WorldWideScience

Sample records for parents pediatric residents

  1. A phenomenologic investigation of pediatric residents' experiences being parented and giving parenting advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, A C; Shawler, P M; Blackmon, D L; DeGrace, E W; Wolraich, M L

    2016-09-01

    Factors surrounding pediatricians' parenting advice and training on parenting during residency have not been well studied. The primary purpose of this study was to examine pediatric residents' self-reported experiences giving parenting advice and explore the relationship between parenting advice given and types of parenting residents received as children. Thirteen OUHSC pediatric residents were individually interviewed to examine experiences being parented and giving parenting advice. Phenomenological methods were used to explicate themes and secondary analyses explored relationships of findings based upon Baumrind's parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive). While childhood experiences were not specifically correlated to the parenting advice style of pediatric residents interviewed, virtually all reported relying upon childhood experiences to generate their advice. Those describing authoritative parents reported giving more authoritative advice while others reported more variable advice. Core interview themes related to residents' parenting advice included anxiety about not being a parent, varying advice based on families' needs, and emphasis of positive interactions and consistency. Themes related to how residents were parented included discipline being a learning process for their parents and recalling that their parents always had expectations, yet always loved them. Pediatric residents interviewed reported giving family centered parenting advice with elements of positive interactions and consistency, but interviews highlighted many areas of apprehension residents have around giving parenting advice. Our study suggests that pediatric residents may benefit from more general educational opportunities to develop the content of their parenting advice, including reflecting on any impact from their own upbringing.

  2. Parental leave for residents and pediatric training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is committed to the development of rational, equitable, and effective parental leave policies that are sensitive to the needs of pediatric residents, families, and developing infants and that enable parents to spend adequate and good-quality time with their young children. It is important for each residency program to have a policy for parental leave that is written, that is accessible to residents, and that clearly delineates program practices regarding parental leave. At a minimum, a parental leave policy for residents and fellows should conform legally with the Family Medical Leave Act as well as with respective state laws and should meet institutional requirements of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for accredited programs. Policies should be well formulated and communicated in a culturally sensitive manner. The AAP advocates for extension of benefits consistent with the Family Medical Leave Act to all residents and interns beginning at the time that pediatric residency training begins. The AAP recommends that regardless of gender, residents who become parents should be guaranteed 6 to 8 weeks, at a minimum, of parental leave with pay after the infant's birth. In addition, in conformance with federal law, the resident should be allowed to extend the leave time when necessary by using paid vacation time or leave without pay. Coparenting, adopting, or fostering of a child should entitle the resident, regardless of gender, to the same amount of paid leave (6-8 weeks) as a person who takes maternity/paternity leave. Flexibility, creativity, and advanced planning are necessary to arrange schedules that optimize resident education and experience, cultivate equity in sharing workloads, and protect pregnant residents from overly strenuous work experiences at critical times of their pregnancies.

  3. Training Pediatric Residents to Provide Smoking Cessation Counseling to Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Collins

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess the effectiveness of a smoking cessation educational program on pediatric residents' counseling. Residents were randomly selected to receive the intervention. Residents who were trained were compared to untrained residents. Self-reported surveys and patient chart reviews were used. Measures included changes in self-reported knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of residents, and differences in chart documentation and caretaker-reported physician counseling behaviors. The intervention was multidimensional including a didactic presentation, a problem-solving session, clinic reminders, and provision of patient education materials. Results showed that residents who were trained were more likely to ask about tobacco use in their patients' households. They were also more likely to advise caretakers to cut down on or to quit smoking, to help set a quit date, and to follow up on the advice given at a subsequent visit. Trained residents were more likely to record a history of passive tobacco exposure in the medical record. These residents also reported improved confidence in their counseling skills and documented that they had done such counseling more often than did untrained residents. Caretakers of pediatric patients who smoke seen by intervention residents were more likely to report that they had received tobacco counseling. Following this intervention, pediatric residents significantly improved their behaviors, attitudes, and confidence in providing smoking cessation counseling to parents of their pediatric patients.

  4. The pediatric resident training on tobacco project: baseline findings from the Parent/Guardian Tobacco Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymowitz, Norman; Schwab, Joseph; Haddock, Christopher keith; Pyle, Sara; Moore, Glenisha; Meshberg, Sarah

    2005-07-01

    Pediatricians have an important and unique role to play in the anti-tobacco arena. They may prevent relapse to smoking in women who stopped smoking during pregnancy, encourage parents to protect infants and young children from environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), prevent the onset of smoking in children and adolescents, and help patients and parents who smoke or use other forms of tobacco to quit. Unfortunately, few pediatricians intervene on tobacco use or ETS, and few pediatric residency training programs prepare residents to address tobacco. The Pediatric Residency Training on Tobacco Project is a 4-year randomized prospective study of the effectiveness of training pediatric residents to intervene on tobacco in patients and parents. In this paper, we present findings from the Baseline Parent/Guardian Tobacco Survey. Fifteen pediatric residency training programs participated in the Pediatric Residency Training on Tobacco Project, and they were assigned randomly to special and standard training conditions. The Baseline Parent/Guardian Tobacco Survey was administered to 1770 participants, a minimum of 100 from each site. The Parent/Guardian Survey was designed to describe the population under study. It addressed demographic information, family tobacco use, rules concerning smoking in the home and elsewhere, smoking behavior and beliefs, and parent/guardian reports of resident intervention on tobacco. Data analyses described the population served by Continuity Clinics associated with the pediatric residency training programs and determined the degree to which residents addressed tobacco in parents/guardians. The parents/guardians were primarily low-income African American and Hispanic females. Approximately 20% reported that they smoked cigarettes, and about 60% prohibited smoking in their home. Seventy percent of the parents reported that the resident asked about cigarette smoking, and about half indicated that the resident talked with them about ETS. However, only

  5. The development of the PARENTS: a tool for parents to assess residents' non-technical skills in pediatric emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Eady, Kaylee; Tang, Kenneth; Jabbour, Mona; Frank, Jason R; Campbell, Meaghan; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2017-11-14

    Parents can assess residents' non-technical skills (NTS) in pediatric emergency departments (EDs). There are no assessment tools, with validity evidence, for parental use in pediatric EDs. The purpose of this study was to develop the Parents' Assessment of Residents Enacting Non-Technical Skills (PARENTS) educational assessment tool and collect three sources of validity evidence (i.e., content, response process, internal structure) for it. We established content evidence for the PARENTS through interviews with physician-educators and residents, focus groups with parents, a literature review, and a modified nominal group technique with experts. We collected response process evidence through cognitive interviews with parents. To examine the internal structure evidence, we administered the PARENTS and performed exploratory factor analysis. Initially, a 20-item PARENTS was developed. Cognitive interviews led to the removal of one closed-ended item, the addition of resident photographs, and wording/formatting changes. Thirty-seven residents and 434 parents participated in the administration of the resulting 19-item PARENTS. Following factor analysis, a one-factor model prevailed. The study presents initial validity evidence for the PARENTS. It also highlights strategies for potentially: (a) involving parents in the assessment of residents, (b) improving the assessment of NTS in pediatric EDs, and (c) capturing parents' perspectives to improve the preparation of future physicians.

  6. The pediatric residency training on tobacco project: four-year parent outcome findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymowitz, Norman; Pyle, Sara A; Haddock, C Keith; Schwab, Joseph V

    2008-08-01

    To assess parent behavioral change and perception of resident intervention on tobacco. In a long-term study of the efficacy of training pediatric residents to address tobacco conducted at the New Jersey Medical School, sixteen pediatric training programs were assigned randomly to either special or standard training conditions. Parent surveys were administered in the fall of 2001 and 2005 in order to assess the effects of resident intervention on parent behavior, as well as parent perceptions of resident intervention. The percent of parents who smoke at sites associated with the special training condition, but not of those at sites associated with standard training, who reported that residents advised them to stop smoking, offered to help them quit, and provided quit smoking materials increased significantly from baseline to year 4. The percent of parents in the special training condition who reported quitting smoking in the past year also increased, although the increase was not statistically significant. A majority of the parents associated with each training condition reported receiving intervention for second hand smoke (SHS). For each training condition, the level of intervention to prevent exposure of infants and children to SHS exposure was similar at baseline and year 4, as was the percent of parents who reported having a smoke-free household. The results support the efficacy of the special training program and underscore the importance of preparing pediatric residents to address tobacco.

  7. Preliminary Validation of a Parent-Child Relational Framework for Teaching Developmental Assessment to Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalado, Michael; Schneiderman, Janet U; Duan, Lei; Ragusa, Gisele

    A parent-child relational framework was used as a method to train pediatric residents in basic knowledge and observation skills for the assessment of child development. Components of the training framework and its preliminary validation as an alternative to milestone-based approaches are described. Pediatric residents were trained during a 4-week clinical rotation to use a semistructured interview and observe parent-child behavior during health visits using clinical criteria for historical information and observed behavior that reflect developmental change in the parent-child relationship. Clinical impressions of concern versus no concern for developmental delay were derived from parent-child relational criteria and the physical examination. A chart review yielded 330 preterm infants evaluated using this methodology at 4 and 15 months corrected age who also had standardized developmental testing at 6 and 18 months corrected age. Sensitivities and specificities were computed to examine the validity of the clinical assessment compared with standardized testing. A subset of residents who completed 50 or more assessments during the rotation was timed at the end of 4 weeks. Parent-child behavioral markers elicited from the history and/or observed during the health visit correlated highly with standardized developmental assessment. Sensitivities and specificities were 0.72/0.98 and 0.87/0.96 at 4 to 6 and 15 to 18 months, respectively. Residents completed their assessments parent-child relational framework is a potentially efficient and effective approach to training residents in the clinical knowledge and skills of child development assessment. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcome of parent-physician communication skills training for pediatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, Christoph; Bosse, Hans Martin; Hoffmann, Katja; Möltner, Andreas; Hancke, Rabea; Conrad, Corinna; Huwendiek, Soeren; Hoffmann, Georg F; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    communication skills represent an essential component of clinical competence. In the field of pediatrics, communication between physicians and patients' parents is characterized by particular difficulties. To investigate the effects of a parent-physician communication skills training program on OSCE performance and self-efficacy in a group control design. parallel to their daily work in the outpatient department, intervention-group experienced clinicians in practice (n=14) participated in a communication training with standardized parents. Control-group physicians (n=14) did not receive any training beyond their daily work. Performance was assessed by independent video ratings of an OSCE. Both groups rated their self-efficacy prior to and following training. regarding OSCE performance, the intervention group demonstrated superior skills in building relationships with parents (pperform better in exploring parents' problems (pcommunication training program led to significant improvement in self-efficacy with respect to the specific training objectives in the intervention group (pcommunication training with standardized parents leads to significant improvement in OSCE performance and self-efficacy. PRACTISE IMPLICATIONS: briefness and tight structure make the presented communication training program applicable even for experienced physicians in daily clinical practice. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Social pediatrics: weaving horizontal and vertical threads through pediatric residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Meta; Martimianakis, Maria Athina Tina; Levy, Rebecca; Atkinson, Adelle; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth; Shouldice, Michelle

    2017-01-13

    Social pediatrics teaches pediatric residents how to understand disease within their patients' social, environmental and political contexts. It's an essential component of pediatric residency training; however there is very little literature that addresses how such a broad-ranging topic can be taught effectively. The aim of this study was to determine and characterize social pediatric education in our pediatric residency training in order to identify strengths and gaps. A social pediatrics curriculum map was developed, attending to 3 different dimensions: (1) the intended curriculum as prescribed by the Objectives of Training for Pediatrics of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), (2) the formal curriculum defined by rotation-specific learning objectives, and (3) the informal/hidden curriculum as reflected in resident and teacher experiences and perceptions. Forty-one social pediatric learning objectives were extracted from the RCPSC Objectives of Training for Pediatrics, most were listed in the Medical Expert (51%) and Health Advocate competencies (24%). Almost all RCPSC social pediatric learning objectives were identified in more than one rotation and/or seminar. Adolescent Medicine (29.2%), Pediatric Ambulatory Medicine (26.2%) and Developmental Pediatrics (25%) listed the highest proportion of social pediatric learning objectives. Four (10%) RCPSC social pediatric objectives were not explicitly named within learning objectives of the formal curriculum. The informal curriculum revealed that both teachers and residents viewed social pediatrics as integral to all clinical encounters. Perceived barriers to teaching and learning of social pediatrics included time constraints, particularly in a tertiary care environment, and the value of social pediatrics relative to medical expert knowledge. Despite the lack of an explicit thematic presentation of social pediatric learning objectives by the Royal College and residency training program

  10. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  11. Pediatric resident perceptions of family-friendly benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Carol D; Frintner, Mary Pat; Cull, William L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the importance of family-friendly features in residency program selection, benefits offered to and used by residents, and importance of benefits in future job selection. A survey of a random, national sample of 1000 graduating pediatric residents in 2008 was mailed and e-mailed. Survey response rate for graduating resident respondents was 59%. Among the respondents, 76% were women. Thirty-seven percent of men and 32% of women were parents. Residents with children were more likely than residents without children to rate family-friendly characteristics as very important in their residency selection (P maternity leave (88%), paternity leave (59%), individual flexibility with schedule (63%), and lactation rooms (55%), but fewer reported on-site child care (24%), care for ill children (19%), and part-time residency positions (12%). Among residents reporting availability, 77% of women with children used maternity leave and lactation rooms. Few held part-time residency positions (2%), but many expressed interest (23% of women with children). The majority of residents with and without children reported that flexibility with schedule was important in their future job selection. Most women with children (71%) and many women without children (52%) considered part-time work to be very important in their job selection. Family-friendly benefits are important to residents, particularly those with children. The data provides a benchmark for the availability and use of family-friendly features at pediatric training programs. The data also shows that many residents are unaware if benefits are offered, which suggests a need to make available benefits more transparent to residents. Copyright 2010 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Challenges of pediatric residency training in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsuen-Chiuan; Harasym, Peter H

    2006-01-01

    A crisis in pediatric residency training today has raised serious concerns about the healthcare quality for children in Taiwan. The purpose of this study was to document the problems and to propose possible solutions for improvement. The problems include: 1) manpower shortage due to the difficulty of recruiting pediatric residents; 2) heavy workload that hinders learning; 3) lack of assessment and poor program planning; and 4) inadequate institutional and financial support. As a result, physicians' competencies are not guaranteed at the end of residency training, even with the pediatric board certification. Possible solutions may include: 1) conducting research on physician manpower statistics, work hours and environment; 2) establishing a Residency Program Review Committee and provision of standards for accreditation; 3) defining the competencies mandated as a general pediatrician and developing a set of measurable qualitative standards; 4) encouraging new programs with flexibility (e.g., primary care); and 5) pursuing adequate institutional and financial supports.

