WorldWideScience

Sample records for partially-halogenated chlorofluorocarbons hcfcs

  1. METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES AND PARTIALLY HALOGENATED DERIVATIVES THEROF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, J.W.

    1959-08-18

    A method is given for producing isotopic methanes and/ or partially halogenated derivatives. Lithium hydride, deuteride, or tritide is reacted with a halogenated methane or with a halogenated methane in combination with free halogen. The process is conveniently carried out by passing a halogenated methane preferably at low pressures or in an admixture with an inert gas through a fixed bed of finely divided lithium hydride heated initially to temperatures of 100 to 200 deg C depending upon the halogenated methane used.

  2. Emission estimates of HCFCs and HFCs in California from the 2010 CalNex study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Barbara; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Cohan, Alex; Nissenson, Paul; Dabdub, Donald; Meinardi, Simone; Atlas, Elliot; Lueb, Rich; Holloway, John S.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Pederson, James; VanCuren, Richard A.; Blake, Donald R.

    2013-02-01

    The CalNex 2010 (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) study was designed to evaluate the chemical composition of air masses over key source regions in California. During May to June 2010, air samples were collected on board a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3D aircraft over the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB) and the Central Valley (CV). This paper analyzes six effective greenhouse gases—chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22), 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane (HCFC-141b), 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b), 2-chloro-1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HCFC-124), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), and 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a)—providing the most comprehensive characterization of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacement compound emissions in California. Concentrations of measured HCFCs and HFCs are enhanced greatly throughout the SoCAB and CV, with highest levels observed in the SoCAB: 310 ± 92 pptv for HCFC-22, 30.7 ± 18.6 pptv for HCFC-141b, 22.9 ± 2.0 pptv for HCFC-142b, 4.86 ± 2.56 pptv for HCFC-124, 109 ± 46.4 pptv for HFC-134a, and 91.2 ± 63.9 pptv for HFC-152a. Annual emission rates are estimated for all six compounds in the SoCAB using the measured halocarbon to carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios and CO emissions inventories. Emission rates of 3.05 ± 0.70 Gg for HCFC-22, 0.27 ± 0.07 Gg for HCFC-141b, 0.06 ± 0.01 Gg for HCFC-142b, 0.11 ± 0.03 Gg for HCFC-124, 1.89 ± 0.43 Gg for HFC-134a, and 1.94 ± 0.45 Gg for HFC-152b for the year 2010 are calculated for the SoCAB. These emissions are extrapolated from the SoCAB region to the state of California using population data. Results from this study provide a baseline emission rate that will help future studies determine if HCFC and HFC mitigation strategies are successful.

  3. Greenhouse effect due to chlorofluorocarbons - Climatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, V.

    1975-01-01

    The infrared bands of chlorofluorocarbons and chlorocarbons enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect. This enhancement may lead to an appreciable increase in the global surface temperature if the atmospheric concentrations of these compounds reach values of the order of 2 parts per billion.

  4. Energy Efficient Alternatives to Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-06-01

    An assessment of the state of the art in refrigeration and insulation technologies is carried out to evaluate the potential for efficient substitutes for CFCs and HCFCs to facilitate the transition to a CFC-free environment. Opportunities for improved efficiency in domestic refrigeration, building chillers, commercial refrigeration and industrial refrigeration are evaluated. Needs for alternate refrigerants, improved components, and/or alternate cycles are identified. A summary of on-going research is presented in each area, and the potential roles of industry and government are considered. The most promising approaches for refrigeration technology fall into these categories: (1) improved vapor compressor cycles with alternate fluids, (2) Stirling cycle development and (3) advances in absorption technology. A summary of on-going research into advanced insulation, focused on vacuum-based insulation technology refrigeration is developed. Insulation applications considered include appliances, transport refrigeration, and buildings. Specific recommendations for a long-term R&D agenda are presented. The potential benefits, research, general approach, and probability of success are addressed.

  5. Measurements of HFC-134a and HCFC-22 in groundwater and unsaturated-zone air: implications for HFCs and HCFCs as dating tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Karl B.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, Niel; Casile, Gerolamo; Sanford, Ward E.

    2014-01-01

    A new analytical method using gas chromatography with an atomic emission detector (GC–AED) was developed for measurement of ambient concentrations of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) in soil, air, and groundwater, with the goal of determining their utility as groundwater age tracers. The analytical detection limits of HCFC-22 (difluorochloromethane, CHClF2) and HFC-134a (1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethane, C2H2F4) in 1 L groundwater samples are 4.3 × 10− 1 and 2.1 × 10− 1 pmol kg− 1, respectively, corresponding to equilibrium gas-phase mixing ratios of approximately 5–6 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). Under optimal conditions, post-1960 (HCFC-22) and post-1995 (HFC-134a) recharge could be identified using these tracers in stable, unmixed groundwater samples. Ambient concentrations of HCFC-22 and HFC-134a were measured in 50 groundwater samples from 27 locations in northern and western parts of Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina (USA), and 3 unsaturated-zone profiles were collected in northern Virginia. Mixing ratios of both HCFC-22 and HFC-134a decrease with depth in unsaturated-zone gas profiles with an accompanying increase in CO2 and loss of O2. Apparently, ambient concentrations of HCFC-22 and HFC-134a are readily consumed by methanotrophic bacteria under aerobic conditions in the unsaturated zone. The results of this study indicate that soils are a sink for these two greenhouse gases. These observations contradict the previously reported results from microcosm experiments that found that degradation was limited above-ambient HFC-134a. The groundwater HFC and HCFC concentrations were compared with concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Nearly all samples had measured HCFC-22 or HFC-134a that were below concentrations predicted by the CFCs and SF6, with many samples showing a complete loss of HCFC-22 and HFC-134a. This study indicates that HCFC-22 and HFC-134

  6. Greenhouse effect of chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Lacis, Andrew; Prather, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A comparison is made of the radiative (greenhouse) forcing of the climate system due to changes of atmospheric chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases. It is found that CFCs, defined to include chlorofluorocarbons, chlorocarbons, and fluorocarbons, now provide about one-quater of current annual increases in anthropogenic greenhouse climate forcing. If the growth rates of CFC production in the early 1970s had continued to the present, current annual growth of climate forcing due to CFCs would exceed that due to CO2.

  7. A United States regulator's perspective on the ongoing chlorofluorocarbon transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, R J

    1999-12-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) put in place a general ban on the use of chlorofluorocarbons for the products it regulates (medical devices, drugs, and foods) in 1978, exempting those products where chlorofluorocarbon use was determined to be essential for the public health. In the intervening years, as the international commitment to a full transition away from all chlorofluorocarbon use took shape under the Montreal Protocol, the FDA has worked with industry to facilitate the development and testing of alternative technologies and products for inhalation drug products. As these alternative products begin to move from testing through the approval process and into marketing, the FDA is working collaboratively with the Environmental Protection Agency, other governmental agencies, and nongovernmental stakeholders to develop a transition policy for the United States. The transition policy for metered dose inhalers must be one that achieves the dual aims of first protecting the patients who rely on these vital medical products, while also achieving the public health need of protecting the ozone layer. As a part of developing such a transition strategy, the FDA published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) in March 1997. The ANPRM proposed mechanisms by which the FDA could determine when chlorofluorocarbon use in a drug product could no longer be considered essential. The ANPRM resulted in a large amount of valuable public debate and input. The FDA is now working to incorporate the knowledge gained from these public comments as it continues the rule-making process.

  8. Global warming potential estimates for the C1-C3 hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) included in the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Beltrone, Allison; Marshall, Paul; Burkholder, James B.

    2018-05-01

    Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are ozone depleting substances and potent greenhouse gases that are controlled under the Montreal Protocol. However, the majority of the 274 HCFCs included in Annex C of the protocol do not have reported global warming potentials (GWPs) which are used to guide the phaseout of HCFCs and the future phase down of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). In this study, GWPs for all C1-C3 HCFCs included in Annex C are reported based on estimated atmospheric lifetimes and theoretical methods used to calculate infrared absorption spectra. Atmospheric lifetimes were estimated from a structure activity relationship (SAR) for OH radical reactivity and estimated O(1D) reactivity and UV photolysis loss processes. The C1-C3 HCFCs display a wide range of lifetimes (0.3 to 62 years) and GWPs (5 to 5330, 100-year time horizon) dependent on their molecular structure and the H-atom content of the individual HCFC. The results from this study provide estimated policy-relevant GWP metrics for the HCFCs included in the Montreal Protocol in the absence of experimentally derived metrics.

  9. Chlorofluorocarbons and the environment: scientific, economic, social and political issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badr, O; Probert, S D; O' Callaghan, P W [Cranfield Inst. of Technology, Bedford (GB). Dept. of Applied Energy

    1990-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons have been among the most useful chemical compounds ever developed. However, after more than forty years of a continuously increasing rate of worldwide use in the industrial and domestic sectors, unequivocal evidence has indicated that, if released into Earth's atmosphere, they are amongst the most devastating of pollutants that could threaten the quality of life for future generations. Thus it is not surprising that, for nearly two decades, this dichotomy of interests has been a prominent issue. This report presents the scientific evidence available concerning the impacts of chlorofluorocarbons on the ambient environment. Regional, national and international policies adopted to try to curb their emissions into the atmosphere are summarised. Economic and social consequences of these policies are discussed, together with some of the available and recommended technological solutions to the environmental problem. It is believed that agreements reached internationally to date are insufficient to ensure the adequate protection of the environment. Even an immediate total ban on the production and use of such chemical compounds would not lead to a reversal of the environmental degradation for at least a century, due to the chlorofluorocarbons already in the atmosphere. (author).

  10. Transport and degradation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the pyritic Rabis Creek aquifer, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsby, K.; Hojberg, A.L.; Engesgaard, P.

    2007-01-01

    Vertical profiles of the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113 penetrating aerobic and anaerobic parts of a shallow sandy aquifer show that the CFC gases are degraded in the Rabis Creek, Denmark...

  11. Chlorofluorocarbons: CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, HCFC-21, HCFC-31, HCFC-133a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredsdorff, Lea; Nielsen, Else

    The Danish EPA has requested documentation for health-based quality criteria in air and groundwater for the following six chlorofluorocarbons: CFC-11, CFC-12, HCFC-21, HCFC-31, CFC-113 (1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane) and HCFC-133a (1-chloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane). A concern for toxic effe...... effects of these chlorofluorocarbons related to soil contamination at old industrial sites, as well as of a carcinogenic potential has been expressed and therefore this issue will be addressed in the documentation....

  12. Steam injection for the thermal plasma destruction of halons and chlorofluorocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, A.B.; Farmer, A.J.D.; Horrigan, E.C. [CSIRO Telecomunications and Industrial Physics, Lindfield NSW (Australia); Mc Allister, T. [CSIRO Telecomunications and Industrial Physics, Clifton Hill Vic (Australia)

    2001-07-01

    The destruction of ozone-depleting substances, in particular chlorofluorocarbons and halons, in the PLASCON plasma process is investigated. In particular, the use of oxygen and steam as oxidising gases is compared. Measurements of the exhaust gas composition are compared with the results Of calculations performed using a comprehensive chemical kinetic scheme. It is found that significant interconversion of ozone-depleting substances occurs, particularly for chloro-fluorocarbon destruction Steam is found to be a superior oxidising gas to oxygen, with greatly reduced levels of ozone-depleting substances and CF{sub 4} in the exhaust gas, particularly if the steam is input at close to or greater than stoichiometric levels. (authors)

  13. What would have happened to the ozone layer if chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) had not been regulated?

    OpenAIRE

    P. A. Newman; L. D. Oman; A. R. Douglass; E. L. Fleming; S. M. Frith; M. M. Hurwitz; S. R. Kawa; C. H. Jackman; N. A. Krotkov; E. R. Nash; J. E. Nielsen; S. Pawson; R. S. Stolarski; G. J. M. Velders

    2009-01-01

    Ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) was first proposed by Molina and Rowland in their 1974 Nature paper. Since that time, the scientific connection between ozone losses and CFCs and other ozone depleting substances (ODSs) has been firmly established with laboratory measurements, atmospheric observations, and modeling research. This science research led to the implementation of international agreements that largely stopped the production of ODSs. In this study we use a fully-c...

  14. A research needs assessment: Energy efficient alternatives to chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Final reprot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    An assessment of the state of the art in refrigeration and insulation technologies is carried out to evaluate the potential for efficient substitutes for CFCs and HCFCs to facilitate the transition to a CFC-free environment. Opportunities for improved efficiency in domestic refrigeration, building chillers, commercial refrigeration and industrial refrigeration are evaluated. Needs for alternate refrigerants, improved components, and/or alternate cycles are identified. A summary of on-going research is presented in each area, and the potential roles of industry and government are considered. The most promising approaches for refrigeration technology fall into these categories: (1) improved vapor compressor cycles with alternate fluids, (2) Stirling cycle development and (3) advances in absorption technology. A summary of on-going research into advanced insulation, focused on vacuum -- based insulation technology refrigeration is developed. Insulation applications considered include appliances, transport refrigeration, and buildings. Specific recommendations for a long-term R&D agenda are present. The potential benefits, research, general approach, and probability of success are addressed.

  15. Chlorine isotope composition in chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113 in firn, stratospheric and tropospheric air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allin, S. J.; Laube, J. C.; Witrant, E.; Kaiser, J.; McKenna, E.; Dennis, P.; Mulvaney, R.; Capron, E.; Martinerie, P.; Roeckmann, Thomas; Blunier, T.; Schwander, J.; Fraser, P. J.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Sturges, W. T.

    2015-01-01

    The stratospheric degradation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) releases chlorine, which is a major contributor to the destruction of stratospheric ozone (O-3). A recent study reported strong chlorine isotope fractionation during the breakdown of the most abundant CFC (CFC-12, CCl2F2, Laube et al.,

  16. Ozone-Depleting Substances on the Black Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you are a wholesaler, distributor, or retailer of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), you are responsible for ensuring the CFCs/HCFCs you buy are legal. Learn about the penalties of knowingly buying or possessing illegal CFCs

  17. Sustainable management of C&D waste - reducing the source to ozone depletion and global warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) are produced. Buildings in many countries are thermally insulated by insulation foam containing large amounts of fluorocarbons (chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) or hydrofluoro-carbons (HCFCs), which are ...

  18. Noaa chlorofluorocarbon tracer program air and seawater measurements: 1986-1989. Data file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisegarver, D.P.; Bullister, J.L.; Gammon, R.H.; Menzia, F.A.; Kelly, K.C.

    1993-04-01

    The NOAA Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) Tracer Program at PMEL has been measuring the growing burden of these anthropogenic gases in the thermocline waters of the Pacific Ocean since 1980. The central goals of the NOAA CFC Tracer Program are to document the transient invasion of the CFC tracers into the Pacific Ocean, by means of repeat occupations of key hydrographic sections at 5-year intervals, and to interpret these changing distributions in terms of coupled ocean-atmosphere models. Studies are underway to use the CFC observations in model-validation studies, and to help develop predictive capabilities on the decade-to-century timescale. The report includes measurements of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) and dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) dissolved in seawater samples collected in the Pacific Ocean by the NOAA CFC Tracer Program on six cruises during the period of 1986-1989. Measurements of depth, pressure, salinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen are included with the CFC data. Measurements of CFC-11 and CFC-12 in air samples collected along the cruise tracks are also included in the report. Data from the report are also available from the authors in digital format

  19. Replacement of chlorofluorocarbons at the DOE gaseous diffusion plants: An assessment of global impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Socolof, M.L.; McCold, L.N.; Saylor, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Three gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) for enriching uranium maintain a large inventory of chlorofluorocarbon-114 (CFC-114) as a coolant. To address the continued use of CFC-114, an ozone-depleting substance, the US Department of Energy (DOE) considered introducing perfluorocarbons (PFCs) by the end of 1995. These PFCs would not contribute to stratospheric ozone depletion but would be larger contributors to global warming than would CFC-114. The paper reports the results of an assessment of the global impacts of four alternatives for modifying GDP coolant system operations over a three-year period beginning in 1996. The overall contribution of GDP coolant releases to impacts on ozone depletion and global warming were quantified by parameters referred to as ozone-depletion impact and global-warming impact. The analysis showed that these parameters could be used as surrogates for predicting global impacts to all resources and could provide a framework for assessing environmental impacts of a permanent coolant replacement, eliminating the need for subsequent resource-specific analyses

  20. What Would Have Happened to the Ozone Layer if Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) had not been Regulated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Paul A.; Oman, L. D.; Douglass, A. R.; Fleming, E. L.; Frith, S. M.; Hurwitz, M. M.; Kawa, S. R.; Jackman, C. H.; Krotkov, N. A.; Nash, E. R.; hide

    2008-01-01

    Ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) was first proposed by Molina and Rowland in their 1974 Nature paper. Since that time, the sci entific connection between ozone losses and CFCs and other ozone depl eting substances (ODSs) has been firmly established with laboratory m easurements, atmospheric observations, and modeling research. This science research led to the implementation of international agreements t hat largely stopped the production of ODSs. In this study we use a fu lly-coupled radiation-chemical-dynamical model to simulate a future world where ODSs were never regulated and ODS production grew at an ann ual rate of 3%. In this "world avoided" simulation 1.7 % of the globa lly-average column ozone is destroyed by 2020, and 67% is destroyed b y 2065 in comparison to 1980. Large ozone depletions in the polar region become year-round rather than just seasonal as is currently observ ed in the Antarctic ozone hole. Very large temperature decreases are observed in response to circulation changes and decreased shortwave radiation absorption by ozone. Ozone levels in the tropical lower strat osphere remain constant until about 2053 and then collapse to near ze ro by 2058 as a result of heterogeneous chemical processes (as curren tly observed in the Antarctic ozone hole). The tropical cooling that triggers the ozone collapse is caused by an increase of the tropical upwelling. In response to ozone changes, ultraviolet radiation increa ses, more than doubling the erythemal radiation in the northern summer midlatitudes by 2060.

  1. What would have happened to the ozone layer if chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs had not been regulated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Newman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs was first proposed by Molina and Rowland in their 1974 Nature paper. Since that time, the scientific connection between ozone losses and CFCs and other ozone depleting substances (ODSs has been firmly established with laboratory measurements, atmospheric observations, and modeling studies. This science research led to the implementation of international agreements that largely stopped the production of ODSs. In this study we use a fully-coupled radiation-chemical-dynamical model to simulate a future world where ODSs were never regulated and ODS production grew at an annual rate of 3%. In this "world avoided" simulation, 17% of the globally-averaged column ozone is destroyed by 2020, and 67% is destroyed by 2065 in comparison to 1980. Large ozone depletions in the polar region become year-round rather than just seasonal as is currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole. Very large temperature decreases are observed in response to circulation changes and decreased shortwave radiation absorption by ozone. Ozone levels in the tropical lower stratosphere remain constant until about 2053 and then collapse to near zero by 2058 as a result of heterogeneous chemical processes (as currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole. The tropical cooling that triggers the ozone collapse is caused by an increase of the tropical upwelling. In response to ozone changes, ultraviolet radiation increases, more than doubling the erythemal radiation in the northern summer midlatitudes by 2060.

  2. Metabolism of chlorofluorocarbons and polybrominated compounds by Pseudomonas putida G786(pHG-2) via an engineered metabolic pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Hur, H G; Sadowsky, M J; Wackett, L P

    1994-01-01

    The recombinant bacterium Pseudomonas putida G786(pHG-2) metabolizes pentachloroethane to glyoxylate and carbon dioxide, using cytochrome P-450CAM and toluene dioxygenase to catalyze consecutive reductive and oxidative dehalogenation reactions (L.P. Wackett, M.J. Sadowsky, L.N. Newman, H.-G. Hur, and S. Li, Nature [London] 368:627-629, 1994). The present study investigated metabolism of brominated and chlorofluorocarbon compounds by the recombinant strain. Under anaerobic conditions, P. putid...

  3. Destruction of concentrated chlorofluorocarbons in India demonstrates an effective option to simultaneously curb climate change and ozone depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karstensen, Kåre Helge; Parlikar, Ulhas V.; Ahuja, Deepak; Sharma, Shiv; Chakraborty, Moumita A.; Maurya, Harivansh Prasad; Mallik, Mrinal; Gupta, P.K.; Kamyotra, J.S.; Bala, S.S.; Kapadia, B.V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Chlorofluorocarbons and halons are potent ozone depleting substances and greenhouse gases. • No provisions in the Montreal or in Kyoto Protocol to destroy stockpiles of concentrated CFCs. • The UNEP recommends 11 technologies for destruction of concentrated CFCs. • No studies have up to now investigated the potential of using cement kilns in developing countries. • The test demonstrated that the local Indian cement kiln was able to destroy high feeding rates of several concentrated CFC-gases effectively. - Abstract: The Montreal Protocol aims to protect the stratospheric ozone layer by phasing out production of substances that contribute to ozone depletion, currently covering over 200 individual substances. As most of these compounds are synthetic greenhouse gases, there is an opportunity to curb both ozone depletion and climate change simultaneously by requiring Parties of both the Montreal and the Kyoto Protocol to destroy their existing stocks of concentrated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Many emerging countries still possess stocks which need to be destroyed in an environmentally sound manner but costs may be prohibitive. The UNEP Technology and Economic Assessment Panel identified in 2002 eleven destruction technologies which meet the criteria for environmentally sound destruction of chlorofluorocarbons. Cement kilns were among these, but no study has been reported in scientific literature assessing its destruction performance under real developing country conditions up to now. In contrast to incinerators and other treatment techniques, high temperature cement kilns are already in place in virtually every country and can, if found technical feasible, be retrofitted and adapted cost-efficiently to destroy chemicals like CFCs. India has the second largest cement industry in the world and several hazardous waste categories have been tested successfully in recent years. The objective of this study was to carry out the first full scale

  4. A Synoptic View of the Ventilation and Circulation of Antarctic Bottom Water from Chlorofluorocarbons and Natural Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkey, Sarah G.; Smethie, William M.; Gebbie, Geoffrey; Gordon, Arnold L.; Sonnerup, Rolf E.; Warner, Mark J.; Bullister, John L.

    2018-01-01

    Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) is the coldest, densest, most prolific water mass in the global ocean. AABW forms at several distinct regions along the Antarctic coast and feeds into the bottom limb of the meridional overturning circulation, filling most of the global deep ocean. AABW has warmed, freshened, and declined in volume around the globe in recent decades, which has implications for the global heat and sea level rise budgets. Over the past three decades, the use of tracers, especially time-varying tracers such as chlorofluorocarbons, has been essential to our understanding of the formation, circulation, and variability of AABW. Here, we review three decades of temperature, salinity, and tracer data and analysis that have led to our current knowledge of AABW and how the southern component of deep-ocean ventilation is changing with time.

  5. Age dating ground water by use of chlorofluorocarbons (CCl3F and CCl2F2), and distribution of chlorofluorocarbons in the unsaturated zone, Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busenberg, E.; Weeks, E.P.; Plummer, L.N.; Bartholomay, R.C.

    1993-04-01

    Detectable concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) were observed in ground water and unsaturated-zone air at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and vicinity. The recharge ages of waters were determined to be from 4 to more than 50 years on the basis of CFC concentrations and other environmental data; most ground waters have ages of 14 to 30 years. These results indicate that young ground water was added at various locations to the older regional ground water (greater than 50 years) within and outside the INEL boundaries. The wells drilled into the Snake River Plain aquifer at INEL sampled mainly this local recharge. The Big Lost River, Birch Creek, the Little Lost River, and the Mud Lake-Terreton area appear to be major sources of recharge of the Snake River Plain aquifer at INEL. An average recharge temperature of 9.7±1.3 degrees C (degrees Celsius) was calculated from dissolved nitrogen and argon concentrations in the ground waters, a temperature that is similar to the mean annual soil temperature of 9 degrees C measured at INEL. This similarity indicates that the aquifer was recharged at INEL and not at higher elevations that would have cooler soil temperatures than INEL. Soil-gas concentrations at Test Area North (TAN) are explained by diffusion theory

  6. Summary record: Workshop on alternatives to chlorofluorocarbons as solvents. Held in Irvine, California on June 17-18, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The impetus for minimization or elimination of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) comes from the growing body of knowledge concerning depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer and formation of polar ozone 'holes'. The workshop concentrated on solvent usage, which constitutes some 12% of CFCs contribution to ozone depletion and is estimated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) at a sales dollar volume of $145 million per year for the United States alone. There is widespread solvent use in the electronics, automotive, defense, and spacecraft industries, as well as by a myriad of smaller fabricators and for consumer products. Seventeen major corporations in collaboration with the EPA, have formed the Industry Cooperative for Ozone Layer Protection (ICOLP). Two meetings were held prior to the workshop. The first included presentations by representatives from the ICOLP member companies on the pertinent activities of their respective organizations. The objective of this meeting was to brief the steering committee on the needs, limitations, problems, and successes in the development of alternatives to CFCs. Much of the background material presented in the workshop report was compiled during this first meeting. The objectives of the second meeting of the steering committee were to plan the agenda for the workshop and to identify the industry representatives to be invited

  7. Metabolism of chlorofluorocarbons and polybrominated compounds by Pseudomonas putida G786(pHG-2) via an engineered metabolic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, H G; Sadowsky, M J; Wackett, L P

    1994-11-01

    The recombinant bacterium Pseudomonas putida G786(pHG-2) metabolizes pentachloroethane to glyoxylate and carbon dioxide, using cytochrome P-450CAM and toluene dioxygenase to catalyze consecutive reductive and oxidative dehalogenation reactions (L.P. Wackett, M.J. Sadowsky, L.N. Newman, H.-G. Hur, and S. Li, Nature [London] 368:627-629, 1994). The present study investigated metabolism of brominated and chlorofluorocarbon compounds by the recombinant strain. Under anaerobic conditions, P. putida G786(pHG-2) reduced 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane, 1,2-dibromo-1,2-dichloroethane, and 1,1,1,2-tetrachloro-2,2-difluoroethane to products bearing fewer halogen substituents. Under aerobic conditions, P. putida G786(pHG-2) oxidized cis- and trans-1,2-dibromoethenes, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-difluoroethene, and 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethene. Several compounds were metabolized by sequential reductive and oxidative reactions via the constructed metabolic pathway. For example, 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane was reduced by cytochrome P-450CAM to 1,2-dibromoethenes, which were subsequently oxidized by toluene dioxygenase. The same pathway metabolized 1,1,1,2-tetrachloro-2,2-difluoroethane to oxalic acid as one of the final products. The results obtained in this study indicate that P. putida G786(pHG-2) metabolizes polyfluorinated, chlorinated, and brominated compounds and further demonstrates the value of using a knowledge of catabolic enzymes and recombinant DNA technology to construct useful metabolic pathways.

  8. Metabolism and toxicity of hydrochlorofluorocarbons: current knowledge and needs for the future.

    OpenAIRE

    Anders, M W

    1991-01-01

    Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are being developed as replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that deplete stratospheric ozone. The depletion of stratospheric ozone may increase the intensity of ultraviolet radiation at the earth's surface, which may be associated with global, adverse human health effects. The greater tropospheric lability of HCFCs, which is due to the presence of C-H bonds, reduces HCFC migration to the stratosphere; HCFCs should, therefore, cause less depletion of str...

  9. Linking chloride mass balance infiltration rates with chlorofluorocarbon and SF6 groundwater dating in semi-arid settings: potential and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Susanne; Osenbruck, Karsten; Duijnisveld, Wilhelmus H M; Schwiede, Martin; Bottcher, Jurgen

    2010-09-01

    In the framework of the investigation of enrichment processes of nitrate in groundwater of the Kalahari of Botswana near Serowe, recharge processes were investigated. The thick unsaturated zone extending to up to 100 m of mostly unconsolidated sediments and very low recharge rates pose a serious challenge to study solute transport related to infiltration and recharge processes, as this extends past the conventional depths of soil scientific investigations and is difficult to describe using evidence from the groundwater due to the limitations imposed by available tracers. To determine the link between nitrate in the vadose zone and in the uppermost groundwater, sediment from the vadose zone was sampled up to a depth of 15-20 m (in one case also to 65 m) on several sites with natural vegetation in the research area. Among other parameters, sediment and water were analysed to determine chloride and nitrate concentration depth profiles. Using the chloride mass balance method, an estimation of groundwater infiltration rates produced values of 0.2-4 mm a(-1). The uncertainty of these values is, however, high. Because of the extreme thickness of the vadose zone, the travel time in the unsaturated zone might reach extreme values of up to 500 years and more. For investigations using groundwater, we applied the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-113, CFC-12, sulphur hexafluoride (SF(6)) and tritium to identify potential recharge, and found indications for some advective transport of the CFCs and SF(6), which we accounted for as constituting potential active localised recharge. In our contribution, we show the potential and limitations of the applied methods to determine groundwater recharge and coupled solute transport in semi-arid settings, and compare travel time ranges derived from soil science and groundwater investigations.

  10. Metabolism and toxicity of hydrochlorofluorocarbons: current knowledge and needs for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, M W

    1991-12-01

    Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are being developed as replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that deplete stratospheric ozone. The depletion of stratospheric ozone may increase the intensity of ultraviolet radiation at the earth's surface, which may be associated with global, adverse human health effects. The greater tropospheric lability of HCFCs, which is due to the presence of C-H bonds, reduces HCFC migration to the stratosphere; HCFCs should, therefore, cause less depletion of stratospheric ozone than CFCs. HCFCs under development include HCFC-22 (chlorodifluoromethane), HCFC-123 (2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane), HCFC-132b (1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane), HCFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane), HCFC-141b (1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, and HCFC-142b (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane). With the exception of HCFC-22, which is already in use, the metabolism and toxicity of HCFCs have not been studied in detail. By analogy to chlorinated ethanes, predictions can be made about the possible metabolism of HCFCs, but there are insufficient data available to predict rates of metabolism. Although most HCFCs appear to show low acute toxicity, some HCFCs are mutagenic in the Ames test. Hence, future research on HCFCs should include studies on the in vivo and in vitro metabolism of HCFCs as well as on their toxicity in in vivo and in vitro systems.

  11. Probability of Unmixed Young Groundwater (defined using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities) in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of unmixed young groundwater (defined using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities) in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps were developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  12. Emission quantification of refrigerant CFCs, HCFCs and HFCs in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    also export their products to the Middle East,. 5. 10. 15. 20 ..... the discarded products containing CFCs and their substitutes. .... ability Study) 2009 Production, sales and atmospheric ... torical review, considerations, and outlook; Int. J. Refrig.

  13. International research into chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marseille, T.J.; Shankle, D.L.; Thurman, A.G.

    1992-05-01

    Selected researchers from 21 countries were queried through questionnaires about their current and planned research activities. The results of the survey show that the majority of research being conducted by the respondents is devoted to investigating the hydrogenated fluorocarbon HFC-134a as a replacement for CFC-12 in refrigeration applications. The main issue with this alternative is identifying compatible lubricants that do not reduce its effectiveness.

  14. Atmospheric histories and emissions of chlorofluorocarbons CFC-13 (CClF3, ΣCFC-114 (C2Cl2F4, and CFC-115 (C2ClF5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Vollmer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on observations of the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-13 (chlorotrifluoromethane, ΣCFC-114 (combined measurement of both isomers of dichlorotetrafluoroethane, and CFC-115 (chloropentafluoroethane in atmospheric and firn samples, we reconstruct records of their tropospheric histories spanning nearly 8 decades. These compounds were measured in polar firn air samples, in ambient air archived in canisters, and in situ at the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment network and affiliated sites. Global emissions to the atmosphere are derived from these observations using an inversion based on a 12-box atmospheric transport model. For CFC-13, we provide the first comprehensive global analysis. This compound increased monotonically from its first appearance in the atmosphere in the late 1950s to a mean global abundance of 3.18 ppt (dry-air mole fraction in parts per trillion, pmol mol−1 in 2016. Its growth rate has decreased since the mid-1980s but has remained at a surprisingly high mean level of 0.02 ppt yr−1 since 2000, resulting in a continuing growth of CFC-13 in the atmosphere. ΣCFC-114 increased from its appearance in the 1950s to a maximum of 16.6 ppt in the early 2000s and has since slightly declined to 16.3 ppt in 2016. CFC-115 increased monotonically from its first appearance in the 1960s and reached a global mean mole fraction of 8.49 ppt in 2016. Growth rates of all three compounds over the past years are significantly larger than would be expected from zero emissions. Under the assumption of unchanging lifetimes and atmospheric transport patterns, we derive global emissions from our measurements, which have remained unexpectedly high in recent years: mean yearly emissions for the last decade (2007–2016 of CFC-13 are at 0.48 ± 0.15 kt yr−1 (> 15 % of past peak emissions, of ΣCFC-114 at 1.90 ± 0.84 kt yr−1 (∼ 10 % of peak emissions, and of CFC-115 at 0.80 ± 0.50

  15. Atmospheric histories and emissions of chlorofluorocarbons CFC-13 (CClF3), ΣCFC-114 (C2Cl2F4), and CFC-115 (C2ClF5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Martin K.; Young, Dickon; Trudinger, Cathy M.; Mühle, Jens; Henne, Stephan; Rigby, Matthew; Park, Sunyoung; Li, Shanlan; Guillevic, Myriam; Mitrevski, Blagoj; Harth, Christina M.; Miller, Benjamin R.; Reimann, Stefan; Yao, Bo; Steele, L. Paul; Wyss, Simon A.; Lunder, Chris R.; Arduini, Jgor; McCulloch, Archie; Wu, Songhao; Siek Rhee, Tae; Wang, Ray H. J.; Salameh, Peter K.; Hermansen, Ove; Hill, Matthias; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Ivy, Diane; O'Doherty, Simon; Krummel, Paul B.; Maione, Michela; Etheridge, David M.; Zhou, Lingxi; Fraser, Paul J.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Weiss, Ray F.; Simmonds, Peter G.

    2018-01-01

    Based on observations of the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-13 (chlorotrifluoromethane), ΣCFC-114 (combined measurement of both isomers of dichlorotetrafluoroethane), and CFC-115 (chloropentafluoroethane) in atmospheric and firn samples, we reconstruct records of their tropospheric histories spanning nearly 8 decades. These compounds were measured in polar firn air samples, in ambient air archived in canisters, and in situ at the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) network and affiliated sites. Global emissions to the atmosphere are derived from these observations using an inversion based on a 12-box atmospheric transport model. For CFC-13, we provide the first comprehensive global analysis. This compound increased monotonically from its first appearance in the atmosphere in the late 1950s to a mean global abundance of 3.18 ppt (dry-air mole fraction in parts per trillion, pmol mol-1) in 2016. Its growth rate has decreased since the mid-1980s but has remained at a surprisingly high mean level of 0.02 ppt yr-1 since 2000, resulting in a continuing growth of CFC-13 in the atmosphere. ΣCFC-114 increased from its appearance in the 1950s to a maximum of 16.6 ppt in the early 2000s and has since slightly declined to 16.3 ppt in 2016. CFC-115 increased monotonically from its first appearance in the 1960s and reached a global mean mole fraction of 8.49 ppt in 2016. Growth rates of all three compounds over the past years are significantly larger than would be expected from zero emissions. Under the assumption of unchanging lifetimes and atmospheric transport patterns, we derive global emissions from our measurements, which have remained unexpectedly high in recent years: mean yearly emissions for the last decade (2007-2016) of CFC-13 are at 0.48 ± 0.15 kt yr-1 (> 15 % of past peak emissions), of ΣCFC-114 at 1.90 ± 0.84 kt yr-1 (˜ 10 % of peak emissions), and of CFC-115 at 0.80 ± 0.50 kt yr-1 (> 5 % of peak emissions). Mean yearly emissions of CFC-115 for

  16. Upgrading of refrigeration units in nuclear power plant: An optimized approach to do justice to governmental restrictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, Klaus; Reinhart, Anton

    1998-01-01

    Stringent regulations to reduce the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) and halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (HCFC) have been set into force by many European countries. A ban for new plants containing HCFCs in 2005 and a total ban of HCFCs in 2020 are discussed within the European Community. Siemens-KWU and Sulzer Escher Wyss have developed a well-proofed procedure to solve the CFC problem for existing refrigeration systems in nuclear power plants. The new refrigerants are fluorinated hydrocarbons and for the centrifugal water chiller R134a is best suited. Prior to the market introduction toxicity, short and long term health effects, inflammability and stability of R134a have been investigated. The mechanical examination included wear, corrosion, lubrication and resistance to decomposition. A well-proven procedure was established which ensures the owner of the plant and the supplier best results

  17. Synthetic greenhouse gases under control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horisberger, B.; Karlaganis, G.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses new Swiss regulations on the use of synthetic materials that posses a considerable greenhouse-warming potential. Synthetic materials such as hydro-chlorofluorocarbons HCFCs, perfluoride-hydrocarbons and sulphur hexafluoride have, in recent years, replaced chlorofluorocarbons CFCs, which were banned on account of their ozone depletion characteristics. The use of these persistent substances is now being limited to applications where more environment-friendly alternatives are not available. The measures decreed in the legislation, which include a general ban on HCFCs as of 2004 and a ban on the export of installations and equipment that use ozone-depleting refrigerants are described. Details on the legislation's effects on the Swiss refrigeration industry are listed and discussed

  18. An Evaluation of C1-C3 Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) Metrics: Lifetimes, Ozone Depletion Potentials, Radiative Efficiencies, Global Warming and Global Temperature Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, J. B.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Marshall, P.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) have been used as chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) substitutes in a number of applications, e.g. refrigerator and air-conditioning systems. Although HCFCs have lower ozone-depletion potentials (ODPs) compared to CFCs, they are potent greenhouse gases. The twenty-eighth meeting of the parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Kigali, 2016) included a list of 274 HCFCs to be controlled under the Montreal Protocol. However, from this list, only 15 of the HCFCs have values for their atmospheric lifetime, ODP, global warming potential (GWP), and global temperature potential (GTP) that are based on fundamental experimental studies, while 48 are registered compounds. In this work, we present a comprehensive evaluation of the atmospheric lifetimes, ODPs, radiative efficiencies (REs), GWPs, and GTPs for all 274 HCFCs to be included in the Montreal Protocol. Atmospheric lifetimes were estimated based on HCFC reactivity with OH radicals and O(1D), as well as their removal by UV photolysis using structure activity relationships and reactivity trends. ODP values are based on the semi-empirical approach described in the WMO/UNEP ozone assessment. Radiative efficiencies were estimated, based on infrared spectra calculated using theoretical electronic structure methods (Gaussian 09). GWPs and GTPs were calculated relative to CO2 using our estimated atmospheric lifetimes and REs. The details of the methodology will be discussed as well as the associated uncertainties. This study has provided a consistent set of atmospheric metrics for a wide range of HCFCs that support future policy decisions. More accurate metrics for a specific HCFC, if desired, would require fundamental laboratory studies to better define the OH reactivity and infrared absorption spectrum of the compound of interest. Overall, HCFCs within the same family (isomers) show a large ODP, GWP, GTP dependence on the molecular geometry of the isomers. The

  19. 3He and chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) in the Southern Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Baptiste, P.; Jamous, D.; Mantisi, F.; Memery, L.; Universite Paris 6

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of 3 He across the Southern Ocean is depicted on the basis of a meridional section between Antarctica and South Africa measured during the INDIGO-3 survey (1988). A core of δ 3 He values above 10% is observed south of the Polar Front, associated with very low CFC concentrations. This 3 He enriched layer is documented from the GEOSECS and INDIGO 3 He data in the Southern Ocean. It is found at a density level around θ σ =27.8 in all the waters close to Antarctica (i.e. south of 50 degS). Its zonal distribution suggests that it is likely that it originates from the central/eastern Pacific. Hence, it provides an indication of the deep Pacific waters in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, which are not easily detectable from the standard hydrographic parameters. (author). 19 refs.; 8 figs

  20. Treatment of chlorofluorocarbons in alcohol solutions by γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimokawa, Toshinari; Nakagawa, Seiko; Sawai, Teruko

    1995-01-01

    A study was done on dechlorination of 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC113) in neutral and alkaline alcohol solutions by means of γ-irradiation. The dechlorination yield (G (Cl - )) was found to depend on the kind of alcohol used as solvents and the presence of hydroxide ion. The order of G (Cl - ) value in alkaline solution was isopropyl alcohol>> ethyl alcohol > methyl alcohol. It was suggested that the high yield obtained in alkaline isopropyl alcohol solution is explained by a chain process in dechlorination reaction. In case of alkaline isopropyl alcohol solution, CFC113 was dechlorinated to lower chlorinated ethane, and 1,1-dichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroetane was a main product. We have discussed on the chain dechlorination mechanism in alkaline isopropyl alcohol solution. (author)

  1. Development of decomposition method for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvent by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimokawa, Toshinari; Nakagawa, Seiko

    1995-01-01

    CFC is chemically and thermally stable, and almost harmless to human body, therefore, it has been used widely for various industries, in particular as the heat media for air conditioners and the washing agent for semiconductors and printed circuit substrates. In 1974, it was pointed out that CFC causes the breakdown of ozone layer, and the ozone hole was found, consequently, it was decided to limit its use, and to prohibit the production of specific CFC. The development of the decomposition treatment technology for the CFC now in use, which is friendly to the global environment including mankind and ozone layer, is strongly desired. Recently, the authors have examined the decomposition treatment method for specific CFC solvents by irradiation, and obtained the interesting knowledge. For the experiment, the CFC 113 was used, and its chemical structure is shown. The experimental method is explained. As the results, the effect of hydroxide ions, the decomposition products such as CFC 123, and the presumption of the mechanism of the chain dechlorination reaction of CFC 113 are reported. The irradiation decomposition method was compared with various other methods, and the cost of treatment is high. The development for hereafter is mentioned. (K.I.)

  2. Refrigerants and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, O. B.; Laptev, Yu A.

    2017-11-01

    The refrigeration and air-conditioning industries are important sectors of the economy and represents about 15 % of global electricity consumptions. The chlorofluorocarbons also called CFCs are a class of refrigerants containing the halogens chlorine and/or fluorine on a carbon skeleton. Because of their environmental impact the Montreal Protocol was negotiated in 1987 to limit the production of certain CFCs and hydrochlirofluorocarbons (HCFCs) in developed and developing countries. The halogenated refrigerants are depleting the ozone layer also major contribution to the greenhouse effect. To be acceptable as a refrigerant a fluid must satisfy a variety of thermodynamic criteria and should be environment friendly with zero Ozone Depletion Potential and low Global Warming Potential. The perspective of a future phase down of HFCs is considered in this report taking into account a strategy for the phase out of HCFCs and perspective of choosing of various refrigerant followed by safety issues.

  3. Attenuation of fluorocarbons released from foam insulation in landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Dote, Yukata; Fredenslund, Anders Michael

    2007-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) have been used as blowing agents (BAs) for foam insulation in home appliances and building materials, which after the end of their useful life are disposed of in landfills. The objective of this project...... was to evaluate the potential for degradation of BAs in landfills, and to develop a landfill model, which could simulate the fate of BAs in landfills. The investigation was performed by use of anaerobic microcosm studies using different types of organic waste and anaerobic digested sludge as inoculum. The BAs...... in any of the experiments within a run time of up to 200 days. The obtained degradation rate coefficients were used as input for an extended version of an existing landfill fate model incorporating a time dependent BA release from co-disposed foam insulation waste. Predictions with the model indicate...

  4. The phase-in and phase-out of European emissions of HCFC-141b and HCFC-142b under the Montreal Protocol: Evidence from observations at Mace Head, Ireland and Jungfraujoch, Switzerland from 1994 to 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derwent, R. G.; Simmonds, P. G.; Greally, B. R.; O'doherty, S.; McCulloch, A.; Manning, A.; Reimann, S.; Folini, D.; Vollmer, M. K.

    The mixing ratios of HCFC-141b (1,1-dichlorofluoroethane) and HCFC-142b (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane) have been rising steadily in baseline air at Mace Head, Ireland over the 10-year period from 1994 to 2004. These HCFCs are widely used replacements for the chlorofluorocarbons phased out under the Montreal Protocol and its subsequent amendments. Analysis of the HCFC content of regionally-polluted air arriving at Mace Head from the European continent shows that European emissions reached a peak during 2000-2001 and have declined subsequently, following the phase-out in their usage. European emissions of HCFC-141b have been further constrained by observations at the High-Alpine Jungfraujoch site. The reductions are consistent with the phase-out of HCFC production and use from the year 2001 onwards mandated by European regulations designed to exceed the requirements of the Montreal Protocol.

  5. TEWI Analysis: Its Utility, Its Shortcomings, and Its Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, V.D.; Fischer, S.K.; Sand, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    The past decade has been a challenging time for the refrigeration and air conditioning industry worldwide. Provisions of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments require the phaseout of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) compounds that have been used extensively as insulating foam blowing agents and refrigerants in refrigeration systems, heat pumps, and air conditioners. In response, hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) compounds were proposed, developed, and are starting to be used as the primary alternatives to CFCs and HCFCs. However, in 1997 under the Kyoto Protocol, industrialized nations have agreed to roll back emissions of HCFCs, carbon dioxide (CO*), and four other greenhouse gases which threaten to cause excessive global warming. The US. Department of Energy and the Alternative Fluorocarbon Environmental Acceptability Study (AFEAS) jointly sponsored research projects to identify the major applications of CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs and to examine the impacts of these compounds and the energy use of applications employing these compounds on global warming. The five major uses of fluorocarbons based on sales were automobile air conditioning, supermarket refrigeration, unitary heat pumps and air conditioning, chillers for cooling large office buildings, and household refrigeration. Almost all of the refrigerants used in these applications are global warming gases, and if the refrigerant leaks out of the system during operation, is lost during maintenance or is not recovered when the system is scraped, it contributes to global warming. But, it is also true that the energy consumed by refrigeration and air conditioning systems, in the form of electricity or the direct combustion of fossil fuel, results in the release of CO*, the primary cause of atmospheric global warming

  6. A new method used to evaluate organic working fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xinxin; He, Maogang; Wang, Jingfu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method named “Weight Classification-Hasse Dominance” to evaluate organic working fluids. This new method combines the advantages of both the method of weight determination and the Hasse Diagram Technique (HDT). It can be used to evaluate the thermodynamic performance, environmental protection indicator, and safety requirement of organic working fluid simultaneously. This evaluation method can offer good reference for working fluid selection. Using this method, the organic working fluids which have been phased out and will be phased out by the Montreal Protocol including CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons), HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons), and HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons) were evaluated. Moreover, HCs (hydrocarbons) can be considered as a completely different kind of organic working fluid from CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs according to the comparison based on this new evaluation method. - Highlights: • We propose a new method used to evaluate organic working fluids. • This evaluation method can offer good reference for working fluid selection. • CFC, HCFC, and HFC working fluids were evaluated using this evaluation method. • HC can be considered as a totally different working fluid from CFC, HCFC, and HFC

  7. The role of refrigerants in climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuebbles, D.J.

    1992-06-01

    The primary chemicals used as refrigerants, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and the compounds being considered as their replacements (HCFCs and HFCs) have been intensely studied because of concerns about chlorine chemistry effects on stratospheric ozone. Increasing attention is being given to the potential effects of these compounds in concerns about global warming. CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs absorb infrared radiation and thus are greenhouse gases that can influence radiative forcing on climate. The purpose of this paper is to describe the current understanding of the role of refrigerants in affecting climate. Increasing atmospheric concentrations of CFCs have accounted for about 24 % of the direct increase in radiative forcing from greenhouse gases over the last decade. However, observed decreases in stratospheric ozone, thought to be connected to increasing stratospheric chlorine from CFCs, suggests a cooling tendency over the last decade. This cooling tendency has strong latitudinal gradients, but is, when globally averaged, about comparable in magnitude and opposite in sign to the radiative forcing from CFCs over this period. Because of their shorter atmospheric lifetimes, the direct radiative influence on climate from the replacement compounds should generally be much smaller than the CFCs

  8. Effect of Dynamic Pressure on the Performance of Thermoacoustic Refrigerator with Aluminium (Al) Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Bheemsha; Nayak, B. Ramesh; Shivakumara, N. V.

    2018-04-01

    In practice the refrigerants are being used in the conventional refrigeration system to get the required cooling effect. These refrigerants produce Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and Hydro chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) which are highly harmful to the environment, particularly depleting of ozone layers resulting in green house emissions. In order to overcome these effects, the research needs to be focused on the development of an ecofriendly refrigeration system. The thermoacoustic refrigeration system is one among such system where the sound waves are used to compress and expand the gas particles. This study focuses on the effect of dynamic pressure on the thermoacoustic refrigerator made of aluminium with overall length of 748.82 mm, and the entire inner surface of the resonator tube was coated with 2mm thickness of polyurethane to minimize the heat losses to the atmosphere. Experiments were conducted with different stack geometries i.e. parallel plates having 0.119 mm thick with spacing between the plates maintained at 0.358 mm, 1mm diameter pipes, 2mm diameter pipes and 4 mm diameter pipes. Experiments were also conducted with different drive ratios of 0.6%, 1% and 1.6% for a constant dynamic pressure of 2 bar and 10 bar for helium and air as working medium. The results were plotted with the help of graphs, the variation of coefficient of performance (COP) and the relative coefficient of performance (COPR) for the above said conditions were calculated.

  9. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) destruction technology by induction coupled plasma; Koshuha purazuma ni yoru tokutei furon hakai gijutsu ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, A. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-05

    Abolishing flon in which the reuse by pollution and degradation is difficult by recovery flon and recovery and recycling process which do not rotate for the middle reuse that the recovery system is constructed is arising. And, the specific flon recovery quantity increases with the progress of development of the recent CFC substitute and renewal to the CFC substitute correspondence machine. Specific flon collapse technique using rf plasma introduced in this paper cultivated the basic technology in Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, resources environment integrated research place. The demonstrated operation research was carried out under Ministry of International Trade and Industry, New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization since December 1994. (NEDO)

  10. The elimination of chlorinated, chlorofluorocarbon, and other RCRA hazardous solvents from the Y-12 Plant's enriched uranium operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.H.; Patton, R.L.; Thompson, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    A major driving force in waste minimization within the plant is the reduction of mixed radioactive wastes associated with operations on highly enriched uranium. High enriched uranium has a high concentration of the uranium-235 isotope (up to 97.5% enrichment) and is radioactive, giving off alpha and low level gamma radiation. The material is fissionable with as little as two pounds dissolved in water being capable of producing a spontaneous chain reaction. For these reasons the material is processed in small batches or small geometries. Additionally, the material is completely recycled because of its strategic and monetary value. Since the early eighties, the plant has had an active waste minimization program which has concentrated on substitution of less hazardous solvents wherever possible. The following paper summarizes efforts in two areas - development of a water-based machining coolant to replace perchloroethylene and substitution of an aliphatic solvent to replace solvents producing hazardous wastes as defined by the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA)

  11. Substitutes for potent green house gases. HFCs, PFCs and SF{sub 6}. Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, P.H. [Dansk Teknologisk Institut (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    CFCs (halogenated chlorofluorocarbons), HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons), HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons), PFCs (fluorocarbons) and SF{sub 6} (sulphur hexafluoride) are all artificial substances which were not to be found in nature until recently. In 1995 the Danish consumption of HFC substances was approximately 740 tonnes, where the corresponding amount of SF{sub 6} was about 17 tonnes. If the entire amount of these substances was released to to the atmosphere, the resulting impact would correspond to an increased emission of greenhouse gases, corresponding to approximately 1.5 million tonnes of CO{sub 2}. HFC substances would account for 73%, SF{sub 6} with 25% and PFC for 1%. This corresponds to approximately 2.6% of the Danish CO{sub 2} emission (nearly 60 million tonnes per year). This corresponds to about half of the aimed 6% reduction of CO{sub 2} emission attained by introduction of mandatory green taxes on CO{sub 2}. According to experience from the CFC programme it is possible to recover some CFC and send it to controlled destruction. From 1993 to 1996 the refrigeration industry, for instance, has returned a total amount of 163 tonnes of CFC refrigerant through the KMO organization (Koelebranchens Miljoe Ordning). Most of this has been destroyed and a small amount has been purified and recycled afterwards. Similarly, it is likely to believe that some HFC refrigerant will be returned through the KMO organization. (au) 11 refs., also published in Danish

  12. Fiscal 1994 survey report. Survey of recent trends in CFC phaseout measures overseas; 1994 nendo shogaikoku ni okeru freon taisaku saishin doko ni kansuru chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Technical literature is referred to for the survey of recent trends in CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) phaseout in various countries overseas. The European Union will totally abolish CFC by the end of 1994 while other developed countries will totally abolish the same by the end of 1995 in compliance with the Montreal protocol. Many of the developing countries are actively striving to reduce CFC use with the help of the Multilateral Fund of Montreal. China and India have production facilities in themselves, and have not announced a phaseout program. There is a proposition for accelerating the regulation of HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons), but reliable substitutes for them are not yet available and their ozone layer restoring capability if used will be slight. It is feared that such will on the contrary retard CFC phaseout in developing countries. Accordingly, any abrupt acceleration of CFC phaseout implementation is inappropriate. Introduced in this report as fluorine-containing greenhouse gas-related information are a summary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the history of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change activities. According to an American survey, the aluminum industry emits 30,000 tons of CF{sub 4} and C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, and the semiconductor manufacturing industry 2,000-3,000 tons. As for SF{sub 6}, 5,000-8,000 tons are emitted mainly by the power industry. Measures for inhibiting them are being taken. (NEDO)

  13. Final report on CCQM-P151: Halocarbons in dry whole air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoderick, George; Guenther, Franklin; Duewer, David; Lee, Jeongsoon; Seog Kim, Jin; Hall, Bradley; Weiss, Ray; Harth, Christina; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The growing awareness of climate change/global warming and continuing concerns regarding stratospheric ozone depletion will require future measurements and standards for many compounds, in particular halocarbons that are linked to these issues. In order to track and control the emissions of these species globally in the atmosphere, it is necessary to demonstrate measurement equivalence at the highest levels of accuracy for assigned values of standards. This report describes the results of a pilot study between National Metrology Institutes and atmospheric research laboratories for several of the more important halocarbons at atmospheric concentration levels. The comparison includes the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC 12), trichlorofluoromethane (CFC 11), and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC 113); the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC 22) and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC 142b); and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC 134a), all in a dried whole air sample. The objective of this key comparison is to compare the measurement capabilities of the participants for these halocarbons at trace atmospheric levels. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM.

  14. Comparison of halocarbon measurements in an atmospheric dry whole air sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoderick, George C; Hall, Bradley D; Harth, Christina M; Kim, Jin Seog; Lee, Jeongsoon; Montzka, Stephen A; Mühle, Jens; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin K; Weiss, Ray F

    The growing awareness of climate change/global warming, and continuing concerns regarding stratospheric ozone depletion, will require continued measurements and standards for many compounds, in particular halocarbons that are linked to these issues. In order to track atmospheric mole fractions and assess the impact of policy on emission rates, it is necessary to demonstrate measurement equivalence at the highest levels of accuracy for assigned values of standards. Precise measurements of these species aid in determining small changes in their atmospheric abundance. A common source of standards/scales and/or well-documented agreement of different scales used to calibrate the measurement instrumentation are key to understanding many sets of data reported by researchers. This report describes the results of a comparison study among National Metrology Institutes and atmospheric research laboratories for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11), and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113); the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b); and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), all in a dried whole air sample. The objective of this study is to compare calibration standards/scales and the measurement capabilities of the participants for these halocarbons at trace atmospheric levels. The results of this study show agreement among four independent calibration scales to better than 2.5% in almost all cases, with many of the reported agreements being better than 1.0%.

  15. Final report on international comparison CCQM-K83: Halocarbons in dry whole air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoderick, George; Guenther, Franklin; Duewer, David; Lee, Jeongsoon; Moon, Dongmin; Lee, Jinbok; Lim, Jeongsik; Seog Kim, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The growing awareness of climate change/global warming and continuing concerns regarding stratospheric ozone depletion will require future measurements and standards for many compounds, in particular halocarbons that are linked to these issues. In order to track and control the emissions of these species globally in the atmosphere, it is necessary to demonstrate measurement equivalence at the highest levels of accuracy for assigned values of standards. This report describes the results of a key comparison for several of the more important halocarbons at atmospheric concentration levels. The comparison includes the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC 12), trichlorofluoromethane (CFC 11), and 1,1,2 trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC 113); the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC 22) and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC 142b); and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane (HFC 134a), all in a dried whole air sample. The objective of this key comparison is to compare the measurement capabilities of the participants for these halocarbons at trace atmospheric levels. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. Comparison of halocarbon measurements in an atmospheric dry whole air sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C. Rhoderick

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growing awareness of climate change/global warming, and continuing concerns regarding stratospheric ozone depletion, will require continued measurements and standards for many compounds, in particular halocarbons that are linked to these issues. In order to track atmospheric mole fractions and assess the impact of policy on emission rates, it is necessary to demonstrate measurement equivalence at the highest levels of accuracy for assigned values of standards. Precise measurements of these species aid in determining small changes in their atmospheric abundance. A common source of standards/scales and/or well-documented agreement of different scales used to calibrate the measurement instrumentation are key to understanding many sets of data reported by researchers. This report describes the results of a comparison study among National Metrology Institutes and atmospheric research laboratories for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12, trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11, and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113; the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22 and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b; and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a, all in a dried whole air sample. The objective of this study is to compare calibration standards/scales and the measurement capabilities of the participants for these halocarbons at trace atmospheric levels. The results of this study show agreement among four independent calibration scales to better than 2.5% in almost all cases, with many of the reported agreements being better than 1.0%.

  17. Comparison of halocarbon measurements in an atmospheric dry whole air sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Bradley D.; Harth, Christina M.; Kim, Jin Seog; Lee, Jeongsoon; Montzka, Stephen A.; Mühle, Jens; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin K.; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-01-01

    The growing awareness of climate change/global warming, and continuing concerns regarding stratospheric ozone depletion, will require continued measurements and standards for many compounds, in particular halocarbons that are linked to these issues. In order to track atmospheric mole fractions and assess the impact of policy on emission rates, it is necessary to demonstrate measurement equivalence at the highest levels of accuracy for assigned values of standards. Precise measurements of these species aid in determining small changes in their atmospheric abundance. A common source of standards/scales and/or well-documented agreement of different scales used to calibrate the measurement instrumentation are key to understanding many sets of data reported by researchers. This report describes the results of a comparison study among National Metrology Institutes and atmospheric research laboratories for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11), and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113); the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b); and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), all in a dried whole air sample. The objective of this study is to compare calibration standards/scales and the measurement capabilities of the participants for these halocarbons at trace atmospheric levels. The results of this study show agreement among four independent calibration scales to better than 2.5% in almost all cases, with many of the reported agreements being better than 1.0%. PMID:26753167

  18. The technical viability of alternative blowing agents in polyisocyanurate roof insulation: A cooperative industry/government project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.; Courville, G.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Graves, R.S.; Linkous, R.L.; McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Wendt, R.L.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1993-06-01

    This report is a summary of the cooperative industry/government program to establish the viability of alternative blowing agents to chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The project was initiated in 1989 following two workshops that focused on needed research on thermal insulation blown with substitutes for CFC-11 and CFC-12. The project is directed by a steering committee of representatives of the sponsors and of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the project is to determine if the performance of polyisocyanurate (PIR) roof insulation foam boards blown with alternate agents differs from the performance of boards blown with CFC-1. This report describes apparent thermal conductivity (k) results obtained from field and laboratory tests from 1989 to 1992 on a set of experimental PIR laminate boardstock produced to evaluate the viability of alternative hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as blowing agents. All boardstock was manufactured from similar formulations that were not optimized for thermal performance. Commercial broadstock made in the future may differ in performance from this set. The PIR boards were prepared with CFC-11, HCFC-123, HCFC-141b, and 50/50 and 65/35 blends of HCFC-123/HCFC-141b.

  19. Montreal Protocol meeting looks to speed up phaseout of ozone depleters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotman, D.; Chynoweth, E.

    1992-01-01

    Delegates from around the world are meeting in Copenhagen this week to debate an accelerated phaseout of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), a time schedule for the eventual phaseout of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and phaseouts of methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. The fate of methyl bromide will also be a hot issue. The fourth meeting of the parties to the Montreal Protocol is widely expected to put through a 100% CFC phaseout by Jan. 1, 1996, coming into agreement with current US and European Community rules. But debate continues over the intermediate phaseout schedule, with European members pushing for an 85% reduction - from a 1986 baseline - by Jan. 1, 1994, and others arguing for a 70% cut by 1994. Delegates are expected to agree to the final phaseout of halons on Jan. 1, 1996, with an 85% cut in carbon tet by 1995. The meeting is also expected to broadly agree on a Jan. 1, 1996 phaseout of methyl chloroform, with a 50% reduction from a 1989 baseline by Jan. 1, 1994. A critical debate for chemical producers will be on the fate of methyl bromide. Many observers expect some phaseout for the chemical, but when and how is undetermined

  20. Projections of global emissions of fluorinated greenhouse gases in 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschrey, Barbara; Schwarz, Winfried [Oeko-Recherche Buero fuer Umweltforschung und -beratung GmbH, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Emissions of fluorinated greenhouse gases are currently covered under the Montreal Protocol, which focuses on ozone-depleting substances such as CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) and HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons), and under the Kyoto Protocol, which controls emissions of HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons), PFCs (perfluorocarbons) and SF{sub 6} (sulfur hexafluoride). This study bridges the gap between political regimes and their reporting systems by giving an overview of banks and emissions of all fluorinated gases in 2005, and projections of banks and emissions of fluorinated gases in 2050. The Montreal Protocol and its amendments will eventually result in the full phase out of CFCs and HCFCs. Developed countries have already completed the phase out of CFCs and will reach full phase out of HCFCs by 2020. Developing countries, in contrast, will phase out CFCs by 2010 and HCFCs by 2030. Although climate-friendly technology is available for most applications, the risk occurs that substitutes for ozone-depleting substances rely on HFCs, which cause global warming. This study determines global emissions of HFCs, PFCs and SF{sub 6} (Kyoto F-gases) in 2050 in a ''business-as-usual'' scenario. The global population is expected to increase to ca. 8.7 billion people, and high economic growth of 3.5% per year is assumed. Emissions in 2050 are quantified for each sector of application as well as for developed and developing countries based on growth rates of each sector. In 2050, total global emissions of fluorinated greenhouse gases are projected to amount to 4 GT CO{sub 2} eq. which equals ca. 5.9% of the total greenhouse gas emissions at this time. Compared to a relatively small share of F-gas emissions ranging around 1.3% of total greenhouse gas emissions in 2004, this percentage reflects an enormous increase. Relative to projected direct CO{sub 2} emissions alone, the 2050 F-gas emissions will even account for ca. 7.9%. In case of CO{sub 2} mitigation, this share

  1. Exploring Hydrofluorocarbons as Groundwater Age Tracers (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, K. B.; Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L. N.; Casile, G.; Sanford, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater dating tracers are an essential tool for analyzing hydrologic conditions in groundwater systems. Commonly used tracers for dating post-1940's groundwater include sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), 3H-3He, and other isotopic tracers (85Kr, δ2H and δ18O isotopes, etc.). Each tracer carries a corresponding set of advantages and limitations imposed by field, analytical, and interpretive methods. Increasing the number available tracers is appealing, particularly if they possess inert chemical properties and unique temporal emission histories from other tracers. Atmospherically derived halogenated trace gases continue to hold untapped potential for new tracers, as they are generally inert and their emission histories are well documented. SF5CF3, and CFC-13 were previously shown to have application as dating tracers, though their low mixing ratios and low solubility require large amounts of water to be degassed for their quantification. Two related groups of compounds, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are hypothesized to be potential age tracers, having similar mixing ratios to the CFCs and relatively high solubility. However, these compounds yield gas chromatography electron capture detector (GC-ECD) responses that are 10-2 -10-5 less than CFC-12, making purge and trap or field stripping GC-ECD approaches impractical. Therefore, in order to use dissolved HCFCs and HFCs as age tracers, different approaches are needed. To solve this problem, we developed an analytical method that uses an atomic emission detector (GC-AED) in place of an ECD to detect fluorinated compounds. In contrast to the ECD, the AED is a universally sensitive, highly linear, elementally specific detector. The new GC-AED system is being used to measure chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), and other fluorinated compounds in one liter water samples to study their potential as age dating tracers. HCFC-22 is a

  2. Compliance with the Clean Air Act Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program requirements at U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, M.P.; Atkins, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program of the Clean Air Act (CAA) requires promulgation of regulations to reduce and prevent damage to the earth's protective ozone layer. Regulations pursuant to Title VI of the CAA are promulgated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at Title 40 CFR, Part 822. The regulations include ambitious production phaseout schedules for ozone depleting substances (ODS) including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform under 40 CFR 82, Subpart A. The regulations also include requirements for recycling and emissions reduction during the servicing of refrigeration equipment and technician certification requirements under Subpart F; provisions for servicing of motor vehicle air conditioners under Subpart B; a ban on nonessential products containing Class 1 ODS under Subpart C; restrictions on Federal procurement of ODS under Subpart D; labeling of products using ODS under Subpart E; and the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program under Subpart G. This paper will provide details of initiatives undertaken at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program. The Stratospheric Ozone Protection Plans include internal DOE requirements for: (1) maintenance of ODS inventories; (2) ODS procurement practices; (3) servicing of refrigeration and air conditioning equipment; (4) required equipment modifications or replacement; (5) technician certification training; (6) labeling of products containing ODS; (7) substitution of chlorinated solvents; and (8) replacement of halon fire protection systems. The plans also require establishment of administrative control systems which assure that compliance is achieved and maintained as the regulations continue to develop and become effective

  3. Simple gases to replace non-environmentally friendly polymer foaming agents. A thermodynamic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolier, Jean-Pierre E.; Randzio, Stanislaw L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The PVT-vibrating wire technique and PVT-scanning transitiometry. ► Polymer swelling with measured gas sorption and gas–polymer interaction energies. ► Experimental measurements up to 373 K and 100 MPa. ► Hydrostatic and plasticization effects under high pressure gas and induced T g -shifts. ► Thermodynamic study of the (gas + polymer) systems polystyrene with CO 2 , N 2 , and freons. - Abstract: Foaming constitutes one of the most important industrial activities in polymer engineering to produce efficient thermal insulating materials. In particular, rigid insulating boards are produced worldwide on a large scale using blowing agents which eventually are released in the environment where they adversely impact the natural friendly stratospheric ozone layer. Concomitantly, the chemicals used as blowing agents contribute to the creation of the unfriendly tropospheric ozone layer generating the disastrous green house effect around our planet. The traditional foaming intermediates currently named freons, like chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) currently used as blowing agents as well as the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) often considered as alternative blowing agents, must be banned from industrial processes and new (friendly) foaming agents have to be suggested and evaluated in terms of both easy engineering and environmental neutrality. Undoubtedly thermodynamics plays a major role in assessing the effective capability of those chemicals. Some CFCs still accepted and other possible simple gases like carbon dioxide and nitrogen have been considered. The in-depth thermodynamic investigation has been made possible thanks to new experimental developments to determine gas solubility in polymers and associated swelling as well as the thermodynamic properties of (gas + polymer) systems, including the thermophysical properties of polymers under gas sorption. Pertinent data have been generated for such properties over extended T and p ranges.

