WorldWideScience

Sample records for particle orbit analysis

  1. Particle orbit analysis for LHD helical axis configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Yamazaki, K.; Motojima, O.

    1993-04-01

    Fast ion orbits for helical magnetic axis configurations in LHD (Large Helical Device) are analyzed and compared with the standard circular axis case. Boundaries between passing and helically trapped particle regions show clear differences: in the non-planar axis case the helically trapped region spreads, near the magnetic axis, over a much wider band across the 90deg pitch angle value and shows a very marked asymmetry. The locally trapped particle region is also wider than in the standard case. The differences in the loss cone boundaries of the two cases are rather small, however, the effects of re-entering criteria are very important in both cases. On the contrary, effects of finite coil size are not significant. (author)

  2. Spatial analysis of galactic cosmic ray particles in low earth orbit/near equator orbit using SPENVIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suparta, W; Zulkeple, S K

    2014-01-01

    The space environment has grown intensively harmful to spacecraft and astronauts. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are one of the radiation sources that composed of high energetic particles originated from space and capable of damaging electronic systems through single event upset (SEU) process. In this paper, we analyzed GCR fluxes at different altitudes by using Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) software and the results are compared to determine their intensities with respect to distance in the Earth's orbit. The altitudes are set at low earth orbit (400 km and 685 km), medium earth orbit (19,100 km and 20,200 km) and high earth orbit (35,793 km and 1,000,000 km). Then, within Low Earth Orbit (LEO) near the equator (NEqO), we used altitude of 685 km to compare GCRs with the intensities of solar particles and trapped particles in the radiation belt to determine the significance of GCRs in the orbit itself.

  3. Orbit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators

  4. Orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.

  5. Cosmic censorship, black holes, and particle orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiscock, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    One of the main reasons for believing in the cosmic censorship hypothesis is the disquieting nature of the alternative: the existence of naked singularities, and hence loss of predictability, the possibility of closed timelike lines and so forth. The consequences of assuming the cosmic hypothesis can also be somewhat strange and unexpected. In particular, Hawking's black hole area theorem is applied to the study of particle orbits near a Schwarzschild black hole. If the cosmic censorship hypothesis (and hence the area theorem) is true, then there exist stable near-circular orbits arbitrarily close to the horizon at r = 2M. (author)

  6. Non-isochronous spiral orbit particle accelerator and fixed frequency closed orbit particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Takashi; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2006-01-01

    One of the present inventions provides a spiral orbit charged particle accelerator in which the magnetic field increases as the radius increases more rapidly than an isochronous magnetic field distribution, and the distribution of fixed-frequency accelerating RF voltage is formed so that a harmonic number changes in integer for every particle revolution. The other invention realizes to make the closed orbit charged particle accelerator having a fixed frequency amplitude modulator that is able to modulate amplitude of the RF voltage so that a harmonic number decreases in integer in an every particle revolution. (author)

  7. Exploratory orbit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Unlike the other documents in these proceedings, this paper is neither a scientific nor a technical report. It is, rather, a short personal essay which attempts to describe an Exploratory Orbit Analysis (EOA) environment. Analyzing the behavior of a four or six dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is at least as difficult as analyzing events in high-energy collisions; the consequences of doing it badly, or slowly, would be at least as devastating; and yet the level of effort and expenditure invested in the latter, the very attention paid to it by physicists at large, must be two orders of magnitude greater than that given to the former. It is difficult to choose the model which best explains the behavior of a physical device if one does not first understand the behavior of the available models. The time is ripe for the development of a functioning EOA environment, which I will try to describe in this paper to help us achieve this goal

  8. Exploratory orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Unlike the other documents in these proceedings, this paper is neither a scientific nor a technical report. It is, rather, a short personal essay which attempts to describe an Exploratory Orbit Analysis (EOA) environment. Analyzing the behavior of a four or six dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is at least as difficult as analyzing events in high-energy collisions; the consequences of doing it badly, or slowly, would be at least as devastating; and yet the level of effort and expenditure invested in the latter, the very attention paid to it by physicists at large, must be two orders of magnitude greater than that given to the former. It is difficult to choose the model which best explains the behavior of a physical device if one does not first understand the behavior of the available models. The time is ripe for the development of a functioning EOA environment, which I will try to describe in this paper to help us achieve this goal.

  9. Particle orbit tracking on a parallel computer: Hypertrack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, B.; Bourianoff, G.; Pilat, F.; Talman, R.

    1991-05-01

    A program has been written which performs particle orbit tracking on the Intel iPSC/860 distributed memory parallel computer. The tracking is performed using a thin element approach. A brief description of the structure and performance of the code is presented, along with applications of the code to the analysis of accelerator lattices for the SSC. The concept of ''ensemble tracking'', i.e. the tracking of ensemble averages of noninteracting particles, such as the emittance, is presented. Preliminary results of such studies will be presented. 2 refs., 6 figs

  10. Effects of solar radiation on the orbits of small particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A modification of the Robertson (1937) equations of particle motion in the presence of solar radiation is developed which allows for partial reflection of sunlight as a result of rapid and varying particle rotations caused by interaction with the solar wind. The coefficients and forces in earlier forms of the equations are compared with those in the present equations, and secular rates of change of particle orbital elements are determined. Orbital dimensions are calculated in terms of time, probable sizes and densities of meteoric and cometary particles are estimated, and times of infall to the sun are computed for a particle moving in an almost circular orbit and a particle moving in an elliptical orbit of high eccentricity. Changes in orbital elements are also determined for particles from a long-period sun-grazing comet. The results show that the time of infall to the sun from a highly eccentric orbit is substantially shorter than from a circular orbit with a radius equal to the mean distance in the eccentric orbit. The possibility is considered that the free orbital kinetic energy of particles drawn into the sun may be the energy source for the solar corona.

  11. Dyson Orbitals, Quasi-Particle effects and Compton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Barbiellini, B.; Bansil, A.

    2004-01-01

    Dyson orbitals play an important role in understanding quasi-particle effects in the correlated ground state of a many-particle system and are relevant for describing the Compton scattering cross section beyond the frameworks of the impulse approximation (IA) and the independent particle model (IPM). Here we discuss corrections to the Kohn-Sham energies due to quasi-particle effects in terms of Dyson orbitals and obtain a relatively simple local form of the exchange-correlation energy. Illust...

  12. Stochastic behaviour of particle orbits in field reversed geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studies of stochastic or ergodic behaviour of beam particle orbits in axisymmetric systems with field reversal produced by ion rings or by neutral injection are presented. In the former case a large class of orbits is ergodic, whereas in the latter most are integrable. Effects of ergodic behaviour on particle confinement, equilibrium, magnetic compression, and stability are discussed. The modification, due to ergodic orbits of the stability criterion for low frequency (ω << ωsub(ci)) resonant instabilities is presented. (author)

  13. Role of bumpy fields on single particle orbit in near quasihelically symmetric stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seol, JaeChun; Hegna, C.C.

    2004-01-01

    The role of symmetry breaking on single particle orbits in near helically symmetric stellarators is investigated. In particular, the effect of a symmetry-breaking bumpy term is included in the analysis of trapped particle orbits. It is found that all trapped particle drift orbits are determined by surfaces on which vertical bar B vertical bar min is constant. Trapped particle orbits reside on these surfaces regardless of pitch angle and are determined solely by the initial position and the shape of the vertical bar B vertical bar min contour. Since vertical bar B vertical bar min contours do not depend on the direction of the banana center motion, superbanana orbits do not appear

  14. Periodic orbits near the particle resonance in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, George

    1978-01-01

    Near the particle resonance of a spiral galaxy the almost circular periodic orbits that exist inside the resonance (direct) or outside it (retrograde) are replaced by elongated trapped orbits around the maxima of the potential L/sub 4/ and L/sub 5/. These are the long- period trapped periodic orbits. The long-period orbits shrink to the points L/sub 4/, L/sub 5/ for a critical value of the Hamiltonian h. For still larger h, a family of short-period trapped orbits appears, with continuously growing size. The evolution of the periodic orbits with h is followed, theoretically and numerically, from the untrapped orbits to the long-periodic orbits and then to the short-periodic orbits, mainly in the case of a bar. In a tight spiral case an explanation of the asymmetric periodic and banana orbits is given, and an example of short-period orbits not surrounding L/sub 4/ or L/sub 5/ is provided. Another family of periodic orbits reaching corotation is trapped at the inner Lindblad resonance. (5 refs).

  15. Full particle orbit effects in regular and stochastic magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Shun, E-mail: shun.ogawa@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [Aix Marseille Univ., Univ. Toulon, CNRS, CPT, Marseille (France); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel [Aix Marseille Univ., Univ. Toulon, CNRS, CPT, Marseille (France); Castillo-Negrete, Diego del [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States); Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2016-07-15

    We present a numerical study of charged particle motion in a time-independent magnetic field in cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field model consists of an unperturbed reversed-shear (non-monotonic q-profile) helical part and a perturbation consisting of a superposition of modes. Contrary to most of the previous studies, the particle trajectories are computed by directly solving the full Lorentz force equations of motion in a six-dimensional phase space using a sixth-order, implicit, symplectic Gauss-Legendre method. The level of stochasticity in the particle orbits is diagnosed using averaged, effective Poincare sections. It is shown that when only one mode is present, the particle orbits can be stochastic even though the magnetic field line orbits are not stochastic (i.e., fully integrable). The lack of integrability of the particle orbits in this case is related to separatrix crossing and the breakdown of the global conservation of the magnetic moment. Some perturbation consisting of two modes creates resonance overlapping, leading to Hamiltonian chaos in magnetic field lines. Then, the particle orbits exhibit a nontrivial dynamics depending on their energy and pitch angle. It is shown that the regions where the particle motion is stochastic decrease as the energy increases. The non-monotonicity of the q-profile implies the existence of magnetic ITBs (internal transport barriers) which correspond to shearless flux surfaces located in the vicinity of the q-profile minimum. It is shown that depending on the energy, these magnetic ITBs might or might not confine particles. That is, magnetic ITBs act as an energy-dependent particle confinement filter. Magnetic field lines in reversed-shear configurations exhibit topological bifurcations (from homoclinic to heteroclinic) due to separatrix reconnection. We show that a similar but more complex scenario appears in the case of particle orbits that depend in a non-trivial way on the energy and pitch angle of the

  16. Quantum walks and orbital states of a Weyl particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katori, Makoto; Fujino, Soichi; Konno, Norio

    2005-01-01

    The time-evolution equation of a one-dimensional quantum walker is exactly mapped to the three-dimensional Weyl equation for a zero-mass particle with spin 1/2, in which each wave number k of the walker's wave function is mapped to a point q(k) in the three-dimensional momentum space and q(k) makes a planar orbit as k changes its value in [-π,π). The integration over k providing the real-space wave function for a quantum walker corresponds to considering an orbital state of a Weyl particle, which is defined as a superposition (curvilinear integration) of the energy-momentum eigenstates of a free Weyl equation along the orbit. Konno's novel distribution function of a quantum walker's pseudovelocities in the long-time limit is fully controlled by the shape of the orbit and how the orbit is embedded in the three-dimensional momentum space. The family of orbital states can be regarded as a geometrical representation of the unitary group U(2) and the present study will propose a new group-theoretical point of view for quantum-walk problems

  17. Particle orbits in W VII-X configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobig, H.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic coordinates are very convenient for describing particle orbits and neoclassical losses in stellarator studies. In the configurations considered (WVII-A and AS, Helias, Heliac, and BSX) plateau losses can be reduced by a factor of 3-4 compared with an equivalent tokamak. It is possible to reduce plateau losses and bootstrap current simultaneously. The bootstrap current can be made negligibly small. The Heliac configuration shows larger plateau losses than the equivalent tokamak. It is possible to localize trapped particles in a region of minimum radial drift velocity. The Er fields strongly reduce localized particle losses

  18. Directing orbits of chaotic systems by particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bo; Wang Ling; Jin Yihui; Tang Fang; Huang Dexian

    2006-01-01

    This paper applies a novel evolutionary computation algorithm named particle swarm optimization (PSO) to direct the orbits of discrete chaotic dynamical systems towards desired target region within a short time by adding only small bounded perturbations, which could be formulated as a multi-modal numerical optimization problem with high dimension. Moreover, the synchronization of chaotic systems is also studied, which can be dealt with as an online problem of directing orbits. Numerical simulations based on Henon Map demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of PSO, and the effects of some parameters are also investigated

  19. On-Orbit Software Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Susanne I.

    2004-01-01

    The On-Orbit Software Analysis Research Infusion Project was done by Intrinsyx Technologies Corporation (Intrinsyx) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center (ARC). The Project was a joint collaborative effort between NASA Codes IC and SL, Kestrel Technology (Kestrel), and Intrinsyx. The primary objectives of the Project were: Discovery and verification of software program properties and dependencies, Detection and isolation of software defects across different versions of software, and Compilation of historical data and technical expertise for future applications

  20. Stability of large orbit, high-current particle rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovelace, R.V.E.

    1994-01-01

    A review is made of theory of the low-frequency stability of large orbit, high-current particle rings which continue to be of interest for compact fusion systems. The precession mode was the first mode predicted by Furth and observed by Christofilos to be unstable under certain conditions. Subsequently, many detailed studies have been made of the stability of particle rings- different modes, different ring geometries, systems with/without a toroidal B field, and sytems with/without a current carrying plasma component. The possibly dangerous modes are still thought to include the precession mode, the tilting mode, and the low order kink modes. copyright American Institute of Physics

  1. Finite orbit energetic particle linear response to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Ye, Huanchun; Breizman, B.N.

    1991-07-01

    The linear response of energetic particles to the TAE modes is calculated taking into account their finite orbit excursion from the flux surfaces. The general expression reproduces the previously derived theory for small banana width: when the banana width triangle b is much larger than the mode thickness triangle m , we obtain a new compact expression for the linear power transfer. When triangle m /triangle b much-lt 1, the banana orbit effect reduces the power transfer by a factor of triangle m /triangle b from that predicted by the narrow orbit theory. A comparison is made of the contribution to the TAE growth rate of energetic particles with a slowing-down distribution arising from an isotropic source, and a balance-injected beam source when the source speed is close to the Alfven speed. For the same stored energy density, the contribution from the principal resonances (|υ parallel | = υ A is substantially enhanced in the beam case compared to the isotropic case, while the contribution at the higher sidebands (|υ parallel |) = υ A /(2 ell - 1) with ell ≥ 2) is substantially reduced. 10 refs

  2. Single-Particle Spin-Orbit Splittings in Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuhiko, ANDO; Hiroharu, BANDO; Department of Physics, Kyoto University; Division of Mathematical Physics, Fukui University

    1981-01-01

    Single-particle spin-orbit splittings (Δ^) in ^O and ^Ca nuclei are evaluated within the framework of the effective interaction theory by employing the Reid soft-core potential and meson-exchange three-body forces (TBF). Among the two-body force contributions, the Pauli-rearrangement effect on Δ^ is studied with special care. The TBF contribution to Δ^ is found to be significant. The G-matrix, the second-order pauli-rearrangement and the TBF contribute to Δ^ by the amount of ~1/2, ~1/5 and ~1...

  3. Finite orbit energetic particle linear response to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Ye Huanchun; Breizman, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    The linear response of energetic particles of the TAE modes is calculated taking into account their finite orbit excursion from the flux surfaces. The general expression reproduces the previously derived theory for small banana width; when the banana width Δ b is much larger than the mode thickness Δ m , we obtain a new compact expression for the linear power transfer. When Δ m /Δ b m /Δ b from that predicted by the narrow orbit theory. A comparison is made of the contribution to the TAE growth rate of energetic particles with a slowing-down distribution arising from an isotropic source, and a balanced-injected beam source when the source speed is close to the Alfven speed. For the same stored energy density, the contribution from the principal resonances (vertical strokev parallel vertical stroke=v A ) is substantially enhanced in the beam case compared to the isotropic case, while the contribution at the higher sidebands (vertical strokev parallel vertical stroke=v A /(2l-1) with l≥2) is substantially reduced. (orig.)

  4. Closed orbit analysis for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milutinovic, J.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    We examine the effects of four types of errors in the RHIC dipoles and quadrupoles on the on-momentum closed orbit in the machine. We use PATRIS both to handle statistically the effects of kick-modeled errors and to check the performance of the Fermilab correcting scheme in a framework of a more realistic modeling. On the basis of the accepted rms values of the lattice errors, we conclude that in about 40% of all studied cases the lattice must be to some extent pre-corrected in the framework of the so-called ''first turn around strategy,'' in order to get a closed orbit within the aperture limitations at all and, furthermore, for approximately 2/3 of the remaining cases we find that a single pass algorithm of the Fermilab scheme is not sufficient to bring closed orbit distortions down to acceptable levels. We have modified the scheme and have allowed repeated applications of the otherwise unchanged three bump method and in doing so we have been able to correct the orbit in a satisfactory manner. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Los Alamos energetic particle sensor systems at geostationary orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Aiello, W.; Asbridge, J.R.; Belian, R.D.; Higbie, P.R.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Laros, J.G.; Tech, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has provided energetic particle sensors for a variety of spacecraft at the geostationary orbit (36,000 km altitude). The sensor system called the Charged Particle Analyzer (CPA) consists of four separate subsystems. The LoE and HiE subsystems measure electrons in the energy ranges 30 to 300 keV and 200 to 2000 keV, respectively. The LoP and HiP subsystems measure ions in the ranges 100 to 600 keV and 0.40 to 150 MeV, respectively. A separate sensor system called the spectrometer for energetic electrons (SEE) measures very high-energy electrons (2 to 15 MeV) using advanced scintillator design. In this paper we describe the relationship of operational anomalies and spacecraft upsets to the directly measured energetic particle environments at 6.6 R/sub E/. We also compare and contrast the CPA and SEE instrument design characteristics with the next generation of Los Alamos instruments to be flown at geostationary altitudes

  6. General classification of charged test particle circular orbits in Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, D. [Silesian University in Opava, Institute of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Opava (Czech Republic); Quevedo, H. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, ICRA, Rome (Italy); Icranet-Pescara, Pescara (Italy); Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Kazakh National University, Department of Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Ruffini, R. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, ICRA, Rome (Italy); Icranet-Pescara, Pescara (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    We investigate charged particles' circular motion in the gravitational field of a charged mass distribution described by the Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime. We introduce a set of independent parameters completely characterizing the different spatial regions in which circular motion is allowed. We provide a most complete classification of circular orbits for different sets of particle and source charge-to-mass ratios. We study both black holes and naked singularities and show that the behavior of charged particles depend drastically on the type of source. Our analysis shows in an alternative manner that the behavior of circular orbits can in principle be used to distinguish between black holes and naked singularities. From this analysis, special limiting values for the dimensionless charge of black hole and naked singularity emerge, namely, Q/M = 1/2, Q/M = √(13)/5 and Q/M = √(2/3) for the black hole case and Q/M = 1, Q/M = 5/(2√(6)), Q/M = 3√(6)/7, and finally Q/M = √(9/8) for the naked singularity case. Similarly and surprisingly, analogous limits emerge for the orbiting particles charge-to-mass ratio ε, for positive charges ε = 1, ε = 2 and ε = M/Q. These limits play an important role in the study of the coupled electromagnetic and gravitational interactions, and the investigation of the role of the charge in the gravitational collapse of compact objects. (orig.)

  7. Representation of Probability Density Functions from Orbit Determination using the Particle Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiku, Alinda K.; Garrison, James; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2012-01-01

    Statistical orbit determination enables us to obtain estimates of the state and the statistical information of its region of uncertainty. In order to obtain an accurate representation of the probability density function (PDF) that incorporates higher order statistical information, we propose the use of nonlinear estimation methods such as the Particle Filter. The Particle Filter (PF) is capable of providing a PDF representation of the state estimates whose accuracy is dependent on the number of particles or samples used. For this method to be applicable to real case scenarios, we need a way of accurately representing the PDF in a compressed manner with little information loss. Hence we propose using the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) as a non-Gaussian dimensional reduction method that is capable of maintaining higher order statistical information obtained using the PF. Methods such as the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) are based on utilizing up to second order statistics, hence will not suffice in maintaining maximum information content. Both the PCA and the ICA are applied to two scenarios that involve a highly eccentric orbit with a lower apriori uncertainty covariance and a less eccentric orbit with a higher a priori uncertainty covariance, to illustrate the capability of the ICA in relation to the PCA.

  8. Innermost stable circular orbit of spinning particle in charged spinning black hole background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Peng; Wei, Shao-Wen; Guo, Wen-Di; Sui, Tao-Tao; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) (spin-aligned or anti-aligned orbit) for a classical spinning test particle with the pole-dipole approximation in the background of Kerr-Newman black hole in the equatorial plane. It is shown that the orbit of the spinning particle is related to the spin of the test particle. The motion of the spinning test particle will be superluminal if its spin is too large. We give an additional condition by considering the superluminal constraint for the ISCO in the black hole backgrounds. We obtain numerically the relations between the ISCO and the properties of the black holes and the test particle. It is found that the radius of the ISCO for a spinning test particle is smaller than that of a nonspinning test particle in the black hole backgrounds.

  9. Acoustic Virtual Vortices with Tunable Orbital Angular Momentum for Trapping of Mie Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Asier; Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2018-01-01

    Acoustic vortices can transfer angular momentum and trap particles. Here, we show that particles trapped in airborne acoustic vortices orbit at high speeds, leading to dynamic instability and ejection. We demonstrate stable trapping inside acoustic vortices by generating sequences of short-pulsed vortices of equal helicity but opposite chirality. This produces a "virtual vortex" with an orbital angular momentum that can be tuned independently of the trapping force. We use this method to adjust the rotational speed of particles inside a vortex beam and, for the first time, create three-dimensional acoustics traps for particles of wavelength order (i.e., Mie particles).

  10. DEVIATION OF STELLAR ORBITS FROM TEST PARTICLE TRAJECTORIES AROUND SGr A* DUE TO TIDES AND WINDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Li, Gongjie; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring the orbits of stars around Sgr A* offers the possibility of detecting the precession of their orbital planes due to frame dragging, of measuring the spin and quadrupole moment of the black hole, and of testing the no-hair theorem. Here we investigate whether the deviations of stellar orbits from test-particle trajectories due to wind mass loss and tidal dissipation of the orbital energy compromise such measurements. We find that the effects of stellar winds are, in general, negligible. On the other hand, for the most eccentric orbits (e > 0.96) for which an optical interferometer, such as GRAVITY, will detect orbital plane precession due to frame dragging, the tidal dissipation of orbital energy occurs at timescales comparable to the timescale of precession due to the quadrupole moment of the black hole. As a result, this non-conservative effect is a potential source of systematic uncertainty in testing the no-hair theorem with stellar orbits

  11. DEVIATION OF STELLAR ORBITS FROM TEST PARTICLE TRAJECTORIES AROUND SGr A* DUE TO TIDES AND WINDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Li, Gongjie; Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: gli@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Monitoring the orbits of stars around Sgr A* offers the possibility of detecting the precession of their orbital planes due to frame dragging, of measuring the spin and quadrupole moment of the black hole, and of testing the no-hair theorem. Here we investigate whether the deviations of stellar orbits from test-particle trajectories due to wind mass loss and tidal dissipation of the orbital energy compromise such measurements. We find that the effects of stellar winds are, in general, negligible. On the other hand, for the most eccentric orbits (e > 0.96) for which an optical interferometer, such as GRAVITY, will detect orbital plane precession due to frame dragging, the tidal dissipation of orbital energy occurs at timescales comparable to the timescale of precession due to the quadrupole moment of the black hole. As a result, this non-conservative effect is a potential source of systematic uncertainty in testing the no-hair theorem with stellar orbits.

  12. Evolution of Cometary Dust Particles to the Orbit of the Earth: Particle Size, Shape, and Mutual Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongu; Ishiguro, Masateru

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we numerically investigated the orbital evolution of cometary dust particles, with special consideration of the initial size–frequency distribution (SFD) and different evolutionary tracks according to the initial orbit and particle shape. We found that close encounters with planets (mostly Jupiter) are the dominating factor determining the orbital evolution of dust particles. Therefore, the lifetimes of cometary dust particles (∼250,000 yr) are shorter than the Poynting–Robertson lifetime, and only a small fraction of large cometary dust particles can be transferred into orbits with small semimajor axes. The exceptions are dust particles from 2P/Encke and, potentially, active asteroids that have little interaction with Jupiter. We also found that the effects of dust shape, mass density, and SFD were not critical in the total mass supply rate to the interplanetary dust particle (IDP) cloud complex when these quantities are confined by observations of zodiacal light brightness and SFD around the Earth’s orbit. When we incorporate a population of fluffy aggregates discovered in the Earth’s stratosphere and the coma of 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko within the initial ejection, the initial SFD measured at the comae of comets (67P and 81P/Wild 2) can produce the observed SFD around the Earth’s orbit. Considering the above effects, we derived the probability of mutual collisions among dust particles within the IDP cloud for the first time in a direct manner via numerical simulation and concluded that mutual collisions can mostly be ignored.

  13. Transfer of orbital angular momentum to an optically trapped low-index particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces-Chavez, V.; Sibbett, W.; Dholakia, K.; Volke-Sepulveda, K.; Chavez-Cerda, S.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate the transfer of orbital angular momentum from a light beam to a trapped low-index particle. The particle is trapped in a dark annular region of a high-order Bessel beam and rotates around the beam axis due to scattering from the helical wave fronts of the light beam. A general theoretical geometrical optics model is developed that, applied to our specific situation, corroborates tweezing and transfer of orbital angular momentum to the low-index particle. Good quantitative agreement between theory and experiment for particle rotation rates is observed

  14. Classification of particle orbits near the magnetic axis in a tokamak by using constants of motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, Shinsuke; Sugama, Hideo; Okamoto, Masao; Wakatani, Masahiro

    2001-01-01

    A classification of particle orbits near the magnetic axis in a tokamak is presented in a space of constants of motion (COM), which is important to apply Lagrangian formulation of neoclassical transport theory to the region near the axis. Orbit types are distinguished by the number of the turning points of σsub(parallel)=υsub(parallel)/|υsub(parallel)| and σ θ =θ-bar/|θ-bar| on each orbit, where υsub(parallel) is the velocity parallel to the magnetic field, and θ-bar(≡v·∇θ) is the poloidal angular velocity. As a set of COM, (ε, μ, ) is taken, where ε is the energy of a particle, μ is the magnetic moment, and is the bounce-averaged minor radius position of a particle orbit. Compared with a familiar set of COM (υ, ξ s , r s ), where υ is the particle velocity, r s is the minor radius at which an orbit crosses the mid-plane, and ξ s =υsub(parallel)/υ evaluated at the crossing point, the set of COM (ε, μ, ) is more suitable in practice for Lagrangian formulation of neoclassical transport theory, in which the particle diffusion is described by the change of average position of particles by collisions. Near the magnetic axis, it is found that there are overlaps in regions of orbit types in the (ε, μ, ) space and that has a minimum value for a given ε. (author)

  15. Blind Analysis in Particle Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roodman, A

    2003-01-01

    A review of the blind analysis technique, as used in particle physics measurements, is presented. The history of blind analyses in physics is briefly discussed. Next the dangers of and the advantages of a blind analysis are described. Three distinct kinds of blind analysis in particle physics are presented in detail. Finally, the BABAR collaboration's experience with the blind analysis technique is discussed

  16. Perturbative evolution of particle orbits around Kerr black holes: time-domain calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Aleman, Ramon [Physical Sciences Department, University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras, San Juan, PR 00931 (Puerto Rico); Khanna, Gaurav [Natural Science Division, Long Island University, Southampton, NY 11968 (United States); Pullin, Jorge [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2003-07-21

    We consider the problem of the gravitational waves produced by a particle of negligible mass orbiting a Kerr black hole. We treat the Teukolsky perturbation equation in the time domain numerically as a 2 + 1 partial differential equation. We model the particle by smearing the singularities in the source term by the use of narrow Gaussian distributions. We have been able to reproduce earlier results for equatorial circular orbits that were computed using the frequency-domain formalism. The time-domain approach is however geared for a more general evolution, for instance of nearly geodesic orbits under the effects of radiation reaction.

  17. Perturbative evolution of particle orbits around Kerr black holes: time-domain calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Aleman, Ramon; Khanna, Gaurav; Pullin, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    We consider the problem of the gravitational waves produced by a particle of negligible mass orbiting a Kerr black hole. We treat the Teukolsky perturbation equation in the time domain numerically as a 2 + 1 partial differential equation. We model the particle by smearing the singularities in the source term by the use of narrow Gaussian distributions. We have been able to reproduce earlier results for equatorial circular orbits that were computed using the frequency-domain formalism. The time-domain approach is however geared for a more general evolution, for instance of nearly geodesic orbits under the effects of radiation reaction

  18. Some features of particle orbit behavior in LHD configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkin, A.A.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Yamazaki, K.; Motojima, O.; Grekov, D.L.; Smirnova, M.S.; Zolotukhin, A.V.

    1993-03-01

    Localizations of helically trapped particle losses on the last closed magnetic surface in different LHD configurations are studied. The effects of electric field, finite β and bootstrap current are taken into account. It is shown that the angular location of the helically trapped particle losses may be controlled by the change of vertical field coil currents. (author)

  19. Chaos and nonlinear dynamics of single-particle orbits in a magnetotaillike magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The properties of charged-particle motion in Hamiltonian dynamics are studied in a magnetotaillike magnetic field configuration. It is shown by numerical integration of the equation of motion that the system is generally nonintegrable and that the particle motion can be classified into three distinct types of orbits: bounded integrable orbits, unbounded stochastic orbits, and unbounded transient orbits. It is also shown that different regions of the phase space exhibit qualitatively different responses to external influences. The concept of 'differential memory' in single-particle distributions is proposed. Physical implications for the dynamical properties of the magnetotail plasmas and the possible generation of non-Maxwellian features in the distribution functions are discussed.

  20. Gravitational waveforms from a point particle orbiting a Schwarzschild black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, Karl

    2004-01-01

    We numerically solve the inhomogeneous Zerilli-Moncrief and Regge-Wheeler equations in the time domain. We obtain the gravitational waveforms produced by a point particle of mass μ traveling around a Schwarzschild black hole of mass M on arbitrary bound and unbound orbits. Fluxes of energy and angular momentum at infinity and the event horizon are also calculated. Results for circular orbits, selected cases of eccentric orbits, and parabolic orbits are presented. The numerical results from the time-domain code indicate that, for all three types of orbital motion, black hole absorption contributes less than 1% of the total flux, so long as the orbital radius r p (t) satisfies r p (t)>5M at all times

  1. Particle Analysis in Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisbing, R E; Schneck, W M

    2006-07-01

    Microscopic trace evidence includes particles from many sources such as biologicals, soil, building materials, metals, explosives, gunshot residues, and cosmetics. The particles are identified by morphological analysis, microscopy, and chemical analysis. Their identity is confirmed by comparison with reference materials or other comparison samples. The probative value of particles of forensic interest depends on their nature and the circumstances of their presence. Copyright © 2006 Central Police University.

  2. Response of energetic particles to local magnetic dipolarization inside geosynchronous orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Gkioulidou, M.; Takahashi, K.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic field dipolarization and energetic particle injections are the most distinct phenomena observed in the inner magnetosphere during the substorm expansion phase. Compared to a wealth of knowledge about the phenomenology of magnetic dipolarizations and particle injections at/outside geosynchronous orbit (GEO), our understanding of them inside GEO remains incomplete because of a very limited number of previous studies. In the present study, we statistically examine the response of 1-1000 keV energetic particles to local magnetic dipolarization by performing a superposed epoch analysis of energetic particle fluxes with the zero epoch defined as the dipolarization onset times. Based on data from the Van Allen Probes tail seasons in 2012-2016, we identified a total of 97 magnetic dipolarization events which occurred closer to the magnetic equator (i.e., BH, which is antiparallel to the Earth's dipole axis, is the dominant component of the local magnetic field at least for 5 min before the onset). For major ion species (hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions), the relative flux intensity to the pre-onset level increases at > 50 keV and decreases at inverse energy dispersion. For dipolarizations with strong impulsive westward electric fields, the relative electron flux intensity increases up to 5-10 times, in particular most significant at several tens of keV. This result suggests that the impulsive electric field acts as an efficient factor in the rapid energization of the tens-of-keV electrons. We also discuss how the response of energetic particles to dipolarization depends on MLT, radial distance, and pitch angle.

  3. Robustness analysis method for orbit control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Yang, Keying; Qi, Rui; Zhao, Shuge; Li, Yanyan

    2017-08-01

    Satellite orbits require periodical maintenance due to the presence of perturbations. However, random errors caused by inaccurate orbit determination and thrust implementation may lead to failure of the orbit control strategy. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the robustness of the orbit control methods. Feasible strategies which are tolerant to errors of a certain magnitude can be developed to perform reliable orbit control for the satellite. In this paper, first, the orbital dynamic model is formulated by Gauss' form of the planetary equation using the mean orbit elements; the atmospheric drag and the Earth's non-spherical perturbations are taken into consideration in this model. Second, an impulsive control strategy employing the differential correction algorithm is developed to maintain the satellite trajectory parameters in given ranges. Finally, the robustness of the impulsive control method is analyzed through Monte Carlo simulations while taking orbit determination error and thrust error into account.

  4. Relativistic equation of the orbit of a particle in a arbitrary central force field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, Francisc D.

    2005-01-01

    The equation of the orbit of a relativistic particle moving in an arbitrary central force field is derived. Straightforward generalizations of well-known first and second order differential equations are given. It is pointed out that the relativistic equation of the orbit has the same form as in the non-relativistic case, the only changes consisting in the appearance of additional terms proportional to 1/c 2 in both potential and total energies. (author)

  5. Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Guochang

    2008-01-01

    This is the first book of the satellite era which describes orbit theory with analytical solutions of the second order with respect to all possible disturbances. Based on such theory, the algorithms of orbits determination are completely revolutionized.

  6. Analysis of orbitally excited B-mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, Zoltan; Quast, Gunter

    2003-01-01

    This thesis reports on the study of orbitally excited B** mesons in DELPHI b-events taken in the years 1994 to 2000 with the DELPHI detector at the LEP collider. The analyses presented represent the result of applying much improved and extended techniques of spectroscopy since the first DELPHI publication in 1995. A major improvement has occurred in the area of particle identification, where a neural network approach has been implemented in the DELPHI software package. Developments in the area of neural networks have led to much improved enrichment of the excited B states. The Bˆ{**} neural networks identify, on a track-by-track basis, the decay pion/kaon originating from the Bˆ{**} decay, suppressing background and keeping signal events in an efficient way. To improve detector resolution, a further application of neural networks has been applied to reconstruct the underlying Q-value. The corresponding network gives a correction on existing measurements of the Q-value in the form of a probability density fu...

  7. ORBXYZ: a 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged-particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.V.; Cohen, R.H.; Ferguson, J.R.; Johnston, B.M.; Sharp, C.B.; Willmann, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, has been modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications. Many details pertaining to this code are given on microfiche accompanying this report

  8. Scattering phases for particles with nonzero orbital momenta and resonance regimes in the Pais approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruk, Yulii M; Voloshchuk, Aleksandr N

    2012-01-01

    The functional Pais equation for scattering phases with nonzero orbital momenta is solved in the case of low-energy particles. For short-range screened potentials, in particular, Yukawa or Thomas-Fermi potentials, the Pais equation is shown to reduce to transcendental equations. For the potentials varying ∼r - n , n > 0, simple algebraic equations are obtained for determining the phases δ l , l≠0. Possible applications of the Pais approximation to the problem of finding resonance regimes in the scattering of low-energy particles with nonzero orbital momenta are discussed. (methodological notes)

  9. Spin analysis of supersymmetric particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S.Y.; Martyn, H.U.

    2006-12-01

    The spin of supersymmetric particles can be determined at e + e - colliders unambiguously. This is demonstrated for a characteristic set of non-colored supersymmetric particles -- smuons, selectrons, and charginos/neutralinos. The analysis is based on the threshold behavior of the excitation curves for pair production in e + e - collisions, the angular distribution in the production process and decay angular distributions. In the first step we present the observables in the helicity formalism for the supersymmetric particles. Subsequently we confront the results with corresponding analyses of Kaluza-Klein particles in theories of universal extra space dimensions which behave distinctly different from supersymmetric theories. It is shown in the third step that a set of observables can be designed which signal the spin of supersymmetric particles unambiguously without any model assumptions. Finally in the fourth step it is demonstrated that the determination of the spin of supersymmetric particles can be performed experimentally in practice at an e + e - collider. (orig.)

  10. A new seniority scheme for non-degenerate single particle orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, T.; Arima, A.

    1978-01-01

    A new method is proposed in the treatment of the seniority scheme. The method enables one to evaluate analytically the contribution from J = 0 Cooper pairs in non-degenerate single-particle orbits to many-body matrix elements. It includes the SU(2) quasi-spin and the BCS approximation as two extreme limits. The effect of particle number conservation is properly taken into account. (Auth.)

  11. Closed orbit related problems: Correction, feedback, and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoki, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    Orbit correction - moving the orbit to a desired orbit, orbit stability - keeping the orbit on the desired orbit using feedback to filter out unwanted noise, and orbit analysis - to learn more about the model of the machine, are strongly interrelated. They are the three facets of the same problem. The better one knows the model of the machine, the better the predictions that can be made on the behavior of the machine (inverse modeling) and the more accurately one can control the machine. On the other hand, one of the tools to learn more about the machine (modeling) is to study and analyze the orbit response to open-quotes kicks.close quotes

  12. Orbital

    OpenAIRE

    Yourshaw, Matthew Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Orbital is a virtual reality gaming experience designed to explore the use of traditional narrative structure to enhance immersion in virtual reality. The story structure of Orbital was developed based on the developmental steps of 'The Hero's Journey,' a narrative pattern identified by Joseph Campbell. Using this standard narrative pattern, Orbital is capable of immersing the player quickly and completely for the entirety of play time. MFA

  13. Burn Delay Analysis of the Lunar Orbit Insertion for Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jonghee; Song, Young-Joo; Kim, Young-Rok; Kim, Bangyeop

    2017-12-01

    The first Korea lunar orbiter, Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO), has been in development since 2016. After launch, the KPLO will execute several maneuvers to enter into the lunar mission orbit, and will then perform lunar science missions for one year. Among these maneuvers, the lunar orbit insertion (LOI) is the most critical maneuver because the KPLO will experience an extreme velocity change in the presence of the Moon’s gravitational pull. However, the lunar orbiter may have a delayed LOI burn during operation due to hardware limitations and telemetry delays. This delayed burn could occur in different captured lunar orbits; in the worst case, the KPLO could fly away from the Moon. Therefore, in this study, the burn delay for the first LOI maneuver is analyzed to successfully enter the desired lunar orbit. Numerical simulations are performed to evaluate the difference between the desired and delayed lunar orbits due to a burn delay in the LOI maneuver. Based on this analysis, critical factors in the LOI maneuver, the periselene altitude and orbit period, are significantly changed and an additional delta-V in the second LOI maneuver is required as the delay burn interval increases to 10 min from the planned maneuver epoch.

  14. Orbital diamagnetism of a charged Brownian particle undergoing birth-death process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayannawar, A.M.; Kumar, N.

    1980-06-01

    We consider the magnetic response of a charged Brownian particle undergoing a stochastic birth-death process. The latter simulates the electron-hole pair production and recombination in semiconductors. We obtain non-zero, orbital diamagnetism which can be large without violating the Van Leeuwen theorem. (author)

  15. Orbital Evolution of Dust Particles in the Sublimation Zone near the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakova, L. I.; Demchenko, B. I.

    2018-03-01

    We have performed the calculations of the orbital evolution of dust particles from volcanic glass ( p-obsidian), basalt, astrosilicate, olivine, and pyroxene in the sublimation zone near the Sun. The sublimation (evaporation) rate is determined by the temperature of dust particles depending on their radius, material, and distance to the Sun. All practically important parameters that characterize the interaction of spherical dust particles with the radiation are calculated using the Mie theory. The influence of radiation and solar wind pressure, as well as the Poynting-Robertson drag force effects on the dust dynamics, are also taken into account. According to the observations (Shestakova and Demchenko, 2016), the boundary of the dust-free zone is 7.0-7.6 solar radii for standard particles of the zodiacal cloud and 9.1-9.2 solar radii for cometary particles. The closest agreement is obtained for basalt particles and certain kinds of olivine, pyroxene, and volcanic glass.

  16. Orbital single particle tracking on a commercial confocal microscope using piezoelectric stage feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzanò, L; Gratton, E

    2014-01-01

    Single Particle Tracking (SPT) is a technique used to locate fluorescent particles with nanometer precision. In the orbital tracking method the position of a particle is obtained analyzing the distribution of intensity along a circular orbit scanned around the particle. In combination with an active feedback this method allows tracking of particles in 2D and 3D with millisecond temporal resolution. Here we describe a SPT setup based on a feedback approach implemented with minimal modification of a commercially available confocal laser scanning microscope, the Zeiss LSM 510, in combination with an external piezoelectric stage scanner. The commercial microscope offers the advantage of a user-friendly software interface and pre-calibrated hardware components. The use of an external piezo-scanner allows the addition of feedback into the system but also represents a limitation in terms of its mechanical response. We describe in detail this implementation of the orbital tracking method and discuss advantages and limitations. As an example of application to live cell experiments we perform the 3D tracking of acidic vesicles in live polarized epithelial cells. (paper)

  17. Analytic robust stability analysis of SVD orbit feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Pfingstner, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Orbit feedback controllers are indispensable for the operation of modern particle accelerators. Many such controllers are based on the decoupling of the inputs and outputs of the system to be controlled with the help of the singular value decomposition (SVD controller). It is crucial to verify the stability of SVD controllers, also in the presence of mismatches between the used accelerator model and the real machine (robust stability problem). In this paper, analytical criteria for guaranteed stability margins of SVD orbit feedback systems for three different types of model mismatches are presented: scaling errors of actuators and BPMs (beam position monitors) and additive errors of the orbit response matrix. For the derivation of these criteria, techniques from robust control theory have been used, e.g the small gain theorem. The obtained criteria can be easily applied directly to other SVD orbit feedback systems. As an example, the criteria were applied to the orbit feedback system of the Compact Linear ...

  18. Asteroid orbital error analysis: Theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muinonen, K.; Bowell, Edward

    1992-01-01

    We present a rigorous Bayesian theory for asteroid orbital error estimation in which the probability density of the orbital elements is derived from the noise statistics of the observations. For Gaussian noise in a linearized approximation the probability density is also Gaussian, and the errors of the orbital elements at a given epoch are fully described by the covariance matrix. The law of error propagation can then be applied to calculate past and future positional uncertainty ellipsoids (Cappellari et al. 1976, Yeomans et al. 1987, Whipple et al. 1991). To our knowledge, this is the first time a Bayesian approach has been formulated for orbital element estimation. In contrast to the classical Fisherian school of statistics, the Bayesian school allows a priori information to be formally present in the final estimation. However, Bayesian estimation does give the same results as Fisherian estimation when no priori information is assumed (Lehtinen 1988, and reference therein).

  19. Neoclassical alpha-particle losses in tokamaks allowing for large orbit widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, M.; O'Brien, M.R.; Zaitsev, F.S.

    1994-01-01

    Alpha-particle physics is of particular importance now that research into controlled fusion has reached thermonuclear parameters and D-T fuel has been used in JET and TFTR. Here we address the important topic of α-particle transport: if transport is too low helium ash accumulates quenching the burn; if it is too high heating of the plasma by fast α-particles is insufficient to maintain the burn. We give results from simulations of α-particle distributions (f α ) which self-consistently treat α-particle birth, collisional slowing down and neoclassical radial transport. The (steady-state) f α is calculated by the FPP code as a function of speed (v), pitch-angle (θ) and flux surface radius (r). This code is based on a 3D Fokker-Planck theory of 'banana regime' neoclassical effects in tokamaks which can treat large deviations of fast ion orbits from flux surfaces and non-Maxwellian distributions. The code reproduces standard neoclassical results for Maxwellian distributions in the large aspect ratio (ε) and small orbit width (Δ) limits (e.g. radial fluxes, conductivities and bootstrap currents), but can also be used for small ε and large Δ which are difficult to treat analytically. The code is particularly useful for α-particle studies as (a) the experimental evidence is that fast ion transport is usually consistent with neoclassical theory, unlike electron or thermal ion transport, and (b) trapped fast ion orbits can deviate greatly from flux surfaces. An alternative to this Fokker-Planck treatment is Monte Carlo modelling. However, representation of the detailed structure of f α (θ,v,r) would require very large number of particles, and hence be very slow. Calculations have been made for parameters typical of TFTR, JET, SSTR (an 'advanced tokamak' reactor) and STR (a tight aspect ratio or 'spherical' tokamak reactor, though only the JET results are discussed in detail. (author) 4 refs., 4 figs

  20. Lunar Regolith Particle Shape Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekhaefer, Rebecca; Hardy, Sandra; Rickman, Douglas; Edmunson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Future engineering of structures and equipment on the lunar surface requires significant understanding of particle characteristics of the lunar regolith. Nearly all sediment characteristics are influenced by particle shape; therefore a method of quantifying particle shape is useful both in lunar and terrestrial applications. We have created a method to quantify particle shape, specifically for lunar regolith, using image processing. Photomicrographs of thin sections of lunar core material were obtained under reflected light. Three photomicrographs were analyzed using ImageJ and MATLAB. From the image analysis measurements for area, perimeter, Feret diameter, orthogonal Feret diameter, Heywood factor, aspect ratio, sieve diameter, and sieve number were recorded. Probability distribution functions were created from the measurements of Heywood factor and aspect ratio.

  1. Feasibility analysis of cislunar flight using the Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Davy A.

    1991-01-01

    A first order orbital mechanics analysis was conducted to examine the possibility of utilizing the Space Shuttle Orbiter to perform payload delivery missions to lunar orbit. In the analysis, the earth orbit of departure was constrained to be that of Space Station Freedom. Furthermore, no enhancements of the Orbiter's thermal protection system were assumed. Therefore, earth orbit insertion maneuvers were constrained to be all propulsive. Only minimal constraints were placed on the lunar orbits and no consideration was given to possible landing sites for lunar surface payloads. The various phases and maneuvers of the mission are discussed for both a conventional (Apollo type) and an unconventional mission profile. The velocity impulses needed, and the propellant masses required are presented for all of the mission maneuvers. Maximum payload capabilities were determined for both of the mission profiles examined. In addition, other issues relating to the feasibility of such lunar shuttle missions are discussed. The results of the analysis indicate that the Shuttle Orbiter would be a poor vehicle for payload delivery missions to lunar orbit.

  2. Circular orbits and acceleration of particles by near-extremal dirty rotating black holes: general approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaslavskii, Oleg B

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect of collisions of ultrahigh energy particles near the black hole horizon (BSW effect) for two scenarios: when one of the particles either (i) moves on a circular orbit or (ii) plunges from it toward the horizon. It is shown that such circular near-horizon orbits can exist for near-extremal black holes only. This includes the innermost stable orbit (ISCO), marginally bound orbit (MBO) and photon one (PhO). We consider generic ‘dirty’ rotating black holes not specifying the metric and show that the energy in the center-of-mass frame has the universal scaling dependence on the surface gravity κ. Namely, E c.m. ∼ κ −n where for the ISCO, n= 1/3 in case (i) or n= 1/2 in case (ii). For the MBO and PhCO, n= 1/2 in both scenarios that agrees with recent calculations of Harada and Kimura for the Kerr metric. We also generalize the Grib and Pavlov observations made for the Kerr metric. The magnitude of the BSW effect on the location of collision has a somewhat paradoxical character: it decreases when approaching the horizon. (paper)

  3. Circular orbits and acceleration of particles by near-extremal dirty rotating black holes: general approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2012-10-01

    We study the effect of collisions of ultrahigh energy particles near the black hole horizon (BSW effect) for two scenarios: when one of the particles either (i) moves on a circular orbit or (ii) plunges from it toward the horizon. It is shown that such circular near-horizon orbits can exist for near-extremal black holes only. This includes the innermost stable orbit (ISCO), marginally bound orbit (MBO) and photon one (PhO). We consider generic ‘dirty’ rotating black holes not specifying the metric and show that the energy in the center-of-mass frame has the universal scaling dependence on the surface gravity κ. Namely, Ec.m. ˜ κ-n where for the ISCO, n=\\frac{1}{3} in case (i) or n=\\frac{1}{2} in case (ii). For the MBO and PhCO, n=\\frac{1}{2} in both scenarios that agrees with recent calculations of Harada and Kimura for the Kerr metric. We also generalize the Grib and Pavlov observations made for the Kerr metric. The magnitude of the BSW effect on the location of collision has a somewhat paradoxical character: it decreases when approaching the horizon.

  4. Local time asymmetry of Pc 4--5 pulsations and associated particle modulations at synchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubun, S.; Erickson, K.N.; Fritz, T.A.; McPherron, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic field and particle flux observations on board ATS 6 at synchronous altitude are used to examine the dawn-dusk asymmetry of characteristics of Pc 4--5 waves and associated particle flux modulation. Most waves at synchronous orbit having ground correlations are polarized in the azimuthal direction (A class) and are usually detected in the dawn sector. Waves with a radially oriented polarization ellipse (R-class) are almost never observed near the subsatellite point on the ground, except for the regular pulsations known as giant pulsation Pg, observed in the early morning. R class Pc 4 waves occur at all local times and have an occurrence peak in the afternoon

  5. Electromagnetic spin–orbit interaction and giant spin-Hall effect in dielectric particle clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yineng [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang, Xiangdong, E-mail: zhangxd@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics and Beijing Key Laboratory of Nanophotonics and Ultrafine Optoelectronic Systems, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081, Beijing (China)

    2013-12-09

    We report a phenomenon that electromagnetic spin–orbit interactions can be tailored by dielectric nanoparticles, and self-similar giant spin-Hall effect has been observed in the dielectric particle cluster. The near-field phase singularities and phase vorticity in the longitudinal component of scattered field can also be controlled by such a dielectric structure. The origin of phenomena is believed to be due to the collective resonance excitation in the dielectric particle cluster. It is expected to find applications in optics information processing and designing new nanophotonic devices.

  6. Spin flip due to the spin–orbit interaction of colliding slow charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasorov, P. V.; Fomin, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    The scattering amplitudes of point charged particles is calculated analytically taking into account the spin–orbit interaction. We have considered two cases typical of a hydrogen-like plasma: scattering of an electron by a heavy ion and scattering of an electron by a free electron. The results have been obtained taking into account the ranges of low collision energies smaller than α"2m_ec"2, where α is the fine structure constant.

  7. Analysis of plasma equilibrium based on orbit-driven current density profile in steady-state plasma on QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K., E-mail: nakamura@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Alam, M.M. [IGSES, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Jiang, Y.Z. [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Mitarai, O. [Tokai University, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Kurihara, K.; Kawamata, Y.; Sueoka, M.; Takechi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Hasegawa, M.; Tokunaga, K.; Araki, K.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Nagata, T. [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • High energy particle guiding center orbit is calculated as a contour plot of conserved variable. • Current density profile is analyzed based on the orbit-driven current. • Plasma equilibrium is reconstructed by considering the hollow current profile. - Abstract: In the present RF-driven (ECCD) steady-state plasma on QUEST (B{sub t} = 0.25 T, R = 0.68 m, a = 0.40 m), plasma current seems to flow in the open magnetic surface outside of the closed magnetic surface in the low-field region according to plasma current fitting (PCF) method. We consider that the current in the open magnetic surface is due to orbit-driven current by high-energy particles in RF-driven plasma. So based on the analysis of current density profile based on the orbit-driven current, plasma equilibrium is to be calculated. We calculated high energy particles guiding center orbits as a contour plot of conserved variable in Hamiltonian formulation and considered particles initial position with different levels of energy and pitch angles that satisfy resonance condition. Then the profile of orbit-driven current is estimated by multiplying the particle density on the resonance surface and the velocity on the orbits. This analysis shows negative current near the magnetic axis and hollow current profile is expected even if pressure driven current is considered. Considering the hollow current profile shifted toward the low-field region, the equilibrium is fitted by J-EFIT coded by MATLAB.

  8. A Ballistic Limit Analysis Program for Shielding Against Micrometeoroids and Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Erie

    2010-01-01

    A software program has been developed that enables the user to quickly and simply perform ballistic limit calculations for common spacecraft structures that are subject to hypervelocity impact of micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) projectiles. This analysis program consists of two core modules: design, and; performance. The design module enables a user to calculate preliminary dimensions of a shield configuration (e.g., thicknesses/areal densities, spacing, etc.) for a ?design? particle (diameter, density, impact velocity, incidence). The performance module enables a more detailed shielding analysis, providing the performance of a user-defined shielding configuration over the range of relevant in-orbit impact conditions.

  9. AGS - The ISR computer program for synchrotron design, orbit analysis and insertion matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keil, E.; Marti, Y.; Montague, B.W.; Sudboe, A.

    1975-01-01

    This is a detailed guide to the use of the current version of a FORTRAN program for carrying out computations required in the design or modification of alternating-gradient synchrotrons and storage rings. The program, which runs on the CDC 7600 computer at CERN, computes linear transformation functions, and modifications of parameters to achieve specified properties; it tracks sets of particle trajectories, finds closed orbits when elements of the structure are displaced, computes the equilibrium orbit, designs closed-orbit bumps, tracks betatron functions through the structure, and matches insertions in the structure to specified betatron and dispersion functions. The report supersedes CERN 69-5 (AGS - The ISR computer system for synchrotron design and orbit analysis, by E. Keil and P. Strolin). (Author)

  10. Orbiter CCTV video signal noise analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, R. M.; Blanke, L. R.; Pannett, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    The amount of steady state and transient noise which will couple to orbiter CCTV video signal wiring is predicted. The primary emphasis is on the interim system, however, some predictions are made concerning the operational system wiring in the cabin area. Noise sources considered are RF fields from on board transmitters, precipitation static, induced lightning currents, and induced noise from adjacent wiring. The most significant source is noise coupled to video circuits from associated circuits in common connectors. Video signal crosstalk is the primary cause of steady state interference, and mechanically switched control functions cause the largest induced transients.

  11. Many-body calculations with deuteron based single-particle bases and their associated natural orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddu, G.

    2018-06-01

    We use the recently introduced single-particle states obtained from localized deuteron wave-functions as a basis for nuclear many-body calculations. We show that energies can be substantially lowered if the natural orbits (NOs) obtained from this basis are used. We use this modified basis for {}10{{B}}, {}16{{O}} and {}24{{Mg}} employing the bare NNLOopt nucleon–nucleon interaction. The lowering of the energies increases with the mass. Although in principle NOs require a full scale preliminary many-body calculation, we found that an approximate preliminary many-body calculation, with a marginal increase in the computational cost, is sufficient. The use of natural orbits based on an harmonic oscillator basis leads to a much smaller lowering of the energies for a comparable computational cost.

  12. Measurement of particle directions in low earth orbit with a Timepix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohl, St.; Bergmann, B.; Granja, C.; Pichotka, M.; Polansky, S.; Pospisil, S.; Owens, A.

    2016-01-01

    In Low Earth Orbit (LEO) in space electronic equipment aboard satellites and space crews are exposed to high ionizing radiation levels. To reduce radiation damage and the exposure of astronauts, to improve shielding and to assess dose levels, it is valuable to know the composition of the radiation fields and particle directions. The presented measurements are carried out with the Space Application of Timepix Radiation Monitor (SATRAM). There, a Timepix detector (300 μm thick silicon sensor, pixel pitch 55 μm, 256 × 256 pixels) is attached to the Proba-V, an earth observing satellite of the European Space Agency (ESA). The Timepix detector's capability was used to determine the directions of energetic charged particles and their corresponding stopping powers. Data are continuously taken at an altitude of 820 km on a sun-synchronous orbit. The particles pitch angles with respect to the sensor layer were measured and converted to an Earth Centred Earth Fixed (ECEF) coordinate system. Deviations from an isotropic field are extracted by normalization of the observed angular distributions by a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation —taking the systematics of the reconstruction algorithm and the pixelation into account.

  13. Economic analysis requirements in support of orbital debris regulatory policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joel S.

    1996-10-01

    As the number of Earth orbiting objects increases so does the potential for generating orbital debris with the consequent increase in the likelihood of impacting and damaging operating satellites. Various debris remediation approaches are being considered that encompass both in-orbit and return-to-Earth schema and have varying degrees of operations, cost, international competitiveness, and safety implications. Because of the diversity of issues, concerns and long-term impacts, there is a clear need for the setting of government policies that will lead to an orderly abatement of the potential orbital debris hazards. These policies may require the establishment of a supportive regulatory regime. The Department of Transportation is likely to have regulatory responsibilities relating to orbital debris stemming from its charge to protect the public health and safety, safety of property, and national security interests and foreign policy interests of the United States. This paper describes DOT's potential regulatory role relating to orbital debris remediation, the myriad of issues concerning the need for establishing government policies relating to orbital debris remediation and their regulatory implications, the proposed technological solutions and their economic and safety implications. Particular emphasis is placed upon addressing cost-effectiveness and economic analyses as they relate to economic impact analysis in support of regulatory impact analysis.

  14. AMS_02 Particle Physics Detector Technologies Orbiting the Earth (2/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    AMS-02 has taken the high performance technologies used in particle physics and implemented them for use in low Earth orbit. Safety aspects for the Space Shuttle flight, that carried AMS_02 to the International Space Station, Space environment and inaccessibility during the life of AMS_02 are some of the aspects which have driven the design of the experiment. The technical challenges to build such a detector have been surmounted through the close collaboration amongst the AMS scientists and industries around the world. Their efforts have resulted in the development of new technologies and higher standards of precision.

  15. AMS_02 Particle Physics Detector Technologies Orbiting the Earth (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    AMS-02 has taken the high performance technologies used in particle physics and implemented them for use in low Earth orbit. Safety aspects for the Space Shuttle flight, that carried AMS_02 to the International Space Station, Space environment and inaccessibility during the life of AMS_02 are some of the aspects which have driven the design of the experiment. The technical challenges to build such a detector have been surmounted through the close collaboration amongst the AMS scientists and industries around the world. Their efforts have resulted in the development of new technologies and higher standards of precision.

  16. Spectral Gaps of Spin-orbit Coupled Particles in Deformed Traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    V. Marchukov, O.; G. Volosniev, A.; V. Fedorov, D.