  13. Pediatric Oncology Branch - training- resident electives | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resident Electives Select pediatric residents may be approved for a 4-week elective rotation at the Pediatric Oncology Branch. This rotation emphasizes the important connection between research and patient care in pediatric oncology. The resident is supervised directly by the Branch’s attending physician and clinical fellows. Residents attend daily in-patient and out-patient

  14. Media education in pediatric residencies: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Dimitri A; Frintner, Mary Pat; Mulligan, Deborah A; Fuld, Gilbert L; Olson, Lynn M

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the current state of residency education with respect to counseling parents about media usage and whether trainees consider it to be adequate. A national survey of graduating pediatric residents was conducted in the United States to determine the amount of training they receive on traditional and new media, their perceptions of its quality, and their self-reported practices regarding talking to families about media usage. A 58% response rate was achieved with no evidence of response bias based on age or gender. Only 38% rated their residency program as "very good" or "excellent" in preparing them to provide anticipatory guidance on the effects of media on children and adolescents. In logistic regression analyses, controlling for demographic characteristics, more training on media issues was a significant predictor for usually/always advising families on traditional, passive media (adjusted odds ratio = 3.29; 95% confidence interval 2.26-4.81) and usually/always advising families on new, interactive media use (adjusted odds ratio = 3.96; 95% confidence interval 2.61-6.00) during well-child visits. The majority of residents believe their training on children in media is inadequate. Enhanced training on media is needed in US pediatric residencies. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pediatric dermatology training during residency: a survey of the 2014 graduating residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Alaleh; Murphy-Chutorian, Blair; Friedman, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of pediatric dermatology is considered a core competency of dermatology training and should be expected of all practicing dermatologists. While the numbers of both pediatric dermatology fellowships and board certified pediatric dermatologists in the workforce have increased over the years, recent reports suggest that there is a gap in pediatric dermatology education during dermatology residency. The goal of this study is to assess the current state of pediatric education during residency, as well as the clinical experience, satisfaction and expectations of graduating dermatology residents. A 31-question self-report survey was distributed electronically to 294 third-year dermatology residents with questions pertaining to demographics, didactic education, resident experience in pediatric dermatology training, satisfaction with pediatric training and future plans. One hundred and twenty-three residents responded (41.8% response rate) representing approximately 29.1% of the total number of graduating residents. 69 (56.1%) residents reported academic time specifically devoted to pediatric dermatology, the majority (79.7%) of which was led by pediatric dermatologists. 82% of residents reported dedicated pediatric dermatology clinics at their program. 86.8% of respondents felt that their training in pediatric dermatology will allow them to confidently see pediatric dermatology patients in practice. This survey highlights a promising state of pediatric dermatology training among current graduating dermatology residents. The majority of current graduating dermatology residents are satisfied with their pediatric dermatology education, feel confident treating pediatric patients, and plan to see pediatric patients in clinical practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Pediatric dermatology training survey of United States dermatology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Mazza, Joni M; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Variability exists in pediatric dermatology education for dermatology residents. We sought to formally assess the pediatric dermatology curriculum and experience in a dermatology residency program. Three unique surveys were developed for dermatology residents, residency program directors, and pediatric dermatology fellowship program directors. The surveys consisted of questions pertaining to residency program characteristics. Sixty-three graduating third-year residents, 51 residency program directors, and 18 pediatric dermatology fellowship program directors responded. Residents in programs with one or more full-time pediatric dermatologist were more likely to feel very competent treating children and were more likely to be somewhat or extremely satisfied with their pediatric curriculums than residents in programs with no full-time pediatric dermatologist (50.0% vs 5.9%, p = 0.002, and 85.3% vs 52.9%, p dermatology fellowships were much more likely to report being extremely satisfied than residents in programs without a pediatric dermatology fellowship (83.3% vs 21.2%; p dermatology residency programs to continue to strengthen their pediatric dermatology curriculums, especially through the recruitment of full-time pediatric dermatologists. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Assessment of pediatric residents burnout in a tertiary academic centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roaa S. Jamjoom

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study burnout among pediatric residents at King Abdulazaiz University Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey that was administered to all pediatric residents enrolled in the Saudi Paediatric Board program (PGY1-PGY4 in a large tertiary academic hospital in the Western region of Saudi Arabia (King Abdulaziz University Hospital. The survey were sent via E-mail to 50 registered general pediatric residents. Results: Seventy percent of the pediatric residents completed the survey. More than 70% of residents experiencing severe burnout. Forty-three percent suffering emotional exhaustion, 71.8% experiencing depersonalization and 40.6% suffering from low accomplishment. Conclusion: Burnout syndrome appear to be a serious threat to resident well-being in our program. Moreover, pediatric residents in our institute experienced higher levels of depersonalization than their peers nationally and internationally.

  18. [Motivation and learning strategies in pediatric residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-Vildósola, Ana Carolina; Carrada-Legaria, Sol; Reyes-Lagunes, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Motivation is an internal mood that moves individuals to act, points them in certain directions, and maintains them in activities, playing a very important role in self-regulated learning and academic performance. Our objective was to evaluate motivation and self-regulation of knowledge in pediatric residents in a third-level hospital, and to determine if there are differences according to the type of specialty and sociodemographic variables. All residents who agreed to participate responded to the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. Cronbach alpha was performed to determine reliability. The mean value of each subscale was compared with Student's t test or ANOVA, correlation of subscales with Pearson test. A value of p≤0.05 was considered significant. We included 118 residents. The questionnaire was highly reliable (α=0.939). There were no significant differences in motivation or learning strategies according to sex, marital status, or age. Those residents studying a second or third specialization had significantly higher scores in elaboration, critical thinking, and peer learning. There were significant correlations between intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy with the development of knowledge strategies such as elaboration, critical thinking, and metacognitive self-regulation. Our students present average-to-high scores of motivation and knowledge strategies, with a significant difference according to type of specialization. There is a high correlation between motivation and knowledge strategies.

  19. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area.

  20. Everyday ethics issues in the outpatient clinical practice of pediatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Margaret; Taylor, Holly A; McDonald, Erin L; Hughes, Mark T; Carrese, Joseph A

    2009-09-01

    To describe the ethics issues that pediatric residents encounter during routine care in an outpatient teaching clinic. Qualitative study including in-depth interviews with pediatric residents and direct observation of interactions between preceptors and residents in a pediatric teaching clinic. The Johns Hopkins Harriet Lane Pediatric Primary Care Clinic, March 20 through April 11, 2006. A convenience sample including all pediatric faculty preceptors supervising at the clinic during the 19 half-day sessions that occurred during the observation period (N = 15) and the pediatric residents seeing patients during these clinic sessions (N = 50). Main Outcome Measure Field notes of preceptor-resident discussions about patient care were made and transcribed for qualitative analysis. Qualitative analysis of the ethics content of cases presented by residents in this pediatric teaching clinic identified 5 themes for categorizing ethics challenges: (1) promoting the child's best interests in complex and resource-poor home and social settings; (2) managing the therapeutic alliance with parents and caregivers; (3) protecting patient privacy and confidentiality; (4) balancing the dual roles of learner and health care provider; and (5) using professional authority appropriately. Qualitative analysis of the ethics content of directly observed preceptor-resident case discussions yielded a set of themes describing the ethics challenges facing pediatric residents. The themes are somewhat different from the lists of residents' ethics experiences developed using recall or survey methods and may be very different from the ideas usually included in hospital-based ethics discussions. This may have implications for improving ethics education during residency training.

  1. Communication skills in pediatric training program: National-based survey of residents' perspectives in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alofisan, Tariq; Al-Alaiyan, Saleh; Al-Abdulsalam, Moath; Siddiqui, Khawar; Hussain, Ibrahim Bin; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad H

    2016-01-01

    Good communication skills and rapport building are considered the cardinal tools for developing a patient-doctor relationship. A positive, healthy competition among different health care organizations in Saudi Arabia underlines an ever increasing emphasis on effective patient-doctor relationship. Despite the numerous guidelines provided and programs available, there is a significant variation in the acceptance and approach to the use of this important tool among pediatric residents in this part of the world. To determine pediatric residents' attitude toward communication skills, their perception of important communication skills, and their confidence in the use of their communication skills in the performance of their primary duties. A cross-sectional study was conducted among all pediatrics trainee residents working in 13 different hospitals in Saudi Arabia. A standardized self-administered questionnaire developed by the Harvard Medical School was used. A total of 297 residents out of all trainees in these centers participated in the data collection. The 283 (95%) residents considered learning communication skills a priority in establishing a good patient-doctor relationship. Thirty four percent reported being very confident with regard to their communication skills. Few residents had the skills, and the confidence to communicate with children with serious diseases, discuss end-of-life issues, and deal with difficult patients and parents. Pediatric residents perceive the importance of communication skills and competencies as crucial components in their training. A proper comprehensive communication skills training should be incorporated into the pediatric resident training curriculum.

  2. Limitation of duty hour regulations for pediatric resident wellness

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura, Osamu; Mishina, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Ishiguro, Akira; Sakai, Hirokazu; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Duty hour regulations have been placed in residency programs to address mental health concerns and to improve wellness. Here, we elucidate the prevalence of depressive symptoms after implementing an overnight call shift system and the factors associated with burnout or depression among residents. A sequential exploratory mixed methods study was conducted in a tertiary care pediatric and perinatal hospital in Tokyo, Japan. A total of 41 pediatric residents participated in the cross-se...

  3. Parental Leave Policies and Pediatric Trainees in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avika; Feldman-Winter, Lori; Szucs, Kinga A

    2015-08-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) states that each residency program should have a clearly delineated, written policy for parental leave. Parental leave has important implications for trainees' ability to achieve their breastfeeding goals. This study aimed to measure the knowledge and awareness among members of the AAP Section on Medical Students, Residents, and Fellowship Trainees (SOMSRFT) regarding parental leave. An online survey was emailed to SOMSRFT members in June 2013. Quantitative data are presented as percentage of respondents. Awareness of leave policies was analyzed based on having children and the sex of respondents. Nine hundred twenty-seven members responded to the survey. Among those with children, 40% needed to extend the duration of their training in order to have longer maternity leave, 44% of whom did so in order to breastfeed longer. Thirty percent of respondents did not know if their program had a written, accessible policy for parental leave. Trainees without children and men were more unaware of specific aspects of parental leave such as eligibility for the Family Medical Leave Act as compared to women and those with children. Despite the fact that United States national policies support parental leave during pediatrics training, and a majority of programs comply, trainees' awareness regarding these policies needs improvement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Intravenous fluid prescription practices among pediatric residents in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jiwon M.; Jung, Younghwa; Lee, Se Eun; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Kee Hyuck; Koo, Ja Wook; Park, Young Seo; Cheong, Hae Il; Ha, Il-Soo; Choi, Yong; Kang, Hee Gyung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have established the association between hypotonic fluids administration and hospital-acquired hyponatremia in children, and have contended that hypotonic fluids be removed from routine practice. To assess current intravenous fluid prescription practices among Korean pediatric residents and to call for updated clinical-practice education Methods: A survey-based analysis was carried out. Pediatric residents at six university hospitals in Korea completed a survey consist...

  5. Parents as passengers during pediatric transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M M; Holditch-Davis, D; Brunssen, S

    1997-01-01

    The transport environment presents a unique setting in which the feasibility, advantages, and disadvantages of passengers accompanying a patient must be assessed carefully. The purpose of this study was to describe the current practice of including parents as passengers during pediatric interfacility transport. One-hundred-eighty-eight critical care transport programs in the United States responded to a voluntary mail survey, providing information about current policies, practices, and crew perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages of carrying parents as passengers. Extra seating for passengers was available in 96% of ambulances, 86% of fixed-wing aircraft, and 54% of helicopters used for pediatric transport. Parents traveled as passengers in all types of vehicles; most frequently in ambulances and fixed-wing aircraft. Twenty percent of helicopter programs allowed parent passengers on more than half of their pediatric transports in this vehicle. Advantages of parent passengers included emotional benefit for the parent and child, availability of parents for history and consent, good public relations, and having the parent present if the child dies. Disadvantages included potential parent anxiety, crew distraction, and space limitations. This study reflects the widely diverse policies, practices, and opinions relevant to this topic and confirms a need for further study.

  6. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE & ATTITUDE OF THE PEDIATRIC RESIDENT ABOUT NEONATAL & PEDIATRIC CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M KADIAVAR

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A high leve of skill & knowledge is required in circumstances of cardiopulmonary resucitation which represents the most urgent clinical situations. The difficulties for pediatric residents who are fronted with the most cases of pediatric & neonatal resucitation are due to different causes of cardiorespiratory arrest in camparison to adults. This study aimed to assess the knowledge & their personal attitude toward the neonatal & pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitatin. Methods: By cross - sectional multicenter study between the pediatric residents who were studied in the teaching hospitals in Tehran (1378-90. Data were gathered among 140 residents by self-completed questionnaires which were included three parts as. demographic information assessment of their attitude by summation of score via ranking list questions and total score from assessment to their knowledge by different scenarios which were formatted in the multiple choice questions. Results: 35.7% of the residents studied in the first year of residency 35.0% in the second year and the remainder (29/3% in the third year More than 90% of them considered their knowledge about neonatal and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation low & less than average. Net only 80% of the residents self - assessed their actual ability about this issue low but also declaired the insufficient education during the medical training. The total score of knowledge assessment was 14.7 + 1_0.54 from 30 without any significant relations among the residents in different hospitals or various levels of pediatric residency. (P value= 0.1 , 0.7 There was not significant correlation between the total score from their attitude & their knowledge. Conclusion: Pediatric residents as the key personnel in the management of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of the neonates and children should have enough knowledge and skills about this topic. This survey demonstrates a low level of the pediatric & neonatal

  7. How Do US Pediatric Residency Programs Teach and Evaluate Community Pediatrics and Advocacy Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Cara; Hoffman, Benjamin D; Moon, Rachel Y

    2017-07-01

    In 2013, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education updated requirements for training in community pediatrics and advocacy in pediatric residency programs. In light of this update, the aim of this study was to better understand how community pediatrics is being taught and evaluated in pediatric residency programs in the United States. Cross-sectional exploratory study using a Web-based survey of pediatric residency program directors in September 2014. Questions focused on teaching and evaluation of 10 community pediatrics competencies. Of 85 programs (43% response rate), 30% offered a separate training track and/or 6-block individualized curriculum in community pediatrics or advocacy. More than 75% required all residents to learn 7 of 10 competencies queried. Respondents in urban settings were more likely to teach care of special populations (P = .02) and public speaking (P pediatrics and advocacy teaching among responding US pediatric residency programs. Although respondents reported a variety of teaching and evaluation methods, there were few statistically significant differences between programs. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Performance of Bedside Lung Ultrasound by a Pediatric Resident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Chen; Grundtvig, Natalia; Klug, Bent Helmuth

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies suggest that lung ultrasound is a good, radiation-free alternative to chest radiography in children with pneumonia. We investigated how bedside lung ultrasound performed by a pediatric resident compared with chest radiography in children with suspected pneumonia. METHODS......: This was a prospective study comparing bedside lung ultrasound to chest radiography as the reference standard. Children aged 0 to 15 years with suspected pneumonia at a pediatric emergency department were included and underwent chest radiography and lung ultrasound. A pediatric resident with minimal practical ultrasound...