  4. History of chemically and radiatively important atmospheric gases from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Prinn

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the organization, instrumentation, datasets, data interpretation, modeling, and accomplishments of the multinational global atmospheric measurement program AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment. AGAGE is distinguished by its capability to measure globally, at high frequency, and at multiple sites all the important species in the Montreal Protocol and all the important non-carbon-dioxide (non-CO2 gases assessed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (CO2 is also measured at several sites. The scientific objectives of AGAGE are important in furthering our understanding of global chemical and climatic phenomena. They are the following: (1 to accurately measure the temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic gases that contribute the majority of reactive halogen to the stratosphere and/or are strong infrared absorbers (chlorocarbons, chlorofluorocarbons – CFCs, bromocarbons, hydrochlorofluorocarbons – HCFCs, hydrofluorocarbons – HFCs and polyfluorinated compounds (perfluorocarbons – PFCs, nitrogen trifluoride – NF3, sulfuryl fluoride – SO2F2, and sulfur hexafluoride – SF6 and use these measurements to determine the global rates of their emission and/or destruction (i.e., lifetimes; (2 to accurately measure the global distributions and temporal behaviors and determine the sources and sinks of non-CO2 biogenic–anthropogenic gases important to climate change and/or ozone depletion (methane – CH4, nitrous oxide – N2O, carbon monoxide – CO, molecular hydrogen – H2, methyl chloride – CH3Cl, and methyl bromide – CH3Br; (3 to identify new long-lived greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases (e.g., SO2F2, NF3, heavy PFCs (C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16, and C8F18 and hydrofluoroolefins (HFOs; e.g., CH2  =  CFCF3 have been identified in AGAGE, initiate the real-time monitoring of these new gases, and reconstruct their past histories from AGAGE, air archive, and firn air measurements; (4

  5. Global and regional emissions estimates of 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a, CH3CHF2) from in situ and air archive observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, P. G.; Rigby, M.; Manning, A. J.; Lunt, M. F.; O'Doherty, S.; McCulloch, A.; Fraser, P. J.; Henne, S.; Vollmer, M. K.; Mühle, J.; Weiss, R. F.; Salameh, P. K.; Young, D.; Reimann, S.; Wenger, A.; Arnold, T.; Harth, C. M.; Krummel, P. B.; Steele, L. P.; Dunse, B. L.; Miller, B. R.; Lunder, C. R.; Hermansen, O.; Schmidbauer, N.; Saito, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Park, S.; Li, S.; Yao, B.; Zhou, L. X.; Arduini, J.; Maione, M.; Wang, R. H. J.; Ivy, D.; Prinn, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    High frequency, in situ observations from 11 globally distributed sites for the period 1994-2014 and archived air measurements dating from 1978 onward have been used to determine the global growth rate of 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a, CH3CHF2). These observations have been combined with a range of atmospheric transport models to derive global emission estimates in a top-down approach. HFC-152a is a greenhouse gas with a short atmospheric lifetime of about 1.5 years. Since it does not contain chlorine or bromine, HFC-152a makes no direct contribution to the destruction of stratospheric ozone and is therefore used as a substitute for the ozone depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). The concentration of HFC-152a has grown substantially since the first direct measurements in 1994, reaching a maximum annual global growth rate of 0.84 ± 0.05 ppt yr-1 in 2006, implying a substantial increase in emissions up to 2006. However, since 2007, the annual rate of growth has slowed to 0.38 ± 0.04 ppt yr-1 in 2010 with a further decline to an annual average rate of growth in 2013-2014 of -0.06 ± 0.05 ppt yr-1. The annual average Northern Hemisphere (NH) mole fraction in 1994 was 1.2 ppt rising to an annual average mole fraction of 10.1 ppt in 2014. Average annual mole fractions in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) in 1998 and 2014 were 0.84 and 4.5 ppt, respectively. We estimate global emissions of HFC-152a have risen from 7.3 ± 5.6 Gg yr-1 in 1994 to a maximum of 54.4 ± 17.1 Gg yr-1 in 2011, declining to 52.5 ± 20.1 Gg yr-1 in 2014 or 7.2 ± 2.8 Tg-CO2 eq yr-1. Analysis of mole fraction enhancements above regional background atmospheric levels suggests substantial emissions from North America, Asia, and Europe. Global HFC emissions (so called "bottom up" emissions) reported by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are based on cumulative national emission data reported to the UNFCCC, which in turn are based on

  6. First retrievals of HCFC-142b from ground-based high-resolution FTIR solar observations: application to high-altitude Jungfraujoch spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Emmanuel; O'Doherty, Simon; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin; Bader, Whitney; Bovy, Benoît; Lejeune, Bernard; Demoulin, Philippe; Roland, Ginette; Servais, Christian; Zander, Rodolphe

    2013-04-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are the first substitutes to the long-lived ozone depleting halocarbons, in particular the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Given the complete ban of the CFCs by the Montreal Protocol, its Amendments and Adjustments, HCFCs are on the rise, with current rates of increase substantially larger than at the beginning of the 21st century. HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2) is presently the second most abundant HCFCs, after HCFC-22 (CHClF2). It is used in a wide range of applications, including as a blowing foam agent, in refrigeration and air-conditioning. Its concentration will soon reach 25 ppt in the northern hemisphere, with mixing ratios increasing at about 1.1 ppt/yr [Montzka et al., 2011]. The HCFC-142b lifetime is estimated at 18 years. With a global warming potential of 2310 on a 100-yr horizon, this species is also a potent greenhouse gas [Forster et al., 2007]. First space-based retrievals of HCFC-142b have been reported by Dufour et al. [2005]. 17 occultations recorded in 2004 by the Canadian ACE-FTS instrument (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier Transform Spectrometer, onboard SCISAT-1) were analyzed, using two microwindows (1132.5-1135.5 and 1191.5-1195.5 cm-1). In 2009, Rinsland et al. determined the HCFC-142b trend near the tropopause, from the analysis of ACE-FTS observations recorded over the 2004-2008 time period. The spectral region used in this study extended from 903 to 905.5 cm-1. In this contribution, we will present the first HCFC-142b measurements from ground-based high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) solar spectra. We use observations recorded at the high altitude station of the Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8°E, 3580 m asl), with a Bruker 120HR instrument, in the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, visit http://www.ndacc.org). The retrieval of HCFC-142b is very challenging, with simulations indicating only weak absorptions, lower than 1% for low sun spectra and current

  7. Hollow-Core FRP–Concrete–Steel Bridge Columns under Torsional Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujith Anumolu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the behavior of hollow-core fiber-reinforced polymer–concrete–steel (HC-FCS columns under cyclic torsional loading combined with constant axial load. The HC-FCS consists of an outer fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP tube and an inner steel tube, with a concrete shell sandwiched between the two tubes. The FRP tube was stopped at the surface of the footing, and provided confinement to the concrete shell from the outer direction. The steel tube was embedded into the footing to a length of 1.8 times the diameter of the steel tube. The longitudinal and transversal reinforcements of the column were provided by the steel tube only. A large-scale HC-FCS column with a diameter of 24 in. (610 mm and applied load height of 96 in. (2438 mm with an aspect ratio of four was investigated during this study. The study revealed that the torsional behavior of the HC-FCS column mainly depended on the stiffness of the steel tube and the interactions among the column components (concrete shell, steel tube, and FRP tube. A brief comparison of torsional behavior was made between the conventional reinforced concrete columns and the HC-FCS column. The comparison illustrated that both column types showed high initial stiffness under torsional loading. However, the HC-FCS column maintained the torsion strength until a high twist angle, while the conventional reinforced concrete column did not.

  8. Global and regional emissions estimates of 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a, CH3CHF2 from in situ and air archive observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Simmonds

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency, in situ observations from 11 globally distributed sites for the period 1994–2014 and archived air measurements dating from 1978 onward have been used to determine the global growth rate of 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a, CH3CHF2. These observations have been combined with a range of atmospheric transport models to derive global emission estimates in a top-down approach. HFC-152a is a greenhouse gas with a short atmospheric lifetime of about 1.5 years. Since it does not contain chlorine or bromine, HFC-152a makes no direct contribution to the destruction of stratospheric ozone and is therefore used as a substitute for the ozone depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs. The concentration of HFC-152a has grown substantially since the first direct measurements in 1994, reaching a maximum annual global growth rate of 0.84 ± 0.05 ppt yr−1 in 2006, implying a substantial increase in emissions up to 2006. However, since 2007, the annual rate of growth has slowed to 0.38 ± 0.04 ppt yr−1 in 2010 with a further decline to an annual average rate of growth in 2013–2014 of −0.06 ± 0.05 ppt yr−1. The annual average Northern Hemisphere (NH mole fraction in 1994 was 1.2 ppt rising to an annual average mole fraction of 10.1 ppt in 2014. Average annual mole fractions in the Southern Hemisphere (SH in 1998 and 2014 were 0.84 and 4.5 ppt, respectively. We estimate global emissions of HFC-152a have risen from 7.3 ± 5.6 Gg yr−1 in 1994 to a maximum of 54.4 ± 17.1 Gg yr−1 in 2011, declining to 52.5 ± 20.1 Gg yr−1 in 2014 or 7.2 ± 2.8 Tg-CO2 eq yr−1. Analysis of mole fraction enhancements above regional background atmospheric levels suggests substantial emissions from North America, Asia, and Europe. Global HFC emissions (so called “bottom up” emissions reported by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC

  9. Methane oxidation and degradation of organic compounds in landfill soil covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    High rates of methane oxidation and degradation of the lowed halogenated methanes (TCM and DCM) and HCFCs (HCFC-21 and HCFC-22) were found in an investigation of the oxidation of methane and halogenated organic compunds (HOCs) in landfill gas affected soil. The degradation followed zero-order kin......High rates of methane oxidation and degradation of the lowed halogenated methanes (TCM and DCM) and HCFCs (HCFC-21 and HCFC-22) were found in an investigation of the oxidation of methane and halogenated organic compunds (HOCs) in landfill gas affected soil. The degradation followed zero...

  10. Dynamic and Static Behavior of Hollow-Core FRP-Concrete-Steel and Reinforced Concrete Bridge Columns under Vehicle Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar I. Abdelkarim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the difference in behavior between hollow-core fiber reinforced polymer-concrete-steel (HC-FCS columns and conventional reinforced concrete (RC columns under vehicle collision in terms of dynamic and static forces. The HC-FCS column consisted of an outer FRP tube, an inner steel tube, and a concrete shell sandwiched between the two tubes. The steel tube was hollow inside and embedded into the concrete footing with a length of 1.5 times the tube diameter while the FRP tube stopped at the top of footing. The RC column had a solid cross-section. The study was conducted through extensive finite element impact analyses using LS-DYNA software. Nine parameters were studied including the concrete material model, unconfined concrete compressive strength, material strain rate, column height-to-diameter ratio, column diameter, column top boundary condition, axial load level, vehicle velocity, and vehicle mass. Generally, the HC-FCS columns had lower dynamic forces and higher static forces than the RC columns when changing the values of the different parameters. During vehicle collision with either the RC or the HC-FCS columns, the imposed dynamic forces and their equivalent static forces were affected mainly by the vehicle velocity and vehicle mass.

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF CFC AND HCFC SUBSTITUTES FOR BLOWING POLYURETHANE FOAM INSULATION PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a cooperative effort to identiry chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbon substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. The substantial ongoing effort is identifying third-generation blowing agets for polyurethane foams to repla...

  12. THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF SELECTED HFC REFRIGERANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants are possible alternatives to replace ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbon and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigerants. The flammability of a proposed new refrigerant is a major consideration in assessing its utility for a particular applicat...

  13. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF PIC FORMATION IN CFC INCINERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of the collection of combustion emission characterization data from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) incineration. A bench scale test program to provide emission characterization data from CFC incineration was developed and performed, with emphasis on the format...

  14. Global Climate Change and Body Functions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chigo Okwuosa

    oxides, ozone and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Human beings ... build fires, cook their food, clothe themselves and use numerous ... storage tank leakage release, like hydrocarbons, heavy metals, MTBE, herbicides, pesticides and chlorinated ...

  15. Dynamics and transport in the stratosphere : Simulations with a general circulation mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalst, M.K. (Maarten Krispijn) van

    2005-01-01

    The middle atmosphere is strongly affected by two of the world's most important environmental problems: global climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion, caused by anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), respectively. General circulation models with

  16. Development of a youth elixir; La mise en oeuvre d`un elixir de jouvence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This short paper presents a new refrigerant developed by Quiri Refrigeration company in collaboration with Electricite de France (EdF), which can replace the no-longer produced R-12 CFC. This substitute, called `youth elixir` is a mixture of HCFCs and has similar physical characteristics, is compatible with the R-12 and can be used in a similar pressure range. Its use requires to modify the existing installation but with a reasonable cost. (J.S.)

  17. Ammonia-a refrigerant in the past and present, more and more in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciconkov, Risto; Lindborg, Anders

    2000-01-01

    The harmful influence on the global climate of CFCs (R11, R12, R502) and HCFCs (R22) refrigerants causes the depletion of the stratospheric ozone and the greenhouse effect. The international activity for the phase-out of the ozone depletion substances (ODSS) is the Montreal Protocol. The alternative refrigerants on the market are natural working fluids: ammonia, hydrocarbons (HCs), carbon dioxide, water and air. HFCs are for some applications the alternatives for CFC/HCFCs and have no ozone depletion (ODP=O), but the HFCs are greenhouse gases and have GWP and are regulated in the Kyoto Protocol. Ammonia has been in use for more than 125 years. The advantages of ammonia are excellent thermodynamic and heat transport properties, but ammonia is regarded as toxic and flammable. The ammonia refrigerating systems are liable under codes and standards, which shall be followed. With better knowledge and understanding, good practice and right comprehension of people involved in ammonia refrigeration, this refrigerant is a winner. There are many research projects and activities in order to widen the use of ammonia in the applications where CFC/HCFCs were used in the past. Regarding to this trend, it is a paradoxical situation in Macedonia and other developing countries where ammonia systems of cold stores, diaries, breweries and food processing go out of use. (Author)

  18. Strengthening the Montreal Protocol: Does it cool down the greenhouse?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Elzen, M.G.J.; Swart, R.J.; Rotmans, J.

    1992-01-01

    Strengthening of the Montreal Protocol is recently being negotiated in London in 1990 in order to achieve further reductions of the regulated CFCs and to include possibly more substances. The implications of different policies with respect to control of ozone depleting substances for climate change are analysed, including the proposed substitution by HCFCs and HFCs, carbon tetrachloride and methylchloroform. A special halocarbon module was developed within the framework of RIVM's Integrated Model to Assess the Greenhouse Effect (IMAGE). IMAGE is a parametrized science based policy model and has been developed to give policy agencies a concise overview of the quantitative aspects of the greenhouse problem, to evaluate various policy options concerning climate change and to serve as a means of communication. It is concluded, from simulations with the halocarbon module, that it is of primary importance to achieve a further reduction of the regulated CFCs compared to the Montreal Protocol with compliance by as many countries as possible. From the perspective of the greenhouse effect the inclusion of longer lived halocarbons, such as carbon tetrachloride and HCFC-22 in the protocol come second. The application of methylchloroform, halons and HCFCs and HFCs with lower global warming potentials (GWPs) than HCFC-22 contributes only marginally to the greenhouse effect in comparison with the much more important greenhouse gases carbon dioxide, methane, ozone and nitrous oxide. Especially if further growth of the total production of HCFCs after complete replacement of the present CFCs can be avoided by using these alternatives with a lower GWP, these substances could therefore be tolerated in a transition period, from the perspective of global warming. 13 figs., 3 tabs., 29 refs

  19. Substituting HCFC-22 for HFC-410A: an environmental impact trade-off between the ozone depletion and climate change regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Fang, X.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    After the phase-out of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as ozone-depleting substances pursuant to the requirements of the Montreal Protocol, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are worldwide used as substitutes although the bulk of them are potent greenhouse gases (GHGs). Therefore, the alternation may bring side effect on global climate change. The trade-off of its environmental impacts between the ozone depletion and climate change regimes necessitates a quantification of the past and future consumption and emissions of both the original HCFCs and their alternative HFCs. Now a dilemma arise in China's RAC industry that HCFC-22, which has an ozone-depleting potential (ODP) of 0.055, has been replaced by HFC-410A, which is a blended potent GHG from respective 50% HFC-32 and HFC-125 with a global warming potential (GWP) of 1923.5. Here, we present our results of estimates of consumption and emissions of HCFC-22 and HFC-410A from 1994 to 2050. Historic emissions of HCFC-22 contributed to global total HCFCs by 4.0% (3.0%-5.6%) ODP-weighted. Projection under a baseline scenario shows future accumulative emissions of HFC-410A make up 5.9%-11.0% of global GWP-weighted HFCs emissions, and its annual contribution to national overall CO2 emissions can be 5.5% in 2050. This makes HCFC-22 and HFC-410A emissions of significant importance in ozone depletion and climate change regimes. Two mitigation scenarios were set to assess the mitigation performance under the North America Proposal and an accelerated schedule. In practice of international environmental agreement, "alternative to alternative" should be developed to avoid regrettable alternations.

  20. Destruction of organochlorated compounds and CFCs by catalytic hydrodechloration; Destruccion de compuestos organoclorados y CFCs mediante hidrodecloracion catalitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez Garcia, S.; Sastre Andres, H.; Diez Sanz, F. V.

    1998-12-01

    The destruction of organohalogenated compounds ( for example chlorinated solvents, PCBs and CFCs) is a very serious environmental problems. Catalytic hydrodechlorination has shown to be potentially efficient method for the destruction of these compounds. In this technique the halogenated compound reacts with hydrogen, tielding a non-chlorinated compound (environmentally harmless) and hydrogen-chloride. In this article, different set-ups and catalysts employed in the catalytic hydrogechlorination were described. Finally, some applications of this technique to the treatment of industrial effluents, such as the destruction of chlorinated solvents (as trichloroethylene o tetrachloromethane), conversion of CFCs into HCFCs, destruction of PCBs and treatment of water polluted with chlorinated pesticides. (Author) 28 refs.

  1. HEAT TRANSFER EVALUATION OF HFC-236FA IN CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the shell-side heat transfer performance of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)-236fa, which is considered to be a potential substitute for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-114 in Navy shipboard chillers, for both conventional finned [1024- and 1575-fpm (...

  2. HEAT TRANSFER EVALUATION OF HFC-236EA AND CFC-114 IN CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a heat transfer evaluation of the refrigerants hexafluoropropane (HFC-236ea) and 1,1,2,2-dichloro-tetrafluoroethane (CFC-114). (NOTE: With the mandatory phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), as dictated by the Montreal Protocol and Clean Air Act Ame...

  3. Anthropogenous modifications of the atmosphere. The atmospheric ozone threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aimedieu, P.

    1991-01-01

    Ozone role and atmospheric chemistry are first reviewed: chemical reactions and vertical distribution of ozone in the atmosphere. The origins of chlorofluorocarbon air pollution and the role of the various types of CFC on ozone depletion, greenhouse effect, cancer, etc. are then discussed. The political and environmental discussions concerning these phenomena are also reviewed

  4. The energy challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter addresses the challenge of switching US energy dependency from fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy for economic and environmental reasons. The topics discussed include the role of fossil fuels in the US economy, the role of chlorofluorocarbons and fossil fuel combustion on the greenhouse effect, energy choices, and the role of energy efficiency and nuclear energy

  5. 78 FR 24997 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Listing of Substitutes for Ozone-Depleting Substances-Fire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    ... available for products and manufacturing processes which use class I and II substances. B. Regulatory... (chlorofluorocarbon, halon, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform, and hydrobromofluorocarbon) or class II... substitute to replace a class I substance or class II substance in one of the eight major industrial use...

  6. Melanoma continues to rise throughout the world

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    depletion of the earth's ozone layer, thought to be induced by artificial chlorofluorocarbons, and the subsequent increase in the amount of ultraviolet light reaching the earth, may exacerbate the increase in melanoma in ... development of raised areas on a previously flat lesion, or scaling, ulceration, crusting or bleeding.

  7. 16 CFR 1401.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 1401.3 Section 1401.3... TECHNICAL DATA § 1401.3 Definitions. For the purposes of this part 1401: (a) Chlorofluorocarbon means any... product across state lines from a contract filler to the marketer of the product would not constitute...

  8. 21 CFR 701.30 - Ingredient names established for cosmetic ingredient labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-dichloro-1, 1, 2, 2-tetrafluoroethane CClF2CClF2 Chlorofluorocarbon 114. 1-Chloro-1, 1-difluoroethane CH3CClF2 Hydrochlorofluorocarbon 142 B. 1, 1-difluoroethane CH3CHF2 Hydrofluorocarbon 152 A. Ethyl ester...

  9. 76 FR 28707 - Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plan Revisions; Infrastructure Requirements for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... provide it in the body of your comment. If you send an e-mail comment directly to EPA, without going... body of your comment and with any disk or CD-ROM you submit. If EPA cannot read your comment due to...), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), smoke and odors. A summary of the regulations is found below under section 110(a)(2)(C). b...

  10. 78 FR 30830 - Promulgation of State Implementation Plan Revisions; Infrastructure Requirements for the 1997 and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... contact information unless you provide it in the body of your comment. If you send an email comment... information in the body of your comment and with any disk or CD-ROM you submit. If EPA cannot read your... (VOCs), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), smoke and odors. A summary of the regulations which the State...

  11. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chemicals, pesticides, chlorofluorocarbons, etc. on the environment have assumed alarming proportions, especially since the middle of the last century. The fate and behaviour of these chemicals in soil, water and atmosphere with disastrous effects on all living organisms, including humans, became a subject of urgent study ...

  12. Environmental and production rights futures: a new booming market?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, J.M.E.; Meulenberg, M.T.G.

    1996-01-01

    Governments or supranational organizations have begun to introduce environmental rights (such as sulfur dioxide or chlorofluorocarbon rights) and production rights (such as milk and fishery rights) to better link production process costs and results. The authors show that the characteristics of

  13. Human safety and pharmacokinetics of the CFC alternative propellants HFC 134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) and HFC 227 (1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane) following whole-body exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmen, H.H.; Hoogendijk, E.M.G.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, W.A.A.; Muijser, H.; Duistermaat, E.; Ravensberg, J.C.; Alexander, D.J.; Borkhataria, D.; Rusch, G.M.; Schmit, B.

    2000-01-01

    HFC 134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) and HFC 227 (1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane) are used to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in refrigerant and aerosol applications, including medical use in metered-dose inhalers. Production and consumption of CFCs are being phased out under the Montreal

  14. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Use of organic refrigerants such as Hydrochlorofluorocarbons and Chlorofluorocarbons have been criticized for their adverse impact on the Earth's protective ozone layer and for their significant global warming potential (GWP). CO2 has been receiving great concern as an alternative refrigerant. Cascade refrigeration ...

  15. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF PIC FORMATION DURING CFC INCINERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of experiments to assess: (1) the effect of residual copper retained in an incineration facility on polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/PCDF) formation during incineration of non-copper-containing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); and (2) th...

  16. Situation and perspectives in refrigerating and air-conditioning. The point of view of Elf Atochem; Situation et perspectives en refrigeration et air conditionne. Point de vue d`Elf Atochem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This paper is a series of transparencies which explains the engagements of Elf Atochem company in the replacement of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs): development of HFCs, production of FORANE, safety and environmental criteria, main refrigerants and their application in new installations, perspectives in reconversion, replacement of R-22, CFC-12 and R-502 fluids with respect to their applications. (J.S.)

  17. Global Warming: How Much and Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanouette, William

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the history of the study of global warming and includes a discussion of the role of gases, like carbon dioxide, methane, and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). Discusses modern research on the global warming, including computer modelling and the super-greenhouse effect. (YP)

  18. Decline of deep and bottom water ventilation and slowing down of anthropogenic carbon storage in the Weddell Sea, 1984-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huhn, Oliver; Rhein, Monika; Hoppema, Mario; van Heuven, Steven

    We use a 27 year long time series of repeated transient tracer observations to investigate the evolution of the ventilation time scales and the related content of anthropogenic carbon (C-ant) in deep and bottom water in the Weddell Sea. This time series consists of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)

  19. Environmental Security: What Environmental Issues Impact Regional Stability and Affect United States Foreign Policy with Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    extraregional sponsor of Alianza para el Desarrollo Sostenible (Sustainable Development Alliance - ALIDES), along with United States and Canada. ALIDES is...more stable the government the better the country will be able to solve its environmental problems. 42 Glossary ALIDES Alianza para el Desarrollo ... Sostenible (Sustainable Development Alliance) C Centigrade CFCs Chlorofluorocarbons BECC Border Environment Cooperation Commission BNC Binational

  20. MODELING AND DESIGN STUDY USING HFC-236EA AS AN ALTERNATIVE REFRIGERANT IN A CENTRIFUGAL COMPRESSOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an investigation of the operation of a centrifugal compressor--part of a chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-114 chiller installation--with the new refrigerant hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)-236ea, a proposed alternative to CFC-114. A large set of CFC-236ea operating da...

  1. Cover Image, Volume 117, Issue 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Franca E S C Viegas, Luis Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Hydrofluoropolyethers are seen as promising environmental friendly third-generation Chlorofluorocarbon replacements in countless applications, with their importance increasing after the ratification of the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol. In e25381, Viegas presents a DFT/M08-HX benchmark...

  2. (H)-FCKW foamed insulating materials in the building industry in Germany. Estimation of the potential emissions up to the year 2010; (H)-FCKW-geschaeumte Daemmstoffe im Bauwesen in Deutschland. Schaetzung der potentiellen Emissionen bis zum Jahr 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obernosterer, Richard [Ressourcen Management Agentur GmbH, Villach (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    CFCs and HCFCs are controlled substances under European Regulation (EC) No. 1005/2009. Article 22 of that Regulation provides that controlled substances contained in certain products (e.g. insulating materials) must be recovered, if technically and economically feasible, or be destroyed without prior recovery. Annex VII lists specific technologies for destruction, recycling or reclamation. In Germany, the use of (H)CFCs in insulating materials has been prohibited since 1995 (R 11 and R 12) and 2000 (R 22). At European level, use of HCFCs (141b and 142b) has been banned since 2002 mainly in the production of extruded polystyrene rigid foam and since 2003 in the production of polyurethane foams. Few data have become available to date on the amounts of (H)CFCs produced and banked up to the time the prohibitions went into effect. The present report therefore provides details on the amounts of (H)CFC-containing insulating materials installed in Germany and estimates the quantities of (H)CFCs still present in them. The study focuses on rigid XPS foam and rigid PU foam used in the construction sector, due to the original objective of the study and the quantitative significance of these foams. XPS insulating foams: XPS panels were assumed to have an average density of 33 kg/m3. Based on annual foam use (volume), density, the market shares of the blowing agents, and blowing agent content in the foam, the annual increase in banked amounts of blowing agents was estimated. Annual fugitive losses were deducted from those banks, specific to the relevant products and blowing agents. As result a bank of approximately 43.7 kt or 15 000 t-ODP was estimated for Germany in 2009. PU insulating foams: Based on annual foam use (volume), density (assumed to be 41 kg/m3 for PU sandwich panels and 33 kg/m3 for other PU products), the market shares of the blowing agents, and blowing agent content in the foam, the annual increase in banked amounts of blowing agents was estimated. Annual

  3. Chlorine in the stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    VON CLARMANN, T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the various aspects of chlorine compounds in the stratosphere, both their roles as reactants and as tracers of dynamical processes. In the stratosphere, reactive chlorine is released from chlorofluorocarbons and other chlorine-containing organic source gases. To a large extent reactive chlorine is then sequestered in reservoir species ClONO2 and HCl. Re-activation of chlorine happens predominantly in polar winter vortices by heterogeneous reaction in combination with sunlig...

  4. Future concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases CO2, CFC and CH4 - an assessment on the educational level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppenau, S.

    1992-01-01

    A model on the educational level is described to estimate effective future atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. The effects of chlorofluorocarbon and methane emission and deforestation are taken into account. The influence of different emission scenarios on the time evolution of greenhouse-gas concentration are illustrated. Future global energy policies are discussed both under the aspects of rising world population and the reduction in global CO 2 emissions. The model can be handled on a PC or even on a pocket calculator

  5. DoD Sustainability Application Guide for Historic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    that are not scheduled for re- coating. • Use natural (plant- or insect-based oils and resins) or water-based stains and varnishes . When...as ingredients in the manufacture of the product. Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) – A non-toxic compound made up of the elements chlorine, fluorine , and...land that has not been impacted by human activity. Halon – Any compound containing carbon and fluorine and/or chlorine which is used as a fire

  6. Water and environment news. No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This issue of the bulletin lists projects in the IAEA's sub-programme D evelopment and Management of Water Resources , presents plan of the IAEA Isotope Hydrology Section for the 1999-2000, reports on the activities of current co-ordinated research projects and technical co-operation projects. This publication also highlights some basic aspects of the measurement of chlorofluorocarbons; the use of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes for investigating past and current climate changes; exploration of geothermal resources in Asia

  7. Spring 2007. Industry Study. Environment Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    clean air and water standards of the US in the 1970s. When scientists recognized that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) used in aerosols and air conditioners ...the Clean Air Act to address GHG emissions from motor vehicles, the Bush Administration has directed the EPA and the Departments of Transportation...Fellow (Japan) Brigadier General Abul Kalam Mohammad Humayun Kabir, PSC , International Fellow (Bangladesh) COL John Kem, US Army Mr. James Kinlaw

  8. Groundwater recharge and flow on Montserrat, West Indies: Insights from groundwater dating

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmings, Brioch; Gooddy, Daren; Whitaker, Fiona; George Darling, W.; Jasim, Alia; Gottsmann, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Study region Montserrat, Lesser Antilles, Caribbean. Study focus Analysis of δ2H and δ18O isotopes, and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) anthropogenic tracers in Montserrat groundwater provides insights into the age and provenance of the spring waters. New hydrological insights δ2H and δ18O analysis indicates uniform recharge elevations for groundwaters on Montserrat. CFC-11 and CFC-12 analysis reveals age differences between isotopically similar, high elevation springs and low eleva...

  9. Surface, core, and structure modifications of phosphorus-containing dendrimers. Influence on the thermal stability

    OpenAIRE

    Turrin , Cédric-Olivier; Maraval , Valérie; Leclaire , Julien; Dantras , Eric; Lacabanne , Colette; Caminade , Anne-Marie; Majoral , Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    International audience; Three new series of phosphorus-containing dendrimers are described. Their solubility depends on the type of end groups they bear. Perfluoroalkyl chains give dendrimers soluble in chlorofluorocarbons, whereas guanidinium and pyridinium derivatives give watersoluble compounds. The thermal stability of these compounds, as well as of 19 other dendrimers of various generations, having various cores, or various end groups, or branching points is studied. The main feature of ...

  10. Selected hydrologic data for the central Virgin River basin area, Washington and Iron counties, Utah, 1915-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkowske, Christopher D.; Heilweil, Victor M.; Wilberg, Dale E.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrologic data were collected in Washington and Iron Counties, Utah, from 1995 to 1997 to better understand the hydrologic system. Data from earlier years also are presented. Data collected from wells include well-completion data, water-level measurements, and physical properties of the water. Data collected from springs and surface-water sites include discharge and physical properties of the water. Selected water samples collected from ground- and surface-water sites were analyzed for isotopes, chlorofluorocarbons, and dissolved gases.

  11. Dynamics and transport in the stratosphere : Simulations with a general circulation mode

    OpenAIRE

    Aalst, M.K. (Maarten Krispijn) van

    2005-01-01

    The middle atmosphere is strongly affected by two of the world's most important environmental problems: global climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion, caused by anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), respectively. General circulation models with coupled chemistry are a key tool to advance our understanding of the complex interplay between dynamics, chemistry and radiation in the middle atmosphere. A key problem of such models is that they generat...

  12. Atmospheric Gas Tracers in Groundwater: Theory, Sampling. Measurement and Interpretation; Yeraltisuyunda Atmosferik Gaz Izleyiciler: Kuram, Oernekleme, Oelcuem ve Yorum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayari, C S [Hacettepe University, Ankara(Turkey)

    2002-07-01

    Some of the atmospheric gasses posses features that are sought in an environmental tracer of hydrogeologic interest. Among these, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hegzafluoride, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform, krypton-85 etc. have found increasing use in groundwater age dating studies during the last ten years. This paper explains the theory of their use as tracer and discusses the major concerns as related to their sampling and analyses. Factors affecting their applicability and the approach to interpret tracer gas data is briefly outlined.

  13. Atmospheric Gas Tracers in Groundwater: Theory, Sampling. Measurement and Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayari, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Some of the atmospheric gasses posses features that are sought in an environmental tracer of hydrogeologic interest. Among these, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hegzafluoride, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform, krypton-85 etc. have found increasing use in groundwater age dating studies during the last ten years. This paper explains the theory of their use as tracer and discusses the major concerns as related to their sampling and analyses. Factors affecting their applicability and the approach to interpret tracer gas data is briefly outlined

  14. Self-Calibrating, Variable-Flow Pumping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1994-01-01

    Pumping system provides accurate, controlled flows of two chemical liquids mixed in spray head and react to form rigid or flexible polyurethane or polyisocyanurate foam. Compatible with currently used polyurethane-based coating materials and gas-bubble-forming agents (called "blowing agents" in industry) and expected to be compatible with materials that used in near future. Handles environmentally acceptable substitutes for chlorofluorocarbon foaming agents.

  15. Abundance and sources of atmospheric halocarbons in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenenberger, Fabian; Henne, Stephan; Hill, Matthias; Vollmer, Martin K.; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; O'Doherty, Simon; Maione, Michela; Emmenegger, Lukas; Peter, Thomas; Reimann, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    A wide range of anthropogenic halocarbons is released to the atmosphere, contributing to stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. Using measurements of atmospheric abundances for the estimation of halocarbon emissions on the global and regional scale has become an important top-down tool for emission validation in the recent past, but many populated and developing areas of the world are only poorly covered by the existing atmospheric halocarbon measurement network. Here we present 6 months of continuous halocarbon observations from Finokalia on the island of Crete in the Eastern Mediterranean. The gases measured are the hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), HFC-134a (CH2FCF3), HFC-125 (CHF2CF3), HFC-152a (CH3CHF2) and HFC-143a (CH3CF3) and the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), HCFC-22 (CHClF2) and HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2). The Eastern Mediterranean is home to 250 million inhabitants, consisting of a number of developed and developing countries, for which different emission regulations exist under the Kyoto and Montreal protocols. Regional emissions of halocarbons were estimated with Lagrangian atmospheric transport simulations and a Bayesian inverse modeling system, using measurements at Finokalia in conjunction with those from Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) sites at Mace Head (Ireland), Jungfraujoch (Switzerland) and Monte Cimone (Italy). Measured peak mole fractions at Finokalia showed generally smaller amplitudes for HFCs than at the European AGAGE sites except for periodic peaks of HFC-152a, indicating strong upwind sources. Higher peak mole fractions were observed for HCFCs, suggesting continued emissions from nearby developing regions such as Egypt and the Middle East. For 2013, the Eastern Mediterranean inverse emission estimates for the four analyzed HFCs and the two HCFCs were 13.9 (11.3-19.3) and 9.5 (6.8-15.1) Tg CO2eq yr-1, respectively. These emissions contributed 16.8 % (13.6-23.3 %) and 53.2 % (38.1-84.2 %) to the total inversion

  16. International symposium on environmental impacts of advanced alternative to CFC; CFC shinki daitai busshitsu no kankyo eikyo ni kansuru kokusai symposium hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-07

    The international symposium on environmental effects of new CFC substitutes was held in Tsukuba City, Ibaraki Pref. on February 7-9, 1996, and 19 papers were made public. In Session 1 (Plenary lecture), reports were made on Global warming and climate change: a review of recent studies; Stratospheric ozone, CFCs, and CFC-substitutes: an update, etc. In Session 2, Measurements of OH rate constants for advanced refrigerants as well as HCFCs and HFCs; The reaction rate of CFC alternatives with OH radical; Experimental and estimated rate constants: reactions of hydroxyl radicals with several halocarbons, etc. In Session 3, Measurement of uptake coefficients of some acetyl halides and fluorinated ethers into water; Mass transfer at the air/water interface: removal processes of halocarbonyl compounds; Heterogeneous reactions of fluorinated ethers on allophane or titanium dioxide, etc. In Session 4, papers were reported on model calculations relating to the global warming.

  17. Adaptation of systems to fluid changes; Adaptation des systemes aux changements de fluides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clodic, D. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    Regulation constraints and the stoppage of CFCs production and HCFCs production in the future lead to rapid evolutions in the conceiving of refrigerating installations which are linked with refrigerant changes. The refrigerant/installation pair has become the aim of detailed analyses in order to understand the relation between the thermodynamical properties of fluids and the energy efficiency of refrigerating installations. The efficiency depends entirely on the global design of the installation while the choice of the fluid is only one element that contributes to this efficiency. This paper analyzes successively: the consequences of pure refrigerant substitution on volume and centrifugal compressors, and the constraints linked with the use of mixtures close to azeotropic compounds (R408A and R404A) and mixtures with temperature shift like R407C. In this last case, the replacement is deeply different in the case of water heat exchangers and in the case of air-circulation heat exchangers. (J.S.) 3 refs.

  18. On-site study of HCFC-22 substitution for HFC non-azeotropic blends (R417A, R422D) on a water chiller of a centralized HVAC system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrella, E.; Larumbe, J.A. [Polytechnic University of Valencia, Dep. of Applied Thermodynamics, Camino de Vera 14, E-46022 Valencia (Spain); Cabello, R.; Sanchez, D.; Llopis, R. [Jaume I University, Dep. of Mechanical Engineering and Construction, Campus de Riu Sec s/n, E-12071 Castellon (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    The European Regulation no 2037/2000 has banned manufacturing HCFC refrigerants from January 1st 2010, although its use is allowed up to 2015 if the fluids come from a recycling process. This situation creates the need for developing new working fluids to replace the HCFC in the refrigeration plants now in operation. Among all the HCFCs the R22 is the most widely used in a wide range of applications, especially in air conditioning. This work presents an on-site experimental study of the R22 replacement by two possible substitutes, the HFC-417A and the HFC-422D, in a water chiller in which the energy performance was evaluated. This chiller is part of the centralized HVAC system of a lecture room building at the Jaume I University of Castellon, Spain. This communication compares and analyses main operation parameters of the chiller when operating with each refrigerant in real conditions. (author)

  19. Artificial neural network analysis of triple effect absorption refrigeration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajizadeh Aghdam, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Islamic Azad University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], email: a.hajizadeh@iaukashan.ac.ir; Nazmara, H.; Farzaneh, B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], email: h.nazmara@nioec.org, email: b_farzaneh_ms@yahoo.com

    2011-07-01

    In this study, artificial neural networks are utilized to predict the performance of triple effect series and parallel flow absorption refrigeration systems, with lithium bromide/water as the working fluid. Important parameters such as high generator and evaporator temperatures were varied and their effects on the performance characteristics of the refrigeration unit were observed. Absorption refrigeration systems make energy savings possible because they can use heat energy to produce cooling, in place of the electricity used for conventional vapour compression chillers. In addition, non-conventional sources of energy (such as solar, waste heat, and geothermal) can be utilized as their primary energy input. Moreover, absorption units use environmentally friendly working fluid pairs instead of CFCs and HCFCs, which affect the ozone layer. Triple effect absorption cycles were analysed. Results apply for both series and parallel flow systems. A relative preference for parallel-flow over series-flow is also shown.

  20. Atmospheric chemistry of hydrofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehested, J

    1995-03-01

    Pulse radiolysis coupled with a time resolved UV absorption detection system and a FTIR spectrometer coupled to a 140 l reaction chamber was used to study the degradation of HCFCs and HFCs in the atmosphere. Reaction rates for a series of reactions of HFCs and HCFCs were investigated: F + RH, R + O{sub 2} + RO{sub 2} + NO, and RO{sub 2} + NO{sub 2} + M, together with UV absorption spectra of the halogenated alkyl (R) and halogenated alkyl peroxy radicals (RO{sub 2}). The products following the self reactions for RO{sub 2} radicals for RO{sub 2} = CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}O{sub 2}, CF{sub 2}HCF{sub 2}O{sub 2}, CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}, CFH{sub 2}CFHO{sub 2}, CF{sub 3}O{sub 2}, and CF{sub 3}C(O)O{sub 2} were investigated by the FTIR setup. The results show that the self reaction of halogenated peroxy radicals give the alkoxy radical, RO, as product. The atmospheric fate of these radicals were C-C bond cleavage for CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}O, CHF{sub 2}CF{sub 2}O, CFH{sub 2}CHFO, and CF{sub 3}C(O)O; while CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O radicals rect with O{sub 2} to give CF{sub 3}CHO and HO{sub 2}. the reaction between CFH{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HO{sub 2} was shown to give 29{+-}7 % CH{sub 2}FCOOH and 72{+-}11 % HCOF as the carbon containing products. (Abstract Truncated)

  1. Tropospheric chemistry research in the U.S.: 1991-1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Joyce E.; Atherton, Cynthia S.; Dignon, Jane

    1995-07-01

    The troposphere is chemically complex. Many of the important species in the troposphere are short-lived, with lifetimes less than or of order of a month. Hence, the composition of the troposphere is regionally diverse, leading to regionally diverse chemical processes which control that composition. With the advent of three-dimensional models and regionally-specific estimates of emissions, however, it has become clear that human activity has perturbed the composition of even short-lived species over vast regions of the globe. The list of short-lived species of concern includes the reactive nitrogen oxides, reactive sulfur, ozone, nonmethane hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Observations have established that increases in the long-lived species such as carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and the chlorofluorocarbons are taking place with important resulting impacts on stratospheric chemistry. Further, there is some indication that carbonyl sulfide (a major precursor to stratospheric aerosols) may have an important anthropogenic source. Growth of pollutants such as these are of concern because they act as greenhouse gases or aerosol precursors (CO2, CH4, O3, N2O, chlorofluorocarbons, carbonyl sufide, reactive sulfur), as agents for depletion of stratospheric ozone (N2O, chlorofluorocarbons), are harmful to vegetation (O3, acids) or act as nutrients (nitrate, sulfate, trace metals). The chemical interactions are important to understand, because the build up of pollutants depends not only on the rates of their release into the troposphere but on their rate of removal in the troposphere. Removal rates depend on processes which determine the rate of oxidation of the component (which for most species proceeds mainly by reaction with the hydroxyl radical) or through precipitation scavenging or dissolution in the ocean (which requires that the pollutant or its oxidation product(s) be soluble in water).

  2. Cleaning up our act: Alternatives for hazardous solvents used in cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoemaker, J.D.; Meltzer, M.; Miscovich, D.; Montoya, D.; Goodrich, P.; Blycker, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has studied more than 70 alternative cleaners as potential replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halogenated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene and trichloroethane), hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene and Stoddard Solvent), and volatile organic compounds (e.g., acetone, alcohols). This report summarizes LLNL`s findings after testing more than 45 proprietary formulations on bench-scale testing equipment and in more than 60 actual shops and laboratories. Cleaning applications included electronics fabrication, machine shops, optical lenses and hardware, and general cleaning. Most of the alternative cleaners are safer than the solvents previously used and many are nonhazardous, according to regulatory criteria.

  3. Road transportation challenges and systems for the next decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welbourne, E.R.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the historical evolution in road transport systems technology and regulations, and of developments foreseen in the next decade, in the contexts of safety, energy consumption and emissions, and the environment. Collision reduction technology including high centre mounted stop lights, antilock braking systems, headlight glare reduction, crashworthiness, and impact modes are discussed. Technology for reducing energy consumption, global climate change implications, chlorofluorocarbons, urban air quality impacts, and the conflict between improved safety and the environment (larger cars tend to be safer) are discussed. 13 refs

  4. Energy and climatic change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadena, Angela Ines

    2000-01-01

    Human intervention in the carbon cycle has become a relevant concern in recent times. Global warming is a phenomenon due to the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases (GHG-s) carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and chlorofluorocarbons, believed to be irreversible. CO 2 is the most important GHG its contribution to the radioactive forcing of climate is estimated in about 70%. Changes in the global concentration of these gases depend on the level of emissions as a by-product of economic activities, the natural assimilative capacity of the global ecosystem, and the abatement activities. The paper include the Colombian situation

  5. Greenhouse science; Global warming: the origin and nature of alleged scientific consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindzen, R. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1992-01-01

    The paper contends that there is not a scientific consensus on the existence of global warming. The scientific issues associated with the prediction of global warming are reviewed and it is concluded that there is no substantive basis for predictions of sizeable global warming due to observed increases in greenhouse gases such as CO[sub 2], methane and chlorofluorocarbons. The history of the current concern over global warming is described. Political aspects, scientists' concerns over funding and the desire of industrial companies to improve their public image by supporting environmental activists are some of the factors seen as responsible for the current global warming 'hysteria'. 6 figs.

  6. Greenhouse effect of trace gases, 1970-1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacis, A.; Hansen, J.; Lee, P.; Lebedeff, S.; Mitchell, T.

    1981-01-01

    Increased abundances were measured for several trace atmospheric gases in the decade 1970-1980. The equilibrium greenhouse warming for the measured increments of CH4, chlorofluorocarbons and N2O is between 50% and 100% of the equilibrium warming for the measured increase of atmospheric CO2 during the same 10 years. The combined warming of CO2 and trace gases should exceed natural global temperature variability in the 1980's and cause the global mean temperature to rise above the maximum of the late 1930's.

  7. Tracer signals of the intermediate layer of the Arabian Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Rhein, Monika; Stramma, Lothar; Plähn, Olaf

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, hydrographic and chlorofluorocarbon (CFCs, components F11, F12) measurements were carried out in the Gulf of Aden, in the Gulf of Oman, and in the Arabian Sea. In the Gulf of Oman, the F12 concentrations in the Persian Gulf outflow (PGW) at about 300m depth were significantly higher than in ambient surface water with saturations reaching 270%. These high values could not be caused by air-sea gas exchange. The outflow was probably contaminated with oil, and the lipophilic character of...

  8. Potential health effects of climatic change: Effects of increased ultraviolet radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, F.

    1991-01-01

    There is scientific evidence that stratospheric ozone concentration has declined over the Northern Hemisphere in the past 20 years, and projections based on various assumption s about future release of chlorofluorocarbon gases and other contaminants suggest that this decline will continue into the next century. The effects on human health secondary to increase in biologically effective ultraviolet radiation are expected to consist of increases in nonmelanoma skin cancer and malignant melanoma of the skin, possible alteration of immune response, and development of lens cataracts. The recent and projected increases in skin cancer and changes in human immune responses are discussed. 19 refs

  9. Pilot retrofit test of refrigerant R-134a for GDSCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albus, J.; Brown, B.; Dungao, M.; Spencer, G.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has issued an interim policy requiring all of its Centers to eliminate consumption (purchase) of stratospheric ozone-depleting substances, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's), by 1995. Also, plans must be outlined for the eventual phase out of their usage. The greatest source of CFC consumption and usage at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex is refrigerant R-12, which is used in many of the facility's air-conditioning systems. A pilot retrofit test shows that retrofitting R-12 air-conditioning systems with hydrofluorocarbon R-13a would be a workable means to comply with the R-12 portion of NASA's policy. Results indicate acceptable cost levels and nearly equivalent system performance.

  10. Gas-discharge method for improving the environmental characteristics of the atmosphere (in memory of G.A. Askar'yan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batanov, G.M.; Kossyi, I.A.; Silakov, V.P.

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of improving the environmental characteristics of the atmosphere with the help of freely localized microwave discharges is analyzed. Theoretical and experimental studies devoted to cleaning the troposphere of ozone-destroying pollutants and creating an artificial ozone layer in the stratosphere are reviewed. Results from the studies of the possibility of the plasmochemical utilization of the accumulated chlorofluorocarbons, capable of depleting the ozone layer, are presented. The results of theoretical and experimental modeling are used to predict the plasmochemical consequences of creating artificial ionized regions in the atmosphere for the purpose of long-range radio and TV communication

  11. Cleaning up our act: Alternatives for hazardous solvents used in cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, J.D.; Meltzer, M.; Miscovich, D.; Montoya, D.; Goodrich, P.; Blycker, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has studied more than 70 alternative cleaners as potential replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halogenated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene and trichloroethane), hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene and Stoddard Solvent), and volatile organic compounds (e.g., acetone, alcohols). This report summarizes LLNL's findings after testing more than 45 proprietary formulations on bench-scale testing equipment and in more than 60 actual shops and laboratories. Cleaning applications included electronics fabrication, machine shops, optical lenses and hardware, and general cleaning. Most of the alternative cleaners are safer than the solvents previously used and many are nonhazardous, according to regulatory criteria

  12. Statement on global climate change before the Subcommittee on Energy and Power, United States House of Representatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, J.A.

    1993-04-01

    Greenhouse gases are gases which are effectively transparent to incoming sunlight but absorb infrared radiation escaping to space and thereby warm the surface of the Earth. Human activities result in the release of greenhouse and related gases in such quantities that they are changing the composition of the atmosphere. Greenhouse and related gases which human activities release include carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ) carbon monoxide (CO), nitrous oxide (N 2 O), nitrogen oxides (NO x ), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ). The emission and effects of these gases are detailed in this report

  13. Status of selected air pollution control programs, February 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    The collection of status reports has been prepared in order to provide a timely summary of selected EPA air pollution control activities to those individuals who are involved with the implementation of these programs. The report contains ozone/carbon monoxide (CO) programs; mobile sources programs; particulate matter nominally 10M and less (PM-10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and lead programs; New Source Review (NSR); economics programs; emission standards programs; Indian activity programs; mobile sources programs; air toxics programs; acid rain programs; permits programs; chlorofluorocarbons programs; enforcement programs; and other programs

  14. Testing of CFC replacement fluids for arc-induced toxic by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cravey, W.R.; Goerz, D.A.; Hawley-Fedder, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The authors have developed a unique test-stand for quantifying the generation of perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacement fluids when they are subjected to high electrical stress/breakdown environments. PFIB is an extremely toxic gas with a threshold limit value of 10 ppbv as set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. They have tested several new fluids from various manufacturers for their potential to generate PFIB. Their goal is to determine breakdown characteristics and quantify toxic by-products of these replacement fluids to determine a safe, usable alternative for present CFC`s.

  15. Do human beings contribute to the greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stordal, Frode

    1999-01-01

    The various sources to and aspects of the greenhouse gas effect were discussed. The gas and pollutant contributions were estimated and the added amounts of methane, nitrogen dioxide and chlorofluorocarbons emissions were approximately equal to that of carbon dioxide. Problems connected to sulphur dioxide emissions were mentioned. The problems of UV and IR radiation were discussed. The sun shine intensity fluctuation was also considered as well as other factors that have influenced the climate before the industrial era. It was concluded that human activities have contributed to the alterations in the greenhouse effect in last century

  16. Atmospheric lifetimes of CFC 11 and CFC 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, A.J.; Steed, J.M.; Miller, C.; Filkin, D.L.; Jesson, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) chemical model of the atmosphere is used to investigate the stratospheric removal rates of the chlorofluorocarbons CFC 11 (CFCl 3 ) and CFC 12 (CF 2 Cl 2 ). Assuming equivalent vertical transport rates, one-dimensional (1-D) models are shown to overestimate the atmospheric lifetime of CFC 11 by approx.10% because of their neglect of latitudinal effects. The present Du Pont 1-D and 2-D models have somewhat different effective transport rates and give steady state CFC 11 atmospheric lifetimes of 75 and 60 years, respectively, assuming no tropospheric destructive mechanism. For CFC 12, the corresponding calculated lifetimes are 140 and 120 years

  17. The Search for Surviving Direct Samples of Early Solar System Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We have become increasingly aware of the fundamental importance of water, and aqueous alteration, on primitive solar-system bodies. All classes of astromaterials studied show some degree of interaction with aqueous fluids. Nevertheless, we are still lacking fundamental information such as the location and timing of the aqueous alteration and the detailed nature of the aqueous fluids. Halite crystals in two meteorite regolith breccias were found to contain aqueous fluid inclusions (brines) trapped approx. 4.5 BYBP. Heating/freezing studies of the aqueous fluid inclusions in these halites demonstrated that they were trapped near 25 C. The initial results of our O and H isotopic measurements on these brine inclusions can be explained by a simple model mixing asteroidal and cometary water. We have been analyzing solids and organics trapped alongside the brines in the halites by FTIR, C-XANES, SXRD and Raman, as clues to the origin of the water. The organics show thermal effects that span the entire range witnessed by organics in all chondrite types. Since we identified water-soluble aromatics, including partially halogenated methanol, in some of the halite, we suspected amino acids were also present, but have thus far found that levels of amino acids were undetectable (which is very interesting). We have also been locating aqueous fluid inclusions in other astromaterials, principally carbonates in CI and CM chondrites. Although we have advanced slowly towards detailed analysis of these ancient brines, since they require techniques right at or just beyond current analytical capabilities, their eventual full characterization will completely open the window onto the origin and activity of early solar system water.

  18. Abundance and sources of atmospheric halocarbons in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Schoenenberger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of anthropogenic halocarbons is released to the atmosphere, contributing to stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. Using measurements of atmospheric abundances for the estimation of halocarbon emissions on the global and regional scale has become an important top-down tool for emission validation in the recent past, but many populated and developing areas of the world are only poorly covered by the existing atmospheric halocarbon measurement network. Here we present 6 months of continuous halocarbon observations from Finokalia on the island of Crete in the Eastern Mediterranean. The gases measured are the hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs, HFC-134a (CH2FCF3, HFC-125 (CHF2CF3, HFC-152a (CH3CHF2 and HFC-143a (CH3CF3 and the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs, HCFC-22 (CHClF2 and HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2. The Eastern Mediterranean is home to 250 million inhabitants, consisting of a number of developed and developing countries, for which different emission regulations exist under the Kyoto and Montreal protocols. Regional emissions of halocarbons were estimated with Lagrangian atmospheric transport simulations and a Bayesian inverse modeling system, using measurements at Finokalia in conjunction with those from Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE sites at Mace Head (Ireland, Jungfraujoch (Switzerland and Monte Cimone (Italy. Measured peak mole fractions at Finokalia showed generally smaller amplitudes for HFCs than at the European AGAGE sites except for periodic peaks of HFC-152a, indicating strong upwind sources. Higher peak mole fractions were observed for HCFCs, suggesting continued emissions from nearby developing regions such as Egypt and the Middle East. For 2013, the Eastern Mediterranean inverse emission estimates for the four analyzed HFCs and the two HCFCs were 13.9 (11.3–19.3 and 9.5 (6.8–15.1 Tg CO2eq yr−1, respectively. These emissions contributed 16.8 % (13.6–23.3 % and 53.2 % (38.1–84.2

  19. Issues and recommendations related to replacement of CFC-114 at the uranium enrichment gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.L.; Banaghan, E.

    1993-01-01

    The operating uranium enrichment gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) in Portsmouth, Ohio and Paducah, Kentucky, which are operated for the United States Department for Energy by Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES), currently use a chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-114) as the primary process stream coolant. Due to recent legislation embodied in the Clean Air Act, the production of this and other related chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) are to be phased out with no production occurring after 1995. Since the plants lose approximately 500,000 pounds per year of this process stream coolant through various leaks, the GDPs are faced with the challenge of identifying a replacement coolant that will allow continued operation of the plants. MMES formed the CFC Task Team to identify and solve the various problems associated with identifying and implementing a replacement coolant. This report includes a review of the work performed by the CFC Task Team, and recommendations that were formulated based on this review and upon original work. The topics covered include; identifying a replacement coolant, coolant leak detection and repair efforts, coolant safety concerns, coolant level sensors, regulatory issues, and an analytical decision analysis

  20. Combustion of methane-oxygen and methane-oxygen-CFC mixtures initiated by a high-current slipping surface discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossyi, I.A.; Silakov, V.P.; Tarasova, N.M.

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the destruction of chlorofluorocarbon (CF 2 Cl 2 ) molecules in a methane-oxygen (air) gas mixture whose combustion is initiated by a high-current slipping surface discharge. It is found that a three-component CH 4 + O 2 (air)+ CF 2 Cl 2 gas mixture (even with a considerable amount of the third component) demonstrates properties of explosive combustion involving chain reactions that are typical of two-component CH 4 + O 2 mixtures. Experiments show the high degree of destruction (almost complete decomposition) of chlorofluorocarbons contained in the mixture during one combustion event. The combustion dynamics is studied. It is shown that the combustion initiated by a slipping surface discharge has a number of characteristic features that make it impossible to identify the combustion dynamics with the formation of a combustion or detonation wave. The features of the effects observed can be related to intense UV radiation produced by a pulsed high-current surface discharge

  1. Flow boiling heat transfer of carbon dioxide inside a small-sized microfin tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Chaobin; Haraguchi, Nobori; Hihara, Eiji [Department of Human and Engineered Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8563 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    This study investigated the flow boiling heat transfer of carbon dioxide inside a small-sized microfin tube (mean inner diameter: 2.0 mm; helix angle: 6.3 ) at a saturation temperature of 15 C, and heat and mass flux ranges of 4.5-18 kW m{sup -2} and 360-720 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, respectively. Although, experimental results indicated that heat flux has a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficient, the coefficient does not always increase with mass flux, as in the case of conventional refrigerants such as HFCs or HCFCs. Under certain conditions, the heat transfer coefficient at a high mass flux was lower than that at a lower mass flux, indicating that convective heat transfer had a suppression effect on nucleate boiling. The heat transfer coefficients in the microfin tubes were 1.9{proportional_to}2.3 times the values in smooth tubes of the same diameter under the same experimental conditions, and the dryout quality was much higher, ranging from 0.9 to 0.95. The experimental results indicated that using microfin tubes may considerably increase the overall heat transfer performance. (author)

  2. Experiments on condensation heat transfer characteristics inside a microfin tube with R410A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D H; Cho, Y J [Korea University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea); Lee, K J; Park, S S [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-11-01

    Due to the ozone depletion and global warming potentials, some refrigerants (CFCs and HCFCs) have been rapidly substituted. R410A is considered as the alternative refrigerant of R22 for the air-conditioners used at home and in industry. Experiments on the condensation heat transfer characteristics inside a smooth or a micro-fin tube with R410A are performed in this study. The test tubes 7/9.52 mm in outer diameters and 3 m in length are used. Varying the mass flux of the refrigerant and the condensation temperatures, the average heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop are investigated. It is shown that the heat transfer is enhanced and the amount of pressure drops are larger in the microfin tube than the smooth tube. From the heat transfer enhancement coefficient and the pressure penalty factor, it is found that the high heat transfer enhancement coefficients are obtained in the range of small mass flux while the penalty factors are almost equal. (author). 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Atmospheric composition calculations for evaluation of climate scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krol, M.S.; Woerd, H.J. van der

    1994-01-01

    The future radiative forcing by non-CO 2 greenhouse gases depends strongly on the behavior of the OH radical, which represents the primary sink for CH 4 , CO and H(C)FCs in the atmosphere. The authors present a simple model to describe the changes in the concentration of the main greenhouse gases. The focus is on the description of the atmospheric chemistry of OH and the important tropospheric oxidant and greenhouse gas O 3 . Changes in the equilibrium concentrations of these oxidants will change the trends in the concentrations of greenhouse gases, especially CH 4 . The model is applied to the 1992 IPCC emissions scenarios, as well as to an IMAGE 2.0 scenario, based on 'Conventional Wisdom' assumptions. The following major results are found: for the central estimate of emissions assuming no additional policies (IS92a), the concentration of CH 4 keeps rising at rates similar to those observed over the last decades; results for the other IS92 scenarios range from stabilization early in the next century (IS92d) to an ever increasing rate of accumulation of CH 4 in the atmosphere (IS92f), even though these scenarios assume no policy interventions. The IMAGE 2.0 Conventional Wisdom scenario is similar to IS92a before the year 2025; afterwards the expansion of agricultural area significantly decreases the emissions of hydrocarbons and NO x from savanna burning, not represented in the IS92 scenarios. This leads to stable levels of atmospheric CH 4 after 2025

  4. The large contribution of projected HFC emissions to future climate forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velders, Guus J M; Fahey, David W; Daniel, John S; McFarland, Mack; Andersen, Stephen O

    2009-07-07

    The consumption and emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are projected to increase substantially in the coming decades in response to regulation of ozone depleting gases under the Montreal Protocol. The projected increases result primarily from sustained growth in demand for refrigeration, air-conditioning (AC) and insulating foam products in developing countries assuming no new regulation of HFC consumption or emissions. New HFC scenarios are presented based on current hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) consumption in leading applications, patterns of replacements of HCFCs by HFCs in developed countries, and gross domestic product (GDP) growth. Global HFC emissions significantly exceed previous estimates after 2025 with developing country emissions as much as 800% greater than in developed countries in 2050. Global HFC emissions in 2050 are equivalent to 9-19% (CO(2)-eq. basis) of projected global CO(2) emissions in business-as-usual scenarios and contribute a radiative forcing equivalent to that from 6-13 years of CO(2) emissions near 2050. This percentage increases to 28-45% compared with projected CO(2) emissions in a 450-ppm CO(2) stabilization scenario. In a hypothetical scenario based on a global cap followed by 4% annual reductions in consumption, HFC radiative forcing is shown to peak and begin to decline before 2050.

  5. Matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic and theoretical study of 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-chloroethane (HCFC-133a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Gessenildo Pereira; Lucena, Juracy Régis; Ventura, Elizete; Andrade do Monte, Silmar; Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui

    2013-11-01

    The molecular structure and infrared spectrum of the atmospheric pollutant 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-chloroethane (HCFC-133a; CF3CH2Cl) in the ground electronic state were characterized experimentally and theoretically. Excited state calculations (at the CASSCF, MR-CISD, and MR-CISD+Q levels) have also been performed in the range up to ˜9.8 eV. The theoretical calculations show the existence of one (staggered) conformer, which has been identified spectroscopically for the monomeric compound isolated in cryogenic (˜10 K) argon and xenon matrices. The observed infrared spectra of the matrix-isolated HCFC-133a were interpreted with the aid of MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations and normal coordinate analysis, which allowed a detailed assignment of the observed spectra to be carried out, including identification of bands due to different isotopologues (35Cl and 37Cl containing molecules). The calculated energies of the several excited states along with the values of oscillator strengths and previous results obtained for CFCs and HCFCs suggest that the previously reported photolyses of the title compound at 147 and 123.6 nm [T. Ichimura, A. W. Kirk, and E. Tschuikow-Roux, J. Phys. Chem. 81, 1153 (1977)] are likely to be initiated in the n-4s and n-4p Rydberg states, respectively.

  6. Thermodynamic simulation for a vapour compression system using organic refrigerants; Simulacao termodinamica do ciclo de compressao a vapor utilizando fluidos refrigerantes organicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Francisco S.; Santos, Carlos A.C. dos [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Lab. de Energia Solar; Torres, Ednildo A.; Jesus, Marcos F. de [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Energia e Gas

    2004-07-01

    According to the Montreal protocol, it is foreseen a total retreat of CFCs and HCFCs in applications of refrigeration and air conditioning. Before this context, considerable attention has been used in the substitution of HCFC-22 (R22) in systems of air conditioning, where they appear as possible alternatives two HFCs (R407c and R410a) and two HCs (R290 and R600a). In this work, possibilities and problems for the use of these fluids as alternatives to R22 in equipment of refrigeration are discussed. Five refrigerants (R22, R407c, R410a, R290 and R600) are selected, computational simulations done and your characteristic in terms of thermodynamic cycles are shown. The obtained conclusion is that propane offers the best alternative for R22 in equipment of refrigeration, because this besides being energetically efficient, is environmentally acceptable. However, safety precautions due to your inflammability must be seriously taken into account. For some applications the substitution of the current fluids (halocarbons) by the hydrocarbons can be done without larger additional costs, but not in the general case. (author)

  7. Simulation of Halocarbon Production and Emissions and Effects on Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes; Ellis

    1997-09-01

    / This paper describes an integrated model that simulates future halocarbon production/emissions and potential ozone depletion. Applications and historical production levels for various halocarbons are discussed first. A framework is then presented for modeling future halocarbon impacts incorporating differences in underlying demands, applications, regulatory mandates, and environmental characteristics. The model is used to simulate the potential impacts of several prominent issues relating to halocarbon production, regulation, and environmental interactions, notably: changes in agricultural methyl bromide use, increases in effectiveness of bromine for ozone depletion, modifications to the elimination schedule for HCFCs, short-term expansion of CFC demand in low use compliance countries, and delays in Russian Federation compliance. Individually, each issue does not unequivocally represent a significant likely increase in long-term atmospheric halogen loading and stratospheric ozone depletion. In combination, however, these impacts could increase peak halogen concentrations and long-term integral halogen loading, resulting in higher levels of stratospheric ozone depletion and longer exposure to increased levels of UV radiation.KEY WORDS: Halocarbons; Ozone depletion; Montreal Protocol; Integrated assessment

  8. Rate constant for the reaction of OH with CH3CCl2F (HCFC-141b) determined by relative rate measurements with CH4 and CH3CCl3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huder, Karin; Demore, William B.

    1993-01-01

    Determination of accurate rate constants for OH abstraction is of great importance for the calculation of lifetimes for HCFCs and their impact on the atmosphere. For HCFC-141b there has been some disagreement in the literature for absolute measurements of this rate constant. In the present work rate constant ratios for HCFC-141b were measured at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range of 298-358 K, with CH4 and CH3CCl3 as reference gases. Ozone was photolyzed at 254 nm in the presence of water vapor to produce OH radicals. Relative depletions of 141b and the reference gases were measured by FTIR. Arrhenius expressions for 141b were derived from each reference gas and found to be in good agreement with each other. The combined expression for HCFC-141b which we recommend is 1.4 x 10 exp -12 exp(-1630/T) with k at 298 K being 5.9 x 10 exp -15 cu cm/molec-s. This value is in excellent agreement with the JPL 92-20 recommendation.

  9. FY1995 study of thermodynamic properties of HFC refrigerant mixtures for Lorentz-cycled new generation air-conditioning equipments; 1995 nendo Lorentz cycle ka shinsedai kucho kikiyo HFC kei kongo reibai no netsurikigaku seishitsu ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    A hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigerant, R-22, is currently being used almost exclusively as a refrigerant for conventional air-conditioning equipments. Since HCFCs are expected to be banned shortly, it is considered a crucial issue to support R and D of the air-conditioning system Lorentz-cycled with hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants mixtures. In the present research project, therefore, it is aimed to reveal some of the essential thermodynamic properties of HFC refrigerant mixtures systematically. On the basis of a series of achievements for the last several years by the present research coordinator and his group regarding thermodynamic properties of single-component and blended HFC refrigerants, we have conducted following three major research programs rather systematically on which no challenges have ever been reported worldwide. Throughout a series of experimental as well as analytical researches performed so as to meet the objectives mentioned above, some novel knowledge and valuable outcomes could be obtained in the present study. (1) Precise measurements of vapor-liquid equilibrium properties with simultaneous determination of densities, latent heats of vaporization, and isobaric specific heat capacities in liquid phase. (2) Analytical studies to establish thermodynamic property modeling. (3) Feasibility study of evaluating the Lorentz-cycled performance. (NEDO)

  10. Study on expansion power recovery in CO2 trans-critical cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hua; Ma Yitai; Li Minxia; Wang Wei

    2010-01-01

    Due to the ozone depletion potential and global warming potential of CFCs and HCFCs, CO 2 is considered as most potential alternative refrigerant. However, there are serious throttle losses and low system efficiency to CO 2 trans-critical cycle because of its low critical temperature and high operating pressure. The aim of this paper is to design an expander to recover expansion power in CO 2 trans-critical cycle. The theoretical analysis and calculation show that 14-23% of input power of compressor can be recovered. A prototype of rolling piston expander is designed and manufactured and its test facility is established. The test facility consists of CO 2 trans-critical cycle, the expander, the chilling water system and the cooling water system. The experimental results show that the recovery ratio and expander efficiency are affected by rotational speed, inlet temperature and mass flow of expander. The highest recovery ratio can reach to 0.145, which means 14.5% of input power of compressor can be recovered. The expander efficiency can reach to 45%.

  11. Stormy weather: 101 solutions to global climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauncey, G.; Mazza, P.

    2001-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive guide to energy efficiency measures that would rid the world of the threat of global warming caused by the wasteful use of hydrocarbon fuels and the resulting greenhouse gas emissions. The actions to be taken are not directed to governments and industry alone; indeed, the change must involve every segment of society to be effective. Accordingly, the book recommends actions that could be taken by individuals, citizen organizations, municipalities, businesses and organizations, energy companies, automobile companies, states and provinces, national governments, developing nations and global solutions. The recommendations range from choosing energy efficient appliances and buying green power, through increased recycling, reuse and reduced consumption, building solar and other renewable energy capacity, using sustainable fuels in automobiles, introducing tax measures favouring energy efficiency and sustainable development, to launching macro-level plans for a global green deal, establishing a global climate fund, accelerating the phase-out of CHCs, HCFCs and HFCs, forming a global ecological alliance and declaring a century of ecological restoration. Bibliographic notes, illustrations

  12. Normalisation in product life cycle assessment: an LCA of the global and European economic systems in the year 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeswijk, Anneke Wegener; van Oers, Lauran F C M; Guinée, Jeroen B; Struijs, Jaap; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2008-02-01

    In the methodological context of the interpretation of environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) results, a normalisation study was performed. 15 impact categories were accounted for, including climate change, acidification, eutrophication, human toxicity, ecotoxicity, depletion of fossil energy resources, and land use. The year 2000 was chosen as a reference year, and information was gathered on two spatial levels: the global and the European level. From the 860 environmental interventions collected, 48 interventions turned out to account for at least 75% of the impact scores of all impact categories. All non-toxicity related, emission dependent impacts are fully dominated by the bulk emissions of only 10 substances or substance groups: CO(2), CH(4), SO(2), NO(x), NH(3), PM(10), NMVOC, and (H)CFCs emissions to air and emissions of N- and P-compounds to fresh water. For the toxicity-related emissions (pesticides, organics, metal compounds and some specific inorganics), the availability of information was still very limited, leading to large uncertainty in the corresponding normalisation factors. Apart from their usefulness as a reference for LCA studies, the results of this study stress the importance of efficient measures to combat bulk emissions and to promote the registration of potentially toxic emissions on a more comprehensive scale.

  13. A preliminary assessment of sources of nitrate in springwaters, Suwannee River basin, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B.G.; Hornsby, H.D.