    2013-01-01

    the spectrum. The effect of a Zeeman term is also considered. Our results demonstrate that variable spectral gaps occur as a function of strength of the Rashba interaction and deformation of the harmonic trapping potential. The single-particle density of states and the critical strength for superfluidity vary...... tremendously with the interaction parameter. The strong variations with Rashba coupling and deformation implies that the few- and many-body physics of spin-orbit coupled systems can be manipulated by variation of these parameters....

  17. Nuclear propulsion systems for orbit transfer based on the particle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Horn, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    The technology of nuclear direct propulsion orbit transfer systems based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is described. A 200 megawatt illustrative design is presented for LEO to GEO and other high ΔV missions. The PBR-NOTV can be used in a one-way mode with the shuttle or an expendable launch vehicle, e.g., the Titan 34D7, or as a two-way reusable space tug. In the one-way mode, payload capacity is almost three times greater than that of chemical OTV's. PBR technology status is described and development needs outlined

  18. Exploring one-particle orbitals in large many-body localized systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalonga, Benjamin; Yu, Xiongjie; Luitz, David J.; Clark, Bryan K.

    2018-03-01

    Strong disorder in interacting quantum systems can give rise to the phenomenon of many-body localization (MBL), which defies thermalization due to the formation of an extensive number of quasilocal integrals of motion. The one-particle operator content of these integrals of motion is related to the one-particle orbitals (OPOs) of the one-particle density matrix and shows a strong signature across the MBL transition as recently pointed out by Bera et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 046603 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.046603; Ann. Phys. 529, 1600356 (2017), 10.1002/andp.201600356]. We study the properties of the OPOs of many-body eigenstates of an MBL system in one dimension. Using shift-and-invert MPS, a matrix product state method to target highly excited many-body eigenstates introduced previously [Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 017201 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.017201], we are able to obtain accurate results for large systems of sizes up to L =64 . We find that the OPOs drawn from eigenstates at different energy densities have high overlap and their occupations are correlated with the energy of the eigenstates. Moreover, the standard deviation of the inverse participation ratio of these orbitals is maximal at the nose of the mobility edge. Also, the OPOs decay exponentially in real space, with a correlation length that increases at low disorder. In addition, we find that the probability distribution of the strength of the large-range coupling constants of the number operators generated by the OPOs approach a log-uniform distribution at strong disorder.

  19. The Thermal Expansion of Ring Particles and the Secular Orbital Evolution of Rings Around Planets and Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The thermal expansion and contraction of ring particles orbiting a planet or asteroid can cause secular orbit evolution. This effect, called here the thermal expansion effect, depends on ring particles entering and exiting the shadow of the body they orbit. A particle cools off in the shadow and heats up again in the sunshine, suffering thermal contraction and expansion. The changing cross-section it presents to solar radiation pressure plus time lags due to thermal inertia lead to a net along-track force. The effect causes outward drift for rocky particles. For the equatorial orbits considered here, the thermal expansion effect is larger than Poynting-Robertson drag in the inner solar system for particles in the size range approx. 0.001 - 0.02 m. This leads to a net increase in the semimajor axis from the two opposing effects at rates ranging from approx. 0.1 R per million years for Mars to approx. 1 R per million years for Mercury, for distances approx. 2R from the body, where R is the body's radius. Asteroid 243 Ida has approx. 10 R per million years, while a hypothetical Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) can have faster rates of approx. 0.5 R per thousand years, due chiefly to its small radius compared to the planets. The thermal expansion effect weakens greatly at Jupiter and is overwhelmed by Poynting-Robertson for icy particles orbiting Saturn. Meteoroids in eccentric orbits about the Sun also suffer the thermal expansion effect, but with only approx. 0.0003e2 AU change in semimajor axis over a million years for a 2 m meteoroid orbiting between Mercury and Earth.

  20. Some exact identities connecting one- and two-particle Green's functions in spin-orbit coupling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Huatong

    2007-01-01

    Some exact identities connecting one- and two-particle Green's functions in the presence of spin-orbit coupling have been derived. These identities are similar to the Ward identity in usual quantum transport theory of electrons. A satisfying approximate calculation of the spin transport in spin-orbit coupling system should also preserve these identities, just as the Ward identities should be remained in the usual electronic transport theory

  1. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yun

    2015-11-21

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam–beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam–beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam–beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this paper, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  2. SimTrack: A compact c++ library for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yun [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    SimTrack is a compact c++ library of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam-beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam-beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam-beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  3. Thermal stresses in the space shuttle orbiter: Analysis versus test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grooms, H.R.; Gibson, W.F. Jr.; Benson, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    Significant temperature differences occur between the internal structure and the outer skin of the Space Shuttle Orbiter as it returns from space. These temperature differences cause important thermal stresses. A finite element model containing thousands of degrees of freedom is used to predict these stresses. A ground test was performed to verify the prediction method. The analysis and test results compare favorably. (orig.)

  4. An analysis of the orbital distribution of solid rocket motor slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Matthew F.; Mulrooney, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The contribution by solid rocket motors (SRMs) to the orbital debris environment is potentially significant and insufficiently studied. Design and combustion processes can lead to the emission of enough by-products to warrant assessment of their contribution to orbital debris. These particles are formed during SRM tail-off, or burn termination, by the rapid solidification of molten Al2O3 slag accumulated during the burn. The propensity of SRMs to generate particles larger than 100μm raises concerns regarding the debris environment. Sizes as large as 1 cm have been witnessed in ground tests, and comparable sizes have been estimated via observations of sub-orbital tail-off events. Utilizing previous research we have developed more sophisticated size distributions and modeled the time evolution of resultant orbital populations using a historical database of SRM launches, propellant, and likely location and time of tail-off. This analysis indicates that SRM ejecta is a significant component of the debris environment.

  5. Charged-particle activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweikert, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses the methodology and application of nuclear activation with ion beams (1 9 via 16 O( 3 He,p) 18 F, 12 C( 3 He,α) 11 C and 14 N(p,α) 11 C respectively. Recently, triton activation has been shown to be inherently still superior to 3 He activation for the determination of oxygen [ 16 O( 3 H,n) 18 F]. Lithium, boron, carbon and sulphur can be detected rapidly, nondestructively and with high sensitivity (approximately 0.25ppm for Li and B) via ''quasi-prompt'' activation based on the detection of short-lived, high-energy beta emitters (10ms 1 H( 7 Li,n) 7 Be for example. Nondestructive multielement analysis: Proton activation has the inherent potential for meeting requirements of broad elemental coverage, sensitivity (ppm and sub-ppm range) and selectivity. Up to 30 elements have been determined in Al, Co, Ag, Nb, Rh, Ta and biological samples, using 12-MeV proton activation followed by gamma-ray spectrometry. These capabilities are further enhanced with the counting of X-ray emitters, 28 elements (26 9 ) and accuracy using proton activation. 204 Pb/ 206 Pb ratios can also be determined with a relative precision of a few per cent. Although charged-particle activation analysis is a well-established trace analysis technique, broad potential capabilities remain to be explored, e.g. those arising from ultrashort-lived nuclides, heavy ion interactions and the combination of delayed and prompt methods. (author)

  6. Particle orbits and non-ideal MHD stability of Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, M.

    1987-01-01

    Particle orbits in a linear EXTRAP vacuum magnetic field configuration are computed. The results indicate that, with an applied electric field along the axis, the particles starting near the magnetic stagnation line would gain substantial energy in the 'free fall', and are the most efficient ones to participate in the ionization process. The acquired energy depends on the electric field strength; the required value of the field is determined. The influence of the pressure anisotropy on the small wavelength internal kink (m=1) mode instability in a Z-pinch, using a generalization of Freidbergs perpendicular MHD model, is investigated. It is found that the stability criterion can not be fulfilled without violation of the fire hose stability condition. This investigation is also performed using the double-adiabatic theory. A finite Larmor radius treatment of the small wavelength kink instabilities for a Z-pinch geometry is presented. It is shown that, when the gyroviscosity is included in the perpendicular MHD model, exponentially growing Alfven waves are predicted even in a homogeneous static equilibrium with isotropic plasma pressure. The Hall effect in the incompressible Hall fluid model is considered. It is found that the Hall parameter reduces the growth rates of the kink modes, but it does not yield complete stabilization (author)

  7. Particle orbits and non-ideal MHD stability of Z-pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghihi, M.

    1987-01-01

    Particle orbits in a linear EXTRAP vacuum magnetic field configuration are computed. The results indicate that, with an applied electric field along the axis, the particles starting near the magnetic stagnation line would gain substantial energy in the 'free fall', and are the most efficient ones to participate in the ionization process. The acquired energy depends on the electric field strength; the required value of the field is determined. The influence of the pressure anisotropy on the small wavelength internal kink (m=1) mode instability in a Z-pinch, using a generalization of Freidbergs perpendicular MHD model, is investigated. It is found that the stability criterion can not be fulfilled without violation of the fire hose stability condition. This investigation is also performed using the double-adiabatic theory. A finite Larmor radius treatment of the small wavelength kink instabilities for a Z-pinch geometry is presented. It is shown that, when the gyroviscosity is included in the perpendicular MHD model, exponentially growing Alfven waves are predicted even in a homogeneous static equilibrium with isotropic plasma pressure. The Hall effect in the incompressible Hall fluid model is considered. It is found that the Hall parameter reduces the growth rates of the kink modes, but it does not yield complete stabilization

  8. Analysis of radiation damage in on-orbit solar array of Venus explorer Akatsuki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Takanobu; Takahashi, You; Imamura, Takeshi; Hada, Yuko; Ishii, Takako T.; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Shiota, Daikou

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of radiation damage in solar array of Venus explorer Akatsuki observed on orbit. The output voltage of the solar array have shown sudden drops, which are most reasonably associated with radiation damage, three times since its launch. The analysis of these radiation damages is difficult, because no direct observation data of the spectra and the amount of the high-energy particles is available. We calculated the radiation damage using the relative damage coefficient (RDC) method assuming a typical spectral shape of protons. (author)

  9. The problems of cosmic ray particle simulation for the near-Earth orbital and interplanetary flight conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nymmik, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    A wide range of the galactic cosmic ray and SEP event flux simulation problems for the near-Earth satellite and manned spacecraft orbits and for the interplanetary mission trajectories are discussed. The models of the galactic cosmic ray and SEP events in the Earth orbit beyond the Earth's magnetosphere are used as a basis. The particle fluxes in the near-Earth orbits should be calculated using the transmission functions. To calculate the functions, the dependences of the cutoff rigidities on the magnetic disturbance level and on magnetic local time have to be known. In the case of space flights towards the Sun and to the boundary of the solar system, particular attention is paid to the changes in the SEP event occurrence frequency and size. The particle flux gradients are applied in this case to galactic cosmic ray fluxes

  10. An LDEF 2 dust instrument for discrimination between orbital debris and natural particles in near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Simpson, J. A.; Mckibben, R. B.; Voss, H. D.; Gursky, H.

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of a space dust instrument which would be ideally suited to carry out near-Earth dust measurements on a possible Long Duraction Exposure Facility reflight mission (LDEF 2) is discussed. As a model for the trajectory portion of the instrument proposed for LDEF 2, the characteristics of a SPAce DUSt instrument (SPADUS) currently under development for flight on the USA ARGOS mission to measure the flux, mass, velocity, and trajectory of near-Earth dust is summarized. Since natural (cosmic) dust and man-made dust particles (orbital debris) have different velocity and trajectory distributions, they are distinguished by means of the SPADUS velocity/trajectory information. The SPADUS measurements will cover the dust mass range approximately 5 x 10(exp -12) g (2 microns diameter) to approximately 1 x 10(exp -5) g (200 microns diameter), with an expected mean error in particle trajectory of approximately 7 deg (isotropic flux). Arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the trajectory instrumentation would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust. The SPADUS measurement principles, characteristics, its role in the ARGOS mission, and its application to an LDEF 2 mission are summarized.

  11. Mission Analysis and Orbit Control of Interferometric Wheel Formation Flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourcade, J.

    Flying satellite in formation requires maintaining the specific relative geometry of the spacecraft with high precision. This requirement raises new problem of orbit control. This paper presents the results of the mission analysis of a low Earth observation system, the interferometric wheel, patented by CNES. This wheel is made up of three receiving spacecraft, which follow an emitting Earth observation radar satellite. The first part of this paper presents trades off which were performed to choose orbital elements of the formation flying which fulfils all constraints. The second part presents orbit positioning strategies including reconfiguration of the wheel to change its size. The last part describes the station keeping of the formation. Two kinds of constraints are imposed by the interferometric system : a constraint on the distance between the wheel and the radar satellite, and constraints on the distance between the wheel satellites. The first constraint is fulfilled with a classical chemical station keeping strategy. The second one is fulfilled using pure passive actuators. Due to the high stability of the relative eccentricity of the formation, only the relative semi major axis had to be controlled. Differential drag due to differential attitude motion was used to control relative altitude. An autonomous orbit controller was developed and tested. The final accuracy is a relative station keeping better than few meters for a wheel size of one kilometer.

  12. Attitude control analysis of tethered de-orbiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, T. V.; Briz Valero, José Francisco; Escorial Olmos, Diego; Lappas, V.; Jakowski, P.; Gray, I.; Tsourdos, A.; Schaub, H.; Biesbroek, R.

    2018-05-01

    The increase of satellites and rocket upper stages in low earth orbit (LEO) has also increased substantially the danger of collisions in space. Studies have shown that the problem will continue to grow unless a number of debris are removed every year. A typical active debris removal (ADR) mission scenario includes launching an active spacecraft (chaser) which will rendezvous with the inactive target (debris), capture the debris and eventually deorbit both satellites. Many concepts for the capture of the debris while keeping a connection via a tether, between the target and chaser have been investigated, including harpoons, nets, grapples and robotic arms. The paper provides an analysis on the attitude control behaviour for a tethered de-orbiting mission based on the ESA e.Deorbit reference mission, where Envisat is the debris target to be captured by a chaser using a net which is connected to the chaser with a tether. The paper provides novel insight on the feasibility of tethered de-orbiting for the various mission phases such as stabilization after capture, de-orbit burn (plus stabilization), stabilization during atmospheric pass, highlighting the importance of various critical mission parameters such as the tether material. It is shown that the selection of the appropriate tether material while using simple controllers can reduce the effort needed for tethered deorbiting and can safely control the attitude of the debris/chaser connected with a tether, without the danger of a collision.

  13. Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Keng C.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge. The Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLE IDS) and the Impact Analysis Process are also described to monitor WLE debris threats. The contents include: 1) Risk Management via SHM; 2) Hardware Overview; 3) Instrumentation; 4) Sensor Configuration; 5) Debris Hazard Monitoring; 6) Ascent Response Summary; 7) Response Signal; 8) Distribution of Flight Indications; 9) Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA); 10) Model Correlation; 11) Impact Tests; 12) Wing Leading Edge Modeling; 13) Ascent Debris PRA Results; and 14) MM/OD PRA Results.

  14. Analysis of orbit determination from Earth-based tracking for relay satellites in a perturbed areostationary orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, P.; Pablos, B.; Barderas, G.

    2017-07-01

    Areostationary satellites are considered a high interest group of satellites to satisfy the telecommunications needs of the foreseen missions to Mars. An areostationary satellite, in an areoequatorial circular orbit with a period of 1 Martian sidereal day, would orbit Mars remaining at a fixed location over the Martian surface, analogous to a geostationary satellite around the Earth. This work addresses an analysis of the perturbed orbital motion of an areostationary satellite as well as a preliminary analysis of the aerostationary orbit estimation accuracy based on Earth tracking observations. First, the models for the perturbations due to the Mars gravitational field, the gravitational attraction of the Sun and the Martian moons, Phobos and Deimos, and solar radiation pressure are described. Then, the observability from Earth including possible occultations by Mars of an areostationary satellite in a perturbed areosynchronous motion is analyzed. The results show that continuous Earth-based tracking is achievable using observations from the three NASA Deep Space Network Complexes in Madrid, Goldstone and Canberra in an occultation-free scenario. Finally, an analysis of the orbit determination accuracy is addressed considering several scenarios including discontinuous tracking schedules for different epochs and different areoestationary satellites. Simulations also allow to quantify the aerostationary orbit estimation accuracy for various tracking series durations and observed orbit arc-lengths.

  15. Low-voltage Power Supply Subsystem for a Sub-Orbital Particle Physic Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Hugo Silva Lopez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese Experiment Module–Extreme Universe Space Observatory (JEM-EUSO is a wide-field (+/-~30°of aperture 2.5m refractor telescope to be installed in the International Space Station (ISS. The instrument looks downward from its orbit, into Earth’s atmosphere, with the main objective of observing ultra-violet (UV fluorescence light generated by Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR extensive air showers (EAS. It is a frontier particle-physics experiment, the first of its kind. The validation of the technical readiness level of such a complex and unique instrument requires prototypes at several levels of integration. At the highest level, the EUSO-Balloon instrument has been conceived, through French space agency (CNES. At a smaller scale and in suborbital flight, EUSO-Balloon integrates all the sub-systems of the full space JEM-EUSO telescope, allowing end-to-end testing of hardware and interfaces, and to probing the global detection chain and strategy, while improving at the same time our knowledge of atmospheric and terrestrial UV background. EUSO-Balloon will be flown by CNES for the first time from Timmins, Canada; on spring 2014.This article presents the low-voltage power supply (LVPS subsystem development for the EUSO-Balloon instrument. This LVPS is the fully operational prototype for the space instrument JEM-EUSO. Besides design and construction, all performance tests and integration results with the other involved subsystems are shown.

  16. Los Alamos geostationary orbit synoptic data set: a compilation of energetic particle data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Higbie, P.R.; Belian, R.D.; Aiello, W.P.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Tech, E.R.; Halbig, M.F.; Payne, J.B.; Robinson, R.; Kedge, S.

    1981-08-01

    Energetic electron (30 to 2000 keV) and proton (145 keV to 150 MeV) measurements made by Los Alamos National Laboratory sensors at geostationary orbit 6.6 R/sub E/ are summarized. The data are plotted in terms of daily average spectra, 3-h local time averages, and in a variety of statistical formats. The data summarize conditions from mid-1976 through 1978 (S/C 1976-059) and from early 1977 through 1978 (S/C 1977-007). The compilations correspond to measurements at 35 0 W, 70 0 W, and 135 0 W geographic longitude and, thus, are indicative of conditions at 9 0 , 11 0 , and 4.8 0 geomagnetic latitude, respectively. Most of this report is comprised of data plots that are organized according to Carrington solar rotations so that the data can be easily compared to solar rotation-dependent interplanetary data. As shown in prior studies, variations in solar wind conditions modulate particle intensity within the terrestrial magnetosphere. The effects of these variations are demonstrated and discussed. Potential uses of the Synoptic Data Set by the scientific and applications-oriented communities are also discussed

  17. Analysis of Errors in a Special Perturbations Satellite Orbit Propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckerman, M.; Jones, J.P.

    1999-02-01

    We performed an analysis of error densities for the Special Perturbations orbit propagator using data for 29 satellites in orbits of interest to Space Shuttle and International Space Station collision avoidance. We find that the along-track errors predominate. These errors increase monotonically over each 36-hour prediction interval. The predicted positions in the along-track direction progressively either leap ahead of or lag behind the actual positions. Unlike the along-track errors the radial and cross-track errors oscillate about their nearly zero mean values. As the number of observations per fit interval decline the along-track prediction errors, and amplitudes of the radial and cross-track errors, increase.

  18. Chemical bonding analysis for solid-state systems using intrinsic oriented quasiatomic minimal-basis-set orbitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.X.; Wang, C.Z.; Ho, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    A chemical bonding scheme is presented for the analysis of solid-state systems. The scheme is based on the intrinsic oriented quasiatomic minimal-basis-set orbitals (IO-QUAMBOs) previously developed by Ivanic and Ruedenberg for molecular systems. In the solid-state scheme, IO-QUAMBOs are generated by a unitary transformation of the quasiatomic orbitals located at each site of the system with the criteria of maximizing the sum of the fourth power of interatomic orbital bond order. Possible bonding and antibonding characters are indicated by the single particle matrix elements, and can be further examined by the projected density of states. We demonstrate the method by applications to graphene and (6,0) zigzag carbon nanotube. The oriented-orbital scheme automatically describes the system in terms of sp 2 hybridization. The effect of curvature on the electronic structure of the zigzag carbon nanotube is also manifested in the deformation of the intrinsic oriented orbitals as well as a breaking of symmetry leading to nonzero single particle density matrix elements. In an additional study, the analysis is performed on the Al 3 V compound. The main covalent bonding characters are identified in a straightforward way without resorting to the symmetry analysis. Our method provides a general way for chemical bonding analysis of ab initio electronic structure calculations with any type of basis sets.

  19. Enumeration and stability analysis of simple periodic orbits in β-Fermi Pasta Ulam lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonone, Rupali L.; Jain, Sudhir R.

    2014-01-01

    We study the well-known one-dimensional problem of N particles with a nonlinear interaction. The special case of quadratic and quartic interaction potential among nearest neighbours is the β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model. We enumerate and classify the simple periodic orbits for this system and find the stability zones, employing Floquet theory. Such stability analysis is crucial to understand the transition of FPU lattice from recurrences to globally chaotic behavior, energy transport in lower dimensional system, dynamics of optical lattices and also its impact on shape parameter of bio-polymers such as DNA and RNA

  20. Enumeration and stability analysis of simple periodic orbits in β-Fermi Pasta Ulam lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonone, Rupali L., E-mail: vaidehisonone@gmail.com; Jain, Sudhir R., E-mail: vaidehisonone@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune-411007, India and Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai - 400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We study the well-known one-dimensional problem of N particles with a nonlinear interaction. The special case of quadratic and quartic interaction potential among nearest neighbours is the β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model. We enumerate and classify the simple periodic orbits for this system and find the stability zones, employing Floquet theory. Such stability analysis is crucial to understand the transition of FPU lattice from recurrences to globally chaotic behavior, energy transport in lower dimensional system, dynamics of optical lattices and also its impact on shape parameter of bio-polymers such as DNA and RNA.

  1. Scout: orbit analysis and hazard assessment for NEOCP objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnocchia, Davide; Chesley, Steven R.; Chamberlin, Alan B.

    2016-10-01

    It typically takes a few days for a newly discovered asteroid to be officially recognized as a real object. During this time, the tentative discovery is published on the Minor Planet Center's Near-Earth Object Confirmation Page (NEOCP) until additional observations confirm that the object is a real asteroid rather than an observational artifact or an artificial object. Also, NEOCP objects could have a limited observability window and yet be scientifically interesting, e.g., radar and lightcurve targets, mini-moons (temporary Earth captures), mission accessible targets, close approachers or even impactors. For instance, the only two asteroids discovered before an impact, 2008 TC3 and 2014 AA, both reached the Earth less than a day after discovery. For these reasons we developed Scout, an automated system that provides an orbital and hazard assessment for NEOCP objects within minutes after the observations are available. Scout's rapid analysis increases the chances of securing the trajectory of interesting NEOCP objects before the ephemeris uncertainty grows too large or the observing geometry becomes unfavorable. The generally short observation arcs, perhaps only a few hours or even less, lead severe degeneracies in the orbit estimation process. To overcome these degeneracies Scout relies on systematic ranging, a technique that derives possible orbits by scanning a grid in the poorly constrained space of topocentric range and range rate, while the plane-of-sky position and motion are directly tied to the recorded observations. This scan allows us to derive a distribution of the possible orbits and in turn identify the NEOCP objects of most interest to prioritize followup efforts. In particular, Scout ranks objects according to the likelihood of an impact, estimates the close approach distance, the Earth-relative minimum orbit intersection distance and v-infinity, and computes scores to identify objects more likely to be an NEO, a km-sized NEO, a Potentially

  2. Uncertainty Requirement Analysis for the Orbit, Attitude, and Burn Performance of the 1st Lunar Orbit Insertion Maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Joo Song

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the uncertainty requirements for orbit, attitude, and burn performance were estimated and analyzed for the execution of the 1st lunar orbit insertion (LOI maneuver of the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO mission. During the early design phase of the system, associate analysis is an essential design factor as the 1st LOI maneuver is the largest burn that utilizes the onboard propulsion system; the success of the lunar capture is directly affected by the performance achieved. For the analysis, the spacecraft is assumed to have already approached the periselene with a hyperbolic arrival trajectory around the moon. In addition, diverse arrival conditions and mission constraints were considered, such as varying periselene approach velocity, altitude, and orbital period of the capture orbit after execution of the 1st LOI maneuver. The current analysis assumed an impulsive LOI maneuver, and two-body equations of motion were adapted to simplify the problem for a preliminary analysis. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the statistical analysis to analyze diverse uncertainties that might arise at the moment when the maneuver is executed. As a result, three major requirements were analyzed and estimated for the early design phase. First, the minimum requirements were estimated for the burn performance to be captured around the moon. Second, the requirements for orbit, attitude, and maneuver burn performances were simultaneously estimated and analyzed to maintain the 1st elliptical orbit achieved around the moon within the specified orbital period. Finally, the dispersion requirements on the B-plane aiming at target points to meet the target insertion goal were analyzed and can be utilized as reference target guidelines for a mid-course correction (MCC maneuver during the transfer. More detailed system requirements for the KPLO mission, particularly for the spacecraft bus itself and for the flight dynamics subsystem at the ground

  3. Effects of the radial electrical field on the drifts, trapping and particle orbits in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this study a detailed analysis of the effect of radial electric fields on drifts, trapping and trajectories for ions of low and intermediate energy (0.1-1 keV) in the helical axis stellarator TJ-II has been performed. In TJ-II the drift velocities have the same rotation direction than the Hard Core (HC, the same than the plasma) with predominance of the vertical downwards component. The intensity is higher near the HC and in the outwards direction. These trends create strong asymmetries in losses even in the absence of electric field. When an electric field is present the poloidal components of the drift velocity predominates modifying deeply the orbit behaviour. Positive electric fields produce internal radial trapping barriers and have a tendency to eliminate the external ones. The opposite happens for negative fields. These facts alterate deeply the tapping and confinement properties of the particles. All these analysis will be used as a basis for the understanding of the modifications on the loss distribution, trapping regions and loss cones for TJ-II that will be addressed in forthcoming studies. (Author)

  4. An analysis of near-circular lunar mapping orbits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Numerical investigations have been carried out to analyse the evolution of lunar circular orbits and the influence of the higher order harmonics of the lunar gravity field. The aim is to select the appropriate near-circular orbit characteristics, which extend orbit life through passive orbit maintenance. The spherical harmonic ...

  5. Empirically characteristic analysis of chaotic PID controlling particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Danping; Lu, Yongzhong; Zhou, Min; Chen, Shiping; Levy, David

    2017-01-01

    Since chaos systems generally have the intrinsic properties of sensitivity to initial conditions, topological mixing and density of periodic orbits, they may tactfully use the chaotic ergodic orbits to achieve the global optimum or their better approximation to given cost functions with high probability. During the past decade, they have increasingly received much attention from academic community and industry society throughout the world. To improve the performance of particle swarm optimization (PSO), we herein propose a chaotic proportional integral derivative (PID) controlling PSO algorithm by the hybridization of chaotic logistic dynamics and hierarchical inertia weight. The hierarchical inertia weight coefficients are determined in accordance with the present fitness values of the local best positions so as to adaptively expand the particles' search space. Moreover, the chaotic logistic map is not only used in the substitution of the two random parameters affecting the convergence behavior, but also used in the chaotic local search for the global best position so as to easily avoid the particles' premature behaviors via the whole search space. Thereafter, the convergent analysis of chaotic PID controlling PSO is under deep investigation. Empirical simulation results demonstrate that compared with other several chaotic PSO algorithms like chaotic PSO with the logistic map, chaotic PSO with the tent map and chaotic catfish PSO with the logistic map, chaotic PID controlling PSO exhibits much better search efficiency and quality when solving the optimization problems. Additionally, the parameter estimation of a nonlinear dynamic system also further clarifies its superiority to chaotic catfish PSO, genetic algorithm (GA) and PSO.

  6. SPICE Module for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggi, John; Carnright, Robert; Hildebrand, Claude

    2008-01-01

    A SPICE module for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) precisely represents complex motion and maneuvers in an interactive, 3D animated environment with support for user-defined quantitative outputs. (SPICE stands for Spacecraft, Planet, Instrument, Camera-matrix, and Events). This module enables the SOAP software to exploit NASA mission ephemeris represented in the JPL Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) SPICE formats. Ephemeris types supported include position, velocity, and orientation for spacecraft and planetary bodies including the Sun, planets, natural satellites, comets, and asteroids. Entire missions can now be imported into SOAP for 3D visualization, playback, and analysis. The SOAP analysis and display features can now leverage detailed mission files to offer the analyst both a numerically correct and aesthetically pleasing combination of results that can be varied to study many hypothetical scenarios. The software provides a modeling and simulation environment that can encompass a broad variety of problems using orbital prediction. For example, ground coverage analysis, communications analysis, power and thermal analysis, and 3D visualization that provide the user with insight into complex geometric relations are included. The SOAP SPICE module allows distributed science and engineering teams to share common mission models of known pedigree, which greatly reduces duplication of effort and the potential for error. The use of the software spans all phases of the space system lifecycle, from the study of future concepts to operations and anomaly analysis. It allows SOAP software to correctly position and orient all of the principal bodies of the Solar System within a single simulation session along with multiple spacecraft trajectories and the orientation of mission payloads. In addition to the 3D visualization, the user can define numeric variables and x-y plots to quantitatively assess metrics of interest.

  7. Risks of nuclear waste disposal in space. III - Long-term orbital evolution of small particle distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, A. L.; Wells, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    A study of long term risks is presented that treats an additional pathway that could result in earth reentry, namely, small radioactive particles released in solar orbit due to payload fragmentation by accidental explosion or meteoroid impact. A characterization of such an event and of the initial mass size distribution of particles is given for two extremes of waste form strength. Attention is given to numerical results showing the mass-time distribution of material and the fraction of initial mass intercepted by earth. It is concluded that it appears that program planners need not be to concerned about the risks of this particular failure mechanism and return pathway.

  8. On the analysis of small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vis, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of small, micrometer or even submicrometer sized, particles represents a challenging problem. The whole analytical procedure, including quality assurance and control, needs careful planning. Even the sampling itself is in many cases not trivial at all and the question as to whether the sample is representative for the suite of particles on wants to measure is sometimes difficult to assess. The question of representativity is even more important if one performs single particle analysis. Only large numbers of such analyses will lead to meaningful and interpretable results. In this contribution a few aspects of the various steps in the analytical protocol will be described. Starting point is that it is the elemental composition of the particle that is of interest

  9. Outcomes After Orbital Atherectomy of Severely Calcified Left Main Lesions: Analysis of the ORBIT II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Shlofmitz, Evan; Shlofmitz, Richard; Sahni, Sheila; Martinsen, Brad; Chambers, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    The ORBIT II trial reported excellent outcomes in patients with severely calcified coronary lesions treated with orbital atherectomy. Severe calcification of the left main (LM) artery represents a complex coronary lesion subset. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of coronary orbital atherectomy to prepare severely calcified protected LM artery lesions for stent placement. The ORBIT II trial was a prospective, multicenter clinical trial that enrolled 443 patients with severely calcified coronary lesions in the United States. The major adverse cardiac event (MACE) rate through 2 years post procedure, defined by cardiac death, myocardial infarction (CK-MB >3x upper limit of normal with or without a new pathologic Q-wave) and target-vessel revascularization, was compared in the LM and non-left main (NLM) groups. Among the 443 patients, a total of 10 underwent orbital atherectomy of protected LM artery lesions. At 2 years, there was no significant difference in the 2-year MACE rate in the LM and NLM groups (30.0% vs 19.1%, respectively; P=.36). Cardiac death was low in both groups (0% vs 4.4%, respectively; P=.99). Myocardial infarction occurred within 30 days in both groups (10.0% vs 9.7%, respectively; P=.99). Severe dissection, perforation, persistent slow flow, and persistent no reflow did not occur in the LM group. Abrupt closure occurred in 1 patient in the LM group. Orbital atherectomy for patients with heavily calcified LM coronary artery lesions is safe and feasible. Further studies are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of orbital atherectomy in patients with severely calcified LM artery lesions.

  10. Space Debris Attitude Simulation - IOTA (In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzler, R.; Schildknecht, T.; Lips, T.; Fritsche, B.; Silha, J.; Krag, H.

    Today, there is little knowledge on the attitude state of decommissioned intact objects in Earth orbit. Observational means have advanced in the past years, but are still limited with respect to an accurate estimate of motion vector orientations and magnitude. Especially for the preparation of Active Debris Removal (ADR) missions as planned by ESA's Clean Space initiative or contingency scenarios for ESA spacecraft like ENVISAT, such knowledge is needed. The In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis tool (IOTA) is a prototype software, currently in development within the framework of ESA's “Debris Attitude Motion Measurements and Modelling” project (ESA Contract No. 40000112447), which is led by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB). The project goal is to achieve a good understanding of the attitude evolution and the considerable internal and external effects which occur. To characterize the attitude state of selected targets in LEO and GTO, multiple observation methods are combined. Optical observations are carried out by AIUB, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is performed by the Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IWF) and radar measurements and signal level determination are provided by the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR). Developed by Hyperschall Technologie Göttingen GmbH (HTG), IOTA will be a highly modular software tool to perform short- (days), medium- (months) and long-term (years) propagation of the orbit and attitude motion (six degrees-of-freedom) of spacecraft in Earth orbit. The simulation takes into account all relevant acting forces and torques, including aerodynamic drag, solar radiation pressure, gravitational influences of Earth, Sun and Moon, eddy current damping, impulse and momentum transfer from space debris or micro meteoroid impact, as well as the optional definition of particular spacecraft specific influences like tank sloshing, reaction wheel behaviour

  11. A FDTD solution of scattering of laser beam with orbital angular momentum by dielectric particles: Far-field characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Wenbo; Hu, Yongxiang; Weimer, Carl; Ayers, Kirk; Baize, Rosemary R.; Lee, Tsengdar

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) beams with orbital angular momentum (OAM) may have great potential applications in communication technology and in remote sensing of the Earth-atmosphere system and outer planets. Study of their interaction with optical lenses and dielectric or metallic objects, or scattering of them by particles in the Earth-atmosphere system, is a necessary step to explore the advantage of the OAM EM beams. In this study, the 3-dimensional (3D) scattered-field (SF) finite-difference time domain (FDTD) technique with the convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbing boundary conditions (ABC) is applied to calculate the scattering of the purely azimuthal (the radial mode number is assumed to be zero) Laguerre–Gaussian (LG) beams with the OAM by dielectric particles. We found that for OAM beam's interaction with dielectric particles, the forward-scattering peak in the conventional phase function (P11) disappears, and light scattering peak occurs at a scattering angle of ~15° to 45°. The disappearance of forward-scattering peak means that, in laser communications most of the particle-scattered noise cannot enter the receiver, thus the received light is optimally the original OAM-encoded signal. This feature of the OAM beam also implies that in lidar remote sensing of the atmospheric particulates, most of the multiple-scattering energy will be off lidar sensors, and this may result in an accurate profiling of particle layers in the atmosphere or in the oceans by lidar, or even in the ground when a ground penetration radar (GPR) with the OAM is applied. This far-field characteristics of the scattered OAM light also imply that the optical theorem, which is derived from plane-parallel wave scattering case and relates the forward scattering amplitude to the total cross section of the scatterer, is invalid for the scattering of OAM beams by dielectric particles. - Highlights: • Scattering of orbital angular momentum (OAM) laser beam by dielectric

  12. Preliminary radar systems analysis for Venus orbiter missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, R. K.; Spadoni, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    A short, preliminary analysis is presented of the problems involved in mapping the surface of Venus with radar from an orbiting spacecraft. Two types of radar, the noncoherent sidelooking and the focused synthetic aperture systems, are sized to fulfill two assumed levels of Venus exploration. The two exploration levels, regional and local, assumed for this study are based on previous Astro Sciences work (Klopp 1969). The regional level is defined as 1 to 3 kilometer spatial and 0.5 to 1 km vertical resolution of 100 percent 0 of the planet's surface. The local level is defined as 100 to 200 meter spatial and 50-10 m vertical resolution of about 100 percent of the surfAce (based on the regional survey). A 10cm operating frequency was chosen for both radar systems in order to minimize the antenna size and maximize the apparent radar cross section of the surface.

  13. Charged particles radiation measurements with Liulin-MO dosimeter of FREND instrument aboard ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter during the transit and in high elliptic Mars orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkova, Jordanka; Koleva, Rositza; Benghin, Victor; Dachev, Tsvetan; Matviichuk, Yuri; Tomov, Borislav; Krastev, Krasimir; Maltchev, Stephan; Dimitrov, Plamen; Mitrofanov, Igor; Malahov, Alexey; Golovin, Dmitry; Mokrousov, Maxim; Sanin, Anton; Litvak, Maxim; Kozyrev, Andrey; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Nikiforov, Sergey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Fedosov, Fedor; Grebennikova, Natalia; Zelenyi, Lev; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Drobishev, Sergey

    2018-03-01

    ExoMars is a joint ESA-Rosscosmos program for investigating Mars. Two missions are foreseen within this program: one consisting of the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), that carries scientific instruments for the detection of trace gases in the Martian atmosphere and for the location of their source regions, plus an Entry, Descent and landing demonstrator Module (EDM), launched on March 14, 2016; and the other, featuring a rover and a surface platform, with a launch date of 2020. On October 19, 2016 TGO was inserted into high elliptic Mars' orbit. The dosimetric telescope Liulin-MO for measuring the radiation environment onboard the ExoMars 2016 TGO is a module of the Fine Resolution Epithermal Neutron Detector (FREND). Here we present first results from measurements of the charged particle fluxes, dose rates, Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra and estimation of dose equivalent rates in the interplanetary space during the cruise of TGO to Mars and first results from dosimetric measurements in high elliptic Mars' orbit. A comparison is made with the dose rates obtained by RAD instrument onboard Mars Science Laboratory during the cruise to Mars in 2011-2012 and with the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) count rates provided by other particle detectors currently in space. The average measured dose rate in Si from GCR during the transit to Mars for the period April 22-September 15, 2016 is 372 ± 37 μGy d-1 and 390 ± 39 μGy d-1 in two perpendicular directions. The dose equivalent rate from GCR for the same time period is about 2 ± 0.3 mSv d-1. This is in good agreement with RAD results for radiation dose rate in Si from GCR in the interplanetary space, taking into account the different solar activity during the measurements of both instruments. About 10% increase of the dose rate, and 15% increase of the dose equivalent rate for 10.5 months flight is observed. It is due to the increase of Liulin-MO particle fluxes for that period and corresponds to the overall GCR intensity

  14. Single Event Upset Analysis: On-orbit performance of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Digital Signal Processor Memory aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaqiang; Choutko, Vitaly; Xiao, Liyi

    2018-03-01

    Based on the collection of error data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Digital Signal Processors (DSP), on-orbit Single Event Upsets (SEUs) of the DSP program memory are analyzed. The daily error distribution and time intervals between errors are calculated to evaluate the reliability of the system. The particle density distribution of International Space Station (ISS) orbit is presented and the effects from the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and the geomagnetic poles are analyzed. The impact of solar events on the DSP program memory is carried out combining data analysis and Monte Carlo simulation (MC). From the analysis and simulation results, it is concluded that the area corresponding to the SAA is the main source of errors on the ISS orbit. Solar events can also cause errors on DSP program memory, but the effect depends on the on-orbit particle density.

  15. Particle-in-Cell Simulation Study on the Floating Potential of Spacecraft in the Low Earth Orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Daotan; Yang Shengsheng; Zheng Kuohai; Qin Xiaogang; Li Detian; Liu Qing; Zhao Chengxuan; Du Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    In order to further understand the characteristics of the floating potential of low earth orbit spacecraft, the effects of the electron current collection area, background electron temperature, photocurrent emission, spacecraft wake, and the shape of spacecraft on spacecraft floating potential were studied here by particle-in-cell simulation in the low earth orbit. The simulation results show that the electron current collection area and background electron temperature impact on the floating potential by changing the electron current collection of spacecraft. By increasing the electron current collection area or background electron temperature, the spacecraft will float at a lower electric potential with respect to the surrounding plasma. However, the spacecraft wake affects the floating potential by increasing the ion current collected by spacecraft. The emission of the photocurrent from the spacecraft surface, which compensates for the electrons collected from background plasma, causes the floating potential to increase. The shape of the spacecraft is also an important factor influencing the floating potential. (paper)

  16. A conceptual study of the use of a particle bed reactor nuclear propulsion module for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malloy, J.; Potekhen, D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a particle bed reactor nuclear engine for direct thrust in a spacecraft based on the NASA/TRW orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV). It presents the conceptual design of a 500 lb thrust engine that matches critical design features of the existing OMV bi-propellant propulsion system. This application contrasts with the usual tendency to consider a nuclear heat source either for high thrust direct propulsion or as a power source for electric propulsion. A nuclear propulsion module adapted to the OMV could potentially accomplish several Department of Defense missions, such as multiple round trips from a space-based support platform at 280 NM to service a constellation of satellites orbiting at 1800 NM

  17. Effects of the radial electric field resonances on the particle orbits and loss cones in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the radial electric field resonances on the trapping and confinement of low and intermediate energy ions (0.1-1 keV) for the Reference configuration of TJ-II have been analysed. In TJ-II these resonances appear for electric potentials that grow with pitch and with the square root of the initial kinetic energy and are placed inside strips whose width increases with the initial radius and with the absolute value of initial pitch. The 0-Resonance is the most important one for particle trapping, it appears for high electric potential (between 1000 and 3000 V for 0.5 keV ions) with the same sign than pitch, inside very wide strips (several thousands of V). Along these band periphery, for potential intensities below the central resonant values, there exists a very strong increase of particle trapping. Instead, around the resonance center, the trapping is inhibited and a very strong increase of the passing particle population appears. This increase is higher for the torus external side (Theta approximately 0 degree centigree) and for small initial radius. For peripherical particles wide loss strips appear along the border of the resonant band corresponding to more positive potential. The 2-Resonance has small effect on trapping but affects strongly to the of peripherical passing particles. It appears for moderate electric potential (between 400 and 1000 V for 0.5 keV ions) with sign opposite than pitch and inside narrow bands than the 0-Resonance. In this case a loss of peripherical passing particles appears, placed also along the more positive potential band side. The other Resonances (except the -4) have much less effect on particle trapping and confinement. All these phenomena have been explained by the action of magnetic barriers and different mechanisms for particle orbit modification. (Author) 8 refs

  18. Automatic analysis of charged particle spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seres, Z.; Kiss, A.

    1975-11-01

    A computer program system is developed for off-line automatic analysis of a series of charged particle spectra measured by solid-state detectors and collected on magnetic tapes. The procedure results in complete angular distributions for the excited levels of the final nucleus up to about 15 MeV. (orig.) [de

  19. Coupling of transverse and longitudinal collective motions due to closed orbit distortion and dispersion in a two-particle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin Yongho.

    1986-09-01

    In order to explain the large discrepancy between the measured transverse coherent tune shifts and analytical ones in a short bunch in PETRA, the effects of the closed orbit distortion y co and the dispersion η on a beam instability is studied with a two-particle model. It follows the result which supports Kohaupt's previous results; they hardly contribute to real tune shift, while the momentum dependence of the wake force can make a beam unstable, with the growth rate which is proportional to the product of y co and η. (orig.)

  20. Analysis of particle kinematics in spheronization via particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Martin; Thommes, Markus

    2013-02-01

    Spheronization is a wide spread technique in pellet production for many pharmaceutical applications. Pellets produced by spheronization are characterized by a particularly spherical shape and narrow size distribution. The particle kinematic during spheronization is currently not well-understood. Therefore, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was implemented in the spheronization process to visualize the particle movement and to identify flow patterns, in order to explain the influence of various process parameters. The spheronization process of a common formulation was recorded with a high-speed camera, and the images were processed using particle image velocimetry software. A crosscorrelation approach was chosen to determine the particle velocity at the surface of the pellet bulk. Formulation and process parameters were varied systematically, and their influence on the particle velocity was investigated. The particle stream shows a torus-like shape with a twisted rope-like motion. It is remarkable that the overall particle velocity is approximately 10-fold lower than the tip speed of the friction plate. The velocity of the particle stream can be correlated to the water content of the pellets and the load of the spheronizer, while the rotation speed was not relevant. In conclusion, PIV was successfully applied to the spheronization process, and new insights into the particle velocity were obtained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Empirically characteristic analysis of chaotic PID controlling particle swarm optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danping Yan

    Full Text Available Since chaos systems generally have the intrinsic properties of sensitivity to initial conditions, topological mixing and density of periodic orbits, they may tactfully use the chaotic ergodic orbits to achieve the global optimum or their better approximation to given cost functions with high probability. During the past decade, they have increasingly received much attention from academic community and industry society throughout the world. To improve the performance of particle swarm optimization (PSO, we herein propose a chaotic proportional integral derivative (PID controlling PSO algorithm by the hybridization of chaotic logistic dynamics and hierarchical inertia weight. The hierarchical inertia weight coefficients are determined in accordance with the present fitness values of the local best positions so as to adaptively expand the particles' search space. Moreover, the chaotic logistic map is not only used in the substitution of the two random parameters affecting the convergence behavior, but also used in the chaotic local search for the global best position so as to easily avoid the particles' premature behaviors via the whole search space. Thereafter, the convergent analysis of chaotic PID controlling PSO is under deep investigation. Empirical simulation results demonstrate that compared with other several chaotic PSO algorithms like chaotic PSO with the logistic map, chaotic PSO with the tent map and chaotic catfish PSO with the logistic map, chaotic PID controlling PSO exhibits much better search efficiency and quality when solving the optimization problems. Additionally, the parameter estimation of a nonlinear dynamic system also further clarifies its superiority to chaotic catfish PSO, genetic algorithm (GA and PSO.

  2. The analysis of influence of field of co-rotation on motion of submicronic particles in the Earth's plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, A. B.

    2018-05-01

    The analysis of the motion of micro-particles with radii of several dozens of nanometers in the Earth's plasmasphere has confirmed that the earlier proved statement about conservation of the form for an orbit of a particle with constant electric charge which moves in superposition of the central gravitational field and the field of a magnetic dipole is true also for the case of a quasi-equilibrium electric charge. For a wide range of altitudes and the sizes of micro-particles other forces that act on the charged grain make considerably smaller impact on its motion. On the basis of numerical simulation it has been shown that for motion in an equatorial plane the field of co-rotation leads to very small monotonous growth of the semimajor axis and an orbit eccentricity, and for not-equatorial orbits there are fluctuations of the semimajor axis, an eccentricity and an inclination of an orbit with the period that considerably exceeds the period of orbital motion. In this paper, on the basis of the analysis of the canonical equations of the motion of a micro-particle in superposition of the central gravitational field and the field of co-rotation the explanation of the time dependences obtained numerically for the basic characteristics of an orbit of a micro-particle is proposed.

  3. Effects on Ion Cyclotron Emission of the Orbit Topology Changes from the Wave-Particle Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellsten, T.; Holmstroem, K.; Johnson, T.; Bergkvist, T.; Laxaback, M.

    2006-01-01

    It is known that non-relaxed distribution functions can give rise to excitation of magnetosonic waves by ion cyclotron interactions when the distribution function increases with respect to the perpendicular velocity. We have found that in a toroidal plasma also collisional relaxed distribution functions of central peaked high-energy ions can destabilise magnetosonic eigenmodes by ion cyclotron interactions, due to the change in localisation of the orbits establishing inverted distribution functions with respect to energy along the characteristics describing the cyclotron interactions. This can take place by interactions with barely co-passing and marginally trapped high-energy ions at the plasma boundary. The interactions are enhanced by tangential interactions, which can also prevent the interactions to reach the stable part of the characteristics where they interact with more deeply trapped orbits. (author)

  4. Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) Shield Ballistic Limit Analysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    This software implements penetration limit equations for common micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shield configurations, windows, and thermal protection systems. Allowable MMOD risk is formulated in terms of the probability of penetration (PNP) of the spacecraft pressure hull. For calculating the risk, spacecraft geometry models, mission profiles, debris environment models, and penetration limit equations for installed shielding configurations are required. Risk assessment software such as NASA's BUMPERII is used to calculate mission PNP; however, they are unsuitable for use in shield design and preliminary analysis studies. The software defines a single equation for the design and performance evaluation of common MMOD shielding configurations, windows, and thermal protection systems, along with a description of their validity range and guidelines for their application. Recommendations are based on preliminary reviews of fundamental assumptions, and accuracy in predicting experimental impact test results. The software is programmed in Visual Basic for Applications for installation as a simple add-in for Microsoft Excel. The user is directed to a graphical user interface (GUI) that requires user inputs and provides solutions directly in Microsoft Excel workbooks.

  5. Analysis of the influence of orbital disturbances applied to an artificial lunar satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonçalves, L D; Rocco, E M; De Moraes, R V

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of the orbital disturbance forces in the trajectory of lunar satellites. The following gravitational and non-gravitational orbital disturbances are considered: the non-homogeneity of the lunar gravitational field; the gravitational attraction due to the third body, considering the Earth and the Sun; the lunar albedo; the solar radiation pressure. Numerical models were developed and implemented in an orbital trajectory simulator aiming to understand the dynamics of the orbital motion of an artificial satellite in lunar orbit when considering the simultaneous effect of all disturbances. Different orbits were simulated in order to characterize the major and the minor influence of each disturbing force as function of the inclination and the right ascension of the ascending node. This study can be very useful in the space mission analysis and in the selection of orbits less affected by environmental disturbances. (paper)

  6. Scripting Module for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnright, Robert; Paget, Jim; Coggi, John; Stodden, David

    2008-01-01

    This add-on module to the SOAP software can perform changes to simulation objects based on the occurrence of specific conditions. This allows the software to encompass simulation response of scheduled or physical events. Users can manipulate objects in the simulation environment under programmatic control. Inputs to the scripting module are Actions, Conditions, and the Script. Actions are arbitrary modifications to constructs such as Platform Objects (i.e. satellites), Sensor Objects (representing instruments or communication links), or Analysis Objects (user-defined logical or numeric variables). Examples of actions include changes to a satellite orbit ( v), changing a sensor-pointing direction, and the manipulation of a numerical expression. Conditions represent the circumstances under which Actions are performed and can be couched in If-Then-Else logic, like performing v at specific times or adding to the spacecraft power only when it is being illuminated by the Sun. The SOAP script represents the entire set of conditions being considered over a specific time interval. The output of the scripting module is a series of events, which are changes to objects at specific times. As the SOAP simulation clock runs forward, the scheduled events are performed. If the user sets the clock back in time, the events within that interval are automatically undone. This script offers an interface for defining scripts where the user does not have to remember the vocabulary of various keywords. Actions can be captured by employing the same user interface that is used to define the objects themselves. Conditions can be set to invoke Actions by selecting them from pull-down lists. Users define the script by selecting from the pool of defined conditions. Many space systems have to react to arbitrary events that can occur from scheduling or from the environment. For example, an instrument may cease to draw power when the area that it is tasked to observe is not in view. The contingency

  7. A FDTD solution of scattering of laser beam with orbital angular momentum by dielectric particles: Far-field characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenbo; Hu, Yongxiang; Weimer, Carl; Ayers, Kirk; Baize, Rosemary R.; Lee, Tsengdar

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) beams with orbital angular momentum (OAM) may have great potential applications in communication technology and in remote sensing of the Earth-atmosphere system and outer planets. Study of their interaction with optical lenses and dielectric or metallic objects, or scattering of them by particles in the Earth-atmosphere system, is a necessary step to explore the advantage of the OAM EM beams. In this study, the 3-dimensional (3D) scattered-field (SF) finite-difference time domain (FDTD) technique with the convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbing boundary conditions (ABC) is applied to calculate the scattering of the purely azimuthal (the radial mode number is assumed to be zero) Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams with the OAM by dielectric particles. We found that for OAM beam's interaction with dielectric particles, the forward-scattering peak in the conventional phase function (P11) disappears, and light scattering peak occurs at a scattering angle of 15° to 45°. The disappearance of forward-scattering peak means that, in laser communications most of the particle-scattered noise cannot enter the receiver, thus the received light is optimally the original OAM-encoded signal. This feature of the OAM beam also implies that in lidar remote sensing of the atmospheric particulates, most of the multiple-scattering energy will be off lidar sensors, and this may result in an accurate profiling of particle layers in the atmosphere or in the oceans by lidar, or even in the ground when a ground penetration radar (GPR) with the OAM is applied. This far-field characteristics of the scattered OAM light also imply that the optical theorem, which is derived from plane-parallel wave scattering case and relates the forward scattering amplitude to the total cross section of the scatterer, is invalid for the scattering of OAM beams by dielectric particles.

  8. Fast Multispectral Radiometry for Particles Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharon, A.; Halevy, I.; Sattinger, D.; Yaar, I.; Krantz, L.; Pinhas, M.

    2014-01-01

    The radiological risk following detonation of radiological dispersal device (RDD) is highly depends the final particles’ size distribution remains after the detonation. In order to produce a realistic source term for the atmospheric dispersion model we should be able to predict the total fraction of aerosols created after the detonation as well as the respirable part of this fraction. The rest of the particles will not be dispersed downwind and hence them concentration will be calculated using much simpler models. The radiological risk out of radioactive (RA) material is highly depends on the particle size. Respirable size (<10 microns) of Alfa, Beta and Gamma emitters are all dangerous when inhaled into the body while larger aerosolos might be risky from a distance (Gamma emitters) or in an external body contact (Alfa, Beta and Gamma). Larger particles (which are not aerosols) are dangerous as fragments when penetrating the body (Alfa, Beta and Gamma) or when depositing on the ground as Gamma emitters. We show here that by using a fast multispectral radiometryfor the detonation fireball analysis it is possible to quantify the reduction of total amount of aerosols due to particles agglomeration with dirt

  9. Optimization of the Orbiting Wide-Angle Light Collectors (OWL) Mission for Charged-Particle and Neutrino Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizmanic, John F.; Mitchell, John W.; Streitmatter, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    OWL [1] uses the Earth's atmosphere as a vast calorimeter to fully enable the emerging field of charged-particle astronomy with high-statistics measurements of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) and a search for sources of UHE neutrinos and photons. Confirmation of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) suppression above approx. 4 x 10(exp 19) eV suggests that most UHECR originate in astrophysical objects. Higher energy particles must come from sources within about 100 Mpc and are deflected by approx. 1 degree by predicted intergalactic/galactic magnetic fields. The Pierre Auger Array, Telescope Array and the future JEM-EUSO ISS mission will open charged-particle astronomy, but much greater exposure will be required to fully identify and measure the spectra of individual sources. OWL uses two large telescopes with 3 m optical apertures and 45 degree FOV in near-equatorial orbits. Simulations of a five-year OWL mission indicate approx. 10(exp 6) sq km/ sr/ yr of exposure with full aperture at approx. 6 x 10(exp 19) eV. Observations at different altitudes and spacecraft separations optimize sensitivity to UHECRs and neutrinos. OWL's stereo event reconstruction is nearly independent of track inclination and very tolerant of atmospheric conditions. An optional monocular mode gives increased reliability and can increase the instantaneous aperture. OWL can fully reconstruct horizontal and upward-moving showers and so has high sensitivity to UHE neutrinos. New capabilities in inflatable structures optics and silicon photomultipliers can greatly increase photon sensitivity, reducing the energy threshold for n detection or increasing viewed area using a higher orbit. Design trades between the original and optimized OWL missions and the enhanced science capabilities are described.

  10. Advanced analysis methods in particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Each generation of high energy physics experiments is grander in scale than the previous - more powerful, more complex and more demanding in terms of data handling and analysis. The spectacular performance of the Tevatron and the beginning of operations of the Large Hadron Collider, have placed us at the threshold of a new era in particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson or another agent of electroweak symmetry breaking and evidence of new physics may be just around the corner. The greatest challenge in these pursuits is to extract the extremely rare signals, if any, from huge backgrounds arising from known physics processes. The use of advanced analysis techniques is crucial in achieving this goal. In this review, I discuss the concepts of optimal analysis, some important advanced analysis methods and a few examples. The judicious use of these advanced methods should enable new discoveries and produce results with better precision, robustness and clarity.

  11. Rapid Frequency Chirps of TAE mode due to Finite Orbit Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Herb; Wang, Ge

    2013-10-01

    The tip model for the TAE mode in the large aspect ratio limit, conceived by Rosenbluth et al. in the frequency domain, together with an interaction term in the frequency domain based on a map model, has been extended into the time domain. We present the formal basis for the model, starting with the Lagrangian for the particle wave interaction. We shall discuss the formal nonlinear time domain problem and the procedure that needs to obtain solutions in the adiabatic limit.

  12. Characteristics of flux variations of energetic particles associated with storm sudden commencement at synchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomomura, Kiyoshi; Kato, Yoshio; Sakurai, Tohru

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of flux variations of energetic particles associated with Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) are examined on the basis of the particle's data observed by solid state detecter onboard the synchronous satellite, GMS ''Himawari'', during the period from Febuary 1978 to August 1979. The energy of the particles are covered from 1.2 to 4.0 MeV for proton and greater than 2 MeV for electron, respectively. The flux variations for protons generally increase in association with SSC. However, for electrons, they show the increase except 7 events (the decrease event) among 40 events studied. It is evident that the values of the flux attained immediately after SSC (J) clearly depend on those just before SSC(J 0 ). They follow a Power law (J proportional J 0 sup( n)). The variation of the proton flux ( + ΔJ + = + J - J 0+ ) increases with the value of the flux just before SSC. In both increase and decrease events for electrons, the variation of the flux tends to increase until the flux just before SSC attains the value of 10 4 , then to decrease as its value exceeds 10 4 . (author)

  13. An advanced analysis method of initial orbit determination with too short arc data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Binzhe; Fang, Li

    2018-02-01

    This paper studies the initial orbit determination (IOD) based on space-based angle measurement. Commonly, these space-based observations have short durations. As a result, classical initial orbit determination algorithms give poor results, such as Laplace methods and Gauss methods. In this paper, an advanced analysis method of initial orbit determination is developed for space-based observations. The admissible region and triangulation are introduced in the method. Genetic algorithm is also used for adding some constraints of parameters. Simulation results show that the algorithm can successfully complete the initial orbit determination.