  9. Obesity prevention in pediatrics: A pilot pediatric resident curriculum intervention on nutrition and obesity education and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jose L; Gilmer, Loise

    2006-09-01

    Obesity is a highly burdensome public health issue associated with premature death, multiple comorbid disabilities and staggering healthcare costs. Between 1980-2000, the prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents nearly tripled. Obesity subjects youth to social stigmatization and discrimination. These economic and personal burdens mandate targeted prevention and detection educational programs for all individuals at risk. The most cost-effective method of approaching this obesity epidemic is through education of health professionals. As part of an "Obesity Prevention in Pediatrics" curriculum, postgraduate-year (PGY)-2 residents first observed and then participated in the dietary evaluation and counseling of pediatric patients and their families. Attitudinal questionnaires, multiple-choice knowledge examinations and a pre-established checklist of desired skills and behaviors provided evaluation of the curriculum's effect on the participants' ability and willingness to manage actually obese or at-risk pediatric patients and their families. Attitudinal survey and knowledge test scores from control PGY-3 residents generally confirmed that their knowledge and counseling skills on obesity prevention and management were well below expectation. Following participation in the curriculum, study residents' knowledge tended to improve, as did their level of comfort in counseling obese and at-risk children, adolescents and their parents. Implementation of an "Obesity Prevention in Pediatrics" curriculum appears to improve participants' knowledge base as well as their skills and level of personal comfort in the recognition, evaluation and management, including counseling, of both obese and at-risk pediatric patients and their families.

  10. Pediatric resident perceptions of shift work in ward rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Osamu; Mishina, Hiroki; Jasti, Harish; Sakai, Hirokazu; Ishiguro, Akira

    2017-10-01

    Although the long working hours of physicians are considered to be a social issue, no effective policies such as duty hour regulations have so far been proposed in Japan. We implemented an overnight call shift (OCS) system for ward rotations to improve the working environment for residents in a pediatric residency program. We later conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire asking the residents to compare this system with the traditional overnight call system. Forty-one pediatric residents participated in this survey. The residents felt that the quality of patient care improved (80.4% agreed). Most felt that there was less emphasis on education (26.8%) and more emphasis on service (31.7%). Overall, the residents reported that the OCS was beneficial (90.2%). In conclusion, the pediatric residents considered the OCS system during ward rotations as beneficial. Alternative solutions are vital to balance improvements in resident work conditions with the requirement for a high quality of education. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. Fellows as teachers: a model to enhance pediatric resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Carl H; Reber, Kris M; Trittmann, Jennifer K B; Huang, Hong; Tomblin, Jordanna; Moorehead, Pamela A; Bauer, John A; Smith, Charles V; Mahan, John D

    2011-01-01

    Pressures on academic faculty to perform beyond their role as educators has stimulated interest in complementary approaches in resident medical education. While fellows are often believed to detract from resident learning and experience, we describe our preliminary investigations utilizing clinical fellows as a positive force in pediatric resident education. Our objectives were to implement a practical approach to engage fellows in resident education, evaluate the impact of a fellow-led education program on pediatric resident and fellow experience, and investigate if growth of a fellowship program detracts from resident procedural experience. This study was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) where fellows designed and implemented an education program consisting of daily didactic teaching sessions before morning clinical rounds. The impact of a fellow-led education program on resident satisfaction with their NICU experience was assessed via anonymous student evaluations. The potential value of the program for participating fellows was also evaluated using an anonymous survey. The online evaluation was completed by 105 residents. Scores were markedly higher after the program was implemented in areas of teaching excellence (4.44 out of 5 versus 4.67, pteaching skills and enhanced knowledge of neonatal pathophysiology as the most valuable aspects of their participation in the education program. The anonymous survey revealed that 87.5% of participating residents believed that NICU fellows were very important to their overall training and education. While fellows are often believed to be a detracting factor to residency training, we found that pediatric resident attitudes toward the fellows were generally positive. In our experience, in the specialty of neonatology a fellow-led education program can positively contribute to both resident and fellow learning and satisfaction. Further investigation into the value of utilizing fellows as a positive force in

  12. Parental separation and pediatric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Sally; Carlsen, Kathrine; Bidstrup, Pernille Envold Hansen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the risk for separation (ending cohabitation) of the parents of a child with a diagnosis of cancer.......The purpose of this study was to determine the risk for separation (ending cohabitation) of the parents of a child with a diagnosis of cancer....

  13. The role of librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine to pediatric residents: a survey of pediatric residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykan, Rachel; Jacobson, Robert M

    2017-10-01

    The research sought to identify the general use of medical librarians in pediatric residency training, to define the role of medical librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) to pediatric residents, and to describe strategies and curricula for teaching EBM used in pediatric residency training programs. We sent a 13-question web-based survey through the Association of Pediatric Program Directors to 200 pediatric residency program directors between August and December 2015. A total of 91 (46%) pediatric residency program directors responded. Most (76%) programs had formal EBM curricula, and more than 75% of curricula addressed question formation, searching, assessment of validity, generalizability, quantitative importance, statistical significance, and applicability. The venues for teaching EBM that program directors perceived to be most effective included journal clubs (84%), conferences (44%), and morning report (36%). While 80% of programs utilized medical librarians, most of these librarians assisted with scholarly or research projects (74%), addressed clinical questions (62%), and taught on any topic not necessarily EBM (58%). Only 17% of program directors stated that librarians were involved in teaching EBM on a regular basis. The use of a librarian was not associated with having an EBM curriculum but was significantly associated with the size of the program. Smaller programs were more likely to utilize librarians (100%) than were medium (71%) or large programs (75%). While most pediatric residency programs have an EBM curriculum and engage medical librarians in various ways, librarians' expertise in teaching EBM is underutilized. Programs should work to better integrate librarians' expertise, both in the didactic and clinical teaching of EBM.

  14. How Residents Learn From Patient Feedback: A Multi-Institutional Qualitative Study of Pediatrics Residents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogetz, Alyssa L; Orlov, Nicola; Blankenburg, Rebecca; Bhavaraju, Vasudha; McQueen, Alisa; Rassbach, Caroline

    2018-04-01

    Residents may view feedback from patients and their families with greater skepticism than feedback from supervisors and peers. While discussing patient and family feedback with faculty may improve residents' acceptance of feedback and learning, specific strategies have not been identified. We explored pediatrics residents' perspectives of patient feedback and identified strategies that promote residents' reflection on and learning from feedback. In this multi-institutional, qualitative study conducted in June and July 2016, we conducted focus groups with a purposive sample of pediatrics residents after their participation in a randomized controlled trial in which they received written patient feedback and either discussed it with faculty or reviewed it independently. Focus group transcripts were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analyzed for themes using the constant comparative approach associated with grounded theory. Thirty-six of 92 (39%) residents participated in 7 focus groups. Four themes emerged: (1) residents valued patient feedback but felt it may lack the specificity they desire; (2) discussing feedback with a trusted faculty member was helpful for self-reflection; (3) residents identified 5 strategies faculty used to facilitate their openness to and acceptance of patient feedback (eg, help resident overcome emotional responses to feedback and situate feedback in the context of lifelong learning); and (4) residents' perceptions of feedback credibility improved when faculty observed patient encounters and solicited feedback on the resident's behalf prior to discussions. Discussing patient feedback with faculty provided important scaffolding to enhance residents' openness to and reflection on patient feedback.

  15. Does being a chief resident predict leadership in pediatric careers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, J J; Levenson, S M; Osman, C J; James, S

    2000-04-01

    Many organizations make efforts to identify future pediatric leaders, often focusing on chief residents (CRs). Identifying future leaders is an issue of great importance not only to the ultimate success of the organization but also to the profession. Because little is known regarding whether completing a CR predicts future leadership in medicine, we sought to determine if former pediatric CRs when compared with pediatric residents who were not CRs reported more often that they were leaders in their profession. Twenty-four pediatric training programs stratified by resident size (36) and geography (East, South, Midwest, and West) were selected randomly from the Graduate Medical Education Directory (American Medical Association, Chicago, IL). Program directors were contacted by mail and telephone and asked to provide their housestaff rosters from 1965-1985. The resulting resident sample was surveyed by questionnaire in 1995. Fifteen of 17 program directors (88%) who possessed the requested data provided 1965-1985 rosters yielding a sample of 963 residents. Fifty-five percent of the resident sample (533) responded. Fifty-eight of the respondents had not completed a pediatric residency, leaving a survey sample of 475. Thirty-four percent (163) were CRs. The sample had a mean age of 47, 67% were male and 87% married. Fellowships were completed by 51%. More former CRs compared with non-CRs (75% vs 64%), more former fellows than non-fellows (75% vs 60%) and more males than females (74% vs 55%) reported they were professional leaders. These associations persisted in a logistic regression that controlled for CR status, gender, marital status, and fellowship status as leadership predictors. Former CRs, former fellows, and men were, respectively, 1.8, 2.3, and 2.3 times more likely to report professional leadership. Pediatric residents who were former CRs and/or fellows, and males were more likely to report professional leadership. Although men were more likely to report

  16. Evaluation of cardiac auscultation skills in pediatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Komal; Thompson, W Reid

    2013-01-01

    Auscultation skills are in decline, but few studies have shown which specific aspects are most difficult for trainees. We evaluated individual aspects of cardiac auscultation among pediatric residents using recorded heart sounds to determine which elements pose the most difficulty. Auscultation proficiency was assessed among 34 trainees following a pediatric cardiology rotation using an open-set format evaluation module, similar to the actual clinical auscultation description process. Diagnostic accuracy for distinguishing normal from abnormal cases was 73%. Findings most commonly correctly identified included pathological systolic and diastolic murmurs and widely split second heart sounds. Those least likely to be identified included continuous murmurs and clicks. Accuracy was low for identifying specific diagnoses. Given time constraints for clinical skills teaching, this suggests that focusing on distinguishing normal from abnormal heart sounds and murmurs instead of making specific diagnoses may be a more realistic goal for pediatric resident auscultation training.

  17. Research training among pediatric residency programs: a national assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Erika L; Naifeh, Monique M; Stevenson, Michelle D; Todd, Christopher; Henry, Emilie D; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Gerber, Linda M; Li, Su-Ting T

    2014-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) states that "residents should participate in scholarly activity." However, there is little guidance for effectively integrating scholarly activity into residency. This study was conducted to understand how pediatric residency programs meet ACGME requirements and to identify characteristics of successful programs. The authors conducted an online cross-sectional survey of all pediatric residency program directors in October 2012, assessing program characteristics, resident participation in scholarly activity, program infrastructure, barriers, and outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify characteristics of programs in the top quartile for resident scholarly activity participation. The response rate was 52.8% (105/199 programs). Seventy-seven (78.6%) programs required scholarly activity, although definitions were variable. When including only original research, systematic reviews or meta-analyses, and case reports or series with references, resident participation averaged 56% (range 0%-100%). Characteristics associated with high-participation programs included a scholarly activity requirement (odds ratio [OR] = 5.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-30.0); program director belief that all residents should present work regionally or nationally (OR = 4.7, 95% CI = 1.5-15.1); and mentorship by >25% of faculty (OR = 3.6, CI = 1.2-11.4). Only 47.1% (41) of program directors were satisfied with resident participation, and only 30.7% (27) were satisfied with the quality of research training provided. The findings suggest that resident scholarly activity experience is highly variable and suboptimal. Identifying characteristics of successful programs can improve the resident research training experience.

  18. Burnout and interventions in pediatric residency: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara F. McKinley

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite an increase in interest in issues related to burnout in medical education and mandates from the national residency accrediting body, available literature is sparse in pediatrics, a medical discipline that requires special empathy and compassion, as well as enhanced communication skills to effectively care for children and their families. Burnout prevalence ranges from 17 to 67.8% of pediatric residents in recent studies. There is little that details the pathogenesis of burnout in these residents and little that compares them with those in other medical disciplines. This comprehensive literature review describes all that is published on burnout and burnout interventions since 2005 in pediatrics and other primary care oriented specialty residents, as well as key papers from pre-2005. This review, with its focus on the available information and evidence-based intervention strategies, identifies four areas for focus for future interventions and directions. It should serve as a useful resource to program directors, medical educators and graduate medical education leadership who are committed to preventing and/or treating burnout in their residents and molding these young physicians to be able to maintain resilience through their careers. This review should also be useful to investigators exploring burnout in other health care professionals.

  19. Fellows as teachers: a model to enhance pediatric resident education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles V. Smith

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Pressures on academic faculty to perform beyond their role as educators has stimulated interest in complementary approaches in resident medical education. While fellows are often believed to detract from resident learning and experience, we describe our preliminary investigations utilizing clinical fellows as a positive force in pediatric resident education. Our objectives were to implement a practical approach to engage fellows in resident education, evaluate the impact of a fellow-led education program on pediatric resident and fellow experience, and investigate if growth of a fellowship program detracts from resident procedural experience.This study was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU where fellows designed and implemented an education program consisting of daily didactic teaching sessions before morning clinical rounds. The impact of a fellow-led education program on resident satisfaction with their NICU experience was assessed via anonymous student evaluations. The potential value of the program for participating fellows was also evaluated using an anonymous survey.The online evaluation was completed by 105 residents. Scores were markedly higher after the program was implemented in areas of teaching excellence (4.44 out of 5 versus 4.67, p<0.05 and overall resident learning (3.60 out of 5 versus 4.61, p<0.001. Fellows rated the acquisition of teaching skills and enhanced knowledge of neonatal pathophysiology as the most valuable aspects of their participation in the education program. The anonymous survey revealed that 87.5% of participating residents believed that NICU fellows were very important to their overall training and education.While fellows are often believed to be a detracting factor to residency training, we found that pediatric resident attitudes toward the fellows were generally positive. In our experience, in the specialty of neonatology a fellow-led education program can positively contribute to both

  20. Parent assessment of medical student skills in ambulatory pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Erika Persson; Christina Haines; Mia Lang

    2013-01-01

    Background: Partnership with parents is a vital part of pediatric medical education, yet few studies have examined parent attitudes towards learners in pediatric settings. Methods: Questionnaires were used to determine parent and student assessment of professional and clinical skills (primary outcome) and parent attitudes towards 3rd year medical students (secondary outcome) at the University of Alberta. Chi Square, Kendall’s Tau and Kappa coefficients were calculated to compare parent an...

  1. Intravenous fluid prescription practices among pediatric residents in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwon M. Lee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recent studies have established the association between hypotonic fluids administration and hospital-acquired hyponatremia in children, and have contended that hypotonic fluids be removed from routine practice. To assess current intravenous fluid prescription practices among Korean pediatric residents and to call for updated clinical-practice education Methods: A survey-based analysis was carried out. Pediatric residents at six university hospitals in Korea completed a survey consisting of four questions. Each question supposed a unique scenario in which the respondents were to prescribe either a hypotonic or an isotonic fluid for the patient. Results: Ninety-one responses were collected and analyzed. In three of the four scenarios, a significant majority prescribed the hypotonic fluids (98.9%, 85.7%, and 69.2%, respectively. Notably, 69.2% of the respondents selected the hypotonic fluids for postoperative management. Almost all (96.7% selected the isotonic fluids for hydration therapy. Conclusion: In the given scenarios, the majority of Korean pediatric residents would prescribe a hypotonic fluid, except for initial hydration. The current state of pediatric fluid management, notably, heightens the risk of hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Updated clinical practice education on intravenous fluid prescription, therefore, is urgently required.