    1998-01-01

    A cooperative study between the Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is evaluating sources of nitrate in water from selected springs and zones in the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Suwannee River Basin. A multi-tracer approach, which consists of the analysis of water samples for naturally occurring chemical and isotopic indicators, is being used to better understand sources and chronology of nitrate contamination in the middle Suwannee River region. In July and August 1997, water samples were collected and analyzed from six springs and two wells for major ions, nutrients, and dissolved organic carbon. These water samples also were analyzed for environmental isotopes [18O/16O, D/H, 13C/12C, 15N/14N] to determine sources of water and nitrate. Chlorofluorocarbons (CCl3F, CCl2F2, and C2Cl3F3) and tritium (3H) were analyzed to assess the apparent ages (residence time) of springwaters and water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Delta 15N-NO3 values in water from the six springs range from 3.94 per mil (Little River Springs) to 8.39 per mil (Lafayette Blue Spring). The range of values indicates that nitrate in the sampled springwaters most likely originates from a mixture of inorganic (fertilizers) and organic (animal wastes) sources, although the higher delta 15N-NO3 value for Lafayette Blue Spring indicates that an organic source of nitrogen is likely at this site. Water samples from the two wells sampled in Lafayette County have high delta 15N-NO3 values of 10.98 and 12.1 per mil, indicating the likelihood of an organic source of nitrate. These two wells are located near dairy and poultry farms, where leachate from animal wastes may contribute nitrate to ground water. Based on analysis of chlorofluorocarbons in ground water, the mean residence time of water in springs ranges from about 12 to 25 years. Chlorofluorocarbons-modeled recharge dates for water samples from the two shallow zones in the Upper Floridan aquifer

  14. Cardiotoxicity of Freon among refrigeration services workers: comparative cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Freon includes a number of gaseous, colorless chlorofluorocarbons. Although freon is generally considered to be a fluorocarbon of relatively low toxicity; significantly detrimental effects may occur upon over exposure. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether occupational exposure to fluorocarbons can induce arterial hypertension, myocardial ischemia, cardiac arrhythmias, elevated levels of plasma lipids and renal dysfunction. Methods This comparative cross-sectional study was conducted at the cardiology clinic of the Suez Canal Authority Hospital (Egypt). The study included 23 apparently healthy male workers at the refrigeration services workshop who were exposed to fluorocarbons (FC 12 and FC 22) and 23 likewise apparently healthy male workers (unexposed), the control group. All the participants were interviewed using a pre-composed questionnaire and were subjected to a clinical examination and relevant laboratory investigations. Results There were no significant statistical differences between the groups studied regarding symptoms suggesting arterial hypertension and renal affection, although a significantly higher percentage of the studied refrigeration services workers had symptoms of arrhythmias. None of the workers had symptoms suggesting coronary artery disease. Clinical examination revealed that the refrigeration services workers had a significantly higher mean pulse rate compared to the controls, though no significant statistical differences were found in arterial blood pressure measurements between the two study groups. Exercise stress testing of the workers studied revealed normal heart reaction to the increased need for oxygen, while sinus tachycardia was detected in all the participants. The results of Holter monitoring revealed significant differences within subject and group regarding the number of abnormal beats detected throughout the day of monitoring (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences detected in the

  15. Etiology, risk factors, epidemiology, and public health issues in melanoma and other cutaneous neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The cytogenetic features of melanoma, including the contribution of specific genes, are beginning to be unraveled. Reproductive factors have been shown to have little relationship to melanoma. The puzzles over apparent systemic effects of exposure have persisted, however. Evidence was published that the history of reaction to sun exposure altered when a diagnosis of melanoma was made. An interesting suggestion was made that the classic melanoma risk factors are associated with promotion rather than initiation of the disease. There is further evidence that exposure decreases melanoma risk in people who tan well but increases it in those who do not. Also reviewed is the evidence that the ozone layer of the stratosphere began to decrease in thickness under the influence of the chlorofluorocarbon gases

  16. Electron-induced hydrogen loss in uracil in a water cluster environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, M.; Kohanoff, J.; Fabrikant, I. I.

    2014-01-01

    Low-energy electron-impact hydrogen loss due to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to the uracil and thymine molecules in a water cluster environment is investigated theoretically. Only the A ′ -resonance contribution, describing the near-threshold behavior of DEA, is incorporated. Calculations are based on the nonlocal complex potential theory and the multiple scattering theory, and are performed for a model target with basic properties of uracil and thymine, surrounded by five water molecules. The DEA cross section is strongly enhanced when the attaching molecule is embedded in a water cluster. This growth is due to two effects: the increase of the resonance lifetime and the negative shift in the resonance position due to interaction of the intermediate negative ion with the surrounding water molecules. A similar effect was earlier found in DEA to chlorofluorocarbons

  17. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabine, C.L.; Key, R.M.; Hall, M.; Kozyr, A.

    1999-01-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), and radiocarbon (delta 14C), at hydrographic stations, as well as the underway partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) during the R/V Thomas G. Thompson oceanographic cruise in the Pacific Ocean (Section P10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Suva, Fiji, on October 5, 1993, and ended in Yokohama, Japan, on November 10, 1993. Measurements made along WOCE Section P10 included pressure, temperature, salinity[measured by conductivity temperature, and depth sensor (CTD)], bottle salinity, bottle oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12), TCO2, TALK, delta 14C, and underway pCO2

  18. Recent changes in the ventilation of the southern oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Darryn W; Primeau, Francois; Devries, Tim; Holzer, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Surface westerly winds in the Southern Hemisphere have intensified over the past few decades, primarily in response to the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole, and there is intense debate on the impact of this on the ocean's circulation and uptake and redistribution of atmospheric gases. We used measurements of chlorofluorocarbon-12 (CFC-12) made in the southern oceans in the early 1990s and mid- to late 2000s to examine changes in ocean ventilation. Our analysis of the CFC-12 data reveals a decrease in the age of subtropical subantarctic mode waters and an increase in the age of circumpolar deep waters, suggesting that the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole has caused large-scale coherent changes in the ventilation of the southern oceans.

  19. Transport and reaction processes affecting the attenuation of landfill gas in cover soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    of methane, chlorofluorocarbons, and hydrochlorofluorocarbons to the atmosphere. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of oxidation reactions on the overall gas transport regime and to evaluate, the contributions of various gas transport processes on methane attenuation in landfill cover soils....... For this purpose, a reactive transport model that includes advection and the Dusty Gas Model for simulation of multicomponent gas diffusion was used. The simulations are constrained by data from a series of counter-gradient laboratory experiments. Diffusion typically accounts for over 99% of methane emission...... to the atmosphere. Oxygen supply into the soil column is driven exclusively by diffusion, whereas advection outward offsets part of the diffusive contribution. In the reaction zone, methane consumption reduces the pressure gradient, further decreasing the significance of advection near the top of the column...

  20. Getting personal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    More than any other environmental problem, global warming is the product of ordinary human activities. Industry will probably have to be regulated, but the public at large will also have to adjust. Ultimately, the problem is going to be solved by a lot of individual decisions. The question is how to change the individuals making those decisions. Americans can do much to reduce the use of fossil fuels and chlorofluorocarbons on their own. Even without any new legislation, people can adopt many of the energy-saving tactics that caught on temporarily after the last oil crisis. They can become informed consumers, buying products that don't deplete the ozone layer or contribute to emissions of greenhouse gases and trying to reduce pollution from their cars and homes. As voters, individuals can elect officials who take global warming seriously and put pressure on those in office to impose stronger efficiency standards

  1. Intermittent Solar Ammonia Absorption Cycle (ISAAC) refrigeration for lesser developed countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Donald C.

    1990-02-01

    The Intermittent Solar Ammonia Absorption Cycle (ISAAC) refrigerator is a solar thermal technology which provides low cost, efficient, reliable ice-making to areas without ready access to electricity. An ISAAC refrigeration system consists of a compound parabolic solar collector, two pressure vessels, a condenser, a cold box or refrigerated space, and simple connective piping -- no moving parts or electrical components. Most parts are simple construction or plumbing grade materials, locally available in many remote areas. This technology has numerous potential benefits in lesser developed countries both by providing a cheap, reliable source of ice, and, since manufacture requires only semi-skilled labor, a source of employment to the local economy. Applications include vaccine storage for health care clinics; fish, meat, and dairy product storage; and personal consumption. Importantly, this technology increases the quality of life for people in lesser developed countries without depleting fossil fuel resources or increasing the release of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and chlorofluorocarbons.

  2. Management of C&D waste from generation to final sink - do we forget the volatile harmful substances?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter

    extremely slowly during use. Therefore, the insulation material will still contain large quantities of CFC when the buildings reach the endof-life and are demolished. The management of C&D waste in relation to controlling the CFC releases is basically unregulated in contrast to end-of-life refrigerators...... activities and obtaining CFC destruction either through foam waste incineration or by controlled microbial processes in landfills receiving the foam waste. There are still a lot of unknown processes and factors that need to be investigated before cost-efficient strategies and technologies are finally......Large quantities of construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) are produced. Buildings in many countries are thermally insulated by insulation foam containing large amounts of CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons), which are both strong ozone depleting substances and greenhouse gases. The CFCs are released...

  3. New High-Resolution Absorption Cross-Section Measurements of HCFC-142B in the Mid-Ir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bris, Karine; Strong, Kimberly; Melo, Stella

    2009-06-01

    HCFC-142b (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane) is a temporary substitute for ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). However, due to its high absorption cross-sections in the mid-IR, HCFC-142b is also a highly potent greenhouse gas, now detectable from space by satellite missions. So far, the accuracy of the retrieval has been limited by the lack of reference data in a range of temperatures compatible with atmospheric observations. We present new absorption cross section measurements of HCFC-142b at high-resolution (0.02 cm^{-1}) from 223 K to 283 K in the 600 cm^{-1}- 4000 cm^{-1} spectral window. The composite spectra are calculated for each temperature from a set of acquisitions at different pressures by Fourier transform spectroscopy.

  4. Products of motor burnout. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley-Fedder, R.; Goerz, D.; Koester, C.; Wilson, M.

    1996-03-30

    The Montreal Protocol of 1987 effectively banned a long list of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) traditionally used in air conditioning and refrigeration applications. The refrigeration and air conditioning industries have responded by developing and testing new, alternative refrigerants that are less damaging to the atmosphere upon release. Despite a reputation for quality and reliability, air conditioning systems do occasionally fail. One of the more common failure modes in a hermetic system is a motor burnout. Motor burnouts can occur by various mechanisms. One of the most common scenarios is a locked motor rotor, which may result from a damaged bearing. The resulting electrical motor burnout is caused by overheating of the locked rotor and subsequent failure of the insulation. This is primarily a thermal breakdown process.

  5. Report on the behalf of the Foreign Affairs Commission on the bill project authorizing the approval of the amendment to the Montreal protocol of 16 September 1987 related to substances which impoverish the ozone layer, and its Annexe: text of the foreign affairs Commission. Nr 415

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Pompeo, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the Montreal protocol, adopted in 1987, was to banish the chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) used as refrigerants since the 1930's, as they are responsible for the impoverishment of the ozone layer. While this objective has been met (the ozone layer is progressively restored), substitutes to CFC have been developed; however some of these substitutes, hydro-fluorocarbons, have been proved to be powerful greenhouse gases. The banishment of HFCs has thus been decided, leading to the Kigali amendment to the Montreal protocol. This report explains the CFC and HFC context and issues in details, and presents its examination by the French Commission of Foreign Affairs. The full text of the report is included (in an annex) at the end of the report

  6. Methane in German hard coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, P.N.; Den Drijver, J.

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide, hard coal mining is being carried out at ever increasing depth, and has, therefore, to cope with correspondingly increasing methane emissions are caused by coal mining. Beside carbon dioxide, chloro-fluoro-carbons (CFCs) and nitrogen oxides, methane is one of the most significant 'greenhouse' gases. It is mainly through the release of such trace gases that the greenhouse effect is brought about. Reducing methane emissions is therefore an important problem to be solved by the coal mining industry. This paper begins by highlighting some of the fundamental principles of methane in hard coal mining. The methane problem in German hard coal mining and the industry's efforts to reduce methane emissions are presented. The future development in German hard coal mining is illustrated by an example which shows how large methane volumes can be managed, while still maintaining high outputs at increasing depth. (author). 7 tabs., 10 figs., 20 refs

  7. Economics of "essential use exemptions" for metered-dose inhalers under the Montreal Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCanio, Stephen J; Norman, Catherine S

    2007-10-01

    The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer has led to rapid reductions in the use of ozone-depleting substances worldwide. However, the Protocol provides for "essential use exemptions" (EUEs) if there are no "technically and economically feasible" alternatives. An application that might qualify as an "essential use" is CFC-powered medical metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the US and other nations have applied for exemptions in this case. One concern is that exemptions are necessary to ensure access to medications for low-income uninsureds. We examine the consequences of granting or withholding such exemptions, and conclude that government policies and private-sector programs are available that make it economically feasible to phase out chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in this application, thereby furthering the global public health objectives of the Montreal Protocol without compromising the treatment of patients who currently receive medication by means of MDIs.

  8. Tutelage of man's terrestrial patrimony: Urgency for tenable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caglioti, V.

    1992-01-01

    Urgency for prompt and coordinated action by industrialized countries is emphasized in this analysis of the earth's most pressing environmental problems - desertification, acid rain, deforestation, the greenhouse effect and ozone depletion. In the analysis of the chemical, physical, thermochemical and climatic processes (e.g., ozone reactions with chlorofluorocarbons, Antarctic atmospheric vortex circulation, volcanic eruptions, the earth's water and carbon cycles, cyclic global temperature variations, etc.) governing the formation and modification of the various environmentally destabilizing phenomena, and in the assessments of the severity and duration of the effects, the paper evidences global and socio-economic aspects relative to the probable causes and proposed solutions. The author states that whereas greater investment by industrialized countries in environmental protection and technology transfer programs is essential to save the earth's natural resources, overall positive results can be achieved only through a contemporaneous change in social values to favour the sharing of the earth's wealth among nations and future generations

  9. Is there any chlorine monoxide in the stratosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, M. J.; Rogers, J. D.; Kostiuk, T.; Deming, D.; Hillman, J. J.; Zipoy, D.

    1983-01-01

    A ground-based search for stratospheric 35-ClO was carried out using an infrared heterodyne spectrometer in the solar absorption mode. Lines due to stratospheric HNO3 and tropospheric OCS were detected at about 0.2 percent absorptance levels, but the expected 0.1 percent lines of ClO in this same region were not seen. We find that stratospheric ClO is at least a factor of seven less abundant than is indicated by in situ measurements, and we set an upper limit of 2.3 x 10 to the 13th molecules/sq cm at the 95 percent confidence level for the integrated vertical column density of ClO. Our results imply that the release of chlorofluorocarbons may be significantly less important for the destruction of stratospheric ozone (O3) than is currently thought. Previously announced in STAR as N83-27518

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of an Evaporative Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapilan N.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of chlorofluorocarbon based refrigerants in the air-conditioning system increases the global warming and causes the climate change. The climate change is expected to present a number of challenges for the built environment and an evaporative cooling system is one of the simplest and environmentally friendly cooling system. The evaporative cooling system is most widely used in summer and in rural and urban areas of India for human comfort. In evaporative cooling system, the addition of water into air reduces the temperature of the air as the energy needed to evaporate the water is taken from the air. Computational fluid dynamics is a numerical analysis and was used to analyse the evaporative cooling system. The CFD results are matches with the experimental results.

  11. Electron-induced hydrogen loss in uracil in a water cluster environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, M.; Kohanoff, J. [Atomistic Simulation Centre, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Fabrikant, I. I., E-mail: ifabrikant1@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588, USA and Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-14

    Low-energy electron-impact hydrogen loss due to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to the uracil and thymine molecules in a water cluster environment is investigated theoretically. Only the A{sup ′}-resonance contribution, describing the near-threshold behavior of DEA, is incorporated. Calculations are based on the nonlocal complex potential theory and the multiple scattering theory, and are performed for a model target with basic properties of uracil and thymine, surrounded by five water molecules. The DEA cross section is strongly enhanced when the attaching molecule is embedded in a water cluster. This growth is due to two effects: the increase of the resonance lifetime and the negative shift in the resonance position due to interaction of the intermediate negative ion with the surrounding water molecules. A similar effect was earlier found in DEA to chlorofluorocarbons.

  12. Reduction of deepwater formation in the Greenland Sea during the 1980s: Evidence from tracer data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, P.; Boenisch, G.; Bayer, R.; Rhein, M.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrographic observations and measurements of the concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have suggested that the formation of Greenland Sea Deep Water (GSDW) slowed down considerably during the 1980s. Such a decrease is related to weakened convection in the Greenland Sea and thus could have significant impact on the properties of the waters flowing over the Scotland-Iceland-Greenlad ridge system into the deep Atlantic. Study of the variability of GSDW formation is relevant for understanding the impact of the circulation in the European Polar seas on regional and global deep water characteristics. New long-term multitracer observations from the Greenland Sea show that GSDW formation indeed was greatly reduced during the 1980s. A box model of deepwater formation and exchange in the European Polar seas tuned by the tracer data indicates that the reduction rate of GSDW formation was about 80% and that the start date of the reduction was between 1978 and 1982. 24 refs., 4 figs

  13. The GEOS Chemistry Climate Model: Comparisons to Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Douglass, A. R.

    2008-05-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOS CCM) has been developed by combining the atmospheric chemistry and transport modules developed over the years at Goddard and the GEOS general circulation model, also developed at Goddard. We will compare model simulations of ozone, and the minor constituents that affect ozone, for the period around 1980 with newly released revised data from the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) instrument on Nimbus 4. We will also compare model simulations for the period of the early 2000s with the data from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the High Resolution Dynamic Limb Sounder (HRDLS) on the Aura satellite. We will use these comparisons to examine the performance of the model for the present atmosphere and for the change that has occurred during the last 2 decades of ozone loss due to chlorine and bromine compounds released from chlorofluorocarbons and halons.

  14. Shallow groundwater intrusion to deeper depths caused by construction and drainage of a large underground facility. Estimation using 3H, CFCs and SF6 as trace materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Hasegawa, Takuma; Nakata, Kotaro; Tomioka, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates a method to estimate shallow groundwater intrusion in and around a large underground research facility (Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory-MIU). Water chemistry, stable isotopes (δD and δ 18 O), tritium ( 3 H), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) in groundwater were monitored around the facility (from 20 m down to a depth of 500 m), for a period of 5 years. The results show that shallow groundwater inflows into deeper groundwater at depths of between 200–400 m. In addition, the content of shallow groundwater estimated using 3 H and CFC-12 concentrations is up to a maximum of about 50%. This is interpreted as the impact on the groundwater environment caused by construction and operation of a large facility over several years. The concomitant use of 3 H and CFCs is an effective method to determine the extent of shallow groundwater inflow caused by construction of an underground facility. (author)

  15. Scaling of silent electrical discharge reactors for hazardous organics destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coogan, J.J.; Rosocha, L.A.; Brower, M.J.; Kang, M.; Schmidt, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Silent electrical discharges are used to produce highly reactive free radicals that destroy hazardous compounds entrained in gaseous effluents at ambient gas temperatures and pressures. We have carried out destruction experiments at Los Alamos on a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including trichloroethylene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride, perchloroethylene (PCE), and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). We have measured a ''nine-factor'', the amount of energy required to reduce the VOC concentration by a factor of ten. For practical reactor power densities, the ''nine-factor'' can be used to predict the destruction an removal efficiency (DRE) in terms of gas flow rate and the number of reactor modules. This report proposes a modular, stackable architecture for scaling up the reactor throughput

  16. Atmospheric chemistry of CFCs and potential alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    Since the discovery of the ozone hole, the knowledge of atmospheric chemistry related to ozone depletion and chlorofluorocarbons has increased significantly. Factors that result in large losses in ozone during the Antarctic spring are present in the Arctic, although a hole has not been observed. The latest science is discussed as it pertains to the Arctic and Antarctic regions. The ozone depletion potentials (ODP) and global warming potentials (GWP) of the most likely alternatives are presented and related to their environmental acceptability. NASA, NSF, NOAA, EPA and the industry sponsored AFEAS program are coordinating efforts to provide further scientific information to more fully understand the potential environmental effects of alternatives. A progress report is given

  17. Air quality guidelines for arenas in Nova Scotia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    A series of guidelines have been prepared to address the quality of air in skating arena facilities in Nova Scotia. They are limited to carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide emissions. Average nitrogen dioxide levels should not exceed 1 part per million (ppm). Average carbon monoxide levels should not exceed 25 ppm. These guidelines do not address other contaminants such as ammonia or chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The guidelines are considered to be the minimum standards required for safe arena operations. These standards can be met by reducing emissions of the ice resurfacer and edger which is one of the major sources of poor air quality in arenas. Other ways to meet the standards are to ensure proper equipment operation, ventilation and monitoring of indoor air quality levels. Symptoms of exposure and potential consequences were also described. It was noted that owners and operators may be found libel for injury if a proper environment is not maintained. 6 appendices.

  18. The global warming problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter, a discussion is presented of the global warming problem and activities contributing to the formation of acid rain, urban smog and to the depletion of the ozone layer. Globally, about two-thirds of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions arise from fossil-fuel burning; the rest arise primarily from deforestation. Chlorofluorocarbons are the second largest contributor to global warming, accounting for about 20% of the total. The third largest contributor is methane, followed by ozone and nitrous oxide. A study of current activities in the US that contribute to global warming shows the following: electric power plants account for about 33% of carbon dioxide emissions; motor vehicles, planes and ships (31%); industrial plants (24%); commercial and residential buildings (11%)

  19. Efforts to reduce stratospheric ozone loss affect agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weare, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    Research has shown that the increased ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface resulting from stratospheric ozone loss poses a danger to everyone. Concern about ozone loss prompted many nations to ratify the Montreal Protocol, the most comprehensive international environmental agreement ever enacted. Several provisions of this protocol will have substantial, long-term effects on the agricultural industry. Agriculture contributes substantially to ozone depletion, primarily through its use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) for refrigeration in processing, storage and transport of meats and produce. This paper is meant to serve as an overview of the scientific basis for ozone depletion concerns, a description of the current international policy agreement, and the possible consequences of that policy for agriculture. (author)

  20. First joint environmental consultancy for China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, S.

    1993-01-01

    China's first joint venture environmental consulting firm, Environomics, formed with $100,000 from Chinese and U.S. investors, will begin doing business next month, says general manager Husayn Anwar. Last December Beijing slated its environmental industry's output to triple to yuan 10 billion ($1.8 billion)/year by the year 2000 - a response to increased strains on the environment caused by China's economic boom. The chemical industry is the foremost source of emissions of toxic substances such as mercury, phenol, and chromium: it also emits one-third of all industrial wastewater in the country, according to a May 1992 Ministry of the Chemical Industry report. Demand for ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons, without any change in technology, is set to triple by 2000, the ministry says

  1. International aspects of the mitigation of the environmental effects of energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, H.G.

    1987-01-01

    It is hard to draw a boundary between those impacts on the environment which are specifically related to energy and those which are a general consequence of the concentration of human activities. This survey of international activities on energy and the environment will be restricted to those effects which commonly operate across international boundaries and will not include such problems as the airborne chemical problems at Bhopal, the Rhine spill at Basel or the ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons. The major international energy-related concerns are: (1) carbon dioxide and the possible warming of the earth; (2) sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides and photochemical oxidant effects on lakes, streams, forests, and structures; (3) nuclear radioactive releases from weapons testing and power plants as they affect human health; and (4) the disposal of radioactive waste as a possible threat for the future ground water supplies or oceans

  2. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations

  3. Electron capture detector based on a non-radioactive electron source: operating parameters vs. analytical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bunert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatographs with electron capture detectors are widely used for the analysis of electron affine substances such as pesticides or chlorofluorocarbons. With detection limits in the low pptv range, electron capture detectors are the most sensitive detectors available for such compounds. Based on their operating principle, they require free electrons at atmospheric pressure, which are usually generated by a β− decay. However, the use of radioactive materials leads to regulatory restrictions regarding purchase, operation, and disposal. Here, we present a novel electron capture detector based on a non-radioactive electron source that shows similar detection limits compared to radioactive detectors but that is not subject to these limitations and offers further advantages such as adjustable electron densities and energies. In this work we show first experimental results using 1,1,2-trichloroethane and sevoflurane, and investigate the effect of several operating parameters on the analytical performance of this new non-radioactive electron capture detector (ECD.

  4. Greenhouse effects. Attempts of two sciences academy reports synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with the greenhouse effect. It is divided into three parts. In the first one, are given the main questions which are raised by the greenhouse effect: what will be the global increase of the earth if the developed countries continue to release gases as carbon oxides or chlorofluorocarbons? What will it be with the increase of the population and with the development of the countries less industrialized nowadays (80% of the earth's population)? What will be the effect on the global climate and on the regional climates? What will be the consequences for the nature, the men and the living species? The possible consequences are explained and some solutions are proposed. (O.L.)

  5. Human activities affecting trace gases and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braatz, B.; Ebert, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Earth's climate has been in a constant state of change throughout geologic time due to natural perturbations in the global geobiosphere. However, various human activities have the potential to cause future global warming over a relatively short amount of time. These activities, which affect the Earth's climate by altering the concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere, include energy consumption, particularly fossil-fuel consumption; industrial processes (production and use of chlorofluorocarbons, halons, and chlorocarbons, landfilling of wastes, and cement manufacture); changes in land use patterns, particularly deforestation and biomass burning; and agricultural practices (waste burning, fertilizer usage, rice production, and animal husbandry). Population growth is an important underlying factor affecting the level of growth in each activity. This paper describes how the human activities listed above contribute to atmospheric change, the current pattern of each activity, and how levels of each activity have changed since the early part of this century

  6. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabine, C.L.; Key, R.M.; Hall, M.; Kozyr, A.

    1999-08-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), and radiocarbon (delta 14C), at hydrographic stations, as well as the underway partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) during the R/V Thomas G. Thompson oceanographic cruise in the Pacific Ocean (Section P10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Suva, Fiji, on October 5, 1993, and ended in Yokohama, Japan, on November 10, 1993. Measurements made along WOCE Section P10 included pressure, temperature, salinity [measured by conductivity temperature, and depth sensor (CTD)], bottle salinity, bottle oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12), TCO2, TALK, delta 14C, and underway pCO2.

  7. Between prohibition and proof of need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haltiner, E. W.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the consequences of new Swiss legislation on the use of chloro-fluoro-carbons (CFC) in refrigeration and air-conditioning units. In particular, the initial replacement of refrigerants that deplete the ozone layer with CFC products is discussed and the climate warming issues associated with global warming potential of these CFCs are examined. The measures set out in the new materials decree that bans substances with a long-term stability in certain appliances and that demands the adherence to the newest technical standards for operation and maintenance are described. The options of refraining from using cooling apparatus at all or the use of other possible solutions for meeting cooling needs using natural working fluids are discussed and the associated problems are discussed. The article is completed with a table giving figures on ecological impact of various substances and a summary of current regulations

  8. Atlantic CFC data in CARINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Steinfeldt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Water column data of carbon and carbon-relevant parameters have been collected and merged into a new database called CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic. In order to provide a consistent data set, all data have been examined for systematic biases and adjusted if necessary (secondary quality control (QC. The CARINA data set is divided into three regions: the Arctic/Nordic Seas, the Atlantic region and the Southern Ocean. Here we present the CFC data for the Atlantic region, including the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113 as well as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. The methods applied for the secondary quality control, a crossover analyses, the investigation of CFC ratios in the ocean and the CFC surface saturation are presented. Based on the results, the CFC data of some cruises are adjusted by a certain factor or given a "poor'' quality flag.

  9. DETECTING INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF EARTH-LIKE EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Henry W. [Harvard College, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Abad, Gonzalo Gonzalez; Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: henrylin@college.harvard.edu, E-mail: ggonzalezabad@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Detecting biosignatures, such as molecular oxygen in combination with a reducing gas, in the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets has been a major focus in the search for alien life. We point out that in addition to these generic indicators, anthropogenic pollution could be used as a novel biosignature for intelligent life. To this end, we identify pollutants in the Earth's atmosphere that have significant absorption features in the spectral range covered by the James Webb Space Telescope. We focus on tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) and trichlorofluoromethane (CCl{sub 3}F), which are the easiest to detect chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) produced by anthropogenic activity. We estimate that ∼1.2 days (∼1.7 days) of total integration time will be sufficient to detect or constrain the concentration of CCl{sub 3}F (CF{sub 4}) to ∼10 times the current terrestrial level.

  10. CFC alternatives for thermal insulation foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankland, I.R. (Allied-Signal Inc., Buffalo, NY (US))

    1990-03-01

    Low density polymeric foam materials expanded with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) blowing agents have found widespread use as highly efficient thermal insulation materials in the construction, refrigeration appliance and transportation industries. The advent of regulations which are reducing the production and consumption of the fully halogenated CFCs for environmental reasons has prompted the development of environmentally acceptable substitutes for the CFC blowing agents. This paper summarizes the physical properties and performance of the leading alternatives for CFC-11, which is used to expand rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foams, and the leading alternatives for CFC-12 which is used to expand extruded polystyrene board foam. Although the alternatives, HCFC-123 and HCFC-14lb for CFC-11 and HCFC142b and HCFC-124 for CFC-12, are not perfect matches from the performance viewpoint, they represent the optimum choice given the constraints on environmental acceptability, toxicity, flammability and performance. (author).

  11. International aspects of restrictions of ozone-depleting substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, S.C.

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes international efforts to protect stratospheric ozone. Also included in this report is a discussion of activities in other countries to meet restrictions in the production and use of ozone-depleting substances. Finally, there is a brief presentation of trade and international competitiveness issues relating to the transition to alternatives for the regulated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons. The stratosphere knows no international borders. Just as the impact of reduced stratospheric ozone will be felt internationally, so protection of the ozone layer is properly an international effort. Unilateral action, even by a country that produces and used large quantities of ozone-depleting substances, will not remedy the problem of ozone depletion if other countries do not follow suit. 32 refs., 7 tabs.

  12. Volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone from radioactive wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ronald J.; Andraski, Brian J.; Stonestrom, David A.; Luo, Wentai

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are often comingled with low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW), but little is known about subsurface VOC emanations from LLRW landfills. The current study systematically quantified VOCs associated with LLRW over an 11-yr period at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in southwestern Nevada. Unsaturated-zone gas samples of VOCs were collected by adsorption on resin cartridges and analyzed by thermal desorption and GC/MS. Sixty of 87 VOC method analytes were detected in the 110-m-thick unsaturated zone surrounding a LLRW disposal facility. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were detected in 100% of samples collected. Chlorofluorocarbons are powerful greenhouse gases, deplete stratospheric ozone, and are likely released from LLRW facilities worldwide. Soil-gas samples collected from a depth of 24 m and a horizontal distance 100 m south of the nearest waste-disposal trench contained >60,000 ppbv total VOCs, including >37,000 ppbv CFCs. Extensive sampling in the shallow unsaturated zone (0–2 m deep) identified areas where total VOC concentrations exceeded 5000 ppbv at the 1.5-m depth. Volatile organic compound concentrations exceeded background levels up to 300 m from the facility. Maximum vertical diffusive fluxes of total VOCs were estimated to be 1 g m-2 yr-1. Volatile organic compound distributions were similar but not identical to those previously determined for tritium and elemental mercury. To our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize the unsaturated zone distribution of VOCs emanating from a LLRW landfill. Our results may help explain anomalous transport of radionuclides at the ADRS and elsewhere.

  13. Metabolism of the hydrochlorofluorocarbon 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J W; Anders, M W

    1991-01-01

    1,2-Dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-132b) is a potential substitute for some ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons and a model for other 1,1,1,2-tetrahaloethanes under consideration as chlorofluorocarbon substitutes. Male Fischer 344 rats were given 10 mmol/kg HCFC-132b dissolved in corn oil by intraperitoneal injection. An NMR assay for covalent binding of HCFC-132b metabolites to liver proteins was negative, whereas binding was observed in halothane-treated rats. Total urinary metabolites excreted by rats given HCFC-132b during the first 24 h amounted to 1.8 +/- 0.1% of the injected dose, as determined by 19F NMR. During the first 6 h, metabolites of HCFC-132b corresponding to 2-chloro-2,2-difluoroethyl glucuronide, unknown metabolite A, chlorodifluoroacetic acid, and chlorodifluoroacetaldehyde hydrate [both free and conjugated (unknown metabolite B)] were excreted in urine in the approximate ratio 100:9:3:7, respectively. Metabolite A is apparently an O-conjugate of 2-chloro-2,2-difluoroethanol; unconjugated 2-chloro-2,2-difluoroethanol was not detected in urine. The 19F NMR spectrum of metabolite B indicates the formation of a hemiacetal of chlorodifluoroacetaldehyde. Repeated exposure of rats to HCFC-132b significantly increased both the rate of chlorodifluoroacetic acid excretion and the relative fraction of the HCFC-132b dose excreted as chlorodifluoroacetic acid in urine. Incubation of HCFC-132b with rat hepatic microsomes yielded chlorodifluoroacetaldehyde hydrate as the only fluorinated product. The in vitro metabolism of HCFC-132b was increased in microsomes from pyridine-treated rats as compared with control rats, and HCFC-132b metabolism was inhibited by p-nitrophenol, indicating that the cytochrome P-450 isoform IIE1 is largely responsible for the initial hydroxylation of HCFC-132b.

  14. Distribution of Isotopic and Environmental Tracers in Groundwater, Northern Ada County, Southwestern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Candice B.; Bartolino, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Residents of northern Ada County, Idaho, depend on groundwater for domestic and agricultural uses. The population of this area is growing rapidly and groundwater resources must be understood for future water-resource management. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, used a suite of isotopic and environmental tracers to gain a better understanding of groundwater ages, recharge sources, and flowpaths in northern Ada County. Thirteen wells were sampled between September and October 2009 for field parameters, major anions and cations, nutrients, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, tritium, radiocarbon, chlorofluorocarbons, and dissolved gasses. Well depths ranged from 30 to 580 feet below land surface. Wells were grouped together based on their depth and geographic location into the following four categories: shallow aquifer, intermediate/deep aquifer, Willow Creek aquifer, and Dry Creek aquifer. Major cations and anions indicated calcium-bicarbonate and sodium-bicarbonate water types in the study area. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes carried an oxygen-18 excess signature, possibly indicating recharge from evaporated sources or water-rock interactions in the subsurface. Chlorofluorocarbons detected modern (post-1940s) recharge in every well sampled; tritium data indicated modern water (post-1951) in seven, predominantly shallow wells. Nutrient concentrations tended to be greater in wells signaling recent recharge based on groundwater age dating, thus confirming the presence of recent recharge in these wells. Corrected radiocarbon results generated estimated residence times from modern to 5,100 years before present. Residence time tended to increase with depth, as confirmed by all three age-tracers. The disagreement among residence times indicates that samples were well-mixed and that the sampled aquifers contain a mixture of young and old recharge. Due to a lack of data, no conclusions about sources of recharge could be drawn

  15. Atmospheric chemistry of hydrofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehested, J.

    1995-03-01

    Pulse radiolysis coupled with a time resolved UV absorption detection system and a FTIR spectrometer coupled to a 140 l reaction chamber was used to study the degradation of HCFCs and HFCs in the atmosphere. Reaction rates for a series of reactions of HFCs and HCFCs were investigated: F + RH, R + O 2 + RO 2 + NO, and RO 2 + NO 2 + M, together with UV absorption spectra of the halogenated alkyl (R) and halogenated alkyl peroxy radicals (RO 2 ). The products following the self reactions for RO 2 radicals for RO 2 = CF 3 CF 2 O 2 , CF 2 HCF 2 O 2 , CF 3 CH 2 O 2 , CFH 2 CFHO 2 , CF 3 O 2 , and CF 3 C(O)O 2 were investigated by the FTIR setup. The results show that the self reaction of halogenated peroxy radicals give the alkoxy radical, RO, as product. The atmospheric fate of these radicals were C-C bond cleavage for CF 3 CF 2 O, CHF 2 CF 2 O, CFH 2 CHFO, and CF 3 C(O)O; while CF 3 CH 2 O radicals rect with O 2 to give CF 3 CHO and HO 2 . The reaction between CFH 2 O 2 and HO 2 was shown to give 29±7 % CH 2 FCOOH and 72±11 % HCOF as the carbon containing products. The following CF 3 O reactions were studied: CF 3 O+NO, (5.2±2.7)x10 -11 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 ; CF 3 O+ 10 13 molecule -1 s -1 ; CF 3 O+H 2 O, 0.2-40x10 -17 cm 3 molecule. Reactions of FCO x , x=1,2,3 and FO x , x=0,1,2, were also studied: k(FC(O)+NO)=(1.0±0.2)x10 -11 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , k(FC(O)O 2 +NO)=(2.5±0.8)x10 -11 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , k(FC(O)O+NO=(1.3±0.7)x10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , k(FC(O)O+O 3 ) -14 cm 3 molecule - 1 s -1 , k(FO 2 +NO)=(1.45±0 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , k(FO 2 +NO 2 )=(1.05±0.15)x10 -13 cm 3 mole k(FO 2 +CO) -16 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , k(FO 2 +CH 4 ) - molecule -1 s -1 , k(FO 2 +O 3 )z3.4x10 -16 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 k(FO+O 3 ) -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . The results from this together with data available in the literature indicate that HFCs do not destroy stratospheric ozone. (author). 11 tabs.; 23 ills.; 106 refs

  16. Inventory compilation of F-gases 2008. Data on HFCs, PFCs, and SF{sub 6} for the national emissions reporting under the Framework Convention on Climate Change for the reporting year 2008; Emissionen fluorierter Treibhausgase in Deutschland 2008. Inventarermittlung der F-Gase 2008 Daten von HFKW, FKW und SF6 fuer die nationale Emissionsberichterstattung gemaess Klimarahmenkonvnention fuer das Berichtsjahr 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Winfried [Oeko-Recherche Buero fuer Umweltforschung und -beratung GmbH, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    This report presents the 2008 data on the German emissions of the fluorinated greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs, and SF{sub 6} (F-gases) to be entered into the ZSE (Centralised System of Emissions at the German Environmental Agency). The overall emissions of HFCs, PFCs, and SF6 have doubled from 1995 to 2008, from 3,241 to 7,202 metric tons. In terms of global warming, the emissions in 2008 exceeded again the 1995 level, with 18.0 vs. 15.5 million tons CO{sub 2} equivalent. Against the previous your, the emissions in metric units have decreased the first time since 1995, however the global warming emissions, have increased by further 0.7 million t CO{sub 2} equivalent. PFC emissions remained in 2008 at the 2007 level although they show a constant down trend from 1995 onwards. Emissions of SF6, which had decreased before 2002, are increasing again from 2003/04. HFC emissions, which continue rising since 1995, stopped growing in 2008 due to a consumption drop in the foam sector. They represent almost two thirds of the total German F-gas emissions. However, only refrigeration and air conditioning are still substantial applications of HFCs, while in the formerly large application sectors of CFCs and HCFCs, such as hard foam, fire extinguishers, and aerosols, natural fluids are being used widely, today. In stationary refrigeration and mobile air conditioning, the upward trend in HFCs emissions was still ongoing in 2008. Section I of this report presents the F-gas emissions data for 2008, in addition to those in 1995, 2000, 2004, and 2007. In section II the data sources of survey are documented. Section III presents the F-gas emissions 1995 - 2008 in detailed tables, by individual sectors. (orig.)

  17. A study of alternative refrigerants for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector in Mauritius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreepaul, R. K.

    2017-11-01

    The most frequently used refrigerants in the refrigeration and air conditioning (RAC) sector in Mauritius are currently hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC). However, because of their strong influence on global warming and the impact of HCFCs on the ozone layer, refrigerants such as ammonia (NH3), carbon dioxide (CO2) and Hydrocarbons (HC), having minimal impact on the environment, are being considered. So far, HCs have only been safely used in domestic refrigeration. Ammonia has been used mainly for industrial refrigeration whereas CO2 is still under study. In this paper, a comparative study of the various feasible alternatives is presented in a survey that was undertaken with major stake holders in the field. The retrofitting possibility of existing equipment was assessed and safety issues associated with each refrigerant were analysed. The major setback of hydrocarbons as a widely accepted refrigerant is its flammability which was considered as a major safety hazard by the majority of respondents in the survey and the main advantages are the improved equipment coefficient of performance (COP) and better TEWI factor. This resulted in a 12 % drop in energy consumption. Despite the excellent thermodynamic properties of ammonia, its use has mainly been confined to industrial refrigeration due to its toxicity. In Mauritius, the performance of ammonia in air conditioning is being evaluated on a pilot basis. The major setback of carbon dioxide as a refrigerant is the high operating pressure which is considered a safety hazard. The high initial investment cost and the lack of qualified maintenance technician is also an issue. The use of CO2 is mainly being considered in the commercial refrigeration sector.

  18. Anesthetic gases and global warming: Potentials, prevention and future of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadani, Hina; Vyas, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Global warming refers to an average increase in the earth's temperature, which in turn causes changes in climate. A warmer earth may lead to changes in rainfall patterns, a rise in sea level, and a wide range of impacts on plants, wildlife, and humans. Greenhouse gases make the earth warmer by trapping energy inside the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases are any gas that absorbs infrared radiation in the atmosphere and include: water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), halogenated fluorocarbons (HCFCs), ozone (O3), perfluorinated carbons (PFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Hazardous chemicals enter the air we breathe as a result of dozens of activities carried out during a typical day at a healthcare facility like processing lab samples, burning fossil fuels etc. We sometimes forget that anesthetic agents are also greenhouse gases (GHGs). Anesthetic agents used today are volatile halogenated ethers and the common carrier gas nitrous oxide known to be aggressive GHGs. With less than 5% of the total delivered halogenated anesthetic being metabolized by the patient, the vast majority of the anesthetic is routinely vented to the atmosphere through the operating room scavenging system. The global warming potential (GWP) of a halogenated anesthetic is up to 2,000 times greater than CO2. Global warming potentials are used to compare the strength of different GHGs to trap heat in the atmosphere relative to that of CO2. Here we discuss about the GWP of anesthetic gases, preventive measures to decrease the global warming effects of anesthetic gases and Xenon, a newer anesthetic gas for the future of anesthesia.

  19. France uses the sun to cool its wine: the Banyuls winery solar cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-12-01

    The engineering consultancy Tecsol was asked to design a cooling system for a winery that would limit the variations in temperature during the year. Tecsol proposed a solar system. The total investment cost amounted to nearly two million French Francs (300,000 euros), almost double the cost of a conventional air-conditioning system. However, because the solar system reduced the conventional energy needs of the warehouse by about 40%, the French Agency for Environment and Energy Management (ADEME) provided a 37% subsidy for its rational use of energy. The 'Solarclim' solar installation has three functions: it produces hot water via 693 vacuum tube collectors with a useful surface of 130 m{sup 2}. The collectors are fixed to the roof of the wine cellar, which has an angle of 15 deg. Heat from the collectors is transferred to a 1000-litre hot water storage tank; it produces chilled water using a lithium bromide absorption plant with a nominal cooling capacity of 52 kW. This is housed in the technical premises on the lowest level and is used in conjunction with a 180 kW open-circuit cooling tower on the north facade; and the third function combines air-conditioning and, when necessary, space heating. The installation has been operating for 12 years with no particular problems. The equipment is environmentally friendly. The solar heat source avoids CO{sub 2} emissions, the absorption machine does not use CFCs or HCFCs, and the system is totally silent. (UK)

  20. Refrigeration and air-conditioning technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, P. J.; Counce, D. M. [eds.

    1993-01-01

    The Alternative Fluorocarbon Environmental Acceptability Study (AFEAS), a consortium of fluorocarbon manufacturers, and the US Department of Energy (DOE) are collaborating on a project to evaluate the energy use and global warming impacts of CFC alternatives. The goal of this project is to identify technologies that could replace the use of CFCs in refrigeration, heating, and air-conditioning equipment; to evaluate the direct impacts of chemical emissions on global warming; and to compile accurate estimates of energy use and, indirect CO{sub 2} emissions of substitute technologies. The first phase of this work focused on alternatives that could be commercialized before the year 2000. The second phase of the project is examining not-in-kind and next-generation technologies that could be developed to replace CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs over a longer period. As part of this effort, Oak Ridge National Laboratory held a workshop on June 23--25, 1993. The preliminary agenda covered a broad range of alternative technologies and at least one speaker was invited to make a brief presentation at the workshop on each technology. Some of the invited speakers were unable to participate, and in a few cases other experts could not be identified. As a result, those technologies were not represented at the workshop. Each speaker was asked to prepare a five to seven page paper addressing six key issues concerning the technology he/she is developing. These points are listed in the sidebar. Each expert also spoke for 20 to 25 minutes at the workshop and answered questions from the other participants concerning the presentation and area of expertise. The primary goal of the presentations and discussions was to identify the developmental state of the technology and to obtain comparable data on system efficiencies. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  1. A range of newly developed mobile generators to dynamically produce SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for reactive compounds at atmospheric concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Daiana; Pascale, Céline; Guillevic, Myriam; Ackermann, Andreas; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Three new mobile facilities have been developed at METAS to dynamically generate SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for a variety of reactive compounds at atmospheric amount of substance fractions and at very low levels of uncertainty (Ux balance. The carrier gas is previously purified from the compounds of interest using commercially available purification cartridges. The permeation chambers of ReGaS2 and ReGaS3 have multiple individual cells allowing for the generation of mixtures containing up to 5 different components if required. ReGaS1 allows for the generation of one-component mixtures only. These primary mixtures are then diluted to the required amount of substance fractions using thermal mass flow controllers for full flexibility and adaptability of the generation process over the entire range of possible concentrations. In order to considerably reduce adsorption/desorption processes and thus stabilisation time, all electro-polished stainless steel parts of ReGaS1 and ReGaS2 in contact with the reference gas mixtures are passivated with SilcoNert2000® surface coating. These three state-of-the-art mobile reference gas generators are applicable under both, laboratory and field conditions. Moreover the dynamic generation method can be adapted and applied to a large variety of molecules (e.g. BTEX, CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs and other refrigerants) and is particularly suitable for reactive gas species and/or at concentration ranges which are unstable when stored in pressurised cylinders. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP). The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union

  2. Hydrogeology of Two Areas of the Tug Hill Glacial-Drift Aquifer, Oswego County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd S.; Bugliosi, Edward F.; Hetcher-Aguila, Kari K.; Eckhardt, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Two water-production systems, one for the Village of Pulaski and the other for the Villages of Sandy Creek and Lacona in Oswego County, New York, withdraw water from the Tug Hill glacial-drift aquifer, a regional sand and gravel aquifer along the western flank of the Tug Hill Plateau, and provide the sole source of water for these villages. As a result of concerns about contamination of the aquifer, two studies were conducted during 2001 to 2004, one for each water-production system, to refine the understanding of ground-water flow surrounding these water-production systems. Also, these studies were conducted to determine the cause of the discrepancy between ground-water ages estimated from previously constructed numerical ground-water-flow models for the Pulaski and Sandy Creek/Lacona well fields and the apparent ground-water ages determined using concentrations of tritium and chlorofluorocarbons. The Village of Pulaski withdrew 650,000 gallons per day in 2000 from four shallow, large-diameter, dug wells finished in glaciolacustrine deposits consisting of sand with some gravelly lenses 3 miles east of the village. Four 2-inch diameter test wells were installed upgradient from each production well, hydraulic heads were measured, and water samples collected and analyzed for physical properties, inorganic constituents, nutrients, bacteria, tritium, dissolved gases, and chlorofluorocarbons. Recharge to the Tug Hill glacial-drift aquifer is from precipitation directly over the aquifer and from upland sources in the eastern part of the recharge area, including (1) unchannelized runoff from till and bedrock hills east of the aquifer, (2) seepage to the aquifer from streams that drain the Tug Hill Plateau, (3) ground-water inflow from the till and bedrock on the adjoining Tug Hill Plateau. Water-quality data collected from four piezometers near the production wells in November 2003 indicated that the water is a calcium-bicarbonate type with iron concentrations that

  3. Simulations of Ground-Water Flow, Transport, Age, and Particle Tracking near York, Nebraska, for a Study of Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants (TANC) to Public-Supply Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian R.; Landon, Matthew K.; Kauffman, Leon J.; Hornberger, George Z.

    2008-01-01

    Contamination of public-supply wells has resulted in public-health threats and negative economic effects for communities that must treat contaminated water or find alternative water supplies. To investigate factors controlling vulnerability of public-supply wells to anthropogenic and natural contaminants using consistent and systematic data collected in a variety of principal aquifer settings in the United States, a study of Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to public-supply wells was begun in 2001 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The area simulated by the ground-water flow model described in this report was selected for a study of processes influencing contaminant distribution and transport along the direction of ground-water flow towards a public-supply well in southeastern York, Nebraska. Ground-water flow is simulated for a 60-year period from September 1, 1944, to August 31, 2004. Steady-state conditions are simulated prior to September 1, 1944, and represent conditions prior to use of ground water for irrigation. Irrigation, municipal, and industrial wells were simulated using the Multi-Node Well package of the modular three-dimensional ground-water flow model code, MODFLOW-2000, which allows simulation of flow and solutes through wells that are simulated in multiple nodes or layers. Ground-water flow, age, and transport of selected tracers were simulated using the Ground-Water Transport process of MODFLOW-2000. Simulated ground-water age was compared to interpreted ground-water age in six monitoring wells in the unconfined aquifer. The tracer chlorofluorocarbon-11 was simulated directly using Ground-Water Transport for comparison with concentrations measured in six monitoring wells and one public supply well screened in the upper confined aquifer. Three alternative model simulations indicate that simulation results are highly sensitive to the distribution of multilayer well bores where leakage

  4. Efficacy and safety of eco-friendly inhalers: focus on combination ipratropium bromide and albuterol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos RJ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ralph J Panos1,2 1Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine Division, Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 2Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine Division, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and its treatment is critical to improve quality of life, reduce symptoms, and diminish the frequency of COPD exacerbations. Due to the harmful environmental effects of pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs containing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs, newer systems for delivering respiratory medications have been developed. Methods: A search of the literature in the PubMed database was undertaken using the keywords “COPD,” “albuterol,” “ipratropium bromide,” and “Respimat® Soft Mist Inhaler™”; pertinent references within the identified citations were included. The environmental effect of CFC-pMDIs, the invention of the Respimat® Soft Mist Inhaler™ (SMI (Boehringer Ingelheim, Ingelheim, Germany, and its use to deliver the combination of albuterol and ipratropium bromide for the treatment of COPD were reviewed. Results: The adverse environmental effects of CFC-pMDIs stimulated the invention of novel delivery systems including the Respimat SMI. This review presents its development, internal mechanism, and use to deliver the combination of albuterol and ipratropium bromide. Conclusion: CFC-pMDIs contributed to the depletion of the ozone layer and the surge in disorders caused by harmful ultraviolet B radiation. The banning of CFCs spurred the development of novel delivery systems for respiratory medications. The Respimat SMI is an innovative device that produces a vapor of inhalable droplets with reduced velocity and prolonged aerosol duration that enhance deposition within the lower airway and is associated with improved patient satisfaction. Clinical trials have demonstrated that the Respimat SMI

  5. Biosphere-Atmosphere Exchange of NOx, CH4, and O3 in Central Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, K. T.; Munger, J. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Budney, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Campos, K.; Rocha, H.; Freitas, H.

    2016-12-01

    Oxidation by OH is the dominant pathway for removing important trace gases such as CH4, CO, CH3Br, and HCFCs. The primary source of atmospheric OH is the photolysis of O3 in the presence of water vapor, and NOx are the main precursors of O3 and OH. Thus, in NOx-rich environments that have both high humidity and high solar radiation, OH concentrations are enhanced, and therefore, tropical forests dominate global oxidation of long-lived gases. The Amazon rain forest has a unique combination of vegetation with diverse characteristics, climate, and a dynamic land use, factors that altogether govern the emission and fate of trace-gases and control particle formation and atmospheric chemistry. Understanding the interactions among the mechanisms that govern local precursor emissions will lead to a better description of the local atmospheric chemistry, which have global impacts. As part of the GoAmazon project, an array of complementary measurements was conducted in a research site in central Amazon, southeast of Santarem (PA, Brazil), situated inside the Tapajos National Forest. The site where the measurements were taken is surrounded by intact rain forest in a 6 km radius, and a 45 m closed canopy. In the east side out of this radius (upwind), some settlements are distributed in a stripe along a road, which were cleared for agriculture and are sparsely populated. The 67 m tower was assembled in the site in 2001 for flux measurements (CO2 and H2O), and included CO in order to assess local and regional biomass burning. In mid 2014 additional instrumentation were added, measuring NOx, O3, CH4, and SO2 fluxes and profiles. The SO2 measurements (until early 2015) showed concentrations up to 0.1 ppb during the peak of the dry season, and a small vertical gradient, suggesting the predominance of biogenic sources. Preliminary results show no significant seasonality in the daytime and nighttime O3 vertical profiles. Occasionally, nighttime profiles showed high concentrations for

  6. Electricity Storage and the Hydrogen-Chlorine Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugolo, Jason Steven

    Electricity storage is an essential component of the transforming energy marketplace. Its absence at any significant scale requires that electricity producers sit ready to respond to every flick of a switch, constantly adjusting power production to meet demand. The dispatchable electricity production technologies that currently enable this type of market are growing unpopular because of their carbon emissions. Popular methods to move away from fossil fuels are wind and solar power. These sources also happen to be the least dispatchable. Electricity storage can solve that problem. By overproducing during sunlight to store energy for evening use, or storing during windy periods for delivery in future calm ones, electricity storage has the potential to allow intermittent renewable sources to constitute a large portion of our electricity mix. I investigate the variability of wind in Chapter 2, and show that the variability is not significantly reduced by geographically distributing power production over the entire country of the Netherlands. In Chapter 3, I calculate the required characteristics of a linear-response, constant activity storage technology to map wind and solar production scenarios onto several different supply scenarios for a range of specified system efficiencies. I show that solid electrode batteries have two orders of magnitude too little energy per unit power to be well suited for renewable balancing and emphasize the value of the modular separation between the power and energy components of regenerative fuel cell technologies. In Chapter 4 I introduce the regenerative hydrogen-chlorine fuel cell (rHCFC), which is a specific technology that shows promise for the above applications. In collaboration with Sustainable Innovations, we have made and tested 6 different rHCFCs. In order to understand the relative importance of the different inefficiencies in the rHCFC, Chapter 5 introduces a complex temperature and concentration dependent model of the r

  7. HCFC-142b emissions in China: An inventory for 2000 to 2050 basing on bottom-up and top-down methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiarui; Li, Li; Su, Shenshen; Hu, Jianxin; Wu, Jing; Wu, Yusheng; Fang, Xuekun

    2014-05-01

    1-Chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b) is both ozone depleting substance included in the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Montreal Protocol) and potent greenhouse gas with high global warming potential. As one of the major HCFC-142b consumption and production countries in the world, China's control action will contribute to both mitigating climate change and protecting ozone layer. Estimating China's HCFC-142b emission is a crucial step for understanding its emission status, drawing up phasing-out plan and evaluating mitigation effect. Both the bottom-up and top-down method were adopted in this research to estimate HCFC-142b emissions from China. Results basing on different methods were compared to test the effectiveness of two methods and validate inventory's reliability. Firstly, a national bottom-up emission inventory of HCFC-142b for China during 2000-2012 was established based on the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories and the Montreal Protocol, showing that in contrast to the downward trend revealed by existing results, HCFC-142b emissions kept increasing from 0.1 kt/yr in 2000 to the peak of 14.4 kt/yr in 2012. Meanwhile a top-down emission estimation was also developed using interspecies correlation method. By correlating atmospheric mixing ratio data of HCFC-142b and reference substance HCFC-22 sampled from four representative cities (Beijing, Hangzhou, Lanzhou and Guangzhou, for northern, eastern, western and southern China, respectively), China's HCFC-142b emission in 2012 was calculated. It was 16.24(13.90-18.58) kt, equivalent to 1.06 kt ODP and 37 Tg CO2-eq, taking up 9.78% (ODP) of total HCFCs emission in China or 30.5% of global HCFC-142b emission. This result was 12.7% higher than that in bottom-up inventory. Possible explanations were discussed. The consistency of two results lend credit to methods effectiveness and results reliability. Finally, future HCFC-142b emission was projected to 2050

  8. Selected Issues on CO2 in Compression Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarlien, R.

    2004-05-15

    Carbon Dioxide (CO2) has shown promising results as an alternative working fluid compared to the CFCs, HFCs and HCFCs. CO2 provides an environmental friendly alternative in a number of heat pump applications, in automobile air conditioning, and as a secondary fluid in refrigeration systems. The physical and the thermodynamic properties of CO2 differ considerably from the more conventional working fluids and offer new possibilities as well as design challenges for systems and components. On this background IEA Heat Pump Programme's Annex 27 was established. The main objective of the Annex has been to bring the CO2 heat pump technology closer to commercialization, by addressing critical issues of both basic and applied character. The scope of the work under this Annex includes compression heat pump, refrigeration and air-conditioning systems and components, with the main emphasis on heat pumps, using CO2 as working fluid. The term 'compression heat pump' covers vapor compression circuits with phase change. The term 'system' includes all the components used in a heating/cooling system from the heat pump to the inside unit, controls included. Results from 12 different research projects together with an extensive literature survey are presented. The projects are carried out as independent research projects, and the findings and the results are the sole responsibility of the authors. The following projects are presented: 1) Feasibility of transcritical CO2 systems for mobile space conditioning applications. 2) Use of CO2- and propane thermosyphons in combination with compact cooler in domestic freeze. 3) Heat transfer of carbon dioxide in an evaporator. 4) Correlating the heat transfer coefficient during in-tube cooling of turbulent supercritical CO2. 5) Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of super-critical CO2 in microchannel tubes under cooling. 6) Flow vaporization of CO2 in microchannel tubes. 7) Two-phase flow patterns during

  9. Response to 'Perception of risk and the future of nuclear power'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mc Elhleny, V.

    1990-01-01

    In our own domestic politics in the United States, examples of renunciation of a civilian technology that I can think of easily are the Supersonic Transport, where we made a social decision not to subsidize production of the 2000 mile per hour Boeing embodiment, and the related decision to begin restricting the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). We began doing the latter in the 1970s, more as a fallout of the Supersonic Transport debate than the self-standing concern it has become. We now have global arrangements to cut back on CFCs, and it would appear that the ones that we have had are going to be tightened. Those are very unusual in the history of technology. it was not a vote of the people that caused inter-urban trams to go out of service. You can look at the history of Los Angeles and say there were some local votes of bodies that were manipulated to hasten the decline of them, but on the whole, technologies are not voted up or down by the people. This is not a plebiscitary thing. In polling, there is an implication that you are taking a sounding of the people and are acting as a result of that sounding. Perception is that everyone is pushing their button, and then you do something

  10. Options to Accelerate Ozone Recovery: Ozone and Climate Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, E. L.; Daniel, J. S.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone primarily originated from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine). Representatives from governments have met periodically over the years to establish international regulations starting with the Montreal Protocol in 1987, which greatly limited the release of these ozone-depleting substances (DDSs). Two global models have been used to investigate the impact of hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ODSs on total column ozone. The investigations primarily focused on chlorine- and bromine-containing gases, but some computations also included nitrous oxide (N2O). The Montreal Protocol with ODS controls have been so successful that further regulations of chlorine- and bromine-containing gases could have only a fraction of the impact that regulations already in force have had. if all anthropogenic ODS emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2% during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional ODS restrictions. Chlorine- and bromine-containing gases and nitrous oxide are also greenhouse gases and lead to warming of the troposphere. Elimination of N 20 emissions would result in a reduction of radiative forcing of 0.23 W/sq m in 2100 than presently computed and destruction of the CFC bank would produce a reduction in radiative forcing of 0.005 W/sq m in 2100. This paper provides a quantitative way to consider future regulations of the CFC bank and N 20 emissions

  11. How motor vehicles contribute to global warming and air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors describe ways in which motor vehicles are contributing to global climate change and health problems caused by air pollution. Globally, motor vehicles account for about a third of world oil consumption and about 14% of the world's carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning. For the US the figures are 50% of oil demand and about 25% of carbon dioxide emissions. Motor vehicles are the major source of ozone precursors and monitoring data suggest that ozone concentrations are increasing by about one percent per year in the northern hemisphere and are causing adverse effects on human health and on crops. A major source of chlorofluorocarbons in the atmosphere is motor vehicle air conditioning. Annually about 120,000 metric tons of CFCs are used in new vehicles and in serving air conditioners in older vehicles. According to the EPA, vehicle air conditioners accounted for about 16% of the total CFC use in the US during 1989. According to the Montreal Protocol, CFCs are to be completely phased out of new vehicles by the turn of the century, thus reducing the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer

  12. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  13. Greenhouse impact of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and CFC emissions in Finland and its control potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipatti, R.; Savolainen, I.; Sinisalo, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) emissions contribute considerably to the anthropogenic enhancement of Earth`s greenhouse effect. The limitation of atmospheric concentrations of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O is considered important also in the Climate Convention. Chlorine released from the CFCs in the stratosphere destroys ozone (O{sub 3}) and the emissions are therefore regulated with the Montreal Protocol. The greenhouse impact of CFCs might be, at least to some extent, compensated by the depletion of O{sub 3} which is also a greenhouse gas. The objective of the presentation is to assess the role of anthropogenic CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, and CFC emissions in the total direct greenhouse impact due to human activities in Finland. The emission estimates for the gases are presented, as well as scenarios for emission history, future development and control potential. The greenhouse impact of the gases is compared with that of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in Finland. (author)

  14. Radiations in space and global environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguti, Takasi

    1994-01-01

    It has been well known that the global environment of the earth is basically determined by the radiation equilibrium of the earth atmosphere system embedded in the solar radiation. However, the surface temperature of about 15 degC on average is much higher than that determined by the radiation equilibrium. This is due to the so-called greenhouse gases in the atmosphere such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane and others. Also the global environment has evolved by interacting with the living things on the earth, for example, tree oxygen by photosynthesis, and a small amount of ozone protecting living things from the fetal damage due to solar ultraviolet radiation. The solar radiation of short wavelength, that is, ultraviolet to X-ray influences atmospheric constituents, and the thermal structure and dynamics of the atmosphere through chemical reaction. The solar energetic particles produced by solar flares precipitate in the polar regions, and the nitric oxides are produced by auroral X-ray. Auroral activities accelerate particles in the magnetosphere. All these radiations cause significant global changes. Human activities increase greenhouse gases rapidly and cause global warming, and atmospheric chloro-fluoro-carbon (CFC) makes the ozone hole. Now, human activities must be modified to match the natural cycle of materials. (K.I.)

  15. BREEAM [Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method] BRE [Building Research Establishment] assessment method for buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, R.

    1994-01-01

    Buildings account for a large share of environmental impacts in their construction, use, and demolition. In western Europe, buildings account for ca 50% of primary energy use (hence CO 2 output), far outweighing the contribution of the transport and industrial sectors. Other impacts from building energy use include the use of chemicals such as chlorofluorocarbons for cooling. In the United Kingdom, the Building Research Establishment (BRE) has developed a certificate system for environmental labelling of buildings so that the performance of the building against a set of defined environmental criteria can be made visible to clients. This system thus rewards positive actions to improve the environmental performance of buildings and assists in marketing to an environmentally aware clientele. Issues included in assessments for awarding the certificate are addressed under three main headings: global issues and use of resources, local issues, and indoor issues. Global issues include ozone depletion and CO 2 emissions; local issues include public health and water conservation; and indoor issues include air quality and lighting. 8 refs., 1 tab

  16. Implications for human health of global atmospheric changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidotti, T.L.; Last, J.

    1991-01-01

    The possible impacts of the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion and ultraviolet irradiation, acid precipitation, and resulting demographic changes are reviewed, along with the implications of global ecological changes on society and sustainable development. Some manifestations of global warming caused by the greenhouse effect could include more frequently extreme weather conditions, rises in sea level, disruption of ocean currents, and changes in composition and distribution of vegetation. Consequences of these manifestations on human health include an increase in the frequency of droughts and heat waves, migration of disease carrying vectors to other areas, submergence of coastal areas and disruption of water supplies, destruction of tropical species potentially useful for medicinal purposes, and impaired production of crops leading to food shortages. Consequences of stratospheric ozone depletion due to chlorofluorocarbon pollution are thought to be a direct result of increased exposure to ultraviolet light; these consequences include higher risks of non-melanoma skin cancer. The effects of acid precipitation are thought to be primarily ecological and indirect. 61 refs,

  17. Public perception of global warming and related environmental issues in Kano city, Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliyasu, Z.; Abubakar, I.; Gajida, A.U.

    2010-07-01

    Sub-Saharan African countries are at an increased risk of the effects of global warming. Unfortunately they have the least capacity to adapt to its untoward effects. We studied public awareness of global warming, its perceived causes, effects and prevention in Kano city, northern Nigeria. Structured questionnaires were administered on a cross section of 181 adults in Kano eliciting their awareness of global warming, as well as perceived causes, effects and ways of prevention. Of the 181 respondents, 132 (72.9%) were aware of global warming mainly from electronic media (44.4%), the Internet (20.5%) and schools (18.7%). They mostly attributed it to air pollution (99.2%), use of fossil fuels (97.7%), toxic waste (78.0%) and chlorofluorocarbons (73.5%). Perceived effects of global warming include extremes of ambient temperature (97.7%), increased disease outbreaks (92.4%), floods (68.2%), droughts (51.5%) and loss of species (50.0%). Respondents opined that global warming could be prevented by using renewable sources of energy such as the sun (53.8%), massive tree planting (44.7%) and phasing out of old automobiles (43.2%). A significantly higher proportion of males, younger and educated respondents were aware of global warming. The high awareness about global warming needs to be reinforced through use of media to encourage advocacy and community action towards preventing global warming and ensuring environmental sustainability.

  18. Sensing and capture of toxic and hazardous gases and vapors by metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Lustig, William P; Li, Jing

    2018-03-13

    Toxic and hazardous chemical species are ubiquitous, predominantly emitted by anthropogenic activities, and pose serious risks to human health and the environment. Thus, the sensing and subsequent capture of these chemicals, especially in the gas or vapor phase, are of extreme importance. To this end, metal-organic frameworks have attracted significant interest, as their high porosity and wide tunability make them ideal for both applications. These tailorable framework materials are particularly promising for the specific sensing and capture of targeted chemicals, as they can be designed to fit a diverse range of required conditions. This review will discuss the advantages of metal-organic frameworks in the sensing and capture of harmful gases and vapors, as well as principles and strategies guiding the design of these materials. Recent progress in the luminescent detection of aromatic and aliphatic volatile organic compounds, toxic gases, and chemical warfare agents will be summarized, and the adsorptive removal of fluorocarbons/chlorofluorocarbons, volatile radioactive species, toxic industrial gases and chemical warfare agents will be discussed.

  19. Analysis of technologies and economics for geothermal energy utilization of electric power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haijie, C.

    1993-01-01

    Geothermal energy -- it is a kind of heat energy which pertains to the internal heat of the earth. It carries the heat of the earth outward by the underground water of the rock section of the earth. Normally, the temperature of the thermal water is 50 degrees-140 degrees. During the 20th century, the rapid development of industry and agriculture quickly increased the need for large amounts of electric power. Now, although there are coal power plants, oil and nature gas power plants, hydroelectric power and nuclear power plants, all countries of the world attach importance to the prospect of geothermal power plants. It is the most economic (no consumption fuel) and safe (no pollution) power plant. (Present author considered that the chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants such as RII, R12, and etc. are not used). In 1904, Italy established the first geothermal power plant in the world. Soon afterwards, the U.S.A., Iceland, Japan, Russia, and New Zealand also established geothermal power plants. In 1970, China, North China, Jiang province and Guangdong province also established geothermal power plants. In 1975, the U.S.A. geothermal power plant capacity of 522mw was the first in the world

  20. Global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies: Combining fluorocarbon and CO2 effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, P.D.; Fischer, S.K.; Hughes, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are on their way out, due to their role in stratospheric ozone depletion and the related international Montreal Protocol agreement and various national phaseout timetables. As the research, engineering development, and manufacturing investment decisions have ensued to prepare for this transition away from CFCs, the climate change issue has emerged and there has recently been increased attention on the direct global warming potential (GWP) of the fluorocarbon alternatives as greenhouse gases. However, there has been less focus on the indirect global warming effect arising from end-use energy changes and associated CO 2 emissions. A study was undertaken to address these combined global warming effects. A concept of Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) was developed for combining the direct and indirect effects and was used for evaluating CFC-replacement options available in the required CFC transition time frame. Analyses of industry technology surveys indicate that CFC-user industries have made substantial progress toward near-equal energy efficiency with many HCFC/HFC alternatives. The findings also bring into question the relative importance of the direct effect in many applications and stress energy efficiency when searching for suitable CFC alternatives. For chillers, household refrigerators, and unitary air-conditioning or heat pump equipment, changes in efficiency of only 2--5% would have a greater effect on future TEWI than completely eliminating the direct effect

  1. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This is the fourth Energy Information Administration (EIA) annual report on US emissions of greenhouse gases. This report presents estimates of US anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and several other greenhouse gases for 1988 through 1994. Estimates of 1995 carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and halocarbon emissions are also provided, although complete 1995 estimates for methane are not yet available. Emissions of carbon dioxide increased by 1.9% from 1993 to 1994 and by an additional 0.8% from 1994 to 1995. Most carbon dioxide emissions are caused by the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, which is strongly related to economic growth, energy prices, and weather. The US economy grew rapidly in 1994 and slowed in 1995. Estimated emissions of methane increased slightly in 1994, as a result of a rise in emissions from energy and agricultural sources. Estimated nitrous oxide emissions increased by 1.8% in 1995, primarily due to increased use of nitrogen fertilizers and higher output of chemicals linked to nitrous oxide emissions. Estimated emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which are known to contribute to global warming, increased by nearly 11% in 1995, primarily as a result of increasing substitution for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). With the exception of methane, the historical emissions estimates presented in this report are only slightly revised from those in last year`s report.