  14. Analysis of Orbital Lifetime Prediction Parameters in Preparation for Post-Mission Disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha–Yeon Choi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric drag force is an important source of perturbation of Low Earth Orbit (LEO orbit satellites, and solar activity is a major factor for changes in atmospheric density. In particular, the orbital lifetime of a satellite varies with changes in solar activity, so care must be taken in predicting the remaining orbital lifetime during preparation for post-mission disposal. In this paper, the System Tool Kit (STK® Long-term Orbit Propagator is used to analyze the changes in orbital lifetime predictions with respect to solar activity. In addition, the STK® Lifetime tool is used to analyze the change in orbital lifetime with respect to solar flux data generation, which is needed for the orbital lifetime calculation, and its control on the drag coefficient control. Analysis showed that the application of the most recent solar flux file within the Lifetime tool gives a predicted trend that is closest to the actual orbit. We also examine the effect of the drag coefficient, by performing a comparative analysis between varying and constant coefficients in terms of solar activity intensities.

  15. Methods of charged-particle activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhri, M. Anwar; Chaudhri, M. Nasir; Jabbar, Q.; Nadeem, Q.

    2006-01-01

    The accuracy of Chaudhri's method for charged-particle activation analysis published in J. Radioanal. Chem. (1977) v. 37 p. 243 has been further demonstrated by extensive calculations. The nuclear reactions 12 C(d,n) 13 N, 63 Cu( 3 He,p) 65 Zn, 107 Ag(α,n) 110 In and 208 Pb(d,p) 209 Pb, the cross sections of which were easily available, have been examined for the detection of 12 C, 63 Cu, 107 Ag and 208 Pb, respectively, in matrices of Cu, Zr and Pb, at the bombarding energies of 4 - 22 MeV. The 'standard' is assumed to be in a carbon matrix. It has been clearly demonstrated that Chaudhri's method, which makes the charged particle activation analysis as simple as neutron activation analysis, provides results which are almost identical to, or only about 1-2 % different, from the results obtained using the full 'Activity Equation' involving solving complex integrals. It is valid even when the difference in the average atomic weights of matrices of the standard and the sample is large. (author)

  16. Single-particle spin-orbit potentials of the LAMBDA and SIGMA hyperons based on the quark-model G-matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, M; Fujita, T; Nakamoto, C; Suzuki, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the SU sub 6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction which was recently developed by the Kyoto-Niigata group, we calculate N N, LAMBDA N and SIGMA N G--matrices in ordinary nuclear matter. Following the Scheerbaum's prescription, the strength of the single-particle spin-orbit potential S sub B is quantitatively discussed. The S subLAMBDA becomes small because of the cancellation between spin-orbit and anti-symmetric spin-orbit components. The short-range correlation is found to further reduce S subLAMBDA.

  17. Improved nano-particle tracking analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, John G

    2012-01-01

    Nano-particle tracking is a method to estimate a particle size distribution by tracking the movements of individual particles, using multiple images of particles moving under Brownian motion. A novel method to recover a particle size distribution from nano-particle tracking data is described. Unlike a simple histogram-based method, the method described is able to account for the finite number of steps in each particle track and consequently for the measurement uncertainty in the step-length data. Computer simulation and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the approach compared with the current method. (paper)

  18. Analysis of the Accuracy of Beidou Combined Orbit Determination Enhanced by LEO and ISL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FENG Laiping

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the precision of BeiDou orbit determination under the conditions of regional ground monitoring station and make good use of increasingly rich on-board data and upcoming ISL technology, a method of BeiDou precision orbit determination is proposed which combines the use of ground monitoring stations data, low earth orbit satellite(LEOs data and Inter-Satellite Link(ISL data. The effects of assisting data of LEOs and ISL on the precision orbit determination of navigation satellite are discussed. Simulation analysis is carried out mainly from the number of LEOs, orbit slot configuration and ISL. The results show that the orbit precision of BeiDou will greatly improve about 73% with a small number of LEOs, while improvement of clock bias is not remarkable; the uniform orbit slot configuration of the same number of LEOs has a modest effect on the accuracy of combined orbit determination; compared with LEOs, the increase of ISL will significantly improve the accuracy of orbit determination with a higher efficiency.

  19. Lissajous orbit acquisition and interpretation in relation to vibration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Mahmood, A.; Bibi, A.; Shehzad, K.; Zahoor, Y.

    2001-01-01

    In resent years, it has become common practice to install dual non-contacting eddy current probes on critical high-speed turbo-machinery to avoid false shutdowns in the events that one of the probes should fail. The pickups are mounted radially in each bearing with the axis of the pickups separated by 90 deg. Some are mounted in the horizontal or vertical directions; others are mounted on an axis 45 deg. from the horizontal '10:30' and '1:30' clock positions. These same non contacting pickups can be hooked into an oscilloscope to provide Lissajous orbit patterns of the shaft's motion in the bearing. This text will deal with proper setup of the transducers and instrumentation required to produce Lissajous orbits. Some examples Lissajous are given and their the diagnosis of common machine problems is provided. The interpretation of JS plots will be the highlight of this text. (author)

  20. Detecting unstable periodic orbits of nonlinear mappings by a novel quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization non-Lyapunov way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fei; Gao Hongrui; Li Zhuoqiu; Tong Hengqing; Lee, Ju-Jang

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that set of unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) can be thought of as the skeleton for the dynamics. However, detecting UPOs of nonlinear map is one of the most challenging problems of nonlinear science in both numerical computations and experimental measures. In this paper, a new method is proposed to detect the UPOs in a non-Lyapunov way. Firstly three special techniques are added to quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO), a novel mbest particle, contracting the searching space self-adaptively and boundaries restriction (NCB), then the new method NCB-QPSO is proposed. It can maintain an effective search mechanism with fine equilibrium between exploitation and exploration. Secondly, the problems of detecting the UPOs are converted into a non-negative functions' minimization through a proper translation in a non-Lyapunov way. Thirdly the simulations to 6 benchmark optimization problems and different high order UPOs of 5 classic nonlinear maps are done by the proposed method. And the results show that NCB-QPSO is a successful method in detecting the UPOs, and it has the advantages of fast convergence, high precision and robustness.

  1. Particle bed reactor propulsion vehicle performance and characteristics as an orbital transfer rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Lazareth, O.W.

    1986-01-01

    The particle bed reactor designed for 100 to 300 MW power output using hydrogen as a coolant is capable of specific impulses up to 1000 seconds as a nuclear rocket. A single space shuttle compatible vehicle can perform extensive missions from LEO to 3 times GEO and return with multi-ton payloads. The use of hydrogen to directly cool particulate reactor fuel results in a compact, lightweight rocket vehicle, whose duration of usefulness is dependent only upon hydrogen resupply availability. The LEO to GEO mission had a payload capability of 15.4 metric tons with 3.4 meters of shuttle bay. To increase the volume limitation of the shuttle bay, the use of ammonia in the initial boost phase from LEO is used to give greater payload volume with a small decrease in payload mass, 8.7 meters and 12.7 m-tons. 5 refs., 15 figs

  2. Analysis of the SPS Long Term Orbit Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velotti, Francesco [CERN; Bracco, Chiara [CERN; Cornelis, Karel [CERN; Drøsdal, Lene [CERN; Fraser, Matthew [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab; Goddard, Brennan [CERN; Kain, Verena [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN

    2016-06-01

    The Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) is the last accelerator in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) injector chain, and has to deliver the two high-intensity 450 GeV proton beams to the LHC. The transport from SPS to LHC is done through the two Transfer Lines (TL), TI2 and TI8, for Beam 1 (B1) and Beam 2 (B2) respectively. During the first LHC operation period Run 1, a long term drift of the SPS orbit was observed, causing changes in the LHC injection due to the resulting changes in the TL trajectories. This translated into longer LHC turnaround because of the necessity to periodically correct the TL trajectories in order to preserve the beam quality at injection into the LHC. Different sources for the SPS orbit drifts have been investigated: each of them can account only partially for the total orbit drift observed. In this paper, the possible sources of such drift are described, together with the simulated and measured effect they cause. Possible solutions and countermeasures are also discussed.

  3. The Orion Exploration Flight Test Post Flight Solid Particle Flight Environment Inspection and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joshua E.

    2016-01-01

    Orbital debris in the millimeter size range can pose a hazard to current and planned spacecraft due to the high relative impact speeds in Earth orbit. Fortunately, orbital debris has a relatively short life at lower altitudes due to atmospheric effects; however, at higher altitudes orbital debris can survive much longer and has resulted in a band of high flux around 700 to 1,500 km above the surface of the Earth. While large orbital debris objects are tracked via ground based observation, little information can be gathered about small particles except by returned surfaces, which until the Orion Exploration Flight Test number one (EFT-1), has only been possible for lower altitudes (400 to 500 km). The EFT-1 crew module backshell, which used a porous, ceramic tile system with surface coatings, has been inspected post-flight for potential micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) damage. This paper describes the pre- and post-flight activities of inspection, identification and analysis of six candidate MMOD impact craters from the EFT-1 mission.

  4. Table of charged particle energies versus magnetic field strength x orbit radius (Bρ) for A = 1 to 7 (100< (Bρ) < 1200 kG.cm)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, L.

    1969-01-01

    A table of charged particle energies versus magnetic field strength x orbit radius (B ρ ) is presented. Particles p, d, t, 3 He ++ , 4 He + , 4 He ++ , 6 Li + , 6 Li ++ , 6 Li +++ , 7 Li + , 7 Li ++ , 7 Li +++ . Values of B ρ : 100 to 1200 kG.cm by steps of 0.5 kG.cm. Values of energies are given in keV. (author) [fr

  5. Density functional theory, comparative vibrational spectroscopic studies, highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital analysis of Linezolid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, K.; Gunasekaran, S.; Kumaresan, S.

    2015-06-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectra and Fourier transform Raman spectra of Linezolid have been recorded in the regions 4,000-400 and 4,000-100 cm-1, respectively. Utilizing the observed Fourier transform infrared spectra and Fourier transform Raman spectra data, a complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound have been carried out. The optimum molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman scattering activities, have been calculated by density functional theory with 6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) levels. The difference between the observed and scaled wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of Linezolid is reported. Mulliken's net charges have also been calculated. Ultraviolet-visible spectrum of the title molecule has also been calculated using time-dependent density functional method. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential, highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital analysis and several thermodynamic properties have been performed by the density functional theoretical method.

  6. Suspended Cell Culture ANalysis (SCAN) Tool to Enhance ISS On-Orbit Capabilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences and partner, Draper Laboratory, propose to develop an on-orbit immuno-based label-free Suspension Cell Culture ANalysis tool, SCAN tool, which...

  7. Empirically characteristic analysis of chaotic PID controlling particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Danping; Lu, Yongzhong; Zhou, Min; Chen, Shiping; Levy, David

    2017-01-01

    Since chaos systems generally have the intrinsic properties of sensitivity to initial conditions, topological mixing and density of periodic orbits, they may tactfully use the chaotic ergodic orbits to achieve the global optimum or their better approximation to given cost functions with high probability. During the past decade, they have increasingly received much attention from academic community and industry society throughout the world. To improve the performance of particle swarm optimization (PSO), we herein propose a chaotic proportional integral derivative (PID) controlling PSO algorithm by the hybridization of chaotic logistic dynamics and hierarchical inertia weight. The hierarchical inertia weight coefficients are determined in accordance with the present fitness values of the local best positions so as to adaptively expand the particles’ search space. Moreover, the chaotic logistic map is not only used in the substitution of the two random parameters affecting the convergence behavior, but also used in the chaotic local search for the global best position so as to easily avoid the particles’ premature behaviors via the whole search space. Thereafter, the convergent analysis of chaotic PID controlling PSO is under deep investigation. Empirical simulation results demonstrate that compared with other several chaotic PSO algorithms like chaotic PSO with the logistic map, chaotic PSO with the tent map and chaotic catfish PSO with the logistic map, chaotic PID controlling PSO exhibits much better search efficiency and quality when solving the optimization problems. Additionally, the parameter estimation of a nonlinear dynamic system also further clarifies its superiority to chaotic catfish PSO, genetic algorithm (GA) and PSO. PMID:28472050

  8. Unstable Periodic Orbit Analysis of Histograms of Chaotic Time Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoldi, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Using the Lorenz equations, we have investigated whether unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) associated with a strange attractor may predict the occurrence of the robust sharp peaks in histograms of some experimental chaotic time series. Histograms with sharp peaks occur for the Lorenz parameter value r=60.0 but not for r=28.0 , and the sharp peaks for r=60.0 do not correspond to a histogram derived from any single UPO. However, we show that histograms derived from the time series of a non-Axiom-A chaotic system can be accurately predicted by an escape-time weighting of UPO histograms. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  9. Toward automated analysis of particle holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary study of approaches for extracting and analyzing data from particle holograms is discussed. It concludes that: (1) for thin spherical particles, out-of-focus methods are optimum; (2) for thin nonspherical particles, out-of-focus methods are useful but must be supplemented by in-focus methods; (3) a complex method of projection and back projection can remove out-of-focus data for deep particles.

  10. An analysis of the low-earth-orbit communications environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diersing, Robert Joseph

    Advances in microprocessor technology and availability of launch opportunities have caused interest in low-earth-orbit satellite based communications systems to increase dramatically during the past several years. In this research the capabilities of two low-cost, store-and-forward LEO communications satellites operating in the public domain are examined--PACSAT-1 (operated by the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and UoSAT-3 (operated by the University of Surrey, England, Electrical Engineering Department). The file broadcasting and file transfer facilities are examined in detail and a simulation model of the downlink traffic pattern is developed. The simulator will aid the assessment of changes in design and implementation for other systems. The development of the downlink traffic simulator is based on three major parts. First, is a characterization of the low-earth-orbit operating environment along with preliminary measurements of the PACSAT-1 and UoSAT-3 systems including: satellite visibility constraints on communications, monitoring equipment configuration, link margin computations, determination of block and bit error rates, and establishing typical data capture rates for ground stations using computer-pointed directional antennas and fixed omni-directional antennas. Second, arrival rates for successful and unsuccessful file server connections are established along with transaction service times. Downlink traffic has been further characterized by measuring: frame and byte counts for all data-link layer traffic; 30-second interval average response time for all traffic and for file server traffic only; file server response time on a per-connection basis; and retry rates for information and supervisory frames. Finally, the model is verified by comparison with measurements of actual traffic not previously used in the model building process. The simulator is then used to predict operation of the PACSAT-1 satellite with modifications to the original design.

  11. Effective theories in physics. From planetary orbits to elementary particle masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, James D.

    2012-01-01

    There is significant interest in the Philosophy of Science community to understand the role that ''effective theories'' have in the work of forefront science. The ideas of effective theories have been implicit in science for a long time, but have only been articulated well in the last few decades. Since Wilson's renormalization group revolution in the early 1970's, the science community has come to more fully understand its power, and by the mid-1990's it had gained its apotheosis. It is still one of the most powerful concepts in science, which has direct impact in how one thinks about and formulates theories of nature. It is this power that this Brief sets out to emphasize through historical analysis and current examples.

  12. Effective theories in physics from planetary orbits to elementary particle masses

    CERN Document Server

    Wells, James D

    2012-01-01

    There is significant interest in the Philosophy of Science community to understand the role that "effective theories" have in the work of forefront science. The ideas of effective theories have been implicit in science for a long time, but have only been articulated well in the last few decades. Since Wilson's renormalization group revolution in the early 1970's, the science community has come to more fully understand its power, and by the mid-1990's it had gained its apotheosis. It is still one of the most powerful concepts in science, which has direct impact in how one thinks about and formulates theories of nature. It is this power that this Brief sets out to emphasize through historical analysis and current examples.

  13. Agile deployment and code coverage testing metrics of the boot software on-board Solar Orbiter's Energetic Particle Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Pablo; da Silva, Antonio; Polo, Óscar R.; Sánchez, Sebastián

    2018-02-01

    In this day and age, successful embedded critical software needs agile and continuous development and testing procedures. This paper presents the overall testing and code coverage metrics obtained during the unit testing procedure carried out to verify the correctness of the boot software that will run in the Instrument Control Unit (ICU) of the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) on-board Solar Orbiter. The ICU boot software is a critical part of the project so its verification should be addressed at an early development stage, so any test case missed in this process may affect the quality of the overall on-board software. According to the European Cooperation for Space Standardization ESA standards, testing this kind of critical software must cover 100% of the source code statement and decision paths. This leads to the complete testing of fault tolerance and recovery mechanisms that have to resolve every possible memory corruption or communication error brought about by the space environment. The introduced procedure enables fault injection from the beginning of the development process and enables to fulfill the exigent code coverage demands on the boot software.

  14. Automatic size analysis of coated fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallisch, K.; Koss, P.

    1977-01-01

    The determination of the diameter, coating thickness, and sphericity of coated fuel particles by conventional methods is very time consuming. Therefore, statistical data can only be obtained with limited accuracy. An alternative method is described that avoids these disadvantages by utilizing a fast optical data-collecting system of high accuracy. This system allows the determination of the diameter of particles in the range between 100 and 1500 μm, with an accuracy of better than +-2 μm and with a rate of 100 particles per second. The density and thickness of coating layers can be determined by comparing the data obtained before and after coating, taking into account the relative increase of weight. A special device allows the automatic determination of the sphericity of single particles as well as the distribution in a batch. This device measures 50 to 100 different diameters of each particle per second. An on-line computer stores the measured data and calculates all parameters required, e.g., number of particles measured, particle diameter, standard deviation, diameter limiting values, average particle volume, average particle surface area, and the distribution of sphericity in absolute and percent form

  15. Unified treatment of complete orthonormal sets for wave functions, and Slater orbitals of particles with arbitrary spin in coordinate, momentum and four-dimensional spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseinov, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    The new analytical relations of complete orthonormal sets for the tensor wave functions and the tensor Slater orbitals of particles with arbitrary spin in coordinate, momentum and four-dimensional spaces are derived using the properties of tensor spherical harmonics and complete orthonormal scalar basis sets of ψ α -exponential type orbitals, φ α -momentum space orbitals and z α -hyperspherical harmonics introduced by the author for particles with spin s=0, where the α=1,0,-1,-2,.... All of the tensor wave functions obtained are complete without the inclusion of the continuum and, therefore, their group of transformations is the four-dimensional rotation group O(4). The analytical formulas in coordinate space are also derived for the overlap integrals over tensor Slater orbitals with the same screening constant. We notice that the new idea presented in this work is the combination of tensor spherical harmonics of rank s with complete orthonormal scalar sets for radial parts of ψ α -, φ α - and z α -orbitals, where s=1/2,1,3/2,2,...

  16. A Preliminary Formation Flying Orbit Dynamics Analysis for Leonardo-BRDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven P.; Mailhe, Laurie M.

    2001-01-01

    Leonardo-BRDF is a NASA mission concept proposed to allow the investigation of radiative transfer and its effect on the Earth's climate and atmospheric phenomenon. Enabled by the recent developments in small-satellite and formation flying technology, the mission is envisioned to be composed of an array of spacecraft in carefully designed orbits. The different perspectives provided by a distributed array of spacecraft offer a unique advantage to study the Earth's albedo. This paper presents the orbit dynamics analysis performed in the context of the Leonardo-BRDF science requirements. First, the albedo integral is investigated and the effect of viewing geometry on science return is studied. The method used in this paper, based on Gauss quadrature, provides the optimal formation geometry to ensure that the value of the integral is accurately approximated. An orbit design approach is presented to achieve specific relative orbit geometries while simultaneously satisfying orbit dynamics constraints to reduce formation-keeping fuel expenditure. The relative geometry afforded by the design is discussed in terms of mission requirements. An optimal two-burn initialization scheme is presented with the required delta-V to distribute all spacecraft from a common parking orbit into their appropriate orbits in the formation. Finally, formation-keeping strategies are developed and the associated delta-V's are calculated to maintain the formation in the presence of perturbations.

  17. Dynamical analysis of an orbiting three-rigid-body system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagnozzi, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.pagnozzi@strath.ac.uk, E-mail: james.biggs@strath.ac.uk; Biggs, James D., E-mail: daniele.pagnozzi@strath.ac.uk, E-mail: james.biggs@strath.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-10

    The development of multi-joint-spacecraft mission concepts calls for a deeper understanding of their nonlinear dynamics to inform and enhance system design. This paper presents a study of a three-finite-shape rigid-body system under the action of an ideal central gravitational field. The aim of this paper is to gain an insight into the natural dynamics of this system. The Hamiltonian dynamics is derived and used to identify relative attitude equilibria of the system with respect to the orbital reference frame. Then a numerical investigation of the behaviour far from the equilibria is provided using tools from modern dynamical systems theory such as energy methods, phase portraits and Poincarè maps. Results reveal a complex structure of the dynamics as well as the existence of connections between some of the equilibria. Stable equilibrium configurations appear to be surrounded by very narrow regions of regular and quasi-regular motions. Trajectories evolve on chaotic motions in the rest of the domain.

  18. Differentiation of orbital lymphoma and idiopathic orbital inflammatory pseudotumor: combined diagnostic value of conventional MRI and histogram analysis of ADC maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiliang; Yuan, Ying; Wu, Yingwei; Tao, Xiaofeng

    2018-05-02

    The overlap of morphological feature and mean ADC value restricted clinical application of MRI in the differential diagnosis of orbital lymphoma and idiopathic orbital inflammatory pseudotumor (IOIP). In this paper, we aimed to retrospectively evaluate the combined diagnostic value of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and whole-tumor histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps in the differentiation of the two lesions. In total, 18 patients with orbital lymphoma and 22 patients with IOIP were included, who underwent both conventional MRI and diffusion weighted imaging before treatment. Conventional MRI features and histogram parameters derived from ADC maps, including mean ADC (ADC mean ), median ADC (ADC median ), skewness, kurtosis, 10th, 25th, 75th and 90th percentiles of ADC (ADC 10 , ADC 25 , ADC 75 , ADC 90 ) were evaluated and compared between orbital lymphoma and IOIP. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the most valuable variables for discriminating. Differential model was built upon the selected variables and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was also performed to determine the differential ability of the model. Multivariate logistic regression showed ADC 10 (P = 0.023) and involvement of orbit preseptal space (P = 0.029) were the most promising indexes in the discrimination of orbital lymphoma and IOIP. The logistic model defined by ADC 10 and involvement of orbit preseptal space was built, which achieved an AUC of 0.939, with sensitivity of 77.30% and specificity of 94.40%. Conventional MRI feature of involvement of orbit preseptal space and ADC histogram parameter of ADC 10 are valuable in differential diagnosis of orbital lymphoma and IOIP.

  19. Ground Contact Analysis for Korea’s Fictitious Lunar Orbiter Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Joo Song

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the ground contact opportunity for the fictitious low lunar orbiter is analyzed to prepare for a future Korean lunar orbiter mission. The ground contact opportunity is basically derived from geometrical relations between the typical ground stations at the Earth, the relative positions of the Earth and Moon, and finally, the lunar orbiter itself. Both the cut-off angle and the orbiter’s Line of Sight (LOS conditions (weather orbiter is located at near or far side of the Moon seen from the Earth are considered to determine the ground contact opportunities. Four KOMPSAT Ground Stations (KGSs are assumed to be Korea’s future Near Earth Networks (NENs to support lunar missions, and world-wide separated Deep Space Networks (DSNs are also included during the contact availability analysis. As a result, it is concluded that about 138 times of contact will be made between the orbiter and the Daejeon station during 27.3 days of prediction time span. If these contact times are converted into contact duration, the duration is found to be about 8.55 days, about 31.31% of 27.3 days. It is discovered that selected four KGSs cannot provide continuous tracking of the lunar orbiter, meaning that international collaboration is necessary to track Korea’s future lunar orbiter effectively. Possible combinations of world-wide separated DSNs are also suggested to compensate for the lack of contact availability with only four KGSs, as with primary and backup station concepts. The provided algorithm can be easily modified to support any type of orbit around the Moon, and therefore, the presented results could aid further progress in the design field of Korea’s lunar orbiter missions.

  20. XML-based analysis interface for particle physics data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jifeng; Lu Xiaorui; Zhang Yangheng

    2011-01-01

    The letter emphasizes on an XML-based interface and its framework for particle physics data analysis. The interface uses a concise XML syntax to describe, in data analysis, the basic tasks: event-selection, kinematic fitting, particle identification, etc. and a basic processing logic: the next step goes on if and only if this step succeeds. The framework can perform an analysis without compiling by loading the XML-interface file, setting p in run-time and running dynamically. An analysis coding in XML instead of C++, easy-to-understood arid use, effectively reduces the work load, and enables users to carry out their analyses quickly. The framework has been developed on the BESⅢ offline software system (BOSS) with the object-oriented C++ programming. These functions, required by the regular tasks and the basic processing logic, are implemented with both standard modules or inherited from the modules in BOSS. The interface and its framework have been tested to perform physics analysis. (authors)

  1. Orbit Determination Using SLR Data for STSAT-2C:Short-arc Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Rok Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present the results of orbit determination (OD using satellite laser ranging (SLR data for the Science and Technology Satellite (STSAT-2C by a short-arc analysis. For SLR data processing, the NASA/GSFC GEODYN II software with one year (2013/04 – 2014/04 of normal point observations is used. As there is only an extremely small quantity of SLR observations of STSAT-2C and they are sparsely distribution, the selection of the arc length and the estimation intervals for the atmospheric drag coefficients and the empirical acceleration parameters was made on an arc-to-arc basis. For orbit quality assessment, the post-fit residuals of each short-arc and orbit overlaps of arcs are investigated. The OD results show that the weighted root mean square post-fit residuals of short-arcs are less than 1 cm, and the average 1-day orbit overlaps are superior to 50/600/900 m for the radial/cross-track/along-track components. These results demonstrate that OD for STSAT-2C was successfully achieved with cm-level range precision. However its orbit quality did not reach the same level due to the availability of few and sparse measurement conditions. From a mission analysis viewpoint, obtaining the results of OD for STSAT-2C is significant for generating enhanced orbit predictions for more frequent tracking.

  2. AN IMPROVED DISTANCE AND MASS ESTIMATE FOR SGR A* FROM A MULTISTAR ORBIT ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehle, A.; Ghez, A. M.; Meyer, L.; Yelda, S.; Albers, S.; Martinez, G. D.; Becklin, E. E.; Do, T.; Morris, M. R.; Sitarski, B.; Witzel, G. [UCLA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Schödel, R. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía S/N, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Lu, J. R. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Matthews, K., E-mail: aboehle@astro.ucla.edu [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-10-10

    We present new, more precise measurements of the mass and distance of our Galaxy’s central supermassive black hole, Sgr A*. These results stem from a new analysis that more than doubles the time baseline for astrometry of faint stars orbiting Sgr A*, combining 2 decades of speckle imaging and adaptive optics data. Specifically, we improve our analysis of the speckle images by using information about a star’s orbit from the deep adaptive optics data (2005–2013) to inform the search for the star in the speckle years (1995–2005). When this new analysis technique is combined with the first complete re-reduction of Keck Galactic Center speckle images using speckle holography, we are able to track the short-period star S0-38 ( K -band magnitude = 17, orbital period = 19 yr) through the speckle years. We use the kinematic measurements from speckle holography and adaptive optics to estimate the orbits of S0-38 and S0-2 and thereby improve our constraints of the mass ( M {sub bh}) and distance ( R {sub o} ) of Sgr A*: M {sub bh} = (4.02 ± 0.16 ± 0.04) × 10{sup 6} M {sub ⊙} and 7.86 ± 0.14 ± 0.04 kpc. The uncertainties in M {sub bh} and R {sub o} as determined by the combined orbital fit of S0-2 and S0-38 are improved by a factor of 2 and 2.5, respectively, compared to an orbital fit of S0-2 alone and a factor of ∼2.5 compared to previous results from stellar orbits. This analysis also limits the extended dark mass within 0.01 pc to less than 0.13 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ⊙} at 99.7% confidence, a factor of 3 lower compared to prior work.

  3. Microscopic analysis of Hopper flow with ellipsoidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sida; Zhou, Zongyan; Zou, Ruiping; Pinson, David; Yu, Aibing

    2013-06-01

    Hoppers are widely used in process industries. With such widespread application, difficulties in achieving desired operational behaviors have led to extensive experimental and mathematical studies in the past decades. Particularly, the discrete element method has become one of the most important simulation tools for design and analysis. So far, most studies are on spherical particles for computational convenience. In this work, ellipsoidal particles are used as they can represent a large variation of particle shapes. Hopper flow with ellipsoidal particles is presented highlighting the effect of particle shape on the microscopic properties.

  4. An automated data management/analysis system for space shuttle orbiter tiles. [stress analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, G. L.; Ballas, M.

    1982-01-01

    An engineering data management system was combined with a nonlinear stress analysis program to provide a capability for analyzing a large number of tiles on the space shuttle orbiter. Tile geometry data and all data necessary of define the tile loads environment accessed automatically as needed for the analysis of a particular tile or a set of tiles. User documentation provided includes: (1) description of computer programs and data files contained in the system; (2) definitions of all engineering data stored in the data base; (3) characteristics of the tile anaytical model; (4) instructions for preparation of user input; and (5) a sample problem to illustrate use of the system. Description of data, computer programs, and analytical models of the tile are sufficiently detailed to guide extension of the system to include additional zones of tiles and/or additional types of analyses

  5. Inorganic particle analysis of dental impression elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively and qualitatively the inorganic particle fraction of commercially available dental elastomers. The inorganic volumetric fraction of two addition silicones (Reprosil Putty/Fluid and Flexitime Easy Putty/Fluid), three condensation silicones (Clonage Putty/Fluid, Optosil Confort/Xantopren VL and Silon APS Putty/Fluid), one polyether (Impregum Soft Light Body) and one polysulfide (Permlastic Light Body) was accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 600 ºC, during 3 h. Unsettled material samples were soaked in acetone and chloroform for removal of the organic portion. The remaining filler particles were sputter-coated with gold evaluation of their morphology and size, under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexitime Easy Putty was the material with the highest results for volumetric particle fraction, while Impregum Soft had the lowest values. Silon 2 APS Fluid presented the lowest mean filler size values, while Clonage Putty had the highest values. SEM micrographs of the inorganic particles showed several morphologies - lathe-cut, spherical, spherical-like, sticks, and sticks mixed to lathe-cut powder. The results of this study revealed differences in particle characteristics among the elastometic materials that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  6. A comprehensive analysis of molecule-intrinsic quasi-atomic, bonding, and correlating orbitals. I. Hartree-Fock wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, Aaron C.; Schmidt, Michael W.; Gordon, Mark S.; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Through a basis-set-independent web of localizing orbital-transformations, the electronic wave function of a molecule is expressed in terms of a set of orbitals that reveal the atomic structure and the bonding pattern of a molecule. The analysis is based on resolving the valence orbital space in terms of an internal space, which has minimal basis set dimensions, and an external space. In the internal space, oriented quasi-atomic orbitals and split-localized molecular orbitals are determined by new, fast localization methods. The density matrix between the oriented quasi-atomic orbitals as well as the locations of the split-localized orbitals exhibit atomic populations and inter-atomic bonding patterns. A correlation-adapted quasi-atomic basis is determined in the external orbital space. The general formulations are specified in detail for Hartree-Fock wave functions. Applications to specific molecules exemplify the general scheme

  7. Thermal and orbital analysis of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killough, Brian D.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals of an Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous orbit are presented. A Sun-synchronous Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) was developed to calculate orbital parameters for an entire year. The output from this program provides the required input data for the TRASYS thermal radiation computer code, which in turn computes the infrared, solar and Earth albedo heat fluxes incident on a space experiment. Direct incident heat fluxes can be used as input to a generalized thermal analyzer program to size radiators and predict instrument operating temperatures. The SOAP computer code and its application to the thermal analysis methodology presented, should prove useful to the thermal engineer during the design phases of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments.

  8. Stress analysis of aspherical coated particle with inner pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Bing, E-mail: bingliu@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Yang Lin; Liang Tongxiang; Tang Chunhe [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Coated particles used in HTR fuel element sustain the inner pressure during irradiation as a pressure vessel. In actually the coated particle is not real spherical but with some asphericity, the stress distribution in the vessel is not uniform, coated layer in aspherical particle sustain more additional stress due to the asphericity. In this paper, the geometric shape distribution is summarized based on actual coated particle statistic. A mechanical analysis model is proposed for SiC layer by geometric combinations, and stress distribution of coated particle with a flat is calculated. The results show that the local maximum stress of aspherical particle increased two times than that of ideal spherical coated particle, which increase the failure probability under irradiation and high temperature.

  9. PIXE analysis of atmospheric aerosol and hydrometeor particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeneveld, K.O.; Hofmann, D.; Georgii, H.W.

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol and hydrometeor particles act decisively on our weather, climate and thereby on all living conditions on Earth. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis has been demonstrated to be an extremely valuable tool for quantitative and qualitative elemental analysis of aerosol particles and hydrometeors. Reliability and detection limits of PIXE are determined, including comparison with other techniques. Aerosol particles are collected on a global scale in ground stations, or by ships and by planes. Correlation between wind direction and elemental composition of atmospheric aerosols, elemental particle size distributions of the tropospheric aerosol, aerosol elemental composition in particle size fractions in the case of long range transport, transport pathways of pollution aerosol, and trace element content precipitation are discussed. Hydrometeors were studied in the form of rain, snow, fog, dew and frost. The time dependence of the melting process of snow was studied in detail, in particular the washout phenomena of impurity ions. (orig.)

  10. Real-time analysis of insoluble particles in glacial ice using single-particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Matthew; Zawadowicz, Maria A.; Das, Sarah B.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2017-11-01

    Insoluble aerosol particles trapped in glacial ice provide insight into past climates, but analysis requires information on climatically relevant particle properties, such as size, abundance, and internal mixing. We present a new analytical method using a time-of-flight single-particle mass spectrometer (SPMS) to determine the composition and size of insoluble particles in glacial ice over an aerodynamic size range of ˜ 0.2-3.0 µm diameter. Using samples from two Greenland ice cores, we developed a procedure to nebulize insoluble particles suspended in melted ice, evaporate condensed liquid from those particles, and transport them to the SPMS for analysis. We further determined size-dependent extraction and instrument transmission efficiencies to investigate the feasibility of determining particle-class-specific mass concentrations. We find SPMS can be used to provide constraints on the aerodynamic size, composition, and relative abundance of most insoluble particulate classes in ice core samples. We describe the importance of post-aqueous processing to particles, a process which occurs due to nebulization of aerosols from an aqueous suspension of originally soluble and insoluble aerosol components. This study represents an initial attempt to use SPMS as an emerging technique for the study of insoluble particulates in ice cores.

  11. Analysis of pinching in deterministic particle separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risbud, Sumedh; Luo, Mingxiang; Frechette, Joelle; Drazer, German

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the problem of spherical particles vertically settling parallel to Y-axis (under gravity), through a pinching gap created by an obstacle (spherical or cylindrical, center at the origin) and a wall (normal to X axis), to uncover the physics governing microfluidic separation techniques such as deterministic lateral displacement and pinched flow fractionation: (1) theoretically, by linearly superimposing the resistances offered by the wall and the obstacle separately, (2) computationally, using the lattice Boltzmann method for particulate systems and (3) experimentally, by conducting macroscopic experiments. Both, theory and simulations, show that for a given initial separation between the particle centre and the Y-axis, presence of a wall pushes the particles closer to the obstacle, than its absence. Experimentally, this is expected to result in an early onset of the short-range repulsive forces caused by solid-solid contact. We indeed observe such an early onset, which we quantify by measuring the asymmetry in the trajectories of the spherical particles around the obstacle. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation Grant Nos. CBET- 0731032, CMMI-0748094, and CBET-0954840.

  12. The Laser Ranging Experiment of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: Five Years of Operations and Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Dandan; McGarry, Jan F.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Sun, Xiaoli; Torrence, Mark H.; Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Rowlands, David D.; Hoffman, Evan D.; Horvath, Julie E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We describe the results of the Laser Ranging (LR) experiment carried out from June 2009 to September 2014 in order to make one-way time-of-flight measurements of laser pulses between Earth-based laser ranging stations and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) orbiting the Moon. Over 4,000 hours of successful LR data are obtained from 10 international ground stations. The 20-30 centimeter precision of the full-rate LR data is further improved to 5-10 centimeter after conversion into normal points. The main purpose of LR is to utilize the high accuracy normal point data to improve the quality of the LRO orbits, which are nomi- nally determined by the radiometric S-band tracking data. When independently used in the LRO precision orbit determination process with the high-resolution GRAIL (Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory) gravity model, LR data provide good orbit solutions, with an average difference of approximately 50 meters in total position, and approximately 20 centimeters in radial direction, compared to the definitive LRO trajectory. When used in combination with the S-band tracking data, LR data help to improve the orbit accuracy in the radial direction to approximately 15 centimeters. In order to obtain highly accurate LR range measurements for precise orbit determination results, it is critical to closely model the behavior of the clocks both at the ground stations and on the spacecraft. LR provides a unique data set to calibrate the spacecraft clock. The LRO spacecraft clock is characterized by the LR data to a timing knowledge of 0.015 milliseconds over the entire 5 years of LR operation. We here present both the engineering setup of the LR experiments and the detailed analysis results of the LR data.

  13. Orbit-based analysis of nonlinear energetic ion dynamics in tokamaks. II. Mechanisms for rapid chirping and convective amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierwage, Andreas [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Shinohara, Kouji [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Naka Fusion Institute, Ibaraki 311-0193 Japan (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    The nonlinear interactions between shear Alfvén modes and tangentially injected beam ions in the 150–400 keV range are studied numerically in realistic geometry for a JT-60U tokamak scenario. In Paper I, which was reported in the companion paper, the recently developed orbit-based resonance analysis method was used to track the resonant frequency of fast ions during their nonlinear evolution subject to large magnetic and electric drifts. Here, that method is applied to map the wave-particle power transfer from the canonical guiding center phase space into the frequency-radius plane, where it can be directly compared with the evolution of the fluctuation spectra of fast-ion-driven modes. Using this technique, we study the nonlinear dynamics of strongly driven shear Alfvén modes with low toroidal mode numbers n = 1 and n = 3. In the n = 3 case, both chirping and convective amplification can be attributed to the mode following the resonant frequency of the radially displaced particles, i.e., the usual one-dimensional phase locking process. In the n = 1 case, a new chirping mechanism is found, which involves multiple dimensions, namely, wave-particle trapping in the radial direction and phase mixing across velocity coordinates.

  14. A method of orbital analysis for large-scale first-principles simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwaki, Tsukuru; Otani, Minoru; Ozaki, Taisuke

    2014-01-01

    An efficient method of calculating the natural bond orbitals (NBOs) based on a truncation of the entire density matrix of a whole system is presented for large-scale density functional theory calculations. The method recovers an orbital picture for O(N) electronic structure methods which directly evaluate the density matrix without using Kohn-Sham orbitals, thus enabling quantitative analysis of chemical reactions in large-scale systems in the language of localized Lewis-type chemical bonds. With the density matrix calculated by either an exact diagonalization or O(N) method, the computational cost is O(1) for the calculation of NBOs associated with a local region where a chemical reaction takes place. As an illustration of the method, we demonstrate how an electronic structure in a local region of interest can be analyzed by NBOs in a large-scale first-principles molecular dynamics simulation for a liquid electrolyte bulk model (propylene carbonate + LiBF 4 )

  15. Analysis scheme of density modulation experiments for particle confinements study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Michael, C.; Kawanata, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Shoji, M.; Toi, K.; Gao, X.; Jie, Y.X.

    2005-01-01

    Density modulation experiments are one of the powerful experimental schemas to study particle confinements. The diffusion coefficients (D) and convection velocity (V), which is impossible to evaluated from particle balance in equilibrium state, can be separately obtained. And the estimated value of D and V are determined independent of absolute value of particle source rate, which is difficult to be obtained experimentally. However sensitivities and interpretation of D and V from modulation experiments should be taken care. In this paper, numerical techniques to solve particle balance equation of modulation components are described. Examples of analysis are shown from the data of LHD. And interpretations of results of modulation experiments are studied. (author)

  16. Analysis of lung tissue particles among silicosis cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Case

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims:Lung tissue samples of several miners, millers, sandblaster, welders andconstruction workers with historical exposure to mineral particles were analyzed. These subjectshad significant respiratory exposure to silica particles and demanded compensation foroccupational lung diseases.Method: Lung tissue samples were observed under an Electron microscope with 10000Xmagnification. Mineral particles were sized and analyzed by EDS detector based on X-rayspectrophotometry.Results: The results have indicated that the lung particle burden of the subjects was closelyrelated to their occupational history. The highest level of mineral silica particles were found in thelungs of miners and sandblasters. The highest concentration of metallic particles was found in thelungs of welders and miners in ferric mining industry. Severity of lung fibrosis was directlyrelated to the lung free silica concentration. However, no association was found between particlediameter and severity of fibrosis. In addition, lung particle burden of silicotic cases with lungcancer contained a much higher concentration of metallic particles and asbestos fibres that thelung of those subject with silicosis only.Conclusion: Although workers in mining and construction may be predominantly exposed tosilica particles including quartz, the role of other mineral particles including asbestos fibres,metallic fibres and other minerals should be taken into account in the genesis of occupational lungdisease in particular lung cancer. Lung tissue sample analysis can provide valuable informationto assess the legal and compensation cases.

  17. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat; Ruebel, O.; Weber, G.; Hamann, B.

    2010-01-01

    scientific data mining is increasingly considered. In plasma simulations, Bagherjeiran et al. presented a comprehensive report on applying graph-based techniques for orbit classification. They used the KAM classifier to label points and components in single and multiple orbits. Love et al. conducted an image space analysis of coherent structures in plasma simulations. They used a number of segmentation and region-growing techniques to isolate regions of interest in orbit plots. Both approaches analyzed particle accelerator data, targeting the system dynamics in terms of particle orbits. However, they did not address particle dynamics as a function of time or inspected the behavior of bunches of particles. Ruebel et al. addressed the visual analysis of massive laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulation data using interactive procedures to query the data. Sophisticated visualization tools were provided to inspect the data manually. Ruebel et al. have integrated these tools to the visualization and analysis system VisIt, in addition to utilizing efficient data management based on HDF5, H5Part, and the index/query tool FastBit. In Ruebel et al. proposed automatic beam path analysis using a suite of methods to classify particles in simulation data and to analyze their temporal evolution. To enable researchers to accurately define particle beams, the method computes a set of measures based on the path of particles relative to the distance of the particles to a beam. To achieve good performance, this framework uses an analysis pipeline designed to quickly reduce the amount of data that needs to be considered in the actual path distance computation. As part of this process, region-growing methods are utilized to detect particle bunches at single time steps. Efficient data reduction is essential to enable automated analysis of large data sets as described in the next section, where data reduction methods are steered to the particular requirements of our clustering analysis

  18. A Finite-Orbit-Width Fokker-Planck solver for modeling of energetic particle interactions with waves, with application to Helicons in ITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrov Yuri V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The bounce-average (BA finite-difference Fokker-Planck (FP code CQL3D [1,2] now includes the essential physics to describe the RF heating of Finite-Orbit-Width (FOW ions in tokamaks. The FP equation is reformulated in terms of Constants-Of-Motion coordinates, which we select to be particle speed, pitch angle, and major radius on the equatorial plane thus obtaining the distribution function directly at this location. Full-orbit, low collisionality neoclassical radial transport emerges from averaging the local friction and diffusion coefficients along guiding center orbits. Similarly, the BA of local quasilinear RF diffusion terms gives rise to additional radial transport. The local RF electric field components needed for the BA operator are usually obtained by a ray-tracing code, such as GENRAY, or in conjunction with full-wave codes. As a new, practical application, the CQL3D-FOW version is used for simulation of alpha-particle heating by high-harmonic waves in ITER. Coupling of high harmonic or helicon fast waves power to electrons is a promising current drive (CD scenario for high beta plasmas. However, the efficiency of current drive can be diminished by parasitic channeling of RF power into fast ions, such as alphas, through finite Larmor-radius effects. We investigate possibilities to reduce the fast ion heating in CD scenarios.

  19. Biophysical analysis of HTLV-1 particles reveals novel insights into particle morphology and Gag stochiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarty Keir H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is an important human retrovirus that is a cause of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. While an important human pathogen, the details regarding virus replication cycle, including the nature of HTLV-1 particles, remain largely unknown due to the difficulties in propagating the virus in tissue culture. In this study, we created a codon-optimized HTLV-1 Gag fused to an EYFP reporter as a model system to quantitatively analyze HTLV-1 particles released from producer cells. Results The codon-optimized Gag led to a dramatic and highly robust level of Gag expression as well as virus-like particle (VLP production. The robust level of particle production overcomes previous technical difficulties with authentic particles and allowed for detailed analysis of particle architecture using two novel methodologies. We quantitatively measured the diameter and morphology of HTLV-1 VLPs in their native, hydrated state using cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM. Furthermore, we were able to determine HTLV-1 Gag stoichiometry as well as particle size with the novel biophysical technique of fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS. The average HTLV-1 particle diameter determined by cryo-TEM and FFS was 71 ± 20 nm and 75 ± 4 nm, respectively. These values are significantly smaller than previous estimates made of HTLV-1 particles by negative staining TEM. Furthermore, cryo-TEM reveals that the majority of HTLV-1 VLPs lacks an ordered structure of the Gag lattice, suggesting that the HTLV-1 Gag shell is very likely to be organized differently compared to that observed with HIV-1 Gag in immature particles. This conclusion is supported by our observation that the average copy number of HTLV-1 Gag per particle is estimated to be 510 based on FFS, which is significantly lower than that found for HIV-1 immature virions. Conclusions In summary, our studies represent the first quantitative biophysical

  20. Failure analysis of satellite subsystems to define suitable de-orbit devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Chiara; Peroni, Moreno; Kingston, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    Space missions in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) are severely affected by the build-up of orbital debris. A key practice, to be compliant with IADC (Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee) mitigation guidelines, is the removal of space systems that interfere with the LEO region not later than 25 years after the End of Mission. It is important to note that the current guidelines are not generally legally binding, even if different Space Agencies are now looking at the compliance for their missions. If the guidelines will change in law, it will be mandatory to have a postmission disposal strategy for all satellites, including micro and smaller classes. A potential increased number of these satellites is confirmed by different projections, in particular in the commercial sector. Micro and smaller spacecraft are, in general, not provided with propulsion capabilities to achieve a controlled re-entry, so they need different de-orbit disposal methods. When considering the utility of different debris mitigation methods, it is useful to understand which spacecraft subsystems are most likely to fail and how this may affect the operation of a de-orbit system. This also helps the consideration of which components are the most relevant or should be redundant depending on the satellite mass class. This work is based on a sample of LEO and MEO satellites launched between January 2000 and December 2014 with mass lower than 1000 kg. Failure analysis of satellite subsystems is performed by means of the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis; the parametric fits are conducted with Weibull distributions. The study is carried out by using the satellite database SpaceTrak™ which provides anomalies, failures, and trends information for spacecraft subsystems and launch vehicles. The database identifies five states for each satellite subsystem: three degraded states, one fully operational state, and one failed state (complete failure). The results obtained can guide the identification of the

  1. Numerical analysis and experiment research on fluid orbital performance of vane type propellant management device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Q; Li, Y; Pan, H L; Liu, J T; Zhuang, B T

    2015-01-01

    Vane type propellant management device (PMD) is one of the key components of the vane-type surface tension tank (STT), and its fluid orbital performance directly determines the STT's success or failure. In present paper, numerical analysis and microgravity experiment study on fluid orbital performance of a vane type PMD were carried out. By using two-phase flow model of volume of fluid (VOF), fluid flow characteristics in the tank with the vane type PMD were numerically calculated, and the rules of fluid transfer and distribution were gotten. A abbreviate model test system of the vane type PMD is established and microgravity drop tower tests were performed, then fluid management and transmission rules of the vane type PMD were obtained under microgravity environment. The analysis and tests results show that the vane type PMD has good and initiative fluid orbital management ability and meets the demands of fluid orbital extrusion in the vane type STT. The results offer valuable guidance for the design and optimization of the new generation of vane type PMD, and also provide a new approach for fluid management and control in space environment

  2. Statistical analysis of magnetically soft particles in magnetorheological elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundermann, T.; Cremer, P.; Löwen, H.; Menzel, A. M.; Odenbach, S.

    2017-04-01

    The physical properties of magnetorheological elastomers (MRE) are a complex issue and can be influenced and controlled in many ways, e.g. by applying a magnetic field, by external mechanical stimuli, or by an electric potential. In general, the response of MRE materials to these stimuli is crucially dependent on the distribution of the magnetic particles inside the elastomer. Specific knowledge of the interactions between particles or particle clusters is of high relevance for understanding the macroscopic rheological properties and provides an important input for theoretical calculations. In order to gain a better insight into the correlation between the macroscopic effects and microstructure and to generate a database for theoretical analysis, x-ray micro-computed tomography (X-μCT) investigations as a base for a statistical analysis of the particle configurations were carried out. Different MREs with quantities of 2-15 wt% (0.27-2.3 vol%) of iron powder and different allocations of the particles inside the matrix were prepared. The X-μCT results were edited by an image processing software regarding the geometrical properties of the particles with and without the influence of an external magnetic field. Pair correlation functions for the positions of the particles inside the elastomer were calculated to statistically characterize the distributions of the particles in the samples.

  3. Primary orbital fracture repair: development and validation of tools for morphologic and functional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontscharuk, Rayisa; Fialkov, Jeffrey A; Binhammer, Paul A; McMillan, Catherine R; Antonyshyn, Oleh

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a technique for objective quantitative evaluation of outcomes of orbital reconstruction. Facial three-dimensional images were captured using a Vectra three-dimensional camera. Morphometric analysis was based on interactive anthropometric identification. The analysis was applied to a population of healthy adults (n = 13) and a population of patients following primary repair of unilateral orbital fractures (n = 13). Morphologic results following reconstruction were evaluated by identifying residual asymmetries. All subjects further completed the Derriford Appearance Questionnaire and the Orbital Appearance and Function Questionnaire.Normative reference values for periorbital asymmetry were determined in a reference population. The mean asymmetry was less than 1.6 mm for each measured morphologic feature. In the trauma population, primary orbital reconstruction effectively restored normal periorbital symmetry in 16 of 20 measured parameters. The fracture population showed no significant differences in the degree of asymmetry in globe projection, lower eyelid position, or ciliary margin length.The overall DAS59 scores were significantly higher in the fracture population (P = 0.04). This was due to significantly higher physical distress and dysfunction scores (P = 0.02), as well as a trend toward higher general and social self-consciousness scores (P = 0.06). No significant difference in facial self-consciousness was noted (P = 0.21). Thus, although primary orbital reconstruction was effective in restoring periorbital morphology, patients still experienced a higher level of physical distress and dysfunction than their nontraumatized counterparts. This was in accordance with patient self-report, which indicated that a greater percentage of patients were significantly bothered by functional outcomes postoperatively as opposed to appearance.

  4. Preparation, analysis, and release of simulated interplanetary grains into low earth orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.R.; Strong, I.B.; Kunkle, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Astronomical observations which reflect the optical and dynamical properties of interstellar and interplanetary grains are the primary means of identifying the shape, size, and the chemistry of extraterrestrial grain materials and is a major subject of this workshop. Except for recent samplings of extraterrestrial particles in near-Earth orbit and in the stratosphere, observations have been the only method of deducing the properties of extraterrestrial particles. Terrestrial laboratory experiments typically seek not to reproduce astrophysical conditions but to illuminate fundamental dust processes and properties which must be extrapolated to interesting astrophysical conditions. In this report, we discuss the formation and optical characterization of simulated interstellar and interplanetary dust with particular emphasis on studying the properties on irregularly shaped particles. We also discuss efforts to develop the techniques to allow dust experiments to be carried out in low-Earth orbit, thus extending the conditions under which dust experiments may be performed. The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Elucidate the optical properties, including scattering and absorption, of simulated interstellar grains including SiC, silicates, and carbon grains produced in the laboratory. (2) Develop the capabilities to release grains and volatile materials into the near-Earth environment and study their dynamics and optical properties. (3) Study the interaction of released materials with the near-Earth environment to elucidate grain behavior in astrophysical environments. Interaction of grains with their environment may, for example, lead to grain alignment or coagulation, which results in observable phenomena such as polarization of lighter or a change of the scattering properties of the grains

  5. The Inner Magnetospheric Imager (IMI): Instrument heritage and orbit viewing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gordon R.

    1992-12-01

    For the last two years an engineering team in the Program Development Office at MSFC has been doing design studies for the proposed Inner Magnetospheric Imager (IMI) mission. This team had a need for more information about the instruments that this mission would carry so that they could get a better handle on instrument volume, mass, power, and telemetry needs as well as information to help assess the possible cost of such instruments and what technology development they would need. To get this information, an extensive literature search was conducted as well as interviews with several members of the IMI science working group. The results of this heritage survey are summarized below. There was also a need to evaluate the orbits proposed for this mission from the stand point of their suitability for viewing the various magnetospheric features that are planned for this mission. This was accomplished by first, identifying the factors which need to be considered in selecting an orbit, second, translating these considerations into specific criteria, and third, evaluating the proposed orbits against these criteria. The specifics of these criteria and the results of the orbit analysis are contained in the last section of this report.

  6. Preliminary investigations on a NTP cargo shuttle for earth to moon orbit payload transfer based on a particle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raepsaet, X.; Proust, E.; Gervaise, F.; Baraer, L.; Naury, S.; Linet, F.L.

    1995-01-01

    MAPS, a 3-year study program on NTP has recently been launched at CEA following the conclusions of a preliminary scoping study of an NTP system for earth to moon orbit cargo shuttle missions. This paper presents the main results of this scoping study, and gives an outline of the MAPS program. (authors). 5 figs., 11 tabs., 7 refs

  7. Preliminary investigations on a NTP cargo shuttle for earth to moon orbit payload transfer based on a particle bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raepsaet, X; Proust, E; Gervaise, F; Baraer, L; Naury, S; Linet, F L [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie; Bresson, C F; Coriolis, C.C. de; Bergeron, I T.A.; Bourquin, L V; Clech, L V; Devaux, L V; Chevillot, L V; Augier, E V [EAMEA, 50 - Cherbourg (France)

    1995-12-01

    MAPS, a 3-year study program on NTP has recently been launched at CEA following the conclusions of a preliminary scoping study of an NTP system for earth to moon orbit cargo shuttle missions. This paper presents the main results of this scoping study, and gives an outline of the MAPS program. (authors). 5 figs., 11 tabs., 7 refs.

  8. Experimental study of the rearrangements of valence protons and neutrons amongst single-particle orbits during double-β decay in 100Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S. J.; Sharp, D. K.; McAllister, S. A.; Kay, B. P.; Deibel, C. M.; Faestermann, T.; Hertenberger, R.; Mitchell, A. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Szwec, S. V.; Thomas, J. S.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2017-11-01

    The rearrangements of protons and neutrons amongst the valence single-particle orbitals during double-β decay of 100Mo have been determined by measuring cross sections in (d ,p ), (p ,d ), (3He,α ), and (3He,d ) reactions on Mo,10098 and Ru,102100 targets. The deduced nucleon occupancies reveal significant discrepancies when compared with theoretical calculations; the same calculations have previously been used to determine the nuclear matrix element associated with the decay probability of double-β decay of the 100Mo system.

  9. Alpha particle analysis using PEARLS spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKlveen, J.W.; Klingler, G.W.; McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha particle assay by conventional plate-counting methods is difficult because chemical separation, tracer techniques, and/or self-absorption losses in the final sample may cause either non-reproducible results or create unacceptable errors. PEARLS (Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation) Spectrometry is an attractive alternative since radionuclides may be extracted into a scintillator in which there would be no self-absorption or geometry problems and in which up to 100% chemical recovery and counting efficiency is possible. Sample preparation may include extraction of the alpha emitter of interest by a specific organic-phase-soluble compound directly into the liquid scintillator. Detection electronics use energy and pulse-shape discrimination to provide discrete alpha spectra and virtual absence of beta and gamma backgrounds. Backgrounds on the order of 0.01 cpm are readily achievable. Accuracy and reproducibility are typically in the 100 +-1% range. Specific procedures have been developed for gross alpha, uranium, plutonium, thorium, and polonium assay. This paper will review liquid scintillation alpha counting methods and reference some of the specific applications. 8 refs., 1 fig

  10. Instantaneous Purified Orbit: A New Tool for Analysis of Nonstationary Vibration of Rotor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Dongfeng

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In some circumstances, vibration signals of large rotating machinery possess time-varying characteristics to some extent. Traditional diagnosis methods, such as FFT spectrum and orbit diagram, are confronted with a huge challenge to deal with this problem. This work aims at studying the four intrinsic drawbacks of conventional vibration signal processing method and instantaneous purified orbit (IPO on the basis of improved Fourier spectrum (IFS to analyze nonstationary vibration. On account of integration, the benefits of short period Fourier transform (SPFT and regular holospectrum, this method can intuitively reflect vibration characteristics of’a rotor system by means of parameter analysis for corresponding frequency ellipses. Practical examples, such as transient vibration in run-up stages and bistable condition of rotor show that IPO is a powerful tool for diagnosis and analysis of the vibration behavior of rotor systems.