  2. Intravenous fluid prescription practices among pediatric residents in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiwon M; Jung, Younghwa; Lee, Se Eun; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Kee Hyuck; Koo, Ja Wook; Park, Young Seo; Cheong, Hae Il; Ha, Il-Soo; Choi, Yong; Kang, Hee Gyung

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have established the association between hypotonic fluids administration and hospital-acquired hyponatremia in children. The present paper investigated the pattern of current practice in intravenous fluid prescription among Korean pediatric residents, to underscore the need for updated education. A survey-based analysis was carried out. Pediatric residents at six university hospitals in Korea completed a survey consisting of four questions. Each question proposed a unique scenario in which the respondents had to prescribe either a hypotonic or an isotonic fluid for the patient. Ninety-one responses were collected and analyzed. In three of the four scenarios, a significant majority prescribed the hypotonic fluids (98.9%, 85.7%, and 69.2%, respectively). Notably, 69.2% of the respondents selected the hypotonic fluids for postoperative management. Almost all (96.7%) selected the isotonic fluids for hydration therapy. In the given scenarios, the majority of Korean pediatric residents would prescribe a hypotonic fluid, except for initial hydration. The current state of pediatric fluid management, notably, heightens the risk of hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Updated clinical practice education on intravenous fluid prescription, therefore, is urgently required.

  3. The evaluation of burnout and job satisfaction levels in residents of pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anıl, Murat; Yurtseven, Ali; Yurtseven, İlkay; Ülgen, Mevlüt; Anıl, Ayşe Berna; Helvacı, Mehmet; Aksu, Nejat

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the level of job-related burnout and the level of job satisfaction among residents of pediatrics. A total of 102 residents of pediatrics who were trained in two Ministry of Health teaching and research hospitals and in two university hospitals in Izmir were included in the study. Demographic data (age, sex), lifestyle (living with parents or not, marital status, number of children) and professional characteristics (total time spent in profession, time spent in residency, number of night shifts per month, institution type: teaching hospital/university) were collected. Maslach Burnout Inventory (subscales: emotional exhaustion, desensitization, personal accomplishment) and Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire were used. High levels of emotional exhaustion and desensitization, and low levels of personal accomplishment and job satisfaction were found in residents of pediatrics. Low levels of emotional exhaustion in teaching and research hospitals and low levels of desensitization in university hospitals were determined (pjob satisfaction levels and a negative correlation between age and emotional exhaustion levels (pjob satisfaction. Emotional exhaustion is more common in teaching and research hospitals and desensitization is more common in universities. Younger age, lower seniority, and the higher number of work-shift increases the burnout.

  4. Antibiotics in pediatrics: Parental knowledge and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trkulja Maja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antibiotics represent the most prescribed class of medication in the pediatric circles. Almost 50% of the medication was prescribed without definite merit. Recently published studies have shown that the level of knowledge, awareness, as well as parents' expectations, play a significant role in the amount of prescribed antibiotics by pediatricians. Aim: To assess the level of parent's education, attitude and behavior, in regard to antibiotic use in pediatric population in Serbia. Material and methods: The cross-sectional study was performed between October 2015 and February 2016. An anonymous survey approach had been used. Demographic data of the participants gave an insight in the level of knowledge and common practice regarding the use of antibiotics in children. The data collected was analyzed by methods of descriptive and analytic statistics. Results: Of 850 recruited, 763 completed and returned the survey. A high level of knowledge was found in 79.5% of the participants. The highest percent of parents answered the questions correctly in regard to reporting drug-related adverse reactions, including allergic reactions (99% and 93% respectively. Almost one third (27% of the parents thought that antibiotics can cure viral infections. More than 20% of participants thought that antibiotics can control pain, and that more expensive medication was more effective. The worrisome is the fact that 15% bought antibiotic at least once without a doctor's prescriptions, while 18% stashed away leftovers for later use. Conclusion: Although study results showed good quality data, parents are still deciding by themselves if they should start antibiotic therapy. Reinforcing established educational programs and encouraging communication with their pediatrician would be highly justified.

  5. Development of a Comprehensive Communication Skills Curriculum for Pediatrics Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Eleanor B; Boland, Kimberly A; Bryant, Kristina A; McKinley, Tara F; Porter, Melissa B; Potter, Katherine E; Calhoun, Aaron W

    2016-12-01

    Effective communication is an essential element of medical care and a priority of medical education. Specific interventions to teach communication skills are at the discretion of individual residency programs. We developed the Resident Communication Skills Curriculum (RCSC), a formal curriculum designed to teach trainees the communication skills essential for high-quality practice. A multidisciplinary working group contributed to the development of the RCSC, guided by an institutional needs assessment, literature review, and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. The result was a cohesive curriculum that incorporates didactic, role play, and real-life experiences over the course of the entire training period. Methods to assess curricular outcomes included self-reporting, surveys, and periodic faculty evaluations of the residents. Curricular components have been highly rated by residents (3.95-3.97 based on a 4-point Likert scale), and residents' self-reported communication skills demonstrated an improvement over the course of residency in the domains of requesting a consultation, providing effective handoffs, handling conflict, and having difficult conversations (intern median 3.0, graduate median 4.0 based on a 5-point Likert scale, P  ≤ .002). Faculty evaluations of residents have also demonstrated improvement over time (intern median 3.0, graduate median 4.5 based on a 5-point Likert scale, P  communication skills curriculum for pediatrics residents was implemented, with a multistep evaluative process showing improvement in skills over the course of the residency program. Positive resident evaluations and informal comments from faculty support its general acceptance. The use of existing resources makes this curriculum feasible.

  6. Ethics education for pediatric residents: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raywat Deonandan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ethics education and research on medical residents is needed because, unlike medical students or experienced doctors, medical residents have to perform multiple roles simultaneously – student, teacher and clinician – thus exposing them to unique ethical stressors.  In this paper we reviewed the literature concerning ethics education in postgraduate pediatrics training programs.  Our goal was not to simply describe educational strategies and programs, but also to explore measurements and experiences of current practices to address gaps in ethics education during residency. Method: We conducted a structured literature review to explore the extent of ethics education in pediatric residency programs.  Results:  Twelve relevant studies were found.  The studies suggest that existing training regimens are insufficient to meet the real life ethical challenges experienced in actual practice, particularly with respect to palliative care and the commission of clinical errors.  Conclusions: The increasing diversity of culture and beliefs in the clinical workplace is also serving to complicate educational needs. An interdisciplinary approach, spread over the entirety of a physician’s training, is a proposed solution worthy of more attention.

  7. Online education improves pediatric residents' understanding of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Megan F; Blondin, Heather M; Youssef, Molly J; Tollefson, Megha M; Hill, Lauren F; Hanson, Janice L; Bruckner, Anna L

    2018-01-01

    Pediatricians manage skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis (AD) but report that their dermatologic training is inadequate. Online modules may enhance medical education when sufficient didactic or clinical teaching experiences are lacking. We assessed whether an online module about AD improved pediatric residents' knowledge and changed their clinical management of AD. Target and control cohorts of pediatric residents from two institutions were recruited. Target subjects took a 30-question test about AD early in their residency, reviewed the online module, and repeated the test 6 months and 1 year later. The control subjects, who had 1 year of clinical experience but had not reviewed the online module, also took the test. The mean percentage of correct answers was calculated and compared using two-sided, two-sample independent t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance. For a subset of participants, clinical documentation from AD encounters was reviewed and 13 practice behaviors were compared using the Fisher exact test. Twenty-five subjects in the target cohort and 29 subjects in the control cohort completed the study. The target cohort improved from 18.0 ± 3.2 to 23.4 ± 3.4 correctly answered questions over 1 year (P online module about AD demonstrated statistically significant improvement in disease-specific knowledge over time and had statistically significantly higher scores than controls. Online dermatology education may effectively supplement traditional clinical teaching. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Perceived benefits and barriers to a career in pediatric neurosurgery: a survey of neurosurgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Mark S; Sussman, Jeffrey S; Durham, Susan; Iantosca, Mark R

    2013-11-01

    , fast healing and lack of comorbidities, and altruism. Perceived significant deterrents included shunts, lower reimbursement, cross-coverage issues, higher malpractice premiums and greater legal exposure, and working with parents and pediatric health professionals. The intrinsic nature of PNS was listed as the most significant deterrent (46%) followed by financial concerns (25%), additional training (12%), longer work hours (12%), and medicolegal issues (4%). The majority felt that fellowship training and PNS certification should be recommended for surgeons treating of all but traumatic brain injuries and Chiari I malformations and performing simple shunt-related procedures, although they felt that these credentials should be required only for treating complex craniosynostosis. The nature of PNS is the most significant barrier to attracting residents, although reimbursement, cross-coverage, and legal issues are also important to residents. The authors provide several recommendations that might enhance resident perceptions of PNS and attract trainees to the specialty.

  9. Tobacco consumption among pediatric residents in Argentina. Current prevalence and trend over the past 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Emiliano; Ferrero, Fernando; Castaños, Claudio; Blengini, María Teresa; Durán, Pablo; Moreno, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Pediatricians are in a strategic position to prevent smoking. To estimate the prevalence of smoking among pediatric residents, analyze associated factors, describe preventive actions, and assess the differences observed over the past decade. Cross-sectional study with a self-administered, anonymous survey conducted among pediatric residents from eight Argentine hospitals. Smoking habit, associated factors, and attitude towards patients' or their parents' smoking were evaluated; results were compared to those obtained in 2002. Out of 448 surveyed physicians, 20.1% smoked. There were no significant differences between smokers and non-smokers in terms of gender, having children, number of on-call shifts, and having a supervisor who smokes. Having a parent who smoked was a risk factor for tobacco use only among women (OR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.09-3.61; p = 0.01). Surveyed residents living with a couple had a lower smoking rate (OR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.34-0.96; p = 0.03). Only 18.1% referred having an active behavior towards smoking patients, no differences were observed between smokers and non-smokers. In addition, there were no differences in smoking prevalence from 2002, but there was a higher rate of residents who advised their patients (32.4% versus 26.1%; p smoking (37.7% versus 18.6%; p parents who smoke was very low. In spite of official policies, tobacco use in this group has not changed over the past decade, but there was an increase in the rate of those who received information during their training and of those who advised their patients of smoking risks.

  10. Implementation of an Integrated Orthopedic Curriculum to Increase Clinical and Procedural Competency amongst Pediatric Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-05

    to Increase Clinical and Procedural Competency Amongst Pediatric Residents presented at/published to APPD Conference, Anaheim, CA, 5-8 April 2017 in...Increase Clinical and Procedural Competency amongst Pediatric Residents 7. FUNDING RECEIVED FOR THIS STUDY? 0 YES l8] t-’O FUNDING SOURCE 8. DO YOU NEED...and Procedural Competency amongst Pediatric Residents Sarah Nelin MD, Taneishia Jones, MD, Jason Beachler MD, Michelle Lawson MD, Bryan Lawson, MD

  11. Analyzing communication skills of Pediatric Postgraduate Residents in Clinical Encounter by using video recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Attia; Khan, Rehan Ahmed; Jabeen, Uzma; Rathore, Ahsan Waheed

    2017-01-01

    To analyze communication skills of pediatric postgraduate residents in clinical encounter by using video recordings. This qualitative exploratory research was conducted through video recording at The Children's Hospital Lahore, Pakistan. Residents who had attended the mandatory communication skills workshop offered by CPSP were included. The video recording of clinical encounter was done by a trained audiovisual person while the resident was interacting with the patient in the clinical encounter. Data was analyzed by thematic analysis. Initially on open coding 36 codes emerged and then through axial and selective coding these were condensed to 17 subthemes. Out of these four main themes emerged: (1) Courteous and polite attitude, (2) Marginal nonverbal communication skills, (3) Power game/Ignoring child participation and (4) Patient as medical object/Instrumental behaviour. All residents treated the patient as a medical object to reach a right diagnosis and ignored them as a human being. There was dominant role of doctors and marginal nonverbal communication skills were displayed by the residents in the form of lack of social touch, and appropriate eye contact due to documenting notes. A brief non-medical interaction for rapport building at the beginning of interaction was missing and there was lack of child involvement. Paediatric postgraduate residents were polite while communicating with parents and child but lacking in good nonverbal communication skills. Communication pattern in our study was mostly one-way showing doctor's instrumental behaviour and ignoring the child participation.

  12. Pediatrics Residents' Confidence and Performance Following a Longitudinal Quality Improvement Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtlandt, Cheryl; Noonan, Laura; Koricke, Maureen Walsh; Zeskind, Philip Sanford; Mabus, Sarah; Feld, Leonard

    2016-02-01

    Quality improvement (QI) training is an integral part of residents' education. Understanding the educational value of a QI curriculum facilitates understanding of its impact. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a longitudinal QI curriculum on pediatrics residents' confidence and competence in the acquisition and application of QI knowledge and skills. Three successive cohorts of pediatrics residents (N = 36) participated in a longitudinal curriculum designed to increase resident confidence in QI knowledge and skills. Key components were a succession of progressive experiential projects, QI coaching, and resident team membership culminating in leadership of the project. Residents completed precurricular and postcurricular surveys and demonstrated QI competence by performance on the pediatric QI assessment scenario. Residents participating in the Center for Advancing Pediatric Excellence QI curriculum showed significant increases in pre-post measures of confidence in QI knowledge and skills. Coaching and team leadership were ranked by resident participants as having the most educational value among curriculum components. A pediatric QI assessment scenario, which correlated with resident-perceived confidence in acquisition of QI skills but not QI knowledge, is a tool available to test pediatrics residents' QI knowledge. A 3-year longitudinal, multimodal, experiential QI curriculum increased pediatrics residents' confidence in QI knowledge and skills, was feasible with faculty support, and was well-accepted by residents.