  2. Fiscal 1999 survey report. Part 2. Research study on restraint of carbon dioxide generation by green chemistry; 1999 nendo green chemistry ni yoru CO{sub 2} hassei yokusei ni kakawaru chosa kenkyu. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    In connection with green chemistry, a concept of bringing paradigm shift to chemical technologies as something that makes reduction in environmental load compatible with economic activities; surveys were made this year on the developments of fine chemicals from renewable resources such as cellulose among the cases of developing chemical substances/products to be called 'green chemicals' reducing environmental load; developments of surfactants produced by certain microorganism, plastic additives with reduced pollutant loads, particularly fire retardants and environmentally benign reactant solvents; concept of green chemistry in the development of chlorofluorocarbon-alternatives; and up-to-date technological level concerning a design method of chemical materials and an estimation method for chemical safety using quantum chemistry calculation. In regard to the chemical materials and products intrinsically containing a certain level of risk, R and D should be reinforced and accelerated in the future on the alternative materials/products reducing their toxicity. In this case, along with the importance of discussing compatibility of technological possibility with economical adaptability, sociological study seems to be necessary in incorporating environmental load reduction into economic evaluation. (NEDO)

  3. Tracer signals of the intermediate layer of the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Monika; Stramma, Lothar; Plähn, Olaf

    In 1995, hydrographic and chlorofluorocarbon (CFCs, components F11, F12) measurements were carried out in the Gulf of Aden, in the Gulf of Oman, and in the Arabian Sea. In the Gulf of Oman, the F12 concentrations in the Persian Gulf outflow (PGW) at about 300m depth were significantly higher than in ambient surface water with saturations reaching 270%. These high values could not be caused by air-sea gas exchange. The outflow was probably contaminated with oil, and the lipophilic character of the CFCs could then lead to the observed supersaturations. The intermediate F12 maximum decreased rapidly further east and south. At the Strait of Bab el Mandeb in the Gulf of Aden, the Red Sea outflow (RSW) was saturated with F12 to about 65% at 400m depth, and decreased to 50% while descending to 800m depth. The low saturation is not surprising, because the outflow contains deep and intermediate water masses from the Red Sea which were isolated from the surface for some time. The tracer contributions to the Arabian Sea for Indian Central Water (ICW) and PGW are about equal, while below 500m depth the RSW contribution greatly exceeds ICW. Modeling the CFC budget of the Arabian Sea, the inflow of ICW north of 12°N is estimated to be 1-6 Sv, depending mainly on the strength of the flow of Red Sea Water into the Arabian Sea.

  4. Importance of the Gulf of Aqaba for the formation of bottom water in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plähn, Olaf; Baschek, Burkard; Badewien, Thomas H.; Walter, Maren; Rhein, Monika

    2002-08-01

    Conductivity-temperature-depth tracer and direct current measurements collected in the northern Red Sea in February and March 1999 are used to study the formation of deep and bottom water in that region. Historical data showed that open ocean convection in the Red Sea can contribute to the renewal of intermediate or deep water but cannot ventilate the bottom water. The observations in 1999 showed no evidence for open ocean convection in the Red Sea during the winter 1998/1999. The overflow water from the Gulf of Aqaba was found to be the densest water mass in the northern Red Sea. An anomaly of the chlorofluorocarbon component CFC-12 observed in the Gulf of Aqaba and at the bottom of the Red Sea suggests a strong contribution of this water mass to the renewal of bottom water in the Red Sea. The CFC data obtained during this cruise are the first available for this region. Because of the new signal, it is possible for the first time to subdivide the deep water column into deep and bottom water in the northern Red Sea. The available data set also shows that the outflow water from the Gulf of Suez is not dense enough to reach down to the bottom of the Red Sea but was found about 250 m above the bottom.

  5. Distribution and ventilation of water masses in the western Ross Sea inferred from CFC measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivaro, Paola; Ianni, Carmela; Magi, Emanuele; Massolo, Serena; Budillon, Giorgio; Smethie, William M.

    2015-03-01

    During the CLIMA Project (R.V. Italica cruise PNRA XVI, January-February 2001), hydrographic and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) observations were obtained, particularly in the western Ross Sea. Their distribution demonstrated water mass structure and ventilation processes in the investigated areas. In the surface waters (AASW) the CFC saturation levels varied spatially: CFCs were undersaturated in all the areas (range from 80 to 90%), with the exception of few stations sampled near Ross Island. In particular, the Terra Nova Bay polynya, where high salinity shelf water (HSSW) is produced, was a low-saturated surface area (74%) with respect to CFCs. Throughout most of the shelf area, the presence of modified circumpolar deep water (MCDW) was reflected in a mid-depth CFC concentration minima. Beneath the MCDW, CFC concentrations generally increased in the shelf waters towards the seafloor. We estimated that the corresponding CFCs saturation level in the source water region for HSSW was about 68-70%. Waters with high CFC concentrations were detected in the western Ross Sea on the down slope side of the Drygalski Trough, indicating that AABW was being supplied to the deep Antarctic Basin. Estimates of ventilation ages depend strongly on the saturation levels. We calculated ventilation ages using the saturation level calibrated tracer ratio, CFC11/CFC12. We deduced a mean residence time of the shelf waters of about 6-7 years between the western Ross Sea source and the shelf break.

  6. Neurotoxicity of 1-bromopropane: Evidence from animal experiments and human studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaku Ichihara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 1-Bromopropane was introduced as an alternative to ozone layer-depleting solvents such as chlorofluorocarbons and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. However, a dozen human cases have been reported with symptoms and signs of toxicity to 1-bromopropane including numbness, diminished vibration sense in the lower extremities as well as ataxic gait. An epidemiological study also demonstrated dose-dependent prolongation of distal latency and decrease in vibration sense in the lower extremities. The initial animal experiments helped to identify and analyze the initial human case of 1-bromopropane toxicity. However, animal data that can explain the central nervous system disorders in humans are limited. Nonetheless, animal data should be carefully interpreted especially in a high-order function of the central nervous system or neurological signs such as ataxia that is influenced by fundamental anatomical/physiological differences between humans and animals. Enzymatic activity in the liver may explain partly the difference in the susceptibility between humans and animals, but further studies are needed to clarify the biological factors that can explain the difference and commonality among the species.

  7. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on development of environmentally friendly high-efficiency energy utilization system. 2. Research of technology of effectively utilizing high-efficiency energy / research of optimum system designing technology; 1998 nendo kankyo chowagata kokoritsu energy riyo system kaihatsu. 2. Kokoritsu energy yuko riyo gijutsu no kenkyu, saiteki system sekkei gijutsu no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    This 2nd volume deals with the transportation and storage of energy in the above-named research. In search of technologies for transporting exhausted heat from the industrial area to the urban section for consumers to utilize the heat for driving their air-conditioners and hot water supply systems, the decomposition and composition reactions of methanol are utilized for a long-range transportation system. The subjects taken up in this connection include the research and development of a methanol energy system, non-equilibrium high-efficiency methanol decomposition technology, multifunctional catalysts, and highly active/selective catalysts capable of promoting reversible endoergic/exoergic reactions. Research and development is also conducted of a high-efficiency heat pump technology using hydrogen-absorbing alloys, and such a pump will realize an air-conditioning system not dependent on chlorofluorocarbon. In the research and development of a long-range heat transportation system using hydrogen-absorbing alloys, a study is made of technologies of heat/hydrogen recovery, transportation, and utilization. (NEDO)

  8. Low helium flux from the mantle inferred from simulations of oceanic helium isotope data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Daniele; Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Key, Robert M.; Schlosser, Peter; Newton, Robert

    2010-09-01

    The high 3He/ 4He isotopic ratio of oceanic helium relative to the atmosphere has long been recognized as the signature of mantle 3He outgassing from the Earth's interior. The outgassing flux of helium is frequently used to normalize estimates of chemical fluxes of elements from the solid Earth, and provides a strong constraint to models of mantle degassing. Here we use a suite of ocean general circulation models and helium isotope data obtained by the World Ocean Circulation Experiment to constrain the flux of helium from the mantle to the oceans. Our results suggest that the currently accepted flux is overestimated by a factor of 2. We show that a flux of 527 ± 102 mol year - 1 is required for ocean general circulation models that produce distributions of ocean ventilation tracers such as radiocarbon and chlorofluorocarbons that match observations. This new estimate calls for a reevaluation of the degassing fluxes of elements that are currently tied to the helium fluxes, including noble gases and carbon dioxide.

  9. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, Tommy

    2012-01-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribut......This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis...... of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first...... two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded...

  10. Hydrochemical and isotope study of Lake Titicaca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonfiantini, R.; Cioni, R.; Paredes, M.

    2002-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic compositions of Lake Titicaca and its inflow waters (precipitation, tributaries, groundwater) were determined with the aim of establishing the lake chemical and isotope balance. The three main regions of the lake, i.e. the Lago Mayor, the eastern and the western basins of Lago Menor, connected in cascade, show significant chemical and isotopic differences. Chloride and sodium balance indicates that an average of about 92% of the inflow water evaporates, and the remaining 8 % is lost through Rio Desaguadero and infiltration. The balance of each basin is also obtained, including the inter-basin fluxes. The stable isotope balance in not possible because no data are available on the mean atmospheric vapour isotopic composition. However, this was tentatively computed using the fluxes obtained from chemistry. The vapour δ-values are slightly more negative than those of rainfall. Tritium, noble gases and chloro-fluoro-carbons in vertical profiles show that the lake is vertically well mixed and there is no water segregation at depth. (author)

  11. Greenhouse effect and its climatic consequences: scientific evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The greenhouse effect plays a major role in climate evolution and the increase observed at present in the concentration of the main gases causing the greenhouse effect (carbon dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons, methane) stems very definitely from human activities. The global warming potential by the various greenhouse effect gases is calculated through restrictive hypotheses. An essential element in the importance given to the growth of the greenhouse effect phenomena was the regular rise in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The overall carbon cycle balance still needs to be worked out. The aerosols caused by sulfurous releases have grown. The decrease in the amount of ozone in the stratosphere brings on a slight cooling of the surface of the Earth. The local increase of tropospheric ozone brings on a slight local warming with a comparable order of magnitude. Despite all the progress that has been achieved in modelling the phenomena, we cannot affirm today that these predictions are accurate. Recent work involving analyses of the polar ice-caps along with other indications of past climates have given a better understanding of the North Atlantic climate over the past 200,000 years. 119 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  12. The development of a solvent-free approach for the determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehntholt, D.J.; Bodek, I.; Miseo, E.V.

    1995-01-01

    Current analytical methods for analysis of total petroleum hydrocarbons or oil and grease in water use extraction of 1.5 liters of the aqueous sample with three aliquots of Freon 113, drying with silica gel and subsequent analysis by infrared spectroscopy at 2,930 cm -1 . The use of chlorofluorocarbons is unacceptable based on environmental concerns regarding the degradation of the ozone layer by photochemical reactions of halocarbons. Due to these environmental concerns, various international agreements have resulted in a plan to eliminate CFCs by the year 2000. A new approach relies on a solid/liquid extraction with thermal desorption of the analytes into a gas stream. The gas stream is analyzed by infrared spectroscopy and the analytes quantified. The steps in the analysis are presented. A known volume of aqueous sample (typically between 10 and 50 ml) is passed through a selectively absorbent resin such as XAD-16. The analytes are absorbed onto the resin, while the water passes through. The analytes are thermally desorbed using a stream of IR transparent gas such as N 2 , At or He which flushes the analytes into a suitable gas cell. The spectrum of the sample is either collected using a Fourier transform spectrometer and commercially available GC/IR or kinetic data collection software or a single wavelength measurement is made using a filter or prism instrument. By integrating the area under the curve for the infrared response versus desorption time, the concentration of the analytes can be calculated

  13. Hydrological and chlorofluoromethane measurements of the Indonesian throughflow entering the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieux, M.; Andrié, C.; Charriaud, E.; Ilahude, A. G.; Metzl, N.; Molcard, R.; Swallow, J. C.

    1996-05-01

    The Java Australia Dynamic Experiment high-resolution February-March 1992 conductivity-temperature-depth and chlorofluoromethane section obtained between Australia and Bali and on the sills between Flores, Sumba, Sawu, Roti, and the Australian continental shelf allows detailed examination of the water masses distribution and their inferred circulation. A sharp hydrological front between the Indonesian waters and the southern Indian Ocean waters is found between 13°S and 14°S in both seasons (February-March 1992 and August 1989). It separates the high-salinity surface waters to the south from the lower-salinity surface waters derived from the Indonesian Seas to the north. It reaches the surface in February 1992, whereas it was capped by a particularly low salinity surface layer in August 1989. Near Bali, the NW monsoon of February-March produces large intrusions of low-salinity water from the Java Sea, through Lombok Strait in the upper 100 m. At depth, the North Indian Intermediate Water, flowing along the Indonesian coast, brings salty, low-oxygen and low-chlorofluorocarbon water. It enters the Sawu Sea through Sumba Strait toward the east, while it undergoes strong mixing with the Indonesian Seas water. The primary pathway of the Indonesian waters is found north of the front and south of the North Indian Intermediate Water, between 13°S and 9°30'S, and the associated salinity minimum can be followed all across the Indian Ocean.

  14. The state of Europe's environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoux, Th.; Desaunay, C.

    2007-01-01

    The deterioration of the world's environment, and in particular the ever greater likelihood of global warming, is the subject of an increasing number of studies. But what is known about the environmental situation in Europe? Despite the political impasse that the European Union is currently in, what are the individual member states doing about the environment? The EU's policy on the environment dates back to 1973, and is remarkable as one of the few areas where the member states appear to accept restrictive agreements unanimously and try afterwards to respect them. Furthermore, the activities of the European Environment Agency seem not to attract the criticisms levelled at most other EU institutions. As Thierry Lavoux explains in this article, the EU's measures have made it possible to stop using both lead in petroleum products and chlorofluorocarbons. The latest challenge for the member states is to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases (especially by meeting the Kyoto criteria) at the same time that emissions generated by the transport and construction sectors are growing steadily. In addition, he stresses, the member states need to be concerned by threats to their ecosystems from urban sprawl, massive use of pesticides and irrigation, and over-fishing... Lastly, says Thierry Lavoux, the EU members must quickly apply their minds to ways of making their agriculture more sustainable and limiting their production of toxic chemicals. (author)

  15. Pollutants from the Gulf War serve as water mass tracer in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plähn, Olaf; Rhein, Monika; Fine, Rana A.; Sullivan, Kevin F.

    In 1995, concentrations of the chlorofluorocarbon compound CFC-12 in the outflow water from the Persian Gulf were 8-40 fold higher than normally caused by air-sea gas exchange. At that time, the anomaly was restricted to the Gulf of Oman north of 20°N, while in 1998 the signal had spread southwestward to 12°N. The sources of this CFC-12 input of about 6400 kg are most likely the fire extinguishers and solvents used during and after the Gulf War in 1991. This CFC-12 signal is a new feature of the Persian Gulf Water (PGW) which can be used to track and quantify the spreading and dilution of PGW in the northern Indian Ocean. The contaminated PGW spreads southward with a mean velocity of 0.02-0.025 m s-1. At 20°N, the anomaly is diluted by a factor of more than two, and east of the island Socotra by a factor of four. A mean transport of less than 0.5·106 m³ s-1 is calculated for PGW assuming a mean dilution rate of 30% from the source signal in the Gulf of Oman to the western Arabian Sea.

  16. Now you see it, now you don't: The ozone hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkniss, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    Fragile, rainbow-colored clouds high in the antarctic sky are a beautiful but onerous reminder that all is not well in the universe. To the trained scientist, the clouds foretell the destruction of Antarctic ozone - a gas that protects the Earth from the sun's destructive ultraviolet rays. The author describes the scene while telling of the Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde role that ozone plays in the environment. In the lower atmosphere, ozone is a nasty pollutant. In the upper atmosphere, it shields the Earth's surface from unwanted ultraviolet radiation. A bombshell was dropped in 1985 by the discovery of a large hole in the ozone layer in the upper atmosphere over the entire expanse of Antarctica. The hole later confirmed in other studies, has been appearing each spring and disappearing each summer since 1975. The mass of scientific evidence leaves no doubt that chlorine from chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) is responsible for destroying the ozone. He predicts the hole will remain for 50 to 100 years, even if the world were to stop releasing CFCs now, although the size of the hole will wax and wane. Increased ultraviolet radiation resulting from the ozone depletion will cause an increase in skin cancer, cataracts, and infection due to weakened immune systems

  17. Our changing atmosphere: Trace gases and the greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, F.S.

    1991-01-01

    A very important factor in the scientific evaluation of greenhouse warming during the last decade has been the realization that this is not just a problem of increasing CO 2 but is rather a more general problem of increasing concentrations of many trace gases. CFCs are increasing at 5% per year with CFC-113 going up at a more rapid rate; methane approximately 1% per year; CO 2 by 0.5% per year; N 2 O about 0.2% per year. These rates of increase have been fed into detailed models of the infrared absorbing characteristics of the atmosphere, and have provided the estimated relative contributions from the various trace gases. Carbon dioxide is still the major contributor to the greenhouse effect, and its yearly contribution appears to be increasing. An important question for dealing with the greenhouse effect will be the full understanding of these CO 2 concentration changes. The total amount of carbon from the burning of fossil fuel that is going into the atmosphere is considerably larger than the carbon dioxide increase registered in the atmosphere. Appreciable CO 2 contributions are also being received from the burning of the tropical forests. The procedures necessary to solve the chlorofluorocarbon problem have been put into place on an international scale and have begun to be implemented. We still have left for the future, however, efforts to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide

  18. Coal and the greenhouse effect: strategies for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, K M [Australian Coal Association, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1991-07-01

    A number of gases, including carbon dioxide, methane, water vapour, nitrous oxide, ozone and chlorofluorocarbons are transparent to incoming short-wave radiation, but are relatively opaque to outgoing longwave radiation. Variations in the concentration of these gases in the troposphere can alter the thermal balance of the earth's atmosphere. Outgoing terrestrial radiation which would otherwise escape to space, is trapped within the inner layer of the atmosphere, resulting in a potential warming and the greenhouse effect. It is estimated that at present greenhouse gases other than carbon dioxide, contribute about 50% to the greenhouse effect. However, in the future, the contribution made by gases other than CO{sub 2} will be become greater. Greenhouse gases arise from a wide range of sources and their escalating increase is largely related to an increase in the world's population, and the standard of living of many areas as well as changes in lifestyle. The effect of increasing man-made greenhouse gases in the troposphere is unknown, but it is proposed that it may increase temperature and may modify climate, agricultural response and land use. The facts and uncertainties relating to potential greenhouse warming are examined. Man-generated emissions are quantified and their source identified. Coal's contribution worldwide is examined in detail and is shown to be small, being about 10% of man-made greenhouse gases. Strategies for minimising emissions, having maximum potential for reduction, with minimum impact on man are suggested. 16 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. The development and evaluation of water-mist fire extinguishing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beason, D. G.; Staggs, K. J.

    1994-08-01

    Fire protection for underfloor space is primarily provided by Halon 1301 which has proven to be very effective. However, due to the link between halons and the possible depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, plans have been implemented to eventually phase out Halon 1301 and 1211. In September 1987 the Montreal Protocol concerning chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) and halons was signed by the United States, the European Economic Community, and 23 other nations. The Montreal Protocol calls for freezing halon production at 1986 levels. Because the majority of underfloor fire protection at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as other Department of Energy (DOE) sites, is either Halon 1301 or sprinklers, some other means of suppression will have to be developed and verified. The potential loss to facilities housing computer or control rooms damaged by underfloor fires can be extreme. These losses would not only include hardware and software replacement costs, but also lost computing and control capability. Here at LLNL technical research in a facility could be severely affected. Recent studies conducted by the Fire Research Discipline of the Special Projects Division have shown that severe fires fueled by cable insulation can develop within as little as a 6-in-high underfloor space (even with mechanical ventilation shut off). Studies also show that conventional sprinklers may not be effective in preventing this destruction. Therefore, we are investigating the water-mist fire extinguishing system as an alternative to Halon 1301 and sprinklers.

  20. Organized crime impact study highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porteous, S D

    1998-10-01

    A study was conducted to address the issue of how organized crime impacts on Canadians and their communities both socially and economically. As far as environmental crime is concerned, three main areas of concern have been identified: (1) illicit trade in ozone depleting substances, (2) illicit hazardous waste treatment, and (3) disposal of illicit trade in endangered species. To gauge the magnitude of organized crime activity, the market value of worldwide illegal trafficking in illicit drugs was estimated to be as high as $100 billion worldwide (between $1.4 to 4 billion in Canada). It is suspected that Canada supplies a substantial portion of the U.S. black market in chlorofluorocarbons with most of the rest being supplied from Mexico. Another area of concern involves the disposal of hazardous wastes. Canada produces approximately 5.9 million tonnes of hazardous waste annually. Of these, 3.2 million tonnes are sent to off-site disposal facilities for specialized treatment and recycling. The treatment of hazardous waste is a very profitable business, hence vulnerable to fraudulent practices engaged in by organized crime groups. Environmental implications of this and other environmental crimes, as well as their economic, commercial, health and safety impact were examined. Other areas of organized crime activity in Canada (drugs, economic crimes, migrant trafficking, counterfeit products, motor vehicle theft, money laundering) were also part of the study.

  1. GLODAPv2 data exploration and extraction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassovski, Misha; Kozyr, Alex; Boden, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The Global Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAP) is a cooperative effort of investigators funded for ocean synthesis and modeling projects by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Energy (DOE), and National Science Foundation (NSF). Cruises conducted as part of the WOCE, JGOFS, and NOAA Ocean-Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study (OACES) over the decade of the 1990s generated oceanographic data of unparalleled quality and quantity. GLODAPv2 is a uniformly calibrated open-ocean data product containing inorganic carbon and carbon-relevant variables. This new product includes data from approximately one million individual seawater samples collected from over 700 cruises during the period 1972-2013. Extensive quality control and subsequent calibration were carried out for salinity, oxygen, nutrient, carbon dioxide, total alkalinity, pH, and chlorofluorocarbon data. The Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC), serving as the primary DOE disseminator for climate data and information, developed database and web accessible systems that permit users worldwide to query and retrieve data from the GLODAPv2 collection. This presentation will showcase this new system, discuss technologies used to build the GLODAPv2 resource, and describe integration with a metadata search engine provided by CDIAC as well.

  2. Development of aircraft lavatory compartments with improved fire resistance characteristics. Phase 4: Sandwich panel decorative ink development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarajan, A.; Johnson, G. A.; Korver, G. L.; Anderson, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Five chemically different resin systems with improved fire resistance properties were studied for a possible screenprinting ink application. Fire resistance is hereby defined as the cured ink possessing improvements in flammability, smoke emission, and thermal stability. The developed ink is for application to polyvinyl fluoride film. Only clear inks without pigments were considered. Five formulations were evaluated compared with KC4900 clear acrylic ink, which was used as a baseline. The tests used in the screening evaluation included viscosity, smoke and toxic gas emission, limiting oxygen index (LOI), and polyvinyl fluoride film (PVF) printability. A chlorofluorocarbon resin (FPC461) was selected for optimization studies. The parameters for optimization included screenprinting process performance, quality of coating, and flammability of screenprinted 0.051-mm (0.002-in.) white Tedlar. The quality of the screenprinted coating on Tedlar is dependent on viscosity, curing time, adhesion to polyvinyl fluoride film, drying time (both inscreen and as an applied film), and silk screen mesh material and porosity.

  3. Anthropogenic CO2 in the oceans estimated using transit time distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, D.W.; McNeil, B.I.

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of anthropogenic carbon (Cant) in the oceans is estimated using the transit time distribution (TTD) method applied to global measurements of chlorofluorocarbon-12 (CFC12). Unlike most other inference methods, the TTD method does not assume a single ventilation time and avoids the large uncertainty incurred by attempts to correct for the large natural carbon background in dissolved inorganic carbon measurements. The highest concentrations and deepest penetration of anthropogenic carbon are found in the North Atlantic and Southern Oceans. The estimated total inventory in 1994 is 134 Pg-C. To evaluate uncertainties the TTD method is applied to output from an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) and compared the results to the directly simulated Cant. Outside of the Southern Ocean the predicted Cant closely matches the directly simulated distribution, but in the Southern Ocean the TTD concentrations are biased high due to the assumption of 'constant disequilibrium'. The net result is a TTD overestimate of the global inventory by about 20%. Accounting for this bias and other centred uncertainties, an inventory range of 94-121 Pg-C is obtained. This agrees with the inventory of Sabine et al., who applied the DeltaC* method to the same data. There are, however, significant differences in the spatial distributions: The TTD estimates are smaller than DeltaC* in the upper ocean and larger at depth, consistent with biases expected in DeltaC* given its assumption of a single parcel ventilation time

  4. COP improvement of refrigerator/freezers, air-conditioners, and heat pumps using nonazeotropic refrigerant mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    With the February, 1992 announcement by President Bush to move the deadline for outlawing CFC (chloro-fluoro-carbon) refrigerants from the year 2000 to the year 1996, the refrigeration and air-conditioning industries have been accelerating their efforts to find alternative refrigerants. Many of the alternative refrigerants being evaluated require synthetic lubricants, are less efficient, and have toxicity problems. One option to developing new, alternative refrigerants is to combine existing non-CFC refrigerants to form a nonazeotropic mixture, with the concentration optimized for the given application so that system COP (Coefficient Of Performance) may be maintained or even improved. This paper will discuss the dilemma that industry is facing regarding CFC phase-out and the problems associated with CFC alternatives presently under development. A definition of nonazeotropic mixtures will be provided, and the characteristics and COP benefits of nonazeotropic refrigerant mixtures will be explained using thermodynamic principles. Limitations and disadvantages of nonazeotropic mixtures will be discussed, and example systems using such mixtures will be reviewed.

  5. Calculated trends and the atmospheric abundance of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane using automated in-situ gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements recorded at Mace Head, Ireland, from October 1994 to March 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, P. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Huang, J.; Prinn, R.; Derwent, R. G.; Ryall, D.; Nickless, G.; Cunnold, D.

    1998-01-01

    The first in-situ measurements by automated gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer are reported for 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, (HCFC-141b), and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane, (HCFC-142b). These compounds are steadily replacing the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as refrigerants, foam-blowing agents, and solvents. The concentrations of all three compounds are shown to be rapidly increasing in the atmosphere, with 134a increasing at a rate of 2.05±0.02 ppt yr-1 over the 30 months of observations. Similarly, 141b and 142b increased at rates of 2.49±0.03 and 1.24±0.02 ppt yr-1, respectively, over the same period. The concentrations recorded at the atmospheric research station at Mace Head, Ireland, on January 1, 1996, the midpoint of the time series, were 3.67 ppt (134a), 7.38 ppt (141b), and 8.78 ppt (142b). From these observations we optimally estimate the HCFC and HFC emissions using a 12-box global model and OH concentrations derived from global 1,1,1-trichloroethane (CCl3CH3) measurements. Comparing two methods of estimating emissions with independent industry estimates shows satisfactory agreement for 134a and 141b, while for 142b, industry estimates are less than half those required to explain our observations.

  6. Blood and exhaled air can be used for biomonitoring of hydrofluorocarbon exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstgård, Lena; Sjögren, Bengt; Gunnare, Sara; Johanson, Gunnar

    2014-02-10

    Various hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) have replaced the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons during the last decades. The objective of this study was to examine the usefulness of blood and breath for exposure biomonitoring of HFCs. We compared data on blood and exhaled air from a series of experiments where healthy volunteers were exposed to vapors of four commonly used HFCs; 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1,1-trifluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, and 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane. All four HFCs had similar toxicokinetic profiles in blood with a rapid initial increase and an apparent steady-state reached within a few minutes. For all HFCs, the inhalation uptake during exposure was low (less than 6%), most of which was exhaled post-exposure. No metabolism could be detected and only minor amounts were excreted unchanged in urine. The observed time courses in blood and breath were well described by physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Simulations of 8-h exposures show that the HFC levels in both blood and breath drop rapidly during the first minutes post-exposure, whereafter the decline is considerably slower and mainly reflects washout from fat tissues. We conclude that blood and exhaled air can be used for biological exposure monitoring. Samples should not be taken immediately at the end of shift but rather 20-30 min later. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-11-16

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  8. Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) 2014 Western Pacific Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, E.; Pfister, L.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) is a series of airborne campaigns focused on understanding physical processes in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) and their role in atmospheric chemistry and climate. ATTREX is using the high-altitude, long-duration NASA Global Hawk Unmanned Air System to make in situ and remote-sensing measurements spanning the Pacific. A particular ATTREX emphasis is to better understand the dehydration of air as it passes through the cold tropical tropopause region. The ATTREX payload contains 12 in situ and remote sensing instruments that measure water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nonmethane hydrocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, chlorofluorocarbons, nitrous oxide), reactive chemical compounds (ozone, bromine, nitrous oxide), meteorological parameters, and radiative fluxes. During January-March, 2014, the Global Hawk was deployed to Guam for ATTREX flights. Six science flights were conducted from Guam (in addition to the transits across the Pacific), resulting in over 100 hours of Western Pacific TTL sampling and about 180 vertical profiles through the TTL. I will provide an overview of the dataset, with examples of the measurements including meteorological parameters, clouds and water vapor, and chemical tracers.

  9. Report on results of the survey for drawing new energy visions for the Town of Hamanaka district; Hamanakacho chiiki shin energy vision sakutei chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    The new energy visions are drawn for Town of Hamanaka, Hokkaido. The town had a population of 7,866 in 1995, which compares with 11,915 in 1960, aging as a whole with reduced number of new born babies. The town has been holding the Japan's top town in tangleweed production and core site in the Kushi-Ne dairy belt. Biomass energy (excreta and woody resources) is at the top of the prospective new energy reserves for the town, which total 88,741Gcal/y, followed by utilization of solar energy and heat exhausted from garbage incineration. The priority projects selected for introduction of new energies include a biogas plant which produces organic compost and biogas energy by anaerobic fermentation of excreta discharged from domestic animals, raw garbage and fishery wastes; system for utilizing waste heat from a stoker type incinerator burning domestic garbage, which satisfies the dioxin emission standard; and system for utilizing low-temperature heat including energy of snow and ice, which uses only a limited extent of the conventional energy and free of chlorofluorocarbon gases. (NEDO)

  10. The chemical industry - friend to the environment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    ''The Chemical Industry - Friend to the Environment?'' was a symposium organised by the North East Region committee of the Industrial Division of the Royal Society of Chemistry. This volume contains typescripts from all the lectures given at the symposium. The general public appreciate the material comforts the Chemical Industry provides, for example textiles, ceramics, steel, speciality chemicals, drugs, prosthetics etc. However, for many their comfort is spoiled by the chemical poisoning of the environment through slag heaps, beaches and countryside littered with non-biodegradable unsightly plastic containers, poor air quality through NO x , CO 2 and chlorofluorocarbon emissions, and of course, nuclear waste. The occasional spillage of hazardous chemicals through road, rail and sea accidents do nothing to improve the Industry's image. The majority of these topics were discussed, though no one presumed to know how to remove the problems entirely but many suggestions were put forward as to how this might be achieved. Of the 13 papers presented three were specifically concerned with recycling of plastics, 9 with the environmental impacts of chemicals and one, which is indexed separately, was concerned with radioactive discharges into the environment from the Sellafield reprocessing plant. (Author)

  11. TRENDS 1991: A compendium of data on global change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, T.A.; Sepanski, R.J.; Stoss, F.W. (eds.)

    1991-12-01

    This document is a source of frequently used global-change data. This second issue of the Trends series expands the coverage of sites recording atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}), and it updates records reported in the first issue. New data for other trace atmospheric gases have been included in this issue; historical data on nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}) from ice cores, modern records of atmospheric concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11 and CFC-12) and N{sub 2}O, and estimates of global estimates of CFC-11 and CFC-12. The estimates for global and national CO{sub 2} emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, the production of cement, and gas flaring have been revised and updated. Regional CO{sub 2} emission estimates have been added, and long-term temperature records have been updated and expanded. Data records are presented in four- to six-page formats, each dealing with a specific site, region, or emissions species. The data records include tables and graphs; discussion of methods for collecting, measuring, and reporting the data; trends in the data; and references to literature that provides further information. All data appearing in the document are available on digital media from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center.

  12. Environmental catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes Consuelo; Villa, Aida Luz

    1996-01-01

    The term environmental catalysis has been used lately to refer to a variety of applications of the catalysis, those which, they have grouped in the following categories: a) Control of emissions (chimney Gases and gases of the vehicles, Compound Organic Volatile (VOC), Scents, Chlorofluorocarbons) b) Conversion of having undone solids or liquids. C) Selective obtaining of alternating products that replace polluting compounds. d)replacement of catalysis environmentally dangerous And e)Development of catalysts for the obtaining of valuable chemical products without the formation of polluting by-products. In the group of Environmental Catalysis comes working in the first category, Particularly, in the exploration of active catalysts in the decrease of the emissions coming from combustion systems, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NOx), N20 and sulfur (SOx). Our fundamental premise is that the molecular meshes are catalytic potential for the development of a technology environmentally clean. These materials understand a class of inorganic compound with unique properties and intimately related with the structure. The net of the molecular meshes consists on tetrahedral configuration atoms (Al,Si, P, etc.) united to each other by oxygen atoms. As a result they are not formed three-dimensional structures alone with channels and cavities but also, with openings bounded by rings that consist of a certain number of tetrahedral atoms

  13. The Importance of the Montreal Protocol in Protecting the Earth's Hydroclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, R.; Wu, Y.; Polvani, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    The 1987 Montreal Protocol regulating emissions of ozone depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) was motivated primarily by the harm to human health and ecosystems arising from increased exposure to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation associated with depletion from the ozone layer. It is now known that the Montreal Protocol has reduced global warming since CFCs are greenhouse gases (GHGs). In this paper we show that the Montreal Protocol also significantly protects the Earth's hydroclimate, even though this was also not a motivating factor in the decision-making that led to the Protocol. General Circulation Model (GCM) results show that in the coming decade (2020-29), under the 'World Avoided' scenario of no regulations on CFC emissions, the subtropical dry zones would in general get drier, and the middle and high latitude regions wetter. This change is similar, in both pattern and magnitude, to that in the coming decade caused by projected increases in carbon dioxide concentrations. This implies that because of the Montreal Protocol, and the ozone depletion and global warming associated with CFCs thus avoided, the hydrological cycle changes in the coming decade will be significantly less than what they otherwise would have been.

  14. Mixing of shallow and deep groundwater as indicated by the chemistry and age of karstic springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, David J.; Katz, Brian G.

    2006-06-01

    Large karstic springs in east-central Florida, USA were studied using multi-tracer and geochemical modeling techniques to better understand groundwater flow paths and mixing of shallow and deep groundwater. Spring water types included Ca-HCO3 (six), Na-Cl (four), and mixed (one). The evolution of water chemistry for Ca-HCO3 spring waters was modeled by reactions of rainwater with soil organic matter, calcite, and dolomite under oxic conditions. The Na-Cl and mixed-type springs were modeled by reactions of either rainwater or Upper Floridan aquifer water with soil organic matter, calcite, and dolomite under oxic conditions and mixed with varying proportions of saline Lower Floridan aquifer water, which represented 4-53% of the total spring discharge. Multiple-tracer data—chlorofluorocarbon CFC-113, tritium (3H), helium-3 (3Hetrit), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)—for four Ca-HCO3 spring waters were consistent with binary mixing curves representing water recharged during 1980 or 1990 mixing with an older (recharged before 1940) tracer-free component. Young-water mixing fractions ranged from 0.3 to 0.7. Tracer concentration data for two Na-Cl spring waters appear to be consistent with binary mixtures of 1990 water with older water recharged in 1965 or 1975. Nitrate-N concentrations are inversely related to apparent ages of spring waters, which indicated that elevated nitrate-N concentrations were likely contributed from recent recharge.

  15. Erratum: Mixing of shallow and deep groundwater as indicated by the chemistry and age of karstic springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, David J.; Katz, Brian G.

    2006-09-01

    Large karstic springs in east-central Florida, USA were studied using multi-tracer and geochemical modeling techniques to better understand groundwater flow paths and mixing of shallow and deep groundwater. Spring water types included Ca-HCO3 (six), Na-Cl (four), and mixed (one). The evolution of water chemistry for Ca-HCO3 spring waters was modeled by reactions of rainwater with soil organic matter, calcite, and dolomite under oxic conditions. The Na-Cl and mixed-type springs were modeled by reactions of either rainwater or Upper Floridan aquifer water with soil organic matter, calcite, and dolomite under oxic conditions and mixed with varying proportions of saline Lower Floridan aquifer water, which represented 4-53% of the total spring discharge. Multiple-tracer data—chlorofluorocarbon CFC-113, tritium (3H), helium-3 (3Hetrit), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)—for four Ca-HCO3 spring waters were consistent with binary mixing curves representing water recharged during 1980 or 1990 mixing with an older (recharged before 1940) tracer-free component. Young-water mixing fractions ranged from 0.3 to 0.7. Tracer concentration data for two Na-Cl spring waters appear to be consistent with binary mixtures of 1990 water with older water recharged in 1965 or 1975. Nitrate-N concentrations are inversely related to apparent ages of spring waters, which indicated that elevated nitrate-N concentrations were likely contributed from recent recharge.

  16. Overview of the use of refrigerating fluids in thermodynamical machines; Panorama de l`utilisation des fluides frigorigenes dans les machines thermodynamiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernier, J. [Syrec SA (France)

    1996-12-31

    The R-22 refrigerant has been used as a substitute of chlorofluorocarbons in refrigerating machineries but its use will become prohibited very soon. This paper raises the problem of its replacement by other HFC or natural fluids. The problem of natural fluids like ammonia or propane concerns their toxicity, flammability and explosion risk. If a regulation about the greenhouse effect is defined, the performance of the installation will be the decisive parameter for the choice of a refrigerant. R-22 fluid has multiple applications from air-conditioning systems to freezing tunnels and the most suitable substitutes will be different from one application to the other. The different criteria that influence the choice of a refrigerating fluid are: the condensation pressure, the delivery temperature, the compressor volume efficiency, the volume refrigerating power, the coefficient of performance, the variation of vaporization temperature, the global greenhouse effect, the toxicity, flammability and explosive character. A comparison between several fluids has been performed with a single-stage airtight compressor of 10 m{sup 3}/h, at a 40 deg. C constant condensation temperature, a 5 deg. C overheating and a 3 deg. C under-cooling. (J.S.) 6 refs.

  17. Solid-cryogen-stabilized, cable-in-conduit (CIC) superconducting cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voccio, J. P.; Michael, P. C.; Bromberg, L.; Hahn, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper considers the use of a solid cryogen as a means to stabilize, both mechanically and thermally, magnesium diboride (MgB2) superconducting strands within a dual-channel cable-in-conduit (CIC) cable for use in AC applications, such as a generator stator winding. The cable consists of two separate channels; the outer channel contains the superconducting strands and is filled with a fluid (liquid or gas) that becomes solid at the device operating temperature. Several options for fluid will be presented, such as liquid nitrogen, hydrocarbons and other chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that have a range of melting temperatures and volumetric expansions (from solid at operating temperature to fixed volume at room temperature). Implications for quench protection and conductor stability, enhanced through direct contact with the solid cryogen, which has high heat capacity and thermal conductivity (compared with helium gas), will be presented. Depending on the cryogen, the conductor will be filled initially either with liquid at atmospheric conditions or a gas at high pressure (∼100 atm). After cooldown, the cryogen in the stranded-channel will be solid, essentially locking the strands in place, preventing strand motion and degradation due to mechanical deformation while providing enhanced thermal capacity for stability and protection. The effect of cryogen porosity is also considered. The relatively high heat capacity of solid cryogens at these lower temperatures (compared to gaseous helium) enhances the thermal stability of the winding. During operation, coolant flow through the open inner channel will minimize pressure drop.

  18. Simulations of future climate with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stendel, M.; Schmith, T.; Hesselbjerg Christensen, J.

    2001-01-01

    A coupled atmosphere/ocean general circulation model to study the time-dependent climate response to changing concentrations of greenhouse gases, chlorofluorocarbons and aerosols according to the new IPCC SRES scenarios A2 and B2 has been used. The results of these experiments are compared to an unforced 300-year control experiment. The changes in the last three decades of the scenario simulations (2071-2100) are furthermore compared to the simulation of present-day climate (1961-1990). In accordance with previous experiments we find that greenhouse warming is reduced when aerosol effects are considered. Sulfur emissions, however, are lower than in the IS92a scenario. Consequently, the greenhouse warming effect, which leads to a bigger temperature increase than in the GSDIO experiment can outweigh the aerosol cooling effect. The result shows that there still are serious difficulties and uncertainties in this type of model simulation. Those are partially due to oversimplifications in the model, concerning the radiative properties of aerosols in particular, and therefore the indirect aerosol effect. Another inherent problem, however, is the uncertainty in the scenarios themselves. This is the case for short-lived substances with an inhomogeneous spatial and temporal distribution, such as aerosols. Therefore, on a decadal horizon, changes in the emissions of those substance can exert a significant effect on anthropogenic climate change. (LN)

  19. An evaluation on the environmental consequences of residual CFCs from obsolete household refrigerators in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiangyang; Duan Huabo; Li Jinhui

    2011-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) contained in household refrigerators consist mainly of CFC-11 and CFC-12, which will be eventually released into the environment. Consequentially, environmental releases of these refrigerants will lead to ozone depletion and contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect, if waste refrigerators are not disposed of properly. In the present paper, the potential release of residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China is examined, and their contributions to ozone depletion and greenhouse effect are compared with those of other recognized ozone-depleting substances (ODS) and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The results imply that annual potential amounts of released residual CFC-11 and CFC-12 will reach their maximums at 4600 and 2300 tons, respectively in 2011, and then decrease gradually to zero until 2020. Meanwhile, the amounts of their most widely used substitutes HCFC-141b and HFC-134a will keep increasing. Subsequently, the contribution ratio of these CFCs and their substitutes to ozone depletion will remain at 25% through 2011, and reach its peak value of 34% by 2018. The contribution to greenhouse effect will reach its peak value of 0.57% by 2010. Moreover, the contribution ratio of these CFCs to the total global release of CFCs will steadily increase, reaching its peak of 15% by 2018. Thus, this period from 2010 to 2018 is a crucial time during which residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China will contribute significantly to ozone depletion.

  20. Professor Paul Crutzen, the winner of the Nobel prize: The discovery of the ozone hole - knowledge and vision; Nobelpreistraeger Prof. Paul Crutzen: Entdeckung des Ozonlochs - Wissen und Vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crutzen, P.; Dellert-Ritter, M.

    1997-02-01

    On 10 December 1995, Professor Crutzen was awarded the Nobel prize for his epoch-making achievements in the field of atmospheric chemistry. This award underlines also Professor Crutzen`s commitment to the protection of the atmosphere. The atmospheric researcher discovered how sensitively the ozone layer reacts to air pollution. His work, together with that of others, led to the ban on ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons. As early as in 1970, Professor Crutzen demonstrated that nitrogen oxides react catalytically with ozone. His think tank provided numerous stimuli for further, intense research on atmospheric chemistry, which triggered a debate on the protection of the thinning ozone layer also among politicians. (orig.) [Deutsch] Am 10. Dezember 1995 wurde Prof. Crutzen fuer seine bahnbrechenden Leistungen auf dem Gebiet der Atmosphaerenchemie mit dem Nobelpreis geehrt. Diese Anerkennung unterstreicht auch das Engagement von Prof. Crutzen zum Schutz der Ozonschicht. Der Atmosphaerenforscher Prof. Crutzen entdeckte, wie empfindlich die Ozonschicht auf Luftverunreinigungen reagiert. Seine Arbeiten fuehrten mit zum Verbot der ozonvernichtenden Fluorchlorkohlenwasserstoffe. Bereits 1970 wies Prof. Crutzen nach, dass Stickstoffoxide katalytisch mit Ozon reagieren. Aus der Ideenfabrik von Prof. Crutzen kamen zahlreiche Anregungen fuer weitere intensive Forschungen zur Chemie der Atmosphaere, die auch unter Politikern eine Debatte ueber den Schutz der hauchduennen Ozonschicht ausloeste. (orig.)

  1. Nitrate in Danish groundwater during the last 60 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B; Thorling, L; Dalgaard, Tommy

    2011-01-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribut......This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis...... of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first...... two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater (see Figure 1). Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark...

  2. Impact of ultraviolet radiation on humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarini, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Solar radiation, including its ultraviolet (UV) components is a key factor in life on Earth. While small quantities of UV are beneficial for people (for example, through the production of vitamin D), the considerable amount to which people sometimes expose themselves may have extremely noxious effects including actinic erythema, sunburn, photo-induced diseases, photo-worsened diseases, actinic ageing and skin cancers. Since the last century, human exposure to UV has increased either by social-behaviour modifications, or by anthropogenic disruption to the environment through, among other things, industrial development. The World Health Organisation's (WHO) INTERSUN programme has several components: action for reconstruction of the ozone layer through, for example, preventing dumping of chlorofluorocarbons; creation and popularisation of a global UV index; prevention campaigns underlining the risks from UV exposure including dissemination of information to daily newspapers. These are all aimed at reducing the amount of UV radiation that people receive. In addition the WHO advises against exposure to UV artificial sources to reduce overall the quantity of UV received. (author)

  3. Impact of ultraviolet radiation on humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarini, J.P. [Laboratoire de Recherche sur les Tumeurs de la Peau Humaine, INSERM, Paris (France)

    2001-07-01

    Solar radiation, including its ultraviolet (UV) components is a key factor in life on Earth. While small quantities of UV are beneficial for people (for example, through the production of vitamin D), the considerable amount to which people sometimes expose themselves may have extremely noxious effects including actinic erythema, sunburn, photo-induced diseases, photo-worsened diseases, actinic ageing and skin cancers. Since the last century, human exposure to UV has increased either by social-behaviour modifications, or by anthropogenic disruption to the environment through, among other things, industrial development. The World Health Organisation's (WHO) INTERSUN programme has several components: action for reconstruction of the ozone layer through, for example, preventing dumping of chlorofluorocarbons; creation and popularisation of a global UV index; prevention campaigns underlining the risks from UV exposure including dissemination of information to daily newspapers. These are all aimed at reducing the amount of UV radiation that people receive. In addition the WHO advises against exposure to UV artificial sources to reduce overall the quantity of UV received. (author)

  4. Tritium-helium 3 dating under complex conditions in hydraulically stressed areas of a buried-valley aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Stephanie Dunkle; Rowe, Gary L.; Schlosser, Peter; Ludin, Andrea; Stute, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The 3H-3He dating method is applied in a buried-valley aquifer near Dayton, Ohio. The study area is large, not all sampling locations lie along well-defined flow paths, and existing wells with variable screen lengths and diameters are used. Reliable use of the method at this site requires addressing several complications: (1) The flow system is disturbed because of high pumping rates and induced infiltration; (2) tritium contamination is present in several areas of the aquifer; and (3) radiogenic helium concentrations are elevated in a significant number of the wells. The 3H-3He ages are examined for self-consistency by comparing the reconstructed tritium evolution to the annual weighted tritium measured in precipitation; deviations result from dispersion, tritium contamination, and mixing. 3H-3He ages are next examined for consistency with chlorofluorocarbon ages; the agreement is poor because of degradation of CFCs. Finally, the 3H-3He ages are examined for consistency with the current understanding of local hydrologic processes; the ages are generally supported by hydrogeologic data and the results of groundwater flow modeling coupled with particle-tracking analyses.

  5. The ozone backlash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taubes, G.

    1993-01-01

    While evidence for the role of chlorofluorocarbons in ozone depletion grows stronger, researchers have recently been subjected to vocal public criticism of their theories-and their motives. Their understanding of the mechanisms of ozone destruction-especially the annual ozone hole that appears in the Antarctic-has grown stronger, yet everywhere they go these days, they seem to be confronted by critics attacking their theories as baseless. For instance, Rush Limbaugh, the conservative political talk-show host and now-best-selling author of The Way Things Ought to Be, regularly insists that the theory of ozone depletion by CFCs is a hoax: bladerdash and poppycock. Zoologist Dixy Lee Ray, former governor of the state of Washington and former head of the Atomic Energy Commission, makes the same argument in her book, Trashing the Planet. The Wall Street Journal and National Review have run commentaries by S. Fred Singer, a former chief scientists for the Department of Transportation, purporting to shoot holes in the theory of ozone depletion. Even the June issue of Omni, a magazine with a circulation of more than 1 million that publishes a mixture of science and science fiction, printed a feature article claiming to expose ozone research as a politically motivated scam

  6. Correlation of refrigerant mass flow rate through adiabatic capillary tubes using mixture refrigerant carbondioxide and ethane for low temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasruddin, Syaka, Darwin R. B.; Alhamid, M. Idrus

    2012-06-01

    Various binary mixtures of carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons, especially propane or ethane, as alternative natural refrigerants to Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or Hydro fluorocarbons (HFCs) are presented in this paper. Their environmental performance is friendly, with an ozone depletion potential (ODP) of zero and Global-warming potential (GWP) smaller than 20. The capillary tube performance for the alternative refrigerant HFC HCand mixed refrigerants have been widely studied. However, studies that discuss the performance of the capillary tube to a mixture of natural refrigerants, in particular a mixture of azeotrope carbon dioxide and ethane is still undeveloped. A method of empirical correlation to determine the mass flow rate and pipe length has an important role in the design of the capillary tube for industrial refrigeration. Based on the variables that effect the rate of mass flow of refrigerant in the capillary tube, the Buckingham Pi theorem formulated eight non-dimensional parameters to be developed into an empirical equations correlation. Furthermore, non-linear regression analysis used to determine the co-efficiency and exponent of this empirical correlation based on experimental verification of the results database.

  7. The effects of greenhouse gases on the Antarctic ozone hole in the past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, P. A.; Li, F.; Lait, L. R.; Oman, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole is primarily caused by human-produced ozone depleting substances such as chlorine-containing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and bromine-containing halons. The large ozone spring-time depletion relies on the very-cold conditions of the Antarctic lower stratosphere, and the general containment of air by the polar night jet over Antarctica. Here we show the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM) coupled ocean-atmosphere-chemistry model for exploring the impact of increasing greenhouse gases (GHGs). Model simulations covering the 1960-2010 period are shown for: 1) a control ensemble with observed levels of ODSs and GHGs, 2) an ensemble with fixed 1960 GHG concentrations, and 3) an ensemble with fixed 1960 ODS levels. We look at a similar set of simulations (control, 2005 fixed GHG levels, and 2005 fixed ODS levels) with a new version of GEOSCCM over the period 2005-2100. These future simulations show that the decrease of ODSs leads to similar ozone recovery for both the control run and the fixed GHG scenarios, in spite of GHG forced changes to stratospheric ozone levels. These simulations demonstrate that GHG levels will have major impacts on the stratosphere by 2100, but have only small impacts on the Antarctic ozone hole.

  8. The greenhouse theory and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, W.

    1994-01-01

    Background information is presented on the theory of the greenhouse effect and its implications for the environment and for government policies. The relationship between climate and atmospheric CO 2 , the major greenhouse gas, is explained. Sources of CO 2 , notably fossil fuel combustion, and sinks (vegetation and oceans) are described. Evidence is presented for an increase in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Irrefutable data indicate an increase in atmospheric CO 2 over 1850-1980 from ca 290 ppM to 345 ppM; other evidence indicates a doubling of atmospheric methane since the eighteenth century. More recent increases have been noted for atmospheric N 2 O and chlorofluorocarbons. The implications of increased atmospheric levels of CO 2 are discussed, and new scientific evidence from Greenland ice-core data is presented which seems to indicate that higher CO 2 concentrations are a result of global warming rather than the cause. Canadian parliamentary action in response to the global warming phenomenon is outlined. A chronology of international efforts in response to global warming is appended. 11 refs

  9. CFC environmental problems and cooling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornung, M.O.

    1991-08-01

    The aim of the report is to provide a broad survey of the technological problems imposed on the production of cooling systems by the demands for reduction in the use of chlorofluorocarbons as refrigerants. With regard to industrial research in this area the present situation is clarified and possible future developments are discussed. The influence of CFC gasses on the global environment and international and national legislation within this field are explained. Alternative refrigerants and cooling processes, and ways of reducing refrigerant leakage, are described. It is concluded that currently the use of alternative refrigerants is the policy which is generally accepted, and intensive research is being carried out in this field. R134a should substitute R12 in the cases of household refrigerators and air conditioning, and will soon be commercially available. The use of R22 and ammonia will be extended. This is a practical policy to follow up commercially, whereas the policy of alternative processes presents more problems because they are not so developed and there is less available know-how in this area. The possibilities for hermetic sealing of cooling systems are unrealistic and should anyway be regarded only as a supplement to alternative refrigerants. Within the European Community it is intended to provide standards and regulations in relation to air pollution from refrigerants. (AB) (58 refs.)

  10. Health effects associated with energy conservation measures in commercial buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenner, R.D.; Baechler, M.C.

    1990-09-01

    Indoor air quality can be impacted by hundreds of different chemicals. More than 900 different organic compounds alone have been identified in indoor air. Health effects that could arise from exposure to individual pollutants or mixtures of pollutants cover the full range of acute and chronic effects, including largely reversible responses, such as rashes and irritations, to the irreversible toxic and carcinogenic effects. These indoor contaminants are emitted from a large variety of materials and substances that are widespread components of everyday life. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with indoor air contaminants for the Bonneville Power Administration to aid the agency in the preparation of environmental documents. Results are reported in two volumes. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with a selected list of indoor air contaminants. In addition, the report discusses potential health effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorofluorocarbons. All references to the literature reviewed are found in this document Volume 2. Volume 2 provides detailed information from the literature reviewed, summarizes potential health effects, reports health hazard ratings, and discusses quantitative estimates of carcinogenic risk in humans and animals. Contaminants discussed in this report are those that; have been measured in the indoor air of a public building; have been measured (significant concentrations) in test situations simulating indoor air quality (as presented in the referenced literature); and have a significant hazard rating. 38 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs

  11. High-global warming potential F-gas emissions in California: comparison of ambient-based versus inventory-based emission estimates, and implications of refined estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Glenn; Zhan, Tao; Hsu, Ying-Kuang; Gupta, Pamela; Pederson, James; Croes, Bart; Blake, Donald R; Barletta, Barbara; Meinardi, Simone; Ashford, Paul; Vetter, Arnie; Saba, Sabine; Slim, Rayan; Palandre, Lionel; Clodic, Denis; Mathis, Pamela; Wagner, Mark; Forgie, Julia; Dwyer, Harry; Wolf, Katy

    2014-01-21

    To provide information for greenhouse gas reduction policies, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventories annual emissions of high-global-warming potential (GWP) fluorinated gases, the fastest growing sector of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally. Baseline 2008 F-gas emissions estimates for selected chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-12), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC-22), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-134a) made with an inventory-based methodology were compared to emissions estimates made by ambient-based measurements. Significant discrepancies were found, with the inventory-based emissions methodology resulting in a systematic 42% under-estimation of CFC-12 emissions from older refrigeration equipment and older vehicles, and a systematic 114% overestimation of emissions for HFC-134a, a refrigerant substitute for phased-out CFCs. Initial, inventory-based estimates for all F-gas emissions had assumed that equipment is no longer in service once it reaches its average lifetime of use. Revised emission estimates using improved models for equipment age at end-of-life, inventories, and leak rates specific to California resulted in F-gas emissions estimates in closer agreement to ambient-based measurements. The discrepancies between inventory-based estimates and ambient-based measurements were reduced from -42% to -6% for CFC-12, and from +114% to +9% for HFC-134a.

  12. Response to Out of Balance: The risk of irreversible climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charest, J.J.

    1991-09-01

    The Standing Committee on Environment of the Canadian House of Commons tabled a report entitled Out of Balance, which was an investigation of issues related to the increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and possible responses to impending climatic change. The government's response to the recommendations made in that report are presented. The framework to the government's response is first introduced, which includes the National Action Strategy on Global Warming (NASGW) that provides a strategy for Canadian initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The strategy is based on the fundamental principles of comprehensiveness, the importance of international agreements, and flexibility. The Standing Committee's recommendations focused on policies to limit Canadian emissions of carbon dioxide, one of the major greenhouse gases. Canadian policies to achieve this goal are being implemented in the Green Plan and the NASGW. Other recommendations and responses involve environmental education, greenhouse gas data collection, phasing out of chlorofluorocarbons, natural gas leakage, energy conservation and demand management, regulatory systems, fuel efficiency standards, forest management, greenhouse gas emissions from federal departments and agencies, and encouragement of environmentally acceptable technologies

  13. Probability of Elevated Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Concentrations in Groundwater in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of elevated volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps was developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  14. Probability of Elevated Nitrate Concentrations in Groundwater in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps was developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  15. Responsibility for the future. Approaches to sustainable management of substance and material flows. Progress report of the Enquete-Commission of the German Bundestag for 'Protection of man and the environment'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Because of our increasingly material-consuming economy there is urgent need for action in orders to cope with the resulting waste disposal problems as well as environmental problems associated with production and the products themselves. A viable solution may be seen in an economy integrating step by step the principles of precautionary environmental protection, namely, on the one hand, avoidance of wastes and nuisances and, on the other hand, enhanced efficiency of material use. Apart from pointing out the state of the debate on paradigms of a material management policy, this book describes and analyses material flows in an exemplary manner. Relevant items chosen by the commission of inquiry were the heavy metal cadmium, the aromatic hydrocarbon benzene, R 134a, a chlorofluorocarbon substitute free of chlorine, and the subject areas textiles/clothing as well as mobility. Regarding the three individual substances the commission of inquiry has formulated first tentative evaluations on the basis of which instruments for avoiding environmental pollution are to be worked out. (orig./UA) [de

  16. F. Sherwood “Sherry” Rowland (1927-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Donald R.; Simpson, Isobel J.

    2012-10-01

    Frank Sherwood Rowland, known to his friends and colleagues as Sherry, died at his home in Corona del Mar, Calif., on 10 March 2012. He was 84. A Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist, Sherry codiscovered the role of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in stratospheric ozone depletion, researched the accumulation of greenhouse gases on a planetary scale, and tirelessly communicated the global consequences of human activity to policy makers and the public. Sherry had a calm, gentle demeanor and was as respected for his integrity and humility as for his groundbreaking scientific achievements. Sherry was a long-time member and Fellow (1980) of AGU and received the AGU Roger Revelle Medal in 1994 for his substantial contributions to the awareness of global change. The following year, he shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Mario Molina and Paul Crutzen for their pioneering contributions to atmospheric chemistry, particularly the formation and decomposition of stratospheric ozone. In its citation, the Nobel Committee commended them for contributing to "our salvation from a global environmental problem that could have catastrophic consequences."

  17. Groundwater flow system under a rapidly urbanizing coastal city as determined by hydrogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagabu, Makoto; Shimada, Jun; Delinom, Robert; Tsujimura, Maki; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    In the Jakarta area (Indonesia), excessive groundwater pumping due to the rapidly increasing population has caused groundwater-related problems such as brackish water contamination in coastal areas and land subsidence. In this study, we adopted multiple hydrogeochemical techniques to demonstrate the groundwater flow system in the Jakarta area. Although almost all groundwater existing in the Jakarta basin is recharged at similar elevations, the water quality and residence time demonstrates a clear difference between the shallow and deep aquifers. Due to the rapid decrease in the groundwater potential in urban areas, we found that the seawater intrusion and the shallow and deep groundwaters are mixing, a conclusion confirmed by major ions, Br -:Cl - ratios, and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-12 analysis. Spring water and groundwater samples collected from the southern mountainside area show younger age characteristics with high concentrations of 14C and Ca-HCO 3 type water chemistry. We estimated the residence times of these groundwaters within 45 years under piston flow conditions by tritium analysis. Also, these groundwater ages can be limited to 20-30 years with piston flow evaluated by CFCs. Moreover, due to the magnitude of the CFC-12 concentration, we can use a pseudo age indicator in this field study, because we found a positive correlation between the major type of water chemistry and the CFC-12 concentration.

  18. A decade of discontinuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L R

    1993-01-01

    Usual trends in the world have changed direction in the 1990s. We do not yet fully know the consequences of these altered trends. As population continues to grow, basic agricultural and industrial production falls (e.g., 1%/year decline in grain production and 0.6%/year decline in oil production). Moreover, world economic growth has fallen .8% annually in the early 1990s. It is feared that these shifts are not short term as were the instabilities generated during the 1973 increase in oil prices. The shifts in the 1990s are not limited to several national political leaders (e.g., OPEC), but are a result of the collision between swelling human numbers and their needs and the limitations of the earth's natural systems on the other. These limitations include the capacity of seas to produce seafood, of grasslands to yield mutton and beef, of the hydrological cycle to generate fresh water, of crops to use fertilizer, of the atmosphere to absorb carbon dioxide and chlorofluorocarbons, and of people to inhale polluted air, and of forests to resist acid rain. These constraints are forcing the realization that each nation must reduce consumption of the earth's natural resources and implement a population policy. The challenge is for social institutions to quickly check and stabilize population growth without infringing in human rights.

  19. Effect of coupled anthropogenic perturbations on stratospheric ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Luther, F.M.; Penner, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1976 the greatest concern about potential perturbations to stratospheric ozone has been in regard to the atmospheric release of chlorofluorocarbons. Consequently, atmospheric measurements of ozone have usually been compared with model calculations in which only chlorocarbon perturbations are considered. However, in order to compare theoretical calculations with recent measurements of ozone and to project expected changes to atmospheric ozone levels over the next few decades, one must consider the effect from other perturbations as well. In this paper, the authors consider the coupling between several possible anthropogenic atmospheric perturbations. Namely, they examine the effects of past and possible future increases of chlorocarbons, CO 2 , N 2 O, and NO x . The focus of these calculations is on the potential changes in ozone due to chlorocarbon emissions, how other anthropogenic perturbations may have influenced the actual change in ozone over the last decade, and how these perturbations may influence future changes in ozone. Although calculations including future chlorocarbon emissions alone result in significant reductions in ozone, there is very little change in total ozone over the coming decades when other anthropogenic sources are included. Increasing CO 2 concentrations have the largest offsetting effect on the change in total ozone due to chlorocarbons. Owing to the necessity of considering emissions from a number of trace gases simultaneously, determining expected global-scale chemical and climatic effects is more complex than was previously recognized

  20. TRENDS 1991: A compendium of data on global change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boden, T.A.; Sepanski, R.J.; Stoss, F.W.

    1991-12-01

    This document is a source of frequently used global-change data. This second issue of the Trends series expands the coverage of sites recording atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ), and it updates records reported in the first issue. New data for other trace atmospheric gases have been included in this issue; historical data on nitrous oxide (N 2 ) from ice cores, modern records of atmospheric concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11 and CFC-12) and N 2 O, and estimates of global estimates of CFC-11 and CFC-12. The estimates for global and national CO 2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, the production of cement, and gas flaring have been revised and updated. Regional CO 2 emission estimates have been added, and long-term temperature records have been updated and expanded. Data records are presented in four- to six-page formats, each dealing with a specific site, region, or emissions species. The data records include tables and graphs; discussion of methods for collecting, measuring, and reporting the data; trends in the data; and references to literature that provides further information. All data appearing in the document are available on digital media from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

  1. Inhaled Drug Delivery: A Practical Guide to Prescribing Inhaler Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Ernst

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct delivery of medication to the target organ results in a high ratio of local to systemic bioavailability and has made aerosol delivery of respiratory medication the route of choice for the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. The most commonly prescribed device is the pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI; its major drawback is the requirement that inspiration and actuation of the device be well coordinated. Other requirements for effective drug delivery include an optimal inspiratory flow, a full inspiration from functional residual capacity and a breath hold of at least 6 s. Available pMDIs are to be gradually phased out due to their use of atmospheric ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs as propellants. Newer pMDI devices using non-CFC propellants are available; preliminary experience suggests these devices greatly increase systemic bioavailability of inhaled corticosteroids. The newer multidose dry powder inhalation devices (DPIs are breath actuated, thus facilitating coordination with inspiration, and contain fewer ingredients. Furthermore, drug delivery is adequate even at low inspired flows, making their use appropriate in almost all situations. Equivalence of dosing among different devices for inhaled corticosteroids will remain imprecise, requiring the physician to adjust the dose of medication to the lowest dose that provides adequate control of asthma. Asthma education will be needed to instruct patients on the effective use of the numerous inhalation devices available.

  2. Ozone depletion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luther, F.M.; Chang, J.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Penner, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Models of stratospheric chemistry have been primarily directed toward an understanding of the behavior of stratospheric ozone. Initially this interest reflected the diagnostic role of ozone in the understanding of atmospheric transport processes. More recently, interest in stratospheric ozone has arisen from concern that human activities might affect the amount of stratospheric ozone, thereby affecting the ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth's surface and perhaps also affecting the climate with various potentially severe consequences for human welfare. This concern has inspired a substantial effort to develop both diagnostic and prognostic models of stratospheric ozone. During the past decade, several chemical agents have been determined to have potentially significant impacts on stratospheric ozone if they are released to the atmosphere in large quantities. These include oxides of nitrogen, oxides of hydrogen, chlorofluorocarbons, bromine compounds, fluorine compounds and carbon dioxide. In order to assess the potential impact of the perturbations caused by these chemicals, mathematical models have been developed to handle the complex coupling between chemical, radiative, and dynamical processes. Basic concepts in stratospheric modeling are reviewed

  3. A review of Thailand's strategies for global climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonchalermkit, S.

    1994-01-01

    Thailand is greatly concerned about global climate change, which is caused primarily by the burning of fossil fuels, deforestation and the release of chlorofluorocarbons. The country itself is not currently a major contributor to global climate change. However, as Thailand's economy expands and its burning of fossil fuels increases, the country's contribution to global climate change could increase. Thailand's use of primary energy supplies grew at an average rate of 13.4 percent per year in the period 1985 to 1990. The rapid, sustained growth was due to the overall pace of growth in the economy and the expansion of industrial, construction, and transportation activities. The primary energy demand was approximately 31,600 kilotons of oil equivalent (KTOE) in 1990. The transportation sector accounted for the largest proportion of energy demand at 30 percent. Within the next 15 years, the power sector is expected to overtake the transportation sector as the largest consumer of energy. Petroleum is currently the predominant source of energy in Thailand, accounting for 56 percent of the primary energy demand. Thailand recognizes that it has an important part to play in finding solutions to minimizing emissions of greenhouse gases and identifying viable response strategies. Thus, in this paper the authors will present several policy strategies relevant to climate change in Thailand and discuss how they have been implemented and enforced. Policies concerning forestry, energy, and environment are reviewed in detail in this paper

  4. Global warming: Towards a strategy for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    A discussion paper is provided as background to a proposed public review of a strategy for Ontario's response to global warming. Global warming arises from the generation of greenhouse gases, which come from the use of fossil fuels, the use of chlorofluorocarbons, and deforestation. Energy policy is the backbone of achieving climate stability since the burning of fossil fuels releases most of the greenhouse gases, mainly carbon dioxide. Canada is, by international standards, a very energy-intensive country and is among the world's largest emitters of carbon dioxide on a per capita basis. Ontario is the largest energy-using province in Canada, and fossil fuels represent over 80% of provincial energy use. A proposed goal for Ontario is to provide leadership in stabilizing atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gases, while minimizing the social, economic, and environmental costs in Ontario of adapting to global warming. A proposed first step to address global warming is to achieve reductions in expected emissions of the greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide, so that levels by the year 2000 are lower than in 1989. Current policies and regulations helping to reduce the greenhouse effect include some of the current controls on automotive emissions and the adoption by the provincial electric utility of targets to reduce electricity demand. New initiatives include establishment of minimum energy efficiency standards and reduction of peak-day electricity use. Action steps for future consideration are detailed in the categories of greenhouse gas emissions reductions, carbon dioxide absorption, and research and analysis into global warming

  5. Climate change and transnational corporations. Analysis and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In Economic and Social Council resolution 1989/25, the Council requested an analytic study of the main sectors of activity that have adverse effects on environmental preservation and the factors that determine the allocation of activities between developed and developing countries. The present report, entitled Climate Change and Transnational Corporations: Analysis and Trends, is in response to that request. The problem of global warming and the dangers it presents to global survival are being given high priority by the United Nations. Discussions are under way leading to a convention on global climate change under the auspices of United Nations intergovernmental bodies. The study was designed as a contribution to that process. It focuses on six transnational energy-producing and energy-consuming industrial sectors, in which corporate practices have a direct and major impact on the problems associated with global climate change. The sectors are fossil fuel production, transportation, electricity-generation, energy-intensive metals production, chlorofluorocarbons and other ozone-depleting chemicals, and inorganic nitrogen fertilizers. The study explores the relative differential impacts between industrialized and developing countries of each sector, and asks how each sector would have to be restructured in order to limit global climate change and ozone depletion. It concludes that major changes in the technical processes and investment patterns of the transnational corporations in those sectors would be necessary if catastrophic environmental changes are to be avoided

  6. Gaining our eco-librium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The author holds firm to his belief that depletion of the ozone layer and global warming are the most important issues this country will face in the 1990s and the next century. After years of neglect, global warming and stratospheric ozone depletion have become matters of widespread international concern. The escalation of the ozone crisis even jump-started an unprecedented international treaty. While applauding the treaty (the Montreal protocol) to limit chlorofluorocarbons, he says it is too little, too late. He urges a 5-year, worldwide phaseout of the six most harmful ozone-depleting chemicals. He also proposes a strategic Environment Initiative that would mobilize resources on behalf of environmental protection in like manner to the Strategic Defense Initiative. To provide incentives for developing and choosing environmentally sensitive products and technologies, he proposes an Environmental Security Trust Fund - charging fees for environmentally damaging products and awarding rebates for environmentally friendly technologies. Mainly, he cautions, we must change the way we think about ourselves, our children and our future

  7. The influence of negative climate changes on physical development of urban and rural areas in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman NURKOVIĆ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of negative climate changes on physical development of urban and rural areas of Bosnia and Herzegovina has been analysed in the paper. So, economy and society in urban and rural areas of Bosnia and Herzegovina are susceptible to environmental consequences of climate changes. In practice, this means that poorer countries in development of economic activities will suffer most due to climate changes, while some developed countries can be in a position to use new commercial possibilities. Presently, there is a significant scientific consensus that human activity affected the increase of atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases, respectively the carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone and chlorofluorocarbon, as a result of global changes of climate that will probably change dramatically during the next centuries in Bosnia and Herzegovina. More and more intensive industrialisation and urbanisation, as well as tourism, a growing phenomenon of the 21st century, have numerous negative direct, indirect and multiplicative effects on flora and fauna habitats of Bosnia and Herzegovina. For all mentioned above, this paper tries to indicate to a need for more significant investing into tourism development, which is presently at a very low level of development in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In the past ten years a dynamical development of tertiary activities in urban and rural areas has been distinguished; among which shopping centres take a significant position. 

  8. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 (11 January - 24 February, 2005)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyr, Alex [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

    2006-08-30

    This report presents methods, and analytical and quality control procedures for salinity, oxygen, nutrient, inorganic carbon, organic carbon, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), and bomb 14C system parameters performed during the A16S_2005 cruise, which took place from January 11 to February 24, 2005, aboard research vessel (R/V) Ronald H. Brown under the auspices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The R/V Ronald H. Brown departed Punta Arenas, Chile, on January 11, 2005, and ended its cruise in Fortaleza, Brazil, on February 24, 2005. The research conducted was one of a series of repeat hydrography sections jointly funded by NOAA and the National Science Foundation as part of the CLIVAR/CO2/repeat hydrography/tracer program. Samples were taken from 36 depths at 121 stations. The data presented in this report include the analyses of water samples for total inorganic carbon (TCO2), fugacity of CO2 (fCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CFC, 14C, hydrographic, and other chemical measurements. The R/V Ronald H. Brown A16S_2005 data set is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  9. Lessons from the Ozone Hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedick, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    On September 16, 1987, a treaty was signed that was unique in that annals of international diplomacy. The Montreal Protocol on substrates that Deplete the Ozone Layer mandated significant reductions in the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of the Montreal Protocol was that it imposed substantial short-term economic costs in order to protect human health and the environment against speculative future dangers - dangers which rested on scientific theories rather than on proven facts. Unlike environmental agreements of the past, it was not a response to harmful events, but rather preventive action on a global scale. In the realm of international relations, there will always be resistance to change and there will always be uncertainties - political, economic, scientific, psychological. The ozone negotiations demonstrated that the international community, even in the real world of ambiguity and imperfect knowledge, can be capable of undertaking difficult cooperative actions for the benefit of future generation. The Montreal Protocol may well be a paradigm for international cooperation on the challenge of global warming

  10. Replacement of Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) -225 Solvent for Cleaning and Verification Sampling of NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems Hardware, Ground Support Equipment, and Associated Test Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Program and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. Candidate solvents were selected and a test plan was developed following the guidelines of ASTM G127, Standard Guide for the Selection of Cleaning Agents for Oxygen Systems. Solvents were evaluated for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Two solvents were determined to be acceptable for cleaning oxygen systems and one was chosen for implementation at NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities. The test program and results are summarized. This project also demonstrated the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  11. Heirs to the throne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nudo, L.

    1993-01-01

    Methyl chloroform and CFC-113 ascended in the cleaning hierarchy as versatile, aggressive, yet safe parts cleaners. Now the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and its global equivalents want these choice solvents to step down. Saddled with an ozone depletion potential higher than anybody cares to talk about, regulators put methyl chloroform (MCF or 1,1,1-trichloroethane) and CFC-113 (trichlorotrifluoroethane) on a list of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) slated for phase-out by Jan. 1, 1996. The phase-out bans production and imports of the blacklisted parts cleaners. But as production declines, the cost of cleaning components with an ozone-depleter gets prohibitive. The steep federal excise tax, shorten shelf-life of CFCs and new labeling rule are reason enough to stop using MCF and CFC-113 and start looking at alternative cleaning processes. The labeling rule mandates warning labels on any component ''manufactured with or containing'' an ozone-depleter as of May 15, 1993. There are no acceptable ''drop-in'' alternatives. Even trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PERC) and methylene chloride (MC) require some equipment modifications. There are plenty of other cleaning alternatives vying for the parts-cleaning throne

  12. Replacement of HCFC-225 Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Program and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. Candidate solvents were selected and a test plan was developed following the guidelines of ASTM G127, Standard Guide for the Selection of Cleaning Agents for Oxygen Systems. Solvents were evaluated for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Two solvents were determined to be acceptable for cleaning oxygen systems and one was chosen for implementation at NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities. The test program and results are summarized. This project also demonstrated the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  13. Results of the Test Program for Replacement of AK-225G Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon the solvent AsahiKlin AK-225 (hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225ca/cb or HCFC-225ca/cb) and, more recently AK-225G (the single isomer form, HCFC-225cb) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of Class II Ozone Depleting Substances, including AK-225G, was prohibited in the United States by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, NASA test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a solvent replacement for AK-225G that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. This paper summarizes the tests performed, results, and lessons learned.

  14. Strategies for addressing climate change: policy perspectives from around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.D.; Sathaye, J.A.; Craig, P.P.

    1992-01-01

    The greenhouse effect is intrinsically global. Accordingly, effective responses require global coordination. While limited policies have been adopted, notably for phasing out chlorofluorocarbons, there is no clear consensus as to what to do about other greenhouse gases. In this paper, we survey attitudes and policy responses among the nations of the world. Public opinion surveys are consistent in showing that considerable sensitivity to environmental issues exists virtually everywhere. On the other hand, there is acute awareness that other issues, especially economic development, can conflict with global climate-change mitigation goals. In such a state of uncertainty there is a strong argument to be made for implementing policies which are good ideas independent of greenhouse-gas considerations. There is also good reason to expand research. What is feasible depends strongly on present and changing attitudes of the citizens of the world, and of their governments. It is thus critical to follow closely the evolution of attitudes. The kind of work summarized in this paper needs to be updated on a continuing basis, and the results made available routinely to the global policy community. We conclude our review with several recommendations for research designed specifically to reduce uncertainty about costs and institutional issues relating to responses to global climate change. (author)

  15. Gas exchange rates measured using a dual-tracer (SF6 and3he) method in the coastal waters of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Kitack; Kaown, Duk-In

    2008-03-01

    Over a period of 5 days between August 12 and 17, 2005, we performed a gas exchange experiment using the dual tracer method in a tidal coastal ocean located off the southern coast of Korea. The gas exchange rate was determined from temporal changes in the ratio of3He to SF6 measured daily in the surface mixed layer. The measured gas exchange rate ( k CO 2), normalized to a Schmidt number of 600 for CO2 in fresh water at 20°C, was approximately 5.0 cm h-1 at a mean wind speed of 3.9 m s-1 during the study period. This value is significantly less than those obtained from floating chamber-based experiments performed previously in estuarine environments, but is similar in magnitude to values obtained using the dual tracer method in river and tidal coastal waters and values predicted on the basis of the relationship between the gas exchange rate and wind speed (Wanninkhof 1992), which is generally applicable to the open ocean. Our result is also consistent with the relationship of Raymond and Cole (2001), which was derived from experiments carried out in estuarine environments using222Rn and chlorofluorocarbons along with measurements undertaken in the Hudson River, Canada, using SF6 and3He. Our results indicate that tidal action in a microtidal region did not discernibly enhance the measured k CO 2 value.

  16. Greenhouse impact of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and CFC emissions in Finland and its control potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipatti, R; Savolainen, I; Sinisalo, J [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) emissions contribute considerably to the anthropogenic enhancement of Earth`s greenhouse effect. The limitation of atmospheric concentrations of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O is considered important also in the Climate Convention. Chlorine released from the CFCs in the stratosphere destroys ozone (O{sub 3}) and the emissions are therefore regulated with the Montreal Protocol. The greenhouse impact of CFCs might be, at least to some extent, compensated by the depletion of O{sub 3} which is also a greenhouse gas. The objective of the presentation is to assess the role of anthropogenic CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, and CFC emissions in the total direct greenhouse impact due to human activities in Finland. The emission estimates for the gases are presented, as well as scenarios for emission history, future development and control potential. The greenhouse impact of the gases is compared with that of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in Finland. (author)

  17. Packed bed reactor treatment of liquid hazardous and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennant, R.A.; Wantuck, P.J.; Vargas, R.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing thermal-based packed bed reactor (PBR) technology as an alternative to incineration for treatment of hazardous organic liquid wastes. The waste streams targeted by this technology are machining fluids contaminated with chlorocarbons and/or chlorofluorocarbons and low levels of plutonium or tritium The PBR offers several distinct advantages including simplistic design, rugged construction, ambient pressure processing, economical operations, as well as ease of scalability and maintainability. In this paper, we provide a description of the apparatus as well as test results using prepared mixtures of machining oils/emulsions with trichloroethylene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), trichloroethane (TCA), and Freon TF. The current treatment system is configured as a two stage device with the PBR (1st stage) coupled to a silent discharge plasma (SDP) cell. The SDP serves as a second stage for further treatment of the gaseous effluent from the PBR. One of the primary advantages of this two stage system is that its suitability for closed loop operation where radioactive components are well contained and even CO 2 is not released to the environment

  18. Fiscal 1998 achievement report on regional consortium research and development project. Venture business fostering regional consortium research and development in its 2nd year--Creation of key industries (Development of energy-efficient catalytic decomposition device for persistent halogen compounds for environmental conservation); 1998 nendo kankyo hozen no tame no nanbunkaisei halogen kagobutsu no sho energy shokubai bunkai sochi no kaihatsu seika hokokusho. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Devices that decompose halogen compounds by use of AlPO{sub 4} are built, and studies are made concerning the collection of basic knowledge and findings, the settlement of problems that accompany scaleup, and the elucidation of mechanism of catalytic function occurrence. Tests are conducted at an intermediate plant, when catalytic performance is observed using a unit accommodating 1 liter of catalyst and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) 12 is subjected to decomposition for the selection of proper operating conditions. Results similar to those from micro-reactor operation are attained when the reaction tube temperature is controlled. On the basis of the results, a real reactor and reaction system are designed and constructed, and CFC12 containing some CFC115 and CFC22 is made to undergo a decomposition reaction in this real reactor. It is then clarified that CFC catalytic decomposition proceeds at a low cost without generating dioxins and that therefore the process is commercially viable. In the study of catalytic adjustment, it is found that adjustment may be sufficiently effected when baking is conducted at 1,000 degrees C even when the extrusion process which demands low manufacturing cost is employed. Studies are also conducted about the mechanism of co-catalytic function occurrence. (NEDO)

  19. Health effects associated with energy conservation measures in commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenner, R.D.; Baechler, M.C.

    1990-09-01

    Indoor air quality can be impacted by hundreds of different chemicals. More than 900 different organic compounds alone have been identified in indoor air. Health effects that could arise from exposure to individual pollutants or mixtures of pollutants cover the full range of acute and chronic effects, including largely reversible responses, such as rashes and irritations, to the irreversible toxic and carcinogenic effects. These indoor contaminants are emitted from a large variety of materials and substances that are widespread components of everyday life. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with indoor air contaminants for the Bonneville Power Administration to aid the agency in the preparation of environmental documents. Results are reported in two volumes. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with a selected list of indoor air contaminants. In addition, the report discusses potential health effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorofluorocarbons. All references to the literature reviewed are found in this document Volume 2. Volume 2 provides detailed information from the literature reviewed, summarizes potential health effects, reports health hazard ratings, and discusses quantitative estimates of carcinogenic risk in humans and animals. Contaminants discussed in this report are those that; have been measured in the indoor air of a public building; have been measured (significant concentrations) in test situations simulating indoor air quality (as presented in the referenced literature); and have a significant hazard rating. 38 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs.

  20. Mycorrhizal mediation of plant response to atmospheric change: Air quality concepts and research considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, S R; Schoeneberger, M M

    1991-01-01

    The term 'global climate change' encompasses many physical and chemical changes in the atmosphere that have been induced by anthropogenic pollutants. Increases in concentrations of CO2 and CH4 enhance the 'greenhouse effect' of the atmosphere and may contribute to changes in temperature and precipitation patterns at the earth's surface. Nitrogen oxides and SO2 are phytotoxic and also react with other pollutants to produce other phytotoxins in the troposphere such as O3 and acidic substances. However, release of chlorofluorocarbons into the atmosphere may cause depletion of stratospheric O3, increasing the transmittance of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation to the earth's surface. Increased intensities of UV-B could affect plants and enhance photochemical reactions that generate some phytotoxic pollutants. The role of mycorrhizae in plant responses to such stresses has received little attention. Although plans for several research programs have acknowledged the importance of drought tolerance and soil fertility in plant responses to atmospheric stresses, mycorrhizae are rarely targeted to receive specific investigation. Most vascular land plants form mycorrhizae, so the role of mycorrhizae in mediating plant responses to atmospheric change may be an important consideration in predicting effects of atmospheric changes on plants in managed and natural ecosystems.

  1. Nuclear power and the greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, D.M.; Tolland, H.G.

    1989-05-01

    Global levels of the ''Greenhouse'' gases - carbon dioxide, the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), methane, nitrous oxide and tropospheric ozone are increasing as a result of man's activities. This increase is widely expected to bring about a rise in global temperature with concomitant environmental impacts. Global warming has been observed over the last century, and the last decade has seen seven of the warmest years on record. There has also been increased variability in the weather (an expected consequence of global warming). However, these possible manifestations of the Greenhouse Effect are within natural variations and proof must await more definitive indications. A brief outline of current views on the Greenhouse Effect is given. This report addresses the energy sector using CO 2 emissions as a measure of its ''Greenhouse'' contribution. This approach understates the energy sector contribution. However, the difference is within the error band. It seems likely that the warming effect of non-energy related emissions will remain the same and there will be more pressure to reduce the emissions from the energy sector. To assess policy options the pattern of future energy demand is estimated. Two scenarios have been adopted to provide alternative frameworks. Both assume low energy growth projections based on increased energy efficiency. The role of nuclear power in reducing carbon dioxide emissions is considered. (author)

  2. New ecology, global change, and forest politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, N.

    1993-01-01

    Ecosystems constantly change. Some changes are caused by natural conditions that evolve at a very slow pace including climate change, species evolution and migration, and soil formation. Forests don't always respond to gradual changes in gradual ways, though gradual change may be hidden for years within the normal variation in the ecosystem. The industrial age has resulted in a rapid and continuing buildup of atmospheric gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and chlorofluorocarbons which trap heat in the greenhouse effect. Industrial processes also emit oxides of nitrogen and sulfur that change atmospheric chemistry and alter the nutrient input into ecosystems. Natural forests face a hard time adjusting to a rate of climatic change that is 3 to 10 times faster than species can migrate and that increases the occurrence of major windstorms. In the forest ecosystem where trees are removed or destroyed under rapid climatic change, conditions may not return to their original state, even if we try to restore it. When the ecosystem changes faster than the bureaucracy of the management agency, a serious problem exists. New understandings of ecology and global change may force new ways of thinking in these situations

  3. Chilling Prospect: Climate Change Effects of Mismanaged Refrigerants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huabo; Miller, T Reed; Liu, Gang; Zeng, Xianlai; Yu, Keli; Huang, Qifei; Zuo, Jian; Qin, Yufei; Li, Jinhui

    2018-06-05

    The global community has responded to the dual threats of ozone depletion and climate change from refrigerant emissions (e.g., chlorofluorocarbons, CFCs, and hydrofluorocarbons, HFCs) in refrigerators and air conditioners (RACs) by agreeing to phase out the production of the most damaging chemicals and replacing them with substitutes. Since these refrigerants are "banked" in products during their service life, they will continue to impact our environment for decades to come if they are released due to mismanagement at the end of life. Addressing such long-term impacts of refrigerants requires a dynamic understanding of the RACs' life cycle, which was largely overlooked in previous studies. Based on field surveys and a dynamic model, we reveal the lingering ozone depletion potential (ODP) and significant global warming potential (GWP) of scrap refrigerants in China, the world's largest producer (62%) and consumer (46%) of RACs in 2015, which comes almost entirely from air conditioners rather than refrigerators. If the use and waste management of RACs continue with the current trend, the total GWP of scrap refrigerants in China will peak by 2025 at a level of 135.2 ± 18.9 Mt CO 2 e (equal to approximately 1.2% ± 0.2% of China's total greenhouse gas emissions or the national total of either The Netherlands and Czech Republic in 2015). Our results imply an urgent need for improving the recycling and waste management of RACs in China.

  4. UV-VIS Spectroscopy Applied to Stratospheric Chemistry, Methods and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsen, K.

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. Numerous observations and modeling have shown with a very high degree of certainty that the man-made emissions of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) and halons are responsible for the Antarctica ozone hole. It is also evident that the ozone layer of the Northern Hemisphere has suffered a certain decline over the last 10-15 years, possibly because of CFC and halons. 20-30% of the observed reduction is ascribed to coupled chlorine and bromine chemistry via a catalytic cycle resulting in the net conversion of 2O{sub 3} to 3O{sub 2}. But the details are not fully understood. The author plans to assemble a UV-VIS spectrometer for measuring the species OClO and BrO and to compare and discuss measured diurnal variations of OClO and BrO with model calculations. The use of Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) is discussed and some results from late 1995 presented. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Air and water cooled modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, Daniel L.; Arnold, Phillip A.; Ball, Don G.; Cook, Edward G.

    1995-01-01

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air.

  6. The history and progression of treatments for allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, Nancy K

    2014-01-01

    This article intends to place new treatments in the context of allergic rhinitis (AR) treatment history. The medical literature was searched for significant advances and changes in AR treatment. Historical data on AR treatment options and management were selected. Reviews of AR management published throughout the 20th century were included to provide context for treatment advances. Modern AR treatment began in the early 20th century with immunotherapy and was soon followed by the emergence of antihistamine therapy in the 1930s. Numerous treatments for AR have been used over the ensuing decades, including decongestants, mast cell stabilizers, and leukotriene receptor antagonists. Topical corticosteroid options were developed the 1950s, and, added to baseline antihistamine therapy, became the foundation of AR treatment. Treatment options were significantly impacted after the 1987 Montreal Protocol, which phased out the use of chlorofluorocarbon propellant aerosols because of environmental concerns. From the mid-1990s until recently, this left only aqueous solution options for intranasal corticosteroids (INSs). The approval of the first hydrofluoroalkane propellant aerosol INSs for AR in 2012 restored a "dry" aerosol treatment option. The first combination intranasal antihistamine/INSs was also approved in 2012, providing a novel treatment option for AR. Treatment of AR has progressed with new therapeutic options now available. This should continue to move forward with agents to alter the allergic mechanism itself and impact the disease burden that has a significant impact on patient outcomes.

  7. Determination of trifluoroacetic acid in 1996--1997 precipitation and surface waters in California and Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wujcik, C.E.; Cahill, T.M.; Seiber, J.N. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1999-05-15

    The atmospheric degradation of three chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacement compounds, namely HFC-134a, HCFC-123, and HCFC-124, results in the formation of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Concentrations of TFA were determined in precipitation and surface water samples collected in California and Nevada during 1996--1997. Terminal lake systems were found to have concentrations 4--13 times higher than their calculated yearly inputs, providing evidence for accumulation. The results support dry deposition as the primary contributor of TFA to surface waters in arid and semiarid environments. Precipitation samples obtained from three different locations contained 20.7--1530 ng/L with significantly higher concentrations in fogwater over rainwater. Elevated levels of TFA were observed for rainwater collected in Nevada over those collected in California, indicating continual uptake and concentration as clouds move from a semiarid to arid climate. Thus several mechanisms exist, including evaporative concentration, vapor-liquid phase partitioning, lowered washout volumes of atmospheric deposition water, and dry deposition, which may lead to elevated concentrations of TFA in atmospheric and surface waters above levels expected from usual rainfall washout.

  8. Arctic Intermediate Water in the Nordic Seas, 1991-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeansson, Emil; Olsen, Are; Jutterström, Sara

    2017-10-01

    The evolution of the different types of Arctic Intermediate Water (AIW) in the Nordic Seas is evaluated and compared utilising hydro-chemical data from 1991 to 2009. It has been suggested that these waters are important components of the Norwegian Sea Arctic Intermediate Water (NSAIW), and of the dense overflows to the North Atlantic. Thus, it is important to understand how their properties and distribution vary with time. The AIWs from the Greenland and Iceland Seas, show different degrees of variability during the studied period; however, only the Greenland Sea Arctic Intermediate Water (GSAIW) shows an increasing temperature and salinity throughout the 2000s, which considerably changed the properties of this water mass. Optimum multiparameter (OMP) analysis was conducted to assess the sources of the NSAIW. The analysis shows that the Iceland Sea Arctic Intermediate Water (ISAIW) and the GSAIW both contribute to NSAIW, at different densities corresponding to their respective density range. This illustrates that they flow largely isopycnally from their source regions to the Norwegian Sea. The main source of the NSAIW, however, is the upper Polar Deep Water, which explains the lower concentrations of oxygen and chlorofluorocarbons, and higher salinity and nutrient concentrations of the NSAIW layer compared with the ISAIW and GSAIW. This shows how vital it is to include chemical tracers in any water mass analysis to correctly assess the sources of the water mass being studied.

  9. Hybrid system: Heat pump-solar air dryer for grains; Sistema hibrido: bomba de calor - calentador solar de aire para el secado de productos agricolas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto Gomez, Willfredo [Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, Tijuana (Mexico); Ortega Herrera, Jose Angel [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Design, building, operation and evaluation energy wise of a hybrid experimental type, with heat pump, that uses no chloride, does not destroy the ozone layer. It is solar air dryer for grains. In this research we dry rice. It has tree systems: 1.- A mechanical compression heat pump, 2.- An air solar heater, and 3.- An agriculture products dryer. The drying capacity is 20 pounds of grain /day, with a median daily solar radiation. The costs is approximately U.S. $ 6 000.00. The heat pump used 22 refrigerant first, and now works with refrigerant SUVA 9000. This refrigerant will be available this year in the I.S., it is one of the ecological class that substitutes the chlorofluorocarbonates. [Spanish] Se disena, construye, opera, y evalua energeticamente, un sistema hibrido tipo experimental, con bomba de calor que utiliza refrigerante que no contiene cloro, y no destruye la capa de ozono y un calentador solar de aire, para secar granos. En este trabajo secamos arroz. Se compone de tres sistemas: 1.- Bomba de calor por compresion mecanica, 2.- Calentador solar de aire, 3.- Secador de productos agricolas. La capacidad de secado es de 10 Kilos de granos/dia promedio. Tiene un costo aproximado de $ 60 000. La bomba de calor utiliza refrigerante 22 en una primera generacion, y actualmente opera con un refrigerante SUVA 9000, en una segunda generacion, este refrigerante se comercializara en este ano, en la Union Americana, pertenece a la familia de los llamados refrigerantes ecologicos, sustitutos de los clorofluorocarbonados.

  10. Global Warming in the Twenty-First Century: An Alternative Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Sato, Makiko; Ruedy, Reto; Lacis, Andrew; Oinas, Valdar

    2000-01-01

    A common view is that the current global warming rate will continue or accelerate. But we argue that rapid warming in recent decades has been driven mainly by non-CO2 greenhouse gases (GHGs), such as chlorofluorocarbons, CH4, and N2O, not by the products of fossil fuel burning, CO2 and aerosols, the positive and negative climate forcings of which are partially offsetting. The growth rate of non-CO2 GHGs has declined in the past decade. If sources of CH4 and O3 precursors were reduced in the future, the change in climate forcing by non-CO2 GHGs in the next 50 years could be near zero. Combined with a reduction of black carbon emissions and plausible success in slowing CO2 emissions, this reduction of non-CO2 GHGs could lead to a decline in the rate of global warming, reducing the danger of dramatic climate change. Such a focus on air pollution has practical benefits that unite the interests of developed and developing countries. However, assessment of ongoing and future climate change requires composition specific long-term global monitoring of aerosol properties.

  11. Replacement of CFCs in thermodynamical systems; Remplacement des CFC dans les systemes thermodynamiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Some chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are well-adapted to coldness production by vapour compression and thus are widely used in the storage of agriculture-food products from the production to the domestic consumer but also in air-conditioning systems and heat pumps. Atmospheric impacts of the use of CFCs (`ozone hole`) led the international community to adopt remedial measures which aim to prohibit the production of CFCs. These constraints led the users of refrigerating fluids to use substitution fluids and to develop new techniques of energy recovery and heat/coldness production. This workshop takes stock of this situation and of the problems encountered by the various actors involved in the replacement of CFCs in thermodynamical systems: evolutions of regulation, point of view of refrigerating fluid producers and of compressors and heat exchangers manufacturers, research studies on substitution fluids, recovery of CFCs and other refrigerating fluids, revival in the use of natural fluids (like ammonia), and use of new thermodynamical systems like compression/absorption (water/ammonia) cycles. (J.S.)

  12. Increased Arctic Deposition of Persistent Compounds as a Result of the Montreal Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C.; Pickard, H. M.; De Silva, A. O.; Spencer, C.; Criscitiello, A. S.; Muir, D.; Sharp, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) are among the diverse groups of compounds characterized as persistent organic pollutants. They are toxic, resistant to environmental degradation, and adversely impact human and environmental health. PFCAs with four or fewer carbons, short-chain PFCAs (scPFCAs), are of particular interest because of their increasing levels in the environment, toxicity to plants, and potential for accumulation in some aquatic ecosystems, making them an emerging environmental concern. A minor source of scPFCAs to the Arctic has been shown to be atmospheric transformation of fluoropolymer precursors, followed by deposition. Additional potential sources of scPFCAs to the Arctic are chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-replacement compounds. Through analysis of an ice core from the Canadian High Arctic, we show that Montreal Protocol-mandated introduction of CFC-replacement compounds for the heat-transfer industry has led to increasing inputs of these scPFCAs to the remote environment. Flux measurements for scPFCAs as a class of contaminants have only been reported in a couple studies to date. Here, we provide the first multi-decadal temporal record of scPFCA deposition, demonstrating a dramatic increase in deposition resulting from emission of CFC-replacements. These results bring to the forefront a need for a holistic approach to environmental risk assessment that considers impacts of replacement substances and degradation products.

  13. Response to 'Perception of risk and the future of nuclear power'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mc Elhleny, V [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Knight Journalism Fellows Proggram, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1990-07-01

    In our own domestic politics in the United States, examples of renunciation of a civilian technology that I can think of easily are the Supersonic Transport, where we made a social decision not to subsidize production of the 2000 mile per hour Boeing embodiment, and the related decision to begin restricting the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). We began doing the latter in the 1970s, more as a fallout of the Supersonic Transport debate than the self-standing concern it has become. We now have global arrangements to cut back on CFCs, and it would appear that the ones that we have had are going to be tightened. Those are very unusual in the history of technology. it was not a vote of the people that caused inter-urban trams to go out of service. You can look at the history of Los Angeles and say there were some local votes of bodies that were manipulated to hasten the decline of them, but on the whole, technologies are not voted up or down by the people. This is not a plebiscitary thing. In polling, there is an implication that you are taking a sounding of the people and are acting as a result of that sounding. Perception is that everyone is pushing their button, and then you do something.

  14. Light and skin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the depletion of ozone in the stratosphere due to chlorofluorocarbons, the screening effect of this ozone layer on ultraviolet radiation (especially the so-called UV-B component) is reduced. This paper describes the impact of increased UV radiation on the human skin. Because of the 'ozone-hole', a distinct increase in the rate of skin cancer is to be expected which will affect all living beings but most of all man - an indirect consequence of the climate development. What makes the increased intensity of UV-B radiation so harmful is the fact that light-induced skin damage accumulates for the period of the life-time of the individual and cannot be reversed. A further thinning of stratospheric ozone would let through, in addition, the more short-waved ('harder') UV-C radiation. The latter, though clinically not significant currently, would then account for a further increase in the rate of malignant skin disease world-wide. (orig.) [de

  15. Modeling Surface Water Transport in the Central Pacific Ocean With 129I Records From Coral Skeletons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, W.; Biddulph, D. L.; Russell, J. L.; Burr, G. S.; Jull, T. J.; Correge, T.; Roeder, B.

    2008-12-01

    129I occurs naturally in extremely low abundance via cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere as well as by spontaneous fission of uranium. Oceanic concentrations of 129I have risen by several orders of magnitude during the last half century largely from environmental pollution coming from several point-source nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. In the Pacific basin, much of the increase has apparently come from the Hanford Nuclear reprocessing plant in the United States, with iodine primarily arriving via the Columbia River. Coral skeletons preserve records of 129I concentration of the surface waters from which they were deposited, yielding records with annual resolution or better. We will present three such records from different locations in the Pacific Ocean: the Solomon Islands, Easter Island and Clipperton Atoll. For this study, drill cores from living massive coral skeletons of the species Porites Lobata were collected from these sites. 129I/127I values were measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the University of Arizona with an NEC 3 MV Pelletron accelerator. Results from the analysis of the corals will be compared to the distribution of other mixed-layer tracers (chloro-fluorocarbons and tritium) collected during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment cruises conducted between 1990 and 2002. The 129I/127I records observed in these corals will also be compared to tracer transit time calculations determined from a 20th century simulation of the GFDL coupled-climate passive-tracer model.

  16. Assessment of managed aquifer recharge from Sand Hollow Reservoir, Washington County, Utah, updated to conditions in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Marston, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Sand Hollow Reservoir in Washington County, Utah, was completed in March 2002 and is operated primarily for managed aquifer recharge by the Washington County Water Conservancy District. From 2002 through 2009, total surface-water diversions of about 154,000 acre-feet to Sand Hollow Reservoir have allowed it to remain nearly full since 2006. Groundwater levels in monitoring wells near the reservoir rose through 2006 and have fluctuated more recently because of variations in reservoir water-level altitude and nearby pumping from production wells. Between 2004 and 2009, a total of about 13,000 acre-feet of groundwater has been withdrawn by these wells for municipal supply. In addition, a total of about 14,000 acre-feet of shallow seepage was captured by French drains adjacent to the North and West Dams and used for municipal supply, irrigation, or returned to the reservoir.From 2002 through 2009, about 86,000 acre-feet of water seeped beneath the reservoir to recharge the underlying Navajo Sandstone aquifer. Water-quality sampling was conducted at various monitoring wells in Sand Hollow to evaluate the timing and location of reservoir recharge moving through the aquifer. Tracers of reservoir recharge include major and minor dissolved inorganic ions, tritium, dissolved organic carbon, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and noble gases. By 2010, this recharge arrived at monitoring wells within about 1,000 feet of the reservoir.

  17. UV-B Radiation Contributes to Amphibian Population Declines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaustein, Andrew

    2007-05-01

    UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation is the most significant biologically damaging radiation at the terrestrial surface. At the organismal level, UV-B radiation can slow growth rates, cause immune dysfunction and result in sublethal damage. UV-B radiation can lead to mutations and cell death. Over evolutionary time, UV radiation has been an important stressor on living organisms. Natural events, including impacts from comets and asteroids, volcanic activity, supernova explosions and solar flares, can cause large-scale ozone depletion with accompanying increases in UV radiation. However, these natural events are transient. Moreover, the amount of ozone damage due to natural events depends upon a number of variables, including the magnitude of the event. This is different from modern-day human-induced production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other chemicals that deplete stratospheric ozone continuously, resulting in long-term increases in UV-B radiation at the surface of the earth. We will briefly review the effects of UV-B exposure in one group of aquatic organisms_amphibians. UV-B has been implicated as a possible factor contributing to global declines and range reductions in amphibian populations.

  18. A manual for a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for light stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    1998-01-01

    The reliability and accuracy of isotopic data can be improved by utilizing database software to (i) store information about samples, (ii) store the results of mass spectrometric isotope-ratio analyses of samples, (iii) calculate analytical results using standardized algorithms stored in a database, (iv) normalize stable isotopic data to international scales using isotopic reference materials, and (v) generate multi-sheet paper templates for convenient sample loading of automated mass-spectrometer sample preparation manifolds. Such a database program is presented herein. Major benefits of this system include (i) an increase in laboratory efficiency, (ii) reduction in the use of paper, (iii) reduction in workload due to the elimination or reduction of retyping of data by laboratory personnel, and (iv) decreased errors in data reported to sample submitters. Such a database provides a complete record of when and how often laboratory reference materials have been analyzed and provides a record of what correction factors have been used through time. It provides an audit trail for stable isotope laboratories. Since the original publication of the manual for LIMS for Light Stable Isotopes, the isotopes 3 H, 3 He, and 14 C, and the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113, have been added to this program.

  19. Replacement Technologies for Precision Cleaning of Aerospace Hardware for Propellant Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-l13- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. Replacement technologies are being investigated for aerospace hardware and for gauges and instrumentation. This paper includes the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification of aerospace hardware using known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils. The results correlate nonvolatile residue with CFC 113. The studies also include enhancements to aqueous sampling for organic and particulate contamination. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon 225 (HCFC 225), HCFC 141b, HFE 7100(R), and Vertrel MCA(R) was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC 113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autogenous ignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  20. Fiscal 1999 achievement report on regional consortium research and development project. Regional consortium on energy research in its 3rd year (Research and development of novel agricultural product storing technology utilizing low temperature energy); 1999 nendo teion energy wo riyoshita nosanbutsu no shinki chozo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    In an effort to develop the above-named technology to meet with Hokkaido's local needs, an experiment is conducted in which 2.6t of potato is preserved for 8 months in the open air at a below freezing temperature. It is then found that a system under which humidity is supplied by a 2-liquid nozzle and temperature is controlled by natural convection is better than the conventional, humidified underground pit. The reason is that the potato looses less weight when stored by the new method. In the case of a 20KW-class Stirling engine installed for power generation in a refuse incinerator flue gas duct, heat recovery efficiency on the high temperature side is increased when the engine heater is improved. Thermoelectric converters may be arranged in a cascade on the low temperature side of the Stirling engine. A pulse tube refrigerator using air as the medium is found to be equivalent to a system working on a CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) alternative. In the study of refrigerant aided cold thermal storage, a propane gas hydrate (which may be slurried) storage is found to exhibit a higher overall heat transfer coefficient than an ice thermal storage. A long-term storage system for agricultural products is constructed and then evaluated for cost performance, the system being a combination of a below-freezing high-humidity refrigerator, preliminary refrigerator, frozen finished goods storage, hydrate cold thermal storage, Stirling engine, and a pulse tube refrigerator. (NEDO)

  1. Fiscal 1999 achievement report on regional consortium research and development project. Regional consortium on energy research in its 3rd year (Development of an environmentally-friendly industrial cleaning system using supercritical CO2 fluid); 1999 nendo chorinkai ryutai wo mochiita kankyo chowagata kogyo senjo sochi no kaihatsu seika hokokusho. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    In high-technology industries such as the semiconductor industry, cleaning operations are indispensable. In these industries, replacement of the current method with a new one has become an urgent matter, thanks to the new control imposed on pollutant CFC (chlorofluorocarbon). Using a supercritical fluid, whose density and other features may be regulated extensively and continuously by controlling temperature and pressure, various conditions may be set in detail for the cleaning element, such as the dissolving power, dispersion force, surface activity, and chemical reactivity. The fluid is environmentally friendly and free of pollution. Facilities for recovering, regenerating, and circulating the solvent are incorporated into a test cleaner built in the preceding fiscal year, and a new system is completed. The system is operated in a test run for performance assessment, and data are collected to specify cleaning conditions best for each kind of the target items. Studies are made to expand the scope of system application for use under supercritical conditions. An experiment is conducted using a pollutant model, and a method to analyze the degree of cleaning is studied using an effective diffusion coefficient. A self-cleaning method is studied for the filter for the regeneration of the supercritical cleaning solvent. A market research is carried out for the commercialization of the industrial cleaning system. (NEDO)

  2. The Effects of Volcano-Induced Ozone Depletion on Short-lived Climate Forcing in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    Photodissociation of oxygen maintains the stratopause ~50°C warmer than the tropopause. Photodissociation of ozone warms the lower stratosphere, preventing most of this high-energy DNA-damaging solar radiation from reaching the troposphere. Ozone depletion allows more UV energy to reach the lower troposphere causing photodissociation of anthropogenic ozone and nitrogen dioxide. UV energy also penetrates the ocean >10 m where it is absorbed more efficiently than infrared radiation that barely penetrates the surface. Manmade chlorofluorocarbons caused ozone depletion from 1965 to 1994 with slow recovery predicted over the next 50+ years. But the lowest levels of ozone followed the eruptions of Pinatubo (1991 VEI=6), Eyjafjallajökull (2010 VEI=4), and Grímsvötn (2011 VEI=4). Each of the relatively small, basaltic eruptions in Iceland caused more ozone depletion than the long-term effects of chlorofluorocarbons, although total ozone appears to return to pre-eruption levels within a decade. Ozone depletion by 20% increases energy flux thru the lowermost troposphere by 0.7 W m-2 for overhead sun causing temperatures in the lower stratosphere to drop >2°C since 1958 in steps after the 3 largest volcanic eruptions: Agung 1963, El Chichón 1982, and Pinatubo. Temperatures at the surface increased primarily in the regions and at the times of the greatest observed ozone depletion. The greatest warming observed was along the Western Antarctic Peninsula (65.4°S) where minimum temperatures rose 6.7°C from 1951 to 2003 while maximum temperatures remained relatively constant. Minimum total column ozone in September-October was 40-56% lower than in 1972 almost every year since 1987, strongly anti-correlated with observed minimum temperatures. Sea ice decreased 10%, 7 ice shelves separated, 87% of the glaciers retreated and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current warmed. Elsewhere under the ozone hole, warming of continental Antarctica was limited by the high albedo (0.86) of

  3. Flow of river water into a karstic limestone aquifer-2. Dating the young fraction in groundwater mixtures in the Upper Floridan aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E.; Drenkard, S.; Schlosser, P.; Ekwurzel, B.; Weppernig, R.; McConnell, J.B.; Michel, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Tritium/helium-3 ( 3 H/ 3 He) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFCs, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) data are used to date the young fraction in groundwater mixtures from a karstic limestone aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia, where regional paleowater in the Upper Floridan aquifer receives recharge from two young sources-the flow of Withlacoochee River water through sinkholes in the river bed, and leakage of infiltration water through post-Eocene semi-confining beds above the Upper Floridan aquifer. In dating the young fraction of mixtures using CFCs, it is necessary to reconstruct the CFC concentration that was in the young fraction prior to mixing. The 3 H/ 3 He age is independent of the extent of dilution with older ( 3 H-free and 3 He trit -free) water. The groundwater mixtures are designated as Type-1 for mixtures of regional paleowater and regional infiltration water and Type-2 for mixtures containing more than approximately 4% of river water. The fractions of regional paleowater, regional infiltration water, and Withlacoochee River water in the groundwater mixtures were determined from Cl - and δ 18 O data for water from the Upper Floridan aquifer at Valdosta, Georgia.The chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 and CFC-113 are removed by microbial degradation and/or sorption processes in most anaerobic (Type-2) groundwater at Valdosta, but are present in some aerobic Type-1 water. CFC-12 persists in both SO 4 -reducing and methanogenic water. The very low detection limits for CFCs (approximately 0.3 pg kg -1 ) permitted CFC-11 and CFC-12 dating of the fraction of regional infiltration water in Type-1 mixtures, and CFC-12 dating of the river-water fraction in Type-2 mixtures. Overall, approximately 50% of the 85 water samples obtained from the Upper Floridan aquifer have CFC-12-based ages of the young fraction that are consistent with the 3 H concentration of the groundwater. Because of uncertainties associated with very low 3 H and 3 He content in dilute mixtures, 3 H/ 3 He dating is

  4. Flow of river water into a karstic limestone aquifer - 2. Dating the young fraction in groundwater mixtures in the Upper Floridan aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Niel; Busenberg, E.; Drenkard, S.; Schlosser, P.; Ekwurzel, B.; Weppernig, R.; McConnell, J.B.; Michel, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFCs, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) data are used to date the young fraction in groundwater mixtures from a karstic limestone aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia, where regional paleowater in the Upper Floridan aquifer receives recharge from two young sources the flow of Withlacoochee River water through sinkholes in the river bed, and leakage of infiltration water through post-Eocene semi-confining beds above the Upper Floridan aquifer. In dating the young fraction of mixtures using CFCs, it is necessary to reconstruct the CFC concentration that was in the young fraction prior to mixing. The 3H/3He age is independent of the extent of dilution with older (3H-free and 3He(trit)-free) water. The groundwater mixtures are designated as Type-I for mixtures of regional paleowater and regional infiltration water and Type-2 for mixtures containing more than approximately 4% of river water. The fractions of regional paleowater, regional infiltration water, and Withlacoochee River water in the groundwater mixtures were determined from Cl- and ??18O data for water from the Upper Floridan aquifer at Valdosta, Georgia The chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 and CFC-113 are removed by microbial degradation and/or sorption processes in most allaerobic (Type-2) groundwater at Valdosta, but are present in some aerobic Type-I water. CFC-12 persists in both SO4-reducing and methanogenic water. The very low detection limits for CFCs (approximately 0.3 pg kg-1) permitted CFC-11 and CFC-12 dating of the fraction of regional infiltration water in Type-I mixtures, and CFC-12 dating of the river-water fraction in Type-2 mixtures. Overall, approximately 50% of the 85 water sam pies obtained from the Upper Floridan aquifer have CFC-12-based ages of the young traction that are consistent with the 3H concentration of the groundwater. Because of uncertainties associated with very low 3H and 3He content in dilute mixtures, 3H/3He dating is limited to the river

  5. Integration of environmentally compatible soldering technologies for waste minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosking, F.M.

    1992-01-01

    There has been a concentrated effort throughout the international microelectronics industry to phase out chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) materials and alleviate the serious problem of ozone depletion created by the release of CFCS. The development of more environmentally compatible manufacturing technologies is the cornerstone of this effort. Alternative materials and processes for cleaning and soldering have received special attention. Electronic. soldering typically utilizes rosin-based fluxes to promote solder wettability. Flux residues must be removed from the soldered parts when high product reliability is essential. Halogenated or CFC solvents have been the principle chemicals used to clean the residues. With the accelerated push to eliminate CFCs in the US by 1995, CFC-free solvents, aqueous-based cleaning, water soluble or ''no clean'' fluxes, and fluxless soldering technologies are being developed and quickly integrated into manufacturing practice. Sandia's Center for Solder Science and Technology has been ch g a variety of fluxless and alternative soldering technologies for DOE's waste minimization program. The work has focused on controlled atmosphere, laser, and ultrasonic fluxless soldering, protective metallic and organic coatings, and fluxes which have water soluble or low solids-based chemistries. With the increasing concern that Pb will also be banned from electronic soldering, Sandia has been characterizing the wetting, aging, and mechanical properties of Pb-fire solder alloys. The progress of these integrated studies will be discussed. Their impact on environmentally compatible manufacturing will be emphasized. Since there is no universal solution to the various environmental, safety, and health issues which currently face industry, the proposed technologies offer several complementary materials and processing options from which one can choose

  6. UV and infrared absorption spectra, atmospheric lifetimes, and ozone depletion and global warming potentials for CCl2FCCl2F (CFC-112, CCl3CClF2 (CFC-112a, CCl3CF3 (CFC-113a, and CCl2FCF3 (CFC-114a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Davis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The potential impact of CCl2FCF3 (CFC-114a and the recently observed CCl2FCCl2F (CFC-112, CCl3CClF2 (CFC-112a, and CCl3CF3 (CFC-113a chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs on stratospheric ozone and climate is presently not well characterized. In this study, the UV absorption spectra of these CFCs were measured between 192.5 and 235 nm over the temperature range 207–323 K. Precise parameterizations of the UV absorption spectra are presented. A 2-D atmospheric model was used to evaluate the CFC atmospheric loss processes, lifetimes, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs, and the associated uncertainty ranges in these metrics due to the kinetic and photochemical uncertainty. The CFCs are primarily removed in the stratosphere by short-wavelength UV photolysis with calculated global annually averaged steady-state lifetimes (years of 63.6 (61.9–64.7, 51.5 (50.0–52.6, 55.4 (54.3–56.3, and 105.3 (102.9–107.4 for CFC-112, CFC-112a, CFC-113a, and CFC-114a, respectively. The range of lifetimes given in parentheses is due to the 2σ uncertainty in the UV absorption spectra and O(1D rate coefficients included in the model calculations. The 2-D model was also used to calculate the CFC ozone depletion potentials (ODPs with values of 0.98, 0.86, 0.73, and 0.72 obtained for CFC-112, CFC-112a, CFC-113a, and CFC-114a, respectively. Using the infrared absorption spectra and lifetimes determined in this work, the CFC global warming potentials (GWPs were estimated to be 4260 (CFC-112, 3330 (CFC-112a, 3650 (CFC-113a, and 6510 (CFC-114a for the 100-year time horizon.

  7. New Delivery Systems and Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Dolovich

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC propellants from industrial and household products has been agreed to by over 165 countires of which more than 135 are developing countries. The timetable for this process is outlined in the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer document and in several subsequent amendments. Pressured metered dose inhalers (pMDIs for medical use have been granted temporary exemptions until replacement formulations, providing the same medication via the same route, and with the same efficacy and safety profiles, are approved for human use. Hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs are the alternative propellants for CFCs-12 and -114. Their potential for damage to the ozone layer is nonexistent, and while they are greenhouse gases, their global warming potential is a fraction (one-tenth of that of CFCs. Replacement formulations for almost all inhalant respiratory medications have been or are being produced and tested; in Canada, it is anticipated that the transition to these HFA or CFC-free pMDIs will be complete by the year 2005. Initially, an HFA pMDI was to be equivalent to the CFC pMDI being replaced, in terms of aerosol properties and effective clinical dose. However, this will not necessarily be the situation, particularly for some corticosteroid products. Currently, only one CFC-free formulation is available in Canada – Airomir, a HFA salbutamol pMDI. This paper discusses the in vitro aerosol characteristics, in vivo deposition and clinical data for several HFA pMDIs for which there are data available in the literature. Alternative delivery systems to the pMDI, namely, dry powder inhalers and nebulizers, are briefly reviewed.

  8. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/Vs Roger Revelle and Thomas Thompson repeat hydrography cruises in the Pacific Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 sections P16S-2005 (9 January - 19 February, 2005) and P16N-2006 (13 February - 30 March, 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyr, Alex [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Feely, R. A. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Sabine, C. L. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Millero, F. J. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Langdon, C. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Dickson, A. G. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Fine, R. A. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Bullister, J. L. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Hansell, D. A. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Carlson, C. A. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Sloyan, B. M. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States); McNichol, A. P. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Key, R. M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Byrne, R. H. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Wanninkhof, R. [Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA, Miami, FL (United States)

    2009-05-01

    This report presents methods, and analytical and quality control procedures for salinity, oxygen, nutrients, total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), pH, discrete CO2 partial pressure (pCO2), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), radiocarbon, δ13C, and underway carbon measurements performed during the P16S-2005 (9 January - 19 February 2005) and P16N-2006 (13 February - 30 March, 2006) cruises in the Pacific Ocean. The research vessel (R/V) Roger Revelle departed Papeete, Tahiti, on January 9, 2005 for the Repeat Section P16S, nominally along 150°W, ending in Wellington, New Zealand, on February 19. During this cruise, samples were taken from 36 depths at 111 CTD stations between 16°S and 71°S. The Repeat Section P16N, nominally along 152°W, consisted of two legs. Leg 1 started on February 13, 2006 in Papeete, Tahiti, and finished on March 3, in Honolulu, Hawaii. The R/V Thomas G. Thompson departed Honolulu for Leg 2 on March 10, 2006 and arrived in Kodiak, Alaska, on March 30. During the P16N cruises, samples were taken from 34 or 36 depths at 84 stations between 17°S and 56.28°N. The research conducted on these cruises was part of a series of repeat hydrography sections jointly funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the Climate Variability Program (CLIVAR)/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program. The P16S and P16N data sets are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  9. Formation and spreading of Red Sea Outflow Water in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ping; Bower, Amy S.; Smethie, William M.; Pratt, Larry J.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrographic data, chlorofluorocarbon-12 (CFC-12) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) measurements collected in March 2010 and September-October 2011 in the Red Sea, as well as an idealized numerical experiment are used to study the formation and spreading of Red Sea Outflow Water (RSOW) in the Red Sea. Analysis of inert tracers, potential vorticity distributions, and model results confirm that RSOW is formed through mixed-layer deepening caused by sea surface buoyancy loss in winter in the northern Red Sea and reveal more details on RSOW spreading rates, pathways, and vertical structure. The southward spreading of RSOW after its formation is identified as a layer with minimum potential vorticity and maximum CFC-12 and SF6. Ventilation ages of seawater within the RSOW layer, calculated from the partial pressure of SF6 (pSF6), range from 2 years in the northern Red Sea to 15 years at 17°N. The distribution of the tracer ages is in agreement with the model circulation field which shows a rapid transport of RSOW from its formation region to the southern Red Sea where there are longer circulation pathways and hence longer residence time due to basin wide eddies. The mean residence time of RSOW within the Red Sea estimated from the pSF6 age is 4.7 years. This time scale is very close to the mean transit time (4.8 years) for particles from the RSOW formation region to reach the exit at the Strait of Bab el Mandeb in the numerical experiment.

  10. Italian WEEE management system and treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments for CFCs removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansotera, M; Navarrini, W; Talaeemashhadi, S; Venturini, F

    2013-06-01

    This study presents and analyzes the data of the Italian system for take-back and recovery of waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEEs) in the start-up period 2008-2010. The analysis was focused particularly on the data about the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments. In fact, the wastes of cooling and freezing equipments have a high environmental impact. Indeed, in their compressor oil and insulation polyurethane (PU) foams chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) ozone-depleting gases are still present. In the period 2001-2004 Northern Italy resulted the main source in Europe of CFCs. The European Directive on WEEE management was enacted in 2002, but in Italy it was implemented by the legislative Decree in 2005 and it became operational in 2008. Actually, in 2008 the national WEEE Coordination Centre was founded in order to organize the WEEE pick-up process and to control collection, recovery and recycling targets. As a result, in 2010 the average WEEE collection per capita exceeded the threshold of more than 4 kg per inhabitant, as well as cooling and freezing appliances represented more than one fourth of the Italian WEEE collection stream. During the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments, CFCs were recovered and disposed principally by burner methods. The analyses of defined specimens collected in the treatment facilities were standardized to reliably determine the amount of recovered CFCs. Samples of alkaline solid salt, alkaline saline solution, polyurethane matrix and compressor oil collected during the audit assessment procedure were analyzed and the results were discussed. In particular, the analysis of PU samples after the shredding and the warm pressing procedures measured a residual CFCs content around 500-1300 mg/kg of CFCs within the foam matrix. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Model-Based Evaluation of the Inverse Gaussian Transit-Time Distribution Method for Inferring Anthropogenic Carbon Storage in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan-Chun; Tjiputra, Jerry; Langehaug, Helene R.; Jeansson, Emil; Gao, Yongqi; Schwinger, Jörg; Olsen, Are

    2018-03-01

    The Inverse Gaussian approximation of transit time distribution method (IG-TTD) is widely used to infer the anthropogenic carbon (Cant) concentration in the ocean from measurements of transient tracers such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Its accuracy relies on the validity of several assumptions, notably (i) a steady state ocean circulation, (ii) a prescribed age tracer saturation history, e.g., a constant 100% saturation, (iii) a prescribed constant degree of mixing in the ocean, (iv) a constant surface ocean air-sea CO2 disequilibrium with time, and (v) that preformed alkalinity can be sufficiently estimated by salinity or salinity and temperature. Here, these assumptions are evaluated using simulated "model-truth" of Cant. The results give the IG-TTD method a range of uncertainty from 7.8% to 13.6% (11.4 Pg C to 19.8 Pg C) due to above assumptions, which is about half of the uncertainty derived in previous model studies. Assumptions (ii), (iv) and (iii) are the three largest sources of uncertainties, accounting for 5.5%, 3.8% and 3.0%, respectively, while assumptions (i) and (v) only contribute about 0.6% and 0.7%. Regionally, the Southern Ocean contributes the largest uncertainty, of 7.8%, while the North Atlantic contributes about 1.3%. Our findings demonstrate that spatial-dependency of Δ/Γ, and temporal changes in tracer saturation and air-sea CO2 disequilibrium have strong compensating effect on the estimated Cant. The values of these parameters should be quantified to reduce the uncertainty of IG-TTD; this is increasingly important under a changing ocean climate.

  12. The greenhouse effect and climate warming up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leygonie, R.

    1992-01-01

    The present article is a follow-up to a previous article, under the same title, which describes the scientific bases of the greenhouse effect and the prospect, based on climatic global models, of a potential climate warming up. The conclusions of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, August 1990) were summarized, predicting a mean global temperature increase between 2.4 and 5.1 deg C in 2070, among other changes. The recent IPCC work confirms 1990 conclusions but states that the decline of ozone in the lower stratosphere could neutralize the radiative forcing of chlorofluorocarbons. At least ten more years of investigation are needed to ascertain an increase of the greenhouse effect. Information is given on recent events which may be connected with the global climate problem, in particular the spectacular eruption of the Pinatubo volcano, in mid 1991, cause of a probable cooling of the atmosphere and a potential decrease of radiative forcing due to anthropogenic dioxide emissions. The most important recent events in the political field is a directive proposal by the European Commission aimed at a taxation of both energy in general and of carbon dioxide emissions by fossil fuels. Another event is the United Nations Convention on climate change, signed by 155 countries at the Rio de Janeiro Conference on Environment and Development, which pledges signatories to decrease their greenhouse gas - emissions but no figures are given on percentages and calendar of reduction. At last, a short chapter is devoted to the French ECLAT programme on climate change which consists both in participating in world programmes and in performing original investigations by French Scientists

  13. Ventilation versus biology: What is the controlling mechanism of nitrous oxide distribution in the North Atlantic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Mercedes; García-Ibáñez, Maribel I.; Steinfeldt, Reiner; Ríos, Aida F.; Pérez, Fiz F.

    2017-04-01

    The extent to which water mass mixing and ocean ventilation contribute to nitrous oxide (N2O) distribution at the scale of oceanic basins is poorly constrained. We used novel N2O and chlorofluorocarbon measurements along with multiparameter water mass analysis to evaluate the impact of water mass mixing and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) on N2O distribution along the Observatoire de la variabilité interannuelle et décennale en Atlantique Nord (OVIDE) section, extending from Portugal to Greenland. The biological N2O production has a stronger impact on the observed N2O concentrations in the water masses traveling northward in the upper limb of the AMOC than those in recently ventilated cold water masses in the lower limb, where N2O concentrations reflect the colder temperatures. The high N2O tongue, with concentrations as high as 16 nmol kg-1, propagates above the isopycnal surface delimiting the upper and lower AMOC limbs, which extends from the eastern North Atlantic Basin to the Iceland Basin and coincides with the maximum N2O production rates. Water mixing and basin-scale remineralization account for 72% of variation in the observed distribution of N2O. The mixing-corrected stoichiometric ratio N2O:O2 for the North Atlantic Basin of 0.06 nmol/μmol is in agreement with ratios of N2O:O2 for local N2O anomalies, suggesting than up to 28% of N2O production occurs in the temperate and subpolar Atlantic, an overlooked region for N2O cycling. Overall, our results highlight the importance of taking into account mixing, O2 undersaturation when water masses are formed and the increasing atmospheric N2O concentrations when parameterizing N2O:O2 and biological N2O production in the global oceans.

  14. Merging Energy Policy Decision Support, Education, and Communication: The 'World Energy' Simulation Role-Playing Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney-varga, J. N.; Franck, T.; Jones, A.; Sterman, J.; Sawin, E.

    2013-12-01

    To meet international goals for climate change mitigation and adaptation, as well as energy access and equity, there is an urgent need to explore and define energy policy paths forward. Despite this need, students, citizens, and decision-makers often hold deeply flawed mental models of the energy and climate systems. Here we describe a simulation role-playing game, World Energy, that provides an immersive learning experience in which participants can create their own path forward for global energy policy and learn about the impact of their policy choices on carbon dioxide emissions, temperature rise, energy supply mix, energy prices, and energy demand. The game puts players in the decision-making roles of advisors to the United Nations Sustainable Energy for All Initiative (drawn from international leaders from industry, governments, intergovernmental organizations, and citizens groups) and, using a state-of-the-art decision-support simulator, asks them to negotiate a plan for global energy policy. We use the En-ROADS (Energy Rapid Overview and Decision Support) simulator, which runs on a laptop computer in <0.1 sec. En-ROADS enables users to specify many factors, including R&D-driven cost reductions in fossil fuel-based, renewable, or carbon-neutral energy technologies; taxes and subsidies for different energy sources; performance standards and energy efficiency; emissions prices; policies to address other greenhouse gas emissions (e.g., methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorocarbons, etc.); and assumptions about GDP and population. In World Energy, participants must balance climate change mitigation goals with equity, prices and access to energy, and the political feasibility of policies. Initial results indicate participants gain insights into the dynamics of the energy and climate systems and greater understanding of the potential impacts policies.

  15. Consistency of cruise data of the CARINA database in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hoppema

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Initially a North Atlantic project, the CARINA carbon synthesis was extended to include the Southern Ocean. Carbon and relevant hydrographic and geochemical ancillary data from cruises all across the Arctic Mediterranean Seas, Atlantic and Southern Ocean were released to the public and merged into a new database as part of the CARINA synthesis effort. Of a total of 188 cruises, 37 cruises are part of the Southern Ocean, including 11 from the Atlantic sector. The variables from all Southern Ocean cruises, including dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2, total alkalinity, oxygen, nitrate, phosphate and silicate, were examined for cruise-to-cruise consistency in one collective effort. Seawater pH and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs are also part of the database, but the pH quality control (QC is described in another Earth System Science Data publication, while the complexity of the Southern Ocean physics and biogeochemistry prevented a proper QC analysis of the CFCs. The area-specific procedures of quality control, including crossover analysis between stations and inversion analysis of all crossover data (i.e. secondary QC, are briefly described here for the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Data from an existing, quality controlled database (GLODAP were used as a reference for our computations – however, the reference data were included into the analysis without applying the recommended GLODAP adjustments so the corrections could be independently verified. The outcome of this effort is an internally consistent, high-quality carbon data set for all cruises, including the reference cruises. The suggested corrections by the inversion analysis were allowed to vary within a fixed envelope, thus accounting for natural variability. The percentage of cruises adjusted ranged from 31% (for nitrate to 54% (for phosphate depending on the variable.

  16. Centuries of thermal sea-level rise due to anthropogenic emissions of short-lived greenhouse gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickfeld, Kirsten; Solomon, Susan; Gilford, Daniel M

    2017-01-24

    Mitigation of anthropogenic greenhouse gases with short lifetimes (order of a year to decades) can contribute to limiting warming, but less attention has been paid to their impacts on longer-term sea-level rise. We show that short-lived greenhouse gases contribute to sea-level rise through thermal expansion (TSLR) over much longer time scales than their atmospheric lifetimes. For example, at least half of the TSLR due to increases in methane is expected to remain present for more than 200 y, even if anthropogenic emissions cease altogether, despite the 10-y atmospheric lifetime of this gas. Chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons have already been phased out under the Montreal Protocol due to concerns about ozone depletion and provide an illustration of how emission reductions avoid multiple centuries of future TSLR. We examine the "world avoided" by the Montreal Protocol by showing that if these gases had instead been eliminated in 2050, additional TSLR of up to about 14 cm would be expected in the 21st century, with continuing contributions lasting more than 500 y. Emissions of the hydrofluorocarbon substitutes in the next half-century would also contribute to centuries of future TSLR. Consideration of the time scales of reversibility of TSLR due to short-lived substances provides insights into physical processes: sea-level rise is often assumed to follow air temperature, but this assumption holds only for TSLR when temperatures are increasing. We present a more complete formulation that is accurate even when atmospheric temperatures are stable or decreasing due to reductions in short-lived gases or net radiative forcing.

  17. Past changes in the vertical distribution of ozone – Part 1: Measurement techniques, uncertainties and availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hassler

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Peak stratospheric chlorofluorocarbon (CFC and other ozone depleting substance (ODS concentrations were reached in the mid- to late 1990s. Detection and attribution of the expected recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer in an atmosphere with reduced ODSs as well as efforts to understand the evolution of stratospheric ozone in the presence of increasing greenhouse gases are key current research topics. These require a critical examination of the ozone changes with an accurate knowledge of the spatial (geographical and vertical and temporal ozone response. For such an examination, it is vital that the quality of the measurements used be as high as possible and measurement uncertainties well quantified. In preparation for the 2014 United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP/World Meteorological Organization (WMO Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion, the SPARC/IO3C/IGACO-O3/NDACC (SI2N Initiative was designed to study and document changes in the global ozone profile distribution. This requires assessing long-term ozone profile data sets in regards to measurement stability and uncertainty characteristics. The ultimate goal is to establish suitability for estimating long-term ozone trends to contribute to ozone recovery studies. Some of the data sets have been improved as part of this initiative with updated versions now available. This summary presents an overview of stratospheric ozone profile measurement data sets (ground and satellite based available for ozone recovery studies. Here we document measurement techniques, spatial and temporal coverage, vertical resolution, native units and measurement uncertainties. In addition, the latest data versions are briefly described (including data version updates as well as detailing multiple retrievals when available for a given satellite instrument. Archive location information for each data set is also given.

  18. Metabolism of 1-fluoro-1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane, and 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-chloroethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H; Jones, J P; Anders, M W

    1995-03-01

    1-Fluoro-1,1,2-trichloroethane (HCFC-131a), 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-132b), and 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-chloroethane (HCFC-133a) were chosen as models for comparative metabolism studies on 1,1,1,2-tetrahaloethanes, which are under consideration as replacements for ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Male Fischer 344 rats were given 10 mmol/kg ip HCFC-131a or HCFC-132b or exposed by inhalation to 1% HCFC-133a for 2 h. Urine collected in the first 24 h after exposure was analyzed by 19F NMR and GC/MS and with a fluoride-selective ion electrode for the formation of fluorine-containing metabolites. Metabolites of HCFC-131a included 2,2-dichloro-2-fluoroethyl glucuronide, 2,2-dichloro-2-fluoroethyl sulfate, dichlorofluoroacetic acid, and inorganic fluoride. Metabolites of HCFC-132b were characterized as 2-chloro-2,2-difluoroethyl glucuronide, 2-chloro-2,2-difluoroethyl sulfate, chlorodifluoroacetic acid, chlorodifluoroacetaldehyde hydrate, chlorodifluoroacetaldehyde-urea adduct, and inorganic fluoride. HCFC-133a was metabolized to 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl glucuronide, trifluoroacetic acid, trifluoroacetaldehyde hydrate, trifluoroacetaldehyde-urea adduct, inorganic fluoride, and a minor, unidentified metabolite. With HCFC-131a and HCFC-132b, glucuronide conjugates of 2,2,2-trihaloethanols were the major urinary metabolites, whereas with HCFC-133a, a trifluoroacetaldehyde-urea adduct was the major urinary metabolite. Analysis of metabolite distribution in vivo indicated that aldehydic metabolites increased as fluorine substitution increased in the order HCFC-131a < HCFC-132b < HCFC-133a. With NADPH-fortified rat liver microsomes, HCFC-133a and HCFC-132b were biotransformed to trifluoroacetaldehyde and chlorodifluoroacetaldehyde, respectively, whereas HCFC-131a was converted to dichlorofluoroacetic acid. No covalently bound metabolites were detected by 19F NMR spectroscopy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. History of aerosol therapy: liquid nebulization to MDIs to DPIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paula J

    2005-09-01

    Inhaled therapies have been used since ancient times and may have had their origins with the smoking of datura preparations in India 4,000 years ago. In the late 18th and in the 19th century, earthenware inhalers were popular for the inhalation of air drawn through infusions of plants and other ingredients. Atomizers and nebulizers were developed in the mid-1800s in France and were thought to be an outgrowth of the perfume industry as well as a response to the fashion of inhaling thermal waters at spas. Around the turn of the 20th century, combustible powders and cigarettes containing stramonium were popular for asthma and other lung complaints. Following the discovery of the utility of epinephrine for treating asthma, hand-bulb nebulizers were developed, as well as early compressor nebulizers. The marketing of the first pressurized metered-dose inhaler for epinephrine and isoproterenol, by Riker Laboratories in 1956, was a milestone in the development of inhaled drugs. There have been remarkable advances in the technology of devices and formulations for inhaled drugs in the past 50 years. These have been influenced greatly by scientific developments in several areas: theoretical modeling and indirect measures of lung deposition, particle sizing techniques and in vitro deposition studies, scintigraphic deposition studies, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and the 1987 Montreal Protocol, which banned chlorofluorocarbon propellants. We are now in an era of rapid technologic progress in inhaled drug delivery and applications of aerosol science, with the use of the aerosolized route for drugs for systemic therapy and for gene replacement therapy, use of aerosolized antimicrobials and immunosuppressants, and interest in specific targeting of inhaled drugs.

  20. Early work on the stratospheric ozone depletion-CFC issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, M.

    2012-12-01

    I became involved with the atmospheric chemistry of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) shortly after joining Sherry Rowland's research group at the University of California, Irvine, in 1973. CFCs had been detected in the troposphere by James Lovelock in 1971, and the question we set out to answer was the fate of these compounds of industrial origin in the environment, as well as possibly identifying any consequences of their accumulation in the atmosphere. After examining many potential sinks for these compounds we realized that because of their unusual stability the most likely destruction process was photolysis in the stratosphere. I carried out measurements of the absorption spectra of these compounds in the near ultraviolet; previous work involved only spectra in the far ultraviolet, not relevant for atmospheric chemistry. The results indicated that photolysis would take place in the upper stratosphere. I subsequently carried out calculations using one-dimensional atmospheric models to estimate their atmospheric residence times, which turned out to be many decades. We realized that the chlorine atoms generated by photolysis of the CFCs would participate in a catalytic chain reaction that would efficiently destroy ozone. Furthermore, we estimated that the amount of CFCs produced industrially was comparable to the amount of nitric oxide produced naturally in the stratosphere by the decomposition of nitrous oxide; work by Paul Crutzen and Harold Johnston had indicated that the abundance of ozone in the stratosphere was controlled by nitric oxide. We then formulated the hypothesis that the continued release of CFCs to the environment posed a threat to the stability of the ozone layer, and published our results in the journal Nature in 1974. The publication was noticed almost exclusively by the community of experts in stratospheric chemistry, and hence Sherry Rowland and I decided at that time that it was our responsibility to communicate this finding to society at large

  1. The second generation model of greenhouse gas emissions: background and initial development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, R.; Wise, M.A.; Edmonds, J.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Barns, D.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis of greenhouse gas emissions has made enormous progress during the course of the past decade. We have progressed from the use of simple time-trend extrapolations to the analysis of emissions of several greenhouse gases with parallel but independent behavioral and optimization models of energy, manufacturing, agriculture, and land-use systems. But our ability to examine potential future scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions is limited because modeling tools adequate to the task of integrating analyses of technologies and human activities on a global scale with regional detail, including energy production and consumption, agriculture, manufacture, capital formation, and land-use, along with the interdependencies between these categories, do not yet exist. The first generation of models were specialty models which focused on a particular aspect of the emissions problem without regard to how that activity interacted with other human and natural activities. The natural science pertaining to greenhouse warming now emphasizes the variety of gases associated with potential changes in the radiative composition of the atmosphere: CO 2 , CH 4 , CO, N 2 O, NO x , SO 2 , VOC's, chlorofluorocarbons, (CFC's) and CFC substitutes. Human activities generating the emissions of these gases are interdependent; actions taken to limit emissions from one segment of the economy will affect other segments of the economy. Policy issues such as the recycling of revenues from a carbon tax, land-use changes due to to tree-planting to sequestrate carbon dioxide or extensive development of biomass energy resources, require a more comprehensive modeling approach in which the relationship between technology, institutions, land use, economics and human activity is explicitly represented. The purpose of this paper is to describe briefly the design of a model which is capable of addressing greenhouse gas emissions and the consequences of alternative policy options. 7 refs

  2. Assessing the planet's condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L R

    1990-01-01

    The destruction of the environment has accelerated since the Earth Day of 1970, the world's population has increased by another 1.6 billion, and over 500 million acres of forest have been lost. Carbon dioxide levels, greenhouse gases, and chlorofluorocarbons have increased in the atmosphere with evidence that global warming has started. The ozone hole has appeared, acid rain has destroyed forests, air pollution in major northern hemisphere cities has worsened, and species are disappearing, while toxic chemicals have been dumped indiscriminately. World grain production has fallen while population has increased. In Europe 14 countries have stabilized their population, and Japan, France, and Finland are on the way to zero growth. Reduction of high fertility in 1/2 could halt the deterioration of living conditions. Japan and China achieved this within a decade. Energy efficiency has to be attained; US cars still consume too much gas. Solar energy with photovoltaic cells to provide power, fuel alcohol from plants, and solar thermal power plants have potential. Semiarid regions, such as northern Africa, could become major producers of solar energy. Various measures are mandatory to cut down on waste: to recycle paper bags, to use standardized glasses for beverages, and to utilize scrap metal in electric arc steel furnaces. Reforestation is also on the agenda, as major deforestation has occurred in the Brazilian Amazon region, in India, and in Europe because of acid rain. Australia's national plan envisions planting 1 billion trees, and the US project is of similar magnitude during the 1990s. Only the US has succeeded in erosion control and topsoil stabilization when it converted erodible cropland into grassland or woodland during 1986-90.

  3. Transmission spectroscopy with the ACE-FTS infrared spectral atlas of Earth: A model validation and feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Franz; Städt, Steffen; Hedelt, Pascal; Godolt, Mareike

    2018-06-01

    Infrared solar occultation measurements are well established for remote sensing of Earth's atmosphere, and the corresponding primary transit spectroscopy has turned out to be valuable for characterization of extrasolar planets. Our objective is an assessment of the detectability of molecular signatures in Earth's transit spectra. To this end, we take a limb sequence of representative cloud-free transmission spectra recorded by the space-borne ACE-FTS Earth observation mission (Hughes et al., ACE infrared spectral atlases of the Earth's atmosphere, JQSRT 2014) and combine these spectra to the effective height of the atmosphere. These data are compared to spectra modeled with an atmospheric radiative transfer line-by-line infrared code to study the impact of individual molecules, spectral resolution, the choice of auxiliary data, and numerical approximations. Moreover, the study serves as a validation of our infrared radiative transfer code. The largest impact is due to water, carbon dioxide, ozone, methane, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, nitric acid, oxygen, and some chlorofluorocarbons (CFC11 and CFC12). The effect of further molecules considered in the modeling is either marginal or absent. The best matching model has a mean residuum of 0.4 km and a maximum difference of 2 km to the measured effective height. For a quantitative estimate of visibility and detectability we consider the maximum change of the residual spectrum, the relative change of the residual norm, the additional transit depth, and signal-to-noise ratios for a JWST setup. In conclusion, our study provides a list of molecules that are relevant for modeling transmission spectra of Earth-like exoplanets and discusses the feasibility of retrieval.

  4. Chemical Evolution of Groundwater Near a Sinkhole Lake, Northern Florida: 1. Flow Patterns, Age of Groundwater, and Influence of Lake Water Leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Brian G.; Lee, Terrie M.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    1995-06-01

    Leakage from sinkhole lakes significantly influences recharge to the Upper Floridan aquifer in poorly confined sediments in northern Florida. Environmental isotopes (oxygen 18, deuterium, and tritium), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs: CFC-11, CCl3F; CFC-12, CCl2F2; and CFC-113, C2Cl3F3), and solute tracers were used to investigate groundwater flow patterns near Lake Barco, a seepage lake in a mantled karst setting in northern Florida. Stable isotope data indicated that the groundwater downgradient from the lake contained 11-67% lake water leakage, with a limit of detection of lake water in groundwater of 4.3%. The mixing fractions of lake water leakage, which passed through organic-rich sediments in the lake bottom, were directly proportional to the observed methane concentrations and increased with depth in the groundwater flow system. In aerobic groundwater upgradient from Lake Barco, CFC-modeled recharge dates ranged from 1987 near the water table to the mid 1970s for water collected at a depth of 30 m below the water table. CFC-modeled recharge dates (based on CFC-12) for anaerobic groundwater downgradient from the lake ranged from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s and were consistent with tritium data. CFC-modeled recharge dates based on CFC-11 indicated preferential microbial degradation in anoxic waters. Vertical hydraulic conductivities, calculated using CFC-12 modeled recharge dates and Darcy's law, were 0.17, 0.033, and 0.019 m/d for the surficial aquifer, intermediate confining unit, and lake sediments, respectively. These conductivities agreed closely with those used in the calibration of a three-dimensional groundwater flow model for transient and steady state flow conditions.

  5. Vegetable Grafting: The Implications of a Growing Agronomic Imperative for Vegetable Fruit Quality and Nutritive Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios C. Kyriacou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Grafting has become an imperative for intensive vegetable production since chlorofluorocarbon-based soil fumigants were banned from use on grounds of environmental protection. Compelled by this development, research into rootstock–scion interaction has broadened the potential applications of grafting in the vegetable industry beyond aspects of soil phytopathology. Grafting has been increasingly tapped for cultivation under adverse environs posing abiotic and biotic stresses to vegetable crops, thus enabling expansion of commercial production onto otherwise under-exploited land. Vigorous rootstocks have been employed not only in the open field but also under protected cultivation where increase in productivity improves distribution of infrastructural and energy costs. Applications of grafting have expanded mainly in two families: the Cucurbitaceae and the Solanaceae, both of which comprise major vegetable crops. As the main drives behind the expansion of vegetable grafting have been the resistance to soilborne pathogens, tolerance to abiotic stresses and increase in yields, rootstock selection and breeding have accordingly conformed to the prevailing demand for improving productivity, arguably at the expense of fruit quality. It is, however, compelling to assess the qualitative implications of this growing agronomic practice for human nutrition. Problems of impaired vegetable fruit quality have not infrequently been associated with the practice of grafting. Accordingly, the aim of the current review is to reassess how the practice of grafting and the prevalence of particular types of commercial rootstocks influence vegetable fruit quality and, partly, storability. Physical, sensorial and bioactive aspects of quality are examined with respect to grafting for watermelon, melon, cucumber, tomato, eggplant, and pepper. The physiological mechanisms at play which mediate rootstock effects on scion performance are discussed in interpreting the

  6. Researchers lack data on trends in UV radiation at Earth's surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurer, P.S.

    1993-01-01

    Current anxiety about depletion of stratospheric ozone stems from the expected resulting increase in biologically damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation at Earth's surface. Atmospheric ozone absorbs sunlight with wavelengths shorter than 320 nm--the highest-energy UV-B wavelengths (280-320 nm) that can damage DNA in living systems. But surprisingly, despite firm evidence the ozone layer is being eroded by chlorine and bromine from man-made compounds, very little information exists on how UV light intensity is changing. Solid data from Antarctica reveal that UV radiation soars under the ozone hole, where fully half of the atmospheric ozone is destroyed each spring. But elsewhere on the globe, where ozone has been thinning at a rate of a few percent per decade, the corresponding trends in UV intensity are not at all clear. In the late 1970s and early 1980s the problem of ozone depletion seemed solved. The US had banned the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in aerosols. Model calculations were predicting CFCs would cause only a small loss of ozone by the second half of the 21st century. Costly monitoring of UV radiation commanded little attention. Attitudes began to change with the 1985 discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole. The National Science Foundation (NSF) established UV monitoring stations in the Antarctic in 1988, adding an Alaskan station in 1990. Both the Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have programs in the works that will eventually place monitoring stations across the US, but it will be many years before researchers have access to the kind of extensive database necessary to reliably evaluation long-term trends in UV intensity

  7. Conservation and fusion as solutions for the greenhouse or global warming effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1992-01-01

    The US and other countries are expected to spend trillion dollar sums for power plants in the next decades. Just in the coming decade, the US oil and natural gas production are expected to decline. The US does have abundant supplies of coal. But as has become apparent because of the effects of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) on ozone in the atmosphere, the effects of human activity on the earth's global environment has already reached an alarming level. A likely more dangerous prospect awaits as one contemplates the effects on the global climate due to rapid increase of heat trapping gases in the atmosphere. Half of this increase arises from energy activity, another quarter from industrial activity (almost entirely due to CFC's). The important and much emphasized effect of deforestation is only a 14% effect at present and agricultural activities contribute another 13%. For the US midwest, which dominates the world trade in basic cereals due to favorable climate and soil conditions, ''Murphy's Law of Applied Statistics'' would be sufficient to imply that any weather changes would lead to less favorable agricultural conditions. The effects of global agricultural failures coupled to increased energy costs could feed back into more rapid human economic activities that lead to accelerated climate changes. Losses are also expected along low lying coastal areas such as near the Indian Ocean, the coastal states, for example Florida, but also elsewhere. And there are other such nonlinear feedback factors which could accelerate the timescale of global warming. Since energy consumption in the US is some five times that of Japan, a rapid conservation program is a must, e.g. in more efficient electric lighting. But for the intermediate term, it can be argued that the US must simultaneously phase in fusion or other similar non-hydrocarbon-based energy technologies. Easily usable oil and natural gas should eventually be reserved for the petrochemical industries

  8. High-efficiency heat pump technology using metal hydrides (eco-energy city project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Y.; Harada, T.; Niikura, J.; Yamamoto, Y.; Suzuki, J. [Human Environmental Systems Development Center, Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan); Gamo, T. [Corporate Environmental Affairs Div., Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Kadoma, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Metal hybrides are effective materials for utilizing hydrogen as a clean energy medium. That is, when the metal hydrides absorb or desorb the hydrogen, a large heat output of reaction occurs. So, the metal hydrides can be applied to a heat pump. We have researched on a high efficiency heat pump technology using their metal hydrides. In this report, a double effect type metal hydride heat pump configuration is described in which the waste heat of 160 C is recovered in a factory cite and transported to areas far distant from the industrial district. In the heat recovery unit, a low pressure hydrogen is converted into highly effective high pressure hydrogen by applying the metal hydrides. Other metal hydrides perform the parts of heating by absorbing the hydrogen and cooling by desorbing the hydrogen in the heat supply unit. One unit scale of the system is 3 kW class as the sum of heating and cooling. This system using the hydrogen absorbing alloy also has good energy storage characteristics and ambient hydrogen pressure self-safety control ability. Furthermore, this heating and cooling heat supply system is not harmful to the natural environment because it is a chlorofluorocarbon-free, and low noise type system. We have developed in the following element technologies to attain the above purposes, that is development of hydrogen absorbing alloys with high heat outputs and technologies to construct the heat pump system. This study is proceeded at present as one of the programs in New Sunshine Project, which aims for development of ingenious energy utilization technology to achieve reduction of primary energy consumption with keeping cultural and wealthy life and preventing deterioration of global environment. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic hysterysis evolution of Ni-Al alloy with Fe and Mn substitution by vacuum arc melting to produce the room temperature magnetocaloric effect material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notonegoro, Hamdan Akbar [PPS Materials Science, FMIPA-Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Mechanical Engineering Dept., FT-Universitas Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa, Cilegon 42435 (Indonesia); Kurniawan, Budhy; Manaf, Azwar, E-mail: azwar@sci.ui.ac.id [PPS Materials Science, FMIPA-Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Setiawan, Jan [Center for Nuclear Fuel Tecnology-Badan Tenaga Atom Nasional, Tangerang Selatan 15310 (Indonesia)

    2016-06-17

    The development of magnetocaloric effect (MCE) material is done in order to reduce the damage of the ozone layer caused by the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) emitted into the air. The research dealing with synthesis of magnetocaloric materials based of Ni-Al Heusler Alloy structure and by varying substitution some atoms of Ni with Fe and Al with Mn on Ni-Al Heusler Alloy structure to become Ni{sub 44}Fe{sub 6}Mn{sub 32}Al{sub 18}. Vacuum Arc Melting (VAM) equipment is used to form the alloys on vacuum condition and by flowing argon gas atmosphere and then followed by annealing process for 72 hours. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) reveals that crystallite structure of material is observed. We define that Ni{sub 44}Fe{sub 6} as X{sub 2}, Mn{sub 25} as Y, and Al{sub 18}Mn{sub 7} as Z. Based on the XRD result, we observed that the general formula X{sub 2}YZ is not changed. The PERMAGRAF measurement revealed that there exists of magnetic hysterysis. The hysterysis show that the magnetic structures of the system undego evolution from diamagnetic to soft ferromagnetic material which all of the compound have the same crystallite structure. This evolution indicated that the change in the composition has led to changes the magnetic composition. Mn is the major element that gives strong magnetic properties to the sample. When Mn partially replaced position of Al, the sample became dominant to be influenced to improve their magnetic properties. In addition, substitution a part of Ni by Fe in the composition reveals a pinning of the domain walls in the sample.

  10. Stratospheric ozone, global warming, and the principle of unintended consequences--an ongoing science and policy success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Stephen O; Halberstadt, Marcel L; Borgford-Parnell, Nathan

    2013-06-01

    In 1974, Mario Molina and F. Sherwood Rowland warned that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) could destroy the stratospheric ozone layer that protects Earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation. In the decade after scientists documented the buildup and long lifetime of CFCs in the atmosphere; found the proof that CFCs chemically decomposed in the stratosphere and catalyzed the depletion of ozone; quantified the adverse effects; and motivated the public and policymakers to take action. In 1987, 24 nations plus the European Community signed the Montreal Protocol. Today, 25 years after the Montreal Protocol was agreed, every United Nations state is a party (universal ratification of 196 governments); all parties are in compliance with the stringent controls; 98% of almost 100 ozone-depleting chemicals have been phased out worldwide; and the stratospheric ozone layer is on its way to recovery by 2065. A growing coalition of nations supports using the Montreal Protocol to phase down hydrofluorocarbons, which are ozone safe but potent greenhouse gases. Without rigorous science and international consensus, emissions of CFCs and related ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) could have destroyed up to two-thirds of the ozone layer by 2065, increasing the risk of causing millions of cancer cases and the potential loss of half of global agricultural production. Furthermore, because most, ODSs are also greenhouse gases, CFCs and related ODSs could have had the effect of the equivalent of 24-76 gigatons per year of carbon dioxide. This critical review describes the history of the science of stratospheric ozone depletion, summarizes the evolution of control measures and compliance under the Montreal Protocol and national legislation, presents a review of six separate transformations over the last 100 years in refrigeration and air conditioning (A/C) technology, and illustrates government-industry cooperation in continually improving the environmental performance of motor vehicle A/C.

  11. Stratospheric ozone, global warming, and the principle of unintended consequences-An ongoing science and policy success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Stephen O; Halberstadt, Marcel L; Borgford-Parnell, Nathan

    2013-06-01

    In 1974, Mario Molina and F. Sherwood Rowland warned that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) could destroy the stratospheric ozone layer that protects Earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation. In the decade after, scientists documented the buildup and long lifetime of CFCs in the atmosphere; found the proof that CFCs chemically decomposed in the stratosphere and catalyzed the depletion of ozone; quantified the adverse effects; and motivated the public and policymakers to take action. In 1987, 24 nations plus the European Community signed the Montreal Protocol. Today, 25 years after the Montreal Protocol was agreed, every United Nations state is a party (universal ratification of 196 governments); all parties are in compliance with the stringent controls; 98% of almost 100 ozone-depleting chemicals have been phased out worldwide; and the stratospheric ozone layer is on its way to recovery by 2065. A growing coalition of nations supports using the Montreal Protocol to phase down hydrofluorocarbons, which are ozone safe but potent greenhouse gases. Without rigorous science and international consensus, emissions of CFCs and related ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) could have destroyed up to two-thirds of the ozone layer by 2065, increasing the risk of causing millions of cancer cases and the potential loss of half of global agricultural production. Furthermore, because most ODSs are also greenhouse gases, CFCs and related ODSs could have had the effect of the equivalent of 24-76 gigatons per year of carbon dioxide. This critical review describes the history of the science of stratospheric ozone depletion, summarizes the evolution of control measures and compliance under the Montreal Protocol and national legislation, presents a review of six separate transformations over the last 100 years in refrigeration and air conditioning (A/C) technology, and illustrates government-industry cooperation in continually improving the environmental performance of motor vehicle A/C. [Box

  12. The Vertical Flux Method (VFM) for regional estimates of temporally and spatially varying nitrate fluxes in unsaturated zone and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C. T.; Liao, L.; Nolan, B. T.; Juckem, P. F.; Ransom, K.; Harter, T.

    2017-12-01

    Process-based modeling of regional NO3- fluxes to groundwater is critical for understanding and managing water quality. Measurements of atmospheric tracers of groundwater age and dissolved-gas indicators of denitrification progress have potential to improve estimates of NO3- reactive transport processes. This presentation introduces a regionalized version of a vertical flux method (VFM) that uses simple mathematical estimates of advective-dispersive reactive transport with regularization procedures to calibrate estimated tracer concentrations to observed equivalents. The calibrated VFM provides estimates of chemical, hydrologic and reaction parameters (source concentration time series, recharge, effective porosity, dispersivity, reaction rate coefficients) and derived values (e.g. mean unsaturated zone travel time, eventual depth of the NO3- front) for individual wells. Statistical learning methods are used to extrapolate parameters and predictions from wells to continuous areas. The regional VFM was applied to 473 well samples in central-eastern Wisconsin. Chemical measurements included O2, NO3-, N2 from denitrification, and atmospheric tracers of groundwater age including carbon-14, chlorofluorocarbons, tritium, and triogiogenic helium. VFM results were consistent with observed chemistry, and calibrated parameters were in-line with independent estimates. Results indicated that (1) unsaturated zone travel times were a substantial portion of the transit time to wells and streams (2) fractions of N leached to groundwater have changed over time, with increasing fractions from manure and decreasing fractions from fertilizer, and (3) under current practices and conditions, 60% of the shallow aquifer will eventually be affected by NO3- contamination. Based on GIS coverages of variables related to soils, land use and hydrology, the VFM results at individual wells were extrapolated regionally using boosted regression trees, a statistical learning approach, that related

  13. ICI bites demerger bullet, Zeneca guns for Brit-pounds 1.3-billion rights issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.; Alperowicz, N.

    1993-01-01

    Any lingering doubts as to ICI's (London) intentions to follow through its demerger proposals were dispelled last week. The company will hive off its bioscience business into Zeneca Group plc, which will make a Brit-pounds 1.3-billion ($1.9 billion) rights issue in June 1993. Shareholders, whose approval for the historic move will be sought in late May, will receive one fully paid Zeneca share for each ICI share. Proceeds from the rights issue will be used to reduce Zeneca's indebtedness to ICI by about 70%. Acknowledging that ICI had 'spread the jam too thinly' during its expansion in the 1980s, chief executive Ronnie Hampel says the new ICI will be a cost-conscious, no-frills' organization and that businesses that failed to perform would be restructured or closed. He is 'not expecting any help from the economy' in 1993. Of ICI's remaining petrochemicals and plastics businesses, Hampel says that despite 'stringent measures to reduce the cost base hor-ellipsis it is clear they will not reach a return on capital that will justify reinvestment by ICI.' He does not see them as closure candidates but as 'businesses that will require further restructuring.' Hampel notes 'a dozen clearly identified areas for expansion,' including paints, catalysts, titanium dioxide, and chlorofluorocarbon replacements. Losses in materials, where substantial rationalization has failed to halt the slide, will be reduced on completion of the DuPont deal - expected by midyear. 'Further measures' would be necessary for the 'residual bit of advanced materials in the US,' he says

  14. Global warming on trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broeker, W.S.

    1992-01-01

    Jim Hansen, a climatologist at NASA's Goddard Space Institute, is convinced that the earth's temperature is rising and places the blame on the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Unconvinced, John Sununu, former White House chief of staff, doubts that the warming will be great enough to produce serious threat and fears that measures to reduce the emissions would throw a wrench into the gears that drive the Unites States' troubled economy. During his three years at the White House, Sununu's view prevailed, and although his role in the debate has diminished, others continue to cast doubt on the reality of global warming. A new lobbying group called the Climate Council has been created to do just this. Burning fossil fuels is not the only problem; a fifth of emissions of carbon dioxide now come from clearing and burning forests. Scientists are also tracking a host of other greenhouse gases that emanate from a variety of human activities; the warming effect of methane, chlorofluorocarbons and nitrous oxide combined equals that of carbon dioxide. Although the current warming from these gases may be difficult to detect against the background noise of natural climate variation, most climatologists are certain that as the gases continue to accumulate, increases in the earth's temperature will become evident even to skeptics. If the reality of global warming were put on trial, each side would have trouble making its case. Jim Hansen's side could not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have warmed the planet. But neither could John Sununu's side prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the warming expected from greenhouse gases has not occurred. To see why each side would have difficulty proving its case, this article reviews the arguments that might be presented in such a hearing

  15. Global solar energy radiation in relation with electricity supply in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoran, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Solar energy is one of the most viable source of renewable energy being both clean and nonpolluting. Spiraling energy use and other human activities have led to measurable effects upon the global environment and climatic changes. There is increasing international concern particularly in the areas of global warming owing to the increase of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the atmosphere and of other greenhouse gases as sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), hydrogen sulfide H 2 S, diethyl sulfide (DMS), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), methane CH 4 , as well in the effect of depletion of ozone (O 3 ) layer in the stratosphere. Climatological and global solar radiation analysis for some Romanian zones with great solar energy potential are presented. Remote sensing data provided by satellites are used for radiative fluxes monitoring and solar energy mapping as well as for solar energy use assessment. The realistic technical potential for solar energy applications in Romania is substantial, over 40000 TJyear -1 . As average energy global solar radiation in horizontal plane lies between 1100 and 1300 kWhm -2 year -1 , solar energy using for electrical power supply being a reliable alternative. More than one half of Romania's area has a range of insolation period between 1200 and 1500 hours year -1 , at an overall average daily irradiation of 1000 - 1200 kWh m -2 . The most favorable area in Romania is the North - Western part of Black Sea coast with an insolation period above 2300 hours year -1 . A small part 140 TJyear -1 are used profitably and almost 10% of the installed 10 6 m 2 of collector area, is still in operation. (author)

  16. Estimated rates of groundwater recharge to the Chicot, Evangeline and Jasper aquifers by using environmental tracers in Montgomery and adjacent counties, Texas, 2008 and 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Timothy D.; Truini, Margot

    2013-01-01

    Montgomery County is in the northern part of the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area, the fourth most populous metropolitan area in the United States. As populations have increased since the 1980s, groundwater has become an important resource for public-water supply and industry in the rapidly growing area of Montgomery County. Groundwater availability from the Gulf Coast aquifer system is a primary concern for water managers and community planners in Montgomery County and requires a better understanding of the rate of recharge to the system. The Gulf Coast aquifer system in Montgomery County consists of the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, the Burkeville confining unit, and underlying Catahoula confining system. The individual sand and clay sequences of the aquifers composing the Gulf Coast aquifer system are not laterally or vertically continuous on a regional scale; however, on a local scale, individual sand and clay lenses can extend over several miles. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, collected groundwater-quality samples from selected wells within or near Montgomery County in 2008 and analyzed these samples for concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), tritium (3H), helium-3/tritium (3He/3H), helium-4 (4He), and dissolved gases (DG) that include argon, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen and oxygen. Groundwater ages, or apparent age, representing residence times since time of recharge, were determined by using the assumption of a piston-flow transport model. Most of the environmental tracer data indicated the groundwater was recharged prior to the 1950s, limiting the usefulness of CFCs, SF6, and 3H concentrations as tracers. In many cases, no tracer was usable at a well for the purpose of estimating an apparent age. Wells not usable for estimating an apparent age were resampled in 2011 and analyzed for concentrations of major ions and carbon-14 (14C). At six of

  17. Mechanistic insights aid the search for CFC substitutes: risk assessment of HCFC-123 as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarabek, A M; Fisher, J W; Rubenstein, R; Lipscomb, J C; Williams, R J; Vinegar, A; McDougal, J N

    1994-06-01

    An international consensus on the need to reduce the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone-depleting gases such as the halons led to the adoptions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol and Title VI of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, "Protecting Stratospheric Ozone." These agreements included major provisions for reducing and eventually phasing out production and use of CFCs and halons as well as advancing the development of replacement chemicals. Because of the ubiquitous use and benefits of CFCs and halons, an expeditious search for safe replacements to meet the legislative deadlines is of critical importance. Toxicity testing and health risk assessment programs were established to evaluate the health and environmental impact of these replacement chemicals. Development and implementation of these programs as well as the structural-activity relationships significant for the development of the replacement chemicals are described below. A dose-response evaluation for the health risk assessment of the replacement chemical HCFC-123 (2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane) is also presented to show an innovative use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. This is based on a parallelogram approach using data on the anesthetic gas halothane, a structural analog to HCFC-123. Halothane and HCFC-123 both form the same metabolite, trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), indicative of the same metabolic oxidative pathway attributed to hepatotoxicity. The parallelogram approach demonstrates the application of template model structures and shows how PBPK modeling, together with judicious experimental design, can be used to improve the accuracy of health risk assessment and to decrease the need for extensive laboratory animal testing.

  18. Massive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Michael J.; Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Garcia, Rolando R.

    2008-01-01

    We use a chemistry-climate model and new estimates of smoke produced by fires in contemporary cities to calculate the impact on stratospheric ozone of a regional nuclear war between developing nuclear states involving 100 Hiroshima-size bombs exploded in cities in the northern subtropics. We find column ozone losses in excess of 20% globally, 25–45% at midlatitudes, and 50–70% at northern high latitudes persisting for 5 years, with substantial losses continuing for 5 additional years. Column ozone amounts remain near or <220 Dobson units at all latitudes even after three years, constituting an extratropical “ozone hole.” The resulting increases in UV radiation could impact the biota significantly, including serious consequences for human health. The primary cause for the dramatic and persistent ozone depletion is heating of the stratosphere by smoke, which strongly absorbs solar radiation. The smoke-laden air rises to the upper stratosphere, where removal mechanisms are slow, so that much of the stratosphere is ultimately heated by the localized smoke injections. Higher stratospheric temperatures accelerate catalytic reaction cycles, particularly those of odd-nitrogen, which destroy ozone. In addition, the strong convection created by rising smoke plumes alters the stratospheric circulation, redistributing ozone and the sources of ozone-depleting gases, including N2O and chlorofluorocarbons. The ozone losses predicted here are significantly greater than previous “nuclear winter/UV spring” calculations, which did not adequately represent stratospheric plume rise. Our results point to previously unrecognized mechanisms for stratospheric ozone depletion. PMID:18391218

  19. Emission impacts of demand-side programs: What have we achieved so far and how will recent policy decision change program choices?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempchin, R.S.; Van den Berg, A.J.; Geba, V.B.; Felix, C.S.; Goldsmith, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    Congress and many state legislatures have been discussing the possibility of regulating carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), Sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen oxides (NO x ), chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) and other emissions. Key to these discussions is the recommendation that energy efficiency, and specifically electric utility demand-side management (DSM) programs, be used as an emission control option. Methods for incorporating the social or external costs of energy production into utility planning are being developed, and estimates of potential emission impacts attributed to DSM programs have been calculated. However, little research has calculated the actual emission impacts from existing DSM programs. The increasing need for electric energy services and fossil fuel generation create an apparent conflict with the risks and regulations associated with global climate change and clean air. Electric utility DSM programs can be used to resolve these conflicts by providing equal or better energy services and a net reduction in emissions. This paper summarizes three separate related research projects. The first study, Impacts of Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs on Power Plant Emissions, collects utility and state data on existing DSM programs to approximate the level of SO 2 , NO x , and CO 2 reductions on a regional and national basis. Phase 1 of this study is a completed survey of DSM savings by state. The second and third studies, Carbon Dioxide Reduction Through Electrification of the Industrial and Transportation Sectors, and Carbon Dioxide Reduction Through Electrification of the Residential and Commercial Sectors, compare selected high efficiency electric technologies with fossil-fueled alternatives to determine CO 2 emissions. Through these studies, the authors have begun to quantify the emissions impacts from utility DSM programs and efficient electric equipment

  20. The Evaluation of Climate Change Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin POPESCU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, it is acknowledged that climatic changes represent a serious threat for the environment and, so, this problem has been approached at numerous conferences, conventions and summits. The climate is strongly influenced by the changes in the atmospheric concentrations of certain gases that hold the solar radiations on the Earth’s surface (the greenhouse effect. The water vapors and the carbon dioxide (CO2 present in the atmosphere have always generated a natural greenhouse effect, without which the Earth surface would be 33o C lower than it is today. Other greenhouse gases are: methane (CH4, nitrogen protoxide (N2O, and the halogenated compounds such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs. During the last hundred years, man’s activity has led to the increase of the atmospheric concentration of the greenhouse gases and of other pollutants, its consequence being the increase of the average global temperature. Although it has not been calculated exactly how much of this warming can be attributed to the greenhouse gases, there is evidence that human activity contributes to global warming. The main causes leading to the accentuation of the greenhouse effect are the burning of the fossil fuels, deforestations, cement production, waste disposal, refrigeration etc. The climatic changes triggered by the greenhouse gases will have consequences that have already made themselves visible, causing: the increase of the sea level and the possible flooding of the low areas; the melting of the icecap; the modification of the precipitations regime, with consequences like the increase of the floods and droughts frequency; changes in the occurrence of climatic extremes, especially in the occurrence of the high, extreme temperatures. All these will have a direct impact on ecosystems, health, some key economic sectors such as agriculture and on water resources.

  1. Pollution of living environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Eržen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Information on cancer causation has come from investigation of the patterns of cancer in human populations and the induction of tumours in experimental animals following treatment with cancer-causing agents. It has been proven that genetic susceptibility may significantly alter the risk from environmental exposures. The most important human carcinogens include tobacco, asbestos, aflatoxins and ultraviolet light. Almost 20 % of cancers are associated with chronic infections, the most significant ones being hepatitis viruses (HBV, HCV, papillomaviruses (HPV and Helicobacter pylori. Pollution of air, water and soil is estimated to account for 4–7 % of all cancers in developed world. A small proportion of lung cancer (< 5 % is attributable to outdoor air pollution by industrial effluent, engine exhaust products and other toxins. Chlorofluorocarbons cause destruction of the ozone layer and enhance the risk of skin cancer through increased ultraviolet radiation. Contamination of drinking water is not a general carcinogenic hazard, but high levels of arsenic and chlorination by-products in some communities carry a risk. Food may be contaminated by natural or man-made toxins, including substances shown to be carcinogenic in experimental animals and, in some cases, in humans. Naturallyoccurring carcinogens include mycotoxins, particularly aflatoxins, which contribute to causation of liver cancer. Food can be contaminated by residual pesticides.Conclusions: Means to reduce and, in some cases, eliminate risk of cancer include elimination of carcinogenic factor (asbestos enforced by regulation and reduction of exposure or use of preventive and prophylactic measures (Hepatitis B, HPV vaccination, avoiding of sun.

  2. Pesticide and transformation product detections and age-dating relations from till and sand deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, K.L.; Morrow, W.S.

    2007-01-01

    Pesticide and transformation product concentrations and frequencies in ground water from areas of similar crop and pesticide applications may vary substantially with differing lithologies. Pesticide analysis data for atrazine, metolachlor, alachlor, acetochlor, and cyanazine and their pesticide transformation products were collected at 69 monitoring wells in Illinois and northern Indiana to document occurrence of pesticides and their transformation products in two agricultural areas of differing lithologies, till, and sand. The till is primarily tile drained and has preferential fractured flow, whereas the sand primarily has surface water drainage and primary porosity flow. Transformation products represent most of the agricultural pesticides in ground water regardless of aquifer material - till or sand. Transformation products were detected more frequently than parent pesticides in both the till and sand, with metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid being most frequently detected. Estimated ground-water recharge dates for the sand were based on chlorofluorocarbon analyses. These age-dating data indicate that ground water recharged prior to 1990 is more likely to have a detection of a pesticide or pesticide transformation product. Detections were twice as frequent in ground water recharged prior to 1990 (82%) than in ground water recharged on or after 1990 (33%). The highest concentrations of atrazine, alachlor, metolachlor, and their transformation products, also were detected in samples from ground water recharged prior to 1990. These age/pesticide detection relations are opposite of what would normally be expected, and may be the result of preferential flow and/or ground-water mixing between aquifers and aquitards as evident by the detection of acetochlor transformation products in samples with estimated ground-water ages predating initial pesticide application. ?? 2007 American Water Resources Association.

  3. The effects of land application of farm dairy effluent on groundwater quality : West Coast 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, T.M.; Hawke, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Land application of agricultural effluent is becoming a standard farming practice. The application of farm dairy effluent to land, as opposed to direct discharge to waterways, is the preferred method for disposal in New Zealand as regulatory authorities move to protect and enhance water quality and meet Maori spiritual and cultural values. Land application recognises the nutrient value of dairy effluent; however, it is not without risks. Careful management of land application of the effluent is required because of the potential nutrient and bacterial contamination of groundwater. In 2001, 19 groundwater bores were sampled on four occasions to assess the effects of farm dairy effluent on groundwater quality. Elevated (> 1.6 g m -3 nitrate-nitrogen concentrations were found in 14 of these bores (43 of 74 samples). The available long-term data shows statistically significant increasing trends in nitrate-nitrogen and chloride over the period 1998 to 2007. The nitrate-nitrogen and chloride results suggest effluent is the source of the elevated nitrate-nitrogen; however, the nitrogen isotope analysis indicates that the source of the nitrate-nitrogen may be from fertiliser or soil organic matter (average δ 15 N value of 3.5 permille). Spatially isolated occurrences of bacterial contamination were also recorded: in 7 bores and 12% of all samples analysed. Groundwater dating, using chlorofluorocarbons, suggested that the groundwater in the region was young (8 to 12 years). Overall, the spatial and temporal data suggests human influences are affecting groundwater quality on the West Coast. (author). 27 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  4. HVAC System Replacements for the Spanish Nuclear Fleet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, J.; Gensollen, T.; Pérez, C.

    2015-07-01

    The European Union and its Member States have established regulations to phase out ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The chiller systems installed at the Spanish nuclear fleet contained zone depleting refrigerants (such as R-11, R-12, and R-22), which are being phased out of service. Due to the different material and thermodynamic properties of the replacement refrigerant (e.g. R-134A), a complete chiller system replacement is needed to comply with the EU regulations for CFCs. Delivering state of the art HVAC and Chiller systems that comply with the Nuclear Plant design basis, licensing basis, system and component specifications as well as European Union (EU) and Spanish codes and standards can be challenging for products purchased from US based manufacturers. Procurement specifications and Request for Quotes (RFQs) issued today for the procurement of original Plant components and systems will contain references to numerous codes and standards that were not in effect at the time the original components were specified and procured. The reference to EU and Spanish codes and standards that are unfamiliar to the HVAC suppliers can lead to uncertainty and concern related to specification compliance. The unnecessary burden of ambiguous codes and standards complicates the proposal process and introduces pricing uncertainty and contract risk. A review of the EU and Spanish national codes and standards that are often referenced in HVAC system related RFQs need to be performed to determine what codes and standards are applicable to HVAC systems designed, manufactured and tested in the US for export to Spain for installation in Spanish NPPs. Lessons learned and best practices should be applied to help both the Supplier (HVAC OEM) and the Purchaser Plant Operator) to optimize the procurement process and improve the quality of offerings to comply with applicable codes and standards. (Author)

  5. Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are used in a number of applications, and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s. However, in the mid-1980s, it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFSs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of these alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects in the form of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential heating and cooling, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air-conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. The discussion in this paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to refrigeration and air-conditioning. In general the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reduction in total equivalent warming impact (TEWI), lifetime equivalent CO 2 emission. Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. Recharge sources and residence times of groundwater as determined by geochemical tracers in the Mayfield Area, southwestern Idaho, 2011–12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Candice B.

    2013-01-01

    Parties proposing residential development in the area of Mayfield, Idaho are seeking a sustainable groundwater supply. During 2011–12, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, used geochemical tracers in the Mayfield area to evaluate sources of aquifer recharge and differences in groundwater residence time. Fourteen groundwater wells and one surface-water site were sampled for major ion chemistry, metals, stable isotopes, and age tracers; data collected from this study were used to evaluate the sources of groundwater recharge and groundwater residence times in the area. Major ion chemistry varied along a flow path between deeper wells, suggesting an upgradient source of dilute water, and a downgradient source of more concentrated water with the geochemical signature of the Idaho Batholith. Samples from shallow wells had elevated nutrient concentrations, a more positive oxygen-18 signature, and younger carbon-14 dates than deep wells, suggesting that recharge comes from young precipitation and surface-water infiltration. Samples from deep wells generally had higher concentrations of metals typical of geothermal waters, a more negative oxygen-18 signature, and older carbon-14 values than samples from shallow wells, suggesting that recharge comes from both infiltration of meteoric water and another source. The chemistry of groundwater sampled from deep wells is somewhat similar to the chemistry in geothermal waters, suggesting that geothermal water may be a source of recharge to this aquifer. Results of NETPATH mixing models suggest that geothermal water composes 1–23 percent of water in deep wells. Chlorofluorocarbons were detected in every sample, which indicates that all groundwater samples contain at least a component of young recharge, and that groundwater is derived from multiple recharge sources. Conclusions from this study can be used to further refine conceptual hydrological models of the area.

  7. Regional variability of nitrate fluxes in the unsaturated zone and groundwater, Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Liao, Lixia; Nolan, Bernard T.; Juckem, Paul F.; Shope, Christopher L.; Tesoriero, Anthony J.; Jurgens, Bryant

    2018-01-01

    Process-based modeling of regional NO3− fluxes to groundwater is critical for understanding and managing water quality, but the complexity of NO3− reactive transport processes make implementation a challenge. This study introduces a regional vertical flux method (VFM) for efficient estimation of reactive transport of NO3− in the vadose zone and groundwater. The regional VFM was applied to 443 well samples in central-eastern Wisconsin. Chemical measurements included O2, NO3−, N2 from denitrification, and atmospheric tracers of groundwater age including carbon-14, chlorofluorocarbons, tritium, and tritiogenic helium. VFM results were consistent with observed chemistry, and calibrated parameters were in-line with estimates from previous studies. Results indicated that (1) unsaturated zone travel times were a substantial portion of the transit time to wells and streams (2) since 1945 fractions of applied N leached to groundwater have increased for manure-N, possibly due to increased injection of liquid manure, and decreased for fertilizer-N, and (3) under current practices and conditions, approximately 60% of the shallow aquifer will eventually be affected by downward migration of NO3−, with denitrification protecting the remaining 40%. Recharge variability strongly affected the unsaturated zone lag times and the eventual depth of the NO3− front. Principal components regression demonstrated that VFM parameters and predictions were significantly correlated with hydrogeochemical landscape features. The diverse and sometimes conflicting aspects of N management (e.g. limiting N volatilization versus limiting N losses to groundwater) warrant continued development of large-scale holistic strategies to manage water quality and quantity.

  8. Using rates of oxygen and nitrate reduction to map the subsurface distribution of groundwater denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, T.; De Dreuzy, J. R.; Abbott, B. W.; Aquilina, L.; Babey, T.; Green, C. T.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Labasque, T.; Laverman, A.; Marçais, J.; Peiffer, S.; Thomas, Z.; Pinay, G.

    2017-12-01

    Widespread fertilizer application over the last 70 years has caused serious ecological and socioeconomic problems in aquatic and estuarine ecosystems. When surplus nitrogen leaches as nitrate (a major groundwater pollutant) to the aquifer, complex flow dynamics and naturally occurring degradation processes control its transport. Under the conditions of depleted oxygen and abundant electron donors, microorganisms reduce NO3- to N2 (denitrification). Denitrification rates vary over orders of magnitude among sites within the same aquifer, complicating estimation of denitrification capacity at the catchment scale. Because it is impractical or impossible to access the subsurface to directly quantify denitrification rates, reactivity is often assumed to occur continuous along flowlines, potentially resulting in substantial over- or underestimation of denitrification. Here we investigated denitrification in an unconfined crystalline aquifer in western France using a combination of common tracers (chlorofluorocarbons, O2, NO3-, and N2) measured in 16 wells to inform a time-based modeling approach. We found that spatially variable denitrification rates arise from the intersection of nitrate rich water with reactive zones defined by the abundance of electron donors (primarily pyrite). Furthermore, based on observed reaction rates of the sequential reduction of oxygen and nitrate, we present a general framework to estimate the location and intensity of the reactive zone in aquifers. Accounting for the vertical distribution of reaction rates results in large differences in estimations of net denitrification rates that assume homogeneous reactivity. This new framework provides a tractable approach for quantifying catchment and regional groundwater denitrification rates that could be used to improve estimation of groundwater resilience to nitrate pollution and develop more realistic management strategies.

  9. Regional Variability of Nitrate Fluxes in the Unsaturated Zone and Groundwater, Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Liao, Lixia; Nolan, Bernard T.; Juckem, Paul F.; Shope, Christopher L.; Tesoriero, Anthony J.; Jurgens, Bryant C.

    2018-01-01

    Process-based modeling of regional NO3- fluxes to groundwater is critical for understanding and managing water quality, but the complexity of NO3- reactive transport processes makes implementation a challenge. This study introduces a regional vertical flux method (VFM) for efficient estimation of reactive transport of NO3- in the vadose zone and groundwater. The regional VFM was applied to 443 well samples in central-eastern Wisconsin. Chemical measurements included O2, NO3-, N2 from denitrification, and atmospheric tracers of groundwater age including carbon-14, chlorofluorocarbons, tritium, and tritiogenic helium. VFM results were consistent with observed chemistry, and calibrated parameters were in-line with estimates from previous studies. Results indicated that (1) unsaturated zone travel times were a substantial portion of the transit time to wells and streams, (2) since 1945 fractions of applied N leached to groundwater have increased for manure-N, possibly due to increased injection of liquid manure, and decreased for fertilizer-N, and (3) under current practices and conditions, approximately 60% of the shallow aquifer will eventually be affected by downward migration of NO3-, with denitrification protecting the remaining 40%. Recharge variability strongly affected the unsaturated zone lag times and the eventual depth of the NO3- front. Principal components regression demonstrated that VFM parameters and predictions were significantly correlated with hydrogeochemical landscape features. The diverse and sometimes conflicting aspects of N management (e.g., limiting N volatilization versus limiting N losses to groundwater) warrant continued development of large-scale holistic strategies to manage water quality and quantity.

  10. Experimental characterization of the COndensation PArticle counting System for high altitude aircraft-borne application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Borrmann

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A characterization of the ultra-fine aerosol particle counter COPAS (COndensation PArticle counting System for operation on board the Russian high altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysika is presented. The COPAS instrument consists of an aerosol inlet and two dual-channel continuous flow Condensation Particle Counters (CPCs operated with the chlorofluorocarbon FC-43. It operates at pressures between 400 and 50 hPa for aerosol detection in the particle diameter (dp range from 6 nm up to 1 μm. The aerosol inlet, designed for the M-55, is characterized with respect to aspiration, transmission, and transport losses. The experimental characterization of counting efficiencies of three CPCs yields dp50 (50% detection particle diameter of 6 nm, 11 nm, and 15 nm at temperature differences (ΔT between saturator and condenser of 17°C, 30°C, and 33°C, respectively. Non-volatile particles are quantified with a fourth CPC, with dp50=11 nm. It includes an aerosol heating line (250°C to evaporate H2SO4-H2O particles of 11 nm<dp<200 nm at pressures between 70 and 300 hPa. An instrumental in-flight inter-comparison of the different COPAS CPCs yields correlation coefficients of 0.996 and 0.985. The particle emission index for the M-55 in the range of 1.4–8.4×1016 kg−1 fuel burned has been estimated based on measurements of the Geophysika's own exhaust.

  11. Halide test agent replacement study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, E.M.; Freeman, W.P.; Kovach, B.J. [and others

    1995-02-01

    The intended phaseout of the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) from commercial use required the evaluation of substitute materials for the testing for leak paths through both individual adsorbers and installed adsorbent banks. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Committee on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (CONAGT) is in charge of maintaining the standards and codes specifying adsorbent leak test methods for the nuclear safety related air cleaning systems. The currently published standards and codes cite the use of R-11, R-12 and R-112 for leak path test agents. All of these compounds are CFCs. There are other agencies and organizations (USDOE, USDOD and USNRC) also specifying testing for leak paths or in some cases for special life tests using the above compounds. The CONAGT has recently developed criteria for the suitability evaluation of substitute test agents. On the basis of these criteria, several compounds were evaluated for their acceptability as adsorbent bed leak and life test agents. The ASME CONAGT Test Agent Qualification Criteria. The test agent qualification is based on the following parameters: (1) Similar retention times on activated carbons at the same concentration levels as one of the following: R-11, R-12, R-112 or R-112a. (2) Similar lower detection limit sensitivity and precision in the concentration range of use as R-11, R-12, R-112 and R-112a. (3) Gives the same in-place leak test results as R-11, R-12, R-112, or R-112a. (4) Chemical and radiological stability under the use conditions. (5) Causes no degradation of the carbon and its impregnant or of the other NATS components under the use conditions. (6) Is listed in the USEPA Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) inventory for commercial use.

  12. Emissions inventories and options for control. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swart, R.J.; Van Amstel, A.R.; Van den Born, G.J.; Kroeze, C.

    1995-10-01

    This report is the final summary report of the project `Social causes of the greenhouse effect, emissions inventories and options for control`. The objectives of the project, that started in 1990, were to support the development of a comprehensive Dutch climate policy and to identify gaps in the knowledge about sources of greenhouse gases. The four phases of the project are summarized. In the first phase, a first national inventory of greenhouse gas emissions was made, capturing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and the ozone precursors carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} ) and volatile organic compounds (VOC). In the second phase, the acquired expertise was used to support the development of Guidelines for National Emissions Inventories by the joint OECD/IPCC programme through workshop organization and participation in the international planning group. In the third phase, a detailed analysis was performed of the sources of methane, its current and future emissions and the options for control. Finally, a similar analysis was performed for nitrous oxide. In these studies, it was found that policies not specifically aiming at mitigating climate change, would help to control the emissions of the non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases. While for methane, national emissions would even decrease because of measures in the livestock management and waste disposal sectors, for nitrous oxide the reductions in agricultural emissions would be outweighed by increases, especially in the transportation sector. The project shows that the application of more detailed information leads to differences with the Guidelines, both because of the limited number of source categories in the Guidelines and because of different, locally specific emissions factors. 4 figs., 2 tabs., 14 refs.

  13. Hydrogen based global renewable energy network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akai, Makoto [Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, AIST, MITI, Namiki, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    In the last quarter of this century, global environmental problem has emerged as a major scientific, political and social issue. Specific Problems include: depletion of ozone layer by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), acid rain, destruction of tropical forests and desertification, pollution of the sea and global wanning due to the greenhouse effect by carbon dioxide and others. Among these problems, particular attention of the world has been focused on the global warming because it has direct linkage to energy consumption which our economic development depends on so far. On the other hand, the future program of The Sunshine Project for alternative energy technology R&D, The Moonlight Project for energy conservation technology R&D, and The Global Environmental Technology Program for environmental problem mitigating technology R&D which are Japan`s national projects being promoted by their Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in the Ministry of International Trade and Industry have been reexamined in view of recent changes in the situations surrounding new energy technology. In this regard, The New Sunshine Program will be established by integrating these three activities to accelerate R&D in the field of energy and environmental technologies. In the reexamination, additional stress has been laid on the contribution to solving global environmental problem through development of clean renewable energies which constitute a major part of the {open_quotes}New Earth 21{close_quotes}, a comprehensive, long-term and international cooperative program proposed by MITI. The present paper discusses the results of feasibility study on hydrogen energy system leading to the concept of WE-NET following a brief summary on R&D status on solar and wind energy in Japan.

  14. New therapeutic options for allergic rhinitis: back to the future with intranasal corticosteroid aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Warner W

    2013-01-01

    Under current guidelines, intranasal corticosteroids (INSs) are considered the most effective first-line therapy to improve allergic rhinitis (AR) symptoms and burden of disease. In the late 1980s-1990s, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-propelled corticosteroid aerosol nasal sprays formed the standard of care for the treatment of AR. Because of environmental concerns, CFC aerosols were gradually phased out, and aqueous INS formulations of nasal sprays became the standard of care. Although many aqueous INS sprays are available, specific product-related factors can reduce patient adherence to an INS and subsequently reduce treatment efficacy. The purpose of this paper was to review the evolution of AR therapeutics and drug devices and how it may have an effect on patient adherence/compliance and patient satisfaction with current available therapies and show the unmet need to improve INS delivery systems. Although aqueous INSs are effective and well tolerated, use in some patients may be compromised because of patient sensory perception and device preference. A historical review of the evolution of intranasal delivery of INSs was undertaken to provide further insight into improving treatment options for patients with AR. Although the various approved INSs appear to be equivalent in terms of reducing AR disease burden, the method in which an INS is delivered to a patient has significant bearing on the overall success of each specific drug product. Hydrofluoroalkane-propelled INS drug products offer a back-to-the-future delivery approach that may be further tailored to the individual patient's needs. Past experiences and the development of new devices are paving the way toward further therapy choices, ultimately affording health care providers access to the most effective treatments for patients with AR.

  15. An analytical method for trifluoroacetic Acid in water and air samples using headspace gas chromatographic determination of the methyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehavi, D; Seiber, J N

    1996-10-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace levels of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), an atmospheric breakdown product of several of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) replacements for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants, in water and air. TFA is derivatized to the volatile methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) and determined by automated headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) with electron-capture detection or manual HSGC using GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The method is based on the reaction of an aqueous sample containing TFA with dimethyl sulfate (DMS) in concentrated sulfuric acid in a sealed headspace vial under conditions favoring distribution of MTFA to the vapor phase. Water samples are prepared by evaporative concentration, during which TFA is retained as the anion, followed by extraction with diethyl ether of the acidified sample and then back-extraction of TFA (as the anion) in aqueous bicarbonate solution. The extraction step is required for samples with a relatively high background of other salts and organic materials. Air samples are collected in sodium bicarbonate-glycerin-coated glass denuder tubes and prepared by rinsing the denuder contents with water to form an aqueous sample for derivatization and analysis. Recoveries of TFA from spiked water, with and without evaporative concentration, and from spiked air were quantitative, with estimated detection limits of 10 ng/mL (unconcentrated) and 25 pg/mL (concentrated 250 mL:1 mL) for water and 1 ng/m(3) (72 h at 5 L/min) for air. Several environmental air, fogwater, rainwater, and surface water samples were successfully analyzed; many showed the presence of TFA.

  16. Inhaladores de polvo seco para el tratamiento de las enfermedades respiratorias: Parte I Dry powder inhalers for the treatment of respiratory diseases: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Muñoz Cernada

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una revisión acerca de la tecnología de los inhaladores de polvo seco (IPS empleados para el tratamiento de las enfermedades respiratorias entre las que se destaca el asma bronquial y la enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica (EPOC. Los IPS comenzaron su desarrollo en la década de los 70 y se han reactualizado en años recientes como una alternativa de sustitución de los inhaladores de dosis metrada con clorofluocarbono (CFC. Se describen los antecedentes de esta tecnología, se mencionan las características físico-químicas principales de este tipo de formulación, así como los factores que influyen en la desagregación y dispersión de los polvos. Por último, se menciona la técnica empleada actualmente en el desarrollo de un nuevo prototipo de IPS que permite optimizar los mecanismos de fluidización para lograr una dosificación altamente reproducibleA review of the dry powder inhalers (DPI technology used to treat respiratory diseases, such as bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, was made. The DPIs began to be developed in the 70's and they have been reupdated recently as a replacement alternative of metered-dose inhalers with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC. The history of this technology is dealt with, the main physicochemical characteristics of this type of formulation are described, and the factors influencing on the disaggregation and dispersion of the powders are mentioned. Finally, the technique used at present in the development of a new prototype of DPI that allows to optimize the fluidization mechanisms to attain a highly reproducible dosage is approached

  17. 2016 AMS Mario J. Molina Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Renyi [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-11-29

    A named symposium to honor Dr. Mario J. Molina was held 10–14 January 2016, as part of the 96th American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Molina first demonstrated that industrially produced chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) decompose in the stratosphere and release chlorine atoms, leading to catalytic ozone destruction. His research in stratospheric chemistry was instrumental to the establishment of the 1987 United Nations Montreal Protocol to ban ozone-depleting substances worldwide. Dr. Molina’s contributions to preserving the planet Earth not only save the atmospheric ozone layer, but also protect the climate by reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases. He was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering research in understanding the stratospheric ozone loss mechanism. In 2013, President Barack Obama announced Dr. Molina as a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The 2016 AMS Molina Symposium honored Dr. Molina’s distinguished contributions to research related to atmospheric chemistry. The symposium contained an integrated theme related to atmospheric chemistry, climate, and policy. Dr. Molina delivered a keynote speech at the Symposium. The conference included invited keynote speeches and invited and contributed oral and poster sessions, and a banquet was held on Tuesday January 12, 2016. The symposium covered all aspects of atmospheric chemistry, with topics including (1) Stratospheric chemistry, (2) Tropospheric chemistry, (3) Aerosol nucleation, growth, and transformation, (4) Aerosol properties, (5) Megacity air pollution, and (6) Atmospheric chemistry laboratory, field, and modeling studies. This DOE project supported 14 scientists, including graduate students, post docs, junior research scientists, and non-tenured assistant professors to attend this symposium.

  18. What to do about greenhouse warming: Look before you leap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, S.F.; Revelle, R.; Starr, C.

    1993-01-01

    Greenhouse warming has emerged as one of the most complex and controversial environmental foreign-policy issues of the 1990s. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), generated from the burning of oil, gas, and coal, is thought to enhance the natural greenhouse effect that has kept the planet warm for billions of years. Some scientists predict drastic climatic changes in the 21st Century. It is a foreign-policy issue because the US has taken a more cautious approach to dealing with CO 2 emissions than have many industrialized nations. Wide acceptance of the Montreal Protocol, which limits and rolls back the manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) to protect the ozone layer, has encouraged environmental activists at international conferences the past three years to call for similar controls on CO 2 from fossil-fuel burning. These activists are disappointed with the White House for not supporting immediate action. But should the US assume leadership in a hastily-conceived campaign that could cripple the global economy, or would it be more prudent to assure first, through scientific research, that the problem is both real and urgent? The authors sum up their conclusions in a simple message: The scientific base for a greenhouse warming is too uncertain to justify drastic action at this time. There is little risk in delaying policy responses to this century-old problem since there is every expectation that scientific understanding will be substantially improved within the next decade. Instead of premature and likely ineffective controls on fuel use that would only slow down CO 2 , the same resources could be used to increase our economic and technological resilience so that we can apply specific remedies as necessary to reduce climate change or to adapt to it. Prudent steps now include energy conservation and efficiency increases and make economic sense even without the threat of greenhouse warming

  19. Lesson learned case study: What the history of ozone depelting chemical phaseout may teach us about how to approach international climate change policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younis, S.E. [Conceptual Engineering Group, Inc., Crofton, MD (United States); Verdonik, D.P. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The world approached the production phaseout of ozone depleting chemicals conservatively under the Vienna Convention. The initial tasks were to recognize the problem within the science field and make political leaders and people aware that the problem existed and was a real threat to environmental stability. Several years later, Meetings of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol to Protect the Stratospheric Ozone Layer began occurring regularly. Long term goals on production reduction levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons were set. Rapid acceleration in production phaseout dates were implemented worldwide, impacting industry plans to research, develop, and implement replacements. The impacts were widespread from small cleaning processes to the defense of countries. The trials and tribulations that industries such as the foam, refrigeration, air conditioning, fire protection, and manufacturing industries have gone through to meet the accelerated challenges are great. This fight is not yet over. Alternatives have yet to be fully implemented, long term effects analysis are not yet completed, budgets have not caught up with the rapid phaseout, and supplies of ODCs are dwindling quickly, as well as increasing in cost at a rapid rate. This is being felt from car owner all the way up to the national defense of countries. The paper will briefly describe the historic events and developments that occurred to industry and the users, from a political, environmental, and business perspective. From this, valuable lessons can be learned and we can plan for the future well in advance, in order that we are not caught off guard again. A very real environmental problem exists with global climate change. This is being increasingly recognized by both political leaders and citizens alike. From what we have seen with ODC phaseout, we can potentially project what course the future.

  20. Greenhouse gas emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.L.; Perlack, R.D.; Prasad, A.M.G.; Ranney, J.W.; Waddle, D.B.

    1990-11-01

    Current and future carbon emissions from land-use change and energy consumption were analyzed for Sub-Saharan Africa. The energy sector analysis was based on UN energy data tapes while the land-use analysis was based on a spatially-explicit land-use model developed specifically for this project. The impacts of different energy and land-use strategies on future carbon emissions were considered. (A review of anthropogenic emissions of methane, nitrous oxides, and chlorofluorocarbons in Sub-Saharan Africa indicated that they were probably minor in both a global and a regional context. The study therefore was focused on emissions of carbon dioxide.) The land-use model predicts carbon emissions from land use change and the amount of carbon stored in vegetation (carbon inventory) on a yearly basis between 1985 and 2001. Emissions and inventory are modeled at 9000 regularly-spaced point locations in Sub-Saharan Africa using location-specific information on vegetation type, soils, climate and deforestation. Vegetation, soils, and climate information were derived from continental-scale maps while relative deforestation rates(% of forest land lost each year) were developed from country-specific forest and deforestation statistics (FAO Tropical Forest Resources Assessment for Africa, 1980). The carbon emissions under different land use strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa were analyzed by modifying deforestation rates and altering the amount of carbon stored under different land uses. The considered strategies were: preservation of existing forests, implementation of agroforestry, and establishment of industrial tree plantations. 82 refs., 16 figs., 25 tabs.

  1. Stratospheric chlorine: Blaming it on nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taube, G.

    1993-01-01

    Much of the bitter public debate over ozone depletion has centered on the claim that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) pale into insignificance alongside natural sources of chlorine in the stratosphere. If so, goes the argument, chlorine could not be depleting ozone as atmospheric scientists claim, because the natural sources have been around since time immemorial, and the ozone layer is still there. The claim, put forward in a book by Rogelio Maduro and Ralf Schauerhammer, has since been touted by former Atomic Energy Commissioner Dixy Lee Ray and talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, and it forms the basis of much of the backlash now being felt by atmospheric scientists. The argument is simple: Maduro and Schauerhammer calculate that 600 million tons of chlorine enters the atmosphere annually from seawater, 36 million tons from volcanoes, 8.4 million tons from biomass burning, and 5 million tons from ocean biota. In contrast, CFCs account for a mere 750,000 tons of atmospheric chlorine a year. Besides disputing the numbers, scientists have both theoretical and observational bases for doubting that much of this chlorine is getting into the stratosphere, where it could affect the ozone layer. Linwood Callis of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center points out one crucial problem with the argument: Chlorine from natural sources is soluble, and so it gets rained out of the lower atmosphere. CFCs, in contrast, are insoluble and inert and thus make it to the stratosphere to release their chlorine. What's more, observations of stratospheric chemistry don't support the idea that natural sources are contributing much to the chlorine there

  2. Proactive quality assurance in environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, J.B.; Kulkarni, S.V.; Wasson, S.J.; Ford, J.S.; Harmon, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Quality Assurance policy of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) stipulates that every project involving environmentally related monitoring, measurements, and data collection activities must have a written and approved quality assurance project plan (QAPjP). A QAPjP is a written document which presents, in specific terms, the policies, organizations, objectives, functional activities, and the quality assurance/quality control activities designed to achieve the quality goals for data collection. In the research studies involving novel or non-routine measurements that use unvalidated methods, measurement quality goals are often difficult or impossible to specify at the beginning of the project for which a QAPjP must be written. Furthermore, it may not be possible for the QAPjP reviewers to evaluate the reasonableness of these goals without initial information about the system under study. For the project to evaluate chlorofluorocarbon for recycling from domestic refrigerators, the QAPjP incorporated standard analytical techniques used by industry. These techniques did not provide accuracy and precision or other validation information. For the initial version of the QAPjP, measurement quality goals were assigned based on limited experience. Quality assurance support was called upon to evaluate the performance of the measurement system for this project through a series of audits. The performance evaluation audits necessitated designing novel audit materials and sample delivery techniques. Continued interaction is necessary between the project and QA teams to permit evolution of reasonable data quality indicators for meaningful assessment of data quality. By treating the QAPjP as a living document that is updated and amended as more knowledge of a system is obtained, AQ becomes an integral part of the research program. This results in a greater understanding of the system under study

  3. Quality of Nevada's aquifers and their susceptibility to contamination, 1990-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: In 1999, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency introduced a rule to protect the quality of ground water in areas other than source-water protection areas. These other sensitive ground-water areas (OSGWA) are areas that are not currently but could eventually be used as a source of drinking water. To help determine whether a well is in an OSGWA, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection needs statewide information on the susceptibility and vulnerability of Nevada's aquifer systems to contamination. This report presents an evaluation of the quality of ground water and susceptibility of Nevada's aquifer systems to anthropogenic contamination. Chemical tracers and statistical methods were used to assess the susceptibility of aquifer systems in Nevada. Chemical tracers included nitrate, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), dissolved gases, and isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. Ground-water samples were collected from 133 wells during August 2002 through October 2003. Logistic regression was done to estimate the probability of detecting nitrate above concentrations typically found in undeveloped areas. Nitrate is one of the most common anthropogenic contaminants that degrades ground-water quality, is commonly measured and is persistent, except in reducing conditions. These characteristics make nitrate a good indicator of aquifer susceptibility. Water-quality data for 5,528 wells were compiled into a database. The area around each well was characterized using information on explanatory variables that could be related to nitrate concentrations. Data also were used to characterize the quality of ground water in Nevada, including dissolved solids, nitrate, pesticide, and VOC concentrations.

  4. Assessment of managed aquifer recharge at Sand Hollow Reservoir, Washington County, Utah, updated to conditions in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Thomas M.; Heilweil, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    Sand Hollow Reservoir in Washington County, Utah, was completed in March 2002 and is operated primarily for managed aquifer recharge by the Washington County Water Conservancy District. From 2002 through 2011, surface-water diversions of about 199,000 acre-feet to Sand Hollow Reservoir have allowed the reservoir to remain nearly full since 2006. Groundwater levels in monitoring wells near the reservoir rose through 2006 and have fluctuated more recently because of variations in reservoir altitude and nearby pumping from production wells. Between 2004 and 2011, a total of about 19,000 acre-feet of groundwater was withdrawn by these wells for municipal supply. In addition, a total of about 21,000 acre-feet of shallow seepage was captured by French drains adjacent to the North and West Dams and used for municipal supply, irrigation, or returned to the reservoir. From 2002 through 2011, about 106,000 acre-feet of water seeped beneath the reservoir to recharge the underlying Navajo Sandstone aquifer. Water quality was sampled at various monitoring wells in Sand Hollow to evaluate the timing and location of reservoir recharge as it moved through the aquifer. Tracers of reservoir recharge include major and minor dissolved inorganic ions, tritium, dissolved organic carbon, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and noble gases. By 2012, this recharge arrived at four monitoring wells located within about 1,000 feet of the reservoir. Changing geochemical conditions at five other monitoring wells could indicate other processes, such as changing groundwater levels and mobilization of vadose-zone salts, rather than arrival of reservoir recharge.

  5. Protecting the ozone layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munasinghe, M; King, K

    1992-06-01

    Stratospheric ozone layer depletion has been recognized as a problem by the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol (MP). The ozone layer shields the earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV-B), which is more pronounced at the poles and around the equator. Industrialized countries have contributed significantly to the problem by releasing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons into the atmosphere. The effect of these chemicals, which were known for their inertness, nonflammability, and nontoxicity, was discovered in 1874. Action to deal with the effects of CFCs and halons was initiated in 1985 in a 49-nation UN meeting. 21 nations signed a protocol limiting ozone depleting substances (ODS): CFCs and halons. Schedules were set based on each country's use in 1986; the target phaseout was set for the year 2000. The MP restricts trade in ODSs and weights the impact of substances to reflect the extent of damage; i.e., halons are 10 times more damaging than CFCs. ODS requirements for developing countries were eased to accommodate scarce resources and the small fraction of ODS emissions. An Interim Multilateral Fund under the Montreal Protocol (IMFMP) was established to provide loans to finance the costs to developing countries in meeting global environmental requirements. The IMFMP is administered by the World Bank, the UN Environmental Program, and the UN Development Program. Financing is available to eligible countries who use .3 kg of ODS/person/year. Rapid phaseout in developed countries has occurred due to strong support from industry and a lower than expected cost. Although there are clear advantages to rapid phaseout, there were no incentives included in the MP for rapid phaseout. Some of the difficulties occur because the schedules set minimum targets at the lowest possible cost. Also, costs cannot be minimized by a country-specific and ODS-specific process. The ways to improve implementation in scheduling and

  6. Climate change in school : where does it fit, and how ready are we?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortner, R.W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The issue of whether the topic of global climate change (GCC) should be part of the school curriculum, from elementary school to high school, was discussed. Studies have shown that teachers place a high priority on climate change as a topic their students should know, but report that their own knowledge is inadequate for conveying it. The subject of GCC is best to be taught in Earth systems oriented classrooms which focus on teaching that the Earth system is composed of interacting subsystems of water, rock, ice, air and life. There is plenty of teaching material about GCC and many credible and free sources of scientific information, but it is was cautioned that some teachers may possess misconceptions about Earth system relationships as well as how human activities impact those systems. The most common misconceptions are: (1) inflated estimates of temperature change, (2) confusion between chlorofluorocarbons, the ozone hole, and climate change, (3) perceived evidence of climate change through warmer weather, (4) all environmental harms such as aerosols, acid rain, and even solid waste disposal cause climate change, (5) confusion between weather issues and climate issues. Overcoming these incorrect perceptions might be difficult. In general, a majority of Americans believe that GCC is a serious threat to their life, but there are some interest groups that oppose human-mediated climate change as a part of the school curriculum, for the same reason they oppose public action the problem. It was emphasized that the development of scientific thinking and technology increases our ability to understand and utilize Earth and space. 26 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  7. Characterization of the spray velocities from a pressurized metered-dose inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosland, Brian Michael; Johnson, Matthew Ronald; Matida, Edgar Akio

    2009-06-01

    Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are widely used to deliver aerosolized medications to the lungs, most often to relieve the symptoms of asthma. Over the past decade, pMDIs have been modified in several ways to eliminate the use of chlorofluorocarbons in their manufacture while increasing efficacy. Numerical simulations are being used more frequently to predict the flow and deposition of particles at various locations, both inside the respiratory tract as well as in pMDIs and add-on devices. These simulations require detailed information about the spray generated by a pMDI to ensure the validity of their results. This paper presents detailed, spatially resolved velocity measurements of the spray emitted from salbutamol sulfate pMDIs obtained using optically triggered particle image velocimetry (PIV). Instantaneous planar velocity measurements were taken and ensemble-averaged at nine different times during the spray event ranging from 1.3 to 100 msec after a pneumatically controlled actuation. The mean spray velocities were shown to be bimodal in time, with two velocity peaks and velocity magnitudes found to be much lower than published data from instantaneous single point measurements. Planar velocity data at each time step were analyzed to produce prescriptive velocity profiles suitable for use in numerical simulations. Spray geometry data are also reported. Statistical comparisons from several thousand individual spray events indicate that there is no significant difference in measured velocity among (1) two brands of pMDI canisters, (2) two pMDIs of the same brand but having different lot numbers, and (3) a full pMDI versus an almost empty pMDI. The addition of a secondary air flow of 30 SLPM (to represent simultaneous inhalation and spray actuation) deflected the spray downward but did not have a significant effect on flow velocity. Further experiments with an added cylindrical spacer revealed that within the spacer, the spray direction and cone angle

  8. The role of ocean transport in the uptake of anthropogenic CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Totterdell

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We compare modeled oceanic carbon uptake in response to pulse CO2 emissions using a suite of global ocean models and Earth system models. In response to a CO2 pulse emission of 590 Pg C (corresponding to an instantaneous doubling of atmospheric CO2 from 278 to 556 ppm, the fraction of CO2 emitted that is absorbed by the ocean is: 37±8%, 56±10%, and 81±4% (model mean ±2σ in year 30, 100, and 1000 after the emission pulse, respectively. Modeled oceanic uptake of pulse CO2 on timescales from decades to about a century is strongly correlated with simulated present-day uptake of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs and CO2 across all models, while the amount of pulse CO2 absorbed by the ocean from a century to a millennium is strongly correlated with modeled radiocarbon in the deep Southern and Pacific Ocean. However, restricting the analysis to models that are capable of reproducing observations within uncertainty, the correlation is generally much weaker. The rates of surface-to-deep ocean transport are determined for individual models from the instantaneous doubling CO2 simulations, and they are used to calculate oceanic CO2 uptake in response to pulse CO2 emissions of different sizes pulses of 1000 and 5000 Pg C. These results are compared with simulated oceanic uptake of CO2 by a number of models simulations with the coupling of climate-ocean carbon cycle and without it. This comparison demonstrates that the impact of different ocean transport rates across models on oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 is of similar magnitude as that of climate-carbon cycle feedbacks in a single model, emphasizing the important role of ocean transport in the uptake of anthropogenic CO2.

  9. Continuing global significance of emissions of Montreal Protocol-restricted halocarbons in the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, D. F.; Lin, J. C.; Romashkin, P. A.; Daube, B. C.; Gerbig, C.; Matross, D. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Hall, B. D.; Elkins, J. W.

    2006-08-01

    Contemporary emissions of six restricted, ozone-depleting halocarbons, chlorofluorocarbon-11 (CFC-11, CCl3F), CFC-12 (CCl2F2), CFC-113 (CCl2FCClF2), methyl chloroform (CH3CCl3), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and Halon-1211 (CBrClF2), and two nonregulated trace gases, chloroform (CHCl3) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), are estimated for the United States and Canada. The estimates derive from 900 to 2900 in situ measurements of each of these gases within and above the planetary boundary layer over the United States and Canada as part of the 2003 CO2 Budget and Regional Airborne-North America (COBRA-NA) study. Air masses polluted by anthropogenic sources, identified by concurrently elevated levels of carbon monoxide (CO), SF6, and CHCl3, were sampled over a wide geographical range of these two countries. For each polluted air mass, we calculated emission ratios of halocarbons to CO and employed the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model to determine the footprint associated with the air mass. Gridded CO emission estimates were then mapped onto the footprints and combined with measured emission ratios to generate footprint-weighted halocarbon flux estimates. We present statistically significant linear relationships between halocarbon fluxes (excluding CCl4) and footprint-weighted population densities, with slopes representative of per capita emission rates. These rates indicate that contemporary emissions of five restricted halocarbons (excluding CCl4) in the United States and Canada continue to account for significant fractions (7-40%) of global emissions.

  10. Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0 2 emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use

  11. Treatment of cooling appliances. Interrelations between environmental protection, resource conservation, and recovery rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laner, David; Rechberger, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of cooling appliances in Austria is primarily influenced by two factors. On the one hand is their changing composition and on the other hand the ordinance on Waste Prevention, Collection and Treatment of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE ordinance), which stipulates a minimum recycling rate of 75% for cooling appliances. This paper investigates whether this recycling rate leads to optimal treatment practices for cooling appliances with respect to resource conservation and environmental protection. Two different treatment technologies which achieve recycling rates between 50-60% and 80-90%, respectively, are compared both for cooling appliances containing Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and for appliances containing Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC). Materials and energy balances are developed for each model. To evaluate resource consumption, expenditures as well as savings of energy and materials are incorporated via the Cumulative Energy Demand (CED). In order to analyse the environmental impact of the different practices, balances for CFC, CO 2 , HF, HCl and solid residues are established. The results show that the treatment type aiming for a maximum of materials recycling contributes more to resource conservation than the other treatment type. But for CFC appliances the former is associated with substantial CFC emissions, which turn out to be most relevant when treating these appliances. Generally, it is found that the optimum recycling rate is a function of the composition of the appliance and the technologies applied, both in recycling and in primary production. A high recycling rate per se does not automatically result in an optimal solution with regard to resource conservation and environmental protection. (author)

  12. Comparison of four inverse modelling systems applied to the estimation of HFC-125, HFC-134a, and SF6 emissions over Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Brunner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs are used in a range of industrial applications and have largely replaced previously used gases (CFCs and HCFCs. HFCs are not ozone-depleting but have large global warming potentials and are, therefore, reported to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC. Here, we use four independent inverse models to estimate European emissions of the two HFCs contributing the most to global warming (HFC-134a and HFC-125 and of SF6 for the year 2011. Using an ensemble of inverse models offers the possibility to better understand systematic uncertainties in inversions. All systems relied on the same measurement time series from Jungfraujoch (Switzerland, Mace Head (Ireland, and Monte Cimone (Italy and the same a priori estimates of the emissions, but differed in terms of the Lagrangian transport model (FLEXPART, NAME, inversion method (Bayesian, extended Kalman filter, treatment of baseline mole fractions, spatial gridding, and a priori uncertainties. The model systems were compared with respect to the ability to reproduce the measurement time series, the spatial distribution of the posterior emissions, uncertainty reductions, and total emissions estimated for selected countries. All systems were able to reproduce the measurement time series very well, with prior correlations between 0.5 and 0.9 and posterior correlations being higher by 0.05 to 0.1. For HFC-125, all models estimated higher emissions from Spain + Portugal than reported to UNFCCC (median higher by 390 % though with a large scatter between individual estimates. Estimates for Germany (+140 % and Ireland (+850 % were also considerably higher than UNFCCC, whereas the estimates for France and the UK were consistent with the national reports. In contrast to HFC-125, HFC-134a emissions from Spain + Portugal were broadly consistent with UNFCCC, and emissions from Germany were only 30 % higher. The data suggest that the UK over

  13. Comparison of four inverse modelling systems applied to the estimation of HFC-125, HFC-134a, and SF6 emissions over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Dominik; Arnold, Tim; Henne, Stephan; Manning, Alistair; Thompson, Rona L.; Maione, Michela; O'Doherty, Simon; Reimann, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are used in a range of industrial applications and have largely replaced previously used gases (CFCs and HCFCs). HFCs are not ozone-depleting but have large global warming potentials and are, therefore, reported to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Here, we use four independent inverse models to estimate European emissions of the two HFCs contributing the most to global warming (HFC-134a and HFC-125) and of SF6 for the year 2011. Using an ensemble of inverse models offers the possibility to better understand systematic uncertainties in inversions. All systems relied on the same measurement time series from Jungfraujoch (Switzerland), Mace Head (Ireland), and Monte Cimone (Italy) and the same a priori estimates of the emissions, but differed in terms of the Lagrangian transport model (FLEXPART, NAME), inversion method (Bayesian, extended Kalman filter), treatment of baseline mole fractions, spatial gridding, and a priori uncertainties. The model systems were compared with respect to the ability to reproduce the measurement time series, the spatial distribution of the posterior emissions, uncertainty reductions, and total emissions estimated for selected countries. All systems were able to reproduce the measurement time series very well, with prior correlations between 0.5 and 0.9 and posterior correlations being higher by 0.05 to 0.1. For HFC-125, all models estimated higher emissions from Spain + Portugal than reported to UNFCCC (median higher by 390 %) though with a large scatter between individual estimates. Estimates for Germany (+140 %) and Ireland (+850 %) were also considerably higher than UNFCCC, whereas the estimates for France and the UK were consistent with the national reports. In contrast to HFC-125, HFC-134a emissions from Spain + Portugal were broadly consistent with UNFCCC, and emissions from Germany were only 30 % higher. The data suggest that the UK over-reports its HFC-134a emissions to

  14. Effects of simulant mixed waste on EPDM and butyl rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be used in transporting mixed waste forms. In this program, we have screened 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile) rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, epi-chloro-hydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene (EPDM) rubber, fluorocarbons (Viton and Kel-F), poly-tetrafluoroethylene (Teflon), high-density polyethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer (Butyl) rubber, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene (SBR) rubber. The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The screening testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to ∼3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste simulants at 60 deg. C. The rubber materials or elastomers were tested using VTR measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, screening criteria of ∼1 g/hr/m 2 for VTR and specific gravity change of 10% were used. Those materials that failed to meet these criteria were judged to have failed the screening tests and were excluded from the next phase of this experimental program. We have completed the comprehensive testing phase of liner materials in a simulant Hanford Tank waste consisting of an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. From the data analyses performed, we have identified the chloro-fluorocarbon Kel-F as having the greatest chemical durability after having been exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the aqueous alkaline simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the extremely poor performance of Teflon under these conditions. We have also completed the comprehensive

  15. Collection of Arctic Ocean Data from US Navy Submarines on the New SCICEX Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smethie, W. M.; Sambrotto, R.; Boyd, T.; Richter-Menge, J.; Corbett, J.

    2011-12-01

    The SCICEX submarine Arctic science program originated in the 1990s when six dedicated science cruises were conducted in the Arctic Ocean aboard US Navy Sturgeon class submarines. After the cold war era Sturgeon class submarines were retired, several Science Accommodation cruises, for which a few days for scientific measurements were added to planned submarine transits through the Arctic Ocean, were carried out when opportunities arose. Renewed interest in conducting further Science Accommodation cruises on a regular basis to better document and understand how the Arctic Ocean responds to climate change resulted in publication of a scientific plan in 2010 (http://www.arctic.gov/publications/scicex_plan.pdf). In the spring of 2011 testing of data collection and water sampling methods aboard newer Virginia and Seawolf class submarines on transit from a Navy ice camp in the Beaufort Sea, was conducted in order to develop protocols and evaluate techniques. Ice draft measurements were also taken in the vicinity of the ice camp and near the North Pole to evaluate new data collection systems. This evaluation will include a comparison of the ice draft data with a comprehensive set of in situ ice thickness measurements taken near the ice camp. Under-ice submarine-launched eXpendable Condutivity Temperature Depth (XCTD) probes were deployed from the USS Connecticut (SSN-22), a Seawolf class submarine, and the resulting profiles compared to CTD casts from the APLIS ice station and historical profiles. Water samples were collected through the hull for measurements of tritium, helium isotopes, oxygen isotopes, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, bacterioplankton, phytoplankton and particulates levels. These samples were returned to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and were in the process of being measured at the time this abstract was written. Measurements completed at this time indicate good samples can be collected for CFC-12

  16. CO2 como refrigerante: del pasado al futuro CO2 as refrigerant: from the past to future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Belman Flores

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available En años recientes y debido a la problemática que ha originado el calentamiento mundial, en el campo de la refrigeración y climatización se ha incrementado el interés por utilizar refrigerantes naturales e hidrocarburos con bajo potencial de calentamiento mundial, este es el caso de la utilización del CO2 como fluido frigorígeno que ha sido visto como una alter­nativa adecuada a los actuales refrigerantes en la comunidad científica. Hoy en día, el CO2 cada vez está retomando presencia en el campo de la refrigeración y climatización a nivel internacional, así pues, el presente trabajo tiene la finalidad de dar a conocer su potencial como refrigerante natural, las causas por las cuales este fluido fue relevado momentánea­mente por refrigerantes clorofluorocarbonados y su renacer en pleno siglo XXI. Además, se plantea su aplicación en la generación de frío en nuestro país mediante la tecnología de compresión de vapor basado en ciclo transcrítico.  In recent years, and due to problems resulting from global warming, interest has grown in the fields of refrigeration and air conditioning, specifically regarding the use of natural refrigerants and hydrocarbons with low potential for global warming. Such is the case of the use of CO2 as a cold fluid, which has been considered in the scientific community as an adequate alternative to common refrigerants. Nowadays, the use of CO2 in the areas of refrigeration and air conditioning has been recognized at international levels. Therefore, this work aims to show its potential as a natural refrigerant, the causes why this fluid was temporarily replaced by chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants, and its reappearance in the XXI century. It also proposes the use of CO2 in air conditioning in our country by using vapor compression technology, based on the transcritical cycle.

  17. Determination of a wide range of volatile organic compounds in ambient air using multisorbent adsorption/thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, J.F.; Luo, W.; Isabelle, L.M.; Bender, D.A.; Baker, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Adsorption/thermal desorption with multisorbent air-sampling cartridges was developed for the determination of 87 method analytes including halogenated alkanes, halogenated alkenes, ethers, alcohols, nitriles, esters, ketones, aromatics, a disulfide, and a furan. The volatilities of the compounds ranged from that of dichlorofluoromethane (CFC12) to that of 1,2,3- trichlorobenzene. The eight most volatile compounds were determined using a 1.5-L air sample and a sample cartridge containing 50 mg of Carbotrap B and 280 mg of Carboxen 1000; the remaining 79 compounds were determined using a 5-L air sample and a cartridge containing 180 mg of Carbotrap B and 70 mg of Carboxen 1000. Analysis and detection were by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The minimum detectable level (MDL) concentration values ranged from 0.01 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) for chlorobenzene to 0.4 ppbv for bromomethane; most of the MDL values were in the range 0.02-0.06 ppbv. No breakthrough was detected with the prescribed sample volumes. Analyte stability on the cartridges was very good. Excellent recoveries were obtained with independent check standards. Travel spike recoveries ranged from 90 to 110% for 72 of the 87 compounds. The recoveries were less than 70% for bromomethane and chloroethene and for a few compounds such as methyl acetate that are subject to losses by hydrolysis; the lowest travel spike recovery was obtained for bromomethane (62%). Blank values for all compounds were either below detection or very low. Ambient atmospheric sampling was conducted in New Jersey from April to December, 1997. Three sites characterized by low, moderate, and high densities of urbanization/traffic were sampled. The median detected concentrations of the compounds were either similar at all three sites (as with the chlorofluorocarbon compounds) or increased with the density of urbanization/traffic (as with dichloromethane, MTBE, benzene, and toluene). For toluene, the median detected

  18. The 2003 edition of geisa: a spectroscopic database system for the second generation vertical sounders radiance simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Lmd Team

    The GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) computer accessible database system, in its former 1997 and 2001 versions, has been updated in 2003 (GEISA-03). It is developed by the ARA (Atmospheric Radiation Analysis) group at LMD (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, France) since 1974. This early effort implemented the so-called `` line-by-line and layer-by-layer '' approach for forward radiative transfer modelling action. The GEISA 2003 system comprises three databases with their associated management softwares: a database of spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located in a spectral range from the microwave to the limit of the visible. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the Giant Planets. a database of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. a database of refractive indices of basic atmospheric aerosol components. Illustrations will be given of GEISA-03, data archiving method, contents, management softwares and Web access facilities at: http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr The performance of instruments like AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder; http://www-airs.jpl.nasa.gov) in the USA, and IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer; http://smsc.cnes.fr/IASI/index.htm) in Europe, which have a better vertical resolution and accuracy, compared to the presently existing satellite infrared vertical sounders, is directly related to the quality of the spectroscopic parameters of the optically active gases, since these are essential input in the forward models used to simulate recorded radiance spectra. For these upcoming atmospheric sounders, the so-called GEISA/IASI sub-database system has been elaborated

  19. Global and regional emission estimates for HCFC-22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Saikawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available HCFC-22 (CHClF2, chlorodifluoromethane is an ozone-depleting substance (ODS as well as a significant greenhouse gas (GHG. HCFC-22 has been used widely as a refrigerant fluid in cooling and air-conditioning equipment since the 1960s, and it has also served as a traditional substitute for some chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs controlled under the Montreal Protocol. A low frequency record on tropospheric HCFC-22 since the late 1970s is available from measurements of the Southern Hemisphere Cape Grim Air Archive (CGAA and a few Northern Hemisphere air samples (mostly from Trinidad Head using the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE instrumentation and calibrations. Since the 1990s high-frequency, high-precision, in situ HCFC-22 measurements have been collected at these AGAGE stations. Since 1992, the Global Monitoring Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL has also collected flasks on a weekly basis from remote sites across the globe and analyzed them for a suite of halocarbons including HCFC-22. Additionally, since 2006 flasks have been collected approximately daily at a number of tower sites across the US and analyzed for halocarbons and other gases at NOAA. All results show an increase in the atmospheric mole fractions of HCFC-22, and recent data show a growth rate of approximately 4% per year, resulting in an increase in the background atmospheric mole fraction by a factor of 1.7 from 1995 to 2009. Using data on HCFC-22 consumption submitted to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP, as well as existing bottom-up emission estimates, we first create globally-gridded a priori HCFC-22 emissions over the 15 yr since 1995. We then use the three-dimensional chemical transport model, Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers version 4 (MOZART v4, and a Bayesian inverse method to estimate global as well as regional annual emissions. Our inversion indicates

  20. Wes Jackson. In nature's way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    The opinions and a biographical sketch of Wes Jackson, the founder of the Land Institute, are presented. The land Institute near Salina, Kansas is a nonprofit organization devoted to sustainable agriculture. Opinions are provided on the relationship of the Land Institute to sustainable agriculture, the definition of sustainability, the feasibility of replication of his work, his ideas about the destruction wreaked by the plow vs. the sword, technology and population growth, the future farmer, and the speed with which modern science has destroyed the ozone layer. Sustainable agriculture is using the prairie to provide answers to how agriculture can work with nature; the approach will take longer but will sustain both agriculture and people for another 10,000 years. The system runs on sunlight and recycles all materials and is based on the principles of ecosystems, which have been around for hundreds of years. Agricultural technology is based on a fossil fuel intensive infrastructure and is "parachuted into Third World countries." "Corn - the gift of the gods has been the killer of this continent." 50% of the topsoil has been lost, and soil is more important than oil. Advances in biotechnology are seen as the "human cleverness" approach; the preference is for an ecological approach first. Biotechnology tells how to "spin wheels faster," but it also generates more waste. The future farmer is more like the 19th century British naturalist. A projection is that 1st the oil is used up, then the natural gas, and when nuclear power is embraced, Murphy's Law must be repealed. It is important to understand the "we can'ts". Realization of limits will direct energy to the sun's potential and recycling and the flow of energy. Descartes' notion of correctable ignorance must be repudiated. Our knowledge-based world has led to acid rain, global warming, the ozone hole, and Chernobyl. It took just 25 years for chlorofluorocarbons to destroy the ozone layer. A philosophical shift in

  1. Evaluation of Oceanic Transport Statistics By Use of Transient Tracers and Bayesian Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trossman, D. S.; Thompson, L.; Mecking, S.; Bryan, F.; Peacock, S.

    2013-12-01

    Key variables that quantify the time scales over which atmospheric signals penetrate into the oceanic interior and their uncertainties are computed using Bayesian methods and transient tracers from both models and observations. First, the mean residence times, subduction rates, and formation rates of Subtropical Mode Water (STMW) and Subpolar Mode Water (SPMW) in the North Atlantic and Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) in the Southern Ocean are estimated by combining a model and observations of chlorofluorocarbon-11 (CFC-11) via Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA), statistical technique that weights model estimates according to how close they agree with observations. Second, a Bayesian method is presented to find two oceanic transport parameters associated with the age distribution of ocean waters, the transit-time distribution (TTD), by combining an eddying global ocean model's estimate of the TTD with hydrographic observations of CFC-11, temperature, and salinity. Uncertainties associated with objectively mapping irregularly spaced bottle data are quantified by making use of a thin-plate spline and then propagated via the two Bayesian techniques. It is found that the subduction of STMW, SPMW, and SAMW is mostly an advective process, but up to about one-third of STMW subduction likely owes to non-advective processes. Also, while the formation of STMW is mostly due to subduction, the formation of SPMW is mostly due to other processes. About half of the formation of SAMW is due to subduction and half is due to other processes. A combination of air-sea flux, acting on relatively short time scales, and turbulent mixing, acting on a wide range of time scales, is likely the dominant SPMW erosion mechanism. Air-sea flux is likely responsible for most STMW erosion, and turbulent mixing is likely responsible for most SAMW erosion. Two oceanic transport parameters, the mean age of a water parcel and the half-variance associated with the TTD, estimated using the model's tracers as

  2. Timescales for nitrate contamination of spring waters, northern Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B.G.; Böhlke, J.K.; Hornsby, H.D.

    2001-01-01

    Residence times of groundwater, discharging from springs in the middle Suwannee River Basin, were estimated using chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), tritium (3H), and tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He) age-dating methods to assess the chronology of nitrate contamination of spring waters in northern Florida. During base-flow conditions for the Suwannee River in 1997–1999, 17 water samples were collected from 12 first, second, and third magnitude springs discharging groundwater from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Extending age-dating techniques, using transient tracers to spring waters in complex karst systems, required an assessment of several models [piston-flow (PFM), exponential mixing (EMM), and binary-mixing (BMM)] to account for different distributions of groundwater age. Multi-tracer analyses of four springs yielded generally concordant PFM ages of around 20±2 years from CFC-12, CFC-113, 3H, and 3He, with evidence of partial CFC-11 degradation. The EMM gave a reasonable fit to CFC-113, CFC-12, and 3H data, but did not reproduce the observed 3He concentrations or 3H/3He ratios, nor did a combination PFM–EMM. The BMM could reproduce most of the multi-tracer data set only if both endmembers had 3H concentrations not much different from modern values. CFC analyses of 14 additional springs yielded apparent PFM ages from about 10 to 20 years from CFC-113, with evidence of partial CFC-11 degradation and variable CFC-12 contamination. While it is not conclusive, with respect to the age distribution within each spring, the data indicate that the average residence times were in the order of 10–20 years and were roughly proportional to spring magnitude. Applying similar models to recharge and discharge of nitrate based on historical nitrogen loading data yielded contrasting trends for Suwanee County and Lafayette County. In Suwanee County, spring nitrate trends and nitrogen isotope data were consistent with a peak in fertilizer input in the 1970s and a relatively high overall ratio

  3. COPD patient satisfaction with ipratropium bromide/albuterol delivered via Respimat: a randomized, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson GT

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gary T Ferguson,1 Mo Ghafouri,2 Luyan Dai,2 Leonard J Dunn31Pulmonary Research Institute of Southeast Michigan, Livonia, MI, USA; 2Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Ridgefield, CT, USA; 3Clinical Research of West Florida, Inc, Clearwater, FL, USABackground: Ipratropium bromide/albuterol Respimat inhaler (CVT-R was developed as an environmentally friendly alternative to ipratropium bromide/albuterol metered-dose inhaler (CVT-MDI, which uses a chlorofluorocarbon propellant.Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction, device usage, and long-term safety of CVT-R compared to CVT-MDI, and to the simultaneous administration of ipratropium bromide hydrofluoroalkane (HFA; I and albuterol HFA (A metered-dose inhalers as dual monotherapies (I + A.Design: This is a 48-week, open-label, randomized, active-controlled, parallel-group study (n = 470 comparing CVT-R to CVT-MDI and to I + A.Participants: Patients were at least 40 years of age, diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and current or exsmokers.Interventions: Patients were randomized to receive: (1 CVT-R, one inhalation four times daily (QID; or (2 CVT-MDI, two inhalations QID; or (3 I + A two inhalations of each inhaler QID.Main measures: Patient Satisfaction and Preference Questionnaire (PASAPQ performance score (primary endpoint and adverse events.Key results: PASAPQ performance score was significantly higher (CVT-R versus CVT-MDI, 9.6; and CVT-R versus I + A, 6.2; both P < 0.001 when using CVT-R compared to CVT-MDI or I + A at all visits starting from week 3, while CVT-MDI and I + A treatment groups were similar. Time to first COPD exacerbation was slightly longer in the CVT-R group compared to the other treatment groups, although it did not reach statistical significance (CVT-R versus CVT-MDI, P = 0.57; CVT-R versus I + A, P = 0.22. Rates of withdrawal and patient refusal to continue treatment were lower in CVT-R compared with CVT

  4. Flow of river water into a Karstic limestone aquifer. 1. Tracing the young fraction in groundwater mixtures in the Upper Floridan Aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E.; McConnell, J.B.; Drenkard, S.; Schlosser, P.; Michel, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The quality of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia is affected locally by discharge of Withlacoochee River water through sinkholes in the river bed. Data on transient tracers and other dissolved substances, including Cl - , 3 H, tritiogenic helium-3 ( 3 He), chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113), organic C (DOC), O 2 (DO), H 2 S, CH 4 , δ 18 O, δD, and 14 C were investigated as tracers of Withlacoochee River water in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The concentrations of all tracers were affected by dilution and mixing. Dissolved Cl - , δ 18 O, δD, CFC-12, and the quantity ( 3 H+ 3 He) are stable in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer, whereas DOC, DO, H 2 S, CH 4 , 14 C, CFC-11, and CFC-113 are affected by microbial degradation and other geochemical processes occurring within the aquifer. Groundwater mixing fractions were determined by using dissolved Cl - and δ 18 O data, recognizing 3 end-member water types in the groundwater mixtures: (1) Withlacoochee River water (δ 18 O=-2.5±0.3per thousand, Cl - =12.2±2 mg/l), (2) regional infiltration water (δ 18 O=-4.2±0.1per thousand, Cl - =2.3±0.1 mg/l), and (3) regional paleowater resident in the Upper Floridan aquifer (δ 18 O=-3.4±0.1per thousand, Cl - =2.6±0.1 mg/l) (uncertainties are ±1σ). Error simulation procedures were used to define uncertainties in mixing fractions. Fractions of river water in groundwater range from 0 to 72% and average 10%. The influence of river-water discharge on the quality of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer was traced from the sinkhole area on the Withlacoochee River 25 km SE in the direction of regional groundwater flow. Infiltration of water is most significant to the N and NW of Valdosta, but becomes negligible to the S and SE in the direction of general thickening of post-Eocene confining beds overlying the Upper Floridan aquifer. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Flow of river water into a Karstic limestone aquifer. 1. Tracing the young fraction in groundwater mixtures in the Upper Floridan Aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E. [U.S. Geological Survey, 432 National Center, Reston, VA (United States); McConnell, J.B. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3039 Amwiler Rd., Atlanta, GA (United States); Drenkard, S.; Schlosser, P. [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY (United States); Michel, R.L. [U.S. Geological Survey, Mail Stop 434, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    he quality of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia is affected locally by discharge of Withlacoochee River water through sinkholes in the river bed. Data on transient tracers and other dissolved substances, including Cl{sup -}, {sup 3}H, tritiogenic helium-3 ({sup 3}He), chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113), organic C (DOC), O{sub 2} (DO), H{sub 2}S, CH{sub 4}, {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}D, and {sup 14}C were investigated as tracers of Withlacoochee River water in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The concentrations of all tracers were affected by dilution and mixing. Dissolved Cl{sup -}, {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}D, CFC-12, and the quantity ({sup 3}H+{sup 3}He) are stable in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer, whereas DOC, DO, H{sub 2}S, CH{sub 4}, {sup 14}C, CFC-11, and CFC-113 are affected by microbial degradation and other geochemical processes occurring within the aquifer. Groundwater mixing fractions were determined by using dissolved Cl{sup -} and {delta}{sup 18}O data, recognizing 3 end-member water types in the groundwater mixtures: (1) Withlacoochee River water ({delta}{sup 18}O=-2.5{+-}0.3per thousand, Cl{sup -}=12.2{+-}2 mg/l), (2) regional infiltration water ({delta}{sup 18}O=-4.2{+-}0.1per thousand, Cl{sup -}=2.3{+-}0.1 mg/l), and (3) regional paleowater resident in the Upper Floridan aquifer ({delta}{sup 18}O=-3.4{+-}0.1per thousand, Cl{sup -}=2.6{+-}0.1 mg/l) (uncertainties are {+-}1{sigma}). Error simulation procedures were used to define uncertainties in mixing fractions. Fractions of river water in groundwater range from 0 to 72% and average 10%. The influence of river-water discharge on the quality of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer was traced from the sinkhole area on the Withlacoochee River 25 km SE in the direction of regional groundwater flow. Infiltration of water is most significant to theN and NW of Valdosta, but becomes negligible to the S and SE in the direction of general thickening of post-Eocene confining

  6. Monitoring of the ozone layer. Annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braathen, Geir O.; Svenoee, Trond; Hansen, Georg H.; Dahlback, Arne

    1998-10-01

    The three stations in Oslo, Tromsoe and at Ny-Aalesund at Svalbard measure the total ozone levels and these show low monthly averages in 1997 compared to the long-term monthly averages. In Oslo the averages for January to April were 3-13 % below those from 1979 to 1989. Detailed measurements are presented. Analyses based on model calculations and measurements both in Norway and at other places are presented and show the low spring ozone values largely to be a result of chemical oxone decomposition. Particularly in 1997 the polar whirl lasted longer than usual. This lead to reduced ozone transport from the equator to the poles which normally is strongest in spring. At the same time the ozone was decomposed through natural processes where NO x is involved. The report concludes that the extremely low values registered are caused by a combination of chemical decomposition due to chlorofluorocarbons and halon and the particularly dynamic meteorological situation. A trend analysis for the period of 1979 to 1997 was carried out. The trend has been declining unevenly. In Oslo, Tromsoe and Ny-Aalesund the UV radiation from the sun is continually measured using GUV instrumentation. The measurements confirm that the main factors influencing the UV level are the height of the sun, the amount of clouds, the thickness of the ozone layer and the reflection properties at the earth surface. Monthly radiation doses are presented as well. Both at the Oslo and Tromsoe universities two ozone layer measuring instruments of the Dobson and Brewer types, are used. Instrumental comparisons are made. From the Bjoernoeya and the Gardermoen there are regularly lifted balloons which may reach a 35 km altitude carrying ozone probes. The ozone altitude distribution is registered. Similar measurements in the Antarctic show that the yearly ozone decomposition from September to November occurs at the heights of 14 to 24 km. Studies show there is extensive ozone decomposition in the Arctic as well

  7. The precautionary principle as a provisional instrument in environmental policy: The Montreal Protocol case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, J. Roger

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • I examine whether a policy invoked under the Precautionary Principle can move beyond provisional status. • I review the certainty of conclusions based upon the Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project. • There is high certainty that anthropogenic ozone depletion has health consequences in polar regions. • Current research focuses on long term projections of risk that perpetuates high uncertainty. • Establishment of a community to generate Assessments acts to perpetuate the period of uncertainty. - Abstract: Environmental studies identify possible threats to the health of the public or the environment when the scientific certainty of risk is low, but the potential cost is high. Governments may respond by invoking the Precautionary Principle, holding that scientific certainty is not required to take actions that reduce possible risk. EU guidelines suggest that precautionary measures remain provisional until sufficient scientific certainty is generated. Here I study the Scientific Assessments produced for the Montreal Protocol, and the scientific community that generates them, and ask whether a long-standing program of scientific investigation and monitoring can generate sufficient scientific certainty to move beyond dependence on the Precautionary Principle. When the Montreal Protocol was ratified, many scientists strongly suspected that anthropogenic substances like chlorofluorocarbons were depleting stratospheric ozone. Although the risk was uncertain, the perceived cost to public health of ozone depletion was high. A quarter century after formulating the Montreal Protocol, science can define the conditions for ozone depletion with great certainty, but uncertainty remains in determining the scale and distribution of the attributable increase in damaging ultra-violet (UV) radiation. Organisations, such as NASA, and scientists that contribute to the Scientific Assessments comprise the community in which the scientific consensus of risk is

  8. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Chakari Basin, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Thomas J.; Chornack, Michael P.; Flanagan, Sarah M.; Chalmers, Ann T.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogeology and water quality of the Chakari Basin, a 391-square-kilometer (km2) watershed near Kabul, Afghanistan, was assessed by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Afghanistan Geological Survey to provide an understanding of the water resources in an area of Afghanistan with considerable copper and other mineral resources. Water quality, chemical, and isotopic samples were collected at eight wells, four springs, one kareze, and the Chakari River in a basin-fill aquifer in the Chakari Basin by the Afghanistan Geological Survey. Results of water-quality analyses indicate that some water samples in the basin had concentrations of chemical constituents that exceeded World Health Organization guidelines for nitrate, sodium, and dissolved solids and some of the samples also had elevated concentrations of trace elements, such as copper, selenium, strontium, uranium, and zinc. Chemical and isotopic analyses, including for tritium, chlorofluorocarbons, and carbon-14, indicate that most wells contain water with a mixture of ages from young (years to decades) to old (several thousand years). Three wells contained groundwater that had modeled ages ranging from 7,200 to 7,900 years old. Recharge from precipitation directly on the basin-fill aquifer, which covers an area of about 150 km2, is likely to be very low (7 × 10-5 meters per day) or near zero. Most recharge to this aquifer is likely from rain and snowmelt on upland areas and seepage losses and infiltration of water from streams crossing the basin-fill aquifer. It is likely that the older water in the basin-fill aquifer is groundwater that has travelled along long and (or) slow flow paths through the fractured bedrock mountains surrounding the basin. The saturated basin-fill sediments in most areas of the basin are probably about 20 meters thick and may be about 30 to 60 meters thick in most areas near the center of the Chakari Basin. The combination of low recharge and little storage indicates that groundwater

  9. Watershed Influences on Residence Time and Oxygen Reduction Rates in an Agricultural Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, C. L.; Tesoriero, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural use of synthetic fertilizers and animal manure has led to increased crop production, but also elevated nitrogen concentrations in groundwater, resulting in impaired water quality. Groundwater oxygen concentrations are a key indicator of potential biogeochemical processes, which control water/aquifer interactions and contaminant transport. The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program has a long-history of studying nutrient transport and processing across the United States and the Glacial Aquifer system in particular. A series of groundwater well networks in Eastern Wisconsin is being used to evaluate the distribution of redox reaction rates over a range of scales with a focus on dissolved O2 reduction rates. An analysis of these multi-scale networks elucidates the influence of explanatory variables (i.e.: soil type, land use classification) on reduction rates and redox reactions throughout the Fox-Wolf-Peshtigo watersheds. Multiple tracers including dissolved gasses, tritium, helium, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and carbon-14 were used to estimate groundwater ages (0.8 to 61.2 yr) at over 300 locations. Our results indicate O2 reduction rates along a flowpath study area (1.2 km2) of 0.15 mg O2 L-1 yr-1 (0.12 to 0.18 mg O2 L-1 yr-1) up to 0.41 mg O2 L-1 yr-1 (0.23 to 0.89 mg O2 L-1 yr-1) for a larger scale land use study area (3,300 km2). Preliminary explanatory variables that can be used to describe the variability in reduction rates include soil type (hydrologic group, bulk density) and chemical concentrations (nitrite plus nitrate, silica). The median residence time expected to reach suboxic conditions (≤ 0.4 mg O2 L-1) for the flowpath and the land use study areas was 66 and 25 yr, respectively. These results can be used to elucidate and differentiate the impact of residence time on groundwater quality vulnerability and sustainability in agricultural regions without complex flow models.

  10. Measurement and prediction of enteric methane emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Lal, Rattan; Lakritz, Jeffrey; Ezeji, Thaddeus

    2011-01-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the agricultural sector account for about 25.5% of total global anthropogenic emission. While CO2 receives the most attention as a factor relative to global warming, CH4, N2O and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) also cause significant radiative forcing. With the relative global warming potential of 25 compared with CO2, CH4 is one of the most important GHGs. This article reviews the prediction models, estimation methodology and strategies for reducing enteric CH4 emissions. Emission of CH4 in ruminants differs among developed and developing countries, depending on factors like animal species, breed, pH of rumen fluid, ratio of acetate:propionate, methanogen population, composition of diet and amount of concentrate fed. Among the ruminant animals, cattle contribute the most towards the greenhouse effect through methane emission followed by sheep, goats and buffalos, respectively. The estimated CH4 emission rate per cattle, buffaloe, sheep and goat in developed countries are 150.7, 137, 21.9 and 13.7 (g/animal/day) respectively. However, the estimated rates in developing countries are significantly lower at 95.9 and 13.7 (g/animal/day) per cattle and sheep, respectively. There exists a strong interest in developing new and improving the existing CH4 prediction models to identify mitigation strategies for reducing the overall CH4 emissions. A synthesis of the available literature suggests that the mechanistic models are superior to empirical models in accurately predicting the CH4 emission from dairy farms. The latest development in prediction model is the integrated farm system model which is a process-based whole-farm simulation technique. Several techniques are used to quantify enteric CH4 emissions starting from whole animal chambers to sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer techniques. The latest technology developed to estimate CH4 more accurately is the micrometeorological mass difference technique. Because the conditions under which

  11. Radiative and Dynamical Feedbacks Limit the Climate Response to Extremely Large Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, D. C.; Vidal, C. M.; Keeble, J. M.; Griffiths, P. T.; Archibald, A. T.

    2017-12-01

    -poor eruption scenarios against a pre-industrial baseline climate. This has important implications for future volcanic eruptions as ClOx reduces in response to the cessation of chlorofluorocarbon emissions.

  12. Short- and Medium-term Atmospheric Effects of Very Large Solar Proton Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Vitt, Francis M.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Labow, Gordon J.; Randall, Cora E.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Funke, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Long-term variations in ozone have been caused by both natural and humankind related processes. In particular, the humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone from chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine) has led to international regulations greatly limiting the release of these substances. These anthropogenic effects on ozone are most important in polar regions and have been significant since the 1970s. Certain natural ozone influences are also important in polar regions and are caused by the impact of solar charged particles on the atmosphere. Such natural variations have been studied in order to better quantify the human influence on polar ozone. Large-scale explosions on the Sun near solar maximum lead to emissions of charged particles (mainly protons and electrons), some of which enter the Earth's magnetosphere and rain down on the polar regions. "Solar proton events" have been used to describe these phenomena since the protons associated with these solar events sometimes create a significant atmospheric disturbance. We have used the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the short- and medium-term (days to a few months) influences of solar proton events between 1963 and 2005 on stratospheric ozone. The four largest events in the past 45 years (August 1972; October 1989; July 2000; and October-November 2003) caused very distinctive polar changes in layers of the Earth's atmosphere known as the stratosphere (12-50 km; -7-30 miles) and mesosphere (50-90 km; 30-55 miles). The solar protons connected with these events created hydrogen- and nitrogen- containing compounds, which led to the polar ozone destruction. The hydrogen-containing compounds have very short lifetimes and lasted for only a few days (typically the duration of the solar proton event). On the other hand, the nitrogen-containing compounds lasted much longer, especially in the Winter. The nitrogen oxides were predicted

  13. The Long-term Middle Atmospheric Influence of Very Large Solar Proton Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Vitt, Francis M.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Randall, Cora E.; Fleming, Eric L.; Frith, Stacey M.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term variations in ozone have been caused by both natural and humankind related processes. The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone originates from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine) and has led to international regulations greatly limiting the release of these substances. Certain natural ozone influences are also important in polar regions and are caused by the impact of solar charged particles on the atmosphere. Such natural variations have been studied in order to better quantify the human influence on polar ozone. Large-scale explosions on the Sun near solar maximum lead to emissions of charged particles (mainly protons and electrons), some of which enter the Earth's magnetosphere and rain down on the polar regions. "Solar proton events" have been used to describe these phenomena since the protons associated with these solar events sometimes create a significant atmospheric disturbance. We have used the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the long-term (> few months) influences of solar proton events from 1963 through 2004 on stratospheric ozone and temperature. There were extremely large solar proton events in 1972, 1989,2000,2001, and 2003. These events caused very distinctive polar changes in layers of the Earth's atmosphere known as the stratosphere (12-50 km; -7-30 miles) and mesosphere (50-90 km; 30-55 miles). The solar protons connected with these events created hydrogen- and nitrogen-containing compounds, which led to the polar ozone destruction. The nitrogen-containing compounds, called odd nitrogen, lasted much longer than the hydrogen-containing compounds and led to long-lived stratospheric impacts. An extremely active period for these events occurred in the five-year period, 2000- 2004, and caused increases in odd nitrogen which lasted for several months after individual events. Associated stratospheric ozone decreases of >lo% were calculated

  14. THE OPPORTUNITY TO ADDRESS THE SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duduială Popescu Lorena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Its economy experienced a sharp decline, coupled with a process of deindustrialization, projected on a phase of the property. In these circumstances, to discuss the sustainable development may seem inappropriate; therefore, be taken in steps such as halting the decline of the economy and industry; the industry revitalization and growth; the development that takes place according to the criteria of sustainable development. To this must be stopped declining industrial output and output stabilization. It must be found and made the necessary conditions leading to full use of the potential of the country, to stimulate those structural changes that allow the country to fall market economy conditions. To address the main criteria for sustainable industrial development since this time of economic downturn may be several reasons such as the need to respect the provisions of international treaties to which Romania is a party. Some of them may be mentioned as: putting control of Earth's greenhouse effect, preventing damage to the ozone layer (waiving of manufacture and use of chlorofluorocarbons, transboundary pollution and protection of large water basins of the border. Each of these treaties contain provisions that are converging concept of sustainable development. The entry into the European Union implies aligning Romanian legislation in the EU The EU Council adopted a common position, relative to a plan of action intended to give a new political impetus of the fifth environmental action program. The main objective of this program is the promotion of sustainable development throughout the economy. The Action Plan identifies priority areas for action, namely: • better integration of environmental issues into policies as those of agriculture, transport, energy, industry and tourism; • further development of basic tools acting on the market and, in particular, horizontal instruments; • improving enforcement and implementation of environmental

  15. Terrace Geochemistry at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site - WM2017-17232 Initial Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautsky, Mark [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Ranalli, Tony [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dander, David [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, David [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-08

    -related activities and areas where the groundwater is associated with non-mill activities. A separate field effort of Phase II work will follow, including investigating additional locations for these isotopes and examination of δ18Osulfate , δ34Ssulfate , and chlorofluorocarbon signatures.

  16. Final report for the IAEA urban aquifers RCA : determining the effects of storm water infiltration on groundwater quality in an urban fractured rock aquifer, Auckland, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.R.; Hong, Y.S.; Sheppard, D.; Roberts, K.; Viljevac, Z.; Smaill, A.; Reeves, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    Disposal of storm water in the Mt Eden-Mt Albert area of Auckland, New Zealand, is via ''soak holes'' drilled directly into the top of the fractured basalt. These soak holes receive storm water and sediment runoff from city streets throughout Mt Eden. Although this method of disposal has been used for at least 60 years, its sustainability with respect to groundwater quality has not been addressed. This study aimed to determine the impact of soakage on the chemical and isotopic composition of the groundwater. In addition, sediments captured by the soak holes were analysed to determine their effectiveness at trapping contaminants. Groundwater samples were collected between August 1998 and August 1999. Three sampling trips were carried out after rainfall events in October 1998, April 1999 and August 1999. Samples were analysed for major and trace components, including nutrients, dissolved and total heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, and Ni), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and stable and radiogenic isotopes. Cores of sediment collected in the soak holes were analysed for major components, total and leachable heavy metals, and PAHs to determine the ability of the sediments to adsorp contaminants. In summary, the Mt Eden aquifer system shows the effect of storm water infiltration rapidly after a rainfall event in some parts of the aquifer. Water quality has been effected in some areas, but in general the water quality is quite good considering the quantity of storm water discharge that has occurred in the area for the past 60 years. The relatively high quality of the water in the wells monitored may be attributed to the ability of the accumulated sediment in the soak holes and the aquifer fractures to trap contaminants. Further research is needed to determine if continued use of the groundwater system as a conduit for storm water infiltration will lead to clogging of the fractures in the aquifer and/or transport of particulates

  17. Atmospheric Detection of Perfluorotributyl Amine, an Uncharacterized Long-Lived Greenhouse Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, A. C.; Young, C. J.; Mabury, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are trace atmospheric constituents of radiative significance. In the atmosphere, PFASs may represent a class of potent long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs) because they possess long lifetimes and exceptionally strong absorption bands in the infrared (IR) spectral region where other naturally occurring greenhouse gases (GHGs) do not absorb. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change determined the radiative forcing (RF) of halocarbons to be +0.337 [± 0.03] W m-2, accounting for 13 % of the total RF attributed to LLGHGs. Although this value claims high certainty, it does not represent the actual perturbation from all environmentally relevant PFASs. Here we present the radiative efficiency (RE) and atmospheric concentration of a previously uncharacterized and unreported PFAS, perfluorotributyl amine (PFBAm). To assess the radiative properties of PFBAm, IR spectra were acquired by Fourier transform spectroscopy at 0.25 cm-1 resolution over the spectral range 0-2500 cm-1 at 296 K. The total integrated band strength, 7.08 x 10-16 cm2 molec-1 cm-1, was used to derive the cloudy-sky, instantaneous RE assuming a 0 to 1 ppbv change in concentration.The RE of PFBAm is calculated to be 0.86 W m-2 ppb-1, exceeding the RE of SF5CF3, the most effective GHG on a per molecule basis as reported in the literature to date. To evaluate the RF of PFBAm, a highly sensitive and selective method for detection was developed and validated. PFBAm was cryogenically extracted and pre-concentrated from bulk air samples for the offline detection by a custom-designed manifold coupled to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Quantitation was achieved by external calibration with a gravimetrically prepared, matrix-matched, authentic gaseous standard. Validation of the sampling method was performed by simultaneous measurement of several legacy chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Preliminary results indicate that PFBAm is present in the

  18. Coupling 3D groundwater modeling with CFC-based age dating to classify local groundwater circulation in an unconfined crystalline aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, Tamara; Marçais, Jean; Thomas, Zahra; Abbott, Benjamin W.; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Rousseau-Gueutin, Pauline; Aquilina, Luc; Labasque, Thierry; Pinay, Gilles

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen pollution of freshwater and estuarine environments is one of the most urgent environmental crises. Shallow aquifers with predominantly local flow circulation are particularly vulnerable to agricultural contaminants. Water transit time and flow path are key controls on catchment nitrogen retention and removal capacity, but the relative importance of hydrogeological and topographical factors in determining these parameters is still uncertain. We used groundwater dating and numerical modeling techniques to assess transit time and flow path in an unconfined aquifer in Brittany, France. The 35.5 km2 study catchment has a crystalline basement underneath a ∼60 m thick weathered and fractured layer, and is separated into a distinct upland and lowland area by an 80 m-high butte. We used groundwater discharge and groundwater ages derived from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) concentration to calibrate a free-surface flow model simulating groundwater flow circulation. We found that groundwater flow was highly local (mean travel distance = 350 m), substantially smaller than the typical distance between neighboring streams (∼1 km), while CFC-based ages were quite old (mean = 40 years). Sensitivity analysis revealed that groundwater travel distances were not sensitive to geological parameters (i.e. arrangement of geological layers and permeability profile) within the constraints of the CFC age data. However, circulation was sensitive to topography in the lowland area where the water table was near the land surface, and to recharge rate in the upland area where water input modulated the free surface of the aquifer. We quantified these differences with a local groundwater ratio (rGW-LOCAL), defined as the mean groundwater travel distance divided by the mean of the reference surface distances (the distance water would have to travel across the surface of the digital elevation model). Lowland, rGW-LOCAL was near 1, indicating primarily topographical controls. Upland, r

  19. Measuring the potential of GHG emissions reductions on the food and beverage processing sector in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, M.; Ciccone, A.D.

    2000-07-01

    Seven per cent of the greenhouse gas emissions from the industrial sector in Ontario relate to the food and beverage processing sector. This report provides the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs with the ability to identify the effects of reducing greenhouse gas emissions on Ontario's food and beverage processing sector. The study was undertaken in response to Ontario's efforts to address the challenges set by the Kyoto Protocol and the proposed release of Canada's National Implementation Strategy on Climate Change. The objective of the report is to help Ontario decide if it should support a national strategy and/or ratify the Kyoto Protocol. Potential ways to meet the Kyoto commitments were also identified in the report. The study was based on an analysis of large amounts of data and information regarding the economic and technological aspects that affect the food and beverage processing industry in Ontario, including the seven major sub-sectors, located mostly in southern Ontario. The types of plants and their associated processes and fuel use were assessed to determine the size and nature of fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions for each sub-sector. The study examined end uses and base technologies for each sub-sector and compared them with energy efficient technologies and opportunities within the industry. Barriers, and how to overcome them, were also described. Ontario's results were then compared with results from Canada's Foundation Paper and Options Analysis prepared for the Agriculture and Agri-Food Table on Climate Change. It was determined that the primary source of greenhouse gases for the industry comes from the use of energy directly from the combustion of fossil fuels and indirectly from the use of electricity. The contributions to greenhouse gases through chlorofluorocarbons or through waste stream is small and shrinking. It was concluded that mitigation strategies should concentrate on energy conservation through energy

  20. Italian WEEE management system and treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments for CFCs removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansotera, M., E-mail: maurizio.sansotera@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Navarrini, W. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Talaeemashhadi, S.; Venturini, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Italian data about WEEE management in the period 2005–2010 have been reported. • In 2001–2004 CFC release was monitored and Po Valley resulted as main source region. • The Italian directive on WEEE management was enacted in 2005 but took effect in 2008. • The CFC analytic procedures of the audit assessments have been discussed. - Abstract: This study presents and analyzes the data of the Italian system for take-back and recovery of waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEEs) in the start-up period 2008–2010. The analysis was focused particularly on the data about the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments. In fact, the wastes of cooling and freezing equipments have a high environmental impact. Indeed, in their compressor oil and insulation polyurethane (PU) foams chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) ozone-depleting gases are still present. In the period 2001–2004 Northern Italy resulted the main source in Europe of CFCs. The European Directive on WEEE management was enacted in 2002, but in Italy it was implemented by the legislative Decree in 2005 and it became operational in 2008. Actually, in 2008 the national WEEE Coordination Centre was founded in order to organize the WEEE pick-up process and to control collection, recovery and recycling targets. As a result, in 2010 the average WEEE collection per capita exceeded the threshold of more than 4 kg per inhabitant, as well as cooling and freezing appliances represented more than one fourth of the Italian WEEE collection stream. During the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments, CFCs were recovered and disposed principally by burner methods. The analyses of defined specimens collected in the treatment facilities were standardized to reliably determine the amount of recovered CFCs. Samples of alkaline solid salt, alkaline saline solution, polyurethane matrix and compressor oil collected during the audit assessment procedure were analyzed and the results

  1. Stratospheric ozone measurements at Arosa (Switzerland): history and scientific relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehelin, Johannes; Viatte, Pierre; Stübi, Rene; Tummon, Fiona; Peter, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Climatic Observatory (LKO) in Arosa (Switzerland), marking the beginning of the world's longest series of total (or column) ozone measurements. They were driven by the recognition that atmospheric ozone is important for human health, as well as by scientific curiosity about what was, at the time, an ill characterised atmospheric trace gas. From around the mid-1950s to the beginning of the 1970s studies of high atmosphere circulation patterns that could improve weather forecasting was justification for studying stratospheric ozone. In the mid-1970s, a paradigm shift occurred when it became clear that the damaging effects of anthropogenic ozone-depleting substances (ODSs), such as long-lived chlorofluorocarbons, needed to be documented. This justified continuing the ground-based measurements of stratospheric ozone. Levels of ODSs peaked around the mid-1990s as a result of a global environmental policy to protect the ozone layer, implemented through the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its subsequent amendments and adjustments. Consequently, chemical destruction of stratospheric ozone started to slow around the mid-1990s. To some extent, this raises the question as to whether continued ozone observation is indeed necessary. In the last decade there has been a tendency to reduce the costs associated with making ozone measurements globally including at Arosa. However, the large natural variability in ozone on diurnal, seasonal, and interannual scales complicates the capacity for demonstrating the success of the Montreal Protocol. Chemistry-climate models also predict a super-recovery of the ozone layer at mid-latitudes in the second half of this century, i.e. an increase of ozone concentrations beyond pre-1970 levels, as a consequence of ongoing climate change. These factors, and identifying potentially unexpected stratospheric responses to climate change, support the continued need to document stratospheric ozone changes. This is particularly valuable at the Arosa site, due

  2. Flow of river water into a karstic limestone aquifer-2. Dating the young fraction in groundwater mixtures in the Upper Floridan aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E. [U.S. Geological Survey, 432 National Center, Reston, VA (United States); Drenkard, S.; Schlosser, P.; Ekwurzel, B.; Weppernig, R. [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY (United States); McConnell, J.B. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3039 Amwiler Rd., Atlanta, GA (United States); Michel, R.L. [U.S. Geological Survey, Mail Stop 434, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Tritium/helium-3 ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFCs, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) data are used to date the young fraction in groundwater mixtures from a karstic limestone aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia, where regional paleowater in the Upper Floridan aquifer receives recharge from two young sources-the flow of Withlacoochee River water through sinkholes in the river bed, and leakage of infiltration water through post-Eocene semi-confining beds above the Upper Floridan aquifer. In dating the young fraction of mixtures using CFCs, it is necessary to reconstruct the CFC concentration that was in the young fraction prior to mixing. The {sup 3}H/{sup 3}He age is independent of the extent of dilution with older ({sup 3}H-free and {sup 3}He{sub trit}-free) water. The groundwater mixtures are designated as Type-1 for mixtures of regional paleowater and regional infiltration water and Type-2 for mixtures containing more than approximately 4% of river water. The fractions of regional paleowater, regional infiltration water, and Withlacoochee River water in the groundwater mixtures were determined from Cl{sup -} and {delta}{sup 18}O data for water from the Upper Floridan aquifer at Valdosta, Georgia.The chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 and CFC-113 are removed by microbial degradation and/or sorption processes in most anaerobic (Type-2) groundwater at Valdosta, but are present in some aerobic Type-1 water. CFC-12 persists in both SO{sub 4}-reducing and methanogenic water. The very low detection limits for CFCs (approximately 0.3 pg kg{sup -1}) permitted CFC-11 and CFC-12 dating of the fraction of regional infiltration water in Type-1 mixtures, and CFC-12 dating of the river-water fraction in Type-2 mixtures. Overall, approximately 50% of the 85 water samples obtained from the Upper Floridan aquifer have CFC-12-based ages of the young fraction that are consistent with the {sup 3}H concentration of the groundwater. Because of uncertainties associated with very low {sup 3}H

  3. Emission estimates for some acidifying and greenhouse gases and options for their control in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipatti, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1998-11-01

    effective greenhouse gases, the most important of which are the HFCs. The emission estimates and impact analyses suggest that the importance of the HFCs could become more significant in the next century if the emissions are allowed to grow unrestricted. The Finnish non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas emissions contribute significantly to the anthropogenic greenhouse impact caused by the Finnish emissions. In the future the impact caused by the CO{sub 2} emissions will grow in importance compared with the non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases. The warming impact caused by methane, CFCs and HCFCs is estimated to decrease, whereas that of N{sub 2}O and HFCs is expected to grow. (orig.) 79 refs.

  4. Halogenated source gases measured by FTIR at the Jungfraujoch station: updated trends and new target species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Emmanuel; Bader, Whitney; Bovy, Benoît; Franco, Bruno; Lejeune, Bernard; Servais, Christian; Notholt, Justus; Palm, Mathias; Toon, Geoffrey C.

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric abundances of chlorine and fluorine increased very significantly during the second half of last century, following large emissions of long-lived halogenated source gases used in numerous industrial and domestic applications. Given the phase-out schedule of ozone depleting substances adopted by the Montreal Protocol, its Amendments and Adjustments, the loading of the CFCs in the Earth's atmosphere is now slowly decreasing. In contrast, their first replacement products, the HCFCs, are still on the rise, with current rates of increase substantially larger than at the beginning of the 21st century. As potent greenhouse gases, a suite of fluorinated compounds are targeted by the Kyoto Protocol. At present, they continue to accumulate in the atmosphere (Montzka et al., 2011). Given their environmental impacts, continuous monitoring of the abundances of these gases is of primary importance. In addition to the in situ networks, remote sensing techniques operated from space, balloon or from the ground provide valuable information to assess the long-term tropospheric and lower stratospheric trends of an increasing number of halogenated source gases, as well as of the reservoirs resulting from their photolysis in the stratosphere (e.g. Mahieu et al., 2014a). In this contribution, we will present decadal time series of halogenated source gases monitored at the high altitude station of the Jungfraujoch (46.5° N, 8° E, 3580 m asl) with Fourier Transform Infared (FTIR) spectrometers, within the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, see http://www.ndacc.org). Total column trends presented in previous studies for CFC-11, -12 and HCFC-22 (Zander at al., 2008), CCl4 (Rinsland et al., 2012), HCFC-142b (Mahieu et al., 2013), CF4 (Mahieu et al., 2014b) and SF6 (Zander et al., 2008) will be updated using the latest available Jungfraujoch solar observations. Investigations dealing with the definition of approaches to

  5. Ground-Water Flow Direction, Water Quality, Recharge Sources, and Age, Great Sand Dunes National Monument, South-Central Colorado, 2000-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, Niel

    2004-01-01

    Great Sand Dunes National Monument is located in south-central Colorado along the eastern edge of the San Luis Valley. The Great Sand Dunes National Monument contains the tallest sand dunes in North America; some rise up to750 feet. Important ecological features of the Great Sand Dunes National Monument are palustrine wetlands associated with interdunal ponds and depressions along the western edge of the dune field. The existence and natural maintenance of the dune field and the interdunal ponds are dependent on maintaining ground-water levels at historic elevations. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study, in collaboration with the National Park Service, of ground-water flow direction, water quality, recharge sources, and age at the Great Sand Dunes National Monument. A shallow unconfined aquifer and a deeper confined aquifer are the two principal aquifers at the Great Sand Dunes National Monument. Ground water in the unconfined aquifer is recharged from Medano and Sand Creeks near the Sangre de Cristo Mountain front, flows underneath the main dune field, and discharges to Big and Little Spring Creeks. The percentage of calcium in ground water in the unconfined aquifer decreases and the percentage of sodium increases because of ionic exchange with clay minerals as the ground water flows underneath the dune field. It takes more than 60 years for the ground water to flow from Medano and Sand Creeks to Big and Little Spring Creeks. During this time, ground water in the upper part of the unconfined aquifer is recharged by numerous precipitation events. Evaporation of precipitation during recharge prior to reaching the water table causes enrichment in deuterium (2H) and oxygen-18 (18O) relative to waters that are not evaporated. This recharge from precipitation events causes the apparent ages determined using chlorofluorocarbons and tritium to become younger, because relatively young precipitation water is mixing with older waters

  6. Preliminary assessment of water chemistry related to groundwater flooding in Wawarsing, New York, 2009-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig J.; Eckhardt, David A.; Stumm, Frederick; Chu, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Water-quality samples collected in an area prone to groundwater flooding in Wawarsing, New York, were analyzed and assessed to better understand the hydrologic system and to aid in the assessment of contributing water sources. Above average rainfall over the past decade, and the presence of a pressurized water tunnel that passes about 700 feet beneath Wawarsing, could both contribute to groundwater flooding. Water samples were collected from surface-water bodies, springs, and wells and analyzed for major and trace inorganic constituents, dissolved gases, age tracers, and stable isotopes. Distinct differences in chemistry exist between tunnel water and groundwater in unconsolidated deposits and in bedrock, and among groundwater samples collected from some bedrock wells during high head pressure and low head pressure of the Rondout-West Branch Tunnel. Samples from bedrock wells generally had relatively higher concentrations of sulfate (SO42-), strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), and lower concentrations of calcium (Ca) and bicarbonate (HCO3-), as compared to unconsolidated wells. Differences in stable-isotope ratios among oxygen-18 to oxygen-16 (δ18O), hydrogen-2 to hydrogen-1 (δ2H), sulfur-34 to sulfur-32(δ34S) of SO42-, Sr-87 to Sr-86 (87Sr/86Sr), and C-13 to C-12 (δ13C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) indicate a potential for distinguishing water in the Delaware-West Branch Tunnel from native groundwater. For example, 87Sr/86Sr ratios were more depleted in groundwater samples from most bedrock wells, as compared to samples from surface-water sources, springs, and wells screened in unconsolidated deposits in the study area. Age-tracer data provided useful information on pathways of the groundwater-flow system, but were limited by inherent problems with dissolved gases in bedrock wells. The sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and (or) chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) apparent recharge years of most water samples from wells screened in unconsolidated deposits and springs ranged

  7. Recharge Area, Base-Flow and Quick-Flow Discharge Rates and Ages, and General Water Quality of Big Spring in Carter County, Missouri, 2000-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imes, Jeffrey L.; Plummer, Niel; Kleeschulte, Michael J.; Schumacher, John G.

    2007-01-01

    during the period of record (water years 1922 through 2004) was 1,170 cubic feet per second on December 7, 1982. The daily mean water temperature of Big Spring was monitored during water years 2001 through 2004 and showed little variability, ranging from 13 to 15? C (degree Celsius). Water temperatures generally vary less than 1? C throughout the year. The warmest temperatures occur during October and November and decrease until April, indicating Big Spring water temperature does show a slight seasonal variation. The use of the traditional hydrograph separation program HYSEP to determine the base flow and quick flow or runoff components at Big Spring failed to yield base-flow and quick-flow discharge curves that matched observations of spring characteristics. Big Spring discharge data were used in combination with specific conductance data to develop an improved hydrograph separation method for the spring. The estimated annual mean quick flow ranged from 15 to 48 cubic feet per second for the HYSEP analysis and ranged from 26 to 154 cubic feet per second for the discharge and specific conductance method for water years 2001 to 2004. Using the discharge and specific conductance method, the estimated base-flow component rises abruptly as the spring hydrograph rises, attains a peak value on the same day as the discharge peak, and then declines abruptly from its peak value. Several days later, base flow begins to increase again at an approximately linear trend, coinciding with the time at which the percentage of quick flow has reached a maximum after each recharge-induced discharge peak. The interval between the discharge peak and the peak in percentage quick flow ranges from 8 to 11 days for seven hydrograph peaks, consistent with quick-flow traveltime estimates by dye-trace tests from the mature karst Hurricane Creek Basin in the central part of the recharge area. Concentrations of environmental tracers chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs: CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113)

  8. Hydrogen emissions and their effects on the arctic ozone losses. Risk analysis of a global hydrogen economy; Wasserstoff-Emissionen und ihre Auswirkungen auf den arktischen Ozonverlust. Risikoanalyse einer globalen Wasserstoffwirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feck, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) could be used as one of the major components in our future energy supply in an effort to avoid greenhouse gas emissions. ''Green'' hydrogen in particular, which is produced from renewable energy sources, should significantly reduce emissions that damage the climate. Despite this basically environmentally-friendly property, however, the complex chain of interactions of hydrogen with other compounds means that the implications for the atmosphere must be analysed in detail. For example, H{sub 2} emissions, which could increase the tropospheric H{sub 2} inventory, can be released throughout the complete hydrogen process chain. H{sub 2} enters the stratosphere via the tropical tropopause and is oxidised there to form water vapour (H{sub 2}O). This extra water vapour causes increased radiation in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum and thus causes the stratosphere to cool down. Both the increase in H{sub 2}O and the resulting cooling down of the stratosphere encourage the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) and liquid sulphate aerosols, which facilitate the production of reactive chlorine, which in turn currently leads to dramatic ozone depletion in the polar stratosphere. In the future, H{sub 2} emissions from a global hydrogen economy could therefore encourage stratospheric ozone depletion in the polar regions and thus inhibit the ozone layer in recovering from the damage caused by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). In addition to estimating possible influences on the trace gas composition of the stratosphere, one of the main aims of this thesis is to evaluate the risk associated with increased polar ozone depletion caused by additional H{sub 2} emissions. Studies reported on here have shown that even if around 90% of today's fossil primary energy input was to be replaced by hydrogen and if around 9.5% of the gas was to escape in a ''worst-case'' scenario, the additional ozone loss for unchanged CFC loading in the stratosphere

  9. Simulations of groundwater flow, transport, and age in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for a study of transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants (TANC) to public-supply wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Vulnerability to contamination from manmade and natural sources can be characterized by the groundwater-age distribution measured in a supply well and the associated implications for the source depths of the withdrawn water. Coupled groundwater flow and transport models were developed to simulate the transport of the geochemical age-tracers carbon-14, tritium, and three chlorofluorocarbon species to public-supply wells in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A separate, regional-scale simulation of transport of carbon-14 that used the flow-field computed by a previously documented regional groundwater flow model was calibrated and used to specify the initial concentrations of carbon-14 in the local-scale transport model. Observations of the concentrations of each of the five chemical species, in addition to water-level observations and measurements of intra-borehole flow within a public-supply well, were used to calibrate parameters of the local-scale groundwater flow and transport models. The calibrated groundwater flow model simulates the mixing of “young” groundwater, which entered the groundwater flow system after 1950 as recharge at the water table, with older resident groundwater that is more likely associated with natural contaminants. Complexity of the aquifer system in the zone of transport between the water table and public-supply well screens was simulated with a geostatistically generated stratigraphic realization based upon observed lithologic transitions at borehole control locations. Because effective porosity was simulated as spatially uniform, the simulated age tracers are more efficiently transported through the portions of the simulated aquifer with relatively higher simulated hydraulic conductivity. Non-pumping groundwater wells with long screens that connect aquifer intervals having different hydraulic heads can provide alternate pathways for contaminant transport that are faster than the advective transport through the aquifer material. Simulation of

  10. Atmospheric Science and the CFC Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Industry involvement with developing atmospheric science and subsequent regulations to protect ozone was unusual. Chlorofluorocarbon manufacturers were research-based businesses accustomed to understanding the science behind product-related issues. When Lovelock's measurements in 1971 implied most of the cumulative production of CFCs remained in the atmosphere, global CFC producers funded academic research to identify natural sinks for the materials. The Fluorocarbon Program Panel (FPP) began in 1972, but changed focus to atmospheric photochemistry following Rowland and Molina's work in 1974. Despite early vociferous opposition, especially by the CFC-using aerosol industry, to any regulations, leaders among the producers worked to build their scientific understanding, expanding FPP funding and launching internal work in modeling and ozone trend analysis. The key first question for industry was not how much depletion might occur, but whether it would occur at all. If so, regardless of the amount, regulations and a major transition would be required in CFC-using industries, and the response would need to be global and prompt. So long as that basic question was in doubt, some businesses and countries would resist the economic cost of action. In the meantime, the producing industry worked to identify potential alternatives and to communicate atmospheric science to the downstream industries. Although the industry science effort was often disparaged as an attack on "real" science, my only assignment when I joined DuPont's Central Research Department in 1979 was to understand and contribute to the science, keeping both the company and our customers informed. Our modeling results were published freely. FPP funding led to better knowledge of the ClO + O rate constant, significantly increasing depletion in model calculations; supported the development of the techniques used to measure in situ atmospheric ClO, so important in later strengthening the case for chlorine

  11. Tropospheric observations of CFC-114 and CFC-114a with a focus on long-term trends and emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Laube

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs are ozone-depleting substances as well as strong greenhouse gases, and the control of their production and use under the Montreal Protocol has had demonstrable benefits to both mitigation of increasing surface UV radiation and climate forcing. A global ban on consumption came into force in 2010, but there is evidence of continuing emissions of certain CFCs from a range of sources. One compound has received little attention in the literature, namely CFC-114 (C2Cl2F4. Of particular interest here is the differentiation between CFC-114 (CClF2CClF2 and its asymmetric isomeric form CFC-114a (CF3CCl2F as atmospheric long-term measurements in the peer-reviewed literature to date have been assumed to represent the sum of both isomers with a time-invariant isomeric speciation. Here we report the first long-term measurements of the two isomeric forms separately, and find that they have different origins and trends in the atmosphere. Air samples collected at Cape Grim (41° S, Australia, during atmospheric background conditions since 1978, combined with samples collected from deep polar snow (firn enable us to obtain a near-complete record of both gases since their initial production and release in the 1940s. Both isomers were present in the unpolluted atmosphere in comparably small amounts before 1960. The mixing ratio of CFC-114 doubled from 7.9 to 14.8 parts per trillion (ppt between the start of the Cape Grim record in 1978 and the end of our record in 2014, while over the same time CFC-114a trebled from 0.35 to 1.03 ppt. Mixing ratios of both isomers are slowly decreasing by the end of this period. This is consistent with measurements of recent aircraft-based samples showing no significant interhemispheric mixing ratio gradient. We also find that the fraction of CFC-114a mixing ratio relative to that of CFC-114 increased from 4.2 to 6.9 % over the 37-year period. This contradicts the current tacit assumption used in

  12. Tropospheric observations of CFC-114 and CFC-114a with a focus on long-term trends and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Johannes C.; Hanif, Norfazrin Mohd; Martinerie, Patricia; Gallacher, Eileen; Fraser, Paul J.; Langenfelds, Ray; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Schwander, Jakob; Witrant, Emmanuel; Wang, Jia-Lin; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Gooch, Lauren J.; Reeves, Claire E.; Sturges, William T.; Oram, David E.

    2016-12-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are ozone-depleting substances as well as strong greenhouse gases, and the control of their production and use under the Montreal Protocol has had demonstrable benefits to both mitigation of increasing surface UV radiation and climate forcing. A global ban on consumption came into force in 2010, but there is evidence of continuing emissions of certain CFCs from a range of sources. One compound has received little attention in the literature, namely CFC-114 (C2Cl2F4). Of particular interest here is the differentiation between CFC-114 (CClF2CClF2) and its asymmetric isomeric form CFC-114a (CF3CCl2F) as atmospheric long-term measurements in the peer-reviewed literature to date have been assumed to represent the sum of both isomers with a time-invariant isomeric speciation. Here we report the first long-term measurements of the two isomeric forms separately, and find that they have different origins and trends in the atmosphere. Air samples collected at Cape Grim (41° S), Australia, during atmospheric background conditions since 1978, combined with samples collected from deep polar snow (firn) enable us to obtain a near-complete record of both gases since their initial production and release in the 1940s. Both isomers were present in the unpolluted atmosphere in comparably small amounts before 1960. The mixing ratio of CFC-114 doubled from 7.9 to 14.8 parts per trillion (ppt) between the start of the Cape Grim record in 1978 and the end of our record in 2014, while over the same time CFC-114a trebled from 0.35 to 1.03 ppt. Mixing ratios of both isomers are slowly decreasing by the end of this period. This is consistent with measurements of recent aircraft-based samples showing no significant interhemispheric mixing ratio gradient. We also find that the fraction of CFC-114a mixing ratio relative to that of CFC-114 increased from 4.2 to 6.9 % over the 37-year period. This contradicts the current tacit assumption used in international climate

  13. Efficacy and safety of ipratropium bromide/salbutamol sulphate administered in a hydrofluoroalkane metered-dose inhaler for the treatment of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Amal Bhattacharya,1 Salil Bhargava,2 Virendra Singh,3 Deepak Talwar,4 Jagdeep Whig,5 Juliet Rebello,6 Shrinivas Purandare,6 Jaideep Gogtay6 1Department of Medicine, MP Shah Medical College, Jamnager, Gujarat, 2Tuberculosis and Chest Diseases, MGM Medical College, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, 3Pulmonary Division, SMS Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, 4Respiratory Diseases, Metro Hospital and Heart Institute, Noida, Uttar Pradesh, 5Department of Medicine, Dayanand Medical College & Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab, 6Clinical Research Department, Cipla Ltd, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Background: The use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs has contributed to the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer resulting in serious health concerns. Ipratropium bromide/salbutamol sulphate CFC-pressurized metered-dose inhalers (IB/SAL-CFC pMDI have been in widespread use for many years without any apparent ill consequences. This combination has now been reformulated using the hydrofluoroalkane (HFA propellant. This study sought to establish the clinical noninferiority of a new HFA-containing IB/SAL pMDI to the conventional IB/SAL-CFC pMDI in subjects with mild/moderate COPD.Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter study in two consecutive periods: a 14-day run-in period followed by a 85-day treatment period. Eligible mild-to-moderate stable COPD subjects aged 40-75 years were enrolled into the study and entered the run-in period during which subjects withdrew all the bronchodilators, except for salbutamol as rescue medication. Subjects were randomized to 85 days treatment with either IB/SAL-HFA or IB/SAL-CFC, 20 µg qid.Results: Of the 290 randomized patients, 249 completed the study. The primary efficacy variable was the change in forced expiratory volume in one second from predose to 60 minutes after dosing on day 85. At the end of the treatment period, the adjusted mean change in forced expiratory volume in one second at 60 minutes was 123

  14. Evaluating 10B-enriched Boric Acid, Bromide, and Heat as Tracers of Recycled Groundwater Flow near MAR Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, T.; Clark, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Coupled with the unpredictability of a changing climate, the projected growth in human population over the next century requires new and innovative ways to augment already-depleted water supplies. An increasingly popular and promising development is managed aquifer recharge (MAR), a cost-effective method of intentionally storing potable water in groundwater aquifers at engineered sites worldwide. Reclaimed (or recycled) water, defined as cleaned and treated wastewater, will account for a larger portion of MAR water in future years. A crucial component for managing groundwater recharged with reclaimed water is its subsurface travel time. The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), with the most recent draft of regulations issued on November 21, 2011, requires the application of groundwater tracers to demonstrate subsurface residence time. Residence time increases the quality of reclaimed water via soil-aquifer treatment (SAT), which includes mechanisms such as sorption, biological degradation, and microbial inactivation to remove potential contaminants or pathogens. This study addresses the need for an appropriate tracer to determine groundwater residence times near MAR facilities. Standard shallow groundwater dating techniques, such as T/3He and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) methods, cannot be used because their uncertainties are typically ± 2 years, longer than the target CDPH retention time of ~6 months. These methods also cannot map preferential flow paths. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), a nonreactive synthetic gas, is well-established as a deliberate tracer for determining subsurface travel time; however, SF6 is a very strong greenhouse gas and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) is regulating its emission. Other tracers, such as noble gas isotopes, that have successfully determined subsurface retention times are impractical due to their high cost. A multi-tracer experiment at the San Gabriel Spreading Grounds test basin (Montebello Forebay, Los Angeles

  15. Influence of the meteorological parameters on CFCs and SF6 concentration in the air of Krakow, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielewski, Jarosław; Najman, Joanna; Śliwka, Ireneusz; Bartyzel, Jakub; Rosiek, Janusz

    2013-04-01

    key words: gas chromatography, trace gases, CFCs and SF6 measurements in urban area. Halogenated compounds (chlorofluorocarbons-CFCs), both natural and industrial, so-called freons, currently exist as trace gases in the entire human environment. The CFCs cause ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Moreover CFCs and SF6 take part in intensification of the greenhouse effect. The decisions of the Vienna Convention (1985) and of the Montreal Protocol (1987) limited the world production level of CFCs in the year 1989 at least 35% after 2004, 90% after 2015 and total reduction after year 2030. On account of international agreements, the measurements of CFCs and SF6 in air were started. Measurement "clean" stations were situated at places outside of urban areas influence and gathered on world program - AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment). One of these stations is Mace Head (Ireland, 53o N, 10o W), which participates in AGAGE since 1987 [1] and in European InGOS (Integrated non-CO2 Greenhouse gas Observing System) program since 2011. Similar research is also conducted in Central Europe, in urban area of Krakow (Poland, 50o N, 19o E) since 1997. The work discusses results from 15 years of concentration measurements (in the years 1997-2012) of selected halocarbons and SF6 in Krakow. To obtain concentrations of measured compounds the mathematical procedure has been used, where concentrations were calculated using a five points Lagrange's interpolation method. Using temporary measurement data were determined daily arithmetic means and their standard deviations. Based on these data, efficiency of Montreal Protocol legislation, implemented in Poland (The Journal of Laws No. 52) could be assessed [2]. Additionally cut-off filtration method was used to estimate trend of the base line of individual air pollutant. Rejected exceedances of base lines were corelated with meteorological characteristics of Krakow region to evaluate possible sources of pollution. The

  16. Mean Residence Time and Emergency Drinking Water Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralik, Martin; Humer, Franko

    2013-04-01

    Mean Residence Times (MRTs) of the raw water of drinking water supplies is the measurement of the water-isotopes (oxygen-18, hydrogen-2 and tritium (3H)). The traceability and the quality oft he lumped model calculation is based on the quality and the density of input (meteorological) stations in the region with monthly measurements. In addition, noble gas measurements in the groundwater (helium-3, krypton-85) and of industrial tracer gases (chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and sulphurhexaflorid (SF6)) are important tools to estimate the MRTs of the raw water in the aquifers. To exclude the presence of small amounts of very recent waters, which are in cases of accidents some times heavily polluted, the raw water is tested for natural radionuclides (beryllium-7 or sulphur-35) with very short half-life or artificial fluorescence tracers. In addition, the estimate of the MRTs of groundwater is an essential part of the vulnerability assessment of drinking water supplies due to climate change impacts (frequency of droughts and floods in the recharge area) and offers a valuable tool to specify a sustainable water abstraction. The applicability of this approach was tested in several springs and groundwater monitoring wells used for raw water abstraction for drinking water supply in Austria.

  17. Estimate of anthropogenic halocarbon emission based on measured ratio relative to CO in the Pearl River Delta region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a GC/FID/MS system, we analyzed the mixing ratio of 16 halocarbon species in more than 100 air samples collected in 2004 from the Pearl River Delta (PRD region of southern China. The results revealed that there are elevated mixing ratios for most of halocarbons, especially for HClC = CCl2 (trichloroethylene, TCE, CH2Cl2 (dichloromethane, DCM, CH3 Br (bromomethane, HCFC-22, CHCl3 (trichloromethane, CCl4 (tetrachloromethane, Cl2C = CCl2 (perchloroethylene, PCE, CH3CCl3 (methyl chloroform, MCF, and CFC-12. Comparisons were done with the data from TRACE-P and ALE/GAGE/AGAGE experiments, we found that the large variability in mixing ratios (relative standard deviation ranged from 9.31 % to 96.55 % of the halocarbons suggested substantial local emissions from the PRD region in 2004. Correlations between the mixing ratio of each species and carbon monoxide (CO was examined, and then the emission of each halocarbon was quantified based on scaling the optimized CO emission inventory with the slope of the regression line fitted to each species relative to CO. The calculated results revealed that mass of CH2Cl2 (7.0 Gg, CH3CCl3 (6.7 Gg, and Cl2C = CCl2 (2.3 Gg accounted for about 62.9 % of total halocarbon emissions, it suggested a significant contribution from solvent use in the PRD region. Emissions of HCFC-22 (3.5 Gg, an alternative refrigerant to chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs, were about 2.3 times greater than those of CFC-12 (1.6 Gg. CFC-12 and HCFC-22 accounted for 21.5 % of total emissions of halocarbons, so that the refrigerant would be the second largest source of halocarbons. However, the ratio approach found only minor emissions of CFCs, such as CFC-11, and the emission of CFC-114 and CFC-113 were close to zero. Emissions of other anthropogenic halocarbons, such as CCl

  18. The effect of heat and mass transfer on the cellular plastic insulation and the long-term aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Youchen [VTT Building Technology, Espoo (Finland). Building Physics, Building Services and Fire Technology

    1997-12-31

    To produce environmental-friendly products, foamed plastic industries are facing the challenge to replace the traditional blowing agents chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) with zero ozone depletion potential (ODP) alternatives. After a series of studies were completed, more understandings and new findings have been achieved with respect to the rigid closed-cell cellular plastic insulations or foamed plastic insulations (FPIs). The mechanism of heat transfer within the FPIs was examined. A new formula for calculating the solid polymer matrix thermal conductivity has been deduced based on the law of energy conservation and Fourier equation of heat conduction. All the parameters involved in this formula can be easily measured. By comparing the simulation results with measurements, the Brokaw equation is recommended for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of a cell-gas mixture. The foamed plastic deformation was also discussed. A new model has been established for predicting the elastic modulus of the foamed plastics. In comparison to the published measurements, it was found that the new model gives fairly good results. A diffusion chamber has been designed and constructed for measuring the gaseous transport properties within the FPIs. To overcome the difficulties of the traditional method, a new measurement procedure and post test data treatment have been suggested. The measurement accuracy is equivalent to the traditional method with an exception of much short time being required. The diffusion coefficients of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} within five n-pentane/CO{sub 2} based polyurethane (PUR) foams have been obtained from the diffusion chamber tests. Measurements showed that the relationship between the gaseous diffusion coefficients within FPIs and temperature follows the Arrhenius type. No identical relationship between diffusion coefficients and foam density was reached. To predict the long-term aging property of CFC-free foamed plastic insulations, a two

  19. Estimation of transit times in a Karst Aquifer system using environmental tracers: Application on the Jeita Aquifer system-Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doummar, Joanna; Hamdan, Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Estimating transit times is essential for the assessment of aquifer vulnerability to contaminants. Groundwater in karst aquifer is assumed to be relatively young due to fast preferential pathways; slow flow components are present in water stored in the fissured matrix. Furthermore, transit times are site specific as they depend on recharge rates, temperatures, elevation, and flow media; saturated and unsaturated zones. These differences create significant variation in the groundwater age in karst systems as the water sampled will be a mix of different water that has been transported through different flow pathways (fissured matrix and conduits). Several methods can be applied to estimate water transit time of an aquifer such as artificial tracers, which provide an estimate for fast flow velocities. In this study, groundwater residence times in the Jeita spring aquifer (Lebanon) were estimated using several environmental tracers such as Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6), Helium-Tritium (3H, 3H- 3He). Additional stable isotope and major ion analysis was performed to characterize water types. Groundwater samples were collected from six different wells in the Jeita catchment area (Jurassic Kesrouane aquifer) as well as from the spring and cave itself. The results are reproducible for the Tritium-Helium method, unlike for the CFC/SF6 methods that yielded poor results due to sampling problems. Tritium concentrations in all groundwater samples show nearly the same concentration (~2.73 TU) except for one sample with relatively lower tritium concentration (~2.26 TU). Ages ranging from 0.07 ± 0.07 years to 23.59 ± 0.00 years were obtained. The youngest age is attributed to the spring/ cave while the oldest ages were obtained in wells tapping the fissured matrix. Neon in these samples showed considerable variations and high delta Ne in some samples indicating high excess air. Four (4) samples showed extreme excess air (Delta-Ne is greater than 70 %) and

  20. Preliminary estimates of residence times and apparent ages of ground water in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and water-quality data from a survey of springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focazio, Michael J.; Plummer, Niel; Bohlke, John K.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Bachman, L. Joseph; Powars, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the residence times of the ground-water systems in Chesapeake Bay watershed helps resource managers anticipate potential delays between implementation of land-management practices and any improve-ments in river and estuary water quality. This report presents preliminary estimates of ground-water residence times and apparent ages of water in the shallow aquifers of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. A simple reservoir model, published data, and analyses of spring water were used to estimate residence times and apparent ages of ground-water discharge. Ranges of aquifer hydraulic characteristics throughout the Bay watershed were derived from published literature and were used to estimate ground-water residence times on the basis of a simple reservoir model. Simple combinations of rock type and physiographic province were used to delineate hydrogeomorphic regions (HGMR?s) for the study area. The HGMR?s are used to facilitate organization and display of the data and analyses. Illustrations depicting the relation of aquifer characteristics and associated residence times as a continuum for each HGMR were developed. In this way, the natural variation of aquifer characteristics can be seen graphically by use of data from selected representative studies. Water samples collected in September and November 1996, from 46 springs throughout the watershed were analyzed for chlorofluorocarbons (CFC?s) to estimate the apparent age of ground water. For comparison purposes, apparent ages of water from springs were calculated assuming piston flow. Additi-onal data are given to estimate apparent ages assuming an exponential distribution of ages in spring discharge. Additionally, results from previous studies of CFC-dating of ground water from other springs and wells in the watershed were compiled. The CFC data, and the data on major ions, nutrients, and nitrogen isotopes in the water collected from the 46 springs are included in this report. The apparent ages of water

  1. Hydrogeologic Investigation, Water Chemistry Analysis, and Model Delineation of contributing Areas for City of Tallahassee Public-Supply Wells, Tallahassee, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. Hal; Katz, Brian G.

    2007-01-01

    Ground water from the Upper Floridan aquifer is the sole source of water supply for Tallahassee, Florida, and the surrounding area. The City of Tallahassee (the City) currently operates 28 water-supply wells; 26 wells are distributed throughout the City and 2 are located in Woodville, Florida. Most of these wells yield an ample supply of potable water; however, water from several wells has low levels of tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The City removes the PCE from the water by passing it through granular-activated carbon units before distribution. To ensure that water-supply wells presently free of contamination remain clean, it is necessary to understand the ground-water flow system in sufficient detail to protect the contributing areas. Ground-water samples collected from four public-supply wells were analyzed for tritium (3H), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Using data for the CFC compounds, apparent ground-water ages ranged from 7 to 31 years. For SF6, the apparent ages tended to be about 5 to 10 years younger than those from CFCs. Apparent ages based on the tritium/tritiogenic helium-3 (3H/3Hetrit) method ranged from 26 to 33 years. The three dating methods indicate that the apparent age of ground water generally decreases from northern to southern Leon County. This southward trend of decreasing ages is consistent with increasing amounts of recharge that occur as ground water moves from north to south. The ground-water age data derived by geochemical and tracer analyses were used in combination with the flow model and particle tracking to determine an effective porosity for the Hawthorn clays and Upper Floridan aquifer. The effective porosities for the Upper Floridan aquifer that resulted in best model matches were averaged to produce an effective porosity of 7 percent, and the effective porosities for the Hawthorn clays that resulted in a match were averaged to produce an effective porosity of 22 percent. Probabilistic contributing areas

  2. Preparing for climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdgate, M

    1989-01-01

    chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been released in great quantities through their use in aerosol sprays, refrigerator fluids, and insulating foams. We can get rid of CFCs and curb the pollutants generating ozone, but it will be difficult to put the brake on either methane or nitrous oxide. And the reduction in carbon dioxide emissions will demand major changes in energy policy as well as action to slow deforestation. It appears that we are already committed to rising temperatures and sea levels. The question is by how much, in which areas? A number of things can be done to prepare for these changes: Governments must recognize that there is a problem; Better models must be worked out, especially to define where the greatest impacts from climate change and sea level rise will hit; Reference scenarios must be developed to see what the impacts are likely to be in ecological, agricultural, social and economic terms; Every country should develop "avoidance strategies" to minimize risk (for example, by not building on land likely to be flooded); We must cut down on the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere from human activities, by eliminating CFCs and adopting energy conservation programs and other measures to minimize CO2 release; Global agreements to protect the atmosphere are needed. full text

  3. Fiber-Optic Determination of N2, O2, and Fuel Vapor in the Ullage of Liquid-Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2008-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system has been developed that can remotely measure the concentration of molecular oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), hydrocarbon vapor, and other gases (CO2, CO, H2O, chlorofluorocarbons, etc.) in the ullage of a liquid-fuel tank. The system provides an accurate and quantitative identification of the above gases with an accuracy of better than 1 percent by volume (for O2 or N2) in real-time (5 seconds). In an effort to prevent aircraft fuel tank fires or explosions similar to the tragic TWA Flight 800 explosion in 1996, OBIGGS are currently being developed for large commercial aircraft to prevent dangerous conditions from forming inside fuel tanks by providing an inerting gas blanket that is low in oxygen, thus preventing the ignition of the fuel/air mixture in the ullage. OBIGGS have been used in military aircraft for many years and are now standard equipment on some newer large commercial aircraft (such as the Boeing 787). Currently, OBIGGS are being developed for retrofitting to existing commercial aircraft fleets in response to pending mandates from the FAA. Most OBIGGS use an air separation module (ASM) that separates O2 from N2 to make nitrogen-enriched air from compressed air flow diverted from the engine (bleed air). Current OBIGGS systems do not have a closed-loop feedback control, in part, due to the lack of suitable process sensors that can reliably measure N2 or O2 and at the same time, do not constitute an inherent source of ignition. Thus, current OBIGGS operate with a high factor-of-safety dictated by process protocol to ensure adequate fuel-tank inerting. This approach is inherently inefficient as it consumes more engine bleed air than is necessary compared to a closed-loop controlled approach. The reduction of bleed air usage is important as it reduces fuel consumption, which translates to both increased flight range and lower operational costs. Numerous approaches to developing OBIGGS feedback-control sensors have been under

  4. Occurrence of Agricultural Chemicals in Shallow Ground Water and the Unsaturated Zone, Northeast Nebraska Glacial Till, 2002-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Steele, Gregory V.; Vogel, Jason R.

    2007-01-01

    Agricultural chemicals applied at the land surface in northeast Nebraska can move downward, past the crop root zone, to ground water. Because agricultural chemicals applied at the land surface are more likely to be observed in the shallowest part of an aquifer, an assessment of shallow ground-water and unsaturated zone quality in the northeast Nebraska glacial till was completed between 2002 and 2004. Ground-water samples were collected at the first occurrence of ground water or just below the water table at 32 sites located in areas likely affected by agriculture. Four of the 32 sites were situated along a ground-water flow path with its downgradient end next to Maple Creek. Twenty-eight sites were installed immediately adjacent to agricultural fields throughout the glacial-till area. In addition to those 32 sites, two sites were installed in pastures to represent ground-water conditions in a non-cropland setting. Ground-water samples were analyzed for physical properties and concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus compounds, selected pesticides and pesticide degradates, dissolved solids, major ions, trace elements, and dissolved organic carbon. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) concentrations were analyzed at about 70 percent of the monitoring wells to estimate the residence time of ground water. Borehole-core samples were collected from 28 of the well boreholes. Sediment in the unsaturated zone was analyzed for nitrate, chloride, and ammonia concentrations. Analytical results indicated that the agricultural chemicals most often detected during this study were nitrates and herbicides. Nitrate as nitrogen (nitrate-N) concentrations (2003 median 9.53 milligrams per liter) indicated that human activity has affected the water quality of recently recharged ground water in approximately two-thirds of the wells near corn and soybean fields. The principal pesticide compounds that were detected reflect the most-used pesticides in the area and

  5. Evaluation of Ground Water Near Sidney, Western Nebraska, 2004-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, G.V.; Sibray, S.S.; Quandt, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    from the Ogallala and the Brule sand. Median concentrations of nitrate varied by aquifer-2.6 milligrams per liter (Ogallala), 2.1 milligrams per liter (Brule), and 1.3 milligrams per liter (Brule sand). The chemistry of the ground water in the study area indicates that ground water flows from recharge areas in both the tableland areas and Lodgepole Creek Valley to discharge areas beyond the study area. Recharging water that percolates into the Ogallala in the tableland areas either enters the Ogallala aquifer, flows along the Ogallala-Brule contact, or enters Brule fractures or sand. Although limited in amount, ground water flowing along the Ogallala-Brule contact or in the Brule fractures or sand appears to be the predominant means by which water moves from the tableland areas to Lodgepole Creek Valley. Apparent ground-water ages from chlorofluorocarbon and sulfur hexafluoride data generally were similar. Age of ground water for most monitoring wells located in Lodgepole Creek Valley ranged from the mid- to late 1960s to the early 1990s. Ages of ground water in samples from monitoring wells located in tableland draw areas ranged from the mid-1980s to the early 1990s. Water in the Brule (areas without known secondary permeability structures) or deeper Brule sand aquifer was substantially older than water in the Ogallala aquifer and probably was recharged between 10,000 to 30,000 years before present. The stable isotopic data indicate that the ground water in the study area probably originated from precipitation. Ground water in Lodgepole Creek and the tableland areas are similar in chemistry. However, there appears to be limited interaction between ground water within the Ogallala to the north of Sidney and Lodgepole Creek Valley. Available data indicate that although some of the ground water in the Ogallala likely flows across the Ogallala-Brule contact, most of it does not move toward Lodgepole Creek.

  6. Historical trends in occurrence and atmospheric inputs of halogenated volatile organic compounds in untreated ground water used as a source of drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, S.D.; Busenberg, E.; Focazio, M.J.; Plummer, Niel

    2004-01-01

    Analyses of samples of untreated ground water from 413 community-, non-community- (such as restaurants), and domestic-supply wells throughout the US were used to determine the frequency of detection of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking-water sources. The VOC data were compiled from archived chromatograms of samples analyzed originally for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by purge-and-trap gas chromatography with an electron-capture detector (GC-ECD). Concentrations of the VOCs could not be ascertained because standards were not routinely analyzed for VOCs other than trichloromonofluoromethane (CFC-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC-113). Nevertheless, the peak areas associated with the elution times of other VOCs on the chromatograms can be classified qualitatively to assess concentrations at a detection limit on the order of parts per quadrillion. Three or more VOCs were detected in 100% (percent) of the chromatograms, and 77.2% of the samples contained 10 or more VOCs. The maximum number of VOCs detected in any sample was 24. Modeled ground-water residence times, determined from concentrations of CFC-12, were used to assess historical trends in the cumulative occurrence of all VOCs detected in this analysis, as well as the occurrence of individual VOCs, such as CFC-11, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), chloroform and tetrachloroethene (PCE). The detection frequency for all of the VOCs detected has remained relatively constant from approximately 1940 to 2000; however, the magnitude of the peak areas on the chromatograms for the VOCs in the water samples has increased from 1940 to 2000. For CFC-11, CCl4, chloroform and PCE, small peaks decrease from 1940 to 2000, and large peaks increase from 1940 to 2000. The increase in peak areas on the chromatograms from analyses of more recently recharged water is consistent with reported increases in atmospheric concentrations of the VOCs. Approximately 44% and 6

  7. Clinical effectiveness of the Respimat® inhaler device in managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: evidence when compared with other handheld inhaler devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    et al

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Felix SF Ram1, Celso R Carvallho2, John White31School of Health and Social Services, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Department of Physical Therapy, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Brazil; 3York Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, York Hospital, York, UKObjectives: Medication for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD may be delivered by a number of different inhaler devices. This study was undertaken to determine the clinical effectiveness of the Respimat® handheld inhaler device compared with other handheld inhaler devices for the delivery of medication in stable COPD.Methodology: A systematic review of high-quality randomized controlled clinical trials comparing Respimat with other inhaler devices using the same medication was performed. Studies were searched for in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials as well as other relevant electronic databases. Manufacturers of inhaled COPD medication were also contacted for potential trials.Results: Seven studies of high methodological quality with 3813 participants were included in the review. Three trials used Handihaler® as the comparator inhaler, three used a chlorofluorocarbon metered-dose inhaler (CFC-MDI, and one trial used a hydroflouroalkane (HFA-MDI. When Respimat was compared with Handihaler, the following reported outcomes were not significantly different: trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 (weighted mean difference [WMD] 0.01 L; P = 0.14, trough forced vital capacity (FVC (WMD 0.001 L: P = 0.88, peak FEV1 (WMD 0.01 L: P = 0.08, peak FVC (WMD 0.01 L: P = 0.55, morning peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR (WMD 5.06 L/min: P = 0.08, and evening PEFR (WMD 4.39 L/min: P = 0.15. Furthermore, there were no differences when Respimat was compared with Handihaler for risk of exacerbations (relative risk [RR] 0.94: P = 0.81, dry mouth (RR 1.57: P = 0.34, or nasopharyngitis (RR 1.42: P = 0.22. For Respimat compared with CFC-MDI, the

  8. Dissemination of Climate Model Output to the Public and Commercial Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Stockwell, PhD

    2010-09-23

    Climate is defined by the Glossary of Meteorology as the mean of atmospheric variables over a period of time ranging from as short as a few months to multiple years and longer. Although the term climate is often used to refer to long-term weather statistics, the broader definition of climate is the time evolution of a system consisting of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Physical, chemical, and biological processes are involved in interactions among the components of the climate system. Vegetation, soil moisture, and glaciers are part of the climate system in addition to the usually considered temperature and precipitation (Pielke, 2008). Climate change refers to any systematic change in the long-term statistics of climate elements (such as temperature, pressure, or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Climate change can be initiated by external forces, such as cyclical variations in the Earth's solar orbit that are thought to have caused glacial and interglacial periods within the last 2 million years (Milankovitch, 1941). However, a linear response to astronomical forcing does not explain many other observed glacial and interglacial cycles (Petit et al., 1999). It is now understood that climate is influenced by the interaction of solar radiation with atmospheric greenhouse gasses (e.g., carbon dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons, methane, nitrous oxide, etc.), aerosols (airborne particles), and Earth's surface. A significant aspect of climate are the interannual cycles, such as the El Nino La Nina cycle which profoundly affects the weather in North America but is outside the scope of weather forecasts. Some of the most significant advances in understanding climate change have evolved from the recognition of the influence of ocean circulations upon the atmosphere (IPCC, 2007). Human activity can affect the climate system through increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases, air pollution, increasing

  9. Age and quality of ground water and sources of nitrogen in the aquifers in Pumpkin Creek Valley, western Nebraska, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, G.V.; Cannia, J.C.; Sibray, S.S.; McGuire, V.L.

    2005-01-01

    Ground water is the source of drinking water for the residents of Pumpkin Creek Valley, western Nebraska. In this largely agricultural area, shallow aquifers potentially are susceptible to nitrate contamination. During the last 10 years, ground-water levels in the North Platte Natural Resources District have declined and contamination has become a major problem for the district. In 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Platte Natural Resources District began a cooperative study to determine the age and quality of the ground water and the sources of nitrogen in the aquifers in Pumpkin Creek Valley. Water samples were collected from 8 surface-water sites, 2 springs, and 88 ground-water sites during May, July, and August 2000. These samples were analyzed for physical properties, nutrients or nitrate, and hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. In addition, a subset of samples was analyzed for any combination of chlorofluorocarbons, tritium, tritium/helium, sulfur-hexafluoride, carbon-14, and nitrogen-15. The apparent age of ground water in the alluvial aquifer typically varied from about 1980 to modern, whereas ground water in the fractured Brule Formation had a median value in the 1970s. The Brule Formation typically contained ground water that ranged from the 1940s to the 1990s, but low-yield wells had apparent ages of 5,000 to 10,000 years before present. Data for oxygen-18 and deuterium indicated that lake-water samples showed the greatest effects from evaporation. Ground-water data showed no substantial evaporative effects and some ground water became isotopically heavier as the water moved downgradient. In addition, the physical and chemical ground-water data indicate that Pumpkin Creek is a gaining stream because little, if any, of its water is lost to the ground-water system. The water-quality type changed from a sodium calcium bicarbonate type near Pumpkin Creek's headwaters to a calcium sodium bicarbonate type near its mouth. Nitrate concentrations were

  10. Hydrology and snowmelt simulation of Snyderville Basin, Park City, and adjacent areas, Summit County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Lynette E.; Mason, James L.; Susong, David D.

    1998-01-01

    Increasing residential and commercial development is placing increased demands on the ground- and surface-water resources of Snyderville Basin, Park City, and adjacent areas in the southwestern corner of Summit County, Utah. Data collected during 1993-95 were used to assess the quantity and quality of the water resources in the study area.Ground water within the study area is present in consolidated rocks and unconsolidated valley fill. The complex geology makes it difficult to determine the degree of hydraulic connection between different blocks of consolidated rocks. Increased ground-water withdrawal during 1983- 95 generally has not affected ground-water levels. Ground-water withdrawal in some areas, however, caused seasonal fluctuations and a decline in ground-water levels from 1994 to 1995, despite greater-than-normal recharge in the spring of 1995.Ground water generally has a dissolved-solids concentration that ranges from 200 to 600 mg/L. Higher sulfate concentrations in water from wells and springs near Park City and in McLeod Creek and East Canyon Creek than in other parts of the study area are the result of mixing with water that discharges from the Spiro Tunnel. The presence of chloride in water from wells and springs near Park City and in streams and wells near Interstate Highway 80 is probably caused by the dissolution of applied road salt. Chlorofluorocarbon analyses indicate that even though water levels rise within a few weeks of snowmelt, the water took 15 to 40 years to move from areas of recharge to areas of discharge.Water budgets for the entire study area and for six subbasins were developed to better understand the hydrologic system. Ground-water recharge from precipitation made up about 80 percent of the ground-water recharge in the study area. Ground-water discharge to streams made up about 40 percent of the surface water in the study area and ground-water discharge to springs and mine tunnels made up about 25 percent. Increasing use of

  11. Air pollution, greenhouse gases and climate change: Global and regional perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, V.; Feng, Y.

    Greenhouse gases (GHGs) warm the surface and the atmosphere with significant implications for rainfall, retreat of glaciers and sea ice, sea level, among other factors. About 30 years ago, it was recognized that the increase in tropospheric ozone from air pollution (NO x, CO and others) is an important greenhouse forcing term. In addition, the recognition of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) on stratospheric ozone and its climate effects linked chemistry and climate strongly. What is less recognized, however, is a comparably major global problem dealing with air pollution. Until about ten years ago, air pollution was thought to be just an urban or a local problem. But new data have revealed that air pollution is transported across continents and ocean basins due to fast long-range transport, resulting in trans-oceanic and trans-continental plumes of atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs) containing sub micron size particles, i.e., aerosols. ABCs intercept sunlight by absorbing as well as reflecting it, both of which lead to a large surface dimming. The dimming effect is enhanced further because aerosols may nucleate more cloud droplets, which makes the clouds reflect more solar radiation. The dimming has a surface cooling effect and decreases evaporation of moisture from the surface, thus slows down the hydrological cycle. On the other hand, absorption of solar radiation by black carbon and some organics increase atmospheric heating and tend to amplify greenhouse warming of the atmosphere. ABCs are concentrated in regional and mega-city hot spots. Long-range transport from these hot spots causes widespread plumes over the adjacent oceans. Such a pattern of regionally concentrated surface dimming and atmospheric solar heating, accompanied by widespread dimming over the oceans, gives rise to large regional effects. Only during the last decade, we have begun to comprehend the surprisingly large regional impacts. In S. Asia and N. Africa, the large north-south gradient in the ABC

  12. Comparison between agricultural and urban ground-water quality in the Mobile River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James L.

    2003-01-01

    . Samples from 8 of the agricultural wells and all 30 urban wells were age dated using analyses of chlorofluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride, and dissolved gases. Ground water sampled from the agricultural wells ranged in age from about 14 to 34 years, with a median age of about 18.5 years. Ground water sampled from the urban wells ranged in age from about 1 to 45 years, with a median age of about 12 years. The ages estimated for the ground water are consistent with the geology and hydrology of the study area and the design of the wells. All of the agricultural and urban wells sampled for this study produce water from the shallow aquifer that overlies and recharges the Black Warrior River aquifer, or from the uppermost unit of the Black Warrior River aquifer. The wells are located in the same physiographic setting, have similar depths, and the water collected from the wells had a similar range in age. Statistically significant differences in ground-water quality beneath the agricultural and urban areas can reasonably be attributed to the effects of land use. Ground water from the agricultural wells typically had acidic pH values and low specific conductance and alkalinity values. The water contained few dissolved solids, and typically had small concentrations of ions. Some of the agricultural ground-water contained concentrations of ammonia, nitrite plus nitrate, phosphorus, orthophosphate, and dissolved organic carbon in concentrations that exceeded those typically found in ground water. Pesticides were detected in ground water collected from 25 of the 29 agricultural wells. Nineteen different pesticide compounds were detected a total of 83 times. Herbicides were the most frequently detected class of pesticides. The greatest concentration of any pesticide was an estimated value of 1.4 microgram per liter of fluometuron. The Wilcoxan rank sum test was used to determine statistically significant differences in water quality between the agricultural and urba

  13. Ground-water quality beneath an urban residential and commercial area, Montgomery, Alabama, 1999-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James L.

    2002-01-01

    The Black Warrior River aquifer, which is composed of the Coker, Gordo, and Eutaw Formations, supplies more than 50 percent of the ground water used for public water supply in the Mobile River Basin. The city of Montgomery, Alabama, is partially built upon a recharge area for the Black Warrior River aquifer, and is one of many major population centers that depend on the Black Warrior River aquifer for public water supply. To represent the baseline ground-water quality in the Black Warrior River aquifer, water samples were collected from 30 wells located in a low-density residential or rural setting; 9 wells were completed in the Coker Formation, 9 wells in the Gordo Formation, and 12 wells in the Eutaw Formation. To describe the ground-water quality beneath Montgomery, Alabama, water samples also were collected from 30 wells located in residential and commercial areas of Montgomery, Alabama; 16 wells were completed in the Eutaw Formation, 8 wells in alluvial deposits, and 6 wells in terrace deposits. The alluvial and terrace deposits directly overlie the Eutaw Formation with little or no hydraulic separation. Ground-water samples collected from both the rural and urban wells were analyzed for physical properties, major ions, nutrients, metals, volatile organic compounds, and pesticides. Samples from the urban wells also were analyzed for bacteria, chlorofluorocarbons, dissolved gases, and sulfur hexafluoride. Ground-water quality beneath the urban area was compared to baseline water quality in the Black Warrior River aquifer.Compared to the rural wells, ground-water samples from urban wells contained greater concentrations or more frequent detections of chloride and nitrate, and the trace metals aluminium, chromium, cobalt, copper, nickel, and zinc. Pesticides and volatile organic compounds were detected more frequently and in greater concentrations in ground-water samples collected from urban wells than in ground-water samples from rural wells.The Spearman rho

  14. Age and source of water in springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex, Calhoun County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Water from wells and springs accounts for more than 90 percent of the public water supply in Calhoun County, Alabama. Springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex are used for public water supply for the cities of Anniston and Jacksonville. The largest ground-water supply is Coldwater Spring, the primary source of water for Anniston, Alabama. The average discharge of Coldwater Spring is about 32 million gallons per day, and the variability of discharge is about 75 percent. Water-quality samples were collected from 6 springs and 15 wells in Calhoun County from November 2001 to January 2003. The pH of the ground water typically was greater than 6.0, and specific conductance was less than 300 microsiemens per centimeter. The water chemistry was dominated by calcium, carbonate, and bicarbonate ions. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of the water samples indicates the occurrence of a low-temperature, water-rock weathering reaction known as silicate hydrolysis. The residence time of the ground water, or ground-water age, was estimated by using analysis of chlorofluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride, and regression modeling. Estimated ground-water ages ranged from less than 10 to approximately 40 years, with a median age of about 18 years. The Spearman rho test was used to identify statistically significant covariance among selected physical properties and constituents in the ground water. The alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved solids increased as age increased; these correlations reflect common changes in ground-water quality that occur with increasing residence time and support the accuracy of the age estimates. The concentration of sodium and chloride increased as age increased; the correlation of these constituents is interpreted to indicate natural sources for chloride and sodium. The concentration of silica increased as the concentration of potassium increased; this correlation, in addition to the isotopic data, is evidence that

  15. The impact of human activities in africa,the north and south pole regions on global climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Babagana

    As a result of the rapid increase in the petroleum exploration, Industrial, deforestation and other human activities going on within or around the Arctic and Antarctica ice caps near or in the temperate region countries like Canada, Greenland, Russia, U.S.A (Alaska), Iceland, Finland, Argentina, Tasmania and New Zealand among many others plus the increase in deforestation activities in Tropical world countries like the Amazon of Brazil, The Tropical Rain forest of Nigeria, Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo), Cotedvoire, Indonesia etc. in addition to the Sahara and the Kalahari deserts encouragement as a result of human factors plus the uncontrolled disposals of broken Refrigerators, Air conditioners and propellants containing chlorofluorocarbon substances capable of destroying the Ozone layer in African refuse dumps (B.Abubkar,2006) are collectively becoming a threat to the world climate. This explains why the volume of the Ocean keeps on rising, global temperature keeps ascending and the global climate is becoming abnormal since the beginning of the above mentioned activities in the above mentioned locations. It was in view of the above that this research was conducted and came up with the under listed suggestions/recommendations: 1. The temperature region countries like Canada, Russia, U.S.A, Argentina etc. should come up with polices restricting certain industries with the possibilities of causing environmental hazards from operating near the Ice Caps of the Arctic or Antarctica even in areas which the Ice was frozen thousands of years ago as the case with Greenland. 2. The research and exploration activities going on around or on the Arctic and the Antarctica regions should be carried out with utmost care and concern to the global climate. 3. The deforestation activities going on without control in most of the Tropical World Countries should be monitored by the United Nation's Specialized Agencies on forest and other related international organization in such

  16. Hydrogen emissions and their effects on the arctic ozone losses. Risk analysis of a global hydrogen economy; Wasserstoff-Emissionen und ihre Auswirkungen auf den arktischen Ozonverlust. Risikoanalyse einer globalen Wasserstoffwirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feck, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) could be used as one of the major components in our future energy supply in an effort to avoid greenhouse gas emissions. ''Green'' hydrogen in particular, which is produced from renewable energy sources, should significantly reduce emissions that damage the climate. Despite this basically environmentally-friendly property, however, the complex chain of interactions of hydrogen with other compounds means that the implications for the atmosphere must be analysed in detail. For example, H{sub 2} emissions, which could increase the tropospheric H{sub 2} inventory, can be released throughout the complete hydrogen process chain. H{sub 2} enters the stratosphere via the tropical tropopause and is oxidised there to form water vapour (H{sub 2}O). This extra water vapour causes increased radiation in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum and thus causes the stratosphere to cool down. Both the increase in H{sub 2}O and the resulting cooling down of the stratosphere encourage the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) and liquid sulphate aerosols, which facilitate the production of reactive chlorine, which in turn currently leads to dramatic ozone depletion in the polar stratosphere. In the future, H{sub 2} emissions from a global hydrogen economy could therefore encourage stratospheric ozone depletion in the polar regions and thus inhibit the ozone layer in recovering from the damage caused by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). In addition to estimating possible influences on the trace gas composition of the stratosphere, one of the main aims of this thesis is to evaluate the risk associated with increased polar ozone depletion caused by additional H{sub 2} emissions. Studies reported on here have shown that even if around 90% of today's fossil primary energy input was to be replaced by hydrogen and if around 9.5% of the gas was to escape in a ''worst-case'' scenario, the additional ozone loss for

  17. Groundwater residence times in Shenandoah National Park, Blue Ridge Mountains, Virginia, USA: A multi-tracer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Niel; Busenberg, E.; Böhlke, J.K.; Nelms, D.L.; Michel, R.L.; Schlosser, P.

    2001-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic properties of water discharging from springs and wells in Shenandoah National Park (SNP), near the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains, VA, USA were monitored to obtain information on groundwater residence times. Investigated time scales included seasonal (wet season, April, 1996; dry season, August–September, 1997), monthly (March through September, 1999) and hourly (30-min interval recording of specific conductance and temperature, March, 1999 through February, 2000). Multiple environmental tracers, including tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), sulfur-35 (35S), and stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) of water, were used to estimate the residence times of shallow groundwater discharging from 34 springs and 15 wells. The most reliable ages of water from springs appear to be based on SF6 and 3H/3He, with most ages in the range of 0–3 years. This range is consistent with apparent ages estimated from concentrations of CFCs; however, CFC-based ages have large uncertainties owing to the post-1995 leveling-off of the CFC atmospheric growth curves. Somewhat higher apparent ages are indicated by 35S (>1.5 years) and seasonal variation of δ18O (mean residence time of 5 years) for spring discharge. The higher ages indicated by the 35S and δ18O data reflect travel times through the unsaturated zone and, in the case of 35S, possible sorption and exchange of S with soils or biomass. In springs sampled in April, 1996, apparent ages derived from the 3H/3He data (median age of 0.2 years) are lower than those obtained from SF6 (median age of 4.3 years), and in contrast to median ages from 3H/3He (0.3 years) and SF6 (0.7 years) obtained during the late summer dry season of 1997. Monthly samples from 1999 at four springs in SNP had SF6apparent ages of only 1.2 to 2.5±0.8 years, and were consistent with the 1997 SF6 data. Water from springs has low excess air (0–1 cm3 kg−1) and N2–Ar temperatures that vary

  18. Using Acid Number as a Leading Indicator of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning System Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis Cartlidge; Hans Schellhase

    2003-07-31

    This report summarizes a literature review to assess the acidity characteristics of the older mineral oil and newer polyolester (POE) refrigeration systems as well as to evaluate acid measuring techniques used in other non-aqueous systems which may be applicable for refrigeration systems. Failure in the older chlorofluorocarbon/hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CFC/HCFC) / mineral oil systems was primarily due to thermal degradation of the refrigerant which resulted in the formation of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids. These are strong mineral acids, which can, over time, severely corrode the system metals and lead to the formation of copper plating on iron surfaces. The oil lubricants used in the older systems were relatively stable and were not prone to hydrolytic degradation due to the low solubility of water in oil. The refrigerants in the newer hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)/POE systems are much more thermally stable than the older CFC/HCFC refrigerants and mineral acid formation is negligible. However, acidity is produced in the new systems by hydrolytic decomposition of the POE lubricants with water to produce the parent organic acids and alcohols used to prepare the POE. The individual acids can therefore vary but they are generally C5 to C9 carboxylic acids. Organic acids are much weaker and far less corrosive to metals than the mineral acids from the older systems but they can, over long time periods, react with metals to form carboxylic metal salts. The salts tend to accumulate in narrow areas such as capillary tubes, particularly if residual hydrocarbon processing chemicals are present in the system, which can lead to plugging. The rate of acid production from POEs varies on a number of factors including chemical structure, moisture levels, temperature, acid concentration and metals. The hydrolysis rate of reaction can be reduced by using driers to reduce the free water concentration and by using scavenging chemicals which react with the system acids. Total acid

  19. Dynamics and transport in the stratosphere : Simulations with a general circulation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalst, Maarten Krispijn

    2005-01-01

    The middle atmosphere is strongly affected by two of the world's most important environmental problems: global climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion, caused by anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), respectively. General circulation models with coupled chemistry are a key tool to advance our understanding of the complex interplay between dynamics, chemistry and radiation in the middle atmosphere. A key problem of such models is that they generate their own meteorology, and thus cannot be used for comparisons with instantaneous measurements. This thesis presents the first application of a simple data assimilation method, Newtonian relaxation, to reproduce realistic synoptical conditions in a state-of-the-art middle atmosphere general circulation model, MA-ECHAM. By nudging the model's meteorology slightly towards analyzed observations from a weather forecasting system (ECMWF), we have simulated specific atmospheric processes during particular meteorological episodes, such as the 1999/2000 Arctic winter. The nudging technique is intended to interfere as little as possible with the model's own dynamics. In fact, we found that we could even limit the nudging to the troposphere, leaving the middle atmosphere entirely free. In that setup, the model realistically reproduced many aspects of the instantaneous meteorology of the middle atmosphere, such as the unusually early major warming and breakup of the 2002 Antarctic vortex. However, we found that this required careful interpolation of the nudging data, and a correct choice of nudging parameters. We obtained the best results when we first projected the nudging data onto the model's normal modes so that we could filter out the (spurious) fast components. In a four-year simulation, for which we also introduced an additional nudging of the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation, we found that the model reproduced much of the interannual variability throughout the

  20. Ultrafast electron dynamics at alkali/ice structures adsorbed on a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to study the interaction between excess electrons in water ice structures adsorbed on metal surfaces and other charged or neutral species, like alkali ions, or chemically reactive molecules, like chlorofluorocarbons (CFC), respectively. The excess electrons in the ice can interact with the ions directly or indirectly via the hydrogen bonded water molecules. In both cases the presence of the alkali influences the population, localization, and lifetime of electronic states of excess electrons in the ice adlayer. These properties are of great relevance when considering the highly reactive character of the excess electrons, which can mediate chemical reactions by dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The influence of alkali adsorption on electron solvation and transfer dynamics in ice structures is investigated for two types of adsorption configurations using femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy. In the first system alkali atoms are coadsorbed on top of a wetting amorphous ice film adsorbed on Cu(111). At temperatures between 60 and 100 K alkali adsorption leads to the formation of positively charged alkali ions at the ice/vacuum interface. The interaction between the alkali ions at the surface and the dipole moments of the surrounding water molecules results in a reorientation of the water molecules. As a consequence new electron trapping sites, i.e. at local potential minima, are formed. Photoinjection of excess electrons into these alkali-ion covered amorphous ice layers, results in the trapping of a solvated electron at an alkali-ion/water complex. In contrast to solvation in pure amorphous ice films, where the electrons are located in the bulk of the ice layer, solvated electrons at alkali-ion/water complexes are located at the ice/vacuum interface. They exhibit lifetimes of several picoseconds and show a fast energetic stabilization. With ongoing solvation, i.e. pump-probe time delay, the electron transfer is

  1. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total column abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.-M. Sinnhuber

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Time series of total column abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl, chlorine nitrate (ClONO2, and hydrogen fluoride (HF were determined from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectra recorded at 17 sites belonging to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and located between 80.05° N and 77.82° S. By providing such a near-global overview on ground-based measurements of the two major stratospheric chlorine reservoir species, HCl and ClONO2, the present study is able to confirm the decrease of the atmospheric inorganic chlorine abundance during the last few years. This decrease is expected following the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, where restrictions and a subsequent phase-out of the prominent anthropogenic chlorine source gases (solvents, chlorofluorocarbons were agreed upon to enable a stabilisation and recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. The atmospheric fluorine content is expected to be influenced by the Montreal Protocol, too, because most of the banned anthropogenic gases also represent important fluorine sources. But many of the substitutes to the banned gases also contain fluorine so that the HF total column abundance is expected to have continued to increase during the last few years. The measurements are compared with calculations from five different models: the two-dimensional Bremen model, the two chemistry-transport models KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the two chemistry-climate models EMAC and SOCOL. Thereby, the ability of the models to reproduce the absolute total column amounts, the seasonal cycles, and the temporal evolution found in the FTIR measurements is investigated and inter-compared. This is especially interesting because the models have different architectures. The overall agreement between the measurements and models for the total column abundances and the seasonal cycles is good. Linear trends of HCl, ClONO2, and HF are calculated from both

  2. Ground-water quality in the Appalachian Plateaus, Kanawha River basin, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Charlynn J.; Kozar, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    current MCL of 50 ?g/L. Neither pesticides nor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were prevalent in the study area, and the concentrations of the compounds that were detected did not exceed any USEPA MCLs. Pesticides were detected in only two of the 30 wells sampled, but four pesticides -- atrazine, carbofuran, DCPA, and deethylatrazine -- were detected in one well; molinate was detected in the other well. All of the pesticides detected were at estimated concentrations of only 0.002 ?g/L. Of the VOCs detected, trihalomethane compounds (THMs), which can result from chlorination of a well, were the most common. THMs were detected in 13 of the 30 wells sampled. Gasoline by-products, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX compounds) were detected in 10 of the 30 wells sampled. The maximum concentration of any of the VOCs detected in this study, however, was only 1.040 ?g/L, for the THM dichlorofluoromethane. Water samples from 25 of the wells were analyzed for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) to estimate the apparent age of ground water. The analyses indicated that age of water ranged from 10 to greater than 57 years, and that the age of ground water could be correlated with the topographic setting of the wells sampled. Thus the apparent age of water in wells on hilltops was youngest (median of 13 years) and that of water in wells in valleys was oldest (median of 42 years). Water from wells on hillsides was intermediate in age (median of 29 years). These data can be used to define contributing areas to wells, corroborate or revise conceptual ground-water flow models, estimate contaminant travel times from spills to other sources such as nearby domestic or public supply wells, and to manage point and nonpoint source activities that may affect critical aquifers.

  3. Ground-water flow and water quality in the Upper Floridan aquifer, southwestern Albany area, Georgia, 1998-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Debbie; Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    During 1997, the Dougherty County Health Department sampled more than 700 wells completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer in Dougherty County, Georgia, and determined that nitrate as nitrogen (hereinafter called nitrate) concentrations were above 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) in 12 percent of the wells. Ten mg/L is the Georgia primary drinking-water standard. The ground-water flow system is complex and poorly understood in this predominantly agricultural area. Therefore, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) - in cooperation with Albany Water, Gas and Light Commission - conducted a study to better define ground-water flow and water quality in the Upper Florida aquifer in the southwestern Albany area, Georgia. Ground-water levels were measured in the southwestern Albany area, Georgia, during May 1998 and March 1999 (spring), and October 1998 and September 1999 (fall). Groundwater levels measured in 75 wells open only to the Upper Floridan aquifer were used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for those four time periods. These maps show that ground water generally flows from northwest to southeast at gradients ranging from about 2 to greater than 10 feet per mile. During spring and fall 1998, ground-water levels were high and mounding of the potentiometric surface occurred in the central part of the study area, indicating a local recharge area. Water levels declined from December through February, and by March 1999 the mound in the potentiometric surface had dissipated. Of the 75 wells in the potentiometric network, 24 were selected for a water-quality network. These 24 wells and 1 spring were sampled during fall 1998 and spring 1999. Samples were analyzed for major chemical constituents, selected minor constituents, selected nutrients, and chlorofluorocarbons (CFC). Water-quality field measurements - such as water temperature, pH, specific conductance (SC), and dissolved oxygen (DO) - were taken at each well. During August 2000, a ground-water sample was collected

  4. Questa baseline and pre-mining ground-water quality investigation. 14. Interpretation of ground-water geochemistry in catchments other than the Straight Creek catchment, Red River Valley, Taos County, New Mexico, 2002-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Hunt, Andrew G.; Naus, Cheryl A.

    2005-01-01

    determined on selected samples. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), mercury, sulfate stable isotope composition (d34S and d18O of sulfate), stable isotope composition of water (d2H and d18O of water) were measured for selected samples. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) and 3He and 3H were measured for age dating on selected samples. Linear regressions from the Straight Creek ground-water data were used to compare ground-water chemistry trends in non-Straight Creek ground waters with Straight Creek alluvial ground-water chemistry dilution trends. Most of the solute trends for the ground waters are similar to those for Straight Creek but there are some notable exceptions. In lithologies that contain substantial pyrite mineralization, acid waters form with similar chemistries to those in Straight Creek and all the waters tend to be calcium-sulfate type. Hottentot ground waters contain substantially lower calcium concentrations relative to those in Straight Creek. This anomaly results from the exposure of rhyolite porphyry in the Hottentot scar and weathering zone. The rhyolite contains less calcium than the altered andesites and tuffs in the Straight Creek catchment and probably does not have the abundant gypsum and calcite. The Hansen ground waters have reached gypsum saturation and have similar calcium, magnesium, and beryllium concentrations as Straight Creek ground waters but have lower concentrations of fluoride, manganese, zinc, cobalt, nickel, copper, and lithium. Lower concentrations of elements related to mineralization at Hansen likely reflect the more distal location of Hansen with respect to intrusive centers that provided the heat source for hydrothermal alteration. The other ground water with water chemistry trends that are outside the Straight Creek trends was from an alluvial well from Capulin Canyon (CC2A). Although it had pH values near 6.0 and most major ions similar to the other Capulin Canyon ground waters, it contained high concentrations

  5. Questa baseline and pre-mining ground-water quality investigation. 5. Well installation, water-level data, and surface- and ground-water geochemistry in the Straight Creek drainage basin, Red River Valley, New Mexico, 2001-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naus, Cheryl A.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Donohoe, Lisa C.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Morin, Roger H.; Verplanck, Philip L.

    2005-01-01

    selected samplings. One set of ground-water samples was collected for helium-3/tritium and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) age dating. Several lines of evidence indicate that surface water is the primary input to the Straight Creek ground-water system. Straight Creek streamflow and water levels in wells closest to the apex of the Straight Creek debris fan and closest to Straight Creek itself appear to respond to the same seasonal inputs. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions in Straight Creek surface water and ground water are similar, and concentrations of most dissolved constituents in most Straight Creek surface-water and shallow (debris-flow and alluvial) aquifer ground-water samples correlate strongly with sulfate (concentrations decrease linearly with sulfate in a downgradient direction). After infiltration of surface water, dilution along the flow path is the dominant mechanism controlling ground-water chemistry. However, concentrations of some constituents can be higher in ground water than can be accounted for by concentrations in Straight Creek surface water, and additional sources of these constituents must therefore be inferred. Constituents for which concentrations in ground water can be high relative to surface water include calcium, magnesium, strontium, silica, sodium, and potassium in ground water from debris-flow and alluvial aquifers and manganese, calcium, magnesium, strontium, sodium, and potassium in ground water from the bedrock aquifer. All ground water is a calcium sulfate type, often at or near gypsum saturation because of abundant gypsum in the aquifer material developed from co-existing calcite and pyrite mineralization. Calcite dissolution, the major buffering mechanism for bedrock aquifer ground water, also contributes to relatively higher calcium concentrations in some ground water. The main source of the second most abundant cation, magnesium, is probably dissolution of magnesium-rich carbonates or silicates. Strontium may also be

  6. Accuracy of CFC groundwater dating in a crystalline bedrock aquifer: Data from a site in southern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockgård, Niclas; Rodhe, Allan; Olsson, K. A.

    The concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) and tritium were determined in groundwater in fractured crystalline bedrock at Finnsjön, Sweden. The specific goal was to investigate the accuracy of CFC dating in such an environment, taking potential degradation and mixing of water into consideration. The water was sampled to a depth of 42 m in three boreholes along an 800-m transect, from a recharge area to a local discharge area. The CFC-113 concentration was at the detection limit in most samples. The apparent recharge date obtained from CFC-11 was earlier than from CFC-12 for all samples, with a difference of over 20 years for some samples. The difference was probably caused by degradation of CFC-11. The CFC-12 dating of the samples ranged from before 1945 to 1975, with the exception of a sample from the water table, which had a present-day concentration. Conclusions about flow paths or groundwater velocity could not be drawn from the CFCs. The comparison between CFC-12 and tritium concentrations showed that most samples could be unmixed or mixtures of waters with different ages, and the binary mixtures that matched the measured concentrations were determined. The mixing model approach can be extended with additional tracers. Précision de la datation au CFC dans un aquifère rocheux-fracturé: données d'un site du sud de la Suède. Les concentrations en chlorofluorocarbones (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) et entritium ont été déterminées dans l'eau souterraine d'un massif fracturé à Finnsjön en Suède. Le but de cette étude est de mieux cerner la précision de la méthode de datation au CFC dans ce type d'environnement hydrogéologique, tout en considérant d'éventuels phénomènes de dégradation et de mélange d'eaux. L'eau a été échantillonnée à une profondeur de 42 mètres dans trois forages alignés sur 800 mètres entre une zone de recharge et une zone de déversement. Les concentrations en CFC-113 sont dans la plupart

  7. Hydrogeologic setting and simulation of groundwater flow near the Canterbury and Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnels, Leadville, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Tristan P.; Paschke, Suzanne S.; Minsley, Burke; Dupree, Jean A.

    2011-01-01

    -current resistivity field survey was performed to evaluate the geologic structure of the study area. The results show that the Canterbury Tunnel is located in a downthrown structural block that is not in direct physical connection with the Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnel. The presence of this structural discontinuity implies there is no direct groundwater pathway between the tunnels along a laterally continuous bedrock unit. Water-quality results for pH and major-ion concentrations near the Canterbury Tunnel showed that acid mine drainage has not affected groundwater quality. Stable-isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen in water indicate that snowmelt is the primary source of groundwater recharge. On the basis of chlorofluorocarbon and tritium concentrations and mixing ratios for groundwater samples, young groundwater (groundwater recharged after 1953) was indicated at well locations upgradient from and in a fault block separate from the Canterbury Tunnel. Samples from sites downgradient from the Canterbury Tunnel were mixtures of young and old (pre-1953) groundwater and likely represent snowmelt recharge mixed with older regional groundwater that discharges from the bedrock units to the Arkansas River valley. Discharge from the Canterbury Tunnel contained the greatest percentage of old (pre-1953) groundwater with a mixture of about 25 percent young water and about 75 percent old water. A calibrated three-dimensional groundwater model representing high-flow conditions was used to evaluate large-scale flow characteristics of the groundwater and to assess whether a substantial hydraulic connection was present between the Canterbury Tunnel and Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnel. As simulated, the faults restrict local flow in many areas, but the fracture-damage zones adjacent to the faults allow groundwater to move along faults. Water-budget results indicate that groundwater flow across the lateral edges of the model controlled the majority of flow in and out of the aquifer (79 percent and

  8. Electrostatic charges generated on aerosolisation of dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yanyang

    2001-01-01

    In responding to the international community's agreement of phasing out chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) propellants by the year 2000, hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) has been chosen to replace CFCs. Intensive investigations related to the new propellant products have been carried out. Aerosol electrostatics is one of the topics investigated. To understand and subsequently control the charging processes is the motive of the research reported here. To help elucidate the complex charging process occurring naturally during atomization of liquids from pressurised Metered Dose Inhalers (pMDIs), it has been broken down into a sequence of related, simpler sub processes-drop charging, streaming current charging (coarse spray), splashing charging and fine spray charging. Our initial studies are of single drops forming at and breaking away from the tips of capillary tubes. The drop forming processes are so slow that any hydrodynamic effect can be dismissed. Then the charge on the drop is measured. It is found that the charge on water drops is always negative (∼ 10 -14 C) at field-free condition and the magnitude of the charge increases as the drop size increases and the surrounding tube diameter decreases. With salt solutions, the charge on drops is negative at dilute solutions, decreases in magnitude as the concentration of electrolytes increases and finally reverses the sign of charge at approximately 1 M - drop charge becomes positive. All these experimental results can be explained in terms of contact potential between liquid and the inner wall of the capillary, which sets up an electric field between the pendant drop and the surrounding tube. Then computational simulation work is carried out and the data are compared with experimental results. It is found that the computer simulation data are in accord with experimental observations. This is a potential method to measure absolute potential difference between a liquid and a solid. Secondly, the hydrodynamic processes are investigated

  9. Statistical analysis of lake levels and field study of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015: Chapter A of Water levels and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Diekoff, Aliesha L.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; White, Eric A.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Morel, Daniel L.; Heck, Jessica M.

    2016-10-19

    ) closed-basin lake-level changes reflected groundwater-level changes in the Quaternary, Prairie du Chien, and Jordan aquifers; (3) the installation of outlet-control structures, such as culverts and weirs, resulted in smaller multiyear lake-level changes than lakes without outlet-control structures; (4) water levels in lakes primarily overlying Superior Lobe deposits were significantly more variable than lakes primarily overlying Des Moines Lobe deposits; (5) lake-level declines were larger with increasing mean lake-level elevation; and (6) the frequency of some of these characteristics varies by landscape position. Flow-through lakes and lakes with outlet-control structures were more common in watersheds with more than 50 percent urban development compared to watersheds with less than 50 percent urban development. A comparison of two 35-year periods during 1925–2014 revealed that variability of annual mean lake levels in flow-through lakes increased when annual precipitation totals were more variable, whereas variability of annual mean lake levels in closed-basin lakes had the opposite pattern, being more variable when annual precipitation totals were less variable. Oxygen-18/oxygen-16 and hydrogen-2/hydrogen-1 ratios for water samples from 40 wells indicated the well water was a mixture of surface water and groundwater in 31 wells, whereas ratios from water sampled from 9 other wells indicated that water from these wells receive no surface-water contribution. Of the 31 wells with a mixture of surface water and groundwater, 11 were downgradient from White Bear Lake, likely receiving water from deeper parts of the lake. Age dating of water samples from wells indicated that the age of water in the Prairie du Chien and Jordan aquifers can vary widely across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. Estimated ages of recharge for 9 of the 40 wells sampled for chlorofluorocarbon concentrations ranged widely from the early 1940s to mid-1970s. The wide range in estimated

  10. Geochemical Investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, South-Central Oklahoma, 2004-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Scott; Hunt, Andrew G.; Parkhurst, David L.

    2009-01-01

    dolomite. The major ion chemistry for these 34 samples is consistent with a set of water-rock interactions. Rainfall infiltrates the soil zone, where the host rock, limestone or dolomite, dissolves as a result of uptake of carbon dioxide gas. Some continued dissolution of dolomite and precipitation of calcite occur as the water flows through the saturated zone. The major ion chemistry of the two samples from wells completed in the confined part of the aquifer indicates the water is a sodium chloride type. Geochemical inverse modeling determined that mixing of calcite-saturated recharge water with brine and dissolving calcite, dolomite, and gypsum accounts for the water composition of these two samples. One of the two samples, collected at Vendome Well in Chickasaw National Recreation Area, had a mixing fraction of brine of about 1 percent. The brine component of the sample at Vendome Well is likely to account for the relatively large concentrations of many of the trace elements (potassium, fluoride, bromide, iodide, ammonia, arsenic, boron, lithium, selenium, and strontium) measured in the water sample. Carbon-14, helium-3/tritium, and chlorofluorocarbons were used to calculate ground-water ages, recharge temperatures, and mixtures of ground water in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. Thirty four of 36 water samples recharged the aquifer after 1950, indicating that water is moving quickly from recharge areas to discharge at streams and springs. Two exceptions to this classification were noted in samples 6 and 15 (Vendome Well). Ground-water ages determined for these two samples by using carbon-14 are 34,000 years (site 6) and 10,500 years (site 15). Concentrations of dissolved argon, neon, and xenon in water samples were used to determine the temperature of the water when it recharged the aquifer. The mean annual air temperature at Ada, Oklahoma, is 16 degrees Celsius (C) and the median temperature of the 30 reconnaissance water samples was 18.1 C. The av

  11. Chemistry of ground water in the Silver Springs basin, Florida, with an emphasis on nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, G.G.

    2004-01-01

    1.15 mg/L. Because fewer wells were in rangeland or forested areas, those categories were grouped together. The median concentration for that group was 0.09 mg/L. The ratio of 15N/14N in ground-water samples ranged from -0.5 to 11.5 per mil. The median value for ground-water samples from 35 wells, 4.9 per mil, is near the top of the range that indicates inorganic nitrogen sources. In agricultural areas, the median 15N/14N was 4.8 per mil, indicating mostly inorganic (fertilizer) sources. In urban areas, the median 15N/14N was 5.4 per mil, indicating more influence of organic nitrogen (N) sources. Thus, in both agricultural and urban areas, fertilizer is an important inorganic source of N in ground water (and, therefore, in spring water as well). The influence of organic N is more apparent in urban areas than in agricultural areas. Two distinct 15N/14N values were observed in water from the Main Spring, one indicating an inorganic nitrogen source and the other indicating a mixture of sources with a strong influence of organic nitrogen. Thirty-five wells and three springs of the Silver Springs group (the Main Spring, the Abyss, and the Blue Grotto) were sampled for a suite of 63 compounds common in wastewater. A total of 38 compounds was detected, nearly all in very low concentrations. The most frequently detected compound was the insecticide N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), which was detected in water from 27 wells and all three springs. The presence or absence of DEET in ground-water samples did not seem to be related to land use; however, hydrogeologic conditions at the well sites (confined or unconfined) generally did affect the presence or absence of DEET in the ground water. DEET also appears to be a useful tracer for the presence of reused water. Water samples were collected from the Main Spring and two other springs of the Silver Springs group and analyzed for concentrations of dissolved gasses and for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexaflu

  12. Sources and chronology of nitrate contamination in spring waters, Suwannee River basin, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Brian G.; Hornsby, H.D.; Bohlke, J.K.; Mokray, M.F.

    1999-01-01

    A multi-tracer approach, which consisted of analyzing water samples for n aturally occurring chemical and isotopic indicators, was used to better understand sources and chronology of nitrate contamination in spring wate rs discharging to the Suwannee and Santa Fe Rivers in northern Florida. Dur ing 1997 and 1998, as part of a cooperative study between the Suwannee River Water Management District and the U.S. Geological Survey, water samples were collected and analyzed from 24 springs and two wells for major ions, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, and selected environmental isotopes [18O/16O, D/H, 13C/12C, 15N/14N]. To better understand when nitrate entered the ground-water system, water samples were analyzed for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs; CCl3F, CCl2F2, and C2Cl3F3) and tritium (3H); in this way, the apparent ages and residence times of spring waters and water from shallow zones in the Upper Floridan aquifer were determined. In addition to information obtained from the use of isotopic and other chemical tracers, information on changes in land-use activities in the basin during 1954-97 were used to estimate nitrogen inputs from nonpoint sources for five counties in the basin. Changes in nitrate concentrations in spring waters with time were compared with estimated nitrogen inputs for Lafayette and Suwannee Counties. Agricultural activities [cropland farming, animal farming operations (beef and dairy cows, poultry, and swine)] along with atmospheric deposition have contributed large quantities of nitrogen to ground water in the Suwannee River Basin in northern Florida. Changes in agricultural land use during the past 40 years in Alachua, Columbia, Gilchrist, Lafayette, and Suwannee Counties have contributed variable amounts of nitrogen to the ground-water system. During 1955-97, total estimated nitrogen from all nonpoint sources (fertilizers, animal wastes, atmospheric deposition, and septic tanks) increased continuously in Gilchrist and Lafayette Counties. In

  13. Estimating nitrate concentrations in groundwater at selected wells and springs in the surficial aquifer system and Upper Floridan aquifer, Dougherty Plain and Marianna Lowlands, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama, 2002-50

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Christy A.; Katz, Brian G.; Berndt, Marian P.

    2013-01-01

    . Measured nitrate concentrations (as nitrogen) in wells and springs sampled during the study ranged from 0.37 to 12.73 milligrams per liter. Average apparent ages of groundwater calculated from measurements of chlorofluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride, and tritium from wells CP-18A, CP-21A,and RF-41 were about 23, 29, and 32 years, respectively. Average apparent ages of groundwater from Baltzell Springs Group, Sandbag Spring, and Jackson Blue Spring were about 16, 18, and 19 years, respectively. Simulated travel times of particles from the six selected sites ranged from less than 1 day to 511 years; both the minimum and maximum particle travel times were estimated for water from Jackson Blue Spring. Median simulated travel times of particles were about 30, 38, and 62 years for Jackson Blue Spring, Sandbag Spring, and Baltzell Springs Group, respectively. Study results indicated that travel times for approximately 50 percent of the particles from all spring sites were less than 50 years. The median simulated travel times of particles arriving at receptor wells CP-18A, CP-21A, and RF-41 were about 50, 35, and 36 years, respectively. All particle travel times were within the same order of magnitude as the tracer-derived average apparent ages for water, although slightly older than the measured ages. Travel time estimates were substantially greater than the measured age for groundwater reaching well CP-18A, as confirmed by the average apparent age of water determined from tracers. Local-scale particle-tracking models were used to predict nitrate concentrations in the three monitor wells and three springs from 2002 to 2050 for three nitrogen management scenarios: (1) fixed input of nitrate at the 2001 level, (2) reduction of nitrate inputs of 4 percent per year (from the previous year) from 2002 to 2050, and (3) elimination of nitrate input after 2001. Simulated nitrate concentrations in well CP-21A peaked at 7.82 milligrams per liter in 2030, and concentrations in background well

  14. Ground-Water Age and Quality in the High Plains Aquifer near Seward, Nebraska, 2003-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Landon, Matthew K.; Turco, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Seward, Nebraska, conducted a study of ground-water age and quality to improve understanding of: (1) traveltimes from recharge areas to public-supply wells, (2) the effects of geochemical reactions in the aquifer on water quality, and (3) how water quality has changed historically in response to land-use practices. Samples were collected from four supply wells in the Seward west well field and from nine monitoring wells along two approximate ground-water flow paths leading to the well field. Concentrations of three different chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-12, CFC-11, and CFC-113), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and ratios of tritium (3H) to helium-3 (3He) isotope derived from radioactive decay of 3H were used to determine the apparent recharge age of ground-water samples. Age interpretations were based primarily on 3H/3He and CFC-12 data. Estimates of apparent ground-water age from tracer data were complicated by mixing of water of different ages in 10 of the 13 ground-water samples collected. Apparent recharge dates of unmixed ground-water samples or mean recharge dates of young fractions of mixed water in samples collected from monitoring wells ranged from 1985 to 2002. For monitoring-well samples containing mixed water, the fraction of the sample composed of young water ranged from 26 to 77 percent of the sample. Apparent mean recharge dates of young fractions in samples collected from four supply wells in the Seward west well field ranged from about 1980 to 1990. Estimated fractions of the samples composed of young water ranged from 39 to 54 percent. It is implicit in the mixing calculations that the remainder of the sample that is not young water is composed of water that is more than 60 years old and contains no detectable quantities of modern atmospheric tracers. Estimated fractions of the mixed samples composed of 'old' water ranged from 23 to 74 percent. Although alternative mixing models can be used to

  15. Atmospheric chemistry of HFE-7000 (CF(3)CF (2)CF (2)OCH (3)) and 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluoro-1-butanol (CF (3)CF (2)CF (2)CH (2)OH): kinetic rate coefficients and temperature dependence of reactions with chlorine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-de-Mera, Yolanda; Aranda, Alfonso; Bravo, Iván; Rodríguez, Diana; Rodríguez, Ana; Moreno, Elena

    2008-10-01

    The adverse environmental impacts of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the Earth's ozone layer have focused attention on the effort to replace these compounds by nonchlorinated substitutes with environmental acceptability. Hydrofluoroethers (HFEs) and fluorinated alcohols are currently being introduced in many applications for this purpose. Nevertheless, the presence of a great number of C-F bonds drives to atmospheric long-lived compounds with infrared absorption features. Thus, it is necessary to improve our knowledge about lifetimes and global warming potentials (GWP) for these compounds in order to get a complete evaluation of their environmental impact. Tropospheric degradation is expected to be initiated mainly by OH reactions in the gas phase. Nevertheless, Cl atoms reaction may also be important since rate constants are generally larger than those of OH. In the present work, we report the results obtained in the study of the reactions of Cl radicals with HFE-7000 (CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)OCH(3)) (1) and its isomer CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH (2). Kinetic rate coefficients with Cl atoms have been measured using the discharge flow tube-mass spectrometric technique at 1 Torr of total pressure. The reactions of these chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) substitutes have been studied under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions in excess of the fluorinated compounds over Cl atoms. The temperature ranges were 266-333 and 298-353 K for reactions of HFE-7000 and CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH, respectively. The measured room temperature rate constants were k(Cl+CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)OCH(3)) = (1.24 +/- 0.28) x 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)and k(Cl+CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH) = (8.35 +/- 1.63) x 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (errors are 2sigma + 10% to cover systematic errors). The Arrhenius expression for reaction 1 was k (1)(266-333 K) = (6.1 +/- 3.8) x 10(-13)exp[-(445 +/- 186)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k (2)(298-353 K) = (1.9 +/- 0.7) x 10(-12)exp[-(244 +/- 125)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (errors

  16. Reactive hydro- end chlorocarbons in the troposphere and lower stratosphere : sources, distributions, and chemical impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeren, H. A.

    2003-09-01

    special interest in this thesis are the tropical regions because they are becoming increasingly important in terms of global anthropogenic pollution and climate change. In addition, natural emissions of hydrocarbons (notably isoprene and terpenes from plants) and reactive chlorocarbons appear to be concentrated in the tropics, where the largest uncertainties exist with respect to source type and source strength. Whenever available, the reactive NMHC and chlorocarbon data have been analyzed with the help of concurrent measurements, which includes ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NO), total reactive oxidized nitrogen (NOy), nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), acetone (CH3COCH3), methanol (CH3OH), acetonitrile (CH3CN), the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 (CCl3F) and CFC-12 (CCl2F2), the hydrofluorocarbon HFC-134a (CH2FCF3), and the hydrochlorofluorocarbons HCFC-141b (CH3CCl2F) and HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2). These additional measurements provided important information about the air mass origin, pollution sources, and chemical age of the encountered air masses. The STREAM-measurements contribute to the present understanding of the budgets of reactive organic trace species in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere at different seasonal conditions. It was found that during summer and fall, the mean concentrations of reactive NMHC and acetone in the lower stratosphere were a factor of two or more higher than during winter, as a result of more intense and frequent mixing across the tropopause. The role of tropical emissions in the global budget of hydrocarbons and the chlorocarbons CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, and C2Cl4 has been investigated during the LBA/CLAIRE 1998,