  11. Unified time analysis of photon and particle tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, Vladislav S.; Recami, Erasmo; Jakiel, Jacek

    2001-07-01

    A unified approach to the time analysis of tunnelling of nonrelativistic particles is presented, in which Time is regarded as a quantum-mechanical observable, canonically conjugated to Energy. The validity of the Hartman effect (independence of the Tunnelling Time of the opaque barrier width, with superluminal group velocities as a consequence) is verified for all the known expressions of the mean tunnelling time. Moreover, the analogy between particle and photon tunnelling is suitably exploited. On the basic of such an analogy, an explanation of some recent microwave and optics experimental results on tunnelling time is proposed. Attention is devoted to some aspects of the causality problem for particle and photon tunnelling. (author)

  12. On-Orbit Quantitative Real-Time Gene Expression Analysis Using the Wetlab-2 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Macarena; Jung, Jimmy; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis; Tran, Luan; Schonfeld, Julie

    2015-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center's WetLab-2 Project enables on-orbit quantitative Reverse Transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis without the need for sample return. The WetLab-2 system is capable of processing sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. The project developed a RNA preparation module that can lyse cells and extract RNA of sufficient quality and quantity for use as templates in qRT-PCR reactions. Our protocol has the advantage of using non-toxic chemicals and does not require alcohols or other organics. The resulting RNA is dispensed into reaction tubes that contain all lyophilized reagents needed to perform qRT-PCR reactions. System operations require simple and limited crew actions including syringe pushes, valve turns and pipette dispenses. The project selected the Cepheid SmartCycler (TradeMark), a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) qRT-PCR unit, because of its advantages including rugged modular design, low power consumption, rapid thermal ramp times and four-color multiplex detection. Single tube multiplex assays can be used to normalize for RNA concentration and integrity, and to study multiple genes of interest in each module. The WetLab-2 system can downlink data from the ISS to the ground after a completed run and uplink new thermal cycling programs. The ability to conduct qRT-PCR and generate results on-orbit is an important step towards utilizing the ISS as a National Laboratory facility. Specifically, the ability to get on-orbit data will provide investigators with the opportunity to adjust experimental parameters in real time without the need for sample return and re-flight. On orbit gene expression analysis can also eliminate the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms or the concern of RNA degradation of fixed samples and provide on-orbit gene expression benchmarking prior to sample return. Finally, the system can also be used for analysis of

  13. Automatic particle-size analysis of HTGR nuclear fuel microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    An automatic particle-size analyzer (PSA) has been developed at ORNL for measuring and counting samples of nuclear fuel microspheres in the diameter range of 300 to 1000 μm at rates in excess of 2000 particles per minute, requiring no sample preparation. A light blockage technique is used in conjunction with a particle singularizer. Each particle in the sample is sized, and the information is accumulated by a multi-channel pulse height analyzer. The data are then transferred automatically to a computer for calculation of mean diameter, standard deviation, kurtosis, and skewness of the distribution. Entering the sample weight and pre-coating data permits calculation of particle density and the mean coating thickness and density. Following this nondestructive analysis, the sample is collected and returned to the process line or used for further analysis. The device has potential as an on-line quality control device in processes dealing with spherical or near-spherical particles where rapid analysis is required for process control

  14. Canonical analysis of non-relativistic particle and superparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluson, Josef [Masaryk University, Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Science, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2018-02-15

    We perform canonical analysis of non-relativistic particle in Newton-Cartan Background. Then we extend this analysis to the case of non-relativistic superparticle in the same background. We determine constraints structure of this theory and find generator of κ-symmetry. (orig.)

  15. Analysis of particle-wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raszillier, H.; Durst, F.

    1988-01-01

    The vertical motion of a rigid sphere in a quiescent viscous fluid towards a horizontal plane wall is analized by a simplified equation of motion, which takes into account as the only wall correction that to the Stokes drag force. The phase space analysis for this equation is sketched; it has been motivated by measurements performed at the LSTM-Erlangen. A more detailed exposition is given in the Erlangen report LSTM 222/T/87. (orig.)

  16. Topology and slowing down of high energy ion orbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, L G [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Porcelli, F [Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Berk, H L [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1994-07-01

    An analysis of nonstandard guiding centre orbits is presented, which is relevant to MeV ions in a Tokamak. The orbit equation has been simplified from the start, allowing to present an analytic classification of the possible orbits. The topological transitions of the orbits during collisional slowing down are described. In particular, the characteristic equations reveal the existence of a single fixed point in the relevant phase plane, and the presence of a bifurcation curve corresponding to the locus of the pinch orbits. A significant particle inward pinch has been discovered. (authors). 7 figs.

  17. Space Shuttle Orbiter - Leading edge structural design/analysis and material allowables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. W.; Curry, D. M.; Kelly, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC), a structural composite whose development was targeted for the high temperature reentry environments of reusable space vehicles, has successfully demonstrated that capability on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Unique mechanical properties, particularly at elevated temperatures up to 3000 F, make this material ideally suited for the 'hot' regions of multimission space vehicles. Design allowable characterization testing, full-scale development and qualification testing, and structural analysis techniques will be presented herein that briefly chart the history of the RCC material from infancy to eventual multimission certification for the Orbiter. Included are discussions pertaining to the development of the design allowable data base, manipulation of the test data into usable forms, and the analytical verification process.

  18. Numerical analysis of microstructure formation of magnetic particles and nonmagnetic particles in MR fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ido, Y; Yamaguchi, T; Inagaki, T

    2009-01-01

    Microstructure formation of magnetic particles and nonmagnetic particles in MR fluids is investigated using the particle method simulation. Nonmagnetic sphere particles are rearranged in the field direction due to the chain-like cluster formation of magnetic particles. In the contrast, the nonmagnetic spherocylinder particles are not sufficiently rearranged in the field direction by using the cluster formation of sphere magnetic particles.

  19. Detection of charged particles through a photodiode: design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angoli, A.; Quirino, L.L.; Hernandez, V.M.; Lopez del R, H.; Mireles, F.; Davila, J.I.; Rios, C.; Pinedo, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    This project develops and construct an charge particle detector mean a pin photodiode array, design and analysis using a silicon pin Fotodiodo that generally is used to detect visible light, its good efficiency, size compact and reduced cost specifically allows to its use in the radiation monitoring and alpha particle detection. Here, so much, appears the design of the system of detection like its characterization for alpha particles where one is reported as alpha energy resolution and detection efficiency. The equipment used in the development of work consists of alpha particle a triple source composed of Am-241, Pu-239 and Cm-244 with 5,55 KBq as total activity, Maestro 32 software made by ORTEC, a multi-channel card Triumph from ORTEC and one low activity electroplated uranium sample. (Author)

  20. A hybrid numerical method for orbit correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, G.; Himel, T.; Shoaee, H.

    1997-09-01

    The authors describe a simple hybrid numerical method for beam orbit correction in particle accelerators. The method overcomes both degeneracy in the linear system being solved and respects boundaries on the solution. It uses the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to find and remove the null-space in the system, followed by a bounded Linear Least Squares analysis of the remaining recast problem. It was developed for correcting orbit and dispersion in the B-factory rings

  1. Mission Analysis for LEO Microwave Power-Beaming Station in Orbital Launch of Microwave Lightcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Dickenson, T.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed mission analysis study has been performed for a 1 km diameter, rechargeable satellite solar power station (SPS) designed to boost 20m diameter, 2400 kg Micr,oWave Lightcraft (MWLC) into low earth orbit (LEO) Positioned in a 476 km daily-repeating oi.bit, the 35 GHz microwave power station is configured like a spinning, thin-film bicycle wheel covered by 30% efficient sola cells on one side and billions of solid state microwave transmitter elements on the other, At the rim of this wheel are two superconducting magnets that can stor,e 2000 G.J of energy from the 320 MW, solar array over a period of several orbits. In preparation for launch, the entire station rotates to coarsely point at the Lightcraft, and then phases up using fine-pointing information sent from a beacon on-board the Lightcraft. Upon demand, the station transmits a 10 gigawatt microwave beam to lift the MWLC from the earth surface into LEO in a flight of several minutes duration. The mission analysis study was comprised of two parts: a) Power station assessment; and b) Analysis of MWLC dynamics during the ascent to orbit including the power-beaming relationships. The power station portion addressed eight critical issues: 1) Drag force vs. station orbital altitude; 2) Solar pressure force on the station; 3) Station orbital lifetime; 4) Feasibility of geo-magnetic re-boost; 5) Beta angle (i..e., sola1 alignment) and power station effective area relationship; 6) Power station percent time in sun vs, mission elapsed time; 7) Station beta angle vs.. charge time; 8) Stresses in station structures.. The launch dynamics portion examined four issues: 1) Ascent mission/trajecto1y profile; 2) MWLC/power-station mission geometry; 3) MWLC thrust angle vs. time; 4) Power station pitch rate during power beaming. Results indicate that approximately 0 58 N of drag force acts upon the station when rotated edge-on to project the minimum frontal area of 5000 sq m. An ion engine or perhaps an electrodynamic

  2. A method of orbital analysis for large-scale first-principles simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohwaki, Tsukuru [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Nissan Research Center, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., 1 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-8523 (Japan); Otani, Minoru [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ozaki, Taisuke [Research Center for Simulation Science (RCSS), Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2014-06-28

    An efficient method of calculating the natural bond orbitals (NBOs) based on a truncation of the entire density matrix of a whole system is presented for large-scale density functional theory calculations. The method recovers an orbital picture for O(N) electronic structure methods which directly evaluate the density matrix without using Kohn-Sham orbitals, thus enabling quantitative analysis of chemical reactions in large-scale systems in the language of localized Lewis-type chemical bonds. With the density matrix calculated by either an exact diagonalization or O(N) method, the computational cost is O(1) for the calculation of NBOs associated with a local region where a chemical reaction takes place. As an illustration of the method, we demonstrate how an electronic structure in a local region of interest can be analyzed by NBOs in a large-scale first-principles molecular dynamics simulation for a liquid electrolyte bulk model (propylene carbonate + LiBF{sub 4})

  3. Particle analysis on concentrated particle suspensions by transmission fluctuation spectrometry with band-pass filters: part 2. Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yamin; Shen, Jianqi; Cai, Xiaoshu; Riebel, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Transmission fluctuation spectrometry (TFS), as a new method of online and real-time particle analysis developed in recent years, can measure the particle size distribution and particle concentration simultaneously. In the preceding paper, high concentration effects on the TFS using band-pass filters were investigated by numerical simulation, and empirical expressions to correct the effects were obtained. This paper presents a study on the TFS measurements in which the particle concentration varies in a very wide dynamic range. Finally, reasonable results on both the particle size distribution and particle concentration are obtained by introducing empirical corrections into the inversion algorithm

  4. Multielement analysis of interplanetary dust particles using TOF-SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, T.; Kloeck, W.; Jessberger, E. K.; Rulle, H.; Zehnpfenning, J.

    1993-01-01

    Sections of three stratospheric particles (U2015G1, W7029*A27, and L2005P9) were analyzed with TOF-SIMS (Time Of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) continuing our efforts to investigate the element distribution in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) with high lateral resolution (approximately 0.2 micron), to examine possible atmospheric contamination effects, and to further explore the abilities of this technique for element analysis of small samples. The samples, previously investigated with SXRF (synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analysis), are highly enriched in Br (Br/Fe: 59 x CI, 9.2 x CI, and 116 x CI, respectively). U2015G1 is the IDP with the by far highest Zn/Fe-ratio (81 x CI) ever reported in chondritic particles.

  5. Fireworks induced particle pollution: A spatio-temporal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Singh, R. K.; Murari, V.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. S.; Banerjee, T.

    2016-11-01

    Diwali-specific firework induced particle pollution was measured in terms of aerosol mass loading, type, optical properties and vertical distribution. Entire nation exhibited an increase in particulate concentrations specifically in Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Aerosol surface mass loading at middle IGP revealed an increase of 56-121% during festival days in comparison to their background concentrations. Space-borne measurements (Aqua and Terra-MODIS) typically identified IGP with moderate to high AOD (0.3-0.8) during pre-festive days which transmutes to very high AOD (0.4-1.8) during Diwali-day with accumulation of aerosol fine mode fractions (0.3-1.0). Most of the aerosol surface monitoring stations exhibited increase in PM2.5 especially on Diwali-day while PM10 exhibited increase on subsequent days. Elemental compositions strongly support K, Ba, Sr, Cd, S and P to be considered as firework tracers. The upper and middle IGP revealed dominance of absorbing aerosols (OMI-AI: 0.80-1.40) while CALIPSO altitude-orbit-cross-section profiles established the presence of polluted dust which eventually modified with association of smoke and polluted continental during extreme fireworks. Diwali-specific these observations have implications on associating fireworks induced particle pollution and human health while inclusion of these observations should improve regional air quality model.

  6. Pyrolysis and combustion kinetics of lycopodium particles in thermogravimetric analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Alireza Mostafavi; Sadjad Salavati; Hossein Beidaghy Dizaji; Mehdi Bidabadi

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is a kind of renewable energy which is used increasingly in different types of combustion systems or in the production of fuels like bio-oil. Lycopodium is a cellulosic particle, with good combustion properties, of which microscopic images show that these particles have spherical shapes with identical diameters of 31 μm. The measured density of these particles is 1.0779 g/cm2. Lycopodium particles contain 64.06% carbon, 25.56% oxygen, 8.55% hydrogen and 1.83% nitrogen, and no sulfur. Thermogravimetric analysis in the nitrogen environment indicates that the maximum of particle mass reduction occurs in the temperature range of 250−550 °C where the maximum mass reduction in the DTG diagrams also occurs in. In the oxygen environment, an additional peak can also be observed in the temperature range of 500−600 °C, which points to solid phase combustion and ignition temperature of lycopodium particles. The kinetics of reactions is determined by curve fitting and minimization of error.

  7. Electric propulsion reliability: Statistical analysis of on-orbit anomalies and comparative analysis of electric versus chemical propulsion failure rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Joseph Homer; Geng, Fan; Ku, Michelle; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2017-10-01

    With a few hundred spacecraft launched to date with electric propulsion (EP), it is possible to conduct an epidemiological study of EP's on orbit reliability. The first objective of the present work was to undertake such a study and analyze EP's track record of on orbit anomalies and failures by different covariates. The second objective was to provide a comparative analysis of EP's failure rates with those of chemical propulsion. Satellite operators, manufacturers, and insurers will make reliability- and risk-informed decisions regarding the adoption and promotion of EP on board spacecraft. This work provides evidence-based support for such decisions. After a thorough data collection, 162 EP-equipped satellites launched between January 1997 and December 2015 were included in our dataset for analysis. Several statistical analyses were conducted, at the aggregate level and then with the data stratified by severity of the anomaly, by orbit type, and by EP technology. Mean Time To Anomaly (MTTA) and the distribution of the time to (minor/major) anomaly were investigated, as well as anomaly rates. The important findings in this work include the following: (1) Post-2005, EP's reliability has outperformed that of chemical propulsion; (2) Hall thrusters have robustly outperformed chemical propulsion, and they maintain a small but shrinking reliability advantage over gridded ion engines. Other results were also provided, for example the differentials in MTTA of minor and major anomalies for gridded ion engines and Hall thrusters. It was shown that: (3) Hall thrusters exhibit minor anomalies very early on orbit, which might be indicative of infant anomalies, and thus would benefit from better ground testing and acceptance procedures; (4) Strong evidence exists that EP anomalies (onset and likelihood) and orbit type are dependent, a dependence likely mediated by either the space environment or differences in thrusters duty cycles; (5) Gridded ion thrusters exhibit both

  8. Structural Analysis Peer Review for the Static Display of the Orbiter Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center Visitors Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minute, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Mr. Christopher Miller with the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) NASA Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) office requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) technical support on March 15, 2012, to review and make recommendations on the structural analysis being performed for the Orbiter Atlantis static display at the KSC Visitor Center. The principal focus of the assessment was to review the engineering firm's structural analysis for lifting and aligning the orbiter and its static display configuration

  9. The long-period eccentric orbit of the particle accelerator HD 167971 revealed by long baseline interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Becker, M.; Sana, H.; Absil, O.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Blomme, R.

    2012-01-01

    Using optical long baseline interferometry, we resolved for the first time the two wide components of HD 167971, a candidate hierarchical triple system known to efficiently accelerate particles. Our multi-epoch Very Large Telescope Interferometer observations provide direct evidence for a

  10. Single particle analysis with a 3600 light scattering photometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholdi, M.F.

    1979-06-01

    Light scattering by single spherical homogeneous particles in the diameter range 1 to 20 μm and relative refractive index 1.20 is measured. Particle size of narrowly dispersed populations is determined and a multi-modal dispersion of five components is completely analyzed. A 360 0 light scattering photometer for analysis of single particles has been designed and developed. A fluid stream containing single particles intersects a focused laser beam at the primary focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector ring. The light scattered at angles theta = 2.5 0 to 177.5 0 at phi = 0 0 and 180 0 is reflected onto a circular array of photodiodes. The ellipsoidal reflector is situated in a chamber filled with fluid matching that of the stream to minimize refracting and reflecting interfaces. The detector array consists of 60 photodiodes each subtending 3 0 in scattering angle on 6 0 centers around 360 0 . 32 measurements on individual particles can be acquired at rates of 500 particles per second. The intensity and angular distribution of light scattered by spherical particles are indicative of size and relative refractive index. Calculations, using Lorenz--Mie theory, of differential scattering patterns integrated over angle corresponding to the detector geometry determined the instrument response to particle size. From this the expected resolution and experimental procedures are determined.Ultimately, the photometer will be utilized for identification and discrimination of biological cells based on the sensitivity of light scattering to size, shape, refractive index differences, internal granularity, and other internal morphology. This study has demonstrated the utility of the photometer and indicates potential for application to light scattering studies of biological cells

  11. Vibrational spectra and natural bond orbital analysis of organic crystal L-prolinium picrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Bismi; Amalanathan, M.; Hubert Joe, I.

    2012-10-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis and quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed on the organic crystal L-prolinium picrate (LPP). The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of LPP have been investigated using B3LYP method. The calculated molecular geometry has been compared with the experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA 4 program. The various intramolecular interactions confirming the biological activity of the compound have been exposed by natural bond orbital analysis. The distribution of Mulliken atomic charges and bending of natural hybrid orbitals associated with hydrogen bonding also reflects the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding thereby enhancing bioactivity. The analysis of the electron density of HOMO and LUMO gives an idea of the delocalization and low value of energy gap indicates electron transport in the molecule and thereby bioactivity. Vibrational analysis reveals the presence of strong O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O interaction between L-prolinium and picrate ions providing evidence for the charge transfer interaction between the donor and acceptor groups and is responsible for its bioactivity.

  12. Evolution of the sedimentation technique for particle size distribution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maley, R.

    1998-01-01

    After an introduction on the significance of particle size measurements, sedimentation methods are described, with emphasis on the evolution of the gravitational approach. The gravitational technique based on mass determination by X-ray adsorption allows fast analysis by automation and easy data handling, in addition to providing the accuracy required by quality control and research applications [it

  13. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  14. Analysis of particles loaded fiber composites for the evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effective material properties are predicted for composites with different shape and size of inclusions such as cylindrical fibers, spherical and elliptical particles and cylindrical fibers with hemispherical ends. The analysis is based on a numerical homogenization technique using finite element method in connection with ...

  15. Q-space analysis of scattering by particles: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    This review describes and demonstrates the Q-space analysis of light scattering by particles. This analysis involves plotting the scattered intensity versus the scattering wave vector q=(4π/λ)sin(θ/2) on a double log plot. The analysis uncovers power law descriptions of the scattering with length scale dependent crossovers between the power laws. It also systematically describes the magnitude of the scattering and the interference ripple structure that often underlies the power laws. It applies to scattering from dielectric spheres of arbitrary size and refractive index (Mie scattering), fractal aggregates and irregularly shaped particles such as dusts. The benefits of Q-space analysis are that it provides a simple and comprehensive description of scattering in terms of power laws with quantifiable exponents; it can be used to differentiate scattering by particles of different shapes, and it yields a physical understanding of scattering based on diffraction. -- Highlights: ► Angular scattering functions for spheres show power laws versus the wave vector q. ► The power laws uncover patterns involving length scales and functionalities. ► Similar power laws appear in scattering from aggregates and irregular particles. ► Power laws provide a comprehensive and quantitative description of scattering

  16. A Novel Double Cluster and Principal Component Analysis-Based Optimization Method for the Orbit Design of Earth Observation Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The weighted sum and genetic algorithm-based hybrid method (WSGA-based HM, which has been applied to multiobjective orbit optimizations, is negatively influenced by human factors through the artificial choice of the weight coefficients in weighted sum method and the slow convergence of GA. To address these two problems, a cluster and principal component analysis-based optimization method (CPC-based OM is proposed, in which many candidate orbits are gradually randomly generated until the optimal orbit is obtained using a data mining method, that is, cluster analysis based on principal components. Then, the second cluster analysis of the orbital elements is introduced into CPC-based OM to improve the convergence, developing a novel double cluster and principal component analysis-based optimization method (DCPC-based OM. In DCPC-based OM, the cluster analysis based on principal components has the advantage of reducing the human influences, and the cluster analysis based on six orbital elements can reduce the search space to effectively accelerate convergence. The test results from a multiobjective numerical benchmark function and the orbit design results of an Earth observation satellite show that DCPC-based OM converges more efficiently than WSGA-based HM. And DCPC-based OM, to some degree, reduces the influence of human factors presented in WSGA-based HM.

  17. Use of MSC/NASTRAN for the thermal analysis of the Space Shuttle Orbiter braking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, James; Mccann, David

    1987-01-01

    A description is given of the thermal modeling and analysis effort being conducted to investigate the transient temperature and thermal stress characteristics of the Space Shuttle Orbiter brake components and subsystems. Models are constructed of the brake stator as well as of the entire brake assembly to analyze the temperature distribution and thermal stress during the landing and braking process. These investigations are carried out on a UNIVAC computer system with MSC/NASTRAN Version 63. Analytical results and solution methods are presented and comparisons are made with SINDA results.

  18. Charged particle activation analysis: present status and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Charged particle activation analysis is a highly sensitive nuclear analytical technique for the determination of elements at trace and ultra trace levels. CPAA involves the irradiation of samples with high energy charged particles, both light ions and heavy ions, from an accelerator in the energy range of 10 to 100 MeV. CPAA has been developed and standardized for the determination of several elements at trace levels in various types of materials using high energy ion beams from VEC machine at Kolkata. A brief review on CPAA is presented here based on our present works and its applications in future. (author)

  19. Numerical analysis of jet breakup behavior using particle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Kazuya; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    A continuous jet changes to droplets where jet breakup occurs. In this study, two-dimensional numerical analysis of jet breakup is performed using the MPS method (Moving Particle Semi-implicit Method) which is a particle method for incompressible flows. The continuous fluid surrounding the jet is neglected. Dependencies of the jet breakup length on the Weber number and the Froude number agree with the experiment. The size distribution of droplets is in agreement with the Nukiyama-Tanasawa distribution which has been widely used as an experimental correlation. Effects of the Weber number and the Froude number on the size distribution are also obtained. (author)

  20. Deadly Sunflower Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2018-04-01

    Solar radiation pressure is usually very effective at removing hazardous millimeter-sized debris from distant orbits around asteroidsand other small solar system bodies (Hamilton and Burns 1992). Theprimary loss mechanism, driven by the azimuthal component of radiationpressure, is eccentricity growth followed by a forced collision withthe central body. One large class of orbits, however, neatly sidestepsthis fate. Orbits oriented nearly perpendicular to the solar directioncan maintain their face-on geometry, oscillating slowly around a stableequilibrium orbit. These orbits, designated sunflower orbits, arerelated to terminator orbits studied by spacecraft mission designers(Broschart etal. 2014).Destabilization of sunflower orbits occurs only for particles smallenough that radiation pressure is some tens of percent the strength ofthe central body's direct gravity. This greatly enhanced stability,which follows from the inability of radiation incident normal to theorbit to efficiently drive eccentricities, presents a threat tospacecraft missions, as numerous dangerous projectiles are potentiallyretained in orbit. We have investigated sunflower orbits insupport of the New Horizons, Aida, and Lucy missions and find thatthese orbits are stable for hazardous particle sizes at asteroids,comets, and Kuiper belt objects of differing dimensions. Weinvestigate the sources and sinks for debris that might populate suchorbits, estimate timescales and equilibrium populations, and willreport on our findings.

  1. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploger, Scott A., E-mail: scott.ploger@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3855 (United States); Demkowicz, Paul A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3855 (United States); Hunn, John D.; Kehn, Jay S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak compact-average burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3 × 10{sup 5} total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Six compacts have been examined, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose from 36 to 79 individual particles near midplane on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer–IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, 981 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel protrusion into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer–IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only four classified particles, all in conjunction with IPyC–SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures and IPyC–SiC debonds.

  2. Unified time analysis of photon and particle tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, Erasmo; Jakiel, Jacek

    2004-01-01

    A unified time analysis of photon and nonrelativistic particle tunnellings is presented, in which time is regarded as a quantum observable, canonically conjugated to energy. Within this approach, one can introduce self-consistent definitions of the tunnelling times, on the basis of conventional quantum mechanics (or one-dimensional quantum electrodynamics) only. The validity of the Hartman effect [which states the tunnelling duration to be independent of the (opaque) barrier width, with superluminal group velocities of the tunnelling packet as a consequence] is verified for all the known expressions of the mean tunnelling time. However, some noticeable generalizations of (and deviations from) the Hartman effect are, as well, briefly investigated. Moreover, the analogy between particle and photon tunnelling is suitably exploited; on the basis of such an analogy, an explanation of some recent interesting microwave and optical experimental results on tunnelling times is proposed. Attention is devoted, at last, to some aspects of the causality problem for particle and photon tunnelling

  3. International patent analysis of water source heat pump based on orbit database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na

    2018-02-01

    Using orbit database, this paper analysed the international patents of water source heat pump (WSHP) industry with patent analysis methods such as analysis of publication tendency, geographical distribution, technology leaders and top assignees. It is found that the beginning of the 21st century is a period of rapid growth of the patent application of WSHP. Germany and the United States had done researches and development of WSHP in an early time, but now Japan and China have become important countries of patent applications. China has been developing faster and faster in recent years, but the patents are concentrated in universities and urgent to be transferred. Through an objective analysis, this paper aims to provide appropriate decision references for the development of domestic WSHP industry.

  4. Orbital selectivity causing anisotropy and particle-hole asymmetry in the charge density wave gap of 2 H -TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Wijayaratne, K.; Butler, A.; Yang, J.; Malliakas, C. D.; Chung, D. Y.; Louca, D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; van Wezel, J.; Chatterjee, U.

    2017-09-01

    We report an in-depth angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on 2 H -TaS2 , a canonical incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) system. This study demonstrates that just as in related incommensurate CDW systems, 2 H -TaSe2 and 2 H -NbSe2 , the energy gap (ΔCDW) of 2 H -TaS2 is localized along the K -centered Fermi surface barrels and is particle-hole asymmetric. The persistence of ΔCDW even at temperatures higher than the CDW transition temperature TCDW in 2 H -TaS2 , reflects the similar pseudogap behavior observed previously in 2 H -TaSe2 and 2 H -NbSe2 . However, in sharp contrast to 2 H -NbSe2 , where ΔCDW is nonzero only in the vicinity of a few "hot spots" on the inner K -centered Fermi surface barrels, ΔCDW in 2 H -TaS2 is nonzero along the entirety of both K -centered Fermi surface barrels. Based on a tight-binding model, we attribute this dichotomy in the momentum dependence and the Fermi surface specificity of ΔCDW between otherwise similar CDW compounds to the different orbital orientations of their electronic states that participate in the CDW pairing. Our results suggest that the orbital selectivity plays a critical role in the description of incommensurate CDW materials.

  5. Study of coal oxidation by charged particle activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlyer, D.J.; Wolf, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    It has been possible, using the technique of changed particle activation analysis, to follow the time course of the oxidation of coal exposed to air. The kinetics have been studied and seem to be consistent with a rapid initial uptake of oxygen containing molecules followed by slow diffusion into the surface of the coal particles. In this latter regard a study has been undertaken to study the depth profile of the oxygen into the coal particle surface. The depth of penetration of the activating particle is determined by the incident energy and therefore, by comparison to the appropriate standards, the depth profile may be determined either by varying the incident energy or by varying the particle size. Both approaches have been used and give consistent results. The depth to which a significant amount of oxygen penetrates varies from about 3 μm for very high rank coals to about 20 μm for low rank coals. This diffusion depth seems to be related to the porosity of the coals. A model for the low temperature air oxidation of coal has been developed to explain the results from the above mentioned experiments

  6. Online single particle analysis of ice particle residuals from mountain-top mixed-phase clouds using laboratory derived particle type assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Susan; Schneider, Johannes; Klimach, Thomas; Mertes, Stephan; Schenk, Ludwig Paul; Kupiszewski, Piotr; Curtius, Joachim; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    In situ single particle analysis of ice particle residuals (IPRs) and out-of-cloud aerosol particles was conducted by means of laser ablation mass spectrometry during the intensive INUIT-JFJ/CLACE campaign at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l.) in January-February 2013. During the 4-week campaign more than 70 000 out-of-cloud aerosol particles and 595 IPRs were analyzed covering a particle size diameter range from 100 nm to 3 µm. The IPRs were sampled during 273 h while the station was covered by mixed-phase clouds at ambient temperatures between -27 and -6 °C. The identification of particle types is based on laboratory studies of different types of biological, mineral and anthropogenic aerosol particles. The outcome of these laboratory studies was characteristic marker peaks for each investigated particle type. These marker peaks were applied to the field data. In the sampled IPRs we identified a larger number fraction of primary aerosol particles, like soil dust (13 ± 5 %) and minerals (11 ± 5 %), in comparison to out-of-cloud aerosol particles (2.4 ± 0.4 and 0.4 ± 0.1 %, respectively). Additionally, anthropogenic aerosol particles, such as particles from industrial emissions and lead-containing particles, were found to be more abundant in the IPRs than in the out-of-cloud aerosol. In the out-of-cloud aerosol we identified a large fraction of aged particles (31 ± 5 %), including organic material and secondary inorganics, whereas this particle type was much less abundant (2.7 ± 1.3 %) in the IPRs. In a selected subset of the data where a direct comparison between out-of-cloud aerosol particles and IPRs in air masses with similar origin was possible, a pronounced enhancement of biological particles was found in the IPRs.

  7. Use of the neighboring orbital model for analysis of electronic coupling in Class III intervalence compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelsen, Stephen F.; Weaver, Michael N.; Luo Yun; Lockard, Jenny V.; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Symmetrical charge-delocalized intervalence radical ions should not be described by the traditional two-state model that has been so successful for their localized counterparts. If they lack direct overlap between their charge-bearing units (M), their diabatic orbitals have an equal energy pair of symmetrized M-centered combination orbitals that are symmetric (S) or antisymmetric (A) with respect to a symmetry element at the center of the molecule. The M combination orbitals will mix separately with bridge orbitals of the same symmetry. We call the simplest useful model for this situation the neighboring orbital model, which uses the S and A bridge orbitals of high overlap that lie closest in energy to the M orbital pair, resulting in two two-state models that have a common energy for one pair. This model is developed quantitatively, and examples having 1, 3, 5, and 7 electrons in the neighboring orbitals are illustrated

  8. Critical hand ischemia treatment via orbital atherectomy-A single center observational retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahro, Abdul; Igyarto, Zsuzsanna; Martinsen, Brad

    2017-03-01

    Critical hand ischemia (CHI) can be devastating and may result in amputation. Distal vessel calcification has been shown to be a major factor in causing CHI. Atherectomy in the upper extremities is not typically considered due to the small anatomy; however, the Diamondback 360° Peripheral Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) (Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.) can access treatment areas with a reference vessel diameter of 1.5mm. A retrospective, observational, single center (Merit Health Center, Jackson, MS) analysis of 11 CHI patients with calcific disease of the radial artery treated with orbital atherectomy (OAS) was completed. Demographics and procedural to 30-day outcomes were assessed. All patients had good blood flow to the hand after intervention and none experienced complications during or immediately post-procedure. At 30-days the freedom from revascularization and amputation was 100%, and all the wounds were healed. The following important principles were followed during the use of OAS for CHI: (1) ACT was therapeutic (~250s); (2) Gentle wire manipulation; (3) Utilization of a small OAS crown (1.25mm); (4) Aggressive vasodilator use-given through the exchange catheter; (5) Angioplasty balloon was matched to the size of the vessel and long and low pressure inflations were completed. Critical hand ischemia can be treated with endovascular techniques. Obtaining good outflow to the fingers is critical for wound healing and preventing amputation. Orbital atherectomy is a useful tool in preparing vessels for balloon angioplasty; particularly in cases where calcification is present. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fragment-orbital tunneling currents and electronic couplings for analysis of molecular charge-transfer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang-Yeon; Kim, Jaewook; Kim, Woo Youn

    2018-04-04

    In theoretical charge-transfer research, calculation of the electronic coupling element is crucial for examining the degree of the electronic donor-acceptor interaction. The tunneling current (TC), representing the magnitudes and directions of electron flow, provides a way of evaluating electronic couplings, along with the ability of visualizing how electrons flow in systems. Here, we applied the TC theory to π-conjugated organic dimer systems, in the form of our fragment-orbital tunneling current (FOTC) method, which uses the frontier molecular-orbitals of system fragments as diabatic states. For a comprehensive test of FOTC, we assessed how reasonable the computed electronic couplings and the corresponding TC densities are for the hole- and electron-transfer databases HAB11 and HAB7. FOTC gave 12.5% mean relative unsigned error with regard to the high-level ab initio reference. The shown performance is comparable with that of fragment-orbital density functional theory, which gave the same error by 20.6% or 13.9% depending on the formulation. In the test of a set of nucleobase π stacks, we showed that the original TC expression is also applicable to nondegenerate cases under the condition that the overlap between the charge distributions of diabatic states is small enough to offset the energy difference. Lastly, we carried out visual analysis on the FOTC densities of thiophene dimers with different intermolecular alignments. The result depicts an intimate topological connection between the system geometry and electron flow. Our work provides quantitative and qualitative grounds for FOTC, showing it to be a versatile tool in characterization of molecular charge-transfer systems.

  10. Functional Group Analysis of Biomass Burning Particles Using Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrell, K.; Lau, A.; Bond, T.; Iraci, L. T.

    2008-12-01

    Biomass burning is a significant source of particulate organic carbon in the atmosphere. These particles affect the energy balance of the atmosphere directly by absorbing and scattering solar radiation, and indirectly through their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The chemical composition of biomass burning particles influences their ability to act as CCN, thus understanding the chemistry of these particles is required for understanding their effects on climate and air quality. As climate change influences the frequency and severity of boreal forest fires, the influence of biomass burning aerosols on the atmosphere may become significantly greater. Only a small portion of the organic carbon (OC) fraction of these particles has been identified at the molecular level, although several studies have explored the general chemical classes found in biomass burning smoke. To complement those studies and provide additional information about the reactive functional groups present, we are developing a method for polarity-based separation of compound classes found in the OC fraction, followed by infrared (IR) spectroscopic analysis of each polarity fraction. It is our goal to find a simple, relatively low-tech method which will provide a moderate chemical understanding of the entire suite of compounds present in the OC fraction of biomass burning particles. Here we present preliminary results from pine and oak samples representative of Midwestern United States forests burned at several different temperatures. Wood type and combustion temperature are both seen to affect the composition of the particles. The latter seems to affect relative contributions of certain functional groups, while oak demonstrates at least one additional chemical class of compounds, particularly at lower burning temperatures, where gradual solid-gas phase reactions can produce relatively large amounts of incompletely oxidized products.

  11. Automated analysis of organic particles using cluster SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillen, Greg; Zeissler, Cindy; Mahoney, Christine; Lindstrom, Abigail; Fletcher, Robert; Chi, Peter; Verkouteren, Jennifer; Bright, David; Lareau, Richard T.; Boldman, Mike

    2004-06-15

    Cluster primary ion bombardment combined with secondary ion imaging is used on an ion microscope secondary ion mass spectrometer for the spatially resolved analysis of organic particles on various surfaces. Compared to the use of monoatomic primary ion beam bombardment, the use of a cluster primary ion beam (SF{sub 5}{sup +} or C{sub 8}{sup -}) provides significant improvement in molecular ion yields and a reduction in beam-induced degradation of the analyte molecules. These characteristics of cluster bombardment, along with automated sample stage control and custom image analysis software are utilized to rapidly characterize the spatial distribution of trace explosive particles, narcotics and inkjet-printed microarrays on a variety of surfaces.

  12. The ground support computer and in-orbit survey data analysis program for the SEEP experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, H.D.; Datlowe, D.W.; Mobilia, J.; Roselle, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    The ground support computer equipment (GSE) and production survey plot and analysis software are described for the Stimulated Emissions of Energetic Particles (SEEP) experiment on the S81-1 satellite. A general purpose satellite data acquisition circuit was developed based on a Z-80 portable microcomputer. By simply changing instrument control software and electrical connectors, automatic testing and control of the various SEEP instruments was accomplished. A new feature incorporated into the SEEP data analysis phase was the development of a correlative data base for all of the SEEP instruments. A CPU efficient survey plot program (with ephemeris) was developed to display the approximate 3100 hours of data, with a time resolution of 0.5 sec, from the ten instrument sensors. The details of the general purpose multigraph algorithms and plot formats are presented. For the first time new associations are being investigated of simultaneous particle, X-ray, optical and plasma density satellite measurements

  13. Painleve singularity analysis applied to charged particle dynamics during reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    For a plasma in the collisionless regime, test-particle modelling can lend some insight into the macroscopic behavior of the plasma, e.g. conductivity and heating. A common example for which this technique is used is a system with electric and magnetic fields given by B = δyx + zy + yz and E = εz, where δ, γ, and ε are constant parameters. This model can be used to model plasma behavior near neutral lines, (γ = 0), as well as current sheets (γ = 0, δ = 0). The integrability properties of the particle motion in such fields might affect the plasma's macroscopic behavior, and the author has asked the question open-quotes For what values of δ, γ, and ε is the system integrable?close quotes To answer this question, the author has employed Painleve singularity analysis, which is an examination of the singularity properties of a test particle's equations of motion in the complex time plane. This analysis has identified two field geometries for which the system's particle dynamics are integrable in terms of the second Painleve transcendent: the circular O-line case and the case of the neutral sheet configuration. These geometries yield particle dynamics that are integrable in the Liouville sense (i.e., there exist the proper number of integrals in involution) in an extended phase space which includes the time as a canonical coordinate, and this property is also true for nonzero γ. The singularity property tests also identified a large, dense set of X-line and O-line field geometries that yield dynamics that may possess the weak Painleve property. In the case of the X-line geometries, this result shows little relevance to the physical nature of the system, but the existence of a dense set of elliptical O-line geometries with this property may be related to the fact that for ε positive, one can construct asymptotic solutions in the limit t → ∞

  14. Charged particle activation analysis at RIKEN. Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, T.

    2008-01-01

    From 1960s to 1980s many groups in the world actively studied and utilized charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) mainly for absolute determination of B, C, N, and O in high-purity substances, particularly semiconductor materials. Here, after a short historical note on CPAA, works of the author's group mainly at RIKEN are outlined and then his opinion is shown about how to anticipate on the present shrinking of CPAA. (author)

  15. Meta-orbital transition in heavy-fermion systems. Analysis by dynamical mean field theory and self-consistent renormalization theory of orbital fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Kazumasa

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a two-orbital Anderson lattice model with Ising orbital intersite exchange interactions on the basis of a dynamical mean field theory combined with the static mean field approximation of intersite orbital interactions. Focusing on Ce-based heavy-fermion compounds, we examine the orbital crossover between two orbital states, when the total f-electron number per site n f is ∼1. We show that a 'meta-orbital' transition, at which the occupancy of two orbitals changes steeply, occurs when the hybridization between the ground-state f-electron orbital and conduction electrons is smaller than that between the excited f-electron orbital and conduction electrons at low pressures. Near the meta-orbital critical end point, orbital fluctuations are enhanced and couple with charge fluctuations. A critical theory of meta-orbital fluctuations is also developed by applying the self-consistent renormalization theory of itinerant electron magnetism to orbital fluctuations. The critical end point, first-order transition, and crossover are described within Gaussian approximations of orbital fluctuations. We discuss the relevance of our results to CeAl 2 , CeCu 2 Si 2 , CeCu 2 Ge 2 , and related compounds, which all have low-lying crystalline-electric-field excited states. (author)

  16. Quantum mechanical analysis of the equilateral triangle billiard: Periodic orbit theory and wave packet revivals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doncheski, M.A.; Robinett, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Using the fact that the energy eigenstates of the equilateral triangle infinite well (or billiard) are available in closed form, we examine the connections between the energy eigenvalue spectrum and the classical closed paths in this geometry, using both periodic orbit theory and the short-term semi-classical behavior of wave packets. We also discuss wave packet revivals and show that there are exact revivals, for all wave packets, at times given by T rev =9μa 2 /4(h/2π) where a and μ are the length of one side and the mass of the point particle, respectively. We find additional cases of exact revivals with shorter revival times for zero-momentum wave packets initially located at special symmetry points inside the billiard. Finally, we discuss simple variations on the equilateral (60 deg. -60 deg. -60 deg. ) triangle, such as the half equilateral (30 deg. -60 deg. -90 deg.) triangle and other 'foldings', which have related energy spectra and revival structures

  17. Image segmentation and particles classification using texture analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayar Aly Atteya

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ingredients of oily fish include a large amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are important elements in various metabolic processes of humans, and have also been used to prevent diseases. However, in an attempt to reduce cost, recent developments are starting a replace the ingredients of fish oil with products of microalgae, that also produce polyunsaturated fatty acids. To do so, it is important to closely monitor morphological changes in algae cells and monitor their age in order to achieve the best results. This paper aims to describe an advanced vision-based system to automatically detect, classify, and track the organic cells using a recently developed SOPAT-System (Smart On-line Particle Analysis Technology, a photo-optical image acquisition device combined with innovative image analysis software. Methods The proposed method includes image de-noising, binarization and Enhancement, as well as object recognition, localization and classification based on the analysis of particles’ size and texture. Results The methods allowed for correctly computing cell’s size for each particle separately. By computing an area histogram for the input images (1h, 18h, and 42h, the variation could be observed showing a clear increase in cell. Conclusion The proposed method allows for algae particles to be correctly identified with accuracies up to 99% and classified correctly with accuracies up to 100%.

  18. An analysis of 3D particle path integration algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmofal, D.L.; Haimes, R.

    1996-01-01

    Several techniques for the numerical integration of particle paths in steady and unsteady vector (velocity) fields are analyzed. Most of the analysis applies to unsteady vector fields, however, some results apply to steady vector field integration. Multistep, multistage, and some hybrid schemes are considered. It is shown that due to initialization errors, many unsteady particle path integration schemes are limited to third-order accuracy in time. Multistage schemes require at least three times more internal data storage than multistep schemes of equal order. However, for timesteps within the stability bounds, multistage schemes are generally more accurate. A linearized analysis shows that the stability of these integration algorithms are determined by the eigenvalues of the local velocity tensor. Thus, the accuracy and stability of the methods are interpreted with concepts typically used in critical point theory. This paper shows how integration schemes can lead to erroneous classification of critical points when the timestep is finite and fixed. For steady velocity fields, we demonstrate that timesteps outside of the relative stability region can lead to similar integration errors. From this analysis, guidelines for accurate timestep sizing are suggested for both steady and unsteady flows. In particular, using simulation data for the unsteady flow around a tapered cylinder, we show that accurate particle path integration requires timesteps which are at most on the order of the physical timescale of the flow

  19. Quantum mechanical analysis of fractal conductance fluctuations: a picture using self-similar periodic orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Tatsuo; Miyamoto, Masanori; Budiyono, Agung; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Fractal magnetoconductance fluctuations are often observed in experiments on ballistic quantum dots. Although the analysis of the exact self-affine fractal has been given by the semiclassical theory using self-similar periodic orbits in systems with a soft-walled potential with a saddle, there has been no corresponding quantum mechanical investigation. We numerically calculate the quantum conductance with use of the recursive Green's function method applied to open cavities characterized by a Henon-Heiles type potential. The conductance fluctuations show exact self-affinity just as in some of the experimental observations. The enlargement factor for the horizontal axis can be explained by the scaling factor of the area of self-similar periodic orbits, and therefore be attributed to the curvature of the saddle in the cavity potential. The fractal dimension obtained through the box counting method agrees with those evaluated with use of the Hurst exponent, and coincides with the semiclassical prediction. We further investigate the variation of the fractal dimension by changing the control parameters between the classical and quantum domains. (fast track communication)

  20. Numerical analysis of orbital transfers to Mars using solar sails and attitude control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M. C.; de Melo, C. F.; Meireles, L. G.

    2017-10-01

    Solar sails present a promising alternative method of propulsion for the coming phases of the space exploration. With the recent advances in materials engineering, the construction of lighter and more resistant materials capable of impelling spaceships with the use of solar radiation pressure has become increasingly viable technologically and economically. The studies, simulations and analysis of orbital transfers from Earth to Mars proposed in this work were implemented considering the use of a flat solar sail. Maneuvers considering the delivery of a sailcraft from a Low Earth Orbit to the border of the Earth’s sphere of influence and interplanetary trajectories to Mars were investigated. A set of simulations were implemented varying the attitude of the sail relative to the Sun. Results show that a sailcraft can carry out transfers with final velocity with respect to Mars smaller than the interplanetary Patched-conic approximation, although this requires a longer time of transfers, provided the attitude of the sailcraft relative to the Sun can be controlled in some points of the trajectories.

  1. Orbital elements and an analysis of models for HDE 226868 = Cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, C.T.

    1975-01-01

    Radial velocities from 21 new high-dispersion spectrograms of HDE 226868 are presented. These are combined with previously published data to calculate a ''definitive'' set of orbital elements for the binary system. In particular, archival data are used to obtain a precise period. The ellipsoidal light curve is analyzed using both a Roche model and an ellipsoidal model, and the results are compared with work by Hutchings. Information from the absorption-line and emission-line velocity curves and the light curve is combined to give estimates for the orbital inclination and the component masses. The possible errors in the analysis are discussed and are shown to be negligible. A qualitative model for the mass transfer is proposed that explains the intensity and velocity variations of the optical emission lines and the variations in the X-ray intensity: including the low-energy X-ray absorption events sometimes seen near superior conjunction of the secondary. Tests of this model are also proposed. Finally, the observations are used to test various models that have been proposed for the system. The observations rule out low mass and rotating degenerate dwarf secondaries and present difficulties for the triple star model. The magnetic reconnection model is not ruled out by the observations. Models in which the secondary is a black hole are consistent with all available observations

  2. Analysis for orbital rendezvous of Chang'E-5 using SBI technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Shan, Q.; Li, P.

    2016-12-01

    Chang'E-5 will be launched in later 2017/early 2018 using a new generation rocket from Wenchang satellite launch center, Hainan, China. It is a lunar sampling return mission, and it is the first time for China to carry out orbital rendezvous and docking in the Moon. How to achieve orbital rendezvous successfully in the Moon is very important in Chang'E-5 mission. Orbital rendezvous will be implemented between an orbiter and an ascender 200 km above the Moon. The ground tracking techniques include range, Doppler and VLBI, and they will be used to track the orbiter and the ascender when the ascender is about 70 km farther away from the orbiter. Later the ascender will approach the orbiter automatically. As a successful example, in Chang'E-3, the differential phase delay (delta delay) data between the rover and the lander are obtained with a random error of about 1 ps, and the relative position of the rover is determined with an accuracy of several meters by using same beam VLBI (SBI) technique. Here the application of the SBI technique for Chang'E-5 orbital rendezvous is discussed. SBI technique can be used to track the orbiter and the ascender simultaneously when they are in the same beam. Delta delay of the two probes can be derived, and the measurement accuracy is much higher than that of the traditional VLBI data because of the cancelation of common errors. Theoretically it can result in a more accurate relative orbit between the two probes. In the simulation, different strategies are discussed to analyze the contribution of SBI data to the orbit accuracy improvement especially relative orbit between the orbiter and ascender. The simulation results show that the relative position accuracy of the orbiter and ascender can reach about 1 m with delta delay data of 10 ps.

  3. Analysis of the orbit errors in the CERN accelerators using model simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Kleban, S.; Clearwater, S.

    1987-09-01

    This paper will describe the use of the PLUS program to find various types of machine and beam errors such as, quadrupole strength, dipole strength, beam position monitors (BPMs), energy profile, and beam launch. We refer to this procedure as the GOLD (Generic Orbit and Lattice Debugger) Method which is a general technique that can be applied to analysis of errors in storage rings and transport lines. One useful feature of the Method is that it analyzes segments of a machine at a time so that the application and efficiency is independent of the size of the overall machine. Because the techniques are the same for all the types of problems it solves, the user need learn only how to find one type of error in order to use the program

  4. TCP/IP Interface for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnright, Robert; Stodden, David; Coggi, John

    2009-01-01

    The Transmission Control Protocol/ Internet protocol (TCP/IP) interface for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) provides the means for the software to establish real-time interfaces with other software. Such interfaces can operate between two programs, either on the same computer or on different computers joined by a network. The SOAP TCP/IP module employs a client/server interface where SOAP is the server and other applications can be clients. Real-time interfaces between software offer a number of advantages over embedding all of the common functionality within a single program. One advantage is that they allow each program to divide the computation labor between processors or computers running the separate applications. Secondly, each program can be allowed to provide its own expertise domain with other programs able to use this expertise.

  5. Studies on airborne dust particles by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Atsushi; Ishii, Taka; Tomiyama, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Isao.

    1974-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was performed on the airborne dust particles collected at six places with different contaminating circumstances in Kyoto city and the suburbs of Okayama city, using an open type low volume air sampler with a membrance filter attached. Radioactivation by neutrons was performed with the reactor in the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University. Short half-life nuclides activated by thermal neutrons were measured. The concentration of airborne dust was usually high in November and December, while Na, Mn, K, etc. probably owing to soil origin showed similar seasonal change to the dust particles, as expected. The concentrations Cl and Br were in proportion to traffic volume, and it was considered to be caused by the exhaust gas from cars. Zn, V. et. were thick in factory areas, which seemed to show the relationship with oil fuel consumption. (Kobatake, H.)

  6. Hydrodynamic Stability Analysis of Particle-Laden Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, T. S.; Majdalani, J.

    2014-11-01

    Fluid-wall interactions within solid rocket motors can result in parietal vortex shedding giving rise to hydrodynamic instabilities, or unsteady waves, that translate into pressure oscillations. The oscillations can result in vibrations observed by the rocket, rocket subsystems, or payload, which can lead to changes in flight characteristics, design failure, or other undesirable effects. For many years particles have been embedded in solid rocket propellants with the understanding that their presence increases specific impulse and suppresses fluctuations in the flowfield. This study utilizes a two dimensional framework to understand and quantify the aforementioned two-phase flowfield inside a motor case with a cylindrical grain perforation. This is accomplished through the use of linearized Navier-Stokes equations with the Stokes drag equation and application of the biglobal ansatz. Obtaining the biglobal equations for analysis requires quantification of the mean flowfield within the solid rocket motor. To that end, the extended Taylor-Culick form will be utilized to represent the gaseous phase of the mean flowfield while the self-similar form will be employed for the particle phase. Advancing the mean flowfield by quantifying the particle mass concentration with a semi-analytical solution the finalized mean flowfield is combined with the biglobal equations resulting in a system of eight partial differential equations. This system is solved using an eigensolver within the framework yielding the entire spectrum of eigenvalues, frequency and growth rate components, at once. This work will detail the parametric analysis performed to demonstrate the stabilizing and destabilizing effects of particles within solid rocket combustion.

  7. Hydrodynamic Stability Analysis of Particle-Laden Solid Rocket Motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, T S; Majdalani, J

    2014-01-01

    Fluid-wall interactions within solid rocket motors can result in parietal vortex shedding giving rise to hydrodynamic instabilities, or unsteady waves, that translate into pressure oscillations. The oscillations can result in vibrations observed by the rocket, rocket subsystems, or payload, which can lead to changes in flight characteristics, design failure, or other undesirable effects. For many years particles have been embedded in solid rocket propellants with the understanding that their presence increases specific impulse and suppresses fluctuations in the flowfield. This study utilizes a two dimensional framework to understand and quantify the aforementioned two-phase flowfield inside a motor case with a cylindrical grain perforation. This is accomplished through the use of linearized Navier-Stokes equations with the Stokes drag equation and application of the biglobal ansatz. Obtaining the biglobal equations for analysis requires quantification of the mean flowfield within the solid rocket motor. To that end, the extended Taylor-Culick form will be utilized to represent the gaseous phase of the mean flowfield while the self-similar form will be employed for the particle phase. Advancing the mean flowfield by quantifying the particle mass concentration with a semi-analytical solution the finalized mean flowfield is combined with the biglobal equations resulting in a system of eight partial differential equations. This system is solved using an eigensolver within the framework yielding the entire spectrum of eigenvalues, frequency and growth rate components, at once. This work will detail the parametric analysis performed to demonstrate the stabilizing and destabilizing effects of particles within solid rocket combustion

  8. Autonomous orbit determination and its error analysis for deep space using X-ray pulsar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Dongzhu; Yuan, Xiaoguang; Guo, Hehe; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous orbit determination (OD) is a complex process using filtering method to integrate observation and orbit dynamic model effectively and estimate the position and velocity of a spacecraft. As a novel technology for autonomous interplanetary OD, X-ray pulsar holds great promise for deep space exploration. The position and velocity of spacecraft should be estimated accurately during the OD process. However, under the same condition, the accuracy of OD can be greatly reduced by the error of the initial orbit value and the orbit mutation. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel OD method, which is based on the X-ray pulsar measurement and Adaptive Unscented Kalman Filter (AUKF). The accuracy of OD can be improved obviously because the AUKF estimates the orbit of spacecraft using measurement residual. During the simulation, the orbit of Phoenix Mars Lander, Deep Impact Probe, and Voyager 1 are selected. Compared with Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) and Extended Kalman Filter (EKF), the simulation results demonstrate that the proposed OD method based on AUKF can accurately determinate the velocity and position and effectively decrease the orbit estimated errors which is caused by the orbit mutation and orbit initial errors. (authors)

  9. Genetic analysis of an orbital metastasis from a primary hepatic neuroendocrine carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob Ø; von Holstein, Sarah L; Prause, Jan U

    2014-01-01

    and immunohistochemical features, and high-resolution, array-based comparative genomic hybridization demonstrated loss of one copy each of chromosomes 3 and 18, and gain of 1q both in the primary hepatic neuroendocrine carcinoma and in the orbital tumour. The orbital mass was diagnosed as a metastasis from the primary...... hepatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumours are extremely rare, and the orbit is an extremely rare location for a neuroendocrine carcinoma metastasis. This is the first reported case of an orbital metastasis with origin from a primary hepatic neuroendocrine carcinoma....

  10. Natural bond orbital analysis, electronic structure and vibrational spectral analysis of N-(4-hydroxyl phenyl) acetamide: A density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindasamy, P.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2014-09-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of N-(4-hydroxy phenyl) acetamide (N4HPA) of painkiller agent were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameter, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational energy distribution analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator’s strength calculated by TD-DFT and N4HPA is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and electron density surfaces of the molecule were constructed. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated.

  11. Toxicogenomic analysis of the particle dose- and size-response relationship of silica particles-induced toxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiaoyan; Jin Tingting; Jin Yachao; Wu Leihong; Hu Bin; Tian Yu; Fan Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between particle size and toxicity of silica particles (SP) with diameters of 30, 70, and 300 nm, which is essential to the safe design and application of SP. Data obtained from histopathological examinations suggested that SP of these sizes can all induce acute inflammation in the liver. In vivo imaging showed that intravenously administrated SP are mainly present in the liver, spleen and intestinal tract. Interestingly, in gene expression analysis, the cellular response pathways activated in the liver are predominantly conserved independently of particle dose when the same size SP are administered or are conserved independently of particle size, surface area and particle number when nano- or submicro-sized SP are administered at their toxic doses. Meanwhile, integrated analysis of transcriptomics, previous metabonomics and conventional toxicological results support the view that SP can result in inflammatory and oxidative stress, generate mitochondrial dysfunction, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis by neutrophil-mediated liver injury. (paper)

  12. Particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ress, R.I.

    1976-01-01

    Charged particles are entrained in a predetermined direction, independent of their polarity, in a circular orbit by a magnetic field rotating at high speed about an axis in a closed cylindrical or toroidal vessel. The field may be generated by a cylindrical laser structure, whose beam is polygonally reflected from the walls of an excited cavity centered on the axis, or by high-frequency energization of a set of electromagnets perpendicular to the axis. In the latter case, a separate magnetostatic axial field limits the orbital radius of the particles. These rotating and stationary magnetic fields may be generated centrally or by individual magnets peripherally spaced along its circular orbit. Chemical or nuclear reactions can be induced by collisions between the orbiting particles and an injected reactant, or by diverting high-speed particles from one doughnut into the path of counterrotating particles in an adjoining doughnut

  13. Implementation of a Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) model for stability and control analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalls, Stephen A.

    1995-07-01

    Three NASA centers: Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Langley Research Center (LaRC), and Johnson Space Center (JSC) are currently involved in studying a family of single-stage- and two-stage-to-orbit (SSTO/TSTO) vehicles to serve as the next generation space transportation system (STS). A rocketed winged-body is the current focus. The configuration (WB001) is a vertically-launched, horizontally-landing system with circular cross-section. Preliminary aerodynamic data was generated by LaRC and is a combination of wind-tunnel data, empirical methods, and Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System-(APAS) generated values. JSC's efforts involve descent trajectory design, stability analysis, and flight control system synthesis. Analysis of WB001's static stability indicates instability in 'tuck' (C(sub mu) less than 0: Mach = 0.30, alpha greater than 3.25 deg; Mach = 0.60, alpha greater than 8.04), an unstable dihedral effects (C(sub l(beta)) greater than 0: Mach = 30,alpha less than 12 deg.; Mach = 0.60, alpha less than 10.00 deg.), and, most significantly, an unstable weathercock stability derivative, C(sub n(beta)), at all angles of attack and subsonic Mach numbers. Longitudinal trim solutions for Mach = 0.30 and 0.60 indicate flight path angle possibilities ranging from around 12 (M = 0.30) to slightly over 20 degrees at Mach = 0.60. Trim angles of attack increase from 6.24 at Mach 0.60 and 10,000 feet to 17.7 deg. at Mach 0.30, sea-level. Lateral trim was attempted for a design cross-wind of 25.0 knots. The current vehicle aerodynamic and geometric characteristics will only yield a lateral trim solution at impractical tip-fin deflections (approximately equal to 43 deg.) and bank angles (21 deg.). A study of the lateral control surfaces, tip-fin controllers for WB001, indicate increased surface area would help address these instabilities, particularly the deficiency in C(sub n(beta)), but obviously at the expense of increased vehicle weight. Growth factors of

  14. Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler Jr., E. C.; Acuna, M.; Burchell, M. J.; Coates, A.; Farrell, W.; Flasar, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Gorevan, S.; Hartle, R. E.; Johnson, W. T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a combined Titan orbiter and Titan Aerorover mission with an emphasis on both in situ and remote sensing measurements of Titan's surface, atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetospheric interaction. The biological aspect of the Titan environment will be emphasized by the mission (i.e., search for organic materials which may include simple organics to 'amono' analogues of amino acids and possibly more complex, lightening detection and infrared, ultraviolet, and charged particle interactions with Titan's surface and atmosphere). An international mission is assumed to control costs. NASA will provide the orbiter, launch vehicle, DSN coverage and operations, while international partners will provide the Aerorover and up to 30% of the cost for the scientific instruments through collaborative efforts. To further reduce costs we propose a single PI for orbiter science instruments and a single PI for Aerorover science instruments. This approach will provide single command/data and power interface between spacecraft and orbiter instruments that will have redundant central DPU and power converter for their instruments. A similar approach could be used for the Aerorover. The mission profile will be constructed to minimize conflicts between Aerorover science, orbiter radar science, orbiter radio science, orbiter imaging science, and orbiter fields and particles (FP) science. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Thermal stress analysis of space shuttle orbiter wing skin panel and thermal protection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Jenkins, Jerald M.

    1987-01-01

    Preflight thermal stress analysis of the space shuttle orbiter wing skin panel and the thermal protection system (TPS) was performed. The heated skin panel analyzed was rectangular in shape and contained a small square cool region at its center. The wing skin immediately outside the cool region was found to be close to the state of elastic instability in the chordwise direction based on the conservative temperature distribution. The wing skin was found to be quite stable in the spanwise direction. The potential wing skin thermal instability was not severe enough to tear apart the strain isolation pad (SIP) layer. Also, the preflight thermal stress analysis was performed on the TPS tile under the most severe temperature gradient during the simulated reentry heating. The tensile thermal stress induced in the TPS tile was found to be much lower than the tensile strength of the TPS material. The thermal bending of the TPS tile was not severe enough to cause tearing of the SIP layer.

  16. Automatic particle-size analysis of HTGR recycle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.E.; Pechin, W.H.

    1977-09-01

    An automatic particle-size analyzer was designed, fabricated, tested, and put into operation measuring and counting HTGR recycle fuel particles. The particle-size analyzer can be used for particles in all stages of fabrication, from the loaded, uncarbonized weak acid resin up to fully-coated Biso or Triso particles. The device handles microspheres in the range of 300 to 1000 μm at rates up to 2000 per minute, measuring the diameter of each particle to determine the size distribution of the sample, and simultaneously determining the total number of particles. 10 figures

  17. An introduction to data analysis of airborne particle composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    A major problem facing air quality management personnel is the identification of sources of airborne particles and the quantitative apportionment of the aerosol mass to those sources. The ability to collect particle samples and analyze these samples for a suite of elements by such techniques as neutron activation analysis or x-ray fluorescence provides that data for the problem of resolving a series of complex mixtures into its components based on the profiles of the elements emitted by the various sources in the airshed. If all of the sources and their composition profiles are known, then the mass balance model becomes a multiple regression problem. If a series of samples have been analyzed without substantial information being available on the sources, factor analysis methods can be employed. In both situations, there are limits to the identification of specific sources or the location of the sources. Thus, other methods that combine chemical with meteorological data have been developed to assist in spatial identification of pollutant sources. There are also limitations to the ability of any statistical method to resolve sources in real world problems. The physical and statistical basis of these methods and their application to representative problems are reviewed in this report. (author). 42 refs, 5 figs, 5 tabs

  18. Optical Orbit Determination of a Geosynchronous Earth Orbit Satellite Effected by Baseline Distances between Various Ground-based Tracking Stations Ⅱ: COMS Case with Analysis of Actual Observation Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Young Son

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the orbit of the Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite (COMS, a Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO satellite, through data from actual optical observations using telescopes at the Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory (SOAO of the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI, Optical Wide field Patrol (OWL at KASI, and the Chungbuk National University Observatory (CNUO from August 1, 2014, to January 13, 2015. The astrometric data of the satellite were extracted from the World Coordinate System (WCS in the obtained images, and geometrically distorted errors were corrected. To handle the optically observed data, corrections were made for the observation time, light-travel time delay, shutter speed delay, and aberration. For final product, the sequential filter within the Orbit Determination Tool Kit (ODTK was used for orbit estimation based on the results of optical observation. In addition, a comparative analysis was conducted between the precise orbit from the ephemeris of the COMS maintained by the satellite operator and the results of orbit estimation using optical observation. The orbits estimated in simulation agree with those estimated with actual optical observation data. The error in the results using optical observation data decreased with increasing number of observatories. Our results are useful for optimizing observation data for orbit estimation.

  19. Shape of the orbital opening: individual characterization and analysis of variability in modern humans, Gorilla gorilla, and Pan troglodytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittbuhl, M; Le Minor, J M; Allenbach, B; Schaaf, A

    1999-05-01

    The description of the human orbital shape is principally qualitative in the classical literature, and characterised by adjectives such as circular, rectangular or quadrangular. In order to provide a precise quantification and interpretation of this shape, a study based on automatic image analysis and Fourier analysis was carried out on 45 human skulls (30 males, 15 females), and for comparison on 61 skulls of Gorilla gorilla (40 males, 21 females), and 34 skulls of Pan troglodytes (20 males, 14 females). Sexual dimorphism in the shape of the orbital opening was not demonstrated. Its dominant morphological features could be characterized by Fourier analysis; elliptical elongation and quadrangularity were dominant morphological features of the shape of the orbital opening in the three species. Elliptical elongation was more marked in humans and Pan, whereas quadrangularity was particularly emphasized in Gorilla. An intraspecific variability of the shape of the orbital opening existed in humans, Gorilla and Pan, and seemed close in the three species. Interspecific partition between humans, Gorilla and Pan was demonstrated despite the variability observed in the three species studied. Interspecific differences between Gorilla and the Pan-humans group were principally explained by the differences in quadrangularity, and by differences in orientation of triangularity and pentagonality. Differences in the shape of the orbital opening between humans and Pan were principally explained by differences in hexagonality, and by differences in orientation of quadrangularity. A closeness of shape between some humans and some individuals in Pan and, to a lesser degree, with some individuals in Gorilla was observed, demonstrating the existence of a morphological continuum of the shape of the orbital opening in hominoids.

  20. Charged particle activation analysis of phosphorus in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumoto, K.; Yagi, M.

    1983-01-01

    Charged particle activation analysis of phosphorus in biological materials using the 31 P(α,n) sup(34m)Cl reaction has been studied. Since sup(34m)Cl is also produced by the 32 S(α,pn) and the 35 Cl(α,α'n) reactions, the thick-target yield curves on phosphorus, sulfur and chlorine were determined in order to choose the optimum irradiation conditions. As a result, it was found that the activation analysis for phosphorus without interferences from sulfur and chlorine is possible by bombarding with less than 17 MeV alphas. The applicability of this method to biological samples was then examined by irradiating several standard reference materials. It was confirmed that phosphorus can readily be determined at the detection limit of 1μg free from interferences due to the matrix elements. (author)

  1. Cross-platform validation and analysis environment for particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekanov, S. V.; Pogrebnyak, I.; Wilbern, D.

    2017-11-01

    A multi-platform validation and analysis framework for public Monte Carlo simulation for high-energy particle collisions is discussed. The front-end of this framework uses the Python programming language, while the back-end is written in Java, which provides a multi-platform environment that can be run from a web browser and can easily be deployed at the grid sites. The analysis package includes all major software tools used in high-energy physics, such as Lorentz vectors, jet algorithms, histogram packages, graphic canvases, and tools for providing data access. This multi-platform software suite, designed to minimize OS-specific maintenance and deployment time, is used for online validation of Monte Carlo event samples through a web interface.

  2. Orbiter/carrier separation for the ALT free flight no. 1 reference trajectories. Mission planning, mission analysis and software formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    Details of the generation of the separation trajectories are discussed. The analysis culminated in definition of separation trajectories between physical separation and orbiter/carrier vortex clearance. Specifications, assumptions and analytical approach used to generate the separation trajectories are presented. Results of the analytical approach are evaluated. Conclusions and recommendations are summarized. Supporting references are listed.

  3. Space-based solar power conversion and delivery systems study. Volume 2: Engineering analysis of orbital systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Program plans, schedules, and costs are determined for a synchronous orbit-based power generation and relay system. Requirements for the satellite solar power station (SSPS) and the power relay satellite (PRS) are explored. Engineering analysis of large solar arrays, flight mechanics and control, transportation, assembly and maintenance, and microwave transmission are included.

  4. Chemical compositions of subway particles in Seoul, Korea determined by a quantitative single particle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sunni; Hwang, HeeJin; Park, YooMyung; Kim, HyeKyoung; Ro, Chul-Un

    2008-12-15

    A novel single particle analytical technique, low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis, was applied to characterize seasonal subway samples collected at a subway station in Seoul, Korea. For all 8 samples collected twice in each season, 4 major types of subway particles, based on their chemical compositions, are significantly encountered: Fe-containing; soil-derived; carbonaceous; and secondary nitrate and/or sulfate particles. Fe-containing particles are generated indoors from wear processes at rail-wheel-brake interfaces while the others may be introduced mostly from the outdoor urban atmosphere. Fe-containing particles are the most frequently encountered with relative abundances in the range of 61-79%. In this study, it is shown that Fe-containing subway particles almost always exist either as partially or fully oxidized forms in underground subway microenvironments. Their relative abundances of Fe-containing particles increase as particle sizes decrease. Relative abundances of Fe-containing particles are higher in morning samples than in afternoon samples because of heavier train traffic in the morning. In the summertime samples, Fe-containing particles are the most abundantly encountered, whereas soil-derived and nitrate/sulfate particles are the least encountered, indicating the air-exchange between indoor and outdoor environments is limited in the summer, owing to the air-conditioning in the subway system. In our work, it was observed that the relative abundances of the particles of outdoor origin vary somewhat among seasonal samples to a lesser degree, reflecting that indoor emission sources predominate.

  5. On-Orbit Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Star Tracker Warm Pixel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felikson, Denis; Ekinci, Matthew; Hashmall, Joseph A.; Vess, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the process of identification and analysis of warm pixels in two autonomous star trackers on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. A brief description of the mission orbit and attitude regimes is discussed and pertinent star tracker hardware specifications are given. Warm pixels are defined and the Quality Index parameter is introduced, which can be explained qualitatively as a manifestation of a possible warm pixel event. A description of the algorithm used to identify warm pixel candidates is given. Finally, analysis of dumps of on-orbit star tracker charge coupled devices (CCD) images is presented and an operational plan going forward is discussed. SDO, launched on February 11, 2010, is operated from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). SDO is in a geosynchronous orbit with a 28.5 inclination. The nominal mission attitude points the spacecraft X-axis at the Sun, with the spacecraft Z-axis roughly aligned with the Solar North Pole. The spacecraft Y-axis completes the triad. In attitude, SDO moves approximately 0.04 per hour, mostly about the spacecraft Z-axis. The SDO star trackers, manufactured by Galileo Avionica, project the images of stars in their 16.4deg x 16.4deg fields-of-view onto CCD detectors consisting of 512 x 512 pixels. The trackers autonomously identify the star patterns and provide an attitude estimate. Each unit is able to track up to 9 stars. Additionally, each tracker calculates a parameter called the Quality Index, which is a measure of the quality of the attitude solution. Each pixel in the CCD measures the intensity of light and a warns pixel is defined as having a measurement consistently and significantly higher than the mean background intensity level. A warns pixel should also have lower intensity than a pixel containing a star image and will not move across the field of view as the attitude changes (as would a dim star image). It should be noted that the maximum error introduced in the star tracker

  6. Orbital Disturbance Analysis due to the Lunar Gravitational Potential and Deviation Minimization through the Trajectory Control in Closed Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonçalves, L D; Rocco, E M; De Moraes, R V

    2013-01-01

    A study evaluating the influence due to the lunar gravitational potential, modeled by spherical harmonics, on the gravity acceleration is accomplished according to the model presented in Konopliv (2001). This model provides the components x, y and z for the gravity acceleration at each moment of time along the artificial satellite orbit and it enables to consider the spherical harmonic degree and order up to100. Through a comparison between the gravity acceleration from a central field and the gravity acceleration provided by Konopliv's model, it is obtained the disturbing velocity increment applied to the vehicle. Then, through the inverse problem, the Keplerian elements of perturbed orbit of the satellite are calculated allowing the orbital motion analysis. Transfer maneuvers and orbital correction of lunar satellites are simulated considering the disturbance due to non-uniform gravitational potential of the Moon, utilizing continuous thrust and trajectory control in closed loop. The simulations are performed using the Spacecraft Trajectory Simulator-STRS, Rocco (2008), which evaluate the behavior of the orbital elements, fuel consumption and thrust applied to the satellite over the time

  7. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter K-Band (26 GHz) Signal Analysis: Initial Study Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.; Heckman, D.

    2017-11-01

    Lower frequency telemetry bands are becoming more limited in bandwidth due to increased competition between flight projects and other entities. Higher frequency bands offer significantly more bandwidth and hence the prospect of much higher data rates. Future or prospective flight projects considering higher frequency bands such as Ka-band (32 GHz) for deep-space and K-band (26 GHz) for near-Earth telemetry links are interested in past flight experience with available received data at these frequencies. Given that there is increased degradation due to the atmosphere at these higher frequencies, there is an effort to retrieve flight data of received signal strength to analyze performance under a variety of factors. Such factors include elevation angle, season, and atmospheric conditions. This article reports on the analysis findings of over 10 million observations of received signal strength of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft collected between 2014 and 2017. We analyzed these data to characterize link performance over a wide range of weather conditions, season, and as a function of elevation angle. Based on this analysis, we have confirmed the safety of using a 3-dB margin for preflight planning purposes. These results suggest that a 3-dB margin with respect to adverse conditions will ensure a 98 to 99 percent data return under 95 percent weather conditions at 26 GHz (K-band), thus confirming expectations from link budget predictions. The results suggest that this margin should be applicable for all elevation angles above 10 deg. Thus, missions that have sufficient power for their desired data rates may opt to use 10 deg as their minimum elevation angle. Limitations of this study include climate variability and the fact that the observations require removal of hotbody noise in order to perform an adequate cumulative distribution function (CDF) analysis, which is planned for a future comprehensive study. Flight projects may use other link margins

  8. Inside versus Outside: Ion Redistribution in Nitric Acid Reacted Sea Spray Aerosol Particles as Determined by Single Particle Analysis (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, A. P.; Guasco, T.; Ryder, O. S.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Collins, D. B.; Ruppel, M. J.; Bertram, T. H.; Prather, K. A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles were generated under real-world conditions using natural seawater and a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves or a marine aerosol reference tank (MART) that replicates those conditions. The SSA particles were exposed to nitric acid in situ in a flow tube and the well-known chloride displacement and nitrate formation reaction was observed. However, as discussed here, little is known about how this anion displacement reaction affects the distribution of cations and other chemical constituents within and phase state of individual SSA particles. Single particle analysis of individual SSA particles shows that cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) within individual particles undergo a spatial redistribution after heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid, along with a more concentrated layer of organic matter at the surface of the particle. These data suggest that specific ion and aerosol pH effects play an important role in aerosol particle structure in ways that have not been previously recognized. The ordering of organic coatings can impact trace gas uptake, and subsequently impact trace gas budgets of O3 and NOx.

  9. A Multidisciplinary Performance Analysis of a Lifting-Body Single-Stage-to-Orbit Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartabini, Paul V.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Korte, J. J.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    2000-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works (LMSW) is currently developing a single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle called VentureStar(TM) A team at NASA Langley Research Center participated with LMSW in the screening and evaluation of a number of early VentureStar(TM) configurations. The performance analyses that supported these initial studies were conducted to assess the effect of a lifting body shape, linear aerospike engine and metallic thermal protection system (TPS) on the weight and performance of the vehicle. These performance studies were performed in a multidisciplinary fashion that indirectly linked the trajectory optimization with weight estimation and aerothermal analysis tools. This approach was necessary to develop optimized ascent and entry trajectories that met all vehicle design constraints. Significant improvements in ascent performance were achieved when the vehicle flew a lifting trajectory and varied the engine mixture ratio during flight. Also, a considerable reduction in empty weight was possible by adjusting the total oxidizer-to-fuel and liftoff thrust-to-weight ratios. However, the optimal ascent flight profile had to be altered to ensure that the vehicle could be trimmed in pitch using only the flow diverting capability of the aerospike engine. Likewise, the optimal entry trajectory had to be tailored to meet TPS heating rate and transition constraints while satisfying a crossrange requirement.

  10. Evaluation and analysis of real-time precise orbits and clocks products from different IGS analysis centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Yang, Hongzhou; Gao, Yang; Yao, Yibin; Xu, Chaoqian

    2018-06-01

    To meet the increasing demands from the real-time Precise Point Positioning (PPP) users, the real-time satellite orbit and clock products are generated by different International GNSS Service (IGS) real-time analysis centers and can be publicly received through the Internet. Based on different data sources and processing strategies, the real-time products from different analysis centers therefore differ in availability and accuracy. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate availability and accuracy of different real-time products and their effects on real-time PPP. A total of nine commonly used Real-Time Service (RTS) products, namely IGS01, IGS03, CLK01, CLK15, CLK22, CLK52, CLK70, CLK81 and CLK90, will be evaluated in this paper. Because not all RTS products support multi-GNSS, only GPS products are analyzed in this paper. Firstly, the availability of all RTS products is analyzed in two levels. The first level is the epoch availability, indicating whether there is outage for that epoch. The second level is the satellite availability, which defines the available satellite number for each epoch. Then the accuracy of different RTS products is investigated on nominal accuracy and the accuracy degradation over time. Results show that Root-Mean-Square Error (RMSE) of satellite orbit ranges from 3.8 cm to 7.5 cm for different RTS products. While the mean Standard Deviations of Errors (STDE) of satellite clocks range from 1.9 cm to 5.6 cm. The modified Signal In Space Range Error (SISRE) for all products are from 1.3 cm to 5.5 cm for different RTS products. The accuracy degradation of the orbit has the linear trend for all RTS products and the satellite clock degradation depends on the satellite clock types. The Rb clocks on board of GPS IIF satellites have the smallest degradation rate of less than 3 cm over 10 min while the Cs clocks on board of GPS IIF have the largest degradation rate of more than 10 cm over 10 min. Finally, the real-time kinematic PPP is

  11. Study on the etching conditions of polycarbonate detectors for particle analysis of safeguards environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, K.; Esaka, K.T.; Lee, C.G.; Inagawa, J.; Esaka, F.; Onodera, T.; Fukuyama, H.; Suzuki, D.; Sakurai, S.; Watanabe, K.; Usuda, S.

    2005-01-01

    The fission track technique was applied to the particle analysis for safeguards environmental samples to obtain information about the isotope ratio of nuclear materials in individual particles. To detect the particles containing nuclear material with high detection efficiency and less particle loss, the influence of uranium enrichments on etching conditions of a fission track detector made of polycarbonate was investigated. It was shown that the increase in uranium enrichment shortened the suitable etching time both for particle detection and for less particle loss. From the results obtained, it was suggested that the screening of the uranium particles according to the enrichment is possible by controlling the etching time of the detector

  12. [Analysis on oil fume particles in catering industry cooking emission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, De-Sheng; Kuang, Yuan-Cheng; Liu, Xin; Dai, Fei-Hong

    2012-06-01

    By measuring the particulate matter of oil fume which is over 10 microm or below 10 microm separately and using microradiography and Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI), it is found out the distributing characteristic of oil fume particles in catering industry cooking emission. The result shows that the diameter of the oil fume particles which was sedimentated in the kitchen is between 10-400 microm, the concentration peak value is between 10-100 microm. The diameter of oil fume aerosol is mostly smaller than 1 microm, while the concentration peak value is between 0.063-0.109 microm. In addition, the mass concentration peak value is between 6.560-9.990 microm. Through the analysis to the physical characteristics of oil fume from catering industry cooking emissions, the eigenvalue of the oil fume has been found and the feature matter for monitoring the oil fume has been discovered to provide a reasonable standard for controlling and monitoring the catering industry cooking emission.

  13. Use of GSR particle analysis program on an analytical SEM to identify sources of emission of airborne particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Y.C.; Trumper, J.; Bostrom, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: High concentrations of airborne particles, in particular PM 10 (particulate matter 10 , but has been little used in Australia for airborne particulates. Two sets of 15 mm PM 10 samples were collected in March and April 2000 from two sites in Brisbane, one within a suburb and one next to an arterial road. The particles were collected directly onto double-sided carbon tapes with a cascade impactor attached to a high-volume PM 10 sampler. The carbon tapes were analysed in a JEOL 840 SEM equipped with a Be-window energy-dispersive X-ray detector and Moran Scientific microanalysis system. An automated Gun Shot Residue (GSR) program was used together with backscattered electron imaging to characterise and analyse individual particulates. About 6,000 particles in total were analysed for each set of impactor samples. Due to limitations of useful pixel size, only particles larger than about 0.5 μm could be analysed. The size, shape and estimated elemental composition (from Na to Pb) of the particles were subjected to non-hierarchical cluster analysis and the characteristics of the clusters were related to their possible sources of emission. Both samples resulted in similar particle clusters. The particles could be classified into three main categories non-spherical (58% of the total number of analysed particles, shape factor >1 1), spherical (15%) and 'carbonaceous' (27%, ie with unexplained % of elemental mass >75%). Non-spherical particles were mainly sea salt and soil particles, and a small amount of iron, lead and mineral dust. The spherical particles were mainly sea salt particles and flyash, and a small amount of iron, lead and secondary sulphate dust. The carbonaceous particles included carbon material mixed with secondary aerosols, roadside dust, sea salt or industrial dust. The arterial road sample also contained more roadside dust and less secondary aerosols than the suburb sample. Current limitations with this method are the minimum particle size

  14. Formation flying for electric sails in displaced orbits. Part I: Geometrical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Mengali, Giovanni; Quarta, Alessandro A.; Yuan, Jianping

    2017-09-01

    We present a geometrical methodology for analyzing the formation flying of electric solar wind sail based spacecraft that operate in heliocentric, elliptic, displaced orbits. The spacecraft orbit is maintained by adjusting its propulsive acceleration modulus, whose value is estimated using a thrust model that takes into account a variation of the propulsive performance with the sail attitude. The properties of the relative motion of the spacecraft are studied in detail and a geometrical solution is obtained in terms of relative displaced orbital elements, assumed to be small quantities. In particular, for the small eccentricity case (i.e. for a near-circular displaced orbit), the bounds characterized by the extreme values of relative distances are analytically calculated, thus providing an useful mathematical tool for preliminary design of the spacecraft formation structure.

  15. Studies of particle drying using non-invasive Raman spectrometry and particle size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Peter; Littlejohn, David; Nordon, Alison; Sefcik, Jan; Slavin, Paul; Dallin, Paul; Andrews, John

    2011-05-21

    The evaporation of methanol from needle-shaped particles of cellobiose octaacetate (COA) has been studied directly in a jacketed vacuum drier using in situ measurements by Raman spectrometry. A design of experiments (DoE) approach was used to investigate the effects of three parameters (method of agitation, % solvent loss on drying and jacket temperature), with the intention of minimising the drying time and extent of particle attrition. Drying curves based on Raman signals for methanol and COA in the spectra of the wet particles indicated the end of drying and revealed three stages in the drying process that could be used to monitor the progress of solvent removal in real time. Off-line particle size measurements based on laser diffraction were made to obtain information on the extent of attrition, to compare with the trends revealed by the Raman drying curves. The study demonstrated that non-invasive Raman spectrometry can be used to study the progress of drying during agitation of particles in a vacuum drier, allowing optimisation of operating conditions to minimise attrition and reduce drying times. Although a correlation between particle size and off-line Raman measurements of COA was demonstrated, it was not possible to derive equivalent information from the in situ Raman spectra owing to the greater effects of particle motion or bulk density variations of the particles in the drier.

  16. A Comprehensive Analysis in Terms of Molecule-Intrinsic, Quasi-Atomic Orbitals. III. The Covalent Bonding Structure of Urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Aaron C; Schmidt, Michael W; Gordon, Mark S; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2015-10-15

    The analysis of molecular electron density matrices in terms of quasi-atomic orbitals, which was developed in previous investigations, is quantitatively exemplified by a detailed application to the urea molecule. The analysis is found to identify strong and weak covalent bonding interactions as well as intramolecular charge transfers. It yields a qualitative as well as quantitative ab initio description of the bonding structure of this molecule, which raises questions regarding some traditional rationalizations.

  17. Numerical Study of Particle Interaction in Gas-Particle and Liquid-Particle Flows: Part I Analysis and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohanarangam

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study into the turbulent behaviour of dilute particulate flow under the influence of two carrier phases namely gas and liquid has been carried out behind a sudden expansion geometry. The major endeavour of the study is to ascertain the response of the particles within the carrier (gas or liquid phase. The main aim prompting the current study is the density difference between the carrier and the dispersed phases. While the ratio is quite high in terms of the dispersed phase for the gas-particle flows, the ratio is far more less in terms of the liquid-particle flows. Numerical simulations were carried out for both these classes of flows using an Eulerian two-fluid model with RNG based k-emodel as the turbulent closure. An additional kinetic energy equation to better represent the combined fluid-particle behaviour is also employed in the current set of simulations. In the first part of this two part series, experimental results of Fessler and Eaton (1995 for Gas-Particle (GP flow and that of Founti and Klipfel (1998 for Liquid-Particle (LP flow have been compared and analysed. This forms the basis of the current study which aims to look at the particulate behaviour under the influence of two carrier phases. Further numerical simulations were carried out to test whether the current numerical formulation can used to simulate these varied type of flows and the same were validated against the experimental data of both GP as well LP flow. Qualitative results have been obtained for both these classes of flows with their respective experimental data both at the mean as well as at the turbulence level for carrier as well as the dispersed phases.

  18. Multipole error analysis using local 3-bump orbit data in Fermilab Recycler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M.J.; Xiao, M.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic harmonic errors of the Fermilab Recycler ring were examined using circulating beam data taken with closed local orbit bumps. Data was first parsed into harmonic orbits of first, second, and third order. Each of which was analyzed for sources of magnetic errors of corresponding order. This study was made possible only with the incredible resolution of a new BPM system that was commissioned after June of 2003

  19. Analysis of the dynamic interaction between SVOCs and airborne particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cong; Shi, Shanshan; Weschler, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    A proper quantitative understanding of the dynamic interaction between gas-phase semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and airborne particles is important for human exposure assessment and risk evaluation. Questions regarding how to properly address gas/particle interactions have introduced...

  20. Post-operative cyst and orbital walls. A CT image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuta, Masahiro (Takeda General Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima (Japan)); Iinuma, Toshitaka

    1989-07-01

    A set of coronal CT images obtained by 118 sides (109 cases) of post-operative cysts of maxilla, seen from 1982 to 1988, was analyzed as to the orbital wall affections. Coronal images were grouped into five consecutive planes, i.e. the first plane being the one which is 5 mm posterior to the nasion, and the other planes in successive orders each being 5 mm apart. The orbital walls were classified into inferior, medial, and transition of these two. The orbital wall affections were classified into dehiscence, thinned-out (less than 1 mm), and normal. The orbital signs and symptoms (epiphora, pain, asthenopia, visual loss, diplopia, and exophthalmos) were analyzed based upon the questionnaires by patients. The inferior wall affections (dehiscence and thinned-out) were seen most often (57%) at the third plane (2 cm posterior to the nasion). The orbital signs and symptoms in general were seen in half of the cases of which 20% were of grave (visual loss, diplopia and exophthalmos). These signs and symptoms were the more often, the more anterior the site of affections located. Grave signs and symptoms were seen at 2 to 2.5 cm posterior to the nasion when the orbital floor was affected and the inferior rectus were either pushed up or in direct contact with the cysts. (author).

  1. Some problems of calibration technique in charged particle activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnov, N.N.; Zatolokin, B.V.; Konstantinov, I.O.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that three different approaches to calibration technique based on the use of average cross-section, equivalent target thickness and thick target yield are adequate. Using the concept of thick target yield, a convenient charged particle activation equation is obtained. The possibility of simultaneous determination of two impurities, from which the same isotope is formed, is pointed out. The use of the concept of thick target yield facilitates the derivation of a simple formula for an absolute and comparative methods of analysis. The methodical error does not exceed 10%. Calibration technique and determination of expected sensitivity based on the thick target yield concept is also very convenient because experimental determination of thick target yield values is a much simpler procedure than getting activation curve or excitation function. (T.G.)

  2. Topology of tokamak orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, J.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-09-01

    Guiding center orbits in noncircular axisymmetric tokamak plasmas are studied in the constants of motion (COM) space of (v, zeta, psi/sub m/). Here, v is the particle speed, zeta is the pitch angle with respect to the parallel equilibrium current, J/sub parallels/, and psi/sub m/ is the maximum value of the poloidal flux function (increasing from the magnetic axis) along the guiding center orbit. Two D-shaped equilibria in a flux-conserving tokamak having β's of 1.3% and 7.7% are used as examples. In this space, each confined orbit corresponds to one and only one point and different types of orbits (e.g., circulating, trapped, stagnation and pinch orbits) are represented by separate regions or surfaces in the space. It is also shown that the existence of an absolute minimum B in the higher β (7.7%) equilibrium results in a dramatically different orbit topology from that of the lower β case. The differences indicate the confinement of additional high energy (v → c, within the guiding center approximation) trapped, co- and countercirculating particles whose orbit psi/sub m/ falls within the absolute B well

  3. Small-Body Extensions for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnright, Robert; Stodden, David; Coggi, John

    2008-01-01

    An extension to the SOAP software allows users to work with tri-axial ellipsoid-based representations of planetary bodies, primarily for working with small, natural satellites, asteroids, and comets. SOAP is a widely used tool for the visualization and analysis of space missions. The small body extension provides the same visualization and analysis constructs for use with small bodies. These constructs allow the user to characterize satellite path and instrument cover information for small bodies in both 3D display and numerical output formats. Tri-axial ellipsoids are geometric shapes the diameters of which are different in each of three principal x, y, and z dimensions. This construct provides a better approximation than using spheres or oblate spheroids (ellipsoids comprising two common equatorial diameters as a distinct polar diameter). However, the tri-axial ellipsoid is considerably more difficult to work with from a modeling perspective. In addition, the SOAP small-body extensions allow the user to actually employ a plate model for highly irregular surfaces. Both tri-axial ellipsoids and plate models can be assigned to coordinate frames, thus allowing for the modeling of arbitrary changes to body orientation. A variety of features have been extended to support tri-axial ellipsoids, including the computation and display of the spacecraft sub-orbital point, ground trace, instrument footprints, and swathes. Displays of 3D instrument volumes can be shown interacting with the ellipsoids. Longitude/latitude grids, contour plots, and texture maps can be displayed on the ellipsoids using a variety of projections. The distance along an arbitrary line of sight can be computed between the spacecraft and the ellipsoid, and the coordinates of that intersection can be plotted as a function of time. The small-body extension supports the same visual and analytical constructs that are supported for spheres and oblate spheroids in SOAP making the implementation of the more

  4. Vector correlation analysis for inelastic and reactive collisions between partners possessing spin and orbital angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S

    2009-12-31

    A general reactive collision of the type A + B --> C + D is considered where both the collision partners (A and B) or the products (C and D) may possess internal, i.e., spin, orbital or rotational, angular momenta. Compact expressions are derived using a rigorous quantum mechanical analysis for the angular momentum anisotropy of either of the products (C or D) arising from an initially polarized distribution of the reactant angular momentum. The angular momentum distribution of the product is expressed in terms of canonical spherical tensors multiplied by anisotropy-transforming coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L). These coefficients act as transformation coefficients between the angular momentum anisotropy of the reactants and that of the product. They are independent of scattering angle but depend on the details of the scattering dynamics. The relationship between the coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L) and the body-fixed scattering S matrix is given and the methodology for the quantum mechanical calculation of the anisotropy-transforming coefficients is clearly laid out. The anisotropy-transforming coefficients are amenable to direct experimental measurement in a similar manner to vector correlation and alignment parameters in photodissociation processes. A key aspect of the theory is the use of projections of both reactant and product angular momenta onto the product recoil vector direction. An important new conservation rule is revealed through the analysis, namely that if the state multipole for reactant angular momentum distribution has a projection q(k) onto the product recoil vector the state multipoles for the product angular momentum distribution all have this same projection. Expressions are also presented for the distribution of the product angular momentum when its components are evaluated relative to the space-fixed Z-axis. Notes with detailed derivations of all the formulas are available as Supporting Information.

  5. Gyrokinetic simulation of particle and heat transport in the presence of Wide orbits and strong profile variations in the Edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, J.A.; Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Ogando, F.

    2006-01-01

    A full f nonlinear 5D gyrokinetic electrostatic particle-in-cell code ELMFIRE using an implicit direct solution method for ion polarization drift and electron parallel velocity response to electric field and its validation are described. The developed code is applied for transport analysis in a tokamak plasma at steep pressure gradient. The role of turbulence and neoclassical equilibrium in determining the flux surface averaged radial electric field component are investigated, as well as the role of the latter in affecting the saturation level of the turbulence. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Seawifs Technical Report Series. Volume 2: Analysis of Orbit Selection for Seawifs: Ascending Versus Descending Node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Gregg, Watson W.

    1992-01-01

    Due to range safety considerations, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) ocean color instrument may be required to be launched into a near-noon descending node, as opposed to the ascending node used by the predecessor sensor, the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS). The relative importance of ascending versus descending near-noon orbits was assessed here to determine if descending node will meet the scientific requirements of SeaWiFS. Analyses focused on ground coverage, local times of coverage, solar and viewing geometries (zenith and azimuth angles), and sun glint. Differences were found in the areas covered by individual orbits, but were not important when taken over a 16 day repeat time. Local time of coverage was also different: for ascending node orbits the Northern Hemisphere was observed in the morning and the Southern Hemisphere in the afternoon, while for descending node orbits the Northern Hemisphere was observed in the afternoon and the Southern in the morning. There were substantial differences in solar azimuth and spacecraft azimuth angles both at equinox and at the Northern Hemisphere summer solstice. Negligible differences in solar and spacecraft zenith angles, relative azimuth angles, and sun glint were obtained at the equinox. However, large differences were found in solar zenith angles, relative azimuths, and sun glint for the solstice. These differences appeared to compensate across the scan, however, an increase in sun glint in descending node over that in ascending node on the western part of the scan was compensated by a decrease on the eastern part of the scan. Thus, no advantage or disadvantage could be conferred upon either ascending node or descending node for noon orbits. Analyses were also performed for ascending and descending node orbits that deviated from a noon equator crossing time. For ascending node, afternoon orbits produced the lowest mean solar zenith angles in the Northern Hemisphere, and morning orbits produced

  7. Analysis of the volumetric relationship among human ocular, orbital and fronto-occipital cortical morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Michael; Bruner, Emiliano; Queer, Sarah; Traynor, Sarah; Senjem, Jess

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on the visual system has focused on investigating the relationship among eye (ocular), orbital, and visual cortical anatomy in humans. This issue is relevant in evolutionary and medical fields. In terms of evolution, only in modern humans and Neandertals are the orbits positioned beneath the frontal lobes, with consequent structural constraints. In terms of medicine, such constraints can be associated with minor deformation of the eye, vision defects, and patterns of integration among these features, and in association with the frontal lobes, are important to consider in reconstructive surgery. Further study is therefore necessary to establish how these variables are related, and to what extent ocular size is associated with orbital and cerebral cortical volumes. Relationships among these anatomical components were investigated using magnetic resonance images from a large sample of 83 individuals, which also included each subject’s body height, age, sex, and uncorrected visual acuity score. Occipital and frontal gyri volumes were calculated using two different cortical parcellation tools in order to provide a better understanding of how the eye and orbit vary in relation to visual cortical gyri, and frontal cortical gyri which are not directly related to visual processing. Results indicated that ocular and orbital volumes were weakly correlated, and that eye volume explains only a small proportion of the variance in orbital volume. Ocular and orbital volumes were also found to be equally and, in most cases, more highly correlated with five frontal lobe gyri than with occipital lobe gyri associated with V1, V2, and V3 of the visual cortex. Additionally, after accounting for age and sex variation, the relationship between ocular and total visual cortical volume was no longer statistically significant, but remained significantly related to total frontal lobe volume. The relationship between orbital and visual cortical volumes remained significant for

  8. Analysis of the volumetric relationship among human ocular, orbital and fronto-occipital cortical morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Michael; Bruner, Emiliano; Queer, Sarah; Traynor, Sarah; Senjem, Jess

    2015-10-01

    Recent research on the visual system has focused on investigating the relationship among eye (ocular), orbital, and visual cortical anatomy in humans. This issue is relevant in evolutionary and medical fields. In terms of evolution, only in modern humans and Neandertals are the orbits positioned beneath the frontal lobes, with consequent structural constraints. In terms of medicine, such constraints can be associated with minor deformation of the eye, vision defects, and patterns of integration among these features, and in association with the frontal lobes, are important to consider in reconstructive surgery. Further study is therefore necessary to establish how these variables are related, and to what extent ocular size is associated with orbital and cerebral cortical volumes. Relationships among these anatomical components were investigated using magnetic resonance images from a large sample of 83 individuals, which also included each subject's body height, age, sex, and uncorrected visual acuity score. Occipital and frontal gyri volumes were calculated using two different cortical parcellation tools in order to provide a better understanding of how the eye and orbit vary in relation to visual cortical gyri, and frontal cortical gyri which are not directly related to visual processing. Results indicated that ocular and orbital volumes were weakly correlated, and that eye volume explains only a small proportion of the variance in orbital volume. Ocular and orbital volumes were also found to be equally and, in most cases, more highly correlated with five frontal lobe gyri than with occipital lobe gyri associated with V1, V2, and V3 of the visual cortex. Additionally, after accounting for age and sex variation, the relationship between ocular and total visual cortical volume was no longer statistically significant, but remained significantly related to total frontal lobe volume. The relationship between orbital and visual cortical volumes remained significant for a

  9. Vibrational study and Natural Bond Orbital analysis of serotonin in monomer and dimer states by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Mukunda Madhab; Devi, Th. Gomti

    2018-06-01

    The vibrational spectral analysis of Serotonin and its dimer were carried out using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Raman techniques. The equilibrium geometrical parameters, harmonic vibrational wavenumbers, Frontier orbitals, Mulliken atomic charges, Natural Bond orbitals, first order hyperpolarizability and some optimized energy parameters were computed by density functional theory with 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The detailed analysis of the vibrational spectra have been carried out by computing Potential Energy Distribution (PED, %) with the help of Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) program. The second order delocalization energies E(2) confirms the occurrence of intramolecular Charge Transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The computed wavenumbers of Serotonin monomer and dimer were found in good agreement with the experimental Raman and IR values.

  10. Numerical analysis of wet separation of particles by density differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markauskas, D.; Kruggel-Emden, H.

    2017-07-01

    Wet particle separation is widely used in mineral processing and plastic recycling to separate mixtures of particulate materials into further usable fractions due to density differences. This work presents efforts aiming to numerically analyze the wet separation of particles with different densities. In the current study the discrete element method (DEM) is used for the solid phase while the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is used for modeling of the liquid phase. The two phases are coupled by the use of a volume averaging technique. In the current study, simulations of spherical particle separation were performed. In these simulations, a set of generated particles with two different densities is dropped into a rectangular container filled with liquid. The results of simulations with two different mixtures of particles demonstrated how separation depends on the densities of particles.

  11. Prediction of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Reaction Wheel Assembly Angular Momentum Using Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHart, Russell

    2017-01-01

    This study determines the feasibility of creating a tool that can accurately predict Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) reaction wheel assembly (RWA) angular momentum, weeks or even months into the future. LRO is a three-axis stabilized spacecraft that was launched on June 18, 2009. While typically nadir-pointing, LRO conducts many types of slews to enable novel science collection. Momentum unloads have historically been performed approximately once every two weeks with the goal of maintaining system total angular momentum below 70 Nms; however flight experience shows the models developed before launch are overly conservative, with many momentum unloads being performed before system angular momentum surpasses 50 Nms. A more accurate model of RWA angular momentum growth would improve momentum unload scheduling and decrease the frequency of these unloads. Since some LRO instruments must be deactivated during momentum unloads and in the case of one instrument, decontaminated for 24 hours there after a decrease in the frequency of unloads increases science collection. This study develops a new model to predict LRO RWA angular momentum. Regression analysis of data from October 2014 to October 2015 was used to develop relationships between solar beta angle, slew specifications, and RWA angular momentum growth. The resulting model predicts RWA angular momentum using input solar beta angle and mission schedule data. This model was used to predict RWA angular momentum from October 2013 to October 2014. Predictions agree well with telemetry; of the 23 momentum unloads performed from October 2013 to October 2014, the mean and median magnitude of the RWA total angular momentum prediction error at the time of the momentum unloads were 3.7 and 2.7 Nms, respectively. The magnitude of the largest RWA total angular momentum prediction error was 10.6 Nms. Development of a tool that uses the models presented herein is currently underway.

  12. A probabilistic analysis of the implications of instrument failures on ESA's Swarm mission for its individual satellite orbit deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    On launch, one of Swarm's absolute scalar magnetometers (ASMs) failed to function, leaving an asymmetrical arrangement of redundant spares on different spacecrafts. A decision was required concerning the deployment of individual satellites into the low-orbit pair or the higher "lonely" orbit. I analyse the probabilities for successful operation of two of the science components of the Swarm mission in terms of a classical probabilistic failure analysis, with a view to concluding a favourable assignment for the satellite with the single working ASM. I concentrate on the following two science aspects: the east-west gradiometer aspect of the lower pair of satellites and the constellation aspect, which requires a working ASM in each of the two orbital planes. I use the so-called "expert solicitation" probabilities for instrument failure solicited from Mission Advisory Group (MAG) members. My conclusion from the analysis is that it is better to have redundancy of ASMs in the lonely satellite orbit. Although the opposite scenario, having redundancy (and thus four ASMs) in the lower orbit, increases the chance of a working gradiometer late in the mission; it does so at the expense of a likely constellation. Although the results are presented based on actual MAG members' probabilities, the results are rather generic, excepting the case when the probability of individual ASM failure is very small; in this case, any arrangement will ensure a successful mission since there is essentially no failure expected at all. Since the very design of the lower pair is to enable common mode rejection of external signals, it is likely that its work can be successfully achieved during the first 5 years of the mission.

  13. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products.

  14. Analysis of bubbly flow using particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, D.R.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.; Schmidl, W.D.; Hassan, Y.A. [Texas A and M University, Nuclear Engineering Dept., College Stagion, TX (United States); Sanchez-Silva, F. [ESIME, INP (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The local phasic velocities can be determined in two-phase flows if the phases can be separated during analysis. The continuous liquid velocity field can be captured using standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) techniques in two-phase flows. PIV is now a well-established, standard flow measurement technique, which provides instantaneous velocity fields in a two-dimensional plane of finite thickness. PIV can be extended to three dimensions within the plane with special considerations. A three-dimensional shadow PIV (SPIV) measurement apparatus can be used to capture the dispersed phase flow parameters such as velocity and interfacial area. The SPIV images contain only the bubble images, and can be easily analyzed and the results used to separate the dispersed phase from the continuous phase in PIV data. An experimental system that combines the traditional PIV technique with SPIV will be described and sample data will be analyzed to demonstrate an advanced turbulence measurement method in a two-phase bubbly flow system. Also, a qualitative error analysis method that allows users to reduce the number of erroneous vectors obtained from the PIV measurements will be discussed. (authors)

  15. Analysis of bubbly flow using particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, D.R.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.; Schmidl, W.D.; Hassan, Y.A.; Sanchez-Silva, F.

    2001-01-01

    The local phasic velocities can be determined in two-phase flows if the phases can be separated during analysis. The continuous liquid velocity field can be captured using standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) techniques in two-phase flows. PIV is now a well-established, standard flow measurement technique, which provides instantaneous velocity fields in a two-dimensional plane of finite thickness. PIV can be extended to three dimensions within the plane with special considerations. A three-dimensional shadow PIV (SPIV) measurement apparatus can be used to capture the dispersed phase flow parameters such as velocity and interfacial area. The SPIV images contain only the bubble images, and can be easily analyzed and the results used to separate the dispersed phase from the continuous phase in PIV data. An experimental system that combines the traditional PIV technique with SPIV will be described and sample data will be analyzed to demonstrate an advanced turbulence measurement method in a two-phase bubbly flow system. Also, a qualitative error analysis method that allows users to reduce the number of erroneous vectors obtained from the PIV measurements will be discussed. (authors)

  16. Baseline Design and Performance Analysis of Laser Altimeter for Korean Lunar Orbiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Chul Lim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Korea’s lunar exploration project includes the launching of an orbiter, a lander (including a rover, and an experimental orbiter (referred to as a lunar pathfinder. Laser altimeters have played an important scientific role in lunar, planetary, and asteroid exploration missions since their first use in 1971 onboard the Apollo 15 mission to the Moon. In this study, a laser altimeter was proposed as a scientific instrument for the Korean lunar orbiter, which will be launched by 2020, to study the global topography of the surface of the Moon and its gravitational field and to support other payloads such as a terrain mapping camera or spectral imager. This study presents the baseline design and performance model for the proposed laser altimeter. Additionally, the study discusses the expected performance based on numerical simulation results. The simulation results indicate that the design of system parameters satisfies performance requirements with respect to detection probability and range error even under unfavorable conditions.

  17. Integrated orbital servicing study follow-on. Volume 2: Technical analysis and system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    In-orbit service functional and physical requirements to support both low and high Earth orbit servicing/maintenance operations were defined, an optimum servicing system configuration was developed and mockups and early prototype hardware were fabricated to demonstrate and validate the concepts selected. Significant issues addressed include criteria for concept selection; representative mission equipment and approaches to their design for serviceability; significant serviceable spacecraft design aspects; servicer mechanism operation in one-g; approaches for the demonstration/simulation; and service mechanism structure design approach.

  18. Positron Emission Tomography Particle tracking using cluster analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundogdu, O.

    2004-01-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking was successfully used in a wide range of industrial applications. This technique primarily uses a single positron emitting tracer particle. However, using multiple particles would provide more comparative information about the physical processes taking place in a system such as mixing or fluidised beds. In this paper, a unique method that enables us to track more than one particle is presented. This method is based on the midpoint of the closest distance between two trajectories or coincidence vectors. The technique presented in this paper employs a clustering method

  19. Positron Emission Tomography Particle tracking using cluster analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundogdu, O. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: o.gundogdu@surrey.ac.uk

    2004-12-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking was successfully used in a wide range of industrial applications. This technique primarily uses a single positron emitting tracer particle. However, using multiple particles would provide more comparative information about the physical processes taking place in a system such as mixing or fluidised beds. In this paper, a unique method that enables us to track more than one particle is presented. This method is based on the midpoint of the closest distance between two trajectories or coincidence vectors. The technique presented in this paper employs a clustering method.

  20. Reactivity of etoricoxib based on computational study of molecular orbitals, molecular electrostatic potential surface and Mulliken charge analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Ritika; Soni, Abhinav; Singh, V. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2018-05-01

    Etoricoxib is one of the selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor drug which plays a significant role in the pharmacological management of arthritis and pain. The theoretical investigation of its reactivity is done using Density Functional Theory calculations. Molecular Electrostatic Potential Surface of etoricoxib and its Mulliken atomic charge distribution are used for the prediction of its electrophilic and nucleophilic sites. The detailed analysis of its frontier molecular orbitals is also done.

  1. Orbital evolution of a test particle around a black hole: indirect determination of the self-force in the post-Newtonian approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burko, Lior M

    2006-01-01

    Comparing the corrections to Kepler's law with orbital evolution under a self-force, we extract the finite, already regularized part of the latter in a specific gauge. We apply this method to a quasi-circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole of an extreme mass ratio binary, and determine the first- and second-order conservative gravitational self-force in a post-Newtonian expansion. We use these results in the construction of the gravitational waveform, and revisit the question of the relative contribution of the self-force and spin-orbit coupling

  2. Orbit Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Klimyk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, properties of orbit functions are reviewed and further developed. Orbit functions on the Euclidean space E_n are symmetrized exponential functions. The symmetrization is fulfilled by a Weyl group corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions will be described. An orbit function is the contribution to an irreducible character of a compact semisimple Lie group G of rank n from one of its Weyl group orbits. It is shown that values of orbit functions are repeated on copies of the fundamental domain F of the affine Weyl group (determined by the initial Weyl group in the entire Euclidean space E_n. Orbit functions are solutions of the corresponding Laplace equation in E_n, satisfying the Neumann condition on the boundary of F. Orbit functions determine a symmetrized Fourier transform and a transform on a finite set of points.

  3. Measurement, correction, and analysis of the equilibrium orbit in the electron stretcher facility ELSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keil, J.

    2000-07-01

    The electron stretcher accelerator ELSA provides an electron beam in the energy range between 0.5 and 3.5 GeV with a high duty factor for medium energy physics experiments. The acceleration of polarized electrons and demands by synchrotron radiation users for a high beam quality require a good correction of the closed orbit. For its measurement a precise beam position monitor (BPM) system based on narrow band RF-receivers with a resolution of some micrometers was developed and installed. 28 stations are connected by a fieldbus with a VME multiprocessor system, which is used for control of the BPM stations and for data acquisition. BPM offsets relative to the quadrupole centers were determined with an accuracy better than 100 μm using the method of beam-based alignment. Based on these measurements the closed orbit distortions were reduced from approx. 3 mm to 140 μm (rms) in both planes. Furthermore elements with dipole field errors were located by means of the uncorrected orbit. Orbit response matrices were analyzed to determine errors of quadrupole magnets and calibration factors of BPMs and corrector magnets. Predicted optics functions and tunes based on the improved optics model are in good agreement with the measurements. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of the Effect of UTI-UTC to High Precision Orbit Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongseok Shin

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available As the spatial resolution of remote sensing satellites becomes higher, very accurate determination of the position of a LEO (Low Earth Orbit satellite is demanding more than ever. Non-symmetric Earth gravity is the major perturbation force to LEO satellites. Since the orbit propagation is performed in the celestial frame while Earth gravity is defined in the terrestrial frame, it is required to convert the coordinates of the satellite from one to the other accurately. Unless the coordinate conversion between the two frames is performed accurately the orbit propagation calculates incorrect Earth gravitational force at a specific time instant, and hence, causes errors in orbit prediction. The coordinate conversion between the two frames involves precession, nutation, Earth rotation and polar motion. Among these factors, unpredictability and uncertainty of Earth rotation, called UTI-UTC, is the largest error source. In this paper, the effect of UTI-UTC on the accuracy of the LEO propagation is introduced, tested and analzed. Considering the maximum unpredictability of UTI-UTC, 0.9 seconds, the meaningful order of non-spherical Earth harmonic functions is derived.

  5. Modeling and analysis of periodic orbits around a contact binary asteroid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, J.; Noomen, R.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Yuan, J.

    2015-01-01

    The existence and characteristics of periodic orbits (POs) in the vicinity of a contact binary asteroid are investigated with an averaged spherical harmonics model. A contact binary asteroid consists of two components connected to each other, resulting in a highly bifurcated shape. Here, it is

  6. Open reduction versus endoscopically controlled reconstruction of orbital floor fractures: a retrospective analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hundepool, A.C.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Koudstaal, M.J.; Wal, K.G.H. van der

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the postoperative results of open reduction versus endoscopically controlled reconstructions of orbital floor fractures. The medical records of 83 patients, treated between January 2000 and December 2008, were reviewed for enophthalmos, diplopia and

  7. Analysis of the Effect of UTI-UTC to High Precision Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongseok; Kwak, Sunghee; Kim, Tag-Gon

    1999-12-01

    As the spatial resolution of remote sensing satellites becomes higher, very accurate determination of the position of a LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellite is demanding more than ever. Non-symmetric Earth gravity is the major perturbation force to LEO satellites. Since the orbit propagation is performed in the celestial frame while Earth gravity is defined in the terrestrial frame, it is required to convert the coordinates of the satellite from one to the other accurately. Unless the coordinate conversion between the two frames is performed accurately the orbit propagation calculates incorrect Earth gravitational force at a specific time instant, and hence, causes errors in orbit prediction. The coordinate conversion between the two frames involves precession, nutation, Earth rotation and polar motion. Among these factors, unpredictability and uncertainty of Earth rotation, called UTI-UTC, is the largest error source. In this paper, the effect of UTI-UTC on the accuracy of the LEO propagation is introduced, tested and analzed. Considering the maximum unpredictability of UTI-UTC, 0.9 seconds, the meaningful order of non-spherical Earth harmonic functions is derived.

  8. Air-ground temperature coupling: analysis by means of Thermal Orbits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Vladimír; Bodri, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2016), s. 112-122 ISSN 2160-0414 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP210/11/0183; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13040 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : Thermal Orbits * temperature monitoring * air temperature vs ground temperature Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  9. Polybutadiene latex particle size distribution analysis utilizing a disk centrifuge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdurmen, E.M.F.J.; Albers, J.G.; German, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    Polybutadiene (I) latexes prepd. by emulsifier-free emulsion polymn. and having particle diam. 50-300 nm for both unimodal and bimodal particles size distributions were analyzed by the line-start (LIST) method in a Brookhaven disk centrifuge photosedimentometer. A special spin fluid was designed to

  10. Nanotip analysis for dielectrophoretic concentration of nanosized viral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Woon-Hong; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2013-05-10

    Rapid and sensitive detection of low-abundance viral particles is strongly demanded in health care, environmental control, military defense, and homeland security. Current detection methods, however, lack either assay speed or sensitivity, mainly due to the nanosized viral particles. In this paper, we compare a dendritic, multi-terminal nanotip ('dendritic nanotip') with a single terminal nanotip ('single nanotip') for dielectrophoretic (DEP) concentration of viral particles. The numerical computation studies the concentration efficiency of viral particles ranging from 25 to 100 nm in radius for both nanotips. With DEP and Brownian motion considered, when the particle radius decreases by two times, the concentration time for both nanotips increases by 4-5 times. In the computational study, a dendritic nanotip shows about 1.5 times faster concentration than a single nanotip for the viral particles because the dendritic structure increases the DEP-effective area to overcome the Brownian motion. For the qualitative support of the numerical results, the comparison experiment of a dendritic nanotip and a single nanotip is conducted. Under 1 min of concentration time, a dendritic nanotip shows a higher sensitivity than a single nanotip. When the concentration time is 5 min, the sensitivity of a dendritic nanotip for T7 phage is 10(4) particles ml(-1). The dendritic nanotip-based concentrator has the potential for rapid identification of viral particles.

  11. Nanotip analysis for dielectrophoretic concentration of nanosized viral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Woon-Hong; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Chung, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Kyong-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of low-abundance viral particles is strongly demanded in health care, environmental control, military defense, and homeland security. Current detection methods, however, lack either assay speed or sensitivity, mainly due to the nanosized viral particles. In this paper, we compare a dendritic, multi-terminal nanotip (‘dendritic nanotip’) with a single terminal nanotip (‘single nanotip’) for dielectrophoretic (DEP) concentration of viral particles. The numerical computation studies the concentration efficiency of viral particles ranging from 25 to 100 nm in radius for both nanotips. With DEP and Brownian motion considered, when the particle radius decreases by two times, the concentration time for both nanotips increases by 4–5 times. In the computational study, a dendritic nanotip shows about 1.5 times faster concentration than a single nanotip for the viral particles because the dendritic structure increases the DEP-effective area to overcome the Brownian motion. For the qualitative support of the numerical results, the comparison experiment of a dendritic nanotip and a single nanotip is conducted. Under 1 min of concentration time, a dendritic nanotip shows a higher sensitivity than a single nanotip. When the concentration time is 5 min, the sensitivity of a dendritic nanotip for T7 phage is 10 4 particles ml −1 . The dendritic nanotip-based concentrator has the potential for rapid identification of viral particles. (paper)

  12. A 3D Visualization and Analysis Model of the Earth Orbit, Milankovitch Cycles and Insolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, Tihomir; Gilb, Roy

    2013-04-01

    Milankovitch theory postulates that periodic variability of Earth's orbital elements is a major climate forcing mechanism. Although controversies remain, ample geologic evidence supports the major role of the Milankovitch cycles in climate, e.g. glacial-interglacial cycles. There are three Milankovitch orbital parameters: orbital eccentricity (main periodicities of ~100,000 and ~400,000 years), precession (quantified as the longitude of perihelion, main periodicities 19,000-24,000 years) and obliquity of the ecliptic (Earth's axial tilt, main periodicity 41,000 years). The combination of these parameters controls the spatio-temporal patterns of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the timing of the seasons with respect to perihelion, as well as season duration. The complex interplay of the Milankovitch orbital parameters on various time scales makes assessment and visualization of Earth's orbit and insolation variability challenging. It is difficult to appreciate the pivotal importance of Kepler's laws of planetary motion in controlling the effects of Milankovitch cycles on insolation patterns. These factors also make Earth-Sun geometry and Milankovitch theory difficult to teach effectively. Here, an astronomically precise and accurate Earth orbit visualization model is presented. The model offers 3D visualizations of Earth's orbital geometry, Milankovitch parameters and the ensuing insolation forcings. Both research and educational uses are envisioned for the model, which is developed in Matlab® as a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). We present the user with a choice between the Berger et al. (1978) and Laskar et al. (2004) astronomical solutions for eccentricity, obliquity and precession. A "demo" mode is also available, which allows the three Milankovitch parameters to be varied independently of each other (and over much larger ranges than the naturally occurring ones), so the user can isolate the effects of each parameter on orbital geometry

  13. DNA-magnetic Particle Binding Analysis by Dynamic and Electrophoretic Light Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Dostalova, Simona; Kudr, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Heger, Zbynek; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-11-09

    Isolation of DNA using magnetic particles is a field of high importance in biotechnology and molecular biology research. This protocol describes the evaluation of DNA-magnetic particles binding via dynamic light scattering (DLS) and electrophoretic light scattering (ELS). Analysis by DLS provides valuable information on the physicochemical properties of particles including particle size, polydispersity, and zeta potential. The latter describes the surface charge of the particle which plays major role in electrostatic binding of materials such as DNA. Here, a comparative analysis exploits three chemical modifications of nanoparticles and microparticles and their effects on DNA binding and elution. Chemical modifications by branched polyethylenimine, tetraethyl orthosilicate and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane are investigated. Since DNA exhibits a negative charge, it is expected that zeta potential of particle surface will decrease upon binding of DNA. Forming of clusters should also affect particle size. In order to investigate the efficiency of these particles in isolation and elution of DNA, the particles are mixed with DNA in low pH (~6), high ionic strength and dehydration environment. Particles are washed on magnet and then DNA is eluted by Tris-HCl buffer (pH = 8). DNA copy number is estimated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Zeta potential, particle size, polydispersity and quantitative PCR data are evaluated and compared. DLS is an insightful and supporting method of analysis that adds a new perspective to the process of screening of particles for DNA isolation.

  14. Proteomic analysis of purified coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Dingming

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV is the coronavirus of domestic chickens causing major economic losses to the poultry industry. Because of the complexity of the IBV life cycle and the small number of viral structural proteins, important virus-host relationships likely remain to be discovered. Toward this goal, we performed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis fractionation coupled to mass spectrometry identification approaches to perform a comprehensive proteomic analysis of purified IBV particles. Results Apart from the virus-encoded structural proteins, we detected 60 host proteins in the purified virions which can be grouped into several functional categories including intracellular trafficking proteins (20%, molecular chaperone (18%, macromolcular biosynthesis proteins (17%, cytoskeletal proteins (15%, signal transport proteins (15%, protein degradation (8%, chromosome associated proteins (2%, ribosomal proteins (2%, and other function proteins (3%. Interestingly, 21 of the total host proteins have not been reported to be present in virions of other virus families, such as major vault protein, TENP protein, ovalbumin, and scavenger receptor protein. Following identification of the host proteins by proteomic methods, the presence of 4 proteins in the purified IBV preparation was verified by western blotting and immunogold labeling detection. Conclusions The results present the first standard proteomic profile of IBV and may facilitate the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms.

  15. Dynamical analysis of bounded and unbounded orbits in a generalized Hénon-Heiles system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubeibe, F. L.; Riaño-Doncel, A.; Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2018-04-01

    The Hénon-Heiles potential was first proposed as a simplified version of the gravitational potential experimented by a star in the presence of a galactic center. Currently, this system is considered a paradigm in dynamical systems because despite its simplicity exhibits a very complex dynamical behavior. In the present paper, we perform a series expansion up to the fifth-order of a potential with axial and reflection symmetries, which after some transformations, leads to a generalized Hénon-Heiles potential. Such new system is analyzed qualitatively in both regimes of bounded and unbounded motion via the Poincaré sections method and plotting the exit basins. On the other hand, the quantitative analysis is performed through the Lyapunov exponents and the basin entropy, respectively. We find that in both regimes the chaoticity of the system decreases as long as the test particle energy gets far from the critical energy. Additionally, we may conclude that despite the inclusion of higher order terms in the series expansion, the new system shows wider zones of regularity (islands) than the ones present in the Hénon-Heiles system.

  16. Particle analysis and differentiation using a photovoltaic cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Lung-Ming; Shu, Wei-En; Wang, Yao-Nan

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed for the sizing and counting of fluorescent and non-fluorescent particles of various sizes on a poly-dimethylsiloxane microchip. In the proposed approach, the detection region of the microchip is illuminated by a laser, which is then incident on a power-free photovoltaic cell. As the particles (both fluorescent and non-fluorescent) pass through the detection region, they block the laser beam, causing a reduction in the output voltage of the cell. The voltage signal is interfaced to a PC and is used to determine both the size and the number of the particles. Meanwhile, the fluorescence signal generated by the fluorescent particles within the sample is detected by an avalanche photodetector and is used to differentiate between the fluorescent and non-fluorescent particles in the sample. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated using fluorescent-labeled beads with means diameters of 5, 8 and 10 µm, respectively, and unlabeled beads with a mean diameter of 7.2 µm. The experimental results confirm that the forward scattered light signal generated by the photovoltaic cell enables both the size and the number of the particles to be reliably determined. Moreover, it is shown that the number of non-fluorescent particles within the sample can be easily determined by comparing the signals received from the photovoltaic cell and avalanche photodetector, respectively. (paper)

  17. The analysis of single-electron orbits in a free electron laser based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordbacheh, A.; Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of a novel free-electron laser (FEL) based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler (RHW) is presented. This RHW is designed in a configuration composed of rectangular rings with alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers immersed in a solenoidal magnetic field. An analytic model of RHW is introduced by solution of Laplace's equation for the magnetostatic fields under the appropriate boundary conditions. The single-electron orbits in combined RHW and axial guide magnetic fields are studied when only the first and the third spatial harmonic components of the RHW field are taken into account and the higher order terms are ignored. The results indicate that the third spatial harmonic leads to group III orbits with a strong negative mass regime particularly in large solenoidal magnetic fields. RHW is found to be a promising candidate with favorable characteristics to be used in microwave FEL.

  18. The analysis of single-electron orbits in a free electron laser based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordbacheh, A.; Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-09-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of a novel free-electron laser (FEL) based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler (RHW) is presented. This RHW is designed in a configuration composed of rectangular rings with alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers immersed in a solenoidal magnetic field. An analytic model of RHW is introduced by solution of Laplace's equation for the magnetostatic fields under the appropriate boundary conditions. The single-electron orbits in combined RHW and axial guide magnetic fields are studied when only the first and the third spatial harmonic components of the RHW field are taken into account and the higher order terms are ignored. The results indicate that the third spatial harmonic leads to group III orbits with a strong negative mass regime particularly in large solenoidal magnetic fields. RHW is found to be a promising candidate with favorable characteristics to be used in microwave FEL.

  19. Single particle transfer for quantitative analysis with total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Esaka, Konomi T.; Magara, Masaaki; Sakurai, Satoshi; Usuda, Shigekazu; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    The technique of single particle transfer was applied to quantitative analysis with total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry. The technique was evaluated by performing quantitative analysis of individual Cu particles with diameters between 3.9 and 13.2 μm. The direct quantitative analysis of the Cu particle transferred onto a Si carrier gave a discrepancy between measured and calculated Cu amounts due to the absorption effects of incident and fluorescent X-rays within the particle. By the correction for the absorption effects, the Cu amounts in individual particles could be determined with the deviation within 10.5%. When the Cu particles were dissolved with HNO 3 solution prior to the TXRF analysis, the deviation was improved to be within 3.8%. In this case, no correction for the absorption effects was needed for quantification

  20. ORBITAL INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Kansky

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Orbit is involved in 40% of all facial fractures. There is considerable variety in severity, ranging from simple nondisplaced to complex comminuted fractures. Complex comminuted fractures (up to 20% are responsible for the majority of complications and unfavorable results. Orbital fractures are classified as internal orbital fractures, zygomatico-orbital fractures, naso-orbito-ethmoidal fractures and combined fractures. The ophtalmic sequelae of midfacial fractures are usually edema and ecchymosis of the soft tissues, subconjuctival hemorrhage, diplopia, iritis, retinal edema, ptosis, enophthalmos, ocular muscle paresis, mechanical restriction of ocular movement and nasolacrimal disturbances. More severe injuries such as optic nerve trauma and retinal detachments have also been reported. Within the wide range of orbital fractures small group of complex fractures causes most of the sequelae. Therefore identification of severe injuries and adequate treatment is of major importance. The introduction of craniofacial techniques made possible a wide exposure even of large orbital wall defects and their reconstruction by bone grafts. In spite of significant progress, repair of complex orbital wall defects remains a problem even for the experienced surgeons.Results. In 1999 121 facial injuries were treated at our department (Clinical Centre Ljubljana Dept. Of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery. Orbit was involved in 65% of cases. Isolated inner orbital fractures presented 4% of all fractures. 17 (14% complex cases were treated, 5 of them being NOE, 5 orbital (frame and inner walls, 3 zygomatico-orbital, 2 FNO and 2 maxillo-orbital fractures.Conclusions. Final result of the surgical treatment depends on severity of maxillofacial trauma. Complex comminuted fractures are responsable for most of the unfavorable results and ocular function is often permanently damaged (up to 75% in these fractures.

  1. Study of talcum charging status in parallel plate electrostatic separator based on particle trajectory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunxiao, CAO; Zhiqiang, WANG; Jinjun, WANG; Guofeng, LI

    2018-05-01

    Electrostatic separation has been extensively used in mineral processing, and has the potential to separate gangue minerals from raw talcum ore. As for electrostatic separation, the particle charging status is one of important influence factors. To describe the talcum particle charging status in a parallel plate electrostatic separator accurately, this paper proposes a modern images processing method. Based on the actual trajectories obtained from sequence images of particle movement and the analysis of physical forces applied on a charged particle, a numerical model is built, which could calculate the charge-to-mass ratios represented as the charging status of particle and simulate the particle trajectories. The simulated trajectories agree well with the experimental results obtained by images processing. In addition, chemical composition analysis is employed to reveal the relationship between ferrum gangue mineral content and charge-to-mass ratios. Research results show that the proposed method is effective for describing the particle charging status in electrostatic separation.

  2. Effect of particle size on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of alumina suspension in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Rosado, José Carlos; L'hermite, Daniel; Levi, Yves

    2012-01-01

    The analysis by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was proposed for the detection and the quantification of different elements in water even when the analyte is composed of particles in suspension. We have studied the effect of particle size on the LIBS signal during liquid analysis. In our study we used different particle sizes (from 2 μm to 90 μm) of Al 2 O 3 in suspension in water. The results were compared to the signal obtained in the case of dissolved aluminum. In the case of particles, a linear correlation between the LIBS signal versus concentration was found but a significant decrease in the slope of the calibration curve was found when the particle size increased. Several hypotheses have been tested and only a partial ablation of the particles might explain this decrease in signal intensity. This effect probably does not occur at smaller particle size. We estimated 860 nm/pulse as ablated thickness from the top of the particle. A statistical analysis over all data obtained allowed us to calculate 100 μm as ablated water column depth. - Highlights: ► We have identified a decrease of calibration curve when particle size increases. ► Partial particle ablation has been identified as the origin of this effect. ► The ablation rate on Al 2 O 3 particles in suspension in water has been estimated. ► We can determine the deepness of the interaction volume into the liquid.

  3. A Multipixel Time Series Analysis Method Accounting for Ground Motion, Atmospheric Noise, and Orbital Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivet, R.; Simons, M.

    2018-02-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar time series methods aim to reconstruct time-dependent ground displacements over large areas from sets of interferograms in order to detect transient, periodic, or small-amplitude deformation. Because of computational limitations, most existing methods consider each pixel independently, ignoring important spatial covariances between observations. We describe a framework to reconstruct time series of ground deformation while considering all pixels simultaneously, allowing us to account for spatial covariances, imprecise orbits, and residual atmospheric perturbations. We describe spatial covariances by an exponential decay function dependent of pixel-to-pixel distance. We approximate the impact of imprecise orbit information and residual long-wavelength atmosphere as a low-order polynomial function. Tests on synthetic data illustrate the importance of incorporating full covariances between pixels in order to avoid biased parameter reconstruction. An example of application to the northern Chilean subduction zone highlights the potential of this method.

  4. A natural orbital analysis of the helium (e,2e) spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; McCarthy, I.E.; Weigold, E.

    1984-10-01

    A series of successively more accurate wavefunctions (of the Natural Orbital form) for the helium atom ground state is used to analyse the 1200eV non-coplanar symmetric (e,2e) data for helium with the Plane Wave Impulse Approximation. Particular attention is focussed upon the determination of the ratio for populating the n = 2 (2s and 2p) and 1s ion states. It is seen that the cross-section ratio (at low recoil momentum) converges satisfactorily as additional target natural orbitals are utilised for the calculation of the overlap function. The convergence of the cross-section ratio at high azimuthal angles is seen to be much slower

  5. [Orbital inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouriaux, F; Coffin-Pichonnet, S; Robert, P-Y; Abad, S; Martin-Silva, N

    2014-12-01

    Orbital inflammation is a generic term encompassing inflammatory pathologies affecting all structures within the orbit : anterior (involvement up to the posterior aspect of the globe), diffuse (involvement of intra- and/or extraconal fat), apical (involvement of the posterior orbit), myositis (involvement of only the extraocular muscles), dacryoadenitis (involvement of the lacrimal gland). We distinguish between specific inflammation and non-specific inflammation, commonly referred to as idiopathic inflammation. Specific orbital inflammation corresponds to a secondary localization of a "generalized" disease (systemic or auto-immune). Idiopathic orbital inflammation corresponds to uniquely orbital inflammation without generalized disease, and thus an unknown etiology. At the top of the differential diagnosis for specific or idiopathic orbital inflammation are malignant tumors, represented most commonly in the adult by lympho-proliferative syndromes and metastases. Treatment of specific orbital inflammation begins with treatment of the underlying disease. For idiopathic orbital inflammation, treatment (most often corticosteroids) is indicated above all in cases of visual loss due to optic neuropathy, in the presence of pain or oculomotor palsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling and analysis of periodic orbits around a contact binary asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinglang; Noomen, Ron; Visser, Pieter N. A. M.; Yuan, Jianping

    2015-06-01

    The existence and characteristics of periodic orbits (POs) in the vicinity of a contact binary asteroid are investigated with an averaged spherical harmonics model. A contact binary asteroid consists of two components connected to each other, resulting in a highly bifurcated shape. Here, it is represented by a combination of an ellipsoid and a sphere. The gravitational field of this configuration is for the first time expanded into a spherical harmonics model up to degree and order 8. Compared with the exact potential, the truncation at degree and order 4 is found to introduce an error of less than 10 % at the circumscribing sphere and less than 1 % at a distance of the double of the reference radius. The Hamiltonian taking into account harmonics up to degree and order 4 is developed. After double averaging of this Hamiltonian, the model is reduced to include zonal harmonics only and frozen orbits are obtained. The tesseral terms are found to introduce significant variations on the frozen orbits and distort the frozen situation. Applying the method of Poincaré sections, phase space structures of the single-averaged model are generated for different energy levels and rotation rates of the asteroid, from which the dynamics driven by the 4×4 harmonics model is identified and POs are found. It is found that the disturbing effect of the highly irregular gravitational field on orbital motion is weakened around the polar region, and also for an asteroid with a fast rotation rate. Starting with initial conditions from this averaged model, families of exact POs in the original non-averaged system are obtained employing a numerical search method and a continuation technique. Some of these POs are stable and are candidates for future missions.

  7. Orbital stability analysis in biomechanics: a systematic review of a nonlinear technique to detect instability of motor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, F; Bisi, M C; Stagni, R

    2013-01-01

    Falls represent a heavy economic and clinical burden on society. The identification of individual chronic characteristics associated with falling is of fundamental importance for the clinicians; in particular, the stability of daily motor tasks is one of the main factors that the clinicians look for during assessment procedures. Various methods for the assessment of stability in human movement are present in literature, and methods coming from stability analysis of nonlinear dynamic systems applied to biomechanics recently showed promise. One of these techniques is orbital stability analysis via Floquet multipliers. This method allows to measure orbital stability of periodic nonlinear dynamic systems and it seems a promising approach for the definition of a reliable motor stability index, taking into account for the whole task cycle dynamics. Despite the premises, its use in the assessment of fall risk has been deemed controversial. The aim of this systematic review was therefore to provide a critical evaluation of the literature on the topic of applications of orbital stability analysis in biomechanics, with particular focus to methodologic aspects. Four electronic databases have been searched for articles relative to the topic; 23 articles were selected for review. Quality of the studies present in literature has been assessed with a customised quality assessment tool. Overall quality of the literature in the field was found to be high. The most critical aspect was found to be the lack of uniformity in the implementation of the analysis to biomechanical time series, particularly in the choice of state space and number of cycles to include in the analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. VIIRS On-Orbit Optical Anomaly - Investigation, Analysis, Root Cause Determination and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iona, Glenn; Butler, James; Guenther, Bruce; Graziani, Larissa; Johnson, Eric; Kennedy, Brian; Kent, Criag; Lambeck, Robert; Waluschka, Eugne; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2012-01-01

    A gradual, but persistent, decrease in the optical throughput was detected during the early commissioning phase for the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Near Infrared (NIR) bands. Its initial rate and unknown cause were coincidently coupled with a decrease in sensitivity in the same spectral wavelength of the Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor (SDSM) raising concerns about contamination or the possibility of a system-level satellite problem. An anomaly team was formed to investigate and provide recommendations before commissioning could resume. With few hard facts in hand, there was much speculation about possible causes and consequences of the degradation. Two different causes were determined as will be explained in this paper. This paper will describe the build and test history of VIIRS, why there were no indicators, even with hindsight, of an on-orbit problem, the appearance of the on-orbit anomaly, the initial work attempting to understand and determine the cause, the discovery of the root cause and what Test-As-You-Fly (TAYF) activities, can be done in the future to greatly reduce the likelihood of similar optical anomalies. These TAYF activities are captured in the lessons learned section of this paper.

  9. Dynamical analysis of rendezvous and docking with very large space infrastructures in non-Keplerian orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colagrossi, Andrea; Lavagna, Michèle

    2018-03-01

    A space station in the vicinity of the Moon can be exploited as a gateway for future human and robotic exploration of the solar system. The natural location for a space system of this kind is about one of the Earth-Moon libration points. The study addresses the dynamics during rendezvous and docking operations with a very large space infrastructure in an EML2 Halo orbit. The model takes into account the coupling effects between the orbital and the attitude motion in a circular restricted three-body problem environment. The flexibility of the system is included, and the interaction between the modes of the structure and those related with the orbital motion is investigated. A lumped parameter technique is used to represents the flexible dynamics. The parameters of the space station are maintained as generic as possible, in a way to delineate a global scenario of the mission. However, the developed model can be tuned and updated according to the information that will be available in the future, when the whole system will be defined with a higher level of precision.

  10. Phenomenological and Astro-particle analysis of light dark matter particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albornoz Vasquez, D.

    2011-09-01

    The nature of Dark Matter (DM) is still unveiled. Experimental efforts aiming to detect the Dark Matter have shown a great progress in the last decade. This work is devoted to the phenomenological and astro-particle studies of Dark Matter candidates of supersymmetric nature - the neutralino - and beyond - scalar particles. The former, in the (1-100) GeV mass range, is currently being tested by the Large Hadron Collider, direct detection and indirect detection experiments; this work shows that the interplay between experimental techniques is a decisive tool to thoroughly search for theoretical predictions. The latter is a non-standard candidate as light as 1 MeV which could be copiously produced at the Large Hadron Collider and, at the same time, it could explain other phenomena such as neutrino masses and/or the 511 keV line from the galactic center of the Milky Way. We start by describing the DM problem in Part I, where we give a review for evidence of the existence of DM, we set the cosmological framework in which we work and describe the history of DM from the Early Universe (EU), to the formation of structure and up to the current distribution of the DM in haloes. Then, in Part II, we go through the important Cosmological, Astro-particle and Particle Physics constraints to particle DM candidates and subsequently introduce models providing relatively light DM candidates, models of standard supersymmetric nature such as the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and the Next-to-MSSM (NMSSM) with neutralino DM, and beyond N=1 SUSY in a light scalar DM scenario inspired in N=2 SUSY. Finally, in Part III we present the findings of the investigations carried out: we describe a numerical tool developed to scan the multidimensional supersymmetric parameter space, then we present an application of this tool to the search of light neutralino configurations in the MSSM and NMSSM as well as an application to the search for neutralino DM in directional detectors, and

  11. WetLab-2: Tools for Conducting On-Orbit Quantitative Real-Time Gene Expression Analysis on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Macarena; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis; Jung, Jimmy; Schonfeld, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a research platform capable of conducting gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens sampled or cultured on orbit. The project has selected a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) qRT-PCR system, the Cepheid SmartCycler and will fly it in its COTS configuration. The SmartCycler has a number of advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, rapid ramp times and the ability to detect up to four separate fluorescent channels at one time enabling multiplex assays that can be used for normalization and to study multiple genes of interest in each module. The team is currently working with Cepheid to enable the downlink of data from the ISS to the ground and provide uplink capabilities for programming, commanding, monitoring, and instrument maintenance. The project has adapted commercial technology to design a module that can lyse cells and extract RNA of sufficient quality and quantity for use in qRT-PCR reactions while using a housekeeping gene to normalize RNA concentration and integrity. The WetLab-2 system is capable of processing multiple sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. The ability to conduct qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms or the concern of RNA degradation of fixed samples. The system can be used to validate terrestrial analyses of samples returned from ISS by providing on-orbit gene expression benchmarking prior to sample return. The ability to get on orbit data will provide investigators with the opportunity to adjust experiment parameters for subsequent trials based on the real-time data analysis without need for sample return and re-flight. Researchers will also be able to sample multigenerational changes in organisms. Finally, the system can be

  12. Electrokinetic Particle Transport in Micro-Nanofluidics Direct Numerical Simulation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Shizhi

    2012-01-01

    Numerous applications of micro-/nanofluidics are related to particle transport in micro-/nanoscale channels, and electrokinetics has proved to be one of the most promising tools to manipulate particles in micro/nanofluidics. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of electrokinetic particle transport in micro-/nanoscale channels is crucial to the development of micro/nano-fluidic devices. Electrokinetic Particle Transport in Micro-/Nanofluidics: Direct Numerical Simulation Analysis provides a fundamental understanding of electrokinetic particle transport in micro-/nanofluidics involving elect

  13. Parallelization and scheduling of data intensive particle physics analysis jobs on clusters of PCs

    CERN Document Server

    Ponce, S

    2004-01-01

    Summary form only given. Scheduling policies are proposed for parallelizing data intensive particle physics analysis applications on computer clusters. Particle physics analysis jobs require the analysis of tens of thousands of particle collision events, each event requiring typically 200ms processing time and 600KB of data. Many jobs are launched concurrently by a large number of physicists. At a first view, particle physics jobs seem to be easy to parallelize, since particle collision events can be processed independently one from another. However, since large amounts of data need to be accessed, the real challenge resides in making an efficient use of the underlying computing resources. We propose several job parallelization and scheduling policies aiming at reducing job processing times and at increasing the sustainable load of a cluster server. Since particle collision events are usually reused by several jobs, cache based job splitting strategies considerably increase cluster utilization and reduce job ...

  14. Plasma balance equations based on orbit theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1982-01-01

    A set of plasma balance equations is proposed which is based on orbit theory and the particle distribution function, to provide means for theoretical analysis of a number of finite Larmor radius (FLR) phenomena without use of the Vlasov equation. Several important FLR effects originate from the inhomogeneity of an electric field in the plasma. The exact solution of a simple case shows that this inhomogeneity introduces fundamental changes in the physics of the particle motion. Thus, the periodic Larmor motion (gyration) is shifted in frequency and becomes elliptically polarized. Further, the non-periodic guiding-centre drift obtains additional components, part of which are accelerated such as to make the drift orbits intersect the equipotential surfaces of a static electric field. An attempt is finally made to classify the FLR effects, also with the purpose of identifying phenomena which have so far not been investigated. (author)

  15. Energy Decomposition Analysis Based on Absolutely Localized Molecular Orbitals for Large-Scale Density Functional Theory Calculations in Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, M J S; Fox, T; Tautermann, C S; Skylaris, C-K

    2016-07-12

    We report the development and implementation of an energy decomposition analysis (EDA) scheme in the ONETEP linear-scaling electronic structure package. Our approach is hybrid as it combines the localized molecular orbital EDA (Su, P.; Li, H. J. Chem. Phys., 2009, 131, 014102) and the absolutely localized molecular orbital EDA (Khaliullin, R. Z.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2007, 111, 8753-8765) to partition the intermolecular interaction energy into chemically distinct components (electrostatic, exchange, correlation, Pauli repulsion, polarization, and charge transfer). Limitations shared in EDA approaches such as the issue of basis set dependence in polarization and charge transfer are discussed, and a remedy to this problem is proposed that exploits the strictly localized property of the ONETEP orbitals. Our method is validated on a range of complexes with interactions relevant to drug design. We demonstrate the capabilities for large-scale calculations with our approach on complexes of thrombin with an inhibitor comprised of up to 4975 atoms. Given the capability of ONETEP for large-scale calculations, such as on entire proteins, we expect that our EDA scheme can be applied in a large range of biomolecular problems, especially in the context of drug design.

  16. Solution Method and Precision Analysis of Double-difference Dynamic Precise Orbit Determination of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Weiping

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To resolve the high relativity between the transverse element of GEO orbit and double-difference ambiguity, the classical double-difference dynamic method is improved and the method, which is to determine precise BeiDou satellite orbit using carrier phase and pseudo-range smoothed by phase, is proposed. The feasibility of the method is discussed and the influence of the method about ambiguity fixing is analyzed. Considering the characteristic of BeiDou, the method, which is to fix double-difference ambiguity of BeiDou satellites by QIF, is derived. The real data analysis shows that the new method, which can reduce the relativity and assure the precision, is better than the classical double-difference dynamic method. The result of ambiguity fixing is well by QIF, but the ambiguity fixing success rate is not high on the whole. So the precision of BeiDou orbit can't be improved clearly after ambiguity fixing.

  17. Lagrangian analysis of multiscale particulate flows with the particle finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate, Eugenio; Celigueta, Miguel Angel; Latorre, Salvador; Casas, Guillermo; Rossi, Riccardo; Rojek, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    We present a Lagrangian numerical technique for the analysis of flows incorporating physical particles of different sizes. The numerical approach is based on the particle finite element method (PFEM) which blends concepts from particle-based techniques and the FEM. The basis of the Lagrangian formulation for particulate flows and the procedure for modelling the motion of small and large particles that are submerged in the fluid are described in detail. The numerical technique for analysis of this type of multiscale particulate flows using a stabilized mixed velocity-pressure formulation and the PFEM is also presented. Examples of application of the PFEM to several particulate flows problems are given.

  18. Analysis of charged particle induced reactions for beam monitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surendra Babu, K. [IOP, Academia Sinica, Taipe, Taiwan (China); Lee, Young-Ouk [Nuclear Data Evaluation Laboratory, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Mukherjee, S., E-mail: smukherjee_msuphy@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002 (India)

    2012-07-15

    The reaction cross sections for different residual nuclides produced in the charged particle (p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}) induced reactions were calculated and compared with the existing experimental data which are important for beam monitoring and medical diagnostic applications. A detailed literature compilation and comparison were made on the available data sets for the above reactions. These calculations were carried out using the statistical model code TALYS up to 100 MeV, which contains Kalbach's latest systematic for the emission of complex particles and complex particle-induced reactions. All optical model calculations were performed by ECIS-03, which is built into TALYS. The level density, optical model potential parameters were adjusted to get the better description of experimental data. Various pre-equilibrium models were used in the present calculations with default parameters.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis for the Orbiter LH2 Feedline Flowliner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Cetin C.

    2005-01-01

    In phase II, additional inducer rotations are simulated in order to understand the root cause of the flowliner crack problem. CFD results confirmed that there is a strong unsteady interaction between the backflow regions caused by the LPFTP inducer and secondary flow regions in the bellows cavity through the flowliner slots. It is observed that the swirl on the duct side of the downstream flowliner is stronger than on the duct side of the upstream flowliner. Due to this swirl, there are more significant unsteady flow interactions through the downstream slots than those observed in the upstream slots. Averaged values of the local velocity at the slots were provided to the NESC-ITA flow physics acoustics team to guide them in designing the acoustics experiment. A parametric study was performed to compare the flow field in the flowliner area when one upstream slot and one corresponding downstream slot were enlarged. No significant differences were observed between the flow field obtained from the enlarged slot configuration when compared with the original configuration. More cases must be analyzed with various enlarged slot configurations to generalize this observation. The flow through the A1 test stand and the flow through the orbiter fuel feedline manifold were simulated without the LPFTP. It was observed that incoming flow to the flowliner and inducer was more uniform in the A1 test stand then in the orbiter manifold. Additionally, each engine LPFTP in the orbiter receives significantly different velocity distributions. Because of the differences observed in the computed results, it is not possible for the A1 test stand to represent the three different engine feedlines simultaneously.

  20. In-Orbit Trend Analysis of Galileo Satellites for Power Sources Degradation Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bard Frederic

    2017-01-01

    The results are in all cases better than the predictions, which is expected due to the usage of conservatives assumptions in the design to cover (for both IOV and FOC worst case scenario for the entire constellation. It should be noted that the FOC GSAT201 and GSAT202 batteries are degrading slightly faster than the 6 others FOC batteries identified GSAT203, GSAT204, GSAT205, GSAT206, GSAT208 and GSAT209, but still below predictions due to their peculiar unexpected orbit reached after launch (higher DoD up to 42% measured due to longer eclipses. These 2 satellites will require specific degradation monitoring.

  1. Particle size analysis in estimating the significance of airborne contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    In this report information on pertinent methods and techniques for analysing particle size distributions is compiled. The principles underlying the measurement methods are described, and the merits of different methods in relation to the information being sought and to their usefulness in the laboratory and in the field are explained. Descriptions on sampling methods, gravitational and inertial particle separation methods, electrostatic sizing devices, diffusion batteries, optical sizing techniques and autoradiography are included. Finally, the report considers sampling for respirable activity and problems related to instrument calibration

  2. Video tracking and post-mortem analysis of dust particles from all tungsten ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endstrasser, N., E-mail: Nikolaus.Endstrasser@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Brochard, F. [Institut Jean Lamour, Nancy-Universite, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Rohde, V., E-mail: Volker.Rohde@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lunt, T.; Bardin, S.; Briancon, J.-L. [Institut Jean Lamour, Nancy-Universite, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Neu, R. [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-08-01

    2D dust particle trajectories are extracted from fast framing camera videos of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) by a new time- and resource-efficient code and classified into stationary hot spots, single-frame events and real dust particle fly-bys. Using hybrid global and local intensity thresholding and linear trajectory extrapolation individual particles could be tracked up to 80 ms. Even under challenging conditions such as high particle density and strong vacuum vessel illumination all particles detected for more than 50 frames are tracked correctly. During campaign 2009 dust has been trapped on five silicon wafer dust collectors strategically positioned within the vacuum vessel of the full tungsten AUG. Characterisation of the outer morphology and determination of the elemental composition of 5 x 10{sup 4} particles were performed via automated SEM-EDX analysis. A dust classification scheme based on these parameters was defined with the goal to link the particles to their most probable production sites.

  3. Isotope analysis of micro metal particles by adopting laser-ablation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyu Seok; Ha, Young Kyung; Han, Sun Ho; Park, Yong Joon; Kim, Won Ho

    2005-01-01

    The isotope analysis of microparticles in environmental samples as well as laboratory samples is an important task. A special concern is necessary in particle analysis of swipe samples. Micro particles are normally analyzed either by dissolving particles in the solvents and adopting conventional analytical methods or direct analysis method such as a laser-ablation ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), SIMS, and SNMS (sputtered neutral mass spectrometry). But the LA-ICPMS uses large amount of samples because normally laser beam is tightly focused on the target particle for the complete ablation. The SIMS and SNMS utilize ion beams for the generation of sample ions from the particle. But the number of ions generated by an ion beam is less than 5% of the total generated particles in SIMS. The SNMS is also an excellent analytical technique for particle analysis, however, ion beam and frequency tunable laser system are required for the analysis. Recently a direct analysis of elements as well as isotopes by using laser-ablation is recognized one of the most efficient detection technology for particle samples. The laser-ablation mass spectrometry requires only one laser source without frequency tuneability with no sample pretreatment. Therefore this technique is one of the simplest analysis techniques for solid samples as well as particles. In this study as a part of the development of the new isotope analysis techniques for particles samples, a direct laser-ablation is adopted with mass spectrometry. Zinc and gadolinium were chosen as target samples, since these elements have isotopes with minor abundance (0.62% for Zn, and 0.2% for Gd). The preliminary result indicates that isotopes of these two elements are analyzed within 10% of natural abundance with good mass resolution by using direct laser-ablation mass spectrometry

  4. A Collaborative Analysis Tool for Thermal Protection Systems for Single Stage to Orbit Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Reginald; Stanley, Thomas Troy

    2001-01-01

    Presented is a design tool and process that connects several disciplines which are needed in the complex and integrated design of high performance reusable single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. Every system is linked to all other systems, as is the case with SSTO vehicles with air breathing propulsion, which is currently being studied by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). In particular, the thermal protection system (TPS) is linked directly to almost every major system. The propulsion system pushes the vehicle to velocities on the order of 15 times the speed of sound in the atmosphere before pulling up to go to orbit which results in high temperatures on the external surfaces of the vehicle. Thermal protection systems to maintain the structural integrity of the vehicle must be able to mitigate the heat transfer to the structure and be lightweight. Herein lies the interdependency, in that as the vehicle's speed increases, the TPS requirements are increased. And as TPS masses increase the effect on the propulsion system and all other systems is compounded. To adequately calculate the TPS mass of this type of vehicle several engineering disciplines and analytical tools must be used preferably in an environment that data is easily transferred and multiple iterations are easily facilitated.

  5. Spin–Orbit Alignment of Exoplanet Systems: Ensemble Analysis Using Asteroseismology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante, T. L.; Lund, M. N.; Kuszlewicz, James S.

    2016-01-01

    seems to be well aligned with the stellar spin axis ( ##IMG## [http://ej.iop.org/images/0004-637X/819/1/85/apj522683ieqn2.gif] $psi =12rc. 6_-11.0^+6.7$ ). While the latter result is in apparent contradiction with a statement made previously in the literature that the multi-transiting system Kepler-25...... observed with NASA’s Kepler satellite. Our results for i s are consistent with alignment at the 2 σ level for all stars in the sample, meaning that the system surrounding the red-giant star Kepler-56 remains as the only unambiguous misaligned multiple-planet system detected to date. The availability...... of a measurement of the projected spin–orbit angle λ for two of the systems allows us to estimate ψ . We find that the orbit of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-7b is likely to be retrograde ( ##IMG## [http://ej.iop.org/images/0004-637X/819/1/85/apj522683ieqn1.gif] $psi =116rc. 4_-14.7^+30.2$ ), whereas that of Kepler-25c...

  6. Analysis of three particle correlations with the INDRA detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, A.; Eudes, Ph.; Lautridou, P.; Lebrun, C.; Reposeur, T.

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of the study of light particle production with the INDRA detector, we have analysed the invariant mass distribution of three particles produced in the Xe + Sn collisions at 50 A.MeV making use of an original interferometric method which offers the possibilities to access the intrinsic parameters of intermediate 'resonances' created during the nuclear collisions. By analyzing the correlations of (α,α,α) it was possible to make evident a signal equivalent to that from 12 C. The study of this signal allows: - to estimate the production rate of αs coming from the 12 C * decay; - accordingly, to introduce a correction for α multiplicity measured by INDRA; - to extract the temperature of the emitting fragment ( 12 C * ); to establish the sequential or direct decay mode of the emitting fragments ( 12 C * → α + 8 Be → α + α + α or 12 C * → α + α + α). Thus, the measured signal is an apparent consequence of the occurrence of the intermediate fragments excited in a metastable state from which the particles are emitted. The emission rate of the α particles coming from the decay of these fragments is estimated to several percents (< 10 %)

  7. Some peculiarity of element analysis using charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzev, A.P.; Abu-Alazm, S.M.; Helal, A.I.; Zahran, N.F.

    2002-01-01

    Multilayer structures, SiC -layers at Si substrate, have been analyzed by RBS, NR, ERD and PIXE methods using the charged particle beams from EG-5 Van de Graaff accelerator of JINR. The depth profiles of the based deposited layers were obtained for the multilayer structures

  8. ORBIT II sub-analysis: Impact of impaired renal function following treatment of severely calcified coronary lesions with the Orbital Atherectomy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Lee, Arthur C; Shlofmitz, Richard A; Martinsen, Brad J; Hargus, Nick J; Elder, Mahir D; Généreux, Philippe; Chambers, Jeffrey W

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of the coronary Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) to prepare severely calcified lesions for stent deployment in patients grouped by renal function. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of severely calcified lesions is associated with increased rates of major adverse cardiac events (MACE), including death, myocardial infarction (MI), and target vessel revascularization (TVR) compared with PCI of non-calcified vessels. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for MACE after PCI. The impact of CKD on coronary orbital atherectomy treatment has not been well characterized. ORBIT II was a prospective, multicenter trial in the U.S., which enrolled 443 patients with severely calcified coronary lesions. The MACE rate was defined as a composite of cardiac death, MI, and target vessel revascularization. Of the 441 patients enrolled with known estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at baseline, 333 (75.5%) patients had eGFR renal impairment had a higher MACE rate through one year follow-up due to a higher rate of periprocedural MI. Interestingly, the rates of cardiac death and revascularization through 1-year were similar in patients with eGFR renal impairment and severely calcified coronary lesions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nuclear microprobe analysis and source apportionment of individual atmospheric aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaxo, P.; Rabello, M.L.C.; Watt, F.; Grime, G.; Swietlicki, E.

    1993-01-01

    In atmospheric aerosol reserach, one key issue is to determine the sources of the airborne particles. Bulk PIXE analysis coupled with receptor modeling provides a useful, but limited view of the aerosol sources influencing one particular site or sample. The scanning nuclear microprobe (SNM) technique is a microanalytical technique that gives unique information on individual aerosol particles. In the SNM analyses a 1.0 μm size 2.4 MeV proton beam from the Oxford SNM was used. The trace elements with Z>11 were measured by the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method with detection limits in the 1-10 ppm range. Carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are measured simultaneously using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected at the Brazilian Antarctic Station and at biomass burning sites in the Amazon basin tropical rain forest in Brazil. In the Antarctic samples, the sea-salt aerosol particles were clearly predominating, with NaCl and CaSO 4 as major compounds with several trace elements as Al, Si, P, K, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, and Pb. Factor analysis of the elemental data showed the presence of four components: 1) Soil dust particles; 2) NaCl particles; 3) CaSO 4 with Sr; and 4) Br and Mg. Strontium, observed at 20-100 ppm levels, was always present in the CaSO 4 particles. The hierarchical cluster procedure gave results similar to the ones obtained through factor analysis. For the tropical rain forest biomass burning aerosol emissions, biogenic particles with a high organic content dominate the particle population, while K, P, Ca, Mg, Zn, and Si are the dominant elements. Zinc at 10-200 ppm is present in biogenic particles rich in P and K. The quantitative aspects and excellent detection limits make SNM analysis of individual aerosol particles a very powerful analytical tool. (orig.)

  10. Physical aspects of quantitative particles analysis by X-ray fluorescence and electron microprobe techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowicz, A.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present both physical fundamentals and recent advances in quantitative particles analysis by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and electron microprobe (EPXMA) techniques. A method of correction for the particle-size effect in XRF analysis is described and theoretically evaluated. New atomic number- and absorption correction procedures in EPXMA of individual particles are proposed. The applicability of these two correction methods is evaluated for a wide range of elemental composition, X-ray energy and sample thickness. Also, a theoretical model for composition and thickness dependence of Bremsstrahlung background generated in multielement bulk specimens as well as thin films and particles are presented and experimantally evaluated. Finally, the limitations and further possible improvements in quantitative particles analysis by XFR and EPXMA are discussed. 109 refs. (author)

  11. Prelaunch calibrations and on-orbit performance analysis of FY-2D SVISSR infrared channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Chen, Fuchun

    2014-10-01

    Meteorological satellites have become an irreplaceable weather and ocean-observing tool in China. These satellites are used to monitor natural disasters and improve the efficiency of many sectors of Chinese national economy. FY-2 series satellites are one of the key components of Chinese meteorological observing system and application system. In this paper, the operational satellite- FY-2D's infrared channels were focused and analyzed. The instruments' background was introduced briefly. The main payload SVISSR specifications were compared with its ancestral VISSR. The optical structure of the SVISSR was also expressed. FY-2D prelaunch calibrations methodology was introduced and the accuracies of the absolute radiometric calibration were analyzed. Some key optics on-orbit performance of FY-2D SVISSR were analyzed include onboard blackbody, cold FPA and detector noise level. All of these works show that FY- 2D's main payload SVISSR was in a healthy status.

  12. An approach for automated analysis of particle holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, A. C.; Caulfield, H. J.; Stewart, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    A simple method for analyzing droplet holograms is proposed that is readily adaptable to automation using modern image digitizers and analyzers for determination of the number, location, and size distributions of spherical or nearly spherical droplets. The method determines these parameters by finding the spatial location of best focus of the droplet images. With this location known, the particle size may be determined by direct measurement of image area in the focal plane. Particle velocity and trajectory may be determined by comparison of image locations at different instants in time. The method is tested by analyzing digitized images from a reconstructed in-line hologram, and the results show that the method is more accurate than a time-consuming plane-by-plane search for sharpest focus.

  13. Quantitative Image Analysis for Evaluating the Coating Thickness and Pore Distribution in Coated Small Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laksmana, F L; Van Vliet, L J; Hartman Kok, P J A; Vromans, H; Frijlink, H W; Van der Voort Maarschalk, K

    This study aims to develop a characterization method for coating structure based on image analysis, which is particularly promising for the rational design of coated particles in the pharmaceutical industry. The method applies the MATLAB image processing toolbox to images of coated particles taken

  14. Effect of feed processing on size of (washed) faeces particles from pigs measured by image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Peder; Kornfelt, Louise Foged; Hansen, Christian Fink

    2005-01-01

    of particles from the sieving fractions were scanned and the length and width of individual particles were identified using image analysis software. The overall mean, mode and median were estimated from a composite function. The dietary physical characteristics significantly affected the proportion of faecal...

  15. Analysis of clay particles behaviour during hydration-dehydration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maison, T.; Laouafa, F.; Delalain, P.; Fleureau, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The knowledge of the physico-chemical processes at a local (micro) level during the shrinkage or the swelling processes of clayey materials is an essential step to characterise the ability of such soils to shrink or to swell. In order to better understand these phenomena, we performed research at microscopic levels using mainly an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM). This apparatus allows exploring some features of the behaviour and physical properties of clays subjected to controlled hygrometry conditions. The observations were performed on an heterogeneous natural clay, the Romainville clay. This clay, showing a sensitive behavior to shrinkage and swelling, is taken in situ from affected site by the drought. This site is well monitored. This clay was characterised by classical geotechnical laboratory tests (mercury porosimetry, X-Ray diffraction, grain size analysis...). Microstructure observations are done on cubic samples of 1 cm side. Swelling-shrinkage cycles are done on clay powder with grain sizes between 63 μm and 125 μm. The microstructure shows a compact clayey matrix with small calcite and quartz grains. Calcite may be present in veins form, due to sedimentation or pressure-dissolution effect. At high humidity value around 98%, moulds are observed on the totality of sample surface. During swelling-shrinkage cycles, surface sample changes are real time followed. Hydratation-dehydration cycles are imposed with a time of 30 minutes (considered as sufficient to reach steady state). The sample deformation induced by swelling and shrinkage is calculated by analyzing 2D ESEM images and assuming isotropic behaviour for the out of plane strain. The result shows a kinetics of swelling and shrinkage which can be decomposed into two successive phases. At each change of relative humidity, the first step is characterized by a discontinuity (jump) in the deformation, followed by a quite constant strain

  16. VOLUME STUDY WITH HIGH DENSITY OF PARTICLES BASED ON CONTOUR AND CORRELATION IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Yu. Nikolaeva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study is the techniques of particle statistics evaluation, in particular, processing methods of particle images obtained by coherent illumination. This paper considers the problem of recognition and statistical accounting for individual images of small scattering particles in an arbitrary section of the volume in case of high concentrations. For automatic recognition of focused particles images, a special algorithm for statistical analysis based on contouring and thresholding was used. By means of the mathematical formalism of the scalar diffraction theory, coherent images of the particles formed by the optical system with high numerical aperture were simulated. Numerical testing of the method proposed for the cases of different concentrations and distributions of particles in the volume was performed. As a result, distributions of density and mass fraction of the particles were obtained, and the efficiency of the method in case of different concentrations of particles was evaluated. At high concentrations, the effect of coherent superposition of the particles from the adjacent planes strengthens, which makes it difficult to recognize images of particles using the algorithm considered in the paper. In this case, we propose to supplement the method with calculating the cross-correlation function of particle images from adjacent segments of the volume, and evaluating the ratio between the height of the correlation peak and the height of the function pedestal in the case of different distribution characters. The method of statistical accounting of particles considered in this paper is of practical importance in the study of volume with particles of different nature, for example, in problems of biology and oceanography. Effective work in the regime of high concentrations expands the limits of applicability of these methods for practically important cases and helps to optimize determination time of the distribution character and

  17. ANALYSIS OF SPIN-ORBIT ALIGNMENT IN THE WASP-32, WASP-38, AND HAT-P-27/WASP-40 SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Enoch, B.; Miller, G. R. M. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Diaz, R. F. [LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille), Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Doyle, A. P.; Smalley, B.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; Maxted, P. F. L. [Astrophysics Group, School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Lennard-Jones Building, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Gillon, M. [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, Allee du 6 Aout, 17 (Bat. B5C) Sart Tilman, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Lendl, M.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Queloz, D. [Observatoire Astronomique de l' Universite de Geneve, 51 Chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Pollacco, D. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Boisse, I. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Hebrard, G., E-mail: djab@st-andrews.ac.uk [Institut dAstrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre and Marie Curie, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2012-12-01

    We present measurements of the spin-orbit alignment angle, {lambda}, for the hot Jupiter systems WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40, based on data obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for all three systems and also carry out Doppler tomography for WASP-32 and WASP-38. We find that WASP-32 (T {sub eff} = 6140{sup +90} {sub -100} K) is aligned, with an alignment angle of {lambda} = 10.{sup 0}5{sup +6.4} {sub -6.5} obtained through tomography, and that WASP-38 (T {sub eff} = 6180{sup +40} {sub -60} K) is also aligned, with tomographic analysis yielding {lambda} = 7.{sup 0}5{sup +4.7} {sub -6.1}. The latter result provides an order-of-magnitude improvement in the uncertainty in {lambda} compared to the previous analysis of Simpson et al. We are only able to loosely constrain the angle for HAT-P-27/WASP-40 (T{sub eff} = 5190{sup +160} {sub -170} K) to {lambda} = 24.{sup 0}2{sup +76.0}{sub -44.5}, owing to the poor signal-to-noise ratio of our data. We consider this result a non-detection under a slightly updated version of the alignment test of Brown et al. We place our results in the context of the full sample of spin-orbit alignment measurements, finding that they provide further support for previously established trends.

  18. Analysis of Hansen's Inferior and Superior Partial Anomalies and the Division of the Elliptic Orbit into Two Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, M. A.; Saad, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a novel analysis was established to prove how Hansen's inferior and superior partial anomalies k and k_1 can divide the elliptic orbit into two segments. The analysis depends on the departures of r (for k) and 1/r (for k1) from their minima. By these departures, we can find: (i) Transformations relating the eccentric anomaly to k and the true anomaly to k1. (ii) Expressions for k and k_1 in terms of the orbital elements. (iii) The interpretation and the intervals of definition of two moduli (X, S) related to k and k_1. (iv) The extreme values of r and the elliptic equations in terms of k and k1. (v) For r' and r'', the modulus X as a measure of the asymmetry of r' (or r'') from r'' (or r'), and the modulus S12 as a measure of the asymmetry of r' and r'' from the minimum value of r. (vi) A description of the segments represented by k and k1. (vii) The relative position of the radius vector at k0° and k1=180°.

  19. Finite orbit analysis for long wavelength modes in a plasma with a hot component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, J.H.; Berk, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    The z-pinch model is used to calculate finite Larmor radius effects of a plasma with a hot component plasma annulus. The equations are analyzed for layer modes and the finite Larmor radius stabilization condition is calculated. Stability requires k 2 rho/sub h/ 2 Rβ/sub h//Δ greater than or equal to 1, where k is the wavenumber in the z-direction, rho/sub h/ the hot species Larmor radius, β/sub h/ the hot particle beta and Δ the thickness of the pressure profile. In addition a new instability is found due to the interaction of the precessional modes associated with inner and outer edges of the hot particle pressure profile

  20. Feed particle size evaluation: conventional approach versus digital holography based image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Dell’Orto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of image analysis approach based on digital holography in defining particle size in comparison with the sieve shaker method (sieving method as reference method. For this purpose ground corn meal was analyzed by a sieve shaker Retsch VS 1000 and by image analysis approach based on digital holography. Particle size from digital holography were compared with results obtained by screen (sieving analysis for each of size classes by a cumulative distribution plot. Comparison between particle size values obtained by sieving method and image analysis indicated that values were comparable in term of particle size information, introducing a potential application for digital holography and image analysis in feed industry.

  1. Number and mass analysis of particles emitted by aircraft engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasiński Remigiusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust emissions from aircraft is a complex issue because of the limited possibility of measurements in flight conditions. Most of the studies on this subject were performed on the basis of stationary test. Engine certification data is used to calculate total emissions generated by air transport. However, it doesnt provide any information about the local effects of air traffic. The main threat to local communities is particulate matter emissions, which adversely affects human health. Emissions from air transport affect air quality, particularly in the vicinity of the airports; it also contributes to the greenhouse effect. The article presents the measurement results of the concentration and size distribution of particles emitted during aircraft landing operation. Measurements were carried out during the landings of aircraft at a civilian airport. It was found that a single landing operation causes particle number concentration value increase of several ten-fold in a short period of time. Using aircraft engine certification data, the methodology for determination of the total number of particles emitted during a single landing operation was introduced.

  2. Tracking of macroscopic particle motions generated by a turbulent wind via digital image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, A. D.; Kawall, J. G.; Keffer, J. F.

    A novel technique utilizing the basic principles of two-dimensional signal analysis and artificial intelligence/computer vision to reconstruct the Lagrangian particle trajectories from flow visualization images of macroparticle motions in a turbulent boundary layer is presented. Since, in most cases, the entire trajectory of a particle could not be viewed in one photographic frame (the particles were moving at a high velocity over a small field of view), a stochastic model was developed to complete the trajectories and obtain statistical data on particle velocities. The associated programs were implemented on a Cray supercomputer to optimize computational costs and time.

  3. Free vibration analysis of linear particle chain impact damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Mohamed; Ghani, Saud

    2013-11-01

    Impact dampers have gained much research interest over the past decades that resulted in several analytical and experimental studies being conducted in that area. The main emphasis of such research was on developing and enhancing these popular passive control devices with an objective of decreasing the three parameters of contact forces, accelerations, and noise levels. To that end, the authors of this paper have developed a novel impact damper, called the Linear Particle Chain (LPC) impact damper, which mainly consists of a linear chain of spherical balls of varying sizes. The LPC impact damper was designed utilizing the kinetic energy of the primary system through placing, in the chain arrangement, a small-sized ball between each two large-sized balls. The concept of the LPC impact damper revolves around causing the small-sized ball to collide multiple times with the larger ones upon exciting the primary system. This action is believed to lead to the dissipation of part of the kinetic energy at each collision with the large balls. This paper focuses on the outcome of studying the free vibration of a single degree freedom system that is equipped with the LPC impact damper. The proposed LPC impact damper is validated by means of comparing the responses of a single unit conventional impact damper with those resulting from the LPC impact damper. The results indicated that the latter is considerably more efficient than the former impact damper. In order to further investigate the LPC impact damper effective number of balls and efficient geometry when used in a specific available space in the primary system, a parametric study was conducted and its result is also explained herein. Single unit impact damper [14-16]. Multiunit impact damper [17,18]. Bean bag impact damper [19,20]. Particle/granular impact damper [21,23,22]. Resilient impact damper [24]. Buffered impact damper [25-27]. Multiunit impact damper consists of multiple masses instead of a single mass. This

  4. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and system analysis study. Volume 2: OTV concept definition and evaluation. Book 1: Mission and system requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofal, Allen E.

    1987-01-01

    The mission and system requirements for the concept definition and system analysis of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) are established. The requirements set forth constitute the single authority for the selection, evaluation, and optimization of the technical performance and design of the OTV. This requirements document forms the basis for the Ground and Space Based OTV concept definition analyses and establishes the physical, functional, performance and design relationships to STS, Space Station, Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV), and payloads.

  5. Localization and force analysis at the single virus particle level using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Horng, Jim-Tong; Chang, Jeng-Shian; Hsieh, Chung-Fan; Tseng, You-Chen; Lin, Shiming

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Localization of single virus particle. ► Force measurements. ► Force mapping. -- Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a vital instrument in nanobiotechnology. In this study, we developed a method that enables AFM to simultaneously measure specific unbinding force and map the viral glycoprotein at the single virus particle level. The average diameter of virus particles from AFM images and the specificity between the viral surface antigen and antibody probe were integrated to design a three-stage method that sets the measuring area to a single virus particle before obtaining the force measurements, where the influenza virus was used as the object of measurements. Based on the purposed method and performed analysis, several findings can be derived from the results. The mean unbinding force of a single virus particle can be quantified, and no significant difference exists in this value among virus particles. Furthermore, the repeatability of the proposed method is demonstrated. The force mapping images reveal that the distributions of surface viral antigens recognized by antibody probe were dispersed on the whole surface of individual virus particles under the proposed method and experimental criteria; meanwhile, the binding probabilities are similar among particles. This approach can be easily applied to most AFM systems without specific components or configurations. These results help understand the force-based analysis at the single virus particle level, and therefore, can reinforce the capability of AFM to investigate a specific type of viral surface protein and its distributions.

  6. Analysis of unstable secondary particles produced in jet of 30 TeV energy sum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Takeshi

    1978-01-01

    High energy jet shower with energy sum of about 30 TeV has been obtained in the airplane-bone emulsion chamber. The size of the emulsion chamber was 20 cm x 25 cm x 12 cm. The airplane altitude was 260 g/cm 2 , and the exposure time was 600 hours. In this experiment, two jet events were found, and one of two events, KG-7, was the largest obtained so far. Three secondary charged particles produced by high energy interaction were analysed in detail. The analysis indicated that three charged particles seemed to be created by the decay of an unstable secondary particle. The lifetime of the unstable particle was estimated to be 10 -3 - 10 -14 sec, and this particle seems to be a charm particle. (Yoshimori, M.)

  7. Motion analysis of optically trapped particles and cells using 2D Fourier analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin Verner; Ahrendt, Peter; Lindballe, Thue Bjerring

    2012-01-01

    Motion analysis of optically trapped objects is demonstrated using a simple 2D Fourier transform technique. The displacements of trapped objects are determined directly from the phase shift between the Fourier transform of subsequent images. Using end-and side-view imaging, the stiffness...... of the trap is determined in three dimensions. The Fourier transform method is simple to implement and applicable in cases where the trapped object changes shape or where the lighting conditions change. This is illustrated by tracking a fluorescent particle and a myoblast cell, with subsequent determination...

  8. Effect of particle size on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of alumina suspension in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Rosado, Jose Carlos [CEA, DEN, SEARS, LANIE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Univ. Paris Sud, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Public Health and Environment UMR 8079, 5 rue J.B. Clement, 92296 Chatenay-Malabry (France); National University of Engineering, Faculty of Science, P.O. Box 31-139, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Lima (Peru); L' hermite, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.lhermite@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, SEARS, LANIE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Levi, Yves [Univ. Paris Sud, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Public Health and Environment UMR 8079, 5 rue J.B. Clement, 92296 Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2012-08-15

    The analysis by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was proposed for the detection and the quantification of different elements in water even when the analyte is composed of particles in suspension. We have studied the effect of particle size on the LIBS signal during liquid analysis. In our study we used different particle sizes (from 2 {mu}m to 90 {mu}m) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in suspension in water. The results were compared to the signal obtained in the case of dissolved aluminum. In the case of particles, a linear correlation between the LIBS signal versus concentration was found but a significant decrease in the slope of the calibration curve was found when the particle size increased. Several hypotheses have been tested and only a partial ablation of the particles might explain this decrease in signal intensity. This effect probably does not occur at smaller particle size. We estimated 860 nm/pulse as ablated thickness from the top of the particle. A statistical analysis over all data obtained allowed us to calculate 100 {mu}m as ablated water column depth. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have identified a decrease of calibration curve when particle size increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partial particle ablation has been identified as the origin of this effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ablation rate on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in suspension in water has been estimated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We can determine the deepness of the interaction volume into the liquid.

  9. Analysis of the particle stability in a new designed ultrasonic levitation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Sebastian; Andrade, Marco A B; Esen, Cemal; Adamowski, Julio Cezar; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    The use of acoustic levitation in the fields of analytical chemistry and in the containerless processing of materials requires a good stability of the levitated particle. However, spontaneous oscillations and rotation of the levitated particle have been reported in literature, which can reduce the applicability of the acoustic levitation technique. Aiming to reduce the particle oscillations, this paper presents the analysis of the particle stability in a new acoustic levitator device. The new acoustic levitator consists of a piezoelectric transducer with a concave radiating surface and a concave reflector. The analysis is conducted by determining numerically the axial and lateral forces that act on the levitated object and by measuring the oscillations of a sphere particle by a laser Doppler vibrometer. It is shown that the new levitator design allows to increase the lateral forces and reduce significantly the lateral oscillations of the levitated object.

  10. Meta-Analysis inside and outside Particle Physics: Convergence Using the Path of Least Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dan; Baker, Rose

    2013-01-01

    In this note, we explain how the method proposed by Hartung and Knapp provides a compromise between conventional meta-analysis methodology and "unconstrained averaging", as used by the Particle Data Group.

  11. Charged particle induced energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, S.A.E.

    1979-01-01

    This review article deals with the X-ray emission induced by heavy, charged particles and the use of this process as an analytical method (PIXE). The physical processes involved, X-ray emission and the various reactions contributing to the background, are described in some detail. The sensitivity is calculated theoretically and the results compared with practical experience. A discussion is given on how the sensitivity can be optimized. The experimental arrangements are described and the various technical problems discussed. The analytical procedure, especially the sample preparation, is described in considerable detail. A number of typical practical applications are discussed. (author)

  12. A retrospective analysis of different modalities for treatment of primary orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esik, Olga; Ikeda, H.; Mukai, K.; Kaneko, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have reviewed 37 patients with primary orbital lymphoma, using the Ann Arbor criteria and the Working Formulation and its modification. Thirty-one patients had stage I disease, four stage II, one stage III and one stage IV. The male to female ratio was 2.7:1. There were 34 low-grade tumours (including 24 mantle zone) and three intermediate-grade. Patients were divided into three groups according to their primary treatment. Group 1: radiotherapy (17 cases); Group 2: surgery alone (13 cases); Group 3: chemotherapy (seven cases). Patients were followed up from 5 months to 24.3 years, with a mean and median of 7.6 and 6.2 years, respectively. The BMDP software package was used for survival estimation (Kaplan-Meier) and determination of prognostic variable (univariate Cox regression). Local relapse-free survival at 10 years was 100% in Group 1, 0% in Group 2 and 42% in Group 3 with a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01) in favour of radiotherapy. Statistically significant good prognostic features were: complete remission (CR) in response to initial treatment, primary radiotherapy and older age. For stage I cases, there was no difference in distant relapse-free survival in the three groups. The overall cause-specific survival for stage I patients at 10 years was 100% for each group and at 20 years was 100, 67 and 0% for Group 1, 2 and 3. The difference between the primary radiotherapy and chemotherapy-treated groups was significant at the p = 0.08 level. Statistically significant prognostic factors were early stage, low-grade histology and primary radiotherapy. In one patient, ptosis and diplopia appeared after surgery. One case of glaucoma required enucleation, one patient suffered severe dry eye syndrome. All patients ((11(11))) in whom the lens received direct radiation developed cataracts of different degrees if follow-up was long enough. Cataract formation was prevented by adequate lens shielding. One patient in CR from a stage I low-grade tumour died

  13. Single particle analysis of eastern Mediterranean aerosol particles: Influence of the source region on the chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemen, Hans-Christian; Schneider, Johannes; Köllner, Franziska; Klimach, Thomas; Pikridas, Michael; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Sciare, Jean; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    The Mediterranean region is one of the most climatically sensitive areas and is influenced by air masses of different origin. Aerosol particles are one important factor contributing to the Earth's radiative forcing, but knowledge about their composition and sources is still limited. Here, we report on results from the INUIT-BACCHUS-ACTRIS campaign, which was conducted at the Cyprus Atmospheric Observatory (CAO, Agia Marina Xyliatou) in Cyprus in April 2016. Our results show that the chemical composition of the aerosol particles in the eastern Mediterranean is strongly dependent on their source region. The composition of particles in a size range between 150 nm and 3 μm was measured using the Aircraft-based Laser ABlation Aerosol MAss spectrometer (ALABAMA), which is a single particle laser ablation instrument using a bipolar time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The mass spectral information on cations and anions allow for the analysis of different molecular fragments. The information about the source regions results from backward trajectories using HYSPLIT Trajectory Model (Trajectory Ensemble) on hourly basis. To assess the influence of certain source regions on the air masses arriving at CAO, we consider the number of trajectories that crossed the respective source region within defined time steps. For a more detailed picture also the height and the velocity of the air masses during their overpass above the source regions will be considered. During the campaign at CAO in April 2016 three main air mass source regions were observed: 1) Northern Central Europe, likely with an enhanced anthropogenic influence (e.g. sulfate and black carbon from combustion processes, fly ash particles from power plants, characterized by Sr and Ba), 2) Southwest Europe, with a higher influence of the Mediterranean Sea including sea salt particles (characterized by, e.g., NaxCly, NaClxNOy), 3) Northern Africa/Sahara, with air masses that are expected to have a higher load of mineral dust

  14. Particle filters on light diesel vehicles - a socio-economic analysis on the introduction of particle filters; Partikelfiltre pae lette dieselkoeretoejer - en samfundsoekonomisk analyse af fremskyndelse af partikelfiltre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, M.; Larsen, Thommy; Carlsen, Kirsten; Mulvad Jeppesen, L.

    2006-09-15

    Emission of particles into the atmosphere is one of the biggest air pollution problems of our times. The emission of particles causes severe health problems such as respiratory and circulatory diseases, lung cancer, asthma, bronchitis and even causes premature deaths. The emission of particles comes from a number of different sources, where traffic is a considerable contributor. The effects of particle emissions from the traffic on the population are substantial, as the emission comes from mobile sources which create a high local pollution in city areas and in consequence high exposure of the local population. Exhaust particle emissions come mainly from diesel engines, and the introduction of particle filters would have a considerable impact on particle emissions. Vehicle emissions regulation is controlled by the EU. The coming emission regulation, EURO 5, is expected to be put into effect by the beginning of 2010. The current suggestions for the EURO 5 restrictions on particles are set so strict that they will be impossible to fulfil without a particle filter. This report performs a socio-economic analysis on the introduction of particle filters on all light vehicles (<3,500 kg). The analysis assumes that all newly registered diesel powered cars and vans should have a factory installed particle filter from the beginning of 2007. This thereby gives a period of three years before implementation of the EURO 5. (au)

  15. Analysis of filler particle levels and sizes in dental alginates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lemes Carlo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the inorganic filler fractions and sizes of commercially alginates. The inorganic particles volumetric fractions of five alginates - Jeltrate(J, Jeltrate Plus(JP, Jeltrate Chromatic Ortho(JC, Hydrogum(H and Ezact Krom(E were accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 450 °C for 3 hours. Unsettled materials were soaked in acetone and chloroform and sputter-coated with gold for SEM evaluation of fillers' morphology and size. The results for the volumetric inorganic particle content were (%: J - 48.33, JP - 48.33, JC - 33.79, H - 37.55 and E - 40.55. The fillers presented a circular appearance with helical form and various perforations. Hydrogum fillers looked like cylindrical, perforated sticks. The mean values for fillers size were (μm: J - 12.91, JP - 13.67, JC - 13.44, E - 14.59 and H - 9 (diameter, 8.81 (length. The results of this study revealed differences in filler characteristics that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  16. Consistent microscopic and phenomenological analysis of composite particle opticle potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sheela; Srivastava, D.K.; Ganguly, N.K.

    1976-01-01

    A microscopic calculation of composits particle optical potential has been done using a realistic nucleon-helion interaction and folding it with the density distribution of the targets. The second order effects were simulated by introducing a scaling factor which was searched on to reproduce the experimental scattering results. Composite particle optical potential was also derived from the nucleon-nucleus optical potential. The second order term was explicitly treated as a parameter. Elastic scattering of 20 MeV 3 H on targets ranging from 40 Ca to 208 Pb to 208 Pb have also been analysed using phenomenological optical model. Agreement of these results with the above calculations verified the consistency of the microscopic theory. But the equivalent sharp radius calculated with n-helion interaction was observed to be smaller than phenomenological value. This was attributed to the absence of saturation effects in the density-independent interaction used. Saturation has been introduced by a density dependent term of the form (1-c zetasup(2/3)), where zeta is the compound density of the target helion system. (author)

  17. Design and analysis of a single stage to orbit nuclear thermal rocket reactor engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labib, Satira; King, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Three NTR reactors are optimized for the single stage launch of 1–15 MT payloads. • The proposed rocket engines have specific impulses in excess of 700 s. • Reactivity and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each reactor. - Abstract: Recent advances in the development of high power density fuel materials have renewed interest in nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) as a viable propulsion technology for future space exploration. This paper describes the design of three NTR reactor engines designed for the single stage to orbit launch of payloads from 1 to 15 metric tons. Thermal hydraulic and rocket engine analyses indicate that the proposed rocket engines are able to reach specific impulses in excess of 800 s. Neutronics analyses performed using MCNP5 demonstrate that the hot excess reactivity, shutdown margin, and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each NTR reactor. The reactors each consist of a 40 cm diameter core packed with hexagonal tungsten cermet fuel elements. The core is surrounded by radial and axial beryllium reflectors and eight boron carbide control drums. The 40 cm long reactor meets the submersion criticality requirements (a shutdown margin of at least $1 subcritical in all submersion scenarios) with no further modifications. The 80 and 120 cm long reactors include small amounts of gadolinium nitride as a spectral shift absorber to keep them subcritical upon submersion in seawater or wet sand following a launch abort

  18. Overview of the LARES Mission: orbit, error analysis and technological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Paris, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    LARES (LAser RElativity Satellite), is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) mission to be launched beginning of 2012 with the new European launch vehicle, VEGA; the launch opportunity was provided by the European Space Agency (ESA). LARES is a laser ranged satellite; it will be launched into a nearly circular orbit, with an altitude of 1450 km and an inclination of 69.5 degrees. The goal of the mission is the measurement of the Lense-Thirring effect with an uncertainty of few percent; such a small uncertainty will be achieved using LARES data together with data from the LAGEOS I (NASA) and LAGEOS II (NASA and ASI) satellites, and because GRACE mission (NASA-CSR and DLR-GFZ) is improving Earth's gravity field models. This paper describes LARES experiment along with the principal error sources affecting the measurement. Furthermore, some engineering aspects of the mission, in particular the structure and materials of the satellite (designed in order to minimize the non-gravitational perturbations), are described.

  19. Design and analysis of a single stage to orbit nuclear thermal rocket reactor engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labib, Satira, E-mail: Satira.Labib@duke-energy.com; King, Jeffrey, E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Three NTR reactors are optimized for the single stage launch of 1–15 MT payloads. • The proposed rocket engines have specific impulses in excess of 700 s. • Reactivity and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each reactor. - Abstract: Recent advances in the development of high power density fuel materials have renewed interest in nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) as a viable propulsion technology for future space exploration. This paper describes the design of three NTR reactor engines designed for the single stage to orbit launch of payloads from 1 to 15 metric tons. Thermal hydraulic and rocket engine analyses indicate that the proposed rocket engines are able to reach specific impulses in excess of 800 s. Neutronics analyses performed using MCNP5 demonstrate that the hot excess reactivity, shutdown margin, and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each NTR reactor. The reactors each consist of a 40 cm diameter core packed with hexagonal tungsten cermet fuel elements. The core is surrounded by radial and axial beryllium reflectors and eight boron carbide control drums. The 40 cm long reactor meets the submersion criticality requirements (a shutdown margin of at least $1 subcritical in all submersion scenarios) with no further modifications. The 80 and 120 cm long reactors include small amounts of gadolinium nitride as a spectral shift absorber to keep them subcritical upon submersion in seawater or wet sand following a launch abort.

  20. Space Shuttle Orbiter Wing-Leading-Edge Panel Thermo-Mechanical Analysis for Entry Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2010-01-01

    Linear elastic, thermo-mechanical stress analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter wing-leading-edge panels is presented for entry heating conditions. The wing-leading-edge panels are made from reinforced carbon-carbon and serve as a part of the overall thermal protection system. Three-dimensional finite element models are described for three configurations: integrated configuration, an independent single-panel configuration, and a local lower-apex joggle segment. Entry temperature conditions are imposed and the through-the-thickness response is examined. From the integrated model, it was concluded that individual panels can be analyzed independently since minimal interaction between adjacent components occurred. From the independent single-panel model, it was concluded that increased through-the-thickness stress levels developed all along the chord of a panel s slip-side joggle region, and hence isolated local joggle sections will exhibit the same trend. From the local joggle models, it was concluded that two-dimensional plane-strain models can be used to study the influence of subsurface defects along the slip-side joggle region of these panels.

  1. Exploratory orbit analysis of Tevatron helical upgrade: One: A first look

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelotti, L.; Saritepe, S.

    1989-04-01

    A key feature of the Tevatron upgrade is the placement of proton and anti-proton bunches on the branches of a double helix which winds around the current closed orbit. Electrostatic separators will transfer the bunches on and off the double helix so that they experience head-on collisions only at the experimental areas, B0 and D0, all other encounters occurring at large transverse separation. In this way the number of bunches, and the luminosity, can be increased without a proportional growth in the beam-beam tune shift. The scenario raises a number of beam dynamics issues, especially (a) the consequences of sampling magnetic fields far from the magnets' center lines, and (b) the effects of the long-range beam-beam interaction. This report presents the results of calculations and simulations done to date to explore (b); a Fermilab team have been studying (a), both experimentally and theoretically, but we shall not review those efforts here. 9 refs., 17 figs

  2. Orbital transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, H. Jr.; Koerner, H.

    1993-01-01

    The Third Aerospace Symposium in Braunschweig presented, for the first time, the possibility of bringing together the classical disciplines of aerospace engineering and the natural science disciplines of meteorology and air chemistry in a european setting. In this way, aspects of environmental impact on the atmosphere could be examined quantitatively. An essential finding of the european conference, is the unrestricted agreement of the experts that the given launch frequencies of the present orbital transport result in a negligible amount of pollutants being released in the atmosphere. The symposium does, however, call attention to the increasing need to consider the effect of orbital and atmospheric environmental impact of a future increase in launch frequencies of orbital transport in connection with future space stations. The Third Aerospace Symposium, 'Orbital Transport, Technical, Meteorological and Chemical Aspects', constituted a first forum of discussion for engineers and scientists. Questions of new orbital transport technologies and their environmental impact were to be discussed towards a first consensus. Through the 34 reports and articles, the general problems of space transportation and environmental protection were addressed, as well as particular aspects of high temperatures during reentry in the atmosphere of the earth, precision navigation of flight vehicles or flow behavior and air chemistry in the stratosphere. (orig./CT). 342 figs

  3. A method for volume determination of the orbit and its contents by high resolution axial tomography and quantitative digital image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, W C

    1985-01-01

    The various congenital and acquired conditions which alter orbital volume are reviewed. Previous investigative work to determine orbital capacity is summarized. Since these studies were confined to postmortem evaluations, the need for a technique to measure orbital volume in the living state is presented. A method for volume determination of the orbit and its contents by high-resolution axial tomography and quantitative digital image analysis is reported. This procedure has proven to be accurate (the discrepancy between direct and computed measurements ranged from 0.2% to 4%) and reproducible (greater than 98%). The application of this method to representative clinical problems is presented and discussed. The establishment of a diagnostic system versatile enough to expand the usefulness of computerized axial tomography and polytomography should add a new dimension to ophthalmic investigation and treatment.

  4. Particle drag history in a subcritical post-shock flow - data analysis method and uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liuyang; Bordoloi, Ankur; Adrian, Ronald; Prestridge, Kathy; Arizona State University Team; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team

    2017-11-01

    A novel data analysis method for measuring particle drag in an 8-pulse particle tracking velocimetry-accelerometry (PTVA) experiment is described. We represented the particle drag history, CD(t) , using polynomials up to the third order. An analytical model for continuous particle position history was derived by integrating an equation relating CD(t) with particle velocity and acceleration. The coefficients of CD(t) were then calculated by fitting the position history model to eight measured particle locations in the sense of least squares. A preliminary test with experimental data showed that the new method yielded physically more reasonable particle velocity and acceleration history compared to conventionally adopted polynomial fitting. To fully assess and optimize the performance of the new method, we performed a PTVA simulation by assuming a ground truth of particle motion based on an ensemble of experimental data. The results indicated a significant reduction in the RMS error of CD. We also found that for particle locating noise between 0.1 and 3 pixels, a range encountered in our experiment, the lowest RMS error was achieved by using the quadratic CD(t) model. Furthermore, we will also discuss the optimization of the pulse timing configuration.

  5. Analysis of individual environmental particles using modern methods of electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskin, A.; Cowin, J.P.; Iedema, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the composition of particles in the atmosphere is critical because of their health effects and their direct and indirect effects on radiative forcing, and hence on climate. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the utility of single particle off-line analysis to investigate the chemistry of individual atmospheric particles using modern, state-of-the-art electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry techniques. We show that these methods provide specific, detailed data on particle composition, chemistry, morphology, phase and internal structure. This information is crucial for evaluating hygroscopic properties of aerosols, understanding aerosol aging and reactivity, and correlating the characteristics of aerosols with their optical properties. The manuscript presents a number of analytical advances in methods of electron probe particle analysis along with a brief review of a number of the research projects carried out in the authors' laboratory on the chemical characterization of environmental particles. The obtained data offers a rich set of qualitative and quantitative information on the particle chemistry, composition and the mechanisms of gas-particle interactions which are of high importance to atmospheric processes involving particulate matter and air pollution

  6. Order-2 Stability Analysis of Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Several stability analyses and stable regions of particle swarm optimization (PSO) have been proposed before. The assumption of stagnation and different definitions of stability are adopted in these analyses. In this paper, the order-2 stability of PSO is analyzed based on a weak stagnation assumption. A new definition of stability is proposed and an order-2 stable region is obtained. Several existing stable analyses for canonical PSO are compared, especially their definitions of stability and the corresponding stable regions. It is shown that the classical stagnation assumption is too strict and not necessary. Moreover, among all these definitions of stability, it is shown that our definition requires the weakest conditions, and additional conditions bring no benefit. Finally, numerical experiments are reported to show that the obtained stable region is meaningful. A new parameter combination of PSO is also shown to be good, even better than some known best parameter combinations.

  7. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming [Department of Biophysics, the Health Science Centre, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Meng, Xing, E-mail: xmeng101@gmail.com [Wadsworth Centre, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York 12201 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties. - Highlights: • New classification method. • Create the accurate initial model. • Better in handling noisy data.

  8. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming; Meng, Xing

    2016-01-01

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties. - Highlights: • New classification method. • Create the accurate initial model. • Better in handling noisy data.

  9. An analysis of particle track effects on solid mammalian tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, P.

    1992-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and quality factor (Q) at extreme values of linear energy transfer (LET) have been determined on the basis of experiments with single-cell systems and specific tissue responses. In typical single-cell systems, each heavy particle (Ar or Fe) passes through a single cell or no cell. In experiments on animal tissues, however, each heavy particle passes through several cells, and the LET can exceed 200 keV μm -1 in every cell. In most laboratory animal tissue systems, however, only a small portion of the hit cells are capable of expressing the end-point being measured, such as cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The following question was therefore addressed: do RBEs and Q factors derived from single-cell experiments properly account for the damage at high LET when multiple cells are hit by HZE tracks? A review is offered in which measured radiation effects and known tissue properties are combined to estimate on the one hand, the number of cells at risk, p 3 n, per track, where n is the number of cells per track based on tissue and organ geometry, and p 3 is the probability that a cell in the track is capable of expressing the experimental end-point. On the other hand, the tissue and single-cell responses are compared by determining the ratio RBE in tissue/RBE in corresponding single cells. Experimental data from the literature indicate that tissue RBEs at very high LET (Fe and Ar ions) are higher than corresponding single-cell RBEs, especially in tissues in which p 3 n is high. (author)

  10. Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Polarization Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Waluschka, Eugene; Wang, Menghua

    2016-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is one of five instruments onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite that launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on October 28, 2011. It is a whiskbroom radiometer that provides +/-56.28deg scans of the Earth view. It has 22 bands, among which 14 are reflective solar bands (RSBs). The RSBs cover a wavelength range from 410 to 2250 nm. The RSBs of a remote sensor are usually sensitive to the polarization of incident light. For VIIRS, it is specified that the polarization factor should be smaller than 3% for 410 and 862 nm bands and 2.5% for other RSBs for the scan angle within +/-45deg. Several polarization sensitivity tests were performed prelaunch for SNPP VIIRS. The first few tests either had large uncertainty or were less reliable, while the last one was believed to provide the more accurate information about the polarization property of the instrument. In this paper, the measured data in the last polarization sensitivity test are analyzed, and the polarization factors and phase angles are derived from the measurements for all the RSBs. The derived polarization factors and phase angles are band, detector, and scan angle dependent. For near-infrared bands, they also depend on the half-angle mirror side. Nevertheless, the derived polarization factors are all within the specification, although the strong detector dependence of the polarization parameters was not expected. Compared to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on both Aqua and Terra satellites, the polarization effect on VIIRS RSB is much smaller.

  11. Substituent effects on the optical properties of naphthalenediimides: A frontier orbital analysis across the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Joshua R; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Slootweg, J Chris; Lammertsma, Koop; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-01-15

    A comprehensive theoretical treatment is presented for the electronic excitation spectra of ca. 50 different mono-, di-, and tetrasubstituted naphthalenediimides (NDI) using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) at ZORA-CAM-B3LYP/TZ2P//ZORA-BP86/TZ2P with COSMO for simulating the effect of dichloromethane (DCM) solution. The substituents -XHn are from groups 14-17 and rows 2-5 of the periodic table. The lowest dipole-allowed singlet excitation (S0 -S1 ) of the monosubstituted NDIs can be tuned from 3.39 eV for -F to 2.42 eV for -TeH, while the S0 -S2 transition is less sensitive to substitution with energies ranging between 3.67 eV for -CH3 and 3.44 eV for -SbH2 . In the case of NDIs with group-15 and -16 substituents, the optical transitions strongly depend on the extent to which -XHn is planar or pyramidal as well as on the possible formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The accumulative effect of double and quadruple substitution leads in general to increasing bathochromic shifts, but the increased steric hindrance in tetrasubstituted NDIs can lead to deformations that diminish the effectiveness of the substituents. Detailed analyses of the Kohn-Sham orbital electronic structure in monosubstituted NDIs reveal the mesomeric destabilization of the HOMO as the primary cause of the bathochromic shift of the S0-S1 transition. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Pooled analysis of the CONFIRM Registries: outcomes in renal disease patients treated for peripheral arterial disease using orbital atherectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Yang, Tae; Adams, George L; Mustapha, Jihad; Das, Tony

    2014-08-01

    Patients with renal disease typically have severely calcified peripheral arterial disease. As a result, this population may have worse clinical outcomes following endovascular intervention compared to patients without renal insufficiency. Clinical trials typically exclude this patient population. Analysis of the CONFIRM I-III registries revealed 1105 patients with renal disease (1777 lesions) and 1969 patients without renal disease (2907 lesions) who underwent orbital atherectomy. This subanalysis compared the composite procedural complication rate including dissection, perforation, slow flow, vessel closure, spasm, embolism, and thrombus formation in patients with and without renal disease. Patients with renal disease had a higher prevalence of diabetes (Patherectomy resulted in similar low rates of procedural complications in the renal disease group compared with the non-renal disease group despite more unfavorable baseline clinical and lesion characteristics in the renal disease group.

  13. Isogyres - Manifestation of Spin-orbit interaction in uniaxial crystal: A closed-fringe Fourier analysis of conoscopic interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samlan, C. T.; Naik, Dinesh N.; Viswanathan, Nirmal K.

    2016-09-01

    Discovered in 1813, the conoscopic interference pattern observed due to light propagating through a crystal, kept between crossed polarizers, shows isochromates and isogyres, respectively containing information about the dynamic and geometric phase acquired by the beam. We propose and demonstrate a closed-fringe Fourier analysis method to disentangle the isogyres from the isochromates, leading us to the azimuthally varying geometric phase and its manifestation as isogyres. This azimuthally varying geometric phase is shown to be the underlying mechanism for the spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion observed in a diverging optical field propagating through a z-cut uniaxial crystal. We extend the formalism to study the optical activity mediated uniaxial-to-biaxial transformation due to a weak transverse electric field applied across the crystal. Closely associated with the phase and polarization singularities of the optical field, the formalism enables us to understand crystal optics in a new way, paving the way to anticipate several emerging phenomena.

  14. Computational analysis of electrical conduction in hybrid nanomaterials with embedded non-penetrating conductive particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jizhe; Naraghi, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a comprehensive multi-resolution two-dimensional (2D) resistor network model is proposed to analyze the electrical conductivity of hybrid nanomaterials made of insulating matrix with conductive particles such as CNT reinforced nanocomposites and thick film resistors. Unlike existing approaches, our model takes into account the impenetrability of the particles and their random placement within the matrix. Moreover, our model presents a detailed description of intra-particle conductivity via finite element analysis, which to the authors’ best knowledge has not been addressed before. The inter-particle conductivity is assumed to be primarily due to electron tunneling. The model is then used to predict the electrical conductivity of electrospun carbon nanofibers as a function of microstructural parameters such as turbostratic domain alignment and aspect ratio. To simulate the microstructure of single CNF, randomly positioned nucleation sites were seeded and grown as turbostratic particles with anisotropic growth rates. Particle growth was in steps and growth of each particle in each direction was stopped upon contact with other particles. The study points to the significant contribution of both intra-particle and inter-particle conductivity to the overall conductivity of hybrid composites. Influence of particle alignment and anisotropic growth rate ratio on electrical conductivity is also discussed. The results show that partial alignment in contrast to complete alignment can result in maximum electrical conductivity of whole CNF. High degrees of alignment can adversely affect conductivity by lowering the probability of the formation of a conductive path. The results demonstrate approaches to enhance electrical conductivity of hybrid materials through controlling their microstructure which is applicable not only to carbon nanofibers, but also many other types of hybrid composites such as thick film resistors.

  15. Analysis of commodity prices with the particle filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiube, Fernando Antonio Lucena; Baidya, Tara Keshar Nanda; Tito, Edison Americo Huarsaya

    2008-01-01

    The behavior of commodities prices is fundamental to real-asset investment decisions, hedging, and pricing financial derivatives. Schwartz and Smith [Schwartz, E.S., Smith, J.E. (2000). Short term-variations and long-term dynamics in commodity prices. Management Science, 46, 893-911.] proposed a two-factor model for describing the stochastic processes of commodity prices, in which the two factors are short-term variations and equilibrium prices. These are both unobserved state variables that are estimated using the Kalman filter. The estimation is based on the observation of future prices for different maturities. The authors have carried out this process without incorporating jumps in the short-term variation of prices. Here we aim to demonstrate that the inclusion of jumps better explains the behavior of oil prices, and in fact creates difficulties in the estimation of state variables. This is because the variables become non-Gaussian so the Kalman filter is not recommended. Another methodology, called the particle filter, is more suitable in this case, and we describe its application in this article

  16. Transient Particle Transport Analysis on TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguilior, S.; Castejon, F.; Guasp, J.; Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Tabares, F.L.; Branas, B.

    2006-12-18

    Particle diffusivity and convective velocity have been determined in ECRH plasmas confined in the stellarator TJ-II by analysing the evolving density profile. This is obtained from an amplitude modulation reflectometry system in addition to an X-ray tomographic reconstruction. The source term, which is needed as an input for transport equations, is obtained using EIRENE code. In order to discriminate between the diffusive and convective contributions, the dynamics of the density evolution has been analysed in several perturbative experiments. This evolution has been considered in discharges with injection of a single pulse of H2 as well as in those that present a spontaneous transition to an enhanced confinement mode and whose confinement properties are modified by inducing an ohmic current. The pinch velocity and diffusivity are parameterized by different expressions in order to fit the experimental time evolution of density profile. The profile evolution is very different from one case to another due to the different values of convective velocities and diffusivities, besides the different source terms. (Author) 19 refs.

  17. An analysis of 1-D smoothed particle hydrodynamics kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulk, D.A.; Quinn, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) kernel is analyzed, resulting in measures of merit for one-dimensional SPH. Various methods of obtaining an objective measure of the quality and accuracy of the SPH kernel are addressed. Since the kernel is the key element in the SPH methodology, this should be of primary concern to any user of SPH. The results of this work are two measures of merit, one for smooth data and one near shocks. The measure of merit for smooth data is shown to be quite accurate and a useful delineator of better and poorer kernels. The measure of merit for non-smooth data is not quite as accurate, but results indicate the kernel is much less important for these types of problems. In addition to the theory, 20 kernels are analyzed using the measure of merit demonstrating the general usefulness of the measure of merit and the individual kernels. In general, it was decided that bell-shaped kernels perform better than other shapes. 12 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  18. Particle and radiation leakage importance: definition, analysis, and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.; Wagschal, J.J.; Yaari, A.

    1982-01-01

    The concept of leakage importance function has been introduced and analyzed for physical systems governed by the Boltzmann transport equation. This leakage importance function represents a measure of the relative importance of source particles located at every point in phase space in contributing to the leakage and provides insight regarding the specific physical process that leads to leakage. The equation satisfied by the leakage importance function has been derived by using adjoint operators. It has been shown that procedures that are customarily used to derive an equation obeyed by an importance function suitable for an integral parameter such as a detector response or an eigenvalue lead to difficulties when directly applied to derive an equation obeyed by the leakage importance function. This is because, although leakage is also an integral parameter (i.e., a functional of the forward flux density), leakage is expressed in terms of a surface integral rather than in terms of volume integrals such as those appearing in expressions of detector responses or eigenvalues. Therefore, a procedure that departs from the customary course has been devised to derive the equation satisfied by the leakage importance function

  19. Weight Analysis of Two-Stage-To-Orbit Reusable Launch Vehicles for Military Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caldwell, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    In response to Department of Defense (DoD) requirements for responsive and low-cost space access, this design study provides an objective empty weight analysis of potential reusable launch vehicle (RLV) configurations...

  20. Life Science Research Sample Transfer Technology for On Orbit Analysis, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With retirement of the space shuttle program, microgravity researchers can no longer count on bringing experiment samples back to earth for post-flight analysis....

  1. Constants of motion for the planar orbit of a charged particle in a static and uniform magnetic field: the magnetic Laplace–Runge–Lenz vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco-Martínez, D; Kunold, A; Cardoso, J L; Ibarra-Sierra, V G; Sandoval-Santana, J C

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we introduce an alternative approach to studying the motion of a planar charged particle subject to a static uniform magnetic field. It is well known that an electric charge under a uniform magnetic field has a planar motion if its initial velocity is perpendicular to the magnetic field. Although some constants of motion (CsM), as the energy and the angular momentum, have been widely discussed for this system, others have been neglected. We find that the angular momentum, the generator of the magnetic translations and the magnetic Laplace–Runge–Lenz vector are CsM for this particular system. We show also that these three quantities form an orthogonal basis of vectors. The present work addresses many aspects of the motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field that should be useful for students and tutors of the classical mechanics courses at the senior undergraduate level. (paper)

  2. A New Cluster Analysis-Marker-Controlled Watershed Method for Separating Particles of Granular Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Ferdous; Haque, Asadul

    2017-10-18

    An accurate determination of particle-level fabric of granular soils from tomography data requires a maximum correct separation of particles. The popular marker-controlled watershed separation method is widely used to separate particles. However, the watershed method alone is not capable of producing the maximum separation of particles when subjected to boundary stresses leading to crushing of particles. In this paper, a new separation method, named as Monash Particle Separation Method (MPSM), has been introduced. The new method automatically determines the optimal contrast coefficient based on cluster evaluation framework to produce the maximum accurate separation outcomes. Finally, the particles which could not be separated by the optimal contrast coefficient were separated by integrating cuboid markers generated from the clustering by Gaussian mixture models into the routine watershed method. The MPSM was validated on a uniformly graded sand volume subjected to one-dimensional compression loading up to 32 MPa. It was demonstrated that the MPSM is capable of producing the best possible separation of particles required for the fabric analysis.

  3. Simulation and scaling analysis of a spherical particle-laden blast wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Y.; Balachandar, S.

    2018-05-01

    A spherical particle-laden blast wave, generated by a sudden release of a sphere of compressed gas-particle mixture, is investigated by numerical simulation. The present problem is a multiphase extension of the classic finite-source spherical blast-wave problem. The gas-particle flow can be fully determined by the initial radius of the spherical mixture and the properties of gas and particles. In many applications, the key dimensionless parameters, such as the initial pressure and density ratios between the compressed gas and the ambient air, can vary over a wide range. Parametric studies are thus performed to investigate the effects of these parameters on the characteristic time and spatial scales of the particle-laden blast wave, such as the maximum radius the contact discontinuity can reach and the time when the particle front crosses the contact discontinuity. A scaling analysis is conducted to establish a scaling relation between the characteristic scales and the controlling parameters. A length scale that incorporates the initial pressure ratio is proposed, which is able to approximately collapse the simulation results for the gas flow for a wide range of initial pressure ratios. This indicates that an approximate similarity solution for a spherical blast wave exists, which is independent of the initial pressure ratio. The approximate scaling is also valid for the particle front if the particles are small and closely follow the surrounding gas.

  4. Simulation and scaling analysis of a spherical particle-laden blast wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Y.; Balachandar, S.

    2018-02-01

    A spherical particle-laden blast wave, generated by a sudden release of a sphere of compressed gas-particle mixture, is investigated by numerical simulation. The present problem is a multiphase extension of the classic finite-source spherical blast-wave problem. The gas-particle flow can be fully determined by the initial radius of the spherical mixture and the properties of gas and particles. In many applications, the key dimensionless parameters, such as the initial pressure and density ratios between the compressed gas and the ambient air, can vary over a wide range. Parametric studies are thus performed to investigate the effects of these parameters on the characteristic time and spatial scales of the particle-laden blast wave, such as the maximum radius the contact discontinuity can reach and the time when the particle front crosses the contact discontinuity. A scaling analysis is conducted to establish a scaling relation between the characteristic scales and the controlling parameters. A length scale that incorporates the initial pressure ratio is proposed, which is able to approximately collapse the simulation results for the gas flow for a wide range of initial pressure ratios. This indicates that an approximate similarity solution for a spherical blast wave exists, which is independent of the initial pressure ratio. The approximate scaling is also valid for the particle front if the particles are small and closely follow the surrounding gas.

  5. Feature-Based Analysis of Plasma-Based Particle Acceleration Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, Oliver [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Geddes, Cameron G. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Min [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cormier-Michel, Estelle [Tech-X Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam and to investigate transverse particle loss.

  6. A critical review of charged particle astronomy at Saturn: The evidence for co-orbiting material in the inner satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefel, John P.; Cooper, John F.

    1990-01-01

    The charged particle observations from Pioneer and Voyager at Saturn were reassessed with a view towards providing limits on the amount of unseen dust and debris that may exist in the Saturnian system. Such estimates are crucial for planning the Cassini tour of Saturn. The data from Pioneer 11 and Voyager were reviewed, intercompared, and correlated with model predictions to set limits on the matter distribution.

  7. Simulating cosmic radiation absorption and secondary particle production of solar panel layers of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite with GEANT4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiǧitoǧlu, Merve; Veske, Doǧa; Nilüfer Öztürk, Zeynep; Bilge Demirköz, Melahat

    2016-07-01

    All devices which operate in space are exposed to cosmic rays during their operation. The resulting radiation may cause fatal damages in the solid structure of devices and the amount of absorbed radiation dose and secondary particle production for each component should be calculated carefully before the production. Solar panels are semiconductor solid state devices and are very sensitive to radiation. Even a short term power cut-off may yield a total failure of the satellite. Even little doses of radiation can change the characteristics of solar cells. This deviation can be caused by rarer high energetic particles as well as the total ionizing dose from the abundant low energy particles. In this study, solar panels planned for a specific LEO satellite, IMECE, are analyzed layer by layer. The Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) database and GEANT4 simulation software are used to simulate the layers of the panels. The results obtained from the simulation will be taken in account to determine the amount of radiation protection and resistance needed for the panels or to revise the design of the panels.

  8. Smoothed Particle Hydro-dynamic Analysis of Improvement in Sludge Conveyance Efficiency of Screw Decanter Centrifuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dae Woong [Korea Testing and Research Institute, Kwachun (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    A centrifuge works on the principle that particles with different densities will separate at a rate proportional to the centrifugal force during high-speed rotation. Dense particles are quickly precipitated, and particles with relatively smaller densities are precipitated more slowly. A decanter-type centrifuge is used to remove, concentrate, and dehydrate sludge in a water treatment process. This is a core technology for measuring the sludge conveyance efficiency improvement. In this study, a smoothed particle hydro-dynamic analysis was performed for a decanter centrifuge used to convey sludge to evaluate the efficiency improvement. This analysis was applied to both the original centrifugal model and the design change model, which was a ball-plate rail model, to evaluate the sludge transfer efficiency.

  9. Analysis of a Single Hot Particle by a Combination of Non-Destructive Analytical Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrnecek, E.; Aldave de las Heras, L.; Bielewski, M.; Carlos, R. [EC JRC Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Betti, M. [IAEA Environment Laboratories (Monaco)

    2013-07-15

    Radioactive substances are often released to the environment in the form of particles. The determination of their chemical composition is a key factor in the overall understanding of their environmental behaviour. The aim of this investigation was to identify the source of one single radioactive particle collected from the Irish Sea and to understand its fate in the environment and in human body fluids. As the particle was supposed to be analysed for its dissolution behaviour in humans after ingestion, it was necessary to gain as much information as possible beforehand on the chemical and isotopic composition by means of non-destructive analysis such as SEM, SIMS, {mu}-XRF and {mu}-XANES. In this paper, an overview of the different non-destructive methods applied for the analysis of this particle and the results obtained is given. Additionally, the dissolution behaviour in human digestive solutions is discussed. (author)

  10. Smoothed Particle Hydro-dynamic Analysis of Improvement in Sludge Conveyance Efficiency of Screw Decanter Centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dae Woong

    2015-01-01

    A centrifuge works on the principle that particles with different densities will separate at a rate proportional to the centrifugal force during high-speed rotation. Dense particles are quickly precipitated, and particles with relatively smaller densities are precipitated more slowly. A decanter-type centrifuge is used to remove, concentrate, and dehydrate sludge in a water treatment process. This is a core technology for measuring the sludge conveyance efficiency improvement. In this study, a smoothed particle hydro-dynamic analysis was performed for a decanter centrifuge used to convey sludge to evaluate the efficiency improvement. This analysis was applied to both the original centrifugal model and the design change model, which was a ball-plate rail model, to evaluate the sludge transfer efficiency.

  11. Improved soil particle-size analysis by gamma-ray attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, J.C.M.; Vaz, C.M.P.; Reichardt, K.; Swartzendruber, D.

    1997-01-01

    The size distribution of particles is useful for physical characterization of soil. This study was conducted to determine whether a new method of soil particle-size analysis by gamma-ray attenuation could be further improved by changing the depth and time of measurement of the suspended particle concentration during sedimentation. In addition to the advantage of nondestructive, undisturbed measurement by gamma-ray attenuation, as compared with conventional pipette or hydrometer methods, the modifications here suggested and employed do substantially decrease the total time for analysis, and will also facilitate total automation and generalize the method for other sedimentation studies. Experimental results are presented for three different Brazilian soil materials, and illustrate the nature of the fine detail provided in the cumulative particle-size distribution as given by measurements obtained during the relatively short time period of 28 min

  12. Detecting chaos in particle accelerators through the frequency map analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaphilippou, Yannis

    2014-06-01

    The motion of beams in particle accelerators is dominated by a plethora of non-linear effects, which can enhance chaotic motion and limit their performance. The application of advanced non-linear dynamics methods for detecting and correcting these effects and thereby increasing the region of beam stability plays an essential role during the accelerator design phase but also their operation. After describing the nature of non-linear effects and their impact on performance parameters of different particle accelerator categories, the theory of non-linear particle motion is outlined. The recent developments on the methods employed for the analysis of chaotic beam motion are detailed. In particular, the ability of the frequency map analysis method to detect chaotic motion and guide the correction of non-linear effects is demonstrated in particle tracking simulations but also experimental data.

  13. Sample volume and alignment analysis for an optical particle counter sizer, and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holve, D.J.; Davis, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    Optical methods for particle size distribution measurements in practical high temperature environments are approaching feasibility and offer significant advantages over conventional sampling methods. A key requirement of single particle counting techniques is the need to know features of the sample volume intensity distribution which in general are a function of the particle scattering properties and optical system geometry. In addition, the sample volume intensity distribution is sensitive to system alignment and thus calculations of alignment sensitivity are required for assessment of practical alignment tolerances. To this end, an analysis of sample volume characteristics for single particle counters in general has been developed. Results from the theory are compared with experimental measurements and shown to be in good agreement. A parametric sensitivity analysis is performed and a criterion for allowable optical misalignment is derived for conditions where beam steering caused by fluctuating refractive-index gradients is significant

  14. Improved Tandem Measurement Techniques for Aerosol Particle Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Vivek Kumar

    Non-spherical, chemically inhomogeneous (complex) nanoparticles are encountered in a number of natural and engineered environments, including combustion systems (which produces highly non-spherical aggregates), reactors used in gas-phase materials synthesis of doped or multicomponent materials, and in ambient air. These nanoparticles are often highly diverse in size, composition and shape, and hence require determination of property distribution functions for accurate characterization. This thesis focuses on development of tandem mobility-mass measurement techniques coupled with appropriate data inversion routines to facilitate measurement of two dimensional size-mass distribution functions while correcting for the non-idealities of the instruments. Chapter 1 provides the detailed background and motivation for the studies performed in this thesis. In chapter 2, the development of an inversion routine is described which is employed to determine two dimensional size-mass distribution functions from Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerosol Particle Mass analyzer tandem measurements. Chapter 3 demonstrates the application of the two dimensional distribution function to compute cumulative mass distribution function and also evaluates the validity of this technique by comparing the calculated total mass concentrations to measured values for a variety of aerosols. In Chapter 4, this tandem measurement technique with the inversion routine is employed to analyze colloidal suspensions. Chapter 5 focuses on application of a transverse modulation ion mobility spectrometer coupled with a mass spectrometer to study the effect of vapor dopants on the mobility shifts of sub 2 nm peptide ion clusters. These mobility shifts are then compared to models based on vapor uptake theories. Finally, in Chapter 6, a conclusion of all the studies performed in this thesis is provided and future avenues of research are discussed.

  15. Physicochemical analysis of interaction of oxide fuel with pyrocarbon coatings of fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutikov, R.A.; Khromov, Yu.F.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    Equilibrium pressure of (CO+Kr,Xe) gases inside fuel particle with oxide kern depending on design features of fuel particle, on temperature. on (O/U) initial composition and fuel burnup is calculated using the suggested model. Analysis of possibility for gas pressure reduction by means of uranium carbide alloying of kern and degree increase of solid fission product retention (Cs for example) during alumosilicate alloying of uranium oxide is conducted

  16. Morphological analysis of polymer systems with broad particle size distribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Ostafinska, Aleksandra; Nevoralová, Martina; Fortelný, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 42, April (2015), s. 8-16 ISSN 0142-9418 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-17921S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polymer blends * morphology * image analysis Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 2.350, year: 2015

  17. Statistical analysis of oxides particles in ODS ferritic steel using advanced electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unifantowicz, P.; Schäublin, R.; Hébert, C.; Płociński, T.; Lucas, G.; Baluc, N.

    2012-01-01

    In this work a combination of advanced transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques enabled a statistically significant analysis of various types of few nanometer size oxides particles in Fe–14Cr–2W–0.3Ti–0.3Y 2 O 3 ferritic steel. These methods include a scanning TEM with EDS and EFTEM coupled with EELS. In addition, principal component analysis was applied to the chemical maps obtained by EFTEM, which drastically improved the signal to noise ratio. Three types of particles were identified in a size range from 2 to 300 nm, namely Cr–Ti–O, Y–O and Y–Ti–O particles, with an average size of 33,16 and 8 nm, respectively. The Cr–Ti–O particles contain Y and Ti enriched zones, which were not observed previously. The EFTEM analysis showed that the titanium addition leads to formation of Y–Ti–O nano-particles, which constitute 84% of the oxides but also precipitation of larger Cr–Ti–O. The presence of small amount of Y–O particles indicated a not sufficient amount of Ti available for reaction during mechanical alloying or consolidation.

  18. Qualitative analysis of a powdered diamond sample by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabida, C.; Annegarn, H.J.; Renan, M.J.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    The main purpose of this analysis was to determine whether nickel is present in diamond powder as a trace element. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) showed unambiguously that nickel was present. Due to the convenience of PIXE in multielemental analysis, the investigations also include a number of other trace elements in the sample

  19. Localization and force analysis at the single virus particle level using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chih-Hao [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Horng, Jim-Tong [Department of Biochemistry, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chang, Jeng-Shian [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Chung-Fan [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Tseng, You-Chen [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shiming, E-mail: til@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Center for Optoelectronic Biomedicine, College of Medicine, Nation Taiwan University, 1-1 Jen-Ai Road, Taipei 10051, Taiwan (China)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Localization of single virus particle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force mapping. -- Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a vital instrument in nanobiotechnology. In this study, we developed a method that enables AFM to simultaneously measure specific unbinding force and map the viral glycoprotein at the single virus particle level. The average diameter of virus particles from AFM images and the specificity between the viral surface antigen and antibody probe were integrated to design a three-stage method that sets the measuring area to a single virus particle before obtaining the force measurements, where the influenza virus was used as the object of measurements. Based on the purposed method and performed analysis, several findings can be derived from the results. The mean unbinding force of a single virus particle can be quantified, and no significant difference exists in this value among virus particles. Furthermore, the repeatability of the proposed method is demonstrated. The force mapping images reveal that the distributions of surface viral antigens recognized by antibody probe were dispersed on the whole surface of individual virus particles under the proposed method and experimental criteria; meanwhile, the binding probabilities are similar among particles. This approach can be easily applied to most AFM systems without specific components or configurations. These results help understand the force-based analysis at the single virus particle level, and therefore, can reinforce the capability of AFM to investigate a specific type of viral surface protein and its distributions.

  20. In-depth proteome analysis of the rubber particle of Hevea brasiliensis (para rubber tree).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Longjun; Kang, Guijuan; Li, Yu; Nie, Zhiyi; Duan, Cuifang; Zeng, Rizhong

    2013-05-01

    The rubber particle is a special organelle in which natural rubber is synthesised and stored in the laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis. To better understand the biological functions of rubber particles and to identify the candidate rubber biosynthesis-related proteins, a comprehensive proteome analysis was performed on H. brasiliensis rubber particles using shotgun tandem mass spectrometry profiling approaches-resulting in a thorough report on the rubber particle proteins. A total of 186 rubber particle proteins were identified, with a range in relative molecular mass of 3.9-194.2 kDa and in isoelectric point values of 4.0-11.2. The rubber particle proteins were analysed for gene ontology and could be categorised into eight major groups according to their functions: including rubber biosynthesis, stress- or defence-related responses, protein processing and folding, signal transduction and cellular transport. In addition to well-known rubber biosynthesis-related proteins such as rubber elongation factor (REF), small rubber particle protein (SRPP) and cis-prenyl transferase (CPT), many proteins were firstly identified to be on the rubber particles, including cyclophilin, phospholipase D, cytochrome P450, small GTP-binding protein, clathrin, eukaryotic translation initiation factor, annexin, ABC transporter, translationally controlled tumour protein, ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, and several homologues of REF, SRPP and CPT. A procedure of multiple reaction monitoring was established for further protein validation. This comprehensive proteome data of rubber particles would facilitate investigation into molecular mechanisms of biogenesis, self-homeostasis and rubber biosynthesis of the rubber particle, and might serve as valuable biomarkers in molecular breeding studies of H. brasiliensis and other alternative rubber-producing species.

  1. Vibrational spectra, molecular structure, natural bond orbital, first order hyperpolarizability, thermodynamic analysis and normal coordinate analysis of Salicylaldehyde p-methylphenylthiosemicarbazone by density functional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porchelvi, E. Elamurugu; Muthu, S.

    2015-01-01

    The thiosemicarbazone compound, Salicylaldehyde p-methylphenylthiosemicarbazone (abbreviated as SMPTSC) was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman and UV. Density functional (DFT) calculations have been carried out for the title compound by performing DFT level of theory using B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) basis set. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies were calculated and compared with the experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with aid of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology. The electronic dipole moment (μD) and the first hyperpolarizability (βtot) values of the investigated molecule were computed using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The stability and charge delocalization of the molecule was studied by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Thearomaticities of the phenyl rings were studied using the standard harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA) index. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges is also calculated. The molecule orbital contributions are studied by density of energy states (DOSs).

  2. Evaluation of Microflow Digital Imaging Particle Analysis for Sub-Visible Particles Formulated with an Opaque Vaccine Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant E Frahm

    Full Text Available Microflow digital imaging (MDI has become a widely accepted method for assessing sub-visible particles in pharmaceutical formulations however, to date; no data have been presented on the utility of this methodology when formulations include opaque vaccine adjuvants. This study evaluates the ability of MDI to assess sub-visible particles under these conditions. A Fluid Imaging Technologies Inc. FlowCAM® instrument was used to assess a number of sub-visible particle types in solution with increasing concentrations of AddaVax™, a nanoscale squalene-based adjuvant. With the objective (10X used and the limitations of the sensor resolution, the instrument was incapable of distinguishing between sub-visible particles and AddaVax™ droplets at particle sizes less than 5 μm. The instrument was capable of imaging all particle types assessed (polystyrene beads, borosilicate glass, cellulose, polyethylene protein aggregate mimics, and lysozyme protein aggregates at sizes greater than 5 μm in concentrations of AddaVax™ up to 50% (vol:vol. Reduced edge gradients and a decrease in measured particle sizes were noted as adjuvant concentrations increased. No significant changes in particle counts were observed for polystyrene particle standards and lysozyme protein aggregates, however significant reductions in particle counts were observed for borosilicate (80% of original and cellulose (92% of original particles. This reduction in particle counts may be due to the opaque adjuvant masking translucent particles present in borosilicate and cellulose samples. Although the results suggest that the utility of MDI for assessing sub-visible particles in high concentrations of adjuvant may be highly dependent on particle morphology, we believe that further investigation of this methodology to assess sub-visible particles in challenging formulations is warranted.

  3. Accurate determination of light elements by charged particle activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikano, K.; Shigematsu, T.

    1989-01-01

    To develop accurate determination of light elements by CPAA, accurate and practical standardization methods and uniform chemical etching are studied based on determination of carbon in gallium arsenide using the 12 C(d,n) 13 N reaction and the following results are obtained: (1)Average stopping power method with thick target yield is useful as an accurate and practical standardization method. (2)Front surface of sample has to be etched for accurate estimate of incident energy. (3)CPAA is utilized for calibration of light element analysis by physical method. (4)Calibration factor of carbon analysis in gallium arsenide using the IR method is determined to be (9.2±0.3) x 10 15 cm -1 . (author)

  4. Stability Analysis of Periodic Orbits in a Class of Duffing-Like Piecewise Linear Vibrators

    KAUST Repository

    El Aroudi, A.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamical behavior of a Duffing-like piecewise linear (PWL) springmass-damper system for vibration-based energy harvesting applications. First, we present a continuous time single degree of freedom PWL dynamical model of the system. From this PWL model, numerical simulations are carried out by computing frequency response and bifurcation diagram under a deterministic harmonic excitation for different sets of system parameter values. Stability analysis is performed using Floquet theory combined with Fillipov method.

  5. Stability Analysis of Periodic Orbits in a Class of Duffing-Like Piecewise Linear Vibrators

    KAUST Repository

    El Aroudi, A.; Benadero, L.; Ouakad, H.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamical behavior of a Duffing-like piecewise linear (PWL) springmass-damper system for vibration-based energy harvesting applications. First, we present a continuous time single degree of freedom PWL dynamical model of the system. From this PWL model, numerical simulations are carried out by computing frequency response and bifurcation diagram under a deterministic harmonic excitation for different sets of system parameter values. Stability analysis is performed using Floquet theory combined with Fillipov method.

  6. GOC: General Orbit Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, L.B.; McNeilly, G.S.

    1979-08-01

    GOC (General Orbit Code) is a versatile program which will perform a variety of calculations relevant to isochronous cyclotron design studies. In addition to the usual calculations of interest (e.g., equilibrium and accelerated orbits, focusing frequencies, field isochronization, etc.), GOC has a number of options to calculate injections with a charge change. GOC provides both printed and plotted output, and will follow groups of particles to allow determination of finite-beam properties. An interactive PDP-10 program called GIP, which prepares input data for GOC, is available. GIP is a very easy and convenient way to prepare complicated input data for GOC. Enclosed with this report are several microfiche containing source listings of GOC and other related routines and the printed output from a multiple-option GOC run

  7. Kinetic performance comparison of fully and superficially porous particles with a particle size of 5 µm: intrinsic evaluation and application to the impurity analysis of griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahsay, Getu; Broeckhoven, Ken; Adams, Erwin; Desmet, Gert; Cabooter, Deirdre

    2014-05-01

    After the great commercial success of sub-3 µm superficially porous particles, vendors are now also starting to commercialize 5 µm superficially porous particles, as an alternative to their fully porous counterparts which are routinely used in pharmaceutical analysis. In this study, the performance of 5 µm superficially porous particles was compared to that of fully porous 5 µm particles in terms of efficiency, separation performance and loadability on a conventional HPLC instrument. Van Deemter and kinetic plots were first used to evaluate the efficiency and performance of both particle types using alkylphenones as a test mixture. The van Deemter and kinetic plots showed that the superficially porous particles provide a superior kinetic performance compared to the fully porous particles over the entire relevant range of separation conditions, when both support types were evaluated at the same operating pressure. The same observations were made both for isocratic and gradient analysis. The superior performance was further demonstrated for the separation of a pharmaceutical compound (griseofulvin) and its impurities, where a gain in analysis time of around 2 could be obtained using the superficially porous particles. Finally, both particle types were evaluated in terms of loadability by plotting the resolution of the active pharmaceutical ingredient and its closest impurity as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio obtained for the smallest impurity. It was demonstrated that the superficially porous particles show better separation performance for griseofulvin and its impurities without significantly compromising sensitivity due to loadability issues in comparison with their fully porous counterparts. Moreover these columns can be used on conventional equipment without modifications to obtain a significant improvement in analysis time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Wuhan University Deep-space Orbit Determination and Gravity Recovery System(WUDOGS and Its Application Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YE Mao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available WUDOGS(Wuhan University deep-space orbit determination and gravity recovery system is a software system designed for deep spacecraft precise orbit determination and planetary gravity recovery, developed independently at Wuhan University. WUDOGS now has the function for Lunar and Mars spacecraft precision orbit determination. Its design pattern and main function are briefly introduced. The cross verification test(CVT between WUDOGS and state of the art planetary precise orbit determination software GEODYN-Ⅱ are elaborated. The results show that:①for orbit propagation, with all the same forces and other configuration, the predicted orbit difference in R,T,N directions are less than 0.3 mm for one month arc, 5×10-3 mm for 2 days arc, compared with GEODYN-Ⅱ;②the difference RMS of computed values of observables for two-way range and two-way range rate is at levels of 0.06 mm and 0.002 mm/s respectively;③for Chinese Chang'E-1 POD, the reconstructed orbit difference between WUDOGS and GEODYN-Ⅱ is at 2 cm level, for ESA MEX POD, the reconstructed orbit difference between WUDOGS and ESA is at 25 m level. Current developing situation of WUDOGS and comparison with international research level show that WUDOGS has a good application prospect, which will be important for meeting the demand of Chinese future planetary exploration and the development of deep space spacecraft POD software.

  9. Kinematic Orbit Determination Method Optimization and Test Analysis for BDS Satellites with Short-arc Tracking Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Rui

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid orbit recovery is a puzzle for the BDS satellites after orbit maneuvers. Two kinematic orbit determination methods are studied, with two orbit determination models being established. The receiver system error and serious multipath error exist in the BDS system. The co-location method is proposed to estimate and calibrate the receiver system errors. A CNMC (code noise and multipath correction method is introduced to weaken the multipath error. Therefore the data quality is controlled efficiently for the receivers in the short tracking arc. The GEO/IGSO/MEO real data is emploied to carry out tests and validation. Using 10 min short tracking arc, the kinematic precise orbit determination accuracy is about 3.27 m for the GEOs, and 8.19 m for the IGSOs, and 5.9 m for the MEOs. Rapid orbit determination is achieved, which satisfying the orbit requirements from the BDS RDSS services. The kinematic precise orbit determination method also supports the RDSS service walking up to the global world.

  10. X-ray fluorescence analysis of welding fume particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsey, T.P.

    1982-01-01

    A commercial standard filter set and two laboratory-made standard filter sets are compared via the analysis of generated welding fume samples by X-ray fluorescence. The latter standards are made by (1) hydrophobic-edge membrane filters spiked with prepared metal ion solutions, and (2) filters through which a dispersion of metal oxide powder in isopropanol has been drawn. The results are presented in table form. Precision (Pre) is the relative standard deviation of the six samples. Four main conclusions are enumerated

  11. On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Susanne V [Berkeley, CA; Goldstein, Allen H [Orinda, CA

    2012-01-03

    A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

  12. Acceleration and propagation of energetic particles in the solar corona: from RHESSI data analysing to the preparation of the STIX tool operations on Solar Orbiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musset, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Sun is an active star and one manifestation of its activity is the production of solar flares. It is currently admitted that solar flares are caused by the release of magnetic energy during the process of magnetic reconnection in the solar upper atmosphere, the solar corona. During these flares, a large fraction of the magnetic energy is transferred to the acceleration of particles (electrons and ions). However, the details of particle acceleration during flares are still not completely understood. Several scenarios and models have been developed to explain particle acceleration. In some of them, electric fields, produced at the location of current sheets, which can be fragmented or collapsing, and which are preferentially located on quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), are accelerating particles. To investigate a possible link between energetic particles and direct electric fields produced at current sheet locations, we looked for a correlation between X-ray emission from energetic electrons and electric currents which can be measured at the photospheric level. We used the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectrometric Imager (RHESSI) data to produce spectra and images of the X-ray emissions during GOES X-class flares, and spectro polarimetric data from the Helio seismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to calculate the vertical current densities from the reconstructed 3D vector magnetic field. A correlation between the coronal X-ray emissions (tracing the energetic electrons near the acceleration site) and the strong current ribbons at the photospheric level (tracing the coronal current sheet) was found in the five studied X-class flares. Moreover, thanks to the 12-minute time cadence of SDO/HMI, we could study for the first time the time evolution of electric currents : in several flares, a change in the current intensity, occurring during the flare peak, was found to be spatially correlated with X-ray emission sites. These

  13. Cluster analysis of rural, urban, and curbside atmospheric particle size data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddows, David C S; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Harrison, Roy M

    2009-07-01

    Particle size is a key determinant of the hazard posed by airborne particles. Continuous multivariate particle size data have been collected using aerosol particle size spectrometers sited at four locations within the UK: Harwell (Oxfordshire); Regents Park (London); British Telecom Tower (London); and Marylebone Road (London). These data have been analyzed using k-means cluster analysis, deduced to be the preferred cluster analysis technique, selected from an option of four partitional cluster packages, namelythe following: Fuzzy; k-means; k-median; and Model-Based clustering. Using cluster validation indices k-means clustering was shown to produce clusters with the smallest size, furthest separation, and importantly the highest degree of similarity between the elements within each partition. Using k-means clustering, the complexity of the data set is reduced allowing characterization of the data according to the temporal and spatial trends of the clusters. At Harwell, the rural background measurement site, the cluster analysis showed that the spectra may be differentiated by their modal-diameters and average temporal trends showing either high counts during the day-time or night-time hours. Likewise for the urban sites, the cluster analysis differentiated the spectra into a small number of size distributions according their modal-diameter, the location of the measurement site, and time of day. The responsible aerosol emission, formation, and dynamic processes can be inferred according to the cluster characteristics and correlation to concurrently measured meteorological, gas phase, and particle phase measurements.

  14. R suite for the Reduction and Analysis of UFO Orbit Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Burns, P.; Kacerek, R.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents work undertaken by UKMON to compile a suite of simple R scripts for the reduction and analysis of meteor data. The application of R in this context is by no means an original idea and there is no doubt that it has been used already in many reports to the IMO. However, we are unaware of any common libraries or shared resources available to the meteor community. By sharing our work we hope to stimulate interest and discussion. Graphs shown in this paper are illustrative and are based on current data from both EDMOND and UKMON.

  15. Stability Analysis of Periodic Orbits in a Class of Duffing-Like Piecewise Linear Vibrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Aroudi A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the dynamical behavior of a Duffing-like piecewise linear (PWL springmass-damper system for vibration-based energy harvesting applications. First, we present a continuous time single degree of freedom PWL dynamical model of the system. From this PWL model, numerical simulations are carried out by computing frequency response and bifurcation diagram under a deterministic harmonic excitation for different sets of system parameter values. Stability analysis is performed using Floquet theory combined with Fillipov method.

  16. Wald Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Analysis of Orbital Conjunction Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Markley, F. Landis; Gold, Dara

    2013-01-01

    We propose a Wald Sequential Probability Ratio Test for analysis of commonly available predictions associated with spacecraft conjunctions. Such predictions generally consist of a relative state and relative state error covariance at the time of closest approach, under the assumption that prediction errors are Gaussian. We show that under these circumstances, the likelihood ratio of the Wald test reduces to an especially simple form, involving the current best estimate of collision probability, and a similar estimate of collision probability that is based on prior assumptions about the likelihood of collision.

  17. Optimization of angular setup with proposed β–η chart for solar energy apparatus through Helios orbital analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Chung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis procedure for the angular setup of the SPVS based on Helios orbital analysis is shown. • Average of 61.87% efficiency for the whole year with this fixed-type SPVS is obtained. • Graphical interpretation on proposed β–η chart for estimating SPVS efficiency is presented. - Abstract: Many reports and patents address tracking-type systems to complete and optimized the acquisition of solar energy. However, fixed-type systems contribute the most of the market to the solar photovoltaic system (SPVS) for the existing buildings. Based on this fact, it is important to discuss and understand the feasible setup parameters to achieve the optimum radiation-collection-efficiency of a fixed-type system. The purpose of the present report is to provide the methodology and to investigate the optimum angles of the system facilities through minimum mathematics. The calculations show that for the demonstrated locations, the maximum efficiency for the whole year of a fixed-type system can reach more than 61% efficiency, compared to a total tracking system at the same location and time intervals. Based on these calculations, the appropriate optical system can be designed to improve system performance for the majority buildings requirements in any location

  18. Deuterium inventory in Tore Supra: reconciling particle balance and post-mortem analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsitrone, E.; Brosset, C.; Pegourie, B.; Gauthier, E.; Bouvet, J.; Bucalossi, J.; Carpentier, S.; Corre, Y.; Delchambre, E.; Dittmar, T.; Douai, D.; Ekedahl, A.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grisolia, C.; Grosman, A.; Gunn, J.; Hong, S.H.; Desgranges, L.; Escarguel, A.; Jacob, W.

    2009-01-01

    Fuel retention, a crucial issue for next step devices, is assessed in present-day tokamaks using two methods: particle balance performed during shots and post-mortem analysis carried out during shutdowns between experimental campaigns. Post-mortem analysis generally gives lower estimates of fuel retention than integrated particle balance. In order to understand the discrepancy between these two methods, a dedicated experimental campaign has been performed in Tore Supra to load the vessel walls with deuterium (D) and monitor the trapped D inventory through particle balance. The campaign was followed by an extensive post-mortem analysis phase of the Tore Supra limiter. This paper presents the status of the analysis phase, including the assessment of the D content in the castellated tile structure of the limiter. Indeed, using combined surface analysis techniques, it was possible to derive the relative contributions of different zones of interest on the limiter (erosion, thick deposits, thin deposits), showing that the post-mortem inventory is mainly due to codeposition (90% of the total), in particular due to gap deposits. However, deuterium was also evidenced deep into the material in erosion zones (10% of the total). At the present stage of the analysis, 50% of the inventory deduced from particle balance has been found through post-mortem analysis, a significant progress with respect to previous studies (factor 8-10 discrepancy). This shows that post-mortem analysis can be consistent with particle balance provided specific procedures are implemented (dedicated campaign followed by extensive post-mortem analysis). Both techniques are needed for a reliable assessment of fuel retention in tokamaks, giving complementary information on how much and where fuel is retained in the vessel walls.

  19. Solar particle radiation storms forecasting and analysis the HESPERIA HORIZON 2020 project and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Crosby, Norma

    2018-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) emitted from the Sun are a major space weather hazard motivating the development of predictive capabilities. This book presents the results and findings of the HESPERIA (High Energy Solar Particle Events forecasting and Analysis) project of the EU HORIZON 2020 programme. It discusses the forecasting operational tools developed within the project, and presents progress to SEP research contributed by HESPERIA both from the observational as well as the SEP modelling perspective. Using multi-frequency observational data and simulations HESPERIA investigated the chain of processes from particle acceleration in the corona, particle transport in the magnetically complex corona and interplanetary space, to the detection near 1 AU. The book also elaborates on the unique software that has been constructed for inverting observations of relativistic SEPs to physical parameters that can be compared with spac e-borne measurements at lower energies. Introductory and pedagogical material incl...

  20. Noctilucent cloud particle size determination based on multi-wavelength all-sky analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolnikov, Oleg S.; Galkin, Alexey A.; Pilgaev, Sergey V.; Roldugin, Alexey V.

    2017-10-01

    The article deals with the analysis of color distribution in noctilucent clouds (NLC) in the sky based on multi-wavelength (RGB) CCD-photometry provided with the all-sky camera in Lovozero in the north of Russia (68.0°N, 35.1°E) during the bright expanded NLC performance in the night of August 12, 2016. Small changes in the NLC color across the sky are interpreted as the atmospheric absorption and extinction effects combined with the difference in the Mie scattering functions of NLC particles for the three color channels of the camera. The method described in this paper is used to find the effective monodisperse radius of particles about 55 nm. The result of these simple and cost-effective measurements is in good agreement with previous estimations of comparable accuracy. Non-spherical particles, Gaussian and lognormal distribution of the particle size are also considered.

  1. Statistical methods for data analysis in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070643

    2015-01-01

    This concise set of course-based notes provides the reader with the main concepts and tools to perform statistical analysis of experimental data, in particular in the field of high-energy physics (HEP). First, an introduction to probability theory and basic statistics is given, mainly as reminder from advanced undergraduate studies, yet also in view to clearly distinguish the Frequentist versus Bayesian approaches and interpretations in subsequent applications. More advanced concepts and applications are gradually introduced, culminating in the chapter on upper limits as many applications in HEP concern hypothesis testing, where often the main goal is to provide better and better limits so as to be able to distinguish eventually between competing hypotheses or to rule out some of them altogether. Many worked examples will help newcomers to the field and graduate students to understand the pitfalls in applying theoretical concepts to actual data

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis of orbital atherectomy plus balloon angioplasty vs balloon angioplasty alone in subjects with calcified femoropopliteal lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinstock B

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Barry Weinstock,1 Raymond Dattilo,2 Tiffini Diage3 1Orlando Health Heart Institute, Mid-Florida Cardiology Specialists, Orlando, FL, USA; 2Department of Cardiology, St Francis Health Center, Topeka, KS, USA; 3North American Science Association (NAMSA, Sunnyvale, CA, USA Introduction: As cost considerations become increasingly critical when selecting optimal endovascular treatment strategies, a cost-benefit analysis was conducted comparing the Diamondback 360°® Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS (Cardiovascular Systems, Inc., St Paul, MN, USA and balloon angioplasty (BA vs BA alone for treatment of calcified femoropopliteal lesions. Patients and methods: The clinical outcomes from COMPLIANCE 360°, a prospective, multicenter, randomized study comparing OAS+BA vs BA alone for treatment of calcified femoropopliteal lesions, were correlated with cost data and previously published quality of life data. Site of service, hospital charges, and associated medical resource utilization were obtained from Uniform Billing statements for index treatments and associated revascularizations out to 1 year. Hospital costs were estimated using hospital-specific, procedure-specific cost-to-charge ratios. Length of stay and procedural data were collected from participating study sites. Results: Twenty-five subjects with 38 lesions and 25 subjects with 27 lesions were randomized to the OAS+BA and BA-alone groups, respectively. Mean hospital charges (US$51,755 vs US$39,922 and estimated hospital costs (US$15,100 vs US$11,016 were higher for OAS+BA compared with BA alone (not statistically significant. Stent utilization was statistically significantly higher with BA-alone treatment for all subjects (1.1 vs 0.1, P=0.001 and in the subset of subjects with one lesion (1.0 vs 0.1, P<0.00001. There was a significant difference in cost for single-lesion versus multiple-lesion treatment. Using costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs for the single-lesion cohort, the 1-year

  3. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Analysis of the Orbiter's LH2 Feedline Flowliner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacuse, Peter J. (Technical Monitor); Hudak, Stephen J., Jr.; Huyse, Luc; Chell, Graham; Lee, Yi-Der; Riha, David S.; Thacker, Ben; McClung, Craig; Gardner, Brian; Leverant, Gerald R.; hide

    2005-01-01

    Work performed by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) as part of an Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) for the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) is summarized. The ITA goal was to establish a flight rationale in light of a history of fatigue cracking due to flow induced vibrations in the feedline flowliners that supply liquid hydrogen to the space shuttle main engines. Prior deterministic analyses using worst-case assumptions predicted failure in a single flight. The current work formulated statistical models for dynamic loading and cryogenic fatigue crack growth properties, instead of using worst-case assumptions. Weight function solutions for bivariant stressing were developed to determine accurate crack "driving-forces". Monte Carlo simulations showed that low flowliner probabilities of failure (POF = 0.001 to 0.0001) are achievable, provided pre-flight inspections for cracks are performed with adequate probability of detection (POD)-specifically, 20/75 mils with 50%/99% POD. Measurements to confirm assumed POD curves are recommended. Since the computed POFs are very sensitive to the cyclic loads/stresses and the analysis of strain gage data revealed inconsistencies with the previous assumption of a single dominant vibrant mode, further work to reconcile this difference is recommended. It is possible that the unaccounted vibrational modes in the flight spectra could increase the computed POFs.

  4. Validation of a particle tracking analysis method for the size determination of nano- and microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestens, Vikram; Bozatzidis, Vassili; De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Ramaye, Yannic; Roebben, Gert

    2017-08-01

    Particle tracking analysis (PTA) is an emerging technique suitable for size analysis of particles with external dimensions in the nano- and sub-micrometre scale range. Only limited attempts have so far been made to investigate and quantify the performance of the PTA method for particle size analysis. This article presents the results of a validation study during which selected colloidal silica and polystyrene latex reference materials with particle sizes in the range of 20 nm to 200 nm were analysed with NS500 and LM10-HSBF NanoSight instruments and video analysis software NTA 2.3 and NTA 3.0. Key performance characteristics such as working range, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, sensitivity, robustness, precision and trueness were examined according to recommendations proposed by EURACHEM. A model for measurement uncertainty estimation following the principles described in ISO/IEC Guide 98-3 was used for quantifying random and systematic variations. For nominal 50 nm and 100 nm polystyrene and a nominal 80 nm silica reference materials, the relative expanded measurement uncertainties for the three measurands of interest, being the mode, median and arithmetic mean of the number-weighted particle size distribution, varied from about 10% to 12%. For the nominal 50 nm polystyrene material, the relative expanded uncertainty of the arithmetic mean of the particle size distributions increased up to 18% which was due to the presence of agglomerates. Data analysis was performed with software NTA 2.3 and NTA 3.0. The latter showed to be superior in terms of sensitivity and resolution.

  5. Communication: Localized molecular orbital analysis of the effect of electron correlation on the anomalous isotope effect in the NMR spin-spin coupling constant in methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C., E-mail: mnzarycz@gmail.com; Provasi, Patricio F., E-mail: patricio@unne.edu.ar [Department of Physics, University of Northeastern - CONICET, Av. Libertad 5500, Corrientes W3404AAS (Argentina); Sauer, Stephan P. A., E-mail: sauer@kiku.dk [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2014-10-21

    We discuss the effect of electron correlation on the unexpected differential sensitivity (UDS) in the {sup 1}J(C–H) coupling constant of CH{sub 4} using a decomposition into contributions from localized molecular orbitals and compare with the {sup 1}J(N–H) coupling constant in NH{sub 3}. In particular, we discuss the well known fact that uncorrelated coupled Hartree-Fock (CHF) calculations are not able to reproduce the UDS in methane. For this purpose we have implemented for the first time a localized molecular orbital analysis for the second order polarization propagator approximation with coupled cluster singles and doubles amplitudes—SOPPA(CCSD) in the DALTON program. Comparing the changes in the localized orbital contributions at the correlated SOPPA and SOPPA(CCSD) levels and at the uncorrelated CHF level, we find that the latter overestimates the effect of stretching the bond between the coupled atoms on the contribution to the coupling from the localized bonding orbital between these atoms. This disturbs the subtle balance between the molecular orbital contributions, which lead to the UDS in methane.

  6. Brane orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Bergshoeff, Eric A; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We complete the classification of half-supersymmetric branes in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory in terms of representations of the T-duality group. As a by-product we derive a last wrapping rule for the space-filling branes. We find examples of T-duality representations of branes in lower dimensions, suggested by supergravity, of which none of the component branes follow from the reduction of any brane in ten-dimensional IIA/IIB string theory. We discuss the constraints on the charges of half-supersymmetric branes, determining the corresponding T-duality and U-duality orbits.

  7. A syncopated leap-frog algorithm for orbit consistent plasma simulation of materials processing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.W.; Leboeuf, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    The authors present a particle algorithm to extend simulation capabilities for plasma based materials processing reactors. The orbit integrator uses a syncopated leap-frog algorithm in cylindrical coordinates, which maintains second order accuracy, and minimizes computational complexity. Plasma source terms are accumulated orbit consistently directly in the frequency and azimuthal mode domains. Finally they discuss the numerical analysis of this algorithm. Orbit consistency greatly reduces the computational cost for a given level of precision. The computational cost is independent of the degree of time scale separation

  8. Large orbit neoclassical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    Neoclassical transport in the presence of large ion orbits is investigated. The study is motivated by the recent experimental results that ion thermal transport levels in enhanced confinement tokamak plasmas fall below the open-quotes irreducible minimum levelclose quotes predicted by standard neoclassical theory. This apparent contradiction is resolved in the present analysis by relaxing the basic neoclassical assumption that the ions orbital excursions are much smaller than the local toroidal minor radius and the equilibrium scale lengths of the system. Analytical and simulation results are in agreement with trends from experiments. The development of a general formalism for neoclassical transport theory with finite orbit width is also discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. D-particle-inspired analysis of localization limits in quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Doplicher, Luisa

    2004-01-01

    Some recent studies of the properties of D-particles suggest that in string theory a rather conventional description of spacetime might be available up to scales that are significantly smaller than the Planck length. We explore this possibility in the framework of a Heisenberg-microscope setup for the analysis of localization of a spacetime event marked by the collision of two D-particles. For the string-theory aspects of our analysis, which only concern some general properties of D-particles, we rely on previous works. The results confirm that a spatial coordinate of the event can indeed be determined with better-than-Planckian accuracy, but we stress that this comes at the price of a rather large uncertainty in the time coordinate. We comment on the implications of these results for the popular quantum-gravity intuition which assigns to the Planck length the role of absolute limit on localization

  10. Nuclear propulsion for orbital transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, G.A.; Lawrence, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in nuclear propulsion for orbital transfer is discussed. Cryogenic propulsion, electric propulsion, solar-thermal propulsion and direct nuclear propulsion are examined in this context. New technologies with exceptional promise are addressed, emphasizing the particle test bed nuclear engine

  11. Pressure analysis in the fabrication process of TRISO UO2-coated fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Malin; Shao Youlin; Liu Bing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The pressure signals during the real TRISO UO2-coated fuel particle fabrication process. ► A new relationship about the pressure drop change and the coated fuel particles properties. ► The proposed relationship is validated by experimental results during successive coating. ► A convenient method for monitoring the fluidized state during coating process. - Abstract: The pressure signals in the coating furnace are obtained experimentally from the TRISO UO 2 -coated fuel particle fabrication process. The pressure signals during the coating process are analyzed and a simplified relationship about the pressure drop change due to the coated layer is proposed based on the spouted bed hydrodynamics. The change of pressure drop is found to be consistent with the change of the combination factor about particle density, bed density, particle diameter and static bed height, during the successive coating process of the buffer PyC, IPyC, SiC and OPyC layer. The newly proposed relationship is validated by the experimental values. Based on this relationship, a convenient method is proposed for real-time monitoring the fluidized state of the particles in a high-temperature coating process in the spouted bed. It can be found that the pressure signals analysis is an effective method to monitor the fluidized state on-line in the coating process at high temperature up to 1600 °C.

  12. Making evident and the analysis of correlations between light particles by means of multidetector INDRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourio, D.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis reports an light particle interferometric study carried out for the first time by means of an 4π detector. This enabled to extract the proton and deuteron emission time for correctly selected sources. These measurements are extremely worth in the study of hot nuclear matter, particularly for its decaying modes. In this way a clear image of the production chronology of light particles in the heavy ion collision is obtained. In addition, it was possible to make evident the production of fast unstable fragments associated to the decay through pre-equilibrium particles contributing to the very low relative momentum correlation function. This work is the result of a successful event: the association of the 4π INDRA multidetector to the analysis function of the light particle correlation. The real breakthrough achieved by this study was to demonstrate the possibility of full phase space exploration by building the light particle 4 π correlation. In the case of the Xe + Sn system at 45 MeV/u we were able to characterize the collision violence and and to isolate three sources of particle emission. Thus, it was possible to characterize the proton and deuterons emission time for the quasi-target as well as for the quasi-projectile. An important decrease in the characteristic deuteron emission time was observed according as the central collision was approached. Other important results were obtained concerning the proton-proton and proton-deuteron correlation functions as well as the presence of an independent particle dynamical emission of mid-rapidity quasi-targets and quasi- projectiles. Finally, the observation of correlation functions allowed to demonstrate structures at very low relative momentum which can not be understood by the final state interaction only. An explanation could be obtained by a theoretical code taking into account the reaction dynamics, the particle interaction in the final state and the decay of primary excited fragments

  13. [Air Dielectric Barrier Discharge Emission Spectrum Measurement and Particle Analysis of Discharge Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shuang-yan; Jin, Xing; Zhang, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The emission spectrum detection and diagnosis is one of the most common methods of application to the plasma. It provides wealth of information of the chemical and physical process of the plasma. The analysis of discharge plasma dynamic behavior plays an important role in the study of gas discharge mechanism and application. An air dielectric discharge spectrum measuring device was designed and the emission spectrum data was measured under the experimental condition. The plasma particles evolution was analyzed from the emission spectrum. The numerical calculation model was established and the density equation, energy transfer equation and the Boltzmann equation was coupled to analyze the change of the particle density to explain the emission spectrum characteristics. The results are that the particle density is growing with the increasing of reduced electric field. The particle density is one or two orders of magnitude difference for the same particle at the same moment for the reduced electric field of 40, 60 or 80 Td. A lot of N₂ (A³), N₂ (A³) and N₂ (C³) particles are generated by the electric field excitation. However, it transforms quickly due to the higher energy level. The transformation returns to the balance after the discharge of 10⁻⁶ s. The emission spectrometer measured in the experiments is mostly generated by the transition of excited nitrogen. The peak concentration of O₂ (A¹), O₂ (B¹) and O₂ (A³ ∑⁺u) is not low compared to the excited nitrogen molecules. These particles energy is relatively low and the transition spectral is longer. The spectrometer does not capture the oxygen emission spectrum. And the peak concentration of O particles is small, so the transition emission spectrum is weak. The calculation results of the stabled model can well explain the emission spectrum data.

  14. Data Acquisition, Management, and Analysis in Support of the Audiology and Hearing Conservation and the Orbital Debris Program Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicken, Todd

    2012-01-01

    My internship at Johnson Space Center, Houston TX comprised of working simultaneously in the Space Life Science Directorate (Clinical Services Branch, SD3) in Audiology and Hearing Conservation and in the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Sciences Directorate in the Orbital Debris Program Office (KX). The purpose of the project done to support the Audiology and Hearing Conservation Clinic (AuHCon) is to organize and analyze auditory test data that has been obtained from tests conducted onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and in Johnson Space Center's clinic. Astronauts undergo a special type of auditory test called an On-Orbit Hearing Assessment (OOHA), which monitors hearing function while crewmembers are exposed to noise and microgravity during long-duration spaceflight. Data needed to be formatted to assist the Audiologist in studying, analyzing and reporting OOHA results from all ISS missions, with comparison to conventional preflight and post-flight audiometric test results of crewmembers. Orbital debris is the #1 threat to manned spacecraft; therefore NASA is investing in different measurement techniques to acquire information on orbital debris. These measurements are taken with telescopes in different parts of the world to acquire brightness variations over time, from which size, rotation rates and material information can be determined for orbital debris. Currently many assumptions are taken to resolve size and material from observed brightness, therefore a laboratory (Optical Measurement Center) is used to simulate the space environment and acquire information of known targets suited to best model the orbital debris population. In the Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) telescopic data were acquired and analyzed to better assess the orbital debris population.

  15. The frequency analysis particle resolution technique of 6LiI(Eu) scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Shaojie

    1995-01-01

    To measure the distribution and rate of tritium production by neutron in a 6 LiD sphere, the 6 LiI(Eu) scintillation detector was used. In the measurement, the frequency analysis particle resolution technique was used. The experiment was completed perfectly

  16. Quantitative Image Analysis for Evaluating the Coating Thickness and Pore Distribution in Coated Small Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laksmana, F.L.; Van Vliet, L.J.; Hartman Kok, P.J.A.; Vromans, H.; Frijlink, H.W.; Van der Voort Maarschalk, K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to develop a characterization method for coating structure based on image analysis, which is particularly promising for the rational design of coated particles in the pharmaceutical industry. Methods The method applies the MATLAB image processing toolbox to images of coated

  17. Application of artificial neural networks in the analysis of multi-particle data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the past years artificial neural networks (ANN) have gained increasing interest not only in the regime of financial forecast and data mining, but also in the field of particle physics. Up to now artificial neural networks have mostly been applied in high energy physics trigger studies. The use of ANNs in medium energy physics data analysis is summarized. (author). 21 refs., 9 figs

  18. Analysis of two dimensional charged particle scintillation using video image processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, A.; Bhave, B.D.; Singh, B.; Panchal, C.G.; Joshi, V.M.; Shyam, A.; Srinivasan, M.

    1993-01-01

    A novel method for video recording of individual charged particle scintillation images and their offline analysis using digital image processing techniques for obtaining position, time and energy information is presented . Results of an exploratory experiment conducted using 241 Am and 239 Pu alpha sources are presented. (author). 3 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Analysis of Periodic Orbits about the Triangular Solutions of the Restricted Sum-Jupiter and Earth-Moon Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Young Park

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the numerical solution in the plane restricted problem of three bodies, about 490 periodic orbits are computed numerically around the L5 of Sun-Jupiter and about 1600 periodic orbits also be done around the L5 of Earth-Moon system. As period increase, the energy and the shape of periodic orbits increase around the L5 of Sun-Jupiter system. But, in Earth-Moon system, the complex shapes and dents appear around the L5 and periodic orbits intersect one another in the place where dents are shown. And there is a region that three different periodic orbits exist with the same period in this region. The regions can exist around the L5 of Sun-Jupiter system where periodic orbit can be unstable by perturbation of other force besides the gravitational force of Jupiter. These regions which is close to L5 are a ~5.12 AU and a ~5.29 AU. The Trojan asteroids that have a small eccentricity and inclination can not exist in this region.

  20. On the ontology of the elementary particles. A philosophical analysis of the actual elementary-particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, Thomas Christian

    2015-01-01

    After a description of the standard model of elementary-particle physics the author describes structuralistic reconstructions. Then the problem of the theoretical terms is discussed. Therafter the reconstruction of the standard-model elementary particles is described. Finally the ontology of leptons, quarks and both free and in atoms bound protons is considered.

  1. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  2. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a ‘Nu Plasma HR’ multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10–20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abundant 236 U/ 238 U isotope ratios (i.e. 10 −5 ). In addition, a data processing procedure was developed for evaluation of transient signals, which is of potential use for routine application of the developed method. We demonstrate that the developed method is reliable and well suited for determining U isotope ratios of individual particles. Analyses of twenty-eight S1 glass particles, measured under optimized conditions, yielded average biases of less than 0.6% from the certified values for 234 U/ 238 U and 235 U/ 238 U ratios. Experimental results obtained for 236 U/ 238 U isotope ratios deviated by less than −2.5% from the certified values. Expanded relative total combined standard uncertainties U c (k = 2) of 2.6%, 1.4% and 5.8% were calculated for 234 U/ 238 U, 235 U/ 238 U and 236 U/ 238 U, respectively. - Highlights: ► LA-MC-ICP-MS was fully validated for the direct analysis of individual particles. ► Traceability was established by using an IRMM glass particle reference material. ► Measured U isotope ratios were in agreement with the certified range. ► A comprehensive total combined uncertainty evaluation was performed. ► The analysis of 236 U/ 238 U isotope ratios was improved by using a deceleration filter.

  3. Particle induced X-ray emission for quantitative trace-element analysis using the Eindhoven cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivits, H.

    1980-01-01

    Development of a multi-elemental trace analysis technique using PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission), was started almost five years ago at the Eindhoven University of Technology, in the Cyclotron Applications Group of the Physics Department. The aim of the work presented is to improve the quantitative aspects of trace-element analysis with PIXE, as well as versatility, speed and simplicity. (Auth.)

  4. Comparison of instrumental neutron activation analysis and instrumental charged-particle activation analysis for determining of Zn-68 abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, H.; Mirzaei, M.; Aslani, G.R.; Kamali-Dehghan, M.; Rajamand, A-A.; Rahiminejad, A.; Mirzajani, N.; Sardari, D.; Shahabi, I.; Majidi, F.

    2004-01-01

    Gallium-67 has found important applications in nuclear medicine since last decades. The bombardment of enriched zinc-68 by proton beams in cyclotron is the most suitable method for the carrier-free production of this radionuclide. Any traces and isotopic impurities of the target cause serious radiological hazards because of their associated induced radioactivities. Trace analysis and Zn-68 content determination of the target material before any bombardment and chemical separation provide a valuable assessment of desired product. The elemental abundance evaluation of enriched isotopes is generally carried out by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry method, ICP-Ms Instrumental neutron activation analysis and instrumental charged particle activation analysis. International neutron activation analysis and instrumental charged- particle activation analysis, looks be an alternative nuclear method for determining the abundance evaluation of enriched Zn-68 enrichment in two different samples has been studied by mean of international neutron activation analysis and instrumental charged- particle activation analysis . One sample was purchased from a French company, cortecnet, and the other was separated by an electromagnetic system in the Ions source department of our center, NRCAM. The neutron or proton irradiation was took place respectively in miniature neutron source reactor of Esfahan by flux of (1 to 5) 10 11 n/cm 2 .sec for 30 min and in Cyclon30 by 19 MeV proton beams of 100μA current for 12 min. The produced radioactivity was measured by HpGe detector for determination of trace impurities and evaluation of Zn-68 content in the samples. The result shows a good agreement with the reported ones by their producers and their low derivation of about ± indicates that the international neutron activation analysis and instrumental charged- particle activation analysis are relatively precise and rapid and each one can be used as a supplemental method for analyzing

  5. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles

    OpenAIRE

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a ‘Nu Plasma HR’ multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10–20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abu...

  6. Direct U isotope analysis in μm-sized particles by LA-MC-ICPMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappel, S.; Boulyga, S.F.; Prohaska, T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The knowledge of the isotopic composition of individual μm-sized hot particles is of great interest especially for strengthened nuclear safeguards in order to identify undeclared nuclear activities. We present the potential of a 'Nu Plasma HR' MC-ICPMS coupled to a New Wave 'UP 193' laser ablation (LA) system for the direct analysis of U isotope abundance ratios in individual μm-sized particles. The ability to determine 234 U/ 238 U and 235 U/ 238 U isotope ratios was successfully demonstrated in the NUSIMEP-6 interlaboratory comparison, which was organized by the IRMM (Geel, Belgium). (author)

  7. Elemental analysis of airborne fine particles collected at the roadside of an arterial road

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Airborne particulate matter was collected at the intersection of Industrial Road in Kawasaki-city, Kanagawa, Japan using a 12-stage low-pressure impactor. High concentrations of airborne particulate matter have been observed in this area. The collected samples were analyzed for 34 elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), and data on the elemental concentrations were obtained. High concentrations of fine particles of As, Br, Sb, V, and Zn were observed. It was further observed that these fine particles were originated predominantly from the wear of tires and brakes, and not from automobile exhaust emissions. (author)

  8. Analysis of the quantum numbers J(PC) of the X(3872) particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-03-30

    We present an analysis of angular distributions and correlations of the X(3872) particle in the exclusive decay mode X(3872)-->J/psipi+ pi- with J/psi-->mu+ mu-. We use 780 pb-1 of data from pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We derive constraints on spin, parity, and charge conjugation parity of the X(3872) particle by comparing measured angular distributions of the decay products with predictions for different J(PC) hypotheses. The assignments J(PC)=1++ and 2-+ are the only ones consistent with the data.

  9. Cluster analysis of HZE particle tracks as applied to space radiobiology problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batmunkh, M.; Bayarchimeg, L.; Lkhagva, O.; Belov, O.

    2013-01-01

    A cluster analysis is performed of ionizations in tracks produced by the most abundant nuclei in the charge and energy spectra of the galactic cosmic rays. The frequency distribution of clusters is estimated for cluster sizes comparable to the DNA molecule at different packaging levels. For this purpose, an improved K-mean-based algorithm is suggested. This technique allows processing particle tracks containing a large number of ionization events without setting the number of clusters as an input parameter. Using this method, the ionization distribution pattern is analyzed depending on the cluster size and particle's linear energy transfer

  10. Research on Multiple Particle Swarm Algorithm Based on Analysis of Scientific Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Hongwei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm based on analysis of scientific materials. The core thesis of MPSO (Multiple Particle Swarm Algorithm is to improve the single population PSO to interactive multi-swarms, which is used to settle the problem of being trapped into local minima during later iterations because it is lack of diversity. The simulation results show that the convergence rate is fast and the search performance is good, and it has achieved very good results.

  11. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 11: Analysis of selected orbit propagation models for the SeaWiFS mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patt, Frederick S.; Hoisington, Charles M.; Gregg, Watson W.; Coronado, Patrick L.; Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Indest, A. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of orbit propagation models was performed by the Mission Operations element of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) Project, which has overall responsibility for the instrument scheduling. The orbit propagators selected for this analysis are widely available general perturbations models. The analysis includes both absolute accuracy determination and comparisons of different versions of the models. The results show that all of the models tested meet accuracy requirements for scheduling and data acquisition purposes. For internal Project use the SGP4 propagator, developed by the North American Air Defense (NORAD) Command, has been selected. This model includes atmospheric drag effects and, therefore, provides better accuracy. For High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) ground stations, which have less stringent accuracy requirements, the publicly available Brouwer-Lyddane models are recommended. The SeaWiFS Project will make available portable source code for a version of this model developed by the Data Capture Facility (DCF).

  12. MAPPIX: A software package for off-line micro-pixe single particle aerosol analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccato, D.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of a multiannual experiment performed at Baia Terra Nova, Antarctica, size-segregated aerosol samples were collected by using a 12-stage SDI impactor (Hillamo design). Approximately 2800 particles, belonging to the first four supermicrometric SDI stages - 8.39, 4.08, 2.68, 1.66 μm dynamic aerosol diameter cuts - were analyzed at the INFN-LNL micro-PIXE facility, a three lens Oxford Microprobe (OM) product, installed in the early nineties. Four regions on each of the 12 sub-samples were measured; 60 aerosol particles were detected on average in each of the analyzed regions. The off-line single aerosol particle (SAP) analysis of such big amount of data required software that is able to rapidly handle the acquired data, with a simple and fast area selection procedure; the subsequent automated PIXE spectra analysis with a specialized code was also needed. The MAPPIX 2.0 software was designed to make easier and faster the user jobs during the SAP analysis. The package is composed of two separate routines: the first one is devoted to data format conversion (OM-LMF file format to MAPPIX format), while the second one is devoted to micro-PIXE maps graphical presentation and aerosol particle selection procedure. The MAPPIX data format and software features will be discussed; a short report of the speed performances will be presented.

  13. CORRECTING FOR INTERPLANETARY SCATTERING IN VELOCITY DISPERSION ANALYSIS OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laitinen, T.; Dalla, S.; Huttunen-Heikinmaa, K.; Valtonen, E.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the origin of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), we must study their injection time relative to other solar eruption manifestations. Traditionally the injection time is determined using the Velocity Dispersion Analysis (VDA) where a linear fit of the observed event onset times at 1 AU to the inverse velocities of SEPs is used to derive the injection time and path length of the first-arriving particles. VDA does not, however, take into account that the particles that produce a statistically observable onset at 1 AU have scattered in the interplanetary space. We use Monte Carlo test particle simulations of energetic protons to study the effect of particle scattering on the observable SEP event onset above pre-event background, and consequently on VDA results. We find that the VDA results are sensitive to the properties of the pre-event and event particle spectra as well as SEP injection and scattering parameters. In particular, a VDA-obtained path length that is close to the nominal Parker spiral length does not imply that the VDA injection time is correct. We study the delay to the observed onset caused by scattering of the particles and derive a simple estimate for the delay time by using the rate of intensity increase at the SEP onset as a parameter. We apply the correction to a magnetically well-connected SEP event of 2000 June 10, and show it to improve both the path length and injection time estimates, while also increasing the error limits to better reflect the inherent uncertainties of VDA

  14. Analysis in nuclear power accident emergency based on random network and particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Dichen; Fang Fang; Ding Weicheng; Chen Zhi

    2014-01-01

    The GERT random network model of nuclear power accident emergency was built in this paper, and the intelligent computation was combined with the random network based on the analysis of Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. The emergency process was divided into the series link and parallel link, and the parallel link was the part of series link. The overall allocation of resources was firstly optimized, and then the parallel link was analyzed. The effect of the resources for emergency used in different links was analyzed, and it was put forward that the corresponding particle velocity vector was limited under the condition of limited emergency resources. The resource-constrained particle swarm optimization was obtained by using velocity projection matrix to correct the motion of particles. The optimized allocation of resources in emergency process was obtained and the time consumption of nuclear power accident emergency was reduced. (authors)

  15. Genetic particle swarm parallel algorithm analysis of optimization arrangement on mistuned blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianyu; Yuan, Huiqun; Yang, Wenjun; Sun, Huagang

    2017-12-01

    This article introduces a method of mistuned parameter identification which consists of static frequency testing of blades, dichotomy and finite element analysis. A lumped parameter model of an engine bladed-disc system is then set up. A bladed arrangement optimization method, namely the genetic particle swarm optimization algorithm, is presented. It consists of a discrete particle swarm optimization and a genetic algorithm. From this, the local and global search ability is introduced. CUDA-based co-evolution particle swarm optimization, using a graphics processing unit, is presented and its performance is analysed. The results show that using optimization results can reduce the amplitude and localization of the forced vibration response of a bladed-disc system, while optimization based on the CUDA framework can improve the computing speed. This method could provide support for engineering applications in terms of effectiveness and efficiency.

  16. Development of a FE Model for the Stress Analysis of HTGR TRISO-coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, K. C.; Kim, Y. K.; Oh, S. C.; Chang, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Finite element modelling of the stresses in TRISO-coated fuel particle under normal operating conditions was carried out with use of the structural analysis computer code ABAQUS. The FE model took into account the irradiation induced swelling and the creep of the PyC layers, the internal fission gas pressure that builds up during irradiation and the constant external ambient pressure. All of the inputs such as particle dimensions, swelling rates and creep rates of PyC layers and other mechanical properties used in these calculations were adopted from Miller's publication published in 1993. The FE model was verified against Miller's solution. Results of this model were found to be in good agreement with Miller's results. With use of the FE model, the static behavior of the TRISO-coated fuel particle, such as load shares, stress contours, stress variations as a function of fluence and shape changes of the TRISO -coated layers were investigated

  17. Analysis of tecniques for measurement of the size distribution of solid particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. O. Arouca

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the size distribution of solid particles is fundamental for analysis of the performance several pieces of equipment used for solid-fluid separation. The main objective of this work is to compare the results obtained with two traditional methods for determination of the size grade distribution of powdery solids: the gamma-ray attenuation technique (GRAT and the LADEQ test tube technique. The effect of draining the suspension in the two techniques used was also analyzed. The GRAT can supply the particle size distribution of solids through the monitoring of solid concentration in experiments on batch settling of diluted suspensions. The results show that use of the peristaltic pump in the GRAT and the LADEQ methods produced a significant difference between the values obtained for the parameters of the particle size model.

  18. Radiation environment measurements and single event upset observations in sun-synchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, C.S.; Sims, A.J.; Farren, J.; Stephen, J.; Underwood, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on analysis of data from the Cosmic Radiation Environment and Dosimetry experiment (CREDO) carried in sun-synchronous polar orbit on UoSat-3 which shows the influence of cosmic rays, trapped protons and solar particles and allows comparison with device behavior

  19. Cement analysis by particle-induced prompt photon spectrometry: comparison of the effect of different charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gihwala, D.; Peisach, M.

    1985-01-01

    Standard cements were analysed by particle-induced prompt photon spectrometry (PIPPS) using 4,75-MeV protons, 5-MeV 4 He+ ions, and 2-MeV deuterons. Precision and sensitivity attainable were compared. Protons and alpha-particles were comparable for the determination of F, Na, Mg and Si. Protons were preferred for P and Ca, and alpha-particles for the direct determination of O. Sources of interference are discussed with particular reference to delayed gamma-ray emission from deuteron bombardment

  20. Performance analysis of a new positron camera geometry for high speed, fine particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovechles, J. M.; Boucher, D.; Pax, R.; Leadbeater, T.; Sasmito, A. P.; Waters, K. E.

    2017-09-01

    A new positron camera arrangement was assembled using 16 ECAT951 modular detector blocks. A closely packed, cross pattern arrangement was selected to produce a highly sensitive cylindrical region for tracking particles with low activities and high speeds. To determine the capabilities of this system a comprehensive analysis of the tracking performance was conducted to determine the 3D location error and location frequency as a function of tracer activity and speed. The 3D error was found to range from 0.54 mm for a stationary particle, consistent for all tracer activities, up to 4.33 mm for a tracer with an activity of 3 MBq and a speed of 4 m · s-1. For lower activity tracers (mineral particles inside a two-inch hydrocyclone and a 142 mm diameter flotation cell. A detailed trajectory, inside the hydrocyclone, of a  -212  +  106 µm (10-1 MBq) quartz particle displayed the expected spiralling motion towards the apex. This was the first time a mineral particle of this size had been successfully traced within a hydrocyclone, however more work is required to develop detailed velocity fields.

  1. Performance Analysis Review of Thorium TRISO Coated Particles during Manufacture, Irradiation and Accident Condition Heating Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    Thorium, in combination with high enriched uranium, was used in all early high temperature reactors (HTRs). Initially, the fuel was contained in a kernel of coated particles. However, particle quality was low in the 1960s and early 1970s. Modern, high quality, tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles with thorium oxide and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) had been manufactured since 1978 and were successfully demonstrated in irradiation and accident tests. In 1980, HTR fuels changed to low enriched uranium UO 2 TRISO fuels. The wide ranging development and demonstration programme was successful, and it established a worldwide standard that is still valid today. During the process, results of the thorium work with high quality TRISO fuel particles had not been fully evaluated or documented. This publication collects and presents the information and demonstrates the performance of thorium TRISO fuels.This publication is an outcome of the technical contract awarded under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Near Term and Promising Long Term Options for Deployment of Thorium Based Nuclear Energy, initiated in 2012. It is based on the compilation and analysis of available results on thorium TRISO coated particle performance in manufacturing and during irradiation and accident condition heating tests

  2. Dimensional analysis and prediction of dielectrophoretic crossover frequency of spherical particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Kai Yeh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The manipulation of biological cells and micrometer-scale particles using dielectrophoresis (DEP is an indispensable technique for lab-on-a-chip systems for many biological and colloidal science applications. However, existing models, including the dipole model and numerical simulations based on Maxwell stress tensor (MST, cannot achieve high accuracy and high computation efficiency at the same time. The dipole model is widely used and provides adequate predictions on the crossover frequency of submicron particles, but cannot predict the crossover frequency for larger particles accurately; on the other hand, the MST method offers high accuracy for a wide variety of particle sizes and shapes, but is time-consuming and may lack predictive understanding of the interplay between key parameters. Here we present a mathematical model, using dimensional analysis and the Buckingham pi theorem, that permits high accuracy and efficiency in predicting the crossover frequency of spherical particles. The curve fitting and calculation are performed using commercial packages OriginLab and MATLAB, respectively. In addition, through this model we also can predict the conditions in which no crossover frequency exists. Also, we propose a pair of dimensionless parameters, forming a functional relation, that provide physical insights into the dependency of the crossover frequency on five key parameters. The model is verified under several scenarios using comprehensive MST simulations by COMSOL Multiphysics software (COMSOL, Inc. and some published experimental data.

  3. Military Space Mission Design and Analysis in a Multi-Body Environment: An Investigation of High-Altitude Orbits as Alternative Transfer Paths, Parking Orbits for Reconstitution, and Unconventional Mission Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    resulting in more debris [6]. This domino effect is known as Kessler’s syndrome [6]. This overpopulation of space may eventually force space users out of...effective solutions with potential real- world applications. 1.6 Previous Contributions Various other researchers have implemented methods from DST to the...However, these maps may be more applicable to the analysis of real world trajectories. 5.6 Limitations of the Current Investigation The current

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of orbital atherectomy plus balloon angioplasty vs balloon angioplasty alone in subjects with calcified femoropopliteal lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Barry; Dattilo, Raymond; Diage, Tiffini

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As cost considerations become increasingly critical when selecting optimal endovascular treatment strategies, a cost-benefit analysis was conducted comparing the Diamondback 360°® Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) (Cardiovascular Systems, Inc., St Paul, MN, USA) and balloon angioplasty (BA) vs BA alone for treatment of calcified femoropopliteal lesions. Patients and methods The clinical outcomes from COMPLIANCE 360°, a prospective, multicenter, randomized study comparing OAS+BA vs BA alone for treatment of calcified femoropopliteal lesions, were correlated with cost data and previously published quality of life data. Site of service, hospital charges, and associated medical resource utilization were obtained from Uniform Billing statements for index treatments and associated revascularizations out to 1 year. Hospital costs were estimated using hospital-specific, procedure-specific cost-to-charge ratios. Length of stay and procedural data were collected from participating study sites. Results Twenty-five subjects with 38 lesions and 25 subjects with 27 lesions were randomized to the OAS+BA and BA-alone groups, respectively. Mean hospital charges (US$51,755 vs US$39,922) and estimated hospital costs (US$15,100 vs US$11,016) were higher for OAS+BA compared with BA alone (not statistically significant). Stent utilization was statistically significantly higher with BA-alone treatment for all subjects (1.1 vs 0.1, P=0.001) and in the subset of subjects with one lesion (1.0 vs 0.1, Patherectomy for treatment of calcified femoropopliteal lesions, a longstanding challenge for peripheral artery disease interventionalists. PMID:24672251

  5. Chemical Speciation of Sulfur in Marine Cloud Droplets and Particles: Analysis of Individual Particles from Marine Boundary Layer over the California Current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Wiley Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Gilles, Mary K; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Desyaterik, Yury; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2008-03-12

    Detailed chemical speciation of the dry residue particles from individual cloud droplets and interstitial aerosol collected during the Marine Stratus Experiment (MASE) was performed using a combination of complementary microanalysis techniques. Techniques include computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Samples were collected at the ground site located in Point Reyes National Seashore, approximately 1 km from the coast. This manuscript focuses on the analysis of individual particles sampled from air masses that originated over the open ocean and then passed through the area of the California current located along the northern California coast. Based on composition, morphology, and chemical bonding information, two externally mixed, distinct classes of sulfur containing particles were identified: chemically modified (aged) sea salt particles and secondary formed sulfate particles. The results indicate substantial heterogeneous replacement of chloride by methanesulfonate (CH3SO3-) and non-sea salt sulfate (nss-SO42-) in sea-salt particles with characteristic ratios of nss-S/Na>0.10 and CH3SO3-/nss-SO42->0.6.

  6. Eulerian-Lagrangian analysis for particle velocities and trajectories in a pure wave motion using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeyama, Motohiko

    2012-04-13

    This paper investigates the velocity and the trajectory of water particles under surface waves, which propagate at a constant water depth, using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The vector fields and vertical distributions of velocities are presented at several phases in one wave cycle. The third-order Stokes wave theory was employed to express the physical quantities. The PIV technique's ability to measure both temporal and spatial variations of the velocity was proved after a series of attempts. This technique was applied to the prediction of particle trajectory in an Eulerian scheme. Furthermore, the measured particle path was compared with the positions found theoretically by integrating the Eulerian velocity to the higher order of a Taylor series expansion. The profile of average travelling distance is also presented with a solution of zero net mass flux in a closed wave flume.

  7. Transition matrices and orbitals from reduced density matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etienne, Thibaud [Université de Lorraine – Nancy, Théorie-Modélisation-Simulation, SRSMC, Boulevard des Aiguillettes 54506, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); CNRS, Théorie-Modélisation-Simulation, SRSMC, Boulevard des Aiguillettes 54506, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, Université de Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2015-06-28

    In this contribution, we report two different methodologies for characterizing the electronic structure reorganization occurring when a chromophore undergoes an electronic transition. For the first method, we start by setting the theoretical background necessary to the reinterpretation through simple tensor analysis of (i) the transition density matrix and (ii) the natural transition orbitals in the scope of reduced density matrix theory. This novel interpretation is made more clear thanks to a short compendium of the one-particle reduced density matrix theory in a Fock space. The formalism is further applied to two different classes of excited states calculation methods, both requiring a single-determinant reference, that express an excited state as a hole-particle mono-excited configurations expansion, to which particle-hole correlation is coupled (time-dependent Hartree-Fock/time-dependent density functional theory) or not (configuration interaction single/Tamm-Dancoff approximation). For the second methodology presented in this paper, we introduce a novel and complementary concept related to electronic transitions with the canonical transition density matrix and the canonical transition orbitals. Their expression actually reflects the electronic cloud polarisation in the orbital space with a decomposition based on the actual contribution of one-particle excitations from occupied canonical orbitals to virtual ones. This approach validates our novel interpretation of the transition density matrix elements in terms of the Euclidean norm of elementary transition vectors in a linear tensor space. A proper use of these new concepts leads to the conclusion that despite the different principles underlying their construction, they provide two equivalent excited states topological analyses. This connexion is evidenced through simple illustrations of (in)organic dyes electronic transitions analysis.

  8. Quantitative trace element analysis of individual fly ash particles by means of X-ray microfluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincze, L.; Somogyi, A.; Osan, J.; Vekemans, B.; Torok, S.; Janssens, K.; Adams, F. [Universitaire of Instelling Antwerp, Wilrijk (Belgium). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    A new quantification procedure was developed for the evaluation of X-ray microfluorescence (XRF) data sets obtained from individual particles, based on iterative Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Combined with the high sensitivity of synchrotron radiation-induced XRF spectroscopy, the method was used to obtain quantitative information down to trace-level concentrations from micrometer-sized particulate matter. The detailed XRF simulation model was validated by comparison of calculated and experimental XRF spectra obtained for glass microsphere standards, resulting in uncertainties in the range of 3-10% for the calculated elemental sensitivities. The simulation model was applied for the quantitative analysis of X-ray tube and synchrotron radiation-induced scanning micro-XRF spectra of individual coal and wood fly ash particles originating from different Hungarian power plants. By measuring the same particles by both methods the major, minor, and trace element compositions of the particles were determined. The uncertainty of the MC based quantitative analysis scheme is estimated to be in the range of 5-30%.

  9. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataraman, S.; Allison, D.P.; Qi, H.; Morrell-Falvey, J.L.; Kallewaard, N.L.; Crowe, J.E.; Doktycz, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of biological samples can be imaged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) under environments that range from vacuum to ambient to liquid. Generally imaging is pursued to evaluate structural features of the sample or perhaps identify some structural changes in the sample that are induced by the investigator. In many cases, AFM images of sample features and induced structural changes are interpreted in general qualitative terms such as markedly smaller or larger, rougher, highly irregular, or smooth. Various manual tools can be used to analyze images and extract more quantitative data, but this is usually a cumbersome process. To facilitate quantitative AFM imaging, automated image analysis routines are being developed. Viral particles imaged in water were used as a test case to develop an algorithm that automatically extracts average dimensional information from a large set of individual particles. The extracted information allows statistical analyses of the dimensional characteristics of the particles and facilitates interpretation related to the binding of the particles to the surface. This algorithm is being extended for analysis of other biological samples and physical objects that are imaged by AFM

  10. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, S. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Allison, D.P. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Cellular, and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Molecular Imaging Inc. Tempe, AZ, 85282 (United States); Qi, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Morrell-Falvey, J.L. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kallewaard, N.L. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Crowe, J.E. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Doktycz, M.J. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: doktyczmj@ornl.gov

    2006-06-15

    A variety of biological samples can be imaged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) under environments that range from vacuum to ambient to liquid. Generally imaging is pursued to evaluate structural features of the sample or perhaps identify some structural changes in the sample that are induced by the investigator. In many cases, AFM images of sample features and induced structural changes are interpreted in general qualitative terms such as markedly smaller or larger, rougher, highly irregular, or smooth. Various manual tools can be used to analyze images and extract more quantitative data, but this is usually a cumbersome process. To facilitate quantitative AFM imaging, automated image analysis routines are being developed. Viral particles imaged in water were used as a test case to develop an algorithm that automatically extracts average dimensional information from a large set of individual particles. The extracted information allows statistical analyses of the dimensional characteristics of the particles and facilitates interpretation related to the binding of the particles to the surface. This algorithm is being extended for analysis of other biological samples and physical objects that are imaged by AFM.

  11. The degree of 5f electron localization in URu2Si2: electron energy-loss spectroscopy and spin-orbit sum rule analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffries, J R; Moore, K T; Butch, N P; Maple, M B

    2010-05-19

    We examine the degree of 5f electron localization in URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} using spin-orbit sum rule analysis of the U N{sub 4,5} (4d {yields} 5f) edge. When compared to {alpha}-U metal, US, USe, and UTe, which have increasing localization of the 5f states, we find that the 5f states of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} are more localized, although not entirely. Spin-orbit analysis shows that intermediate coupling is the correct angular momentum coupling mechanism for URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} when the 5f electron count is between 2.6 and 2.8. These results have direct ramifications for theoretical assessment of the hidden order state of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, where the degree of localization of the 5f electrons and their contribution to the Fermi surface are critical.

  12. Confocal (micro)-XRF for 3D analysis of elements distribution in hot environmental particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielewski, M.; Eriksson, M.; Himbert, J.; Simon, R.; Betti, M.; Hamilton, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    Studies on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminates in the environment are often constrained by a lack of knowledge on the elemental distribution and general behavior of particulate bound radionuclides contained in hot particles. A number of hot particles were previously isolated from soil samples collected at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands and characterized using non-destructive techniques [1]. The present investigation at HASYLAB is a part of larger research program at ITU regarding the characterization of environmental radioactive particles different locations and source-terms. Radioactive particles in the environment are formed under a number of different release scenarios and, as such, their physicochemical properties may provide a basis for identifying source-term specific contamination regimes. Consequently, studies on hot particles are not only important in terms of studying the elemental composition and geochemical behavior of hot particles but may also lead to advances in assessing the long-term impacts of radioactive contamination on the environment. Six particles isolated from soil samples collected at the Marshall Islands were studied. The element distribution in the particles was determined by confocal (micro)-XRF analysis using the ANKA FLUO beam line. The CRL (compound refractive lens) was used to focus the exciting beam and the polycapillary half lens to collimate the detector. The dimensions of confocal spot were measured by 'knife edge scanning' method with thin gold structure placed at Si wafer. The values of 3.1 x 1.4 x 18.4 (micro)m were achieved if defined as FWHMs of measured L?intensity profiles and when the19.1 keV exciting radiation was used. The collected XRF spectra were analyzed offline with AXIL [2] software to obtain net intensities of element characteristic lines.Further data processing and reconstruction of element distribution was done with the software 'R' [3] dedicated for statistical

  13. Evaluation of the synchrotron close orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashmakov, Yu.A.; Karpov, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    The knowledge of the closed orbit position is an essential condition for the effective work of any accelerator. Therefore questions of calculations, measurements and controls have great importance. For example, during injection of particles into a synchrotron, the amplitudes of their betatron oscillations may become commensurable with the working region of the synchrotron. This makes one pay attention at the problem of formation of the optimum orbit with use of correcting optical elements. In addition, it is often necessary to calculate such an orbit at the end of the acceleration cycle when particles are deposited at internal targets or removed from the synchrotron. In this paper, the computation of the close orbit is reduced to a determination at an arbitrarily chosen azimuth of the eigenvector of the total transfer matrix of the synchrotron ring and to tracing with this vector desired orbit. The eigenvector is found as a result of an iteration

  14. Material analysis with the aid of particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, E.

    1984-12-01

    Material analysis are discussed on the basis of PIXE and Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. Various problems including cross-section changes, energy changes, count rate and deadtime, background, escape peaks and perturbations and overlap are discussed in relation to PIXE, while the influence of the energy loss of the projectile, the mass of the projectile, the cinematic factor, projectile energy, the scattering angle and the solid angle are discussed in terms of Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. X-ray production theory and x-ray detectors are also briefly discussed. The effect of elastically scattered protons on the energy resolution of the x-ray detector is discussed. The application of PIXE and Rutherford scattering spectroscopy to the analysis of air particle samples, and to the determination of the efficiency of the filters used for the collection of air-particle samples is also discussed

  15. Particle tracking for unsaturated-zone groundwater travel time analysis at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, B.W.; Skinner, L.H.; Zieman, N.B.

    1995-01-01

    A particle tracking code developed to link numerical modeling of groundwater flow in the unsaturated zone to the analysis of groundwater travel times was used to produce preliminary estimates of the distribution of groundwater-travel time from a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada to the water table. Compliance with 10CFR960 requires the demonstration that pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel time from the disturbed zone to the accessible environment is expected to exceed 1,000 years along any path of likely and significant radionuclide travel. The use of multiple particles and multiple realizations of the geology and parameter distributions in the unsaturated zone allows a probabilistic analysis of groundwater travel times that may be applied for evaluating compliance

  16. The particle analysis based on FT-TIMS technique for swipe sample under the frame of nuclear safeguard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tianli; Liu Xuemei; Liu Zhao; Tang Lei; Long Kaiming

    2008-06-01

    Under the frame of nuclear safeguard, the particles analysis for swipe sample is an advance mean to detect the undeclared uranium enriched facilities and undeclared uranium enriched activity. The technique of particle analysis based on fission track-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (FT-TIMS) for swipe sample have been built. The reliability and the experimental background for selecting particles consisting of uranium from swipe sample by FT method have been verified. In addition, the utilization coefficient of particles on the surface of swipe sample have also been tested. These works have provided the technique support for application in the area of nuclear verification. (authors)

  17. Using Static Percentiles of AE9/AP9 to Approximate Dynamic Monte Carlo Runs for Radiation Analysis of Spiral Transfer Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Betty P.; O'Brien, T. Paul

    2015-06-01

    The Aerospace Corporation performed a study to determine whether static percentiles of AE9/AP9 can be used to approximate dynamic Monte Carlo runs for radiation analysis of spiral transfer orbits. Solar panel degradation is a major concern for solar-electric propulsion because solar-electric propulsion depends on the power output of the solar panel. Different spiral trajectories have different radiation environments that could lead to solar panel degradation. Because the spiral transfer orbits only last weeks to months, an average environment does not adequately address the possible transient enhancements of the radiation environment that must be accounted for in optimizing the transfer orbit trajectory. Therefore, to optimize the trajectory, an ensemble of Monte Carlo simulations of AE9/AP9 would normally be run for every spiral trajectory to determine the 95th percentile radiation environment. To avoid performing lengthy Monte Carlo dynamic simulations for every candidate spiral trajectory in the optimization, we found a static percentile that would be an accurate representation of the full Monte Carlo simulation for a representative set of spiral trajectories. For 3 LEO to GEO and 1 LEO to MEO trajectories, a static 90th percentile AP9 is a good approximation of the 95th percentile fluence with dynamics for 4-10 MeV protons, and a static 80th percentile AE9 is a good approximation of the 95th percentile fluence with dynamics for 0.5-2 MeV electrons. While the specific percentiles chosen cannot necessarily be used in general for other orbit trade studies, the concept of determining a static percentile as a quick approximation to a full Monte Carlo ensemble of simulations can likely be applied to other orbit trade studies. We expect the static percentile to depend on the region of space traversed, the mission duration, and the radiation effect considered.

  18. An In-situ materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) diagnostic to study particle density control and hydrogenic fuel retention in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allain, Jean-Paul [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2014-09-05

    A new materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) was designed, constructed and tested to develop understanding of particle control and hydrogenic fuel retention in lithium-based plasma-facing surfaces in NSTX. The novel feature of MAPP is an in-situ tool to probe the divertor NSTX floor during LLD and lithium-coating shots with subsequent transport to a post-exposure in-vacuo surface analysis chamber to measure D retention. In addition, the implications of a lithiated graphite-dominated plasma-surface environment in NSTX on LLD performance, operation and ultimately hydrogenic pumping and particle control capability are investigated in this proposal. MAPP will be an invaluable tool for erosion/redeposition simulation code validation.

  19. On the determination of phosphorus via charged particle activation analysis Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormali, S.M.; James, W.D.; Poland, J.E.; Schweikert, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The application of charged particle activation analysis to the determination of phosphorus in a variety of sample materials is discussed. The activity produced via the sup(31)P(α,n)sup(34m)Cl reaction is quantitated either nondestructively or using postirradiation radiochemical separations depending on the characteristics of the sample matrices. Corrections which are necessary for the determination of phosphorus in pure tantalum metal due to spectral interferences are discussed. (author)

  20. ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF RESPIRABLE TIRE PARTICLES AND ASSESSMENT OF CARDIO-PULMONARY TOXICITY IN RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elemental Analysis of Respirable Tire Particles and Assessment of Cardio-pulmonary Toxicity in RatsR.R. Gottipolu, PhD1, E. Landa, PhD2, J.K. McGee, MS1, M.C. Schladweiler, BS1, J.G. Wallenborn, MS3, A.D. Ledbetter, BS1, J.E. Richards, MS1 and U.P. Kodavanti, PhD1. 1NHEER...