  13. Pediatric fractures – an educational needs assessment of Canadian pediatric emergency medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixon AC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Dixon Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Objectives: To determine the gaps in knowledge of Canadian pediatric emergency medicine residents with regards to acute fracture identification and management. Due to their predominantly medical prior training, fractures may be an area of weakness requiring a specific curriculum to meet their needs. Methods: A questionnaire was developed examining comfort level and performance on knowledge based questions of trainees in the following areas: interpreting musculoskeletal X-rays; independently managing pediatric fractures, physical examination techniques, applied knowledge of fracture management, and normal development of the bony anatomy. Using modified Dillman technique the instrument was distributed to pediatric emergency medicine residents at seven Canadian sites. Results: Out of 43 potential respondents, 22 (51% responded. Of respondents, mean comfort with X-ray interpretation was 69 (62–76 95% confidence interval [CI] while mean comfort with fracture management was only 53 (45–63 95% CI; mean comfort with physical exam of shoulder 60 (53–68 95% CI and knee 69 (62–76 95% CI was low. Less than half of respondents (47%; 95% CI 26%–69% could accurately identify normal wrist development, correctly manage a supracondylar fracture (39%; 95% CI 20%–61%, or identify a medial epicondyle fracture (44%; 95% CI 24%–66%. Comfort with neurovascular status of the upper (mean 82; 95% CI 75–89 and lower limb (mean 81; 95% CI 74–87 was high. Interpretation: There are significant gaps in knowledge of physical exam techniques, fracture identification and management among pediatric emergency medicine trainees. A change in our current teaching methods is required to meet this need. Keywords: pediatric, fractures, education, radiologic interpretation

  14. Resident interest and factors involved in entering a pediatric pulmonary fellowship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gershan William M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively little is known about interest in pediatric pulmonology among pediatric residents. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine at this institution: 1 the level of pediatric resident interest in pursuing a pulmonary fellowship, 2 potential factors involved in development of such interest, 3 whether the presence of a pulmonary fellowship program affects such interest. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all 52 pediatric residents at this institution in 1992 and to all 59 pediatric residents and 14 combined internal medicine/pediatrics residents in 2002, following development of a pulmonary fellowship program. Results Response rates were 79% in 1992 and 86% in 2002. Eight of the 43 responders in 1992 (19% had considered doing a pulmonary fellowship compared to 7 of 63 (11% in 2002. The highest ranked factors given by the residents who had considered a fellowship included wanting to continue one's education after residency, enjoying caring for pulmonary patients, and liking pulmonary physiology and the pulmonary faculty. Major factors listed by residents who had not considered a pulmonary fellowship included not enjoying the tracheostomy/ventilator population and chronic pulmonary patients in general, and a desire to enter general pediatrics or another fellowship. Most residents during both survey periods believed that they would be in non-academic or academic general pediatrics in 5 years. Only 1 of the 106 responding residents (~1% anticipated becoming a pediatric pulmonologist. Conclusions Although many pediatric residents consider enrolling in a pulmonary fellowship (~10–20% here, few (~1% here will actually pursue a career in pediatric pulmonology. The presence of a pulmonary fellowship program did not significantly alter resident interest, though other confounding factors may be involved.

  15. Parent assessment of medical student skills in ambulatory pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Persson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Partnership with parents is a vital part of pediatric medical education, yet few studies have examined parent attitudes towards learners in pediatric settings. Methods: Questionnaires were used to determine parent and student assessment of professional and clinical skills (primary outcome and parent attitudes towards 3rd year medical students (secondary outcome at the University of Alberta. Chi Square, Kendall’s Tau and Kappa coefficients were calculated to compare parent and student responses in 8 areas: communication, respect, knowledge, listening, history taking, physical examination, supervision, and overall satisfaction. Results: Overall satisfaction with medical student involvement by parents was high: 56.7% of all parents ranked the encounter as ‘excellent’. Areas of lesser satisfaction included physician supervision of students. Compared to the parent assessment, students tended to underrate many of their skills, including communication, history taking and physical exam. There was no relationship between parent demographics and their attitude to rating any of the students’ skills. Conclusions: Parents were satisfied with medical student involvement in the care of their children. Areas identified for improvement included increased supervision of students in both history taking and physical examination. This is one of the largest studies examining parent attitudes towards pediatric students. The results may enhance undergraduate curriculum development and teaching in pediatric ambulatory clinics and strengthen the ongoing partnership between the community and teaching clinics.

  16. Concurrent Surgery and the Role of the Pediatric Attending Surgeon: Comparing Parents' and Surgeons' Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jennie K; Ibarra, Christopher; Feinn, Richard S; Rodriguez-Davalos, Manuel I; Carter, Cordelia W

    2018-06-01

    The common practice of performing concurrent or overlapping operations has been intensely scrutinized by lay media and academic press to investigate its safety and cost-effectiveness. However, there is little information about its use within the pediatric population. Even less is known about parents' expectations about the surgeon's role on the day of operation and how they align with those of pediatric surgeons and surgical trainees, despite the potential for significant discrepancies in expectations to erode trust and damage the physician-family relationship. A 5-point Likert-style survey was designed to characterize expectations about the degree of involvement by pediatric attending surgeons throughout a surgical case (1 = strongly disagree, 3 = neutral, 5 = strongly agree). The survey was administered to parents of pediatric patients undergoing elective operations during a 3-month interval at a single academic institution. The survey was also administered to surgeons and surgical residents at the same institution. Multivariate multiplicity-adjusted t-tests were used to identify significant differences between responders. One hundred and ten parents and 84 pediatric surgeons and trainees completed the survey. Parents' responses to the survey ranged from 4.15 to 4.89, compared with 2.75 to 4.86 from surgeons. The differences achieved statistical significance (p children. There is a significant mismatch between parents' expectations and those of pediatric surgeons about the role of the surgeon on the day of operation, with parents consistently expecting more direct involvement by the attending surgeon. These discrepancies can have implications for both parent/patient satisfaction and medical education. Copyright © 2018 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Children's postdivorce residence arrangements and parental experienced time pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Franciëlla; Poortman, Anne Rigt; van der Lippe, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Although the rise in postdivorce joint physical custody has fueled scholarly interest in its impact on children, consequences for parents remain understudied. Because children's residence arrangements determine time and coordination demands associated with child care, this study investigated the

  18. Breastfeeding education and support services offered to pediatric residents in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osband, Yardaena B; Altman, Robin L; Patrick, Patricia A; Edwards, Karen S

    2011-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) encourages pediatricians to support the practice of breastfeeding and residency educators to develop formal curricula in breastfeeding education. Few studies, however, describe breastfeeding education or support services currently provided to pediatric residents in the United States. The goals of this study were to investigate breastfeeding training offered during 3-year pediatric residency programs and to describe residency programs' policies and services for residents who breastfeed. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a Web-based survey of pediatric program directors regarding breastfeeding education and support services for residents. Seventy percent of program directors (132 of 189) completed the survey, with 77.3% of respondents (n = 102) estimating the amount of breastfeeding education offered to their pediatric residents. Residents are provided with a median total of 9.0 hours of breastfeeding training over 3 years, primarily in continuity clinic and in lectures and rounds with attendings. At the programs' primary teaching hospitals, breastfeeding residents are provided breastfeeding rooms (67.0%), breast pumps (75.3%), and breast milk storage facilities (87.6%). Only 10 programs reported having an official policy to accommodate breastfeeding residents. Pediatric residents receive approximately 3 hours of breastfeeding training per year. In addition, there is less than universal implementation by residency programs of AAP recommendations for supporting breastfeeding in the workplace. Pediatric residency programs should find ways to improve and assess the quality of breastfeeding education and workplace support to better role model this advocacy standard. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Parent-child relationships in Type 1 diabetes: associations among child behavior, parenting behavior, and pediatric parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweenie, Rachel; Mackey, Eleanor R; Streisand, Randi

    2014-03-01

    Interactions between parents and children can influence behavioral and emotional functioning related to Type 1 diabetes (T1D), yet have been relatively unexplored during preadolescence. The present study examined associations among child problem behaviors, critical parenting behaviors, and pediatric parenting stress in a sample of preadolescent youth with T1D. Data are available from 86 preadolescent-parent dyads who participated in the initial baseline assessment of a randomized controlled trial designed to assess the efficacy of an adherence promotion program. Measures included the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, the Diabetes Family Behavior Checklist, and the Pediatric Inventory for Parents. After controlling for significant demographic and medical characteristics, parents who reported their child's behavior as more problematic reported more difficulty with pediatric parenting stress, which was also associated with more child-reported critical parenting behaviors. Child problem behaviors and critical parenting behaviors were associated with one another, partially via their association with increased pediatric parenting stress. Potential clinical applications include interventions geared toward helping parents manage difficult child behaviors as well as cope with pediatric parenting stress, with the ultimate goal of improving the parent-child relationship and management of T1D.

  20. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children with sickle cell disease: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Anupama Rao; Norris, Chelita Kaye; Minniti, Caterina P

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate the current clinical practice regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring dental treatment; and (2) evaluate the perceived relative risk of bacteremia following specific dental procedures, as defined by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists. A written survey depicting various clinical scenarios of SCD children requiring common dental procedures was mailed to directors of pediatric dental advanced education programs and distributed to pediatric hematologists attending the 2003 Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America conference in Washington, DC. Surveys were returned by 60% (N=34/57) of the pediatric dentistry residency program directors. The surveys were obtained from 51% of pediatric hematologists at the meeting (N=72/140). At least 50% of all respondents recommended prophylaxis for the following clinical situations: dental extractions, treatment under general anesthesia, and status post splenectomy. The perceived risk of infectious complication was highest for extractions, followed by restorative treatment and tooth polishing. Dental residency program directors were more likely (71%, N=24/34) to recommend additional antibiotic therapy for patients taking penicillin prophylaxis if they required an invasive oral surgical procedure. Conversely, only 38% (N=25/66) of pediatric hematologists recommended additional antibiotic therapy (P=.001). Eighty-six percent of dental residency program directors (N=25/29) chose amoxicillin for prophylaxis whereas only 62% of pediatric hematologists (N=36/58) recommended amoxicillin. (Pchildren undergoing dental treatments. Further research and risk/benefit assessment is needed to create a unified approach.

  1. [Teaching pediatrics to residents via conventional lectures in France: A national survey from students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, B; Bendavid, M; Faivre, J-C; Salleron, J; Debillon, T; Claris, O; Chabrol, B; Schweitzer, C; Gajdos, V

    2017-08-01

    To assess the point of view of young physicians training in pediatrics in France on their theoretical courses during residency. A free-access electronic anonymous survey was sent three times by e-mail to the 1215 residents in pediatrics, from July to October 2015. Fifty-seven percent of French residents in pediatrics responded to the survey. It was established that they took part in six (range, 3-10) half-days of specific theoretical teaching in pediatrics from November 2014 to mid-April 2015. Only 54% participated in more than 75% of regional theoretical training. The main self-declared reason for their absence was that they could not leave their clinical activities. Fifty-three per cent of the residents took part in additional training, 45% of them because they found the primary theoretical training insufficient. The overall quality of the theoretical teaching was rated 5 (range, 3-7) out of 10. Eighty-five percent of residents expected to be evaluated on their knowledge during their residency. In pediatrics, additional training is individually undertaken because they deemed their initial training insufficient during their residency. An evaluation of knowledge is requested by residents. The reform of the national residency program must take into account these results in redesigning the theoretical training in pediatrics, integrating innovative teaching techniques to daily practice, for example. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Resident Education Curriculum in Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology: The Short Curriculum 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Hina J; Karjane, Nicole; Teelin, Karen; Abraham, Margaret; Holt, Stephanie; Chelvakumar, Gayaythri; Dumont, Tania; Huguelet, Patricia S; Conner, Lindsay; Wheeler, Carol; Fleming, Nathalie

    2018-04-01

    The degree of exposure to pediatric and adolescent gynecology (PAG) varies across residency programs in obstetrics and gynecology and pediatrics. Nevertheless, these programs are responsible for training residents and providing opportunities within their programs to fulfill PAG learning objectives. To that end, the North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology has taken a leadership role in PAG resident education by creating and systematically updating the Short Curriculum. This curriculum outlines specific learning objectives that are central to PAG education and lists essential resources for learners' reference. This updated curriculum replaces the previous 2014 publication with added content, resources, and updated references. Additionally, attention to the needs of learners in pediatrics and adolescent medicine is given greater emphasis in this revised North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Short Curriculum 2.0. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Parent-Adolescent Involvement: The Relative Influence of Parent Gender and Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Daniel N.; Amato, Paul R.; King, Valarie

    2006-01-01

    The 1995 wave of the Add Health study is used to investigate the relative influence of parent gender and residence on patterns of parental involvement with adolescents. Adolescent reports (N=17,330) of shared activities, shared communication, and relationship quality with both biological parents are utilized. A multidimensional scaling analysis…

  4. Pediatric irritable bowel syndrome patient and parental characteristics differ by care management type

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates whether certain patient or parental characteristics are associated with gastroenterology (GI) referral versus primary pediatrics care for pediatric irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A retrospective clinical trial sample of patients meeting pediatric Rome III IBS criteria was assem...

  5. Innovation in Pediatric Surgical Education for General Surgery Residents: A Mobile Web Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouch, Joshua D; Wagner, Justin P; Scott, Andrew; Sullins, Veronica F; Chen, David C; DeUgarte, Daniel A; Shew, Stephen B; Tillou, Areti; Dunn, James C Y; Lee, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    General surgery residents lack a standardized educational experience in pediatric surgery. We hypothesized that the development of a mobile educational interface would provide general surgery residents broader access to pediatric surgical education materials. We created an educational mobile website for general surgery residents rotating on pediatric surgery, which included a curriculum, multimedia resources, the Operative Performance Rating Scale (OPRS), and Twitter functionality. Residents were instructed to consult the curriculum. Residents and faculty posted media using the Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, and following each surgical procedure reviewed performance via the OPRS. Site visits, Twitter posts, and OPRS submissions were quantified from September 2013 to July 2014. The pediatric surgery mobile website received 257 hits; 108 to the homepage, 107 to multimedia, 28 to the syllabus, and 19 to the OPRS. All eligible residents accessed the content. The Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, was assigned to 20 posts; the overall audience reach was 85 individuals. Participants in the mobile OPRS included 11 general surgery residents and 4 pediatric surgery faculty. Pediatric surgical education resources and operative performance evaluations are effectively administered to general surgery residents via a structured mobile platform. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing pediatrics residents' mathematical skills for prescribing medication: a need for improved training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Mark L; Sussmane, Jeffrey B

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate residents' skills in performing basic mathematical calculations used for prescribing medications to pediatric patients. In 2001, a test of ten questions on basic calculations was given to first-, second-, and third-year residents at Miami Children's Hospital in Florida. Four additional questions were included to obtain the residents' levels of training, specific pediatrics intensive care unit (PICU) experience, and whether or not they routinely double-checked doses and adjusted them for each patient's weight. The test was anonymous and calculators were permitted. The overall score and the score for each resident class were calculated. Twenty-one residents participated. The overall average test score and the mean test score of each resident class was less than 70%. Second-year residents had the highest mean test scores, although there was no significant difference between the classes of residents (p =.745) or relationship between the residents' PICU experiences and their exam scores (p =.766). There was no significant difference between residents' levels of training and whether they double-checked their calculations (p =.633) or considered each patient's weight relative to the dose prescribed (p =.869). Seven residents committed tenfold dosing errors, and one resident committed a 1,000-fold dosing error. Pediatrics residents need to receive additional education in performing the calculations needed to prescribe medications. In addition, residents should be required to demonstrate these necessary mathematical skills before they are allowed to prescribe medications.

  7. Embedding patient simulation in a pediatric cardiology rotation: a unique opportunity for improving resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shaun; Follansbee, Christopher; Nwankwo, Ugonna; Hofkosh, Dena; Sherman, Frederick S; Hamilton, Melinda F

    2015-01-01

    High-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) has been used in medical education to bridge gaps in medical knowledge and clinical skills. Few studies have analyzed the impact of HFPS in subspecialty rotations for pediatric residents. We hypothesized that pediatric residents exposed to HFPS with a structured content curriculum would perform better on a case quiz than residents without exposure to HFPS. Prospective randomized controlled Tertiary-care free standing children's hospital During a cardiology rotation, senior pediatric residents completed an online pediatric cardiology curriculum and a cardiology quiz. After randomization into two groups, the study group participated in a fully debriefed HFPS session. The control group had no HFPS. Both groups completed a case quiz. Confidence surveys pre- and postsimulation were completed. From October 2010 through March 2013, 55 residents who rotated through the pediatric cardiology rotation were used in the final analysis (30 control, 25 in the study group). There was no significant difference between groups on the initial cardiology quiz. The study group scored higher on the case quiz compared with the control group (P = .024). Based on pre- and postsimulation questionnaires, residents' confidence in approaching a pediatric cardiology patient improved from an average Likert score of 5.1 to 7.5 (on scale of 0-10) (P cardiology rotation was feasible and well received. Our study suggests that simulation promotes increased confidence and may modestly improve clinical reasoning compared to traditional educational techniques. Targeted simulation sessions may readily be incorporated into pediatric subspecialty rotations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Residency factors that influence pediatric in-training examination score improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Lindsay H; Highbaugh-Battle, Angela P; Buchter, Susie

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine which measurable factors of resident training experience contribute to improvement of in-training examination (ITE) and certifying examination (CE) scores. This is a descriptive retrospective study analyzing data from July 2003 through June 2006 at a large academic pediatric training program. Pediatric categorical residents beginning residency in July 2003 were included. Regression analyses were used to determine if the number of admissions performed, core lectures attended, acute care topics heard, grand rounds attended, continuity clinic patients encountered, or procedures performed correlated with improvement of ITE scores. These factors were then analyzed in relation to CE scores. Seventeen residents were included in this study. The number of general pediatric admissions was the only factor found to correlate with an increase in ITE score (P = .04). Scores for the ITE at pediatric levels 1 and 3 were predictive of CE scores. No other factors measured were found to influence CE scores. Although all experiences of pediatric residents likely contribute to professional competence, some experiences may have more effect on ITE and CE scores. In this study, only general pediatric admissions correlated significantly with an improvement in ITE scores from year 1 to year 3. Further study is needed to identify which elements of the residency experience contribute most to CE success. This would be helpful in optimizing residency program structure and curriculum within the limitations of duty hour regulations.

  9. Empathy, Sense of Power, and Personality: Do They Change During Pediatric Residency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Larrie; Agrawal, Dewesh; Toto, Regina; Blatt, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Empathy is a critical competency in medicine. Prior studies demonstrate a longitudinal decrease in empathy during residency; however, they have not included pediatric residents. The relations among the expression of empathy, sense of power (ability to influence other's behavior), and personality traits in residents also have not been addressed. Lastly, there are no data on how residents compare with the general nonmedical population in their expression of empathy. The purposes of our study were to assess whether empathy, sense of power, and personality type were statistically correlated; if resident empathy declines over time; and how resident empathy compares with that of nonmedical peers. In 2010, a cohort of individuals entering pediatric residency were given three validated survey instruments at the beginning of their first and third years of training to explore longitudinal changes in empathy, sense of power, and major personality traits. We found no decrease in resident empathy in 2 years of pediatric training, no changes in their sense of power, and no statistically significant correlation between empathetic tendencies and sense of power. When compared with the general nonmedical population, pediatric residents rated themselves higher in empathy. As expected, the two components of empathy (empathic concern and perspective taking) were moderately correlated. Of the major personality traits, only agreeableness showed significant correlation with empathy. Pediatric resident empathy did not decrease longitudinally, unlike studies in other residents. There was no inverse relation between self-perceptions of sense of power and empathy as is present in the business literature. Finally, pediatric resident empathy was significantly higher when compared with a general nonmedical population.

  10. Bourdieu at the bedside: briefing parents in a pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrow, Karen; Hodnett, Ellen; Stremler, Robyn; McKeever, Patricia; Cohen, Eyal

    2014-12-01

    The philosophy of family-centered care (FCC) promotes partnerships between families and staff to plan, deliver, and evaluate services for children and has been officially adopted by a majority of pediatric hospitals throughout North America. However, studies indicated that many parents have continued to be dissatisfied with their decision-making roles in their child's care. This is particularly salient for parents of children with chronic ongoing complex health problems. These children are dependent upon medical technology and require frequent hospitalizations during which parents must contribute to difficult decisions regarding their child's care. Given this clinical issue, an alternative theoretical perspective was explored to redress this problem. Pierre Bourdieu's theoretical concepts of field, capital, and habitus were used to analyze the hierarchical relationships in pediatric acute care hospitals and to design a briefing intervention aimed at improving parents' satisfaction with decision making in that health care setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Evaluating the need for alternative didactic learning options in pediatric dental residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Douglas B; Rutkauskas, John S; Clothey, Rebecca A

    2009-06-01

    The need for an alternative means of delivery of a didactic curriculum to pediatric dental residents is described. It is our hope with this project to encourage a much-needed didactic curriculum for programs lacking faculty and to endorse other programs in which academicians exist but cannot cover all the material with which a resident needs to become familiar in the two years of postgraduate residency training. A decrease in faculty number due to retirement, debt burden, or marginal recruitment techniques along with an increase in positions in pediatric dentistry residency programs poses a unique educational dilemma. Using a mixed-method research methodology, we sent a twelve-question survey to 105 pediatric dentistry residency program directors and department chairs, followed by eight telephone interviews. Results from a 55 percent return rate show that the debt burden of most pediatric dental residents is well over $100,000 and that this affects a resident's decision to enter academia, as does the relative lack of positive recruitment techniques and poor faculty remuneration. The survey results affirm the need for improvement in the didactic curriculum of pediatric dentistry residents and show that program directors and department chairs also feel that an alternative delivery method using DVD or online/web-based programs would be welcomed. Despite their extremely heavy workloads, educators are willing to contribute by providing lectures or reading lists in their area of expertise.

  12. Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Cognitive Ability and Skills of Pediatrics Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, James S.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The cognitive and skills performances of sleep-deprived pediatrics residents were measured by using questions like those on the pediatrics board certification examination and using tasks that required coordination and dexterity. Implications of findings are discussed in the context of the controversy over the structure and process of medical…

  13. Benchmarks for Support and Outcomes for Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: A 5-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Michael; Williams, Ronald; Dennar, Princess E; Hopkins, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Combined internal medicine and pediatrics (medicine-pediatrics) residencies were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited separately from their corresponding categorical residencies in June 2006. We investigated how ACGME accreditation of medicine-pediatrics programs has affected the levels of support (both financial and personnel), the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) match rate, performance on the board examination, and other graduate outcomes. From 2009 through 2013 we sent an annual SurveyMonkey online survey to members of the Medicine-Pediatrics Program Directors Association. Questions pertained to program characteristics, program director support, recruitment, ambulatory training, and graduate data. More than 79% of responders completed the entire survey for each year (sample size was 60 program directors). Compared to the time prior to accreditation of the specialty, there was an increase in program directors who are dually trained (89% versus 93%), an increase in program director salary ($134,000 before accreditation versus $185,000 in 2013, P Pediatrics examination was comparable to that for pediatrics residents. Since accreditation, a larger number of residents are choosing careers in hospital medicine. Our data show widespread improved support for medicine-pediatrics programs since the 2006 start of ACGME accreditation.

  14. Child and parental adaptation to pediatric stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijmoet-Wiersma, C. M. Jantien; Kolk, Annemarie M.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Spek, Emmelien M.; van Klink, Jeanine M. M.; Egeler, R. Maarten; Bredius, Robbert G. M.; Koopman, Hendrik M.

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic pediatric stem cell transplantation (SCT) is a very intensive treatment with a high mortality and morbidity. The objectives of this study were to assess the (1) self- and proxy-reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL) compared to a norm group, (2) levels of parenting stress

  15. Child and parental adaptation to pediatric stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijmoet-Wiersma, C.M.J.; Kolk, A.M.; Grootenhuis, M.A.; Spek, E.M.; van Klink, J.M.M.; Egeler, R.M.; Bredius, R.G.M.; Koopman, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Goals of work: Allogeneic pediatric stem cell transplantation (SCT) is a very intensive treatment with a high mortality and morbidity. The objectives of this study were to assess the (1) self- and proxy-reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL) compared to a norm group, (2) levels of parenting

  16. Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency Program: Relationship between Lifestyle Behaviors and Burnout and Wellbeing Measures in First-Year Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClafferty, Hilary; Brooks, Audrey J; Chen, Mei-Kuang; Brenner, Michelle; Brown, Melanie; Esparham, Anna; Gerstbacher, Dana; Golianu, Brenda; Mark, John; Weydert, Joy; Yeh, Ann Ming; Maizes, Victoria

    2018-04-23

    It is widely recognized that burnout is prevalent in medical culture and begins early in training. Studies show pediatricians and pediatric trainees experience burnout rates comparable to other specialties. Newly developed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in professionalism and personal development recognize the unacceptably high resident burnout rates and present an important opportunity for programs to improve residents experience throughout training. These competencies encourage healthy lifestyle practices and cultivation of self-awareness, self-regulation, empathy, mindfulness, and compassion—a paradigm shift from traditional medical training underpinned by a culture of unrealistic endurance and self-sacrifice. To date, few successful and sustainable programs in resident burnout prevention and wellness promotion have been described. The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR) curriculum, developed in 2011, was designed in part to help pediatric programs meet new resident wellbeing requirements. The purpose of this paper is to detail levels of lifestyle behaviors, burnout, and wellbeing for the PIMR program’s first-year residents ( N = 203), and to examine the impact of lifestyle behaviors on burnout and wellbeing. The potential of the PIMR to provide interventions addressing gaps in lifestyle behaviors with recognized association to burnout is discussed.

  17. Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency Program: Relationship between Lifestyle Behaviors and Burnout and Wellbeing Measures in First-Year Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary McClafferty

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that burnout is prevalent in medical culture and begins early in training. Studies show pediatricians and pediatric trainees experience burnout rates comparable to other specialties. Newly developed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME core competencies in professionalism and personal development recognize the unacceptably high resident burnout rates and present an important opportunity for programs to improve residents experience throughout training. These competencies encourage healthy lifestyle practices and cultivation of self-awareness, self-regulation, empathy, mindfulness, and compassion—a paradigm shift from traditional medical training underpinned by a culture of unrealistic endurance and self-sacrifice. To date, few successful and sustainable programs in resident burnout prevention and wellness promotion have been described. The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR curriculum, developed in 2011, was designed in part to help pediatric programs meet new resident wellbeing requirements. The purpose of this paper is to detail levels of lifestyle behaviors, burnout, and wellbeing for the PIMR program’s first-year residents (N = 203, and to examine the impact of lifestyle behaviors on burnout and wellbeing. The potential of the PIMR to provide interventions addressing gaps in lifestyle behaviors with recognized association to burnout is discussed.

  18. Parental spirituality in life-threatening pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, David B; Barrera, Maru; Granek, Leeat; D'Agostino, Norma Mammone; Shaheed, Jenny; Beaune, Laura; Bouffet, Eric; Antle, Beverley

    2017-01-01

    This study addressed parental spirituality in the context of pediatric cancer with a poor prognosis. Drawing upon previous research implementing a longitudinal grounded theory design examining parental hope, 35 parents were interviewed regarding their experiences with an emergent description of the role of spirituality in parents' daily lives. Spirituality included religious beliefs and practices, notions of a higher force or cosmos, relationship with a divine being, as well as elements emerging from meaning-making and relationships. Parental expectations of spirituality remained relatively constant across data collection time points (3-9 months postdiagnosis), although limited variation occurred relative to shifting circumstance (e.g., deterioration of the child's condition). Spirituality appeared to offer: greater acceptance of parents' inability to protect their child from harm related to her/his life-threatening illness, guidance and emotion decompression, and support from one's faith community. Recommendations for integrating spiritual assessment in clinical care practice are offered.

  19. Integrating Parenting Support Within and Beyond the Pediatric Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Julie M; Stockton, Maria Paz; Andrade, Berta; Daniel, Stephanie

    2018-01-01

    Positive parenting programs, developmental support services, and evidence-based home visiting programs can effectively provide parenting support and improve health and developmental outcomes for at-risk children. Few models, however, have integrated referrals for on-site support and home visiting programs into the provision of routine pediatric care within a medical home. This article describes an innovative approach, through partnership with a community-based organization, to deliver on-site and home visiting support services for children and families within and beyond the medical home. Our model offers a system of on-site services, including parenting, behavior, and/or development support, with optional intensive home visiting services. Assessment included description of the population served, delineation of services provided, and qualitative identification of key themes of the impact of services, illustrated by case examples. This replicable model describes untapped potential of the pediatric medical home as a springboard to mitigate risk and optimize children's health and development.

  20. The current and ideal state of mental health training: pediatric resident perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Elisa; Richardson, Joshua E; Bostwick, Susan; Ward, Mary J; Green, Cori

    2015-01-01

    PHENOMENON: Mental health (MH) problems are prevalent in the pediatric population, and in a setting of limited resources, pediatricians need to provide MH care in the primary medical home yet are uncomfortable doing so citing a lack of training during residency as one barrier. The purpose of this study is to describe pediatric residents' experiences and perspectives on the current and ideal states of MH training and ideas for curriculum development to bridge this gap. A qualitative study using focus groups of pediatric residents from an urban academic medical center was performed. Audio recordings were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Twenty-six residents participated in three focus groups, which is when thematic saturation was achieved. The team generated five major themes: capabilities, comfort, organizational capacity, coping, and education. Residents expressed uncertainty at every step of an MH visit. Internal barriers identified included low levels of comfort and negative emotional responses. External barriers included a lack of MH resources and mentorship in MH care, or an inadequate organizational capacity. These internal and external barriers resulted in a lack of perceived capability in handling MH issues. In response, residents reported inadequate coping strategies, such as ignoring MH concerns. To build knowledge and skills, residents prefer educational modalities including didactics, experiential learning through collaborations with MH specialists, and tools built into patient care flow. Insights: Pediatric residency programs need to evolve in order to improve resident training in MH care. The skills and knowledge requested by residents parallel the American Academy of Pediatrics statement on MH competencies. Models of collaborative care provide similar modalities of learning requested by residents. These national efforts have not been operationalized in training programs yet may be useful for curriculum development and

  1. Parental Feeding Style and Pediatric Obesity in Latino Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliszewski, Genevieve; Gillette, Meredith Dreyer; Brown, Chris; Cowden, John D

    2017-06-01

    Pediatric obesity has become an epidemic in the United States. Previous research has shown that parenting factors related to feeding style affect child weight and that Latino families are especially at risk for pediatric obesity. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between parental feeding style and child body mass index (BMI) in Latino families. Latino parents of children between the ages of 2 and 8 ( N = 124) completed a survey on parental feeding styles, acculturation, and demographics. The outcome variable was child BMI. Among respondents, 89% were mothers, 72% were overweight or obese, and 40% reported an indulgent feeding style. Children had a mean age of 59 months ( SD = 23.8) and a mean BMI z score of 0.77 ( SD = 1.14). A demanding parental feeding style was associated with lower child BMI z score, r = -.179, p parents' feeding behaviors. Future research is warranted in the area of ethnic variations of parenting and how these affect feeding and obesity in this highly vulnerable population.

  2. The alternative residence of minors with separated parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Flavia BARBUR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article proposes to analyze the modality in which the alternative residence is established within the legislation of several states, as well as the modality in which the courts apply the notion of alternative residence. In addition to this, we took into consideration the views expressed by psychologists regarding this matter. In the latter part of the article we analyzed the regulations regarding the residence of minors whose parents are separated in domestic law and we submitted our conclusions regarding the advantages and the disadvantages of an alternative residence. In order to obtain the necessary information, we studied the legislation from different countries, the principles of the European Commission on Family Law, articles on this subject and case law, as well as studies conducted in several states. We were therefore able to observe that in some states, the alternative residence is explicitly provisioned by law, while in other states, even though the notion is not explicitly provisioned, the courts managed to find ways in which, through the judgments rendered, to establish it by way of fact. The study is relevant to our legal system as domestic legislation does not specifies alternative residence, but nevertheless, in practice, such an arrangement could answer best the superior interest of the child.

  3. [Pediatric autopsy and informed parental consent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambaud, C; Guilleminault, C

    2005-10-01

    In French legal terminology, the definition of autopsy is "organs'withholding". This phrase is ambiguous, meaning both removing the organs for their macroscopic exam and their retention for subsequent histology. The autopsy of a child requires an informed consent from both parents. The issue is that the pathologist who performs the autopsy is not the one who delivers the information and gets the parents' consent: therefore, he does not know what they were told and what they actually agreed upon. A questionnaire was sent to 3 groups of paediatricians (N=891) to approach their knowledge regarding autopsy. Among 362 paediatricians who answered the questionnaire, 57.2% never attended an autopsy and procedures were badly known. They did not know whether or not organs, were systematically sampled especially brain. Regarding the possibility of conservation of organs, a majority thought that one should not solely answer to parents'queries (63.8%) but rather that one should point out every possibility, without giving the ins and outs (60.8%). The majority favoured organs retention and use for research. We make 3 suggestions: to register autopsy in the Natioanal Securite Sociale nomenclature, to establish information and consent forms for organs'removal, retention and disposal, and to offer parents the possibility of an interview with the pathologist before and/or after the autopsy, in association with the paediatrician.

  4. Improvement of Skills in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation of Pediatric Residents by Recorded Video Feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantasit, Nattachai; Vaewpanich, Jarin; Kuptanon, Teeradej; Kamalaporn, Haruitai; Khositseth, Anant

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the pediatric residents' cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills, and their improvements after recorded video feedbacks. Pediatric residents from a university hospital were enrolled. The authors surveyed the level of pediatric resuscitation skill confidence by a questionnaire. Eight psychomotor skills were evaluated individually, including airway, bag-mask ventilation, pulse check, prompt starting and technique of chest compression, high quality CPR, tracheal intubation, intraosseous, and defibrillation. The mock code skills were also evaluated as a team using a high-fidelity mannequin simulator. All the participants attended a concise Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) lecture, and received video-recorded feedback for one hour. They were re-evaluated 6 wk later in the same manner. Thirty-eight residents were enrolled. All the participants had a moderate to high level of confidence in their CPR skills. Over 50 % of participants had passed psychomotor skills, except the bag-mask ventilation and intraosseous skills. There was poor correlation between their confidence and passing the psychomotor skills test. After course feedback, the percentage of high quality CPR skill in the second course test was significantly improved (46 % to 92 %, p = 0.008). The pediatric resuscitation course should still remain in the pediatric resident curriculum and should be re-evaluated frequently. Video-recorded feedback on the pitfalls during individual CPR skills and mock code case scenarios could improve short-term psychomotor CPR skills and lead to higher quality CPR performance.

  5. Parents' satisfaction with pediatric ambulatory anesthesia in northeast of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonmak, Suhattaya; Boonmak, Polpun; Pothiruk, Kittawan; Hoontanee, Nattakhan

    2009-12-01

    Study the satisfaction of parents with ambulatory anesthesia and associated factors, including characteristics of the patients and their parents. This was a prospective, descriptive, observation study. The authors included children who were scheduled for ambulatory anesthetic service between birth and 14 years of age and attended at Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand. The authors excluded patients whose parents could not be reached by telephone. Before anesthesia, the authors recorded the patients and parents' characteristics, level of information perception (pre-, peri- and post-anesthesia and complications). After anesthesia, the anesthesia technique and any complications were recorded. The day after anesthesia, the authors made phone calls to the patients to record the parents' satisfaction score (viz, of overall, pre-, peri- and post-anesthesia care, and information about the level of patient care at home), and any anesthesia related complications. Ninety-two patients and their parents were included in the present study. Overall parents 'satisfaction with the anesthesia service was 96.7% (i.e., 89/92) (95% CI 90.8-99.3). Parents' satisfaction with pre- and peri-anesthesia care was 100% (95% CI 96.1-100) and 97.9% (95% CI 92.4-99.7), respectively. Parents' satisfaction with the PACU care and information of patient care at home was 96.7% (95% CI 90.8-99.3) and 91.3% (95% CI 83.6-96.2), respectively. Associated factors where parents were dissatisfied included PACU care satisfaction (i.e., relative risk 22.5 (95% CI 3.2-158)) and patient care information at home (i.e., relative risk 13.3 (95% CI 1.3-136.0)). The present study showed a high level of parents' satisfaction. Parents' dissatisfaction associated with PACU care and information about post anesthesia care at home. Additionally information on parents' characteristics provides invaluable data for improving pediatric ambulatory anesthesia in Srinagarind Hospital.

  6. Pediatric residents' learning styles and temperaments and their relationships to standardized test scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Sanjeev Y; Thompson, Lindsay A; Saliba, Heidi; Black, Erik W; Ryan, Kathleen A; Kelly, Maria N; Novak, Maureen; Mellott, Jane; Tuli, Sonal S

    2011-12-01

    Board certification is an important professional qualification and a prerequisite for credentialing, and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) assesses board certification rates as a component of residency program effectiveness. To date, research has shown that preresidency measures, including National Board of Medical Examiners scores, Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society membership, or medical school grades poorly predict postresidency board examination scores. However, learning styles and temperament have been identified as factors that 5 affect test-taking performance. The purpose of this study is to characterize the learning styles and temperaments of pediatric residents and to evaluate their relationships to yearly in-service and postresidency board examination scores. This cross-sectional study analyzed the learning styles and temperaments of current and past pediatric residents by administration of 3 validated tools: the Kolb Learning Style Inventory, the Keirsey Temperament Sorter, and the Felder-Silverman Learning Style test. These results were compared with known, normative, general and medical population data and evaluated for correlation to in-service examination and postresidency board examination scores. The predominant learning style for pediatric residents was converging 44% (33 of 75 residents) and the predominant temperament was guardian 61% (34 of 56 residents). The learning style and temperament distribution of the residents was significantly different from published population data (P  =  .002 and .04, respectively). Learning styles, with one exception, were found to be unrelated to standardized test scores. The predominant learning style and temperament of pediatric residents is significantly different than that of the populations of general and medical trainees. However, learning styles and temperament do not predict outcomes on standardized in-service and board examinations in pediatric residents.

  7. Parental Reflective Functioning: An Approach to Enhancing Parent-Child Relationships in Pediatric Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Monica Roosa; Webb, Denise; Sadler, Lois S; Slade, Arietta

    2015-01-01

    The current state of science suggests that safe, responsive, and nurturing parent-child relationships early in children's lives promotes healthy brain and child development and protection against lifelong disease by reducing toxic stress and promoting foundational social-emotional health. Pediatric health care providers (HCPs) have a unique opportunity to foster these relationships. However, such a role requires a shift in pediatric health care from a focus only on children to one that includes families and communities, as well as the inclusion of children's social and emotional health with their physical health. To foster healthy parent-child relationships, HCPs must develop the expertise to integrate approaches that support the family's socioemotional health into pediatric primary care. This article suggests ways in which pediatric HCPs can integrate a focus on parental reflective functioning into their clinical work, helping parents to understand some of the thoughts and feelings that underlie their children's behavior. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Parental Perspectives on a Pediatric Human Non-Subjects Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Kyle B; Clayton, Ellen Wright

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic biorepositories will be important tools to help unravel the effect of common genetic variants on risk for common pediatric diseases. Our objective was to explore how parents would respond to the inclusion of children in an opt-out model biobank. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews with parents in hospital-based pediatric clinics. Participants responded to a description of a biorepository already collecting samples from adults. Two coders independently analyzed and coded interviews using framework analysis. Opt-out forms were later piloted in a clinic area. Parental opt-out choices were recorded electronically, with opt-out rates reported here. RESULTS: Parents strongly supported medical research in general and expressed a high level of trust that Vanderbilt University would keep their child's medical information private. Parents were more likely to allow their child's sample to be included in the biorepository than to allow their child to participate in a hypothetical study that would not help or harm their child, but might help other children. Only a minority were able to volunteer a concern raised by the description of the biobank. The opt-out rate was initially high compared with the opt-out rate in the adult biorepository, but after the first week decreased to near the baseline in adult clinics. CONCLUSION: Parents in our study generally support an opt-out model biobank in children. Most would allow their own child's sample to be included. Institutions seeking to build pediatric biobanks may consider the human non-subjects model as a viable alternative to traditional human-subjects biobanks.

  9. Training gaps for pediatric residents planning a career in primary care: a qualitative and quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Adam A; Kamin, Carol; Glicken, Anita Duhl; Jones, M Douglas

    2011-09-01

    Resident training in pediatrics currently entails similar training for all residents in a fragmented curriculum with relatively little attention to the career plans of individual residents. To explore strengths and gaps in training for residents planning a career in primary care pediatrics and to present strategies for addressing the gaps. Surveys were sent to all graduates of the University of Colorado Denver Pediatric Residency Program (2003-2006) 3 years after completion of training. Respondents were asked to evaluate aspects of their training, using a 5-point Likert scale and evaluating each item ranging from "not at all well prepared" to "extremely well prepared" for their future career. In addition, focus groups were conducted with practitioners in 8 pediatric practices in Colorado. Sessions were transcribed and hand coded by 2 independent coders. Survey data identified training in behavior and development (mean score, 3.72), quality improvement and patient safety strategies (mean, 3.57), and practice management (mean, 2.46) as the weakest aspects of training. Focus groups identified deficiencies in training in mental health, practice management, behavioral medicine, and orthopedics. Deficiencies noted in curriculum structure were lack of residents' long-term continuity of relationships with patients; the need for additional training in knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed for primary care (perhaps even a fourth year of training); and a training structure that facilitates greater resident autonomy to foster development of clinical capability and self-confidence. Important gaps were identified in the primary care training of pediatric residents. These data support the need to develop more career-focused training.

  10. Impact of a Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Curriculum on an Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Dawn M; Miladinovic, Branko; Caselnova, Petra M; Holmström, Shelly W

    2016-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a new pediatric and adolescent gynecology (PAG) curriculum for improving obstetrics/gynecology resident physician knowledge and comfort level in patient management and to describe the current deficiencies in resident physician knowledge and comfort level in PAG. A PAG curriculum was implemented for the obstetrics/gynecology resident physicians (n = 20) at the University of South Florida in July 2013. Before and after the curriculum was introduced, resident physicians and recent graduates of the residency program completed a survey to assess their comfort level and a knowledge assessment consisting of 20 case-based questions. University-based residency program. Resident physicians and recent resident physician graduates in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Introduction of a PAG curriculum during the 2013-2014 academic year. Improvement in resident physicians' comfort level and knowledge in PAG. After the curriculum was introduced, comfort increased in examining the genitals of a pediatric gynecology patient (median difference = 1.5; P = .003) and history-taking, physical examination skills, and management (median difference = 1; P = .002) compared with before the curriculum. There was no significant difference in overall quiz score (15.5 ± 1.87 vs 15.8 ± 1.3; P = .78). A curriculum in PAG did improve resident comfort level in managing PAG patients, but did not significantly improve knowledge of this topic. Copyright © 2016.

  11. Google Glass for Residents Dealing With Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Arrest: A Randomized, Controlled, Simulation-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, David; Arnaud, Cécile; Guedj, Romain; Duguet, Alexandre; de Suremain, Nathalie; Petit, Arnaud

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether real-time video communication between the first responder and a remote intensivist via Google Glass improves the management of a simulated in-hospital pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest before the arrival of the ICU team. Randomized controlled study. Children's hospital at a tertiary care academic medical center. Forty-two first-year pediatric residents. Pediatric residents were evaluated during two consecutive simulated pediatric cardiopulmonary arrests with a high-fidelity manikin. During the second evaluation, the residents in the Google Glass group were allowed to seek help from a remote intensivist at any time by activating real-time video communication. The residents in the control group were asked to provide usual care. The main outcome measures were the proportion of time for which the manikin received no ventilation (no-blow fraction) or no compression (no-flow fraction). In the first evaluation, overall no-blow and no-flow fractions were 74% and 95%, respectively. During the second evaluation, no-blow and no-flow fractions were similar between the two groups. Insufflations were more effective (p = 0.04), and the technique (p = 0.02) and rate (p Google Glass group than in the control group. Real-time video communication between the first responder and a remote intensivist through Google Glass did not decrease no-blow and no-flow fractions during the first 5 minutes of a simulated pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest but improved the quality of the insufflations and chest compressions provided.

  12. Child abuse training and knowledge: a national survey of emergency medicine, family medicine, and pediatric residents and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Suzanne P; Heisler, Kurt W; Paulson, James F; Youmans, Eren

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the level of knowledge, comfort, and training related to the medical management of child abuse among pediatrics, emergency medicine, and family medicine residents. Surveys were administered to program directors and third-year residents at 67 residency programs. The resident survey included a 24-item quiz to assess knowledge regarding the medical management of physical and sexual child abuse. Sites were solicited from members of a network of child abuse physicians practicing at institutions with residency programs. Analyzable surveys were received from 53 program directors and 462 residents. Compared with emergency medicine and family medicine programs, pediatric programs were significantly larger and more likely to have a medical provider specializing in child abuse pediatrics, have faculty primarily responsible for child abuse training, use a written curriculum for child abuse training, and offer an elective rotation in child abuse. Exposure to child abuse training and abused patients was highest for pediatric residents and lowest for family medicine residents. Comfort with managing child abuse cases was lowest among family medicine residents. On the knowledge quiz, pediatric residents significantly outperformed emergency medicine and family medicine residents. Residents with high knowledge scores were significantly more likely to come from larger programs and programs that had a center, provider, or interdisciplinary team that specialized in child abuse pediatrics; had a physician on faculty responsible for child abuse training; used a written curriculum for child abuse training; and had a required rotation in child abuse pediatrics. By analyzing the relationship between program characteristics and residents' child abuse knowledge, we found that pediatric programs provide far more training and resources for child abuse education than emergency medicine and family medicine programs. As leaders, pediatricians must

  13. A comparison of Canadian pediatric resident career plans in 1998 and 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseer, Larissa; Roth, Daniel E; Tallett, Susan; Hilliard, Robert; Vohra, Sunita

    2008-12-01

    Studies of pediatric resident career plans and preferences help to forecast changes in the demographic profile and practice patterns of North American pediatricians, providing insights that can guide child health care and medical education policy making. With this study we aimed to compare 4 aspects of Canadian pediatric resident career plans in 1998 and 2006: (1) weekly work hours; (2) scope of practice; (3) professional activities; and (4) community size. Canadian pediatric residents were invited to participate in a national cross-sectional survey to explore career plans and preferences in 1998 (mailing) and 2006 (on-line). Response rates were 69% in 1998 and 52% in 2006. In both survey years, the majority of respondents were female (69% and 73%, respectively). Overall, residents planned to work a similar number of weekly hours in both survey years (47.8 vs 48.8). Women planned to work significantly fewer hours than men; this gap was wider in 2006 than in 1998 (1998: 2.8 fewer hours; 2006: 7.8 fewer hours). After adjusted analysis, the association between proportion of time in primary care and study year became significant; however, time in consultant general or subspecialty pediatrics remained nonsignificantly changed. Residents planned to spend less time in clinical work in 2006 than 1998 (64.4% vs 58.1%), and more planned to work and reside in metropolitan areas (68% vs 78% of decided respondents). Between 1998 and 2006, there was no overall change in the number of hours that Canadian pediatric residents planned to work, but the gender gap widened because of an increase in planned weekly work hours among men. The results also suggest that new strategies may be needed to improve future pediatrician availability in small communities by addressing barriers to nonmetropolitan practice, especially for women.

  14. Parent assessment of medical student’s skills in ambulatory pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Erika; Haines, Christina; Lang, Mia

    2013-01-01

    Background Partnership with parents is a vital part of pediatric medical education, yet few studies have examined parent attitudes towards learners in pediatric settings. Methods Questionnaires were used to determine parent and student assessment of professional and clinical skills (primary outcome) and parent attitudes towards 3rd year medical students (secondary outcome) at the University of Alberta. Chi Square, Kendall’s Tau and Kappa coefficients were calculated to compare parent and stud...

  15. Burnout syndrome during residency in internal medicine and pediatrics in a country without working time directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Duygu Yazgan; Durusu Tanriover, Mine; Unal, Sule; Dizdar, Omer; Kalyoncu, Umut; Karakaya, Jale; Unal, Serhat; Kale, Gulsev

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate burnout syndrome among internal medicine and pediatrics residents in a country that does not have the working time directive (WTD) and also to determine the risk factors and consequent impact on efficient functioning in clinical areas. A 57-item questionnaire was given to internal medicine and pediatrics residents. Responses from 22 pediatrics and 33 internal medicine residents were evaluated. Demographic findings, burnout scores, having hobbies, social activities and reading books unrelated to medicine were similar between the two groups. Six pediatrics residents (27.3 per cent) and 11 (33.3 per cent) internal medicine residents met the criteria for clinically significant burnout. Personal accomplishment scores and reading books unrelated to medicine were found to be related to burnout. Burnout is a syndrome characterized by depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and a low sense of personal accomplishment. It is important to document burnout in countries where WTDs are not implemented. Further studies might demonstrate burnout's effect on patient safety, service quality and physician's performance.

  16. Latino Parents' Perceptions of Pediatric Weight Counseling Terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierim, Shanna Doucette; Newcomer, Sophia; Castillo, Alyssa; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Raghunath, Silvia; Clarke, Christina; Wright, Leslie; Haemer, Matthew; Hambidge, Simon J

    2018-04-01

    Little is known about Latino parents' perceptions of weight-related language in English or Spanish, particularly for counseling obese youth. We sought to identify English and Spanish weight counseling terms perceived by Latino parents across demographic groups as desirable for providers to use, motivating, and inoffensive. Latino parents of children treated at urban safety-net clinics completed surveys in English or Spanish. Parents rated the desirable, motivating, or offensive properties of terms for excess weight using a 5-point scale. We compared parental ratings of terms and investigated the association of parent and child characteristics with parent perceptions of terms. A total of 525 surveys met inclusion criteria (255 English, 270 Spanish). English survey respondents rated "unhealthy weight" and "too much weight for his/her health" the most motivating and among the most desirable and least offensive terms. Spanish survey respondents found "demasiado peso para su salud" highly desirable, highly motivating, and inoffensive, and respondents valued its connection to the child's health. Commonly used clinical terms "overweight"/"sobrepeso" and "high BMI [body mass index]"/"índice de masa corporal alta" were not as desirable or as motivating. "Chubby," "fat," "gordo," and "muy gordo" were the least motivating and most offensive terms. Parents' ratings of commonly used clinical terms varied widely across demographic groups, but more desirable terms had less variability. "Unhealthy weight," "too much weight for his/her health," and its Spanish equivalent, "demasiado peso para su salud," were the most desirable and motivating, and the least offensive terms. Latino parents' positive perceptions of these terms occurred across parent and child characteristics, supporting their use in weight counseling. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Does teaching crisis resource management skills improve resuscitation performance in pediatric residents?*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Jaime; Duff, Jonathan P; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Djogovic, Dennis; Joynt, Chloe

    2014-05-01

    The effect of teaching crisis resource management skills on the resuscitation performance of pediatric residents is unknown. The primary objective of this pilot study was to determine if teaching crisis resource management to residents leads to improved clinical and crisis resource management performance in simulated pediatric resuscitation scenarios. A prospective, randomized control pilot study. Simulation facility at tertiary pediatric hospital. Junior pediatric residents. Junior pediatric residents were randomized to 1 hour of crisis resource management instruction or no additional training. Time to predetermined resuscitation tasks was noted in simulated resuscitation scenarios immediately after intervention and again 3 months post intervention. Crisis resource management skills were evaluated using the Ottawa Global Rating Scale. Fifteen junior residents participated in the study, of which seven in the intervention group. The intervention crisis resource management group placed monitor leads 24.6 seconds earlier (p = 0.02), placed an IV 47.1 seconds sooner (p = 0.04), called for help 50.4 seconds faster (p = 0.03), and checked for a pulse after noticing a rhythm change 84.9 seconds quicker (p = 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference in time to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (p = 0.264). The intervention group had overall crisis resource management performance scores 1.15 points higher (Ottawa Global Rating Scale [out of 7]) (p = 0.02). Three months later, these differences between the groups persisted. A 1-hour crisis resource management teaching session improved time to critical initial steps of pediatric resuscitation and crisis resource management performance as measured by the Ottawa Global Rating Scale. The control group did not develop these crisis resource management skills over 3 months of standard training indicating that obtaining these skills requires specific education. Larger studies of crisis resource education are

  18. Availability of Emotional Support and Mental Health Care for Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, Melissa M; Serwint, Janet R; Chaudron, Linda H; Baldwin, Constance D; Blumkin, Aaron K; Szilagyi, Peter G

    Resident mental health (MH) problems can be associated with reduced empathy and increased medical errors. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandates resident MH support services, but it is unknown if these services are accessible and meet resident needs. We sought to describe the prevalence of anxiety and depression in current pediatric residents in New York State (NYS), and their self-reported use of and barriers to support services. We developed an online survey and distributed it to all categorical pediatric residents in 9 NYS programs. Items addressing self-concern for clinical anxiety and depression and use of MH services were pilot tested for content and construct validity. The validated Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2) measured depressive symptoms. Analyses used descriptive and chi-square tests. Respondents included 227 residents (54% response rate) distributed across training levels and programs. Many reported "often" or "almost always" feeling stress (52%), physical exhaustion (41%), and mental exhaustion (35%); 11% had PHQ-2-defined depressive symptoms. Some thought that their stress levels raised concern for clinical depression (25%) or anxiety (28%); among these, only 44% and 39%, respectively, had sought care. More women reported physical exhaustion (P Barriers to receipt of services included inflexible schedules (82%), guilt about burdening colleagues (65%), fear of confidentiality breach (46%), and difficulty identifying services (44%). Pediatric residents frequently experience MH symptoms, but many do not know about or use support services. Programs should enhance MH support by overcoming barriers and increasing resident awareness of services. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Life satisfaction of people with intellectual disability living in community residences: perceptions of the residents, their parents and staff members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C; Rabinovitz, S

    2003-02-01

    Within the literature on quality of life (QoL), life satisfaction (LS) has emerged as a key variable by which to measure perceived well-being, which is referred to as subjective QoL. The LS self-reports of 93 residents with intellectual disability (ID) living in community-based residences were compared with reports about their LS completed by their staff and parents. The residents were interviewed on their LS by social workers who did not belong to the staff of the interviewee's residence. The instrument used was the Life Satisfaction Scale (LSS). Staff and parents completed the short version of the LSS. Residents and staff's LS reports were positively correlated. However, significant differences were found between these two groups of informants when the residents were characterized as high functioning, had a low score in challenging behaviour, worked in an integrative employment setting and lived in an apartment. As opposed to staff/resident discrepancies, no differences were found between parents' and residents' LS reports. If residents cannot to be interviewed about their LS, then the parent is the preferred person to respond on behalf of the resident. The current study highlights the importance of including both objective measures (e.g. functional assessment characteristics) and subjective measures (e.g. LS) in order to get a better understanding of the QoL of people with ID.

  20. A Virtual Reality Curriculum for Pediatric Residents Decreases Rates of Influenza Vaccine Refusal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Francis J; DeBlasio, Dominick; Beck, Andrew F; Ollberding, Nicholas J; Davis, David; Cruse, Bradley; Samaan, Zeina; McLinden, Daniel; Klein, Melissa D

    Influenza vaccine hesitancy is common in the primary care setting. Though physicians can affect caregivers' attitudes toward vaccination, physicians report uneasiness discussing vaccine hesitancy. Few studies have targeted physician-patient communication training as a means to decrease vaccination refusal. An immersive virtual reality (VR) curriculum was created to teach pediatric residents communication skills when discussing influenza vaccine hesitancy. This pilot curriculum consisted of 3 VR simulations during which residents counseled graphical character representatives (avatars) who expressed vaccine hesitancy. Participants were randomized to the intervention (n = 24) or control (n = 21) group. Only residents in the intervention group underwent the VR curriculum. Impact of the curriculum was assessed through difference in influenza vaccine refusal rates between the intervention and control groups in the 3 months after the VR curriculum. Participants included postgraduate level (PL) 2 and PL3 pediatric residents. All eligible residents (n = 45) participated; the survey response rate was 100%. In patients aged 6 to 59 months, residents in the intervention group had a decreased rate of influenza vaccination refusal in the postcurriculum period compared to the control group (27.8% vs 37.1%; P = .03). Immersive VR may be an effective modality to teach communication skills to medical trainees. Next steps include evaluation of the curriculum in a larger, multisite trial. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Learning styles in medical residents and their professors of a pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Muñoz, Irina Elizabeth; Gómez-Negrete, Alonso; Varela-Ruiz, Margarita; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Mercado-Arellano, José Agustín; Sciandra-Rico, Martha Minerva; Matute-González, Mario Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background: the learning styles are cognitive, emotional, and psychological characteristics, which function as relatively stable indicators of how teachers and students perceive, interact, and respond to their learning environments. Knowing students' styles allows teachers to have tools to improve medical education. Our objective was to identify learning styles in pediatric residents and professors from a pediatric hospital. Methods: a learning styles questionnaire was applied to residents and theirs professors; data was analyzed in SPSS 12 software. Results: the dominant learning style in pediatric residents was reflexive and for professors was theoretical. There wasn't any difference between sexes or between medical or surgical specialities. There was more correlation between professors and residents when there was an increase in training time. Conclusions: the learning styles between professors and residents are different, especially at the beginning of the medical specialty courses; that's why it is necessary to realize a confrontation between the students' learning styles and teaching methods used by professors to improve significant learning. To know learning styles gives residents an important alternative to find a better study strategy.

  2. A dedicated scholarly research program in an adult and pediatric neurology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Haut, Sheryl R; Lipton, Richard B; Milstein, Mark J; Ocava, Lenore C; Ballaban-Gil, Karen; Moshé, Solomon L; Mehler, Mark F

    2017-04-04

    To describe and assess the effectiveness of a formal scholarly activity program for a highly integrated adult and pediatric neurology residency program. Starting in 2011, all graduating residents were required to complete at least one form of scholarly activity broadly defined to include peer-reviewed publications or presentations at scientific meetings of formally mentored projects. The scholarly activity program was administered by the associate residency training director and included an expanded journal club, guided mentorship, a required grand rounds platform presentation, and annual awards for the most scholarly and seminal research findings. We compared scholarly output and mentorship for residents graduating within a 5-year period following program initiation (2011-2015) and during the preceding 5-year preprogram baseline period (2005-2009). Participation in scholarship increased from the preprogram baseline (24 of 53 graduating residents, 45.3%) to the postprogram period (47 of 57 graduating residents, 82.1%, p Neurology.

  3. Parental responses to involvement in rounds on a pediatric inpatient unit at a teaching hospital: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, Linda C; Dick, Ronald; Parry, Carol; Tamura, Glen S

    2008-03-01

    In pediatric teaching hospitals, medical decisions are traditionally made by the attending and resident physicians during rounds that do not include parents. This structure limits the ability of the medical team to provide "family-centered care" and the attending physician to model communication skills. The authors thus set out to identify how parents responded to participation in interdisciplinary teaching rounds conducted in a large tertiary care children's teaching hospital. A qualitative descriptive study was conducted using data from semistructured interviews of parents who had participated in rounds on the inpatient medical unit of a large academic children's hospital. From December 2004 to April 2005, 18 parents were interviewed after their participation in rounds. Questions assessed their experiences, expectations, preferred communication styles, and suggestions for improvement. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Being able to communicate, understand the plan, and participate with the team in decision making about their child's care were the most frequently cited outcomes of importance to parents. All 18 participants described the overall experience as positive, and 17 of 18 described themselves as "comfortable" with inclusion in rounds. Use of lay terminology and inclusion of nurses in rounds were preferred. Including parents on ward rounds at a teaching hospital was viewed positively by parents. Specific themes of particular importance to parents were identified. Further study is needed to assess the impact of inclusion of parents on rounds on patient outcomes and the resident experience.

  4. Benchmarks for Support and Outcomes for Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: A 5-Year Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Michael; Williams, Ronald; Dennar, Princess E.; Hopkins, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined internal medicine and pediatrics (medicine-pediatrics) residencies were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited separately from their corresponding categorical residencies in June 2006. Objective We investigated how ACGME accreditation of medicine-pediatrics programs has affected the levels of support (both financial and personnel), the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) match rate, performance on the board examination, and other graduate outcomes. Methods From 2009 through 2013 we sent an annual SurveyMonkey online survey to members of the Medicine-Pediatrics Program Directors Association. Questions pertained to program characteristics, program director support, recruitment, ambulatory training, and graduate data. More than 79% of responders completed the entire survey for each year (sample size was 60 program directors). Results Compared to the time prior to accreditation of the specialty, there was an increase in program directors who are dually trained (89% versus 93%), an increase in program director salary ($134,000 before accreditation versus $185,000 in 2013, P medicine. Conclusions Our data show widespread improved support for medicine-pediatrics programs since the 2006 start of ACGME accreditation. PMID:26692969

  5. Sleep education in pediatric residency programs: a cross-cultural look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindell, Jodi A; Bartle, Alex; Ahn, Youngmin; Ramamurthy, Mahesh Babu; Huong, Huynh Thi Duy; Kohyama, Jun; Li, Albert M; Ruangdaraganon, Nichara; Sekartini, Rini; Teng, Arthur; Goh, Daniel Y T

    2013-04-03

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of education about sleep and sleep disorