. However, ITR upregulated both tenocyte (Coll. I ∼7-11 fold; tenomodulin ∼4-5 fold and non-tenocyte-related genes (∼3-8 fold. In the in vitro study, TSCs and tenocytes were stretched to 4% and 8% using a custom made mechanical loading system. Low mechanical stretching (4% of TSCs from both patellar and Achilles tendons increased the expression of only the tenocyte-related genes (Coll. I ∼5-6 fold; tenomodulin ∼6-13 fold, but high mechanical stretching (8% increased the expression of both tenocyte (Coll. I ∼28-50 fold; tenomodulin ∼14-48 fold and non-tenocyte-related genes (2-5-fold. However, in tenocytes, non-tenocyte related gene expression was not altered by the application of either low or high mechanical stretching. These findings indicate that appropriate mechanical loading could be beneficial to tendons because of their potential to induce anabolic changes in tendon cells. However, while excessive mechanical loading caused anabolic changes in tendons, it also induced differentiation of TSCs into non-tenocytes, which may lead to the development

  1. Achilles tendon and sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulreich, N.; Kainberger, F.; Huber, W.; Nehrer, S.

    2002-01-01

    Because of the rising popularity of recreational sports activities achillodynia is an often associated symptom with running, soccer and athletics. Therefore radiologist are frequently asked to image this tendon. The origin of the damage of the Achilles tendon is explained by numerous hypothesis, mainly a decreased perfusion and a mechanical irritation that lead to degeneration of the tendon. High-resolution technics such as sonography and magnetic resonance imaging show alterations in the structure of the tendon which can be graduated and classified. Manifestations like tendinosis, achillobursitis, rupture and Haglunds disease can summarized as the tendon overuse syndrom. A rupture of a tendon is mostly the result of a degeneration of the collagenfibres. The task of the radiologist is to acquire the intrinsic factors for a potential rupture. (orig.) [de

  2. Evaluation of the clinical-functional results from repairing extensive rotator cuff injury with inclusion of the tendon of the long head of the biceps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Yukio Ikemoto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the outcomes of the arthroscopic margin convergence of the posterior cuff to the biceps tendon. METHODS: From October 2003 to December 2007, 20 patients with massive rotator cuff tear which include the rotator interval were treated with arthroscopic margin convergence of the posterior cuff to biceps tendon. Sixteen patients were female and four were male. The mean age was 58.95 years old. The dominant side was affected in 16 cases (80%. The outcomes were analysed according to the UCLA Score with a minimum follow-up period of two years. RESULTS: The UCLA score improved, on average, 14 points (p < 0.001. Six patients had excellent results; nine good; three fair and two poor results. The mean improvement of forward flexion was 33º (p < 0.001, 3º of external rotation (p < 0.396 and two vertebral levels for internal rotation (p < 0.025. CONCLUSION: The arthroscopic margin convergence of the posterior cuff to the biceps tendon leads to satisfactory results.

  3. Tendon Adaptation to Sport-specific Loading in Adolescent Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, M; Carlsohn, A; Fröhlich, K; John, M; Riegels, N; Mayer, F

    2016-02-01

    Tendon adaptation due to mechanical loading is controversially discussed. However, data concerning the development of tendon thickness in adolescent athletes is sparse. The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in Achilles (AT) and patellar tendon (PT) thickness in adolescent athletes while considering age, gender and sport-specific loading. In 500 adolescent competitive athletes of 16 different sports and 40 recreational controls both ATs and PTs were sonographically measured. Subjects were divided into 2 age groups (sport type categories (ball, combat, and water sports, combined disciplines, cycling, controls). In addition, 3 risk groups (low, moderate, high) were created according to the athlete's risk of developing tendinopathy. AT and PT thickness did not significantly differ between age groups (AT/PT:sports/cyclists and lowest in controls (p≤0.002). PT thickness was greatest in water sports and lowest in controls (p=0.02). High risk athletes presented slightly higher AT thickness compared to the low risk group (p=0.03). Increased AT and PT thickness in certain sport types compared to controls supports the hypothesis of structural tendon adaptation due to sport-specific loading. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Rotator cuff repair with a tendon-fibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Chen, Qingshan; Thoreson, Andrew R; Qu, Jin; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Steinmann, Scott P; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-11-01

    To compare the mechanical performance of a rotator cuff repaired with a novel tendon-fibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch vs the traditional Mason-Allen repair in an in vitro canine model. Twenty shoulders and 10 bridging patches from patellar tendon were harvested. The patches were trimmed and sliced into 2 layers. An infraspinatus tendon tear was created in each shoulder. Modified Mason-Allen sutures were used to repair the infraspinatus tendon to the greater tuberosity, with or without the bridging patch (bridging patch group and controls, respectively). Shoulders were loaded to failure under displacement control at a rate of 0.5mm/s. The ultimate tensile load was significantly higher in the bridging patch group than control (mean [SD], 365.46 [36.45] vs 272.79 [48.88] N; Pfibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch achieved higher ultimate tensile load and stiffness at the patch-greater tuberosity repair site compared with traditional repair in a canine model. This composite tissue transforms the traditional tendon-to-bone healing interface (with dissimilar tissues) into a pair of bone-to-bone and tendon-to-tendon interfaces, which may improve healing quality and reduce retear rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Development of Achilles tendon rupture in skiing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckert, K; Benedetto, K P; Vogel, A

    1983-06-01

    This is an analysis of decline of rupture of the Achilles tendon in skiing while there is a steady increase of skiing injuries. Three groups, equipped with three different types of ski boots were observed once on a plane slope on the other hand on a bump track. The simultaneous size of angle of knee and ankle was measured by telemetry. The high plastic ski boot, which obstructs the ankle forward and lateral is apart from the rise of heel in the boot, the safety binding and the new skiing style the main reason for decline of rupture of the Achilles tendon in skiing.

  6. MOLECULAR PATHOBIOLOGICAL AND SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC CHANGES IN HORSE TENDON CELLS TREA TED WITH ENROFLOXACIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khan1 and J. Halper

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone (FQNL antibiotics have been used widely in horses because of their broad-spectrum bactericidal activity and relative safety, however, their use is not without risk. Tendonitis and spontaneous tendon rupture have been reported in people during or following therapy with FQNLs. To evaluate the potential damage of enrofloxacin (ENRO on the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SOFT, an equine cell culture system as an in vitro model of equine tendon injury and repair was developed. The effects of ENRO on tendon cell cultures established from equine SOFT were studied. The data thus collected demonstrated that ENRO inhibited cell proliferation, induced morphological changes and altered proteoglycan synthesis in equine tendon cell cultures. Interestingly, these effects were more pronounced in juvenile tendon cells as compared to adult horses, It. is hypothesized that morphological changes and inhibition of cell proliferation is a result of impaired production of proteoglycans and other glycoproteins in the extracellular matrix of ENRO-treated tendon cells.

  7. Prevalence of triceps tendon tears on MRI of the elbow and clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koplas, Monica C.; Schneider, Erika; Sundaram, Murali

    2011-01-01

    Triceps tendon injuries are reported to be very rare. To our knowledge, there have been no studies describing its prevalence or injury patterns on MR imaging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and patterns of triceps injuries based on a large series of consecutive MR examinations. Clinical correlation was obtained. From 801 consecutive elbow MR examinations over a 15-year period, 28 patients with 30 triceps tendon injuries were identified and graded as partial tendon tear and complete tendon tear. The patients' medical records were reviewed to determine age, gender, cause of tears, and management. The prevalence of triceps tendon injuries was 3.8%. There were 5 women and 23 men with partial or complete tears (mean age: 46.6 years; range: 2.7 to 75.1 years). The most common injury was partial tear, found in 18 patients. There were 10 patients with 12 complete tears (2 had re-torn following surgical repair). A tear was suspected in 12 out 28 (43%) patients prior to the MRI. The most common presenting symptom was pain. The most common cause was athletic injury (8 patients [29%], including weightlifting [2 patients]). Tendon tear was found to be a complication of infection in 6 patients, and in 3 patients the tears were a complication of steroid use. Thirteen tendon tears were surgically repaired (8 of these were complete tears). Triceps tendon injury is not as rare as commonly reported and may often be clinically underdiagnosed. (orig.)

  8. Prevalence of triceps tendon tears on MRI of the elbow and clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koplas, Monica C. [University of Mississippi Medical Center, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Radiology, Jackson, MS (United States); Schneider, Erika [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Triceps tendon injuries are reported to be very rare. To our knowledge, there have been no studies describing its prevalence or injury patterns on MR imaging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and patterns of triceps injuries based on a large series of consecutive MR examinations. Clinical correlation was obtained. From 801 consecutive elbow MR examinations over a 15-year period, 28 patients with 30 triceps tendon injuries were identified and graded as partial tendon tear and complete tendon tear. The patients' medical records were reviewed to determine age, gender, cause of tears, and management. The prevalence of triceps tendon injuries was 3.8%. There were 5 women and 23 men with partial or complete tears (mean age: 46.6 years; range: 2.7 to 75.1 years). The most common injury was partial tear, found in 18 patients. There were 10 patients with 12 complete tears (2 had re-torn following surgical repair). A tear was suspected in 12 out 28 (43%) patients prior to the MRI. The most common presenting symptom was pain. The most common cause was athletic injury (8 patients [29%], including weightlifting [2 patients]). Tendon tear was found to be a complication of infection in 6 patients, and in 3 patients the tears were a complication of steroid use. Thirteen tendon tears were surgically repaired (8 of these were complete tears). Triceps tendon injury is not as rare as commonly reported and may often be clinically underdiagnosed. (orig.)

  9. Prevalence of triceps tendon tears on MRI of the elbow and clinical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplas, Monica C; Schneider, Erika; Sundaram, Murali

    2011-05-01

    Triceps tendon injuries are reported to be very rare. To our knowledge, there have been no studies describing its prevalence or injury patterns on MR imaging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and patterns of triceps injuries based on a large series of consecutive MR examinations. Clinical correlation was obtained. From 801 consecutive elbow MR examinations over a 15-year period, 28 patients with 30 triceps tendon injuries were identified and graded as partial tendon tear and complete tendon tear. The patients' medical records were reviewed to determine age, gender, cause of tears, and management. The prevalence of triceps tendon injuries was 3.8%. There were 5 women and 23 men with partial or complete tears (mean age: 46.6 years; range: 2.7 to 75.1 years). The most common injury was partial tear, found in 18 patients. There were 10 patients with 12 complete tears (2 had re-torn following surgical repair). A tear was suspected in 12 out 28 (43%) patients prior to the MRI. The most common presenting symptom was pain. The most common cause was athletic injury (8 patients [29%], including weightlifting [2 patients]). Tendon tear was found to be a complication of infection in 6 patients, and in 3 patients the tears were a complication of steroid use. Thirteen tendon tears were surgically repaired (8 of these were complete tears). Triceps tendon injury is not as rare as commonly reported and may often be clinically underdiagnosed.

  10. Efeito do Hólmio YAG laser (Ho: YAG sobre o tendão patelar de ratos após 12 e 24 semanas de seguimento The effects of Holmium YAG laser (Ho:YAG on the patellar tendon of rats after 12 and 24 weeks of follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldo Lino Júnior

    2005-01-01

    , com neoformação vascular evidente. No grupo de 24 semanas as fibras de colágeno se apresentavam com disposição regular e paralela ao longo eixo do tendão.The authors have studied the effects of the Holmium: Yttrium Aluminum Grenade (Ho:YAG laser on tendon sizes (proximal and distal length and width and on the cellularity and arrangement of collagen fibers in 20 Wistar variety, male, white, adult rats (Rattus Novergicus. The animals have been divided in two groups, according to the follow-up time (12 and 24 weeks and pursuant to the for form of laser application (continuous or two-point. A Holmium laser (pulsed, solid state, 2.1 micron waves, 40 watts, OmniTip 30º tip apparatus was used. After the animals were sacrificed, the proximal and distal length and width of the operated size of such rats were compared to those of the non-operated size be means of non-parametric testing (considering p=0,05. The length in the operated size was significantly bigger for both follow-up groups, when compared to the length of the non-operated size, however there was no significant difference in such measures in function of the type of laser application. In the same manner, the width, both in the proximal and distal regions, was significantly bigger in the operated size in both follow-up groups, without showing any significant difference whatsoever in function of the type of application. When the measures in both follow-up groups were compared, distal length and width showed a trend to become bigger after 24 weeks, while width in the proximal region was significantly bigger in this group. As for the subjective microscopic evaluation, both in longitudinal and cross sections, it was possible to observe and increase in the number of fibroblasts, mainly in the 12-week group. The average fibroblast concentration in the tendon with 24-week follow-up was group deemed to be intermediate between the 12-week group and non-operated tendon. The conjunctive tissue was exuberant in the region

  11. ARTHROSCOPIC CORRECTION OF THE INJURIES OF THE COMPLEX «TENDON OF THE BICEPS LONG HEAD - THE ARTICULAR LIP» IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH FULL-LAYER RUPTURES OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Dokolin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage of the long head of the biceps at the place of attachment to the articular tubercle supraglenoidal lip of shoulder, to the entrance and throughout intertubercle furrows are common causes of pain and dysfunction of the shoulder joint. At the same clinical manifestations of the morphology of such lesions may be different. The current literature discusses various options of surgical correction of the biceps injury. Variety of methods of surgical treatment and the lack of consensus in support of their application in different patients in different types of injuries were the basis for the present study. A prospective analysis of the functional results of surgical treatment of the 34 - year’s patients with associated rotator cuff (SSP+ISP+SSC+ and the tendon of the biceps muscle in age from 34 to 75 years. Options for surgical correction of the damaged part of the biceps were: biceps tenotomy, biceps tenotomy with intraarticular tenodez of the shoulder to the head before entering intertubercle furrow, biceps tenotomy and extraarticular subpectorialtenodez to the proximal humerus is intertubercle interferrent screw groove, as well as its attachment to the tendon suture large pectoral muscle. Choice of surgical approach depended on the patient's age, level of daily physical activity, morphology and localization of lesions. The best results were obtained when the extra-articular subpectorialtenodez of long head of the biceps to the proximal humerus interferrent screw and suture fixation to the pectoralis major muscle, the average follow-up was 16,6 ± 4,7 months.

  12. Elbow Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Many things can make your elbow hurt. A common cause is tendinitis, an inflammation or injury to the tendons that attach muscle to bone. Tendinitis of the elbow is a sports injury, often from playing tennis or golf. You ...

  13. Eccentric Training for Tendon Healing After Acute Lesion: A Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaux, Jean-François; Libertiaux, Vincent; Leprince, Pierre; Fillet, Marianne; Denoel, Vincent; Wyss, Clémence; Lecut, Christelle; Gothot, André; Le Goff, Caroline; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Drion, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    The tendon is a dynamic entity that remodels permanently. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection has been shown to have a beneficial effect on tendon healing after lesion in rats. Furthermore, eccentric exercise seems to improve the mechanical quality of the tendon. A combination of PRP injection and eccentric training might be more effective than either treatment alone. Controlled laboratory study. Adult male rats were anesthetized, an incision was performed in the middle of their left patellar tendon and an injection of physiological fluid (PF) or homologous PRP was randomly made at the lesion level. The rats were then divided into 2 groups: the eccentric group, undergoing eccentric training 3 times a week, and the untrained group, without any training. Thus, 4 groups were compared. After 5 weeks, the tendons were removed and their ultimate tensile strength and energy were measured. Tendons were frozen for proteomic analyses when all biomechanical tests were completed. Statistical analysis was performed with linear mixed effect models. No significant difference was found between the treatments using PF injection or PRP injection alone. However, the value of the ultimate tensile force at rupture was increased by 4.5 N (108% of control, P = .006) when eccentric training was performed. An intragroup analysis revealed that eccentric training significantly improved the ultimate force values for the PRP group. Proteomic analysis revealed that eccentric training led to an increase in abundance of several cytoskeletal proteins in the PF group, while a decrease in abundance of enzymes of the glycolytic pathway occurred in the PRP-treated groups, indicating that this treatment might redirect the exercise-driven metabolic plasticity of the tendon. Eccentric training altered the metabolic plasticity of tendon and led to an improvement of injured tendon resistance regardless of the treatment injected (PF or PRP). This study demonstrates the necessity of eccentric rehabilitation

  14. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppé, Christian; Lonsdale, Markus

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Following Achilles tendon rupture, running is often allowed after 6 months. However, tendon healing is slow and the metabolic status of the tendon at this point is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate tendon metabolism (glucose uptake) and vascularization at 3, 6 and 12...... demonstrate that the healing process as determined by metabolic activity and vascularization continues for 6 months after injury when large loads are typically allowed on the tendon. Indeed, metabolic activity remained elevated for more than 1 year after injury despite normalized vascularization. The robust...... negative correlation between tendon metabolism and patient-reported outcome suggests that a high metabolic activity 6 months after the injury may be related to a poor clinical healing outcome....

  15. Triple Achilles Tendon Rupture: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amol; Hofer, Deann

    We present a case report with 1-year follow-up data of a 57-year-old male soccer referee who had sustained an acute triple Achilles tendon rupture injury during a game. His triple Achilles tendon rupture consisted of a rupture of the proximal watershed region, a rupture of the main body (mid-watershed area), and an avulsion-type rupture of insertional calcific tendinosis. The patient was treated surgically with primary repair of the tendon, including tenodesis with anchors. Postoperative treatment included non-weightbearing for 4 weeks and protected weightbearing until 10 weeks postoperative, followed by formal physical therapy, which incorporated an "antigravity" treadmill. The patient was able to return to full activity after 26 weeks, including running and refereeing, without limitations. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Containment structure tendon investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, J.F.; Murray, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes an investigation into the possible causes of lower-than-predicted tendon forces which were measured during past tendon surveillances for a concrete containment. The containment is post tensioned by vertical tendons which are anchored into a rock foundation. The tendons were originally stressed in 1969, and lift-off tests were performed on six occasions subsequent to this date over a period of 11 years. The tendon forces measured in these tests were generally lower than predicted, and by 1979 the prestress level in the containment was only marginally above the design requirement. The tendons were retensioned in 1980, and by this time an investigation into the possible causes was underway. Potential causes investigated include the rock anchors and surrounding rock, elastomeric pad creep, wire stresses, thermal effects, stressing equipment and lift-off procedures, and wire stress relaxation. The investigation activities included stress relaxation testing of wires pulled from actual tendons. The stress relaxation test program included wire specimens at several different temperature and initial stress levels and the effect of a varying temperature history on the stress relaxation property of the wires. For purpose of future force predictions of the retensioned tendons, the test program included tests to determine the effect on stress relaxation due to restressing the wires after they had relaxed for 1000 hours and 10,000 hours. (orig./GL)

  17. Fascicles and the interfascicular matrix show decreased fatigue life with ageing in energy storing tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2017-07-01

    Tendon is composed of rope-like fascicles bound together by interfascicular matrix (IFM). The IFM is critical for the function of energy storing tendons, facilitating sliding between fascicles to allow these tendons to cyclically stretch and recoil. This capacity is required to a lesser degree in positional tendons. We have previously demonstrated that both fascicles and IFM in energy storing tendons have superior fatigue resistance compared with positional tendons, but the effect of ageing on the fatigue properties of these different tendon subunits has not been determined. Energy storing tendons become more injury-prone with ageing, indicating reduced fatigue resistance, hence we tested the hypothesis that the decline in fatigue life with ageing in energy storing tendons would be more pronounced in the IFM than in fascicles. We further hypothesised that tendon subunit fatigue resistance would not alter with ageing in positional tendons. Fascicles and IFM from young and old energy storing and positional tendons were subjected to cyclic fatigue testing until failure, and mechanical properties were calculated. The results show that both IFM and fascicles from the SDFT exhibit a similar magnitude of reduced fatigue life with ageing. By contrast, the fatigue life of positional tendon subunits was unaffected by ageing. The age-related decline in fatigue life of tendon subunits in energy storing tendons is likely to contribute to the increased risk of injury in aged tendons. Full understanding of the mechanisms resulting in this reduced fatigue life will aid in the development of treatments and interventions to prevent age-related tendinopathy. Understanding the effect of ageing on tendon-structure function relationships is crucial for the development of effective preventative measures and treatments for age-related tendon injury. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the fatigue resistance of the interfascicular matrix decreases with ageing in energy

  18. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Li, Qianqian [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Yang, Jun [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, 421 Hospital of PLA, Guangzhou 510318 (China); Dong, Weiqiang [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital to Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Wang, Qiang, E-mail: 1780468505@qq.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Subei People’s Hospital of Jiangsu Province (Clinical Medical College of Yangzhou University), Yangzhou, Jiangsu Province 225001 (China); Yu, Bin, E-mail: carryzhang1985@live.com [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation.

  19. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Jun; Dong, Weiqiang; Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation

  20. Expression of extracellular matrix components and related growth factors in human tendon and muscle after acute exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, K M; Bjerrum, S S; Schjerling, P

    2013-01-01

    Acute kicking exercise induces collagen synthesis in both tendon and muscle in humans, but it is not known if this relates to increased collagen transcription and if other matrix genes are regulated. Young men performed 1 h of one-leg kicking at 67% of max workload. Biopsies were taken from...... the patellar tendon and vastus lateralis muscle of each leg at 2 (n = 10), 6 (n = 11), or 26 h (n = 10) after exercise. Levels of messenger ribonucleic acid mRNA for collagens, noncollagenous matrix proteins, and growth factors were measured with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction...

  1. T2 mapping in patellar chondromalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Santiago, Fernando; Pozuelo Calvo, Rocío; Almansa López, Julio; Guzmán Álvarez, Luis; Castellano García, María del Mar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation between the T2 relaxation times of the patellar cartilage and morphological MRI findings of chondromalacia. Methods: This prospective study comprises 50 patients, 27 men and 23 women suffering of anterior knee pain (mean age: 29.7, SD 8.3 years; range: 16–45 years). MRI of 97 knees were performed in these patients at 1.5 T magnet including sagittal T1, coronal intermediate, axial intermediate fat sat and T2 mapping. Chondromalacia was assessed using a modified version of Noyes classification. The relaxation time, T2, was studied segmenting the full thickness of the patellar cartilage in 12 areas: 4 proximal (external facet–proximal–lateral (EPL), external facet–proximal–central (EPC), internal facet–proximal–central (IPC), internal facet–proximal–medial (IPM), 4 in the middle section (external facet–middle–lateral (EML), external facet–middle–central (EMC), internal facet–middle–central (IMC), internal facet–middle–medial (IMM) and 4 distal (external facet–distal–lateral (EDL), external facet–distal–central (EDC), internal facet–distal–central (IDC), internal facet–distal–medial (IDM). Results: T2 values showed a significant increase in mild chondromalacia regarding normal cartilage in most of the cartilage areas (p < 0.05), except in the internal distal facet (IDC and IDM), EPC, EDL, and IMM. Severe chondromalacia was characterized by a fall of T2 relaxation times with loss of statistical significant differences in comparison with normal cartilage, except in EMC and IMC, where similar values as mild chondromalacia were maintained (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Steepest increase in T2 values of patellar cartilage occurs in early stages of patellar cartilage degeneration. Progression of morphologic changes of chondromalacia to more severe degrees is associated to a new drop of T2 relaxation times approaching basal values in most of the areas of the patellar cartilage, except in the

  2. T2 mapping in patellar chondromalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Santiago, Fernando, E-mail: ferusan12@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Traumatology Hospital, University Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Granada (Spain); Pozuelo Calvo, Rocío [Department of Rehabilitation and Physical therapy, Traumatology Hospital, University Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Granada (Spain); Almansa López, Julio [Department of Physic, University Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Granada (Spain); Guzmán Álvarez, Luis; Castellano García, María del Mar [Department of Radiology, Traumatology Hospital, University Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Granada (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    Objective: To study the correlation between the T2 relaxation times of the patellar cartilage and morphological MRI findings of chondromalacia. Methods: This prospective study comprises 50 patients, 27 men and 23 women suffering of anterior knee pain (mean age: 29.7, SD 8.3 years; range: 16–45 years). MRI of 97 knees were performed in these patients at 1.5 T magnet including sagittal T1, coronal intermediate, axial intermediate fat sat and T2 mapping. Chondromalacia was assessed using a modified version of Noyes classification. The relaxation time, T2, was studied segmenting the full thickness of the patellar cartilage in 12 areas: 4 proximal (external facet–proximal–lateral (EPL), external facet–proximal–central (EPC), internal facet–proximal–central (IPC), internal facet–proximal–medial (IPM), 4 in the middle section (external facet–middle–lateral (EML), external facet–middle–central (EMC), internal facet–middle–central (IMC), internal facet–middle–medial (IMM) and 4 distal (external facet–distal–lateral (EDL), external facet–distal–central (EDC), internal facet–distal–central (IDC), internal facet–distal–medial (IDM). Results: T2 values showed a significant increase in mild chondromalacia regarding normal cartilage in most of the cartilage areas (p < 0.05), except in the internal distal facet (IDC and IDM), EPC, EDL, and IMM. Severe chondromalacia was characterized by a fall of T2 relaxation times with loss of statistical significant differences in comparison with normal cartilage, except in EMC and IMC, where similar values as mild chondromalacia were maintained (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Steepest increase in T2 values of patellar cartilage occurs in early stages of patellar cartilage degeneration. Progression of morphologic changes of chondromalacia to more severe degrees is associated to a new drop of T2 relaxation times approaching basal values in most of the areas of the patellar cartilage, except in the

  3. [The history of flexor tendon surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamay, A

    1997-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries were already treated in antiquity by Hippocrates, Galien and Avicenne. Since the Renaissance, other surgeons have attempted to repair flexor tendon injuries, but without success due to problems related to unsuitable materials and ignorance of the basic rules of asepsis and the absence of antiseptics until the second half of the 19th century. The first successful flexor tendon grafts in man were performed by K. Biesalski in 1910, E. Lexer in 1912 and L. Mayer in 1916. These three authors published their series of grafts and described in detail the anatomical, physiological and technical principles to be respected. St. Bunnell, in 1918, developed various pull-out direct suture procedures, but faced with the problems of adhesions, he abandoned this technique and proposed not to repair flexors in the digital tunnels but to graft them. He defined the famous zone which he called No man's land, which subsequently became Claude Verdan's zone II, in 1959. In 1960, C. Verdan published his first series of sutures maintained by 2 pins in zone II with comparable results to those obtained after grafting. In 1967, H. Kleinert, with his mobile suture, became the leader of direct tendon repair in zone II. 2-stage grafts were introduced in 1965 under the impetus of J. Hunter, who revised and popularized the studies conducted by A. Bassett and R.E. Caroll in 1950.

  4. Clinical and radiological outcomes after a quasi-anatomical reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament with gracilis tendon autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monllau, Joan C; Masferrer-Pino, Àngel; Ginovart, Gerard; Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Gelber, Pablo E; Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente

    2017-08-01

    To analyse the clinical and radiological outcomes of a quasi-anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) with a gracilis tendon autograft. Patients with objective recurrent patellar instability that were operated on from 2006 to 2012 were included. A quasi-anatomical surgical technique was performed using a gracilis tendon autograft. It was anatomically attached at the patella, and the adductor magnus tendon was also used as a pulley for femoral fixation (non-anatomical reconstruction). The IKDC, Kujala and Lysholm scores as well as Tegner and VAS for pain were collected preoperatively and at final follow-up. Radiographic measurements of patellar position tilt and signs of osteoarthritis (OA) as well as trochlear dysplasia were also recorded. Thirty-six patients were included. The mean age at surgery was 25.6 years. After a minimum 27 months of follow-up, all functional scores significantly improved (p patellofemoral surfaces at the short term, as shown by the absence of radiological signs of OA in the CT scan. The procedure has been shown to be safe and suitable for the treatment of chronic patellar instability, including in adolescents with open physis. A new effective, inexpensive and easy-to-perform technique is described to reconstruct MPFL in the daily clinical practice. Therapeutic case series, Level IV.

  5. Tendon 'turnover lengthening' technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerovac, S; Miranda, B H

    2013-11-01

    Tendon defect reconstruction is amongst the most technically challenging areas in hand surgery. Tendon substance deficiency reconstruction techniques include lengthening, grafting, two-stage reconstruction and tendon transfers, however each is associated with unique challenges over and above direct repair. We describe a novel 'turnover lengthening' technique for hand tendons that has successfully been applied to the repair of several cases, including a case of attritional flexor and traumatic extensor tendon rupture in two presented patients where primary tenorrhaphy was not possible. In both cases a good post-operative outcome was achieved, as the patients were happy having returned back to normal activities of daily living such that they were discharged 12 weeks post-operatively. Our technique avoids the additional morbidity and complications associated with grafting, transfers and two stage reconstructions. It is quick, simple and reproducible for defects not exceeding 3-4 cm, provides a means of immediate one stage reconstruction, no secondary donor site morbidity and does not compromise salvage by tendon transfer and/or two-stage reconstruction in cases of failure. To our knowledge no such technique has been previously been described to reconstruct such hand tendon defects. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bevacizumab Improves Achilles Tendon Repair in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Tempfer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Effective wound-healing generally requires efficient re-vascularization after injury, ensuring sufficient supply with oxygen, nutrients, and various cell populations. While this applies to most tissues, tendons are mostly avascular in nature and harbor relatively few cells, probably contributing to their poor regenerative capacity. Considering the minimal vascularization of healthy tendons, we hypothesize that controlling angiogenesis in early tendon healing is beneficial for repair tissue quality and function. Methods: To address this hypothesis, Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody blocking VEGF-A signaling, was locally injected into the defect area of a complete tenotomy in rat Achilles tendon. At 28 days post-surgery, the defect region was investigated using immunohistochemistry against vascular and lymphatic epitopes. Polarization microscopy and biomechanical testing was used to determine tendon integrity and gait analysis for functional testing in treated vs non-treated animals. Results: Angiogenesis was found to be significantly reduced in the Bevacizumab treated repair tissue, accompanied by significantly reduced cross sectional area, improved matrix organization, increased stiffness and Young’s modulus, maximum load and stress. Further, we observed an improved gait pattern when compared to the vehicle injected control group. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study we propose that reducing angiogenesis after tendon injury can improve tendon repair, potentially representing a novel treatment-option.

  7. Stem Cell Applications in Tendon Disorders: A Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Young

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries are a common cause of morbidity and a significant health burden on society. Tendons are structural tissues connecting muscle to bone and are prone to tearing and tendinopathy, an overuse or degenerative condition that is characterized by failed healing and cellular depletion. Current treatments, for tendon tear are conservative, surgical repair or surgical scaffold reconstruction. Tendinopathy is treated by exercises, injection therapies, shock wave treatments or surgical tendon debridement. However, tendons usually heal with fibrosis and scar tissue, which has suboptimal tensile strength and is prone to reinjury, resulting in lifestyle changes with activity restriction. Preclinical studies show that cell therapies have the potential to regenerate rather than repair tendon tissue, a process termed tenogenesis. A number of different cell lines, with varying degrees of differentiation, have being evaluated including stem cells, tendon derived cells and dermal fibroblasts. Even though cellular therapies offer some potential in treating tendon disorders, there have been few published clinical trials to determine the ideal cell source, the number of cells to administer, or the optimal bioscaffold for clinical use.

  8. Patellar calcar: MRI appearance of a previously undescribed anatomical entity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Mark S.; Tiegs-Heiden, Christin A.; Stuart, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The femoral calcar is a constant anatomical structure within the proximal femur representing a condensation of bone trabeculae. It is our impression that a similar structure is present within the patella. The purpose of this retrospective study was to define the prevalence, appearance, location, and configuration of the patellar calcar on MRI examinations. One hundred consecutive unenhanced knee MRIs were retrospectively reviewed by two readers who were blinded to the clinical indication. The patellar calcar was defined as a dark signaling, linear or curvilinear structure subjacent to the patellar articular surface. If present, the patellar calcar was assigned to a ''well seen,'' ''moderately well seen,'' or ''faintly seen'' category. Location of the calcar within the patella, orientation, configuration, and thickness were recorded. Confounding variables, such as marrow edema, patellar chondromalacia, bipartite patella, or postoperative changes were also recorded. The patellar calcar was visualized in 81 out of 100 (81 %) MRIs. When detected, the calcar was well seen in 20 out of 81 (25 %), moderately well seen in 35 out of 81 (43 %), and faintly seen in 26 out of 81 (32 %). The anteroposterior width of the calcar measured at its thickest segment was: 1 mm in 10 out of 81 (12 %). The patellar calcar was seen in the majority of knee MRIs and had a consistent imaging appearance. The calcar may be obscured by degenerative arthrosis of the patella and rarely may mimic patellar stress fracture or osteochondritis dissecans. Radiologists and clinicians should be familiar with this normal anatomical structure. (orig.)

  9. Epidemiology of Patellar Tendinopathy in Elite Male Soccer Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hägglund, Martin; Zwerver, Johannes; Ekstrand, Jan

    Background: Patellar tendinopathy is common among athletes in jumping sports and in sports with prolonged repetitive stress of the knee extensor apparatus. The epidemiology in soccer is not well described. Purpose: This study was undertaken to investigate and describe the epidemiology of patellar

  10. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles reduce the survival rate of osteocytes in bone-tendon constructs without affecting the mechanical properties of tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Kaori; Urabe, Ken; Naruse, Kouji; Uchida, Kentaro; Matsuura, Terumasa; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Suto, Mitsutoshi; Nemoto, Noriko; Kamiya, Kentaro; Itoman, Moritoshi

    2012-03-01

    Frozen bone-patellar tendon bone allografts are useful in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction as the freezing procedure kills tissue cells, thereby reducing immunogenicity of the grafts. However, a small portion of cells in human femoral heads treated by standard bone-bank freezing procedures survive, thus limiting the effectiveness of allografts. Here, we characterized the survival rates and mechanisms of cells isolated from rat bones and tendons that were subjected to freeze-thaw treatments, and evaluated the influence of these treatments on the mechanical properties of tendons. After a single freeze-thaw cycle, most cells isolated from frozen bone appeared morphologically as osteocytes and expressed both osteoblast- and osteocyte-related genes. Transmission electron microscopic observation of frozen cells using freeze-substitution revealed that a small number of osteocytes maintained large nuclei with intact double membranes, indicating that these osteocytes in bone matrix were resistant to ice crystal formation. We found that tendon cells were completely killed by a single freeze-thaw cycle, whereas bone cells exhibited a relatively high survival rate, although survival was significantly reduced after three freeze-thaw cycles. In patella tendons, the ultimate stress, Young's modulus, and strain at failure showed no significant differences between untreated tendons and those subjected to five freeze-thaw cycles. In conclusion, we identified that cells surviving after freeze-thaw treatment of rat bones were predominantly osteocytes. We propose that repeated freeze-thaw cycles could be applied for processing bone-tendon constructs prior to grafting as the treatment did not affect the mechanical property of tendons and drastically reduced surviving osteocytes, thereby potentially decreasing allograft immunogenecity.

  11. GH receptor blocker administration and muscle-tendon collagen synthesis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rie Harboe; Doessing, Simon; Goto, Kazushige

    2011-01-01

    Collagen is the predominant structural protein in tendons and ligaments, and can be controlled by hormonal changes. In animals, injections of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) has been shown to increase collagen synthesis in tendons and ligaments and to improve structural tissue healing......, but the effect of local IGF-I administration on tendon collagen synthesis in human has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to study whether local injections of IGF-I would have a stimulating effect on tendon collagen synthesis. Twelve healthy nonsmoking men [age 62 ± 1 years (mean ± SEM), BMI 27 ± 1......] participated. Two injections of either human recombinant IGF-I (0.1 mL Increlex©) or saline (control) into each patellar tendon were performed 24-h apart, respectively. Tendon collagen fractional synthesis rate (FSR) was measured by stable isotope technique in the hours after the second injection...

  12. Achilles tendon healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, E.H.; Pope, C.F.; Barber, V.; Jokl, P.; Lynch, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on symptomatic Achilles tendon abnormalities (rupture, tendinitis) evaluated with MR imaging during the healing phase after either surgical or conservative treatment. A total of 21 patients were studied. Fifteen of 21 underwent surgery (13 tendon ruptures) and six were managed conservatively (one rupture). MR studies were obtained before treatment in 11, at 3 months in eight, at 6 months in seven, and at 12 months in 12. The 1.5-T spin-echo and gradient-echo images were correlated with clinical results, planter reflex response times, and calf force measurements. Sequential T2 times were obtained from representative levels in the tendons

  13. MRI evaluation of the patellar articular cartilage in patients with subluxation of the patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Katsuyuki; Inoue, Masahiro; Harada, Koushi; Murakami, Takamichi; Kim, Shougen; Fujita, Norihiko; Sakurai, Kousuke; Kozuka, Takahiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-04-01

    In patients with subluxation of the patella, injury of the patellar articular cartilage is frequently observed and correct evaluation is important to manage these patients. We examined 11 patients with subluxation of the patella and five normal volunteers. In 12 patellofemoral joints of seven patients with subluxation of the patella, the abnormalities observed on MRI were compared with those on arthroscopy and/or at operation. MRI was performed with a Magnetom 1.5 T (Siemens) using the round surface coil. Pulse sequences were SE (TR 400 ms/TE 19 ms), FLASH(TR 320 ms/TE 15 ms FA 90deg and 40deg), and SE (TR 2000 ms/TE 26, 70 ms). We analysed MR findings of the 12 abnormal joints and 10 normal joints according to the following classification of abnormalities observed on arthroscopy; normal appearance (n=3 joints), softening and fibrillation (n=6), fragmentation (n=3), and erosion to bone (n=0). In only one of the six cases with softening and fibrillation observed on arthroscopy, MRI could visualize the thickening of patellar articular cartilage, but in all three cases with fragmentation observed on arthroscopy, MRI could visualize the thin inhomogeneous cartilage with irregular surface. The combination of SE (TR 400 ms/TE 19 ms) and FLASH (TR 320 ms/TE 15 ms FA 90deg) are extremely effective pulse sequence to detect the abnormalities of patellar articular cartilage. We conclude that MRI is a useful noninvasive method of detecting advanced changes in patellar articular cartilage. (author).

  14. MRI evaluation of the patellar articular cartilage in patients with subluxation of the patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Katsuyuki; Inoue, Masahiro; Harada, Koushi; Murakami, Takamichi; Kim, Shougen; Fujita, Norihiko; Sakurai, Kousuke; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1991-01-01

    In patients with subluxation of the patella, injury of the patellar articular cartilage is frequently observed and correct evaluation is important to manage these patients. We examined 11 patients with subluxation of the patella and five normal volunteers. In 12 patellofemoral joints of seven patients with subluxation of the patella, the abnormalities observed on MRI were compared with those on arthroscopy and/or at operation. MRI was performed with a Magnetom 1.5 T (Siemens) using the round surface coil. Pulse sequences were SE (TR 400 ms/TE 19 ms), FLASH(TR 320 ms/TE 15 ms FA 90deg and 40deg), and SE (TR 2000 ms/TE 26, 70 ms). We analysed MR findings of the 12 abnormal joints and 10 normal joints according to the following classification of abnormalities observed on arthroscopy; normal appearance (n=3 joints), softening and fibrillation (n=6), fragmentation (n=3), and erosion to bone (n=0). In only one of the six cases with softening and fibrillation observed on arthroscopy, MRI could visualize the thickening of patellar articular cartilage, but in all three cases with fragmentation observed on arthroscopy, MRI could visualize the thin inhomogeneous cartilage with irregular surface. The combination of SE (TR 400 ms/TE 19 ms) and FLASH (TR 320 ms/TE 15 ms FA 90deg) are extremely effective pulse sequence to detect the abnormalities of patellar articular cartilage. We conclude that MRI is a useful noninvasive method of detecting advanced changes in patellar articular cartilage. (author)

  15. The TOPGAME-study : effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy. Design of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, Johannes; Verhagen, Evert; Hartgens, Fred; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patellar tendinopathy is a major problem for many athletes, especially those involved in jumping activities. Despite its frequency and negative impact on athletic careers, no evidence-based guidelines for management of this overuse injury exist. Since functional outcomes of conservative

  16. The effect of a patellar strap on knee joint proprioception in healthy participants and athletes with patellar tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Astrid J.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L.; Zwerver, Johannes; van der Worp, Henk

    Objectives: The primary aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of a patellar strap on knee joint proprioception in both healthy participants and in patients with patellar tendinopathy (PT). Secondary aims are to examine whether there is a difference in effectiveness of the use of

  17. Achilles tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your Achilles tendon to point your toes and push off your foot when walking. If your Achilles ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  18. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a strong fibrous cord that connects the muscles in the back of your calf to your heel bone. If you overstretch your Achilles tendon, it can tear (rupture) completely or just partially. If your Achilles ...

  19. T2 mapping in patellar chondromalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Santiago, Fernando; Pozuelo Calvo, Rocío; Almansa López, Julio; Guzmán Álvarez, Luis; Castellano García, María Del Mar

    2014-06-01

    To study the correlation between the T2 relaxation times of the patellar cartilage and morphological MRI findings of chondromalacia. This prospective study comprises 50 patients, 27 men and 23 women suffering of anterior knee pain (mean age: 29.7, SD 8.3 years; range: 16-45 years). MRI of 97 knees were performed in these patients at 1.5T magnet including sagittal T1, coronal intermediate, axial intermediate fat sat and T2 mapping. Chondromalacia was assessed using a modified version of Noyes classification. The relaxation time, T2, was studied segmenting the full thickness of the patellar cartilage in 12 areas: 4 proximal (external facet-proximal-lateral (EPL), external facet-proximal-central (EPC), internal facet-proximal-central (IPC), internal facet-proximal-medial (IPM), 4 in the middle section (external facet-middle-lateral (EML), external facet-middle-central (EMC), internal facet-middle-central (IMC), internal facet-middle-medial (IMM) and 4 distal (external facet-distal-lateral (EDL), external facet-distal-central (EDC), internal facet-distal-central (IDC), internal facet-distal-medial (IDM). T2 values showed a significant increase in mild chondromalacia regarding normal cartilage in most of the cartilage areas (pchondromalacia was characterized by a fall of T2 relaxation times with loss of statistical significant differences in comparison with normal cartilage, except in EMC and IMC, where similar values as mild chondromalacia were maintained (pchondromalacia to more severe degrees is associated to a new drop of T2 relaxation times approaching basal values in most of the areas of the patellar cartilage, except in the central area of the middle section, where T2 values remain increased. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracorporeal shockwave for chronic patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Ko, Jih-Yang; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Weng, Lin-Hsiu; Hsu, Shan-Lin

    2007-06-01

    Chronic patellar tendinopathy is an overuse syndrome with pathologic changes similar to tendinopathies of the shoulder, elbow, and heel. Extracorporeal shockwave was shown effective in many tendinopathies. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy may be more effective than conservative treatment for chronic patellar tendinopathy. Randomized controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 2. This study consisted of 27 patients (30 knees) in the study group and 23 patients (24 knees) in the control group. In the study group, patients were treated with 1500 impulses of extracorporeal shockwave at 14 KV (equivalent to 0.18 mJ/mm(2) energy flux density) to the affected knee at a single session. Patients in the control group were treated with conservative treatments including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, exercise program, and the use of a knee strap. The evaluation parameters included pain score, Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment score, and ultrasonographic examination at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then once a year. At the 2- to 3-year follow-up, the overall results for the study group were 43% excellent, 47% good, 10% fair, and none poor. For the control group, the results were none excellent, 50% good, 25% fair, and 25% poor. The mean Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment scores were 42.57 +/- 10.22 and 39.25 +/- 10.85, respectively, before treatment (P = .129) and 92.0 +/- 10.17 and 41.04 +/- 10.96, respectively, after treatment (P Extracorporeal shockwave therapy appeared to be more effective and safer than traditional conservative treatments in the management of patients with chronic patellar tendinopathy.

  1. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Achilles and Patellar Tendinopathy: Meta-Analysis and a Systematic Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Punnoose, Anuj; Norrish, Alan; Pak, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sports related injuries such as lower limb tendinopathies can result in long-standing impairment of athletic performance. In recent years, treatment interventions like eccentric exercises, Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injections and Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT) have gained popularity among Physiotherapists and sports clinicians, but the evidence of their effectiveness is very limited. Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of ESWT on Achilles and Patellar tendinopathy....

  2. Changes in Indirect Markers of Muscle Damage and Tendons After Daily Drop Jumping Exercise with Rapid Load Increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidas Paleckis, Mantas Mickevičius, Audrius Snieckus, Vytautas Streckis, Mati Pääsuke, Saulius Rutkauskas, Rasa Steponavičiūtė, Albertas Skurvydas, Sigitas Kamandulis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and type I collagen degradation, as well as, patellar and Achilles tendon morphological differences during nine daily drop-jumps sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load to test the hypothesis that frequent drop-jump training results in negative muscular and tendon adaptation. Young men (n = 9 performed daily drop jump workouts with progression every 3 days in terms of number of jumps, platform height and squat amplitude. Voluntary and electrically evoked knee extensor torque, muscle soreness, blood plasma creatine kinase (CK activity and carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptide (ICTP, patellar and Achilles tendon thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA were assessed at different time points during the training period and again on days 1, 3, 10 and 17 after the training. The findings were as follows: (1 steady decline in maximal muscle strength with major recovery within 24 hours after the first six daily training sessions; (2 larger decline in electrically induced muscle torque and prolonged recovery during last three training sessions; (3 increase in patellar and Achilles tendons CSA without change in thickness towards the end of training period; (4 increase in jump height but not in muscle strength after whole training period. Our findings suggest that frequent drop-jump sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load do not induce severe muscle damage or major changes in tendons, nonetheless, this type of loading is not advisable for muscle strength improvement.

  3. Equine induced pluripotent stem cells have a reduced tendon differentiation capacity compared to embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Patricia Bavin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries occur commonly in horses and their repair through scar tissue formation predisposes horses to a high rate of re-injury. Pluripotent stem cells may provide a cell replacement therapy to improve tendon tissue regeneration and lower the frequency of re-injury. We have previously demonstrated that equine embryonic stem cells (ESCs differentiate into the tendon cell lineage upon injection into the damaged horse tendon and can differentiate into functional tendon cells in vitro to generate artificial tendons. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have now been derived from horses but, to date, there are no reports on their ability to differentiate into tendon cells. As iPSCs can be produced from adult cell types, they provide a more accessible source of cells than ESCs, which require the use of horse embryos. The aim of this study was to compare tendon differentiation by ESCs and iPSCs produced through two independent methods. In 2-dimensional differentiation assays the iPSCs expressed tendon associated genes and proteins, which were enhanced by the presence of transforming growth factor-β3. However, in 3-dimensional differentiation assays the iPSCs failed to differentiate into functional tendon cells and generate artificial tendons. These results demonstrate the utility of the 3-dimensional in vitro tendon assay for measuring tendon differentiation and the need for more detailed studies to be performed on equine iPSCs to identify and understand their epigenetic differences from pluripotent ESCs prior to their clinical application.

  4. Tendon Contraction After Cyclic Elongation Is an Age-Dependent Phenomenon: In Vitro and In Vivo Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavagnino, Michael; Bedi, Asheesh; Walsh, Christopher P; Sibilsky Enselman, Elizabeth R; Sheibani-Rad, Shahin; Arnoczky, Steven P

    2014-06-01

    Tendons are viscoelastic tissues that deform (elongate) in response to cyclic loading. However, the ability of a tendon to recover this elongation is unknown. Tendon length significantly increases after in vivo or in vitro cyclic loading, and the ability to return to its original length through a cell-mediated contraction mechanism is an age-dependent phenomenon. Controlled laboratory study. In vitro, rat tail tendon fascicles (RTTfs) from Sprague-Dawley rats of 3 age groups (1, 3, and 12 months) underwent 2% cyclic strain at 0.17 Hz for 2 hours, and the percentages of elongation were determined. After loading, the RTTfs were suspended for 3 days under tissue culture conditions and photographed daily to determine the amount of length contraction. In vivo, healthy male participants (n = 29; age, 19-49 years) had lateral, single-legged weightbearing radiographs taken of the knee at 60° of flexion immediately before, immediately after, and 24 hours after completing eccentric quadriceps loading exercises on the dominant leg to fatigue. Measurements of patellar tendon length were taken from the radiographs, and the percentages of tendon elongation and subsequent contraction were calculated. In vitro, cyclic loading increased the length of all RTTfs, with specimens from younger (1 and 3 months) rats demonstrating significantly greater elongation than those from older (12 months) rats (P = .009). The RTTfs contracted to their original length significantly faster (P fashion, with younger animals contracting faster. In vivo, repetitive eccentric loading exercises significantly increased patellar tendon length (P 30 years). Cyclic tendon loading results in a significant increase in tendon elongation under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Tendons in both conditions demonstrated an incomplete return to their original length after 24 hours, and the extent of this return was age dependent. The age- and time-dependent contraction of tendons, elongated after repetitive

  5. The impact of patellar tendinopathy on sports and work performance in active athletes

    OpenAIRE

    De Vries, Astrid J; Koolhaas, Wendy; Zwerver, Johannes; Diercks, Ron L.; Nieuwenhuis, Kari; Van Der Worp, Henk; Brouwer, Sandra; Van Den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Greater insight into sports and work performance of athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT) will help establish the severity of this common overuse injury. Primary aim of this study is to investigate the impact of PT on sports and work performance. Seventy seven active athletes with PT (50 males; age 28.1 +/- 8.2years; Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment Patella 56.4 +/- 12.3) participated in this survey. Sports performance, work ability and work productivity were assessed using the Osl...

  6. Long-Term Follow-Up of Nonoperatively and Operatively Treated Acute Primary Patellar Dislocation in Skeletally Immature Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Bengtsson Moström

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The present study reports a long-term follow-up of acute primary patellar dislocation in patients with open physes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate knee function and recurrence rates after surgical and nonsurgical treatment of patellar dislocation. Methods. A total of 51 patients, including 29 girls and 22 boys, who were 9–14 years of age at the time of injury, were retrospectively evaluated. The minimum follow-up time was 5 years. Thigh muscle torque, range of motion, the squat test, the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS, the Kujala score, and the recurrence rate were registered. Radiological predisposing factors at the time of injury were determined. Results. Quality of life and sports/recreation were the most affected subscales, according to KOOS, and a reduced Kujala score was also observed in all treatment groups. The surgically treated patients had a significantly lower recurrence rate. Those patients also exhibited reduced muscle performance, with a hamstring to quadriceps ratio (H/Q of 1.03. The recurrence rate was not correlated with knee function. Conclusions. Patellar dislocation in children influences subjective knee function in the long term. Surgery appears to reduce the recurrence rate, but subjective knee function was not restored.

  7. Achilles tendon of wistar rats treated with laser therapy and eccentric exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Maria Verônica de; Silva, Carlos Henrique Osório; Silva, Micheline Ozana da; Costa, Marcela Bueno Martins da; Dornas, Raul Felipe; Borges, Andréa Pacheco Batista; Natali, Antônio José

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTIntroduction:Both laser therapy and eccentric exercises are used in tendon injuries. However, the association of these physiotherapeutic modalities is yet little investigated.Objective:To evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy associated to eccentric exercise (downhill walking) on Achilles tendinopathy of Wistar rats.Method:Eighteen Achilles tendon from 15 adult male Wistar rats were used. Tendons were distributed in six groups (laser, eccentric exercise, laser and eccentric e...

  8. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells influence early tendon-healing in a rabbit achilles tendon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Alphonsus K S; Ang, Abel D; Goh, James C H; Hui, James H P; Lim, Aymeric Y T; Lee, Eng Hin; Lim, Beng Hai

    2007-01-01

    A repaired tendon needs to be protected for weeks until it has accrued enough strength to handle physiological loads. Tissue-engineering techniques have shown promise in the treatment of tendon and ligament defects. The present study tested the hypothesis that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells can accelerate tendon-healing after primary repair of a tendon injury in a rabbit model. Fifty-seven New Zealand White rabbits were used as the experimental animals, and seven others were used as the source of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The injury model was a sharp complete transection through the midsubstance of the Achilles tendon. The transected tendon was immediately repaired with use of a modified Kessler suture and a running epitendinous suture. Both limbs were used, and each side was randomized to receive either bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a fibrin carrier or fibrin carrier alone (control). Postoperatively, the rabbits were not immobilized. Specimens were harvested at one, three, six, and twelve weeks for analysis, which included evaluation of gross morphology (sixty-two specimens), cell tracing (twelve specimens), histological assessment (forty specimens), immunohistochemistry studies (thirty specimens), morphometric analysis (forty specimens), and mechanical testing (sixty-two specimens). There were no differences between the two groups with regard to the gross morphology of the tendons. The fibrin had degraded by three weeks. Cell tracing showed that labeled bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells remained viable and present in the intratendinous region for at least six weeks, becoming more diffuse at later time-periods. At three weeks, collagen fibers appeared more organized and there were better morphometric nuclear parameters in the treatment group (p tendon repair can improve histological and biomechanical parameters in the early stages of tendon-healing.

  9. Comparative diagnostic imaging of a partial patellar ligament tear in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ricciardi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic lesions of the patellar ligament (PL are rare in dogs. The resulting injury can be a complete or partial laceration, depending on the quantity of torn collagen fibres. Information obtained from imaging evaluation is of great value to the clinical approach towards PL injuries, because subsequent treatment options are affected by the distinction between complete or partial tears. Imaging diagnosis of PL damage in veterinary practice commonly relies on radiographic examination through the recognition of indirect signs, such as “patella alta”, bone fragments at the level of the patellar or tibial insertion, and soft tissue opacity at the cranial aspect of the joint. Although ultrasound (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have been described as useful diagnostic tools for the assessment of PL tears in human patients, specific comparative data regarding the evaluation of PL rupture in dogs using different imaging modalities is lacking in the veterinary literature. This paper describes the radiographic, ultrasonographic, CT and MRI imaging findings of a partial PL tear in a dog and discusses the utility of these techniques in diagnosing this condition. CT provided more detailed information than X-ray examination in the assessment of the osteoligamentous junction, the exclusion of microfracture and distal PL avulsion, but did not add information regarding PL integrity. MRI and US provided the most useful information regarding intra-ligamentous damage and as such their combined use may be considered for the assessment of PL injuries after clinical examination and survey radiographs.

  10. Influence of repetitive mechanical loading on MMP2 activity in tendon fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Elise; Lu, Alex; Jamil, Sarwat; Mousavizadeh, Rouhollah; McCormack, Robert; Roberts, Clive; Scott, Alex

    2016-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase2 has been implicated in tendon pathology caused by repetitive movements. However, its activity in the early stages of the tendon's response to overuse, and its presence in the circulation as a possible indicator of tendon degradation, remain unknown. Human tendon cells were repetitively stretched for 5 days, and the rabbit Achilles tendon complex underwent repetitive motion 3× per week for 2 weeks. Quantitative polymer chain reaction analysis was performed to detect matrix metalloproteinase2/14 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase2 messenger ribonucleic acid of cells and rabbit tissue, and matrix metalloproteinase2 protein levels were determined with an enzyme linked immunoassay. Matrix metalloproteinase2 activity was examined using zymography of the conditioned media, tendon and serum. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize matrix metalloproteinase2 in tendon tissue, and the density of fibrillar collagen in tendons was examined using second harmonic generation microscopy. Tendon cells stretched with high strain or high frequency demonstrated increased matrix metalloproteinase2 messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels. Matrix metalloproteinase2 activity was increased in the rabbit Achilles tendon tissue at weeks 1 and 2; however, serum activity was only increased at week 1. After 2 weeks of exercise, the collagen density was lower in specific regions of the exercised rabbit Achilles tendon complex. Matrix metalloproteinase2 expression in exercised rabbit Achilles tendons was detected surrounding tendon fibroblasts. Repetitive mechanical stimulation of tendon cells results in a small increase in matrix metalloproteinase2 levels, but it appears unlikely that serum matrix metalloproteinase2 will be a useful indicator of tendon overuse injury. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1991-2000, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Reconstruction of chronic Achilles tendon rupture with flexor hallucis longus tendon harvested using a minimally invasive technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xudong; Wu, Yongping; Tao, Huimin; Yang, Disheng

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of flexor hallucis longus tendon harvested using a minimally invasive technique in reconstruction of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Between July 2006 and December 2009, 22 patients (22 feet) with chronic Achilles tendon rupture were treated, including 16 males and 6 females with a median age of 48 years (range, 28-65 years). The disease duration was 27-1,025 days (median, 51 days). Twenty-one patients had hooflike movement's history and 1 patient had no obvious inducement. The result of Thompson test was positive in 22 cases. The score was 53.04 +/- 6.75 according to American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot score system. MRI indicated that the gap of the chronic Achilles tendon rupture was 4.2-8.0 cm. A 3 cm-long incision was made vertically in the plantar aspect of the midfoot and a 1 cm-long transverse incision was made in a plantar flexor crease at the base of the great toe to harvest flexor hallucis longus tendon. The flexor hallucis longus tendon was 10.5-13.5 cm longer from tuber calcanei to the end of the Achilles tendon, and then the tendon was fixed to the tuber calcanei using interface screws or anchor nail after they were woven to form reflexed 3-bundle and sutured. Wound healed by first intention in all patients and no early complication occurred. Twenty-two patients were followed up 12-42 months (mean, 16.7 months). At 12 months after operation, The AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score was 92.98 +/- 5.72, showing significant difference when compared with that before operation (t= -40.903, P=0.000). The results were excellent in 18 cases, good in 2 cases, and fair in 2 cases with an excellent and good rate of 90.9%. No sural nerve injury, posterior tibial nerve injury, plantar painful scar, medial plantar nerve injury, and lateral plantar nerve injury occurred. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture reconstruction with flexor hallucis longus tendon harvested using a minimally invasive technique offers a

  12. Adolescent patellar instability: current concepts review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D; Metcalfe, A; Wogan, C; Mandalia, V; Eldridge, J

    2017-02-01

    Patellar instability most frequently presents during adolescence. Congenital and infantile dislocation of the patella is a distinct entity from adolescent instability and measurable abnormalities may be present at birth. In the normal patellofemoral joint an increase in quadriceps angle and patellar height are matched by an increase in trochlear depth as the joint matures. Adolescent instability may herald a lifelong condition leading to chronic disability and arthritis. Restoring normal anatomy by trochleoplasty, tibial tubercle transfer or medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction in the young adult prevents further instability. Although these techniques are proven in the young adult, they may cause growth arrest and deformity where the physis is open. A vigorous non-operative strategy may permit delay of surgery until growth is complete. Where non-operative treatment has failed a modified MPFL reconstruction may be performed to maintain stability until physeal closure permits anatomical reconstruction. If significant growth remains an extraosseous reconstruction of the MPFL may impart the lowest risk to the physis. If minor growth remains image intensifier guided placement of femoral intraosseous fixation may impart a small, but acceptable, risk to the physis. This paper presents and discusses the literature relating to adolescent instability and provides a framework for management of these patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:159-70. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  13. A practical approach to magnetic resonance imaging of normal and injured tendons: pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, B.B.; Khan, K.M.

    2003-01-01

    The imaging of tendon injury can be troublesome from a number of perspectives. First, tendon injuries are extremely common, accounting for 30%-50% of all sports injuries, and are, therefore, seen frequently at imaging centers. Second, tendons have a unique histology and ultra-structure with a number of normal variations that can mimic pathologic conditions, of which the radiologist should be aware. Finally, although full-thickness tears are easily diagnosed both clinically and with imaging, imaging findings for partial tears overlap those of tendinosis and those of normal tendons, and this can be very troublesome for radiologists, clinicians and patients alike. The objective of this article is to develop a practical approach to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analysis of tendons, both normal and pathologic, emphasizing the common features at different anatomic locations. (author)

  14. A practical approach to magnetic resonance imaging of normal and injured tendons: pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, B.B. [UBC Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Khan, K.M. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Family Practice, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2003-10-01

    The imaging of tendon injury can be troublesome from a number of perspectives. First, tendon injuries are extremely common, accounting for 30%-50% of all sports injuries, and are, therefore, seen frequently at imaging centers. Second, tendons have a unique histology and ultra-structure with a number of normal variations that can mimic pathologic conditions, of which the radiologist should be aware. Finally, although full-thickness tears are easily diagnosed both clinically and with imaging, imaging findings for partial tears overlap those of tendinosis and those of normal tendons, and this can be very troublesome for radiologists, clinicians and patients alike. The objective of this article is to develop a practical approach to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analysis of tendons, both normal and pathologic, emphasizing the common features at different anatomic locations. (author)

  15. Subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and ipsilateral fracture of the medial malleolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Paula J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although ankle fractures and an Achilles tendon rupture are relatively frequent in isolation, their association in the same injury is uncommon. Case presentation A 38 year old male tree surgeon fell six meters from a tree, sustaining a subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and an ipsilateral closed fracture of the medial malleolus. The injuries were diagnosed following clinical examination and imaging. Conclusion This injury combination is infrequent, and management of the Achilles tendon rupture should take into account the necessity not to secondarily displace the fracture of the medial malleollus.

  16. Engaging Stem Cells for Customized Tendon Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim Thaker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for a consistent therapeutic approach to tendon injury repair is long overdue. Patients with tendon microtears or full ruptures are eligible for a wide range of invasive and non invasive interventions, often subjectively decided by the physician. Surgery produces the best outcomes, and while studies have been conducted to optimize graft constructs and to track outcomes, the data from these studies have been inconclusive on the whole. What has been established is a clear understanding of healthy tendon architecture and the inherent process of healing. With this knowledge, tissue regeneration efforts have achieved immense progress in scaffold design, cell line selection, and, more recently, the appropriate use of cytokines and growth factors. This paper evaluates the plasticity of bone-marrow-derived stem cells and the elasticity of recently developed biomaterials towards tendon regeneration efforts. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, hematopoietic progenitor cells, and poly(1,8-octanediol co-citrate scaffolds (POC are discussed in the context of established grafting strategies. With POC scaffolds to cradle the growth of MSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells, developing a fibroelastic network guided by cytokines and growth factors may contribute towards consistent graft constructs, enhanced functionality, and better patient outcomes.

  17. Golf Injuries to the Hand, Wrist, or Elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Golf Injuries to the Hand, Wrist or Elbow Email ... enjoyment of the game injury free. Types of Golf Injuries Golf injuries can include tendonitis, sprains or ...

  18. What is the impact of inflammation on the critical interplay between mechanical signaling and biochemical changes in tendon matrix?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Michael; Bayer, Monika L; Eliasson, Pernilla

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading can influence tendon collagen homeostasis in animal models, while the dynamics of the human adult tendon core tissue are more debatable. Currently available data indicate that human tendon adaptation to loading may happen primarily in the outer tendon region. A role of inflamma......Mechanical loading can influence tendon collagen homeostasis in animal models, while the dynamics of the human adult tendon core tissue are more debatable. Currently available data indicate that human tendon adaptation to loading may happen primarily in the outer tendon region. A role...... of inflammation in this peritendinous adaptation is supported by a rise in inflammatory mediators in the peritendinous area after physiological mechanical loading in humans. This plays a role in the exercise-induced rise in tendon blood flow and peritendinous collagen synthesis. Although inflammatory activity can...... activate proteolytic pathways in tendon, mechanical loading can protect against matrix degradation. Acute tendon injury displays an early inflammatory response that seems to be lowered when mechanical loading is applied during regeneration of tendon. Chronically overloaded tendons (tendinopathy) do neither...

  19. Surgical treatment of partial biceps tendon ruptures at the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellaero, David T; Mallon, William J

    2006-01-01

    We present the treatment and results of a consecutive series of 7 patients (mean age, 42.7 years) with partial ruptures of the distal biceps tendon. All injuries occurred as the result of either heavy labor or weightlifting. Diagnosis in all cases was made with magnetic resonance imaging. After failure of conservative therapy, the patients were treated with repair of the distal biceps tendon. Mean follow-up was 30.6 months (range, 25-39 months). Results were uniformly good, with all patients satisfied with the outcome. All patients maintained their preoperative range of motion, with none reporting significant postoperative pain. The only complication was transient neurapraxias of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve in 2 cases. We conclude that patients presenting with chronic pain in the cubital fossa should be evaluated for possible partial biceps tendon tear. If the diagnosis of partial tendon tear is made, surgical repair is a safe and effective method of treatment.

  20. Bilateral simultaneous anterior cruciate ligament injury: a case report and national survey of orthopedic surgeon management preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Saadat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear is a common injury seen by sports medicine orthopedic surgeons. However, a bilateral simultaneous ACL injury is extremely rare and has been reported only three times in the literature. We present a young female skier with simultaneous bilateral ACL tears that were managed with staged ACL reconstruction. We then conducted a nationwide survey (United States to determine the prevalence of simultaneous bilateral ACL tear and preferred management strategies by sports medicine orthopedic surgeons. Sports medicine fellowship directors were contacted and asked to send an 8-item survey to colleagues (sports medicine fellowship trained surgeons asking about overall number of ACL reconstructions performed, number of bilateral simultaneous ACL injuries seen and optimal management strategies of such an injury. Out of 43 responses, only 22 (51.2% surgeons had seen a bilateral simultaneous ACL injury. Of these, 16 (76.2% preferred staged reconstruction. Graft choice was mixed between autograft and allograft, but a large majority preferred either patellar tendon autograft (58% or hamstring autograft (41% were the most common choice. Staged reconstruction is the treatment of choice by surgeons surveyed in our study.

  1. Evolution of the patellar sesamoid bone in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Samuels

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The patella is a sesamoid bone located in the major extensor tendon of the knee joint, in the hindlimb of many tetrapods. Although numerous aspects of knee morphology are ancient and conserved among most tetrapods, the evolutionary occurrence of an ossified patella is highly variable. Among extant (crown clade groups it is found in most birds, most lizards, the monotreme mammals and almost all placental mammals, but it is absent in most marsupial mammals as well as many reptiles. Here, we integrate data from the literature and first-hand studies of fossil and recent skeletal remains to reconstruct the evolution of the mammalian patella. We infer that bony patellae most likely evolved between four and six times in crown group Mammalia: in monotremes, in the extinct multituberculates, in one or more stem-mammal genera outside of therian or eutherian mammals and up to three times in therian mammals. Furthermore, an ossified patella was lost several times in mammals, not including those with absent hindlimbs: once or more in marsupials (with some re-acquisition and at least once in bats. Our inferences about patellar evolution in mammals are reciprocally informed by the existence of several human genetic conditions in which the patella is either absent or severely reduced. Clearly, development of the patella is under close genomic control, although its responsiveness to its mechanical environment is also important (and perhaps variable among taxa. Where a bony patella is present it plays an important role in hindlimb function, especially in resisting gravity by providing an enhanced lever system for the knee joint. Yet the evolutionary origins, persistence and modifications of a patella in diverse groups with widely varying habits and habitats—from digging to running to aquatic, small or large body sizes, bipeds or quadrupeds—remain complex and perplexing, impeding a conclusive synthesis of form, function, development and genetics across

  2. Clinical aspects of tendon healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.H.M. van der Meulen (Jacques)

    1974-01-01

    textabstractWe know that healing of a tendon wound takes place by an invasion of fibreblasts from the surrounding tissues; the tendon itself has no intrinsic healing capacity. lt was Potenza (1962) who proved that a traumatic suture of the tendons within their sheath is followed by disintegration of

  3. Bilateral patellar tuberculosis masquerading as infected infrapatellar bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Ravi; Haq, Rehan Ul

    2017-04-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented to our outpatient department with complaints of pain and swelling in bilateral infrapatellar regions and a discharging sinus in the right knee over the duration of one year. Radiographs showed lytic regions in bilateral patellae. Samples sent from material curetted from sinus yielded no organism but histopathology reported granulomatous inflammation. Following a fresh magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan that revealed the infrapatellar pad of fat communicating with the patellar lesions, an exploration and evacuation was done. Material sent revealed epithelioid cell granulomas with caseous necrosis consistent with tuberculosis (TB). The patient was put on first line anti-tubercular treatment (ATT) and has responded favourably with healing of sinus and patellar lesions. Bilateral infrapatellar bursitis is not rare. However patellar TB as a cause for OMIT is not a common diagnosis. A bilateral patellar involvement has not been reported in literature to the best of our knowledge.

  4. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengkun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired with PET were assigned to PET group; the other eight rabbits repaired with PET along with injection of HE were assigned to HA-PET group. All rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biomechanical and histological examination. The HA-PET group revealed higher biomechanical property compared with the PET group. Histologically, more collagen tissues grew into the HA-PET group compared with PET group. In conclusion, application of sodium hyaluronate can improve the healing of Achilles tendon reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament.

  5. Achilles tendon of wistar rats treated with laser therapy and eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Verônica de Souza

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:Both laser therapy and eccentric exercises are used in tendon injuries. However, the association of these physiotherapeutic modalities is yet little investigated.Objective:To evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy associated to eccentric exercise (downhill walking on Achilles tendinopathy of Wistar rats.Method:Eighteen Achilles tendon from 15 adult male Wistar rats were used. Tendons were distributed in six groups (laser, eccentric exercise, laser and eccentric exercise, rest, contralateral tendon, and healthy tendon. Unilateral tendinopathy was surgically induced by transversal compression followed by scarification of tendon fibers. The treatments laser therapy (904 nm, 3J/cm² and/or eccentric exercise (downhill walking; 12 m/min; 50 min/day; 15o inclination treadmill began 24 hours after surgery and remained for 20 days. Clinical and biomechanical analyzes were conducted. Achilles tendon was macroscopically evaluated and the transversal diameter measured. Euthanasia was performed 21 days after lesion induction. Tendons of both limbs were collected and frozen at -20°C until biomechanical analysis, on which the characteristic of maximum load (N, stress at ultimate (MPa and maximum extension (mm were analyzed.Results:Swelling was observed within 72 hours postoperative. No fibrous adhesions were observed nor increase in transversal diameter of tendons. Animals with the exercised tendons, but not treated with laser therapy, presented lower (p=0.0000 locomotor capacity. No difference occurred be-tween groups for the biomechanical characteristics maximum load (p=0.4379, stress at ultimate (p=0.4605 and maximum extension (p=0.3820 evaluated, even considering healthy and contralateral tendons.Conclusion:The concomitant use of low-level laser and the eccentric exercise of downhill walking, starting 24 hours after surgically induced tendinopathy, do not result in a tendon with the same biomechanical resistance or elasticity

  6. Effect of administration of oral contraceptives in vivo on collagen synthesis in tendon and muscle connective tissue in young women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Miller, B F; Holm, L

    2009-01-01

    concentrations of estradiol and progesterone (control, n = 12). Subjects performed 1 h of one-legged kicking exercise. The next day collagen fractional synthesis rates (FSR) in tendon and muscle connective tissue were measured after a flooding dose of [(13)C]proline followed by biopsies from the patellar tendon......, body composition, and exercise-training status were included. The two groups were either habitual users of oral contraceptives exposed to a high concentration of synthetic estradiol and progestogens (OC, n = 11), or non-OC-users tested in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle characterized by low...... bioavailability of IGF-I in OC. In conclusion, synthetic female sex hormones administered as OC had an inhibiting effect on collagen synthesis in tendon, bone, and muscle connective tissue, which may be related to a lower bioavailability of IGF-I....

  7. Patellar calcar: MRI appearance of a previously undescribed anatomical entity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Mark S.; Tiegs-Heiden, Christin A. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Stuart, Michael J. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The femoral calcar is a constant anatomical structure within the proximal femur representing a condensation of bone trabeculae. It is our impression that a similar structure is present within the patella. The purpose of this retrospective study was to define the prevalence, appearance, location, and configuration of the patellar calcar on MRI examinations. One hundred consecutive unenhanced knee MRIs were retrospectively reviewed by two readers who were blinded to the clinical indication. The patellar calcar was defined as a dark signaling, linear or curvilinear structure subjacent to the patellar articular surface. If present, the patellar calcar was assigned to a ''well seen,'' ''moderately well seen,'' or ''faintly seen'' category. Location of the calcar within the patella, orientation, configuration, and thickness were recorded. Confounding variables, such as marrow edema, patellar chondromalacia, bipartite patella, or postoperative changes were also recorded. The patellar calcar was visualized in 81 out of 100 (81 %) MRIs. When detected, the calcar was well seen in 20 out of 81 (25 %), moderately well seen in 35 out of 81 (43 %), and faintly seen in 26 out of 81 (32 %). The anteroposterior width of the calcar measured at its thickest segment was: < 1 mm in 43 out of 81 (53 %), 1 mm in 28 out of 81 (35 %), and >1 mm in 10 out of 81 (12 %). The patellar calcar was seen in the majority of knee MRIs and had a consistent imaging appearance. The calcar may be obscured by degenerative arthrosis of the patella and rarely may mimic patellar stress fracture or osteochondritis dissecans. Radiologists and clinicians should be familiar with this normal anatomical structure. (orig.)

  8. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Godinho, Marta S C; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2015-12-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Corticosteroid administration alters the mechanical properties of isolated collagen fascicles in rat-tail tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, B T; Aagaard, P; Crafoord-Larsen, D

    2009-01-01

    Overload tendon injuries are frequent in recreational and elite sports. The optimal treatment strategy remains unknown, but local administration of corticosteroids is one common treatment option. The direct effects of the corticosteroid administration on the tissue are not fully understood...

  10. Complete rupture of the long head of the biceps tendon and the distal biceps tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter J. Oberholzer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The most common injury to the biceps muscle is rupture of the long head of the biceps tendon. A tear can occur proximally, distally or at the musculotendinous junction. Two cases are discussed, in both of which the patients felt a sudden sharp pain in the upper arm, at the shoulder and elbow respectively, and presented with a biceps muscle bump (Popeye deformity.

  11. triceps tendon avulsion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... trauma. Systemic causes such as chronic renal failure, steriod use, diabetes mellitus, hyperparathyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, osteogensis imperfecta and local causes like local steriod injection, olecranon bursitis and attritional changes due to degenerative arthritis are associated with tendon weakening.

  12. Biomechanical cadaveric comparison of patellar ligament suture protected by a steel cable versus a synthetic cable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouget, P; Breque, C; Beranger, J S; Faure, J P; Khiami, F; Vendeuvre, T

    2017-12-01

    Purpose and hypothesis: Patellar ligament rupture is a rare disabling pathology requiring a surgical ligament suture protected by a frame. The gold standard is the steel cable, but its rigidity and the necessity of a surgical re-intervention for its removal render it unsatisfactory. The objective of this paper is to quantify the mechanical protection provided by the terylene® in comparison with steel. Twenty-four knees of 12 fresh frozen cadaveric subjects were divided into 2 homogeneous groups (terylene and steel) of 12 knees (mean age = 69.3 years). Proximal ligament repair was performed according to a three-tunnel transosseous reinsertion technique. Mechanical tests were performed in flexion to simulate movement of the knee. The interligament gap and the amplitude angulation of the knee were measured by a system of extensometer and optical goniometer. Mechanical analysis permitted calculation of flexion amplitude for a ligament gap of 1 and 2 mm taking as initial angle the adjusting angle of pretension of the protection frame. Study of deformations of frames was performed. Statistical analysis was performed with a Wilcoxon Mann Whitney test. There is no significant difference in protection of the ligament suture between the "terylene" and "steel" groups. Mean flexion amplitudes (mΔF) show no significant differences between the 2 groups for a distension of the suture of 1 mm (m ΔF terylene1 = 4.74 °; mΔF steel1 = 5.91°; p = 0.198) and 2 mm (mΔF terylene2 = 8.71°; mΔF steel2 = 10.41°; p = 0.114). Elastic deformation of terylene was significantly greater than that of steel (p = 0.0004). Suture protection of the patellar ligament by a terylene wire is not significantly different from that provided by steel frame. The elastic properties of terylene and absence of a need for re intervention to secure its removal lead us towards its use in acute ruptures of the patellar ligament. The main limits involve the properties of

  13. HGF Mediates the Anti-inflammatory Effects of PRP on Injured Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianying; Middleton, Kellie K.; Fu, Freddie H.; Im, Hee-Jeong; Wang, James H-C.

    2013-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and other growth factors are widely used in orthopaedic/sports medicine to repair injured tendons. While PRP treatment is reported to decrease pain in patients with tendon injury, the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Tendon pain is often associated with tendon inflammation, and HGF is known to protect tissues from inflammatory damages. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF in PRP causes the anti-inflammatory effects. To test this hypothesis, we performed in vitro experiments on rabbit tendon cells and in vivo experiments on a mouse Achilles tendon injury model. We found that addition of PRP or HGF decreased gene expression of COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1, induced by the treatment of tendon cells in vitro with IL-1β. Further, the treatment of tendon cell cultures with HGF antibodies reduced the suppressive effects of PRP or HGF on IL-1β-induced COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1 gene expressions. Treatment with PRP or HGF almost completely blocked the cellular production of PGE2 and the expression of COX proteins. Finally, injection of PRP or HGF into wounded mouse Achilles tendons in vivo decreased PGE2 production in the tendinous tissues. Injection of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) however, did not reduce PGE2 levels in the wounded tendons, but the injection of HGF antibody inhibited the effects of PRP and HGF. Further, injection of PRP or HGF also decreased COX-1 and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that PRP exerts anti-inflammatory effects on injured tendons through HGF. This study provides basic scientific evidence to support the use of PRP to treat injured tendons because PRP can reduce inflammation and thereby reduce the associated pain caused by high levels of PGE2. PMID:23840657

  14. HGF mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of PRP on injured tendons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianying Zhang

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF and other growth factors are widely used in orthopaedic/sports medicine to repair injured tendons. While PRP treatment is reported to decrease pain in patients with tendon injury, the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Tendon pain is often associated with tendon inflammation, and HGF is known to protect tissues from inflammatory damages. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF in PRP causes the anti-inflammatory effects. To test this hypothesis, we performed in vitro experiments on rabbit tendon cells and in vivo experiments on a mouse Achilles tendon injury model. We found that addition of PRP or HGF decreased gene expression of COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1, induced by the treatment of tendon cells in vitro with IL-1β. Further, the treatment of tendon cell cultures with HGF antibodies reduced the suppressive effects of PRP or HGF on IL-1β-induced COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1 gene expressions. Treatment with PRP or HGF almost completely blocked the cellular production of PGE2 and the expression of COX proteins. Finally, injection of PRP or HGF into wounded mouse Achilles tendons in vivo decreased PGE2 production in the tendinous tissues. Injection of platelet-poor plasma (PPP however, did not reduce PGE2 levels in the wounded tendons, but the injection of HGF antibody inhibited the effects of PRP and HGF. Further, injection of PRP or HGF also decreased COX-1 and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that PRP exerts anti-inflammatory effects on injured tendons through HGF. This study provides basic scientific evidence to support the use of PRP to treat injured tendons because PRP can reduce inflammation and thereby reduce the associated pain caused by high levels of PGE2.

  15. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF KNEE INJURIES AMONG US HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES, 2005/06–2010/11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, David M.; Collins, Christy L.; Best, Thomas M.; Flanigan, David C.; Fields, Sarah K.; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Purpose US high school athletes sustain millions of injuries annually. Detailed patterns of knee injuries, among the most costly sports injuries, remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that patterns of knee injuries in US high school sports differ by sport and gender. Methods US High school sports-related injury data were collected for 20 sports using the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System, High School RIO™. Knee injury rates, rate ratios, and injury proportion ratios were calculated. Results From 2005/06–2010/11, 5,116 knee injuries occurred during 17,172,376 athlete exposures (AEs) for an overall rate of 2.98 knee injuries per 10,000 AEs. Knee injuries were more common in competition than practice (RR 3.53, 95% CI 3.34–3.73). Football had the highest knee injury rate (6.29 per 10,000 AEs) followed by girls’ soccer (4.53) and girls’ gymnastics (4.23). Girls had significantly higher knee injury rates than boys in gender-comparable sports (soccer, volleyball, basketball, baseball/softball, lacrosse, swimming and diving, and track and field) (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.39–1.65). The most commonly involved structure was the MCL (reported in 36.1% of knee injuries), followed by the patella/patellar tendon (29.5%), ACL (25.4%), meniscus (23.0%), LCL (7.9%), and PCL (2.4%). Girls were significantly more likely to sustain ACL injuries in gender-comparable sports (RR 2.38, 95% CI 1.91–2.95). Overall, 21.2% of knee injuries were treated with surgery; girls were more often treated with surgery than boys in gender-comparable sports (IPR 1.30, 95% CI 1.11–1.53). Conclusions Knee injury patterns differ by sport and gender. Continuing efforts to develop preventive interventions could reduce the burden of these injuries. PMID:23059869

  16. Unrecognised Acute Rupture of the Achilles Tendon in Severe Ankle Sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inversion ankle sprain is a common sport injury. It commonly refers to the injury of lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle. Failure to detect the concomitant injuries would lead to inappropriate treatment and suboptimal result. A case of unrecognised rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with severe inversion ankle sprain is reported.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of the Achilles Tendon While Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anițaș Răzvan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Achilles tendon is the most frequent recipient of traumatic injuries. The aim of this study is to identify and describe the varying load at ankle level and especially at the Achilles tendon’s insertion on the calcaneus.

  18. Evidence Supporting Intralesional Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Equine Flexor Tendon Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmitha Durgam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical bottom lineCurrent experimental evidence suggests that intralesional stem cell administration improves the histological characteristics and matrix organisation of healing equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT; however, the clinical relevance of these findings are not clear. Current case-based evidence suggests that cell-based therapies improve the quality of tendon healing and reduce the recurrence rates of SDFT injuries but the lack of any randomised, controlled prospective studies with function-based outcomes is still concerning, given the widespread advocacy for and use of ‘stem cell’ therapies for the treatment of equine tendon injuries

  19. Partial isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon in a professional soccer player: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariani Pier

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The complete isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon has been described as a rare injury and this report describes the case of a 31-year-old soccer player who sustained a partial rupture of the popliteus tendon during a game. The injury was suspected clinically and at MRI but confirmed only by the arthroscopic examination. The treatment consisted in open debridment with no tendon repair or augmentation. Seven weeks post-operation the patient was symptom-free and returned to competitive professional soccer at the same preinjury level. The clinical and arthroscopic findings of the case reported suggest a possible overuse disease with degenerative expression.

  20. No effect of extracorporeal shockwave therapy on patellar tendinopathy in jumping athletes during the competitive season: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerver, Johannes; Hartgens, Fred; Verhagen, Evert; van der Worp, Henk; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L

    2011-06-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common overuse injury among jumping athletes. No evidence-based treatment guidelines exist. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) appears to be a promising treatment but its effectiveness has not been studied in athletes with patellar tendinopathy who have symptoms for 3 to 12 months and are still playing. The TOPGAME study was created to determine the effectiveness of ESWT on pain, symptoms, and function in athletes with early symptomatic patellar tendinopathy who are still in training and competition. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Athletes playing volleyball, basketball, or handball with patellar tendinopathy for 3 to 12 months were randomized into the ESWT or placebo group during the first half of the season. The ESWT group received 3 ESWT treatments while the placebo group received sham ESWT. In-season follow-up measurements were 1, 12, and 22 weeks after treatment. The primary outcome was severity of patellar tendinopathy determined with the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures were pain during activities of daily living and sports and after functional knee-loading tests rated on a visual analog scale and subjective improvement. Multilevel analyses were performed to determine differences between groups over time. Of the 127 symptomatic athletes invited to participate, 62 were eligible, gave consent, and were randomized into the ESWT (n = 31) or placebo group (n = 31). Mean VISA-P scores before and 1, 12, and 22 weeks after treatment were 59.4 (±11.7), 66.8 (±16.2), 66.7 (±17.5), and 70.5 (±18.9) for the ESWT group and 62.4 (±13.4), 66.3 (±19.0), 68.9 (±20.3), and 72.7 (±18.0) for the placebo group. For the VISA-P, there was a significant effect for time (P Extracorporeal shockwave therapy as a solitary treatment during the competitive season has no benefit over placebo treatment in the management of actively competing jumping athletes with

  1. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  2. Groin injuries in atheletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Per

    2017-01-01

    Groin injuries have a bad reputation as very difficult to diagnose and treat. However, this is not justified and in the last two decades an increasing number of good scientific papers have been published. The key to the groin injuries is the anatomy. Groin injuries are related to muscles, tendons...

  3. Fingertip Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Fingertip Injury Email to a friend * required fields ...

  4. Study protocol: a double blind randomised control trial of high volume image guided injections in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy in a young active population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker-Davies, Robert M; Nicol, Alastair; McCurdie, I; Watson, James; Baker, Polly; Wheeler, Patrick; Fong, Daniel; Lewis, Mark; Bennett, Alexander N

    2017-05-22

    Chronic tendinopathy is a significant problem particularly in active populations limiting sporting and occupational performance. The prevalence of patellar tendinopathy in some sports is near 50% and the incidence of lower limb tendinopathy is 1.4% p.a. in the UK Military. Management includes isometric, eccentric, heavy slow resistance exercises and extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT). Often these treatments are inadequate yet there is no good evidence for injection therapies and success rates from surgery can be as low as 50%. High Volume Image Guided Injection (HVIGI) proposes to strip away the neovascularity and disrupt the nerve ingrowth seen in chronic cases and has shown promising results in case series. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of HVIGI in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). RCT comparing 40ml HVIGI, with or without corticosteroid, with a 3ml local anaesthetic sham-control injection. Ninety-six participants will be recruited. male, 18-55 years old, chronic Achilles or patellar tendinopathy of at least 6 months, failed conservative management including ESWT, and Ultrasound (US) evidence of neovascularisation, tendon thickening and echogenic changes. Outcome measures will be recorded at baseline, 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measures include The Victoria Institute of Sport Assessments for Achilles and patellar tendinopathy (VISA-A and VISA-P) and VAS pain. Secondary outcome measures include Modified Ohberg score, maximum tendon diameter and assessment of hypoechoic appearance on US, and Functional Activity Assessment. Despite previous interventional trials and reviews there is still insufficient evidence to guide injectable therapy for chronic tendinopathy that has failed conservative treatment. The scant evidence available suggests HVIGI has the greatest potential however there is no level one RCT evidence to support this. Investigating the efficacy of HVIGI against control in a RCT and separating the effect of HVIGI

  5. Novel methods for tendon investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Michael; Langberg, Henning; Bojsen-Møller, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. Tendon structures have been studied for decades, but over the last decade, methodological development and renewed interest for metabolic, circulatory and tissue protein turnover in tendon tissue has resulted in a rising amount of investigations. Method. This paper will detail the various...... modern investigative techniques available to study tendons. Results. There are a variety of investigative methods available to study the correlations between mechanics and biology in tendons. Conclusion. The available methodologies not only allow for potential insight into physiological...... and pathophysiological mechanisms in tendon tissue, but also, to some extent, allow for more elaborate studies of the intact human tendon. Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/full/10.1080/09638280701785403...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made of...

  7. [Significance of lateral release in the therapy of patellar chondromalacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, T; Göbel, F; Huschenbett, A; Hein, W

    2002-10-01

    A retrospective study was performed in 26 patients who underwent an operation for femoro-patellar pain due to a patellar chondromalacia with or without minor patellar dislocation/lateral pressure syndrome. The average age of the patients was 28.5 (15-39) years. 22 of the 26 patients revealed minor chondral damages of the stages 1 and 2 according to Outerbridge. In 12 patients ("lavage" group), an arthroscopic joint debridement only was carried out, while an additional open, lateral retinaculum release was made in 14 patients ("lateral release" group). The patella's distance of dislocation according to Hepp was reduced on an average of 3.0 (0-7) mm (p = 0.0019). The results of Bentley's score obtained during the follow-up interval on an average of 30.1 (9 to 60) months were almost identical for both groups. "Good" and "very good" results were achieved in the "lavage" group (83.3 %) and "lateral release" group (78.6 % of the patients). Lateral release should be used in cases of patellar decentration between 5 and 10 mm and adequate pain symptoms. The post-operative distance of dislocation should be less than 5 mm. Under such conditions and with minor chondral damage, a combined approach by using an arthroscopic joint debridement and open lateral release is promising to treat a patellar dislocation/lateral pressure syndrome.

  8. An artificial tendon with durable muscle interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Alan; Litsky, Alan; Mayerson, Joel; Witte, David; Melvin, David; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2010-02-01

    A coupling mechanism that can permanently fix a forcefully contracting muscle to a bone anchor or any totally inert prosthesis would meet a serious need in orthopaedics. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler device to satisfy these demands. The objective of this study was to test OrthoCoupler's performance in vitro and in vivo in the goat semitendinosus tendon model. For in vitro evaluation, 40 samples were fatigue-tested, cycling at 10 load levels, n = 4 each. For in vivo evaluation, the semitendinosus tendon was removed bilaterally in eight goats. Left sides were reattached with an OrthoCoupler, and right sides were reattached using the Krackow stitch with #5 braided polyester sutures. Specimens were harvested 60 days postsurgery and assigned for biomechanics and histology. Fatigue strength of the devices in vitro was several times the contractile force of the semitendinosus muscle. The in vivo devices were built equivalent to two of the in vitro devices, providing an additional safety factor. In strength testing at necropsy, suture controls pulled out at 120.5 +/- 68.3 N, whereas each OrthoCoupler was still holding after the muscle tore, remotely, at 298 +/- 111.3 N (mean +/- SD) (p < 0.0003). Muscle tear strength was reached with the fiber-muscle composite produced in healing still soundly intact. This technology may be of value for orthopaedic challenges in oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and sports-injury reconstruction. (c) 2009 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  9. Patellar denervation with electrocautery in total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Zhu, Chen; Guo, Yongyuan; Shi, Sifeng; Chen, Desheng; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-11-01

    The impact of patellar denervation with electrocautery in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on post-operative outcomes has been under debate. This study aims to conduct a meta-analysis and systematic review to compare the benefits and risks of circumpatellar electrocautery with those of non-electrocautery in primary TKAs. Comparative and randomized clinical studies were identified by conducting an electronic search of articles dated up to September 2012 in PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and the Cochrane databases. Six studies that focus on a total of 849 knees were analysed. A random-effects model was conducted using the inverse-variance method for continuous variables and the Mantel-Haenszel method for dichotomous variables. There was no significant difference in the incidence of anterior knee pain between the electrocautery and non-electrocautery groups. In term of patellar score and Knee Society Score, circumpatellar electrocautery improved clinical outcomes compared with non-electrocautery in TKAs. The statistical differences were in favour of the electrocautery group but have minimal clinical significance. In addition, the overall complications indicate no statistical significance between the two groups. This study shows no strong evidence either for or against electrocautery compared with non-electrocautery in TKAs. Therapeutic study (systematic review and meta-analysis), Level III.

  10. Sports injuries in young athletes: long-term outcome and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2010-06-01

    Physical activity plays a significant role in the physical and emotional well-being of a child. In the past 15 to 20 years, there has been a dramatic increase in sports participation at a young age, which has offered numerous health benefits, including self-esteem, confidence, team play, fitness, agility, and strength. Children are playing sports at younger ages. This article assesses the long-term outcome of sports injuries in young athletes, with suggestions on how to prevent such injuries. There are no definitive epidemiological data on withdraw from sports activities due to injury in young athletes. Disturbed physeal growth as a result of injury can result in length discrepancy, angular deformity, or altered joint mechanics, and may cause significant long-term disability. Sequelae of Osgood-Schlatter lesion include painful ossicle in the distal patellar tendon. Fragmentation or separation of the apophysis appears to be the result of adaptive changes to the increased stress that occurs in overuse activities. The presence of these changes undeniably demonstrates an osseous reaction, although they are not disabling. Promotion of a physically active lifestyle is encouraged worldwide, particularly with regard to the many health benefits. Reduction of only a moderate proportion of all sports injuries is of significance for the young athletes' health and could have a long-term economic impact on health care costs. It is therefore important to convince medical doctors, physical therapists, athletic trainers and coaches, as well as athletes of the necessity to implement active prevention measures in their therapy and training programs, thus decreasing the injury and re-injury rate and enhancing athletic performance.

  11. Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of resistance exercise contraction mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farup, J; Rahbek, S K; Vendelbo, M H; Matzon, A; Hindhede, J; Bejder, A; Ringgard, S; Vissing, K

    2014-10-01

    In a comparative study, we investigated the effects of maximal eccentric or concentric resistance training combined with whey protein or placebo on muscle and tendon hypertrophy. 22 subjects were allocated into either a high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate + carbohydrate group (WHD) or a carbohydrate group (PLA). Subjects completed 12 weeks maximal knee extensor training with one leg using eccentric contractions and the other using concentric contractions. Before and after training cross-sectional area (CSA) of m. quadriceps and patellar tendon CSA was quantified with magnetic resonance imaging and a isometric strength test was used to assess maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD). Quadriceps CSA increased by 7.3 ± 1.0% (P tendon CSA increased by 14.9 ± 3.1% (P effect of contraction mode. MVC and RFD increased by 15.6 ± 3.5% (P effects. In conclusion, high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate augments muscle and tendon hypertrophy following 12 weeks of resistance training - irrespective of contraction mode. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Optimal Contrast Agent Staining of Ligaments and Tendons for X-Ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Richard; Lowe, Tristan; Shearer, Tom

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography has become an important tool for studying the microstructures of biological soft tissues, such as ligaments and tendons. Due to the low X-ray attenuation of such tissues, chemical contrast agents are often necessary to enhance contrast during scanning. In this article, the effects of using three different contrast agents--iodine potassium iodide solution, phosphotungstic acid and phosphomolybdic acid--are evaluated and compared. Porcine anterior cruciate ligaments, patellar tendons, medial collateral ligaments and lateral collateral ligaments were used as the basis of the study. Three samples of each of the four ligament/tendon types were each assigned a different contrast agent (giving a total of twelve samples), and the progression of that agent through the tissue was monitored by performing a scan every day for a total period of five days (giving a total of sixty scans). Since the samples were unstained on day one, they had been stained for a total of four days by the time of the final scans. The relative contrast enhancement and tissue deformation were measured. It was observed that the iodine potassium iodide solution penetrated the samples fastest and caused the least sample shrinkage on average (although significant deformation was observed by the time of the final scans), whereas the phosphomolybdic acid caused the greatest sample shrinkage. Equations describing the observed behaviour of the contrast agents, which can be used to predict optimal staining times for ligament and tendon X-ray computed tomography, are presented.

  13. An advanced glycation endproduct (AGE)-rich diet promotes accumulation of AGEs in Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Svensson, Rene B; Scheijen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated the rela......Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated...... the relationship between AGE content in the diet and accumulation of AGEs in weight-bearing animal Achilles tendon. Two groups of mice (C57BL/6Ntac) were fed with either high-fat diet low in AGEs high-fat diet (HFD) (n = 14) or normal diet high in AGEs (ND) (n = 11). AGE content in ND was six to 50-fold higher...... than HFD The mice were sacrificed at week 40 and Achilles and tail tendons were carefully excised to compare weight and nonweight-bearing tendons. The amount of the AGEs carboxymethyllysine (CML), methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone (MG-H1) and carboxyethyllysine (CEL) in Achilles and tail tendon...

  14. The effects of platelet lysate patches on the activity of tendon-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Almeida, Raquel; Franco, Albina R; Pesqueira, Tamagno; Oliveira, Mariana B; Babo, Pedro S; Leonor, Isabel B; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2018-03-01

    Platelet-derived biomaterials are widely explored as cost-effective sources of therapeutic factors, holding a strong potential for endogenous regenerative medicine. Particularly for tendon repair, treatment approaches that shift the injury environment are explored to accelerate tendon regeneration. Herein, genipin-crosslinked platelet lysate (PL) patches are proposed for the delivery of human-derived therapeutic factors in patch augmentation strategies aiming at tendon repair. Developed PL patches exhibited a controlled release profile of PL proteins, including bFGF and PDGF-BB. Additionally, PL patches exhibited an antibacterial effect by preventing the adhesion, proliferation and biofilm formation by S. aureus, a common pathogen in orthopaedic surgical site infections. Furthermore, these patches supported the activity of human tendon-derived cells (hTDCs). Cells were able to proliferate over time and an up-regulation of tenogenic genes (SCX, COL1A1 and TNC) was observed, suggesting that PL patches may modify the behavior of hTDCs. Accordingly, hTDCs deposited tendon-related extracellular matrix proteins, namely collagen type I and tenascin C. In summary, PL patches can act as a reservoir of biomolecules derived from PL and support the activity of native tendon cells, being proposed as bioinstructive patches for tendon regeneration. Platelet-derived biomaterials hold great interest for the delivery of therapeutic factors for applications in endogenous regenerative medicine. In the particular case of tendon repair, patch augmentation strategies aiming at shifting the injury environment are explored to improve tendon regeneration. In this study, PL patches were developed with remarkable features, including the controlled release of growth factors and antibacterial efficacy. Remarkably, PL patches supported the activity of native tendon cells by up-regulating tenogenic genes and enabling the deposition of ECM proteins. This patch holds great potential towards

  15. Tissue-Engineered Tendon for Enthesis Regeneration in a Rat Rotator Cuff Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Smietana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Healing of rotator cuff (RC injuries with current suture or augmented scaffold techniques fails to regenerate the enthesis and instead forms a weaker fibrovascular scar that is prone to subsequent failure. Regeneration of the enthesis is the key to improving clinical outcomes for RC injuries. We hypothesized that the utilization of our tissue-engineered tendon to repair either an acute or a chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tear would regenerate a functional enthesis and return the biomechanics of the tendon back to that found in native tissue. Engineered tendons were fabricated from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells utilizing our well-described fabrication technology. Forty-three rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon followed by acute (immediate or chronic (4 weeks retracted repair by using either our engineered tendon or a trans-osseous suture technique. Animals were sacrificed at 8 weeks. Biomechanical and histological analyses of the regenerated enthesis and tendon were performed. Statistical analysis was performed by using a one-way analysis of variance with significance set at p < 0.05. Acute repairs using engineered tendon had improved enthesis structure and lower biomechanical failures compared with suture repairs. Chronic repairs with engineered tendon had a more native-like enthesis with increased fibrocartilage formation, reduced scar formation, and lower biomechanical failure compared with suture repair. Thus, the utilization of our tissue-engineered tendon showed improve enthesis regeneration and improved function in chronic RC repairs compared with suture repair. Clinical Significance: Our engineered tendon construct shows promise as a clinically relevant method for repair of RC injuries.

  16. Kinematic MR imaging of the knee for evaluating patellar tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellock, F.G.; Mink, J.H.; Fox, J.

    1988-01-01

    A new technique to evaluate patellar tracking uses MR imaging and a specially designed positioning device (MEDRAD). T1-weighted, axial plane imaging was performed on both knees at the following joint angles: 0 0 , 5 0 , 10 0 , 15 0 , 20 0 , 25 0 , and 30 0 . The total examination time was approximately 12 minutes. Images were viewed in a cine loop to produce a kinematic study that depicted the relationship of the patella to the trochlear groove during the different angles of knee flexion. To date, 102 subjects (204 knees) have been examined. Dislocation, subluxatino, lateral tilt, lateral and medial displacement of the patella, and normal patellar tracking could all be identified with this technique. Abnormal configurations of the patella and/or trochlear groove were also clearly demonstrated. In conclusion, kinematic MR imaging of the knee provided important clinical information concerning patellar tracking and other related abnormalities of the patellofemoral joint

  17. Evidence of accumulated stress in Achilles and anterior knee tendons in elite badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesen, Anders Ploug; Boesen, Morten Ilum; Koenig, Merete Juhl; Bliddal, Henning; Torp-Pedersen, Soren; Langberg, Henning

    2011-01-01

    Tendon-related injuries are a major problem, but the aetiology of tendinopathies is unknown. In tendinopathies as well as during unaccustomed loading, intra-tendinous flow can be detected indicating that extensive loading can provoke intra-tendinous flow. The aim of present study is to evaluate the vascular response as indicated by colour Doppler (CD) activity in both the Achilles and patella tendon after loading during high-level badminton matches. The Achilles tendon was subdivided into a mid-tendon, pre-insertional, and insertional region and the anterior knee tendons into a quadriceps-, patella- and tuberositas region. Intra-tendinous flow was measured using both a semi-quantitative grading system (CD grading) and a quantitative scoring system (CF) on colour Doppler. Intra-tendinous flow in the Achilles and anterior knee tendons was examined in fourteen single players before tournament and after 1st and 2nd match, respectively on both the dominant and non-dominant side. All players had abnormal intra-tendinous flow (Colour Doppler ≥ grade 2) in at least one tendon in at least one scan during the tournament. At baseline, only two of the 14 players had normal flow in all the tendons examined. After 1st match, tendencies to higher intra-tendinous flow were observed in both the dominant patella tendon and non-dominant quadriceps tendon (P-values n.s.). After 2nd match, intra-tendinous flow was significant increased in the dominant patella tendon (P = 0.009). In all other locations, there was a trend towards a stepwise increase in intra-tendinous flow. The preliminary results indicate that high amount of intra-tendinous flow was found in elite badminton players at baseline and was increased after repetitive loading, especially in the patella tendon (dominant leg). The colour Doppler measurement can be used to determine changes in intra-tendinous flow after repetitive loading.

  18. Inferior patellar pole fragmentation in children: just a normal variant?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H.; Vogelius, Esben S.; Orth, Robert C.; Guillerman, R.P.; Jadhav, Siddharth P. [Texas Children' s Hospital, E.B. Singleton Pediatric Radiology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Fragmentary ossification of the inferior patella is often dismissed as a normal variant in children younger than 10 years of age. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fragmentary inferior patellar pole ossification is a normal variant or is associated with symptoms or signs of pathology using MRI and clinical exam findings as reference. A retrospective review was performed on 150 patients ages 5-10 years who underwent 164 knee radiography and MRI exams (45.1% male, mean age: 7.8 years). The presence or absence of inferior patellar pole fragmentation on radiography was correlated with the presence or absence of edema-like signal on MR images. Clinical notes were reviewed for the presence of symptoms or signs referable to the inferior patellar pole. These data were compared with a 1:1 age- and sex-matched control group without inferior pole fragmentation. Statistical analysis was performed using two-tailed t-tests. Forty of 164 (24.4%) knee radiographs showed fragmentary ossification of the inferior patella. Of these 40 knees, 62.5% (25/40) had edema-like signal of the inferior patellar bone marrow compared with 7.5% (3/40) of controls (P = 0.035). Patients with fragmentary ossification at the inferior patella had a significantly higher incidence of documented focal inferior patellar pain compared with controls (20% vs. 2.5%, P = 0.015). Inferior patellar pole fragmentation in children 5 to 10 years of age may be associated with localized symptoms and bone marrow edema-like signal and should not be routinely dismissed as a normal variant of ossification. (orig.)

  19. Patellar SPECT and planar imaging in orthopedic patients with knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehdashti, F.; Collier, B.D.; Johnson, R.P.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Carrera, G.F.; Krasnow, A.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Eighty-five painful knees in 56 patients were independently evaluated clinically, radiographically, and scintigraphically. All patients had an established final diagnosis of osteoarthritis or other predisposing conditions. Results of patellar bone scintigraphy were abnormal in 66 of 85 knees; there were ten isolated findings and 12 cases of medial, nine of lateral, and 35 of triple compartment involvement. Four-quadrant patellar analysis identified nine instances of isolated lateal patellar facet syndrome. Single-photon emission CT was of significant value in localizing patellar abnormalities. Radiographic evaluation disclosed osteoarthritis in 27 of 66 scintigraphically abnormal knees. Patellar bone scintigraphy is more valuable than radiography for evaluating adult orthopedic patients with knee pain

  20. The TOPGAME-study: effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy. Design of a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Zwerver, J.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Hartgens, F.; Akker-Scheek, van den, I.; Diercks, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Patellar tendinopathy is a major problem for many athletes, especially those involved in jumping activities. Despite its frequency and negative impact on athletic careers, no evidence-based guidelines for management of this overuse injury exist. Since functional outcomes of conservative and surgical treatments remain suboptimal, new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have to be developed and evaluated. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) appears to be a promising tr...

  1. The TOPGAME-study: effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy. Design of a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Zwerver, Johannes; Verhagen, Evert; Hartgens, Fred; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patellar tendinopathy is a major problem for many athletes, especially those involved in jumping activities. Despite its frequency and negative impact on athletic careers, no evidence-based guidelines for management of this overuse injury exist. Since functional outcomes of conservative and surgical treatments remain suboptimal, new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have to be developed and evaluated. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) appears to be a promising treatment ...

  2. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppe, Christian; Magnusson, S.P.; Lonsdale, Markus; Friberg, Lars; Svensson, Rene B.; Kjaer, Michael; Neergaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Following Achilles tendon rupture, running is often allowed after 6 months. However, tendon healing is slow and the metabolic status of the tendon at this point is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate tendon metabolism (glucose uptake) and vascularization at 3, 6 and 12 months after Achilles tendon rupture as measured using PET and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). The study group comprised 23 patients with surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture who were investigated at 3 months (n = 7), 6 months (n = 7) and 12 months (n = 9) after surgery. The triceps surae complex was loaded over 20 min of slow treadmill walking while a radioactive tracer ( 18 F-FDG) was administered prior to PET. Vascularization was measured in terms of PDUS flow activity, and patient-reported outcomes were scored using the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS) and sports assessment (VISA-A) questionnaire. Relative glucose uptake ( 18 F-FDG) was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at all time-points (6, 3 and 1.6 times higher at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively; P ≤ 0.001), and was also higher in the tendon core than in the periphery at 3 and 6 months (P ≤ 0.02), but lower at 12 months (P = 0.06). Relative glucose uptake was negatively related to ATRS at 6 months after repair (r = -0.89, P ≤ 0.01). PDUS flow activity was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at 3 and 6 months (P < 0.05 for both), but had normalized by 12 months. These data demonstrate that the healing process as determined by metabolic activity and vascularization continues for 6 months after injury when large loads are typically allowed on the tendon. Indeed, metabolic activity remained elevated for more than 1 year after injury despite normalized vascularization. The robust negative correlation between tendon metabolism and patient-reported outcome suggests that a high metabolic activity 6 months after the injury may be related to a poor clinical healing outcome. (orig.)

  3. Characterization of calcium and zinc spatial distributions at the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction by synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongbin; Chen, Can; Wang, Zhanwen; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi; Wu, Tianding; Cao, Yong; Zhou, Jingyong; Zheng, Cheng; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-09-01

    Tendon attaches to bone through a functionally graded fibrocartilage zone, including uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF), tidemark (TM) and calcified fibrocartilage (CF). This transition zone plays a pivotal role in relaxing load transfer between tendon and bone, and serves as a boundary between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. Calcium and zinc are believed to play important roles in the normal growth, mineralization, and repair of the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction (BTJ). However, spatial distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of BTJ and their distribution-function relationship are not totally understood. Thus, synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μXRF) in combination with backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was employed to characterize the distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of rabbit patella-patellar tendon complex (PPTC). For the first time, the unique distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were clearly mapped by this method. The distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were inhomogeneous. A significant accumulation of zinc was exhibited in the transition region between UF and CF. The highest zinc content (3.17 times of that of patellar tendon) was found in the TM of fibrocartilage zone. The calcium content began to increase near the TM and increased exponentially across the calcified fibrocartilage region towards the patella. The highest calcium content (43.14 times of that of patellar tendon) was in the transitional zone of calcified fibrocartilage region and the patella, approximately 69 μm from the location with the highest zinc content. This study indicated, for the first time, that there is a differential distribution of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of PPTC. These observations reveal new insights into region-dependent changes across the fibrocartilage zone of

  4. Surgical treatment of distal biceps tendon rupture: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina N. Cozma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Distal biceps tendon rupture affects the functional upperextremity movement, impairing supination and flexion strength. According to age, profession and additional risks treatment might be nonoperative or surgical. Methods. We describe the case of a 43 years old male patient who sustained an injury to his right distal biceps and was diagnosed with acute right distal biceps rupture. Surgical treatment was decided and biceps tendon was reinserted to the radius tuberosity using a combination of a cortical button fixation associated with an interference screw. Results. Postoperative functional result was favorable with no complications and with no movement limitation after one month. Conclusions. When possible, distal biceps tendon repair should be realized surgically because this permits restoring of the muscle strength to near normal levels with no loss of motion. Nerve complications are common; therefore the surgery should be realized by experienced upper extremity surgeons.

  5. Signs of patellar chondromalacia on sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.; Monu, J.U.; Fisher, D.R.; Keene, J.S.; Graf, B.K.

    1992-01-01

    We incidentally noted distinctive high signal defects or fissures in the patellar articular cartilage on sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images in 4 patients. At subsequent arthroscopy all 4 patients were found to have patellar chondromalacia. To determine the reliabilty of these signs, we retrospectively evaluated, in a blinded manner, sagittal T2-weighted MR images of the knee in 75 patients who were undergoing arthroscopic assessment of their patellar articular cartilage. We indentified high signal defects of fissures in the patellar cartilage of 5 patients. Patellar chondromalacia was noted at arthroscopy in all 5 patients. Arthroscopy demonstrated patellar chondromalacia in an additional 21 patients with normal MR images. We conclude that high signal defects or fissures on sagittal T2-weighted images are usefull signs of patellar chondromalacia. This single imaging sequence will, however, detect only a small number of the cartilage lesions that may be present. (orig.)

  6. Signs of patellar chondromalacia on sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Smet, A.A.; Monu, J.U.; Fisher, D.R. (Univ. of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Dept. of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)); Keene, J.S.; Graf, B.K. (Univ. of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Div. of Orthopedic Surgery, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-02-01

    We incidentally noted distinctive high signal defects or fissures in the patellar articular cartilage on sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images in 4 patients. At subsequent arthroscopy all 4 patients were found to have patellar chondromalacia. To determine the reliabilty of these signs, we retrospectively evaluated, in a blinded manner, sagittal T2-weighted MR images of the knee in 75 patients who were undergoing arthroscopic assessment of their patellar articular cartilage. We indentified high signal defects of fissures in the patellar cartilage of 5 patients. Patellar chondromalacia was noted at arthroscopy in all 5 patients. Arthroscopy demonstrated patellar chondromalacia in an additional 21 patients with normal MR images. We conclude that high signal defects or fissures on sagittal T2-weighted images are usefull signs of patellar chondromalacia. This single imaging sequence will, however, detect only a small number of the cartilage lesions that may be present. (orig.).

  7. Baseball and softball injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quincy

    2006-05-01

    Baseball and softball injuries can be a result of both acute and overuse injuries. Soft tissue injuries include contusions, abrasions, and lacerations. Return to play is allowed when risk of further injury is minimized. Common shoulder injuries include those to the rotator cuff, biceps tendon, and glenoid labrum. Elbow injuries are common in baseball and softball and include medial epicondylitis, ulnar collateral ligament injury, and osteochondritis dissecans. Typically conservative treatment with relative rest, medication, and a rehabilitation program will allow return to play. Surgical intervention may be needed for certain injuries or conservative treatment failure.

  8. An advanced glycation endproduct (AGE)-rich diet promotes accumulation of AGEs in Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Svensson, Rene B; Scheijen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    the relationship between AGE content in the diet and accumulation of AGEs in weight-bearing animal Achilles tendon. Two groups of mice (C57BL/6Ntac) were fed with either high-fat diet low in AGEs high-fat diet (HFD) (n = 14) or normal diet high in AGEs (ND) (n = 11). AGE content in ND was six to 50-fold higher......Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated...... was measured using ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) and pentosidine with high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescent detection. AGEs in Achilles tendon were higher than in tail tendon for CML (P

  9. Structured white light scanning of rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alex; Easton, Katrina; Devanaboyina, Pavan Teja; Wu, Jian-Ping; Kirk, Thomas Brett; Lloyd, David

    2016-11-07

    The cross-sectional area (CSA) of a material is used to calculate stress under load. The mechanical behaviour of soft tissue is of clinical interest in the management of injury; however, measuring CSA of soft tissue is challenging as samples are geometrically irregular and may deform during measurement. This study presents a simple method, using structured light scanning (SLS), to acquire a 3D model of rabbit Achilles tendon in vitro for measuring CSA of a tendon. The Artec Spider™ 3D scanner uses structured light and stereophotogrammetry technologies to acquire shape data and reconstruct a 3D model of an object. In this study, the 3D scanner was integrated with a custom mechanical rig, permitting 360-degree acquisition of the morphology of six New Zealand White rabbit Achilles tendons. The reconstructed 3D model was then used to measure CSA of the tendon. SLS, together with callipers and micro-CT, was used to measure CSA of objects with a regular or complex shape, such as a drill flute and human cervical vertebra, for validating the accuracy and repeatability of the technique. CSA of six tendons was measured with a coefficient of variation of less than 2%. The mean CSA was 9.9±1.0mm 2 , comparable with those reported by other researchers. Scanning of phantoms demonstrated similar results to μCT. The technique developed in this study offers a simple and accurate method for effectively measuring CSA of soft tissue such as tendons. This allows for localised calculation of stress along the length, assisting in the understanding of the function, injury mechanisms and rehabilitation of tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of aging and resistance training in rat tendon remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqueti, Rita C; Durigan, João L Q; Oliveira, Anderson José S; Mekaro, Marcelo Shinyu; Guzzoni, Vinicius; Aro, Andrea A; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Selistre-de-Araujo, Heloisa S

    2018-01-01

    In elderly persons, weak tendons contribute to functional limitations, injuries, and disability, but resistance training can attenuate this age-related decline. We evaluated the effects of resistance training on the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the calcaneal tendon (CT) in young and old rats and its effect on tendon remodeling. Wistar rats aged 3 mo (young, n = 30) and 20 mo (old, n = 30) were divided into 4 groups: young sedentary, young trained, old sedentary (OS), and old trained (OT). The training sessions were conducted over a 12-wk period. Aging in sedentary rats showed down-regulation in key genes that regulated ECM remodeling. Moreover, the OS group showed a calcification focus in the distal region of the CT, with reduced blood vessel volume density. In contrast, resistance training was effective in up-regulating connective tissue growth factor, VEGF, and decorin gene expression in old rats. Resistance training also increased proteoglycan content in young and old rats in special small leucine-rich proteoglycans and blood vessels and prevented calcification in OT rats. These findings confirm that resistance training is a potential mechanism in the prevention of aging-related loss in ECM and that it attenuates the detrimental effects of aging in tendons, such as ruptures and tendinopathies.-Marqueti, R. C., Durigan, J. L. Q., Oliveira, A. J. S., Mekaro, M. S., Guzzoni, V., Aro, A. A., Pimentel, E. R., Selistre-de-Araujo, H. S. Effects of aging and resistance training in rat tendon remodeling. © FASEB.

  11. Effects of Patellar Taping on the Patella Position in Presence of Quadriceps Contraction in 20-40 Year-Old Women With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome Using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Banejad

    2016-06-01

    Discussion: Kinesio taping plus quadriceps contraction reduced the PFCA and LPFA. Patellar taping is effective in the correction of the patellar position in contracted quadriceps. Therefore, both neuromuscular and mechanical effects of patellar taping affect the patellar position over a long period. The combination of patellar taping and exercise reduced pain and improved activity faster than either of the treatment alone.

  12. Bone growth into a revised porous-coated patellar implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L N; Lund, B; Gotfredsen, K

    1990-01-01

    A noncemented and clinically stable porous-coated patellar component (PCA) was removed from a patient after 11 months because of infection. It was sectioned and examined histologically in undecalcified, thin-ground sections. The bone ingrowth into the porous space was measured at eight levels. Ea...

  13. Comparative diagnostic imaging of a partial patellar ligament tear in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2018-04-27

    Apr 27, 2018 ... of the patellar or tibial insertion, and soft tissue opacity at the cranial aspect of the joint. ... the exclusion of microfracture and distal PL avulsion, but did not add information ..... angles and under stress (Hodgson et al., 2012).

  14. Chondromalacia induced by patellar subluxation in the rabbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, B.N.; Møller-Larsen, F.; Frich, Lars Henrik

    1989-01-01

    A unilateral patellar malalignment was induced in 20 young and 20 mature rabbits by lateral displacement of the tibial tuberosity, the other knee serving as osteotomized in situ control. At 6 weeks, all the knees appeared macroscopically normal, but histologically definite cartilage degeneration ...... produces changes resembling chondromalacia patellae and early arthrotic changes suggesting the importance of malalignment in the development of patellofemoral cartilage degeneration....

  15. Lateral patellar luxation in nine small breed dogs | Dona | Open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper was to describe the clinical features, the management and the outcome of nine small breed dogs affected with lateral patella luxation referred during the period between January 2010 and December 2014. Patellar luxations were classified according to: breed, age, sex, weight, and grade of ...

  16. Trochleoplasty and medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction for recurrent patellar dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Raghuveer Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of recurrent patellar dislocation with high-grade trochlear dysplasia which persisted despite two previous operations. We did a Dejour′s sulcus deepening trochleoplasty, medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction, and lateral retinacular release. Trochleoplasty and medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction is required in patients with high grade trochlear dysplasia.

  17. High incidence of acute and recurrent patellar dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Kasper Skriver; Kallemose, Thomas; Blønd, Lars

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the Danish population as a whole from 1994 to 2013 to find the incidence of acute and recurrent patellar dislocation. METHODS: The study was performed as a descriptive epidemiological study. The Danish National Patient Registry was retrospecti...

  18. Severity of upper-limb panga injuries and infection rates associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The injuries sustained included 32 flexor tendon injuries, 14 extensor tendon injuries, 9 fractures and 21 peripheral nerve injuries. Results. Of the patients, 17 underwent early primary repair (within 24 h), 19 delayed primary repair, and 13 delayed repair following primary washout. Wounds were assessed postoperatively ...

  19. Immediate effect of exercise on achilles tendon properties: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obst, Steven J; Barrett, Rod S; Newsham-West, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Understanding the mechanical and morphological adaptation of the Achilles tendon (AT) in response to acute exercise could have important implications for athletic performance, injury prevention, and rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review and critical evaluation of the literature to determine the immediate effect of a single bout of exercise on the mechanical and morphological properties of the AT in vivo. Five electronic research databases were systematically searched for intervention-based studies reporting mechanical and morphological properties of the AT after a single bout of exercise. Searches revealed 3292 possible articles; 21 met the inclusion criteria. There is evidence that maximal isometric contractions and prolonged static stretching (>5 min) of the triceps surae complex cause an immediate decrease in AT stiffness, whereas prolonged running and hopping have minimal effect. Limited but consistent evidence exists, indicating that AT hysteresis is reduced after prolonged static stretching. Consistent evidence supports a reduction in free AT diameter (anterior-posterior) after dynamic ankle exercise, and this change appears most pronounced in the healthy tendon and after eccentric exercise. The mechanical and morphological properties of the AT in vivo are affected by acute exercise in a mode- and dose-dependent manner. Transient changes in AT stiffness, hysteresis, and diameter after unaccustomed exercise modes and doses may expose the tendon to increased risk of strain injury and impact on the mechanical function of the triceps surae muscle-tendon unit.

  20. Calf Endurance and Achilles Tendon Structure in Classical Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellers, Jennifer A; van Ostrand, Katrina; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2017-06-15

    Optimal lower leg function is critical for ballet dancers to meet their occupational requirements. Achilles tendon injury is particularly detrimental to ballet dancers. While standardized measures have been validated and incorporated into clinical practice for use in people with Achilles tendon injury, normative ranges specific to the dancer population have not been described. The purpose of this pilot study was to observe the performance of pre-professional ballet students and professional ballet dancers on a well-established test battery for lower leg functional performance as well as ultra-sonographic evaluation of the structure of their Achilles tendons. The dancers in this study had significantly shorter Achilles tendons than non-dancers (p = 0.016). Dancers demonstrated significantly higher maximum heel-rise height on the heel-rise test for calf endurance (p < 0.001) but performed significantly less work than non-dancers (p = 0.014). The results of this study support the use of the heel-rise test as a tool for screening and to guide rehabilitation.

  1. Patellatendinopathie ('jumper's knee'); een veelvoorkomende en lastig te behandelen sportblessure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.

    2008-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common and difficult-to-treat overuse injury of the patellar tendon with a very negative impact on the careers of many athletes. It appears to involve a failed healing process in the tendon--not inflammation--and has consequences for the treatment strategy. Rehabilitation

  2. [Application of silk-based tissue engineering scaffold for tendon / ligament regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yejun; Le, Huihui; Jin, Zhangchu; Chen, Xiao; Yin, Zi; Shen, Weiliang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Tendon/ligament injury is one of the most common impairments in sports medicine. The traditional treatments of damaged tissue repair are unsatisfactory, especially for athletes, due to lack of donor and immune rejection. The strategy of tissue engineering may break through these limitations, and bring new hopes to tendon/ligament repair, even regeneration. Silk is a kind of natural biomaterials, which has good biocompatibility, wide range of mechanical properties and tunable physical structures; so it could be applied as tendon/ligament tissue engineering scaffolds. The silk-based scaffold has robust mechanical properties; combined with other biological ingredients, it could increase the surface area, promote more cell adhesion and improve the biocompatibility. The potential clinical application of silk-based scaffold has been confirmed by in vivo studies on tendon/ligament repairing, such as anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, achilles tendon and rotator cuff. To develop novel biomechanically stable and host integrated tissue engineered tendon/ligament needs more further micro and macro studies, combined with product development and clinical application, which will give new hope to patients with tendon/ligament injury.

  3. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction enhances naked plasmid DNA transfection in rabbit Achilles tendons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L; Zhang, L; Wang, L; Jiang, Y; Luo, Y; Peng, Y; Lin, L

    2012-07-01

    The study was to investigate the probability of increasing the transfection of the gene in tendons by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), and to search for the most suitable transfection conditions. A mixture of microbubbles and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmids was injected into rabbit Achilles tendons by different administration routes and the tendons were ultrasound pulse by different ultrasonic conditions in order to determine the most appropriate conditions. Then, the rabbits were divided into four groups: (1) ultrasound + microbubbles + plasmid; (2) ultrasound+ plasmid; (3) microbubble + plasmid; (4) plasmid only. EGFP expression in the tendons and other tissues, and the damage to tendon and paratenon were all observed. The results showed that EGFP expression in the tendon was higher by ultrasound pulse with 2 W cm(-2) of output intensity and a 20% duty cycle for 10 min. Local injection was determined to be the better administration route. Among the four groups, EGFP expression in Group 1 was higher than that in other groups. EGFP expression was highest on seventh day, then it gradually decrease over time, and lasted more than 56 days. EGFP expression was not found in other tissues. There was no obvious injury caused by UTMD. Under suitable conditions, it is feasible to use UTMD as a safe and effective gene transfection therapy for tendon injuries.

  4. Triceps brachii tendon: anatomic-MR imaging study in cadavers with histologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belentani, Clarissa; Pastore, Daniel; Wangwinyuvirat, Mani; Dirim, Berna; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald; Haghighi, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to describe the normal MR anatomy of the triceps brachii tendon (TBT) insertion, to correlate the findings with those seen in anatomic sections and histopathologic analysis, and to review triceps tendon injuries. Twelve cadaveric elbows were used according to institution guidelines. T1-weighted spin-echo MR images were acquired in three planes. Findings on MR imaging were correlated with those derived from anatomic and histologic study. On MR images, the TBT had a bipartite appearance as it inserted on olecranon in all specimens. The insertion of the medial head was deeper than that of the long and lateral heads and was mainly muscular at its insertion, with a small amount of the tendon blending with the muscle distally, necessitating histologic analysis to determine if there was tendon blending with the muscle at the site of insertion and if the medial head inserted together with the common tendon or as a single unit. At histopathologic analysis, the three heads of the triceps tendon had a common insertion on the olecranon. The bipartite aspect of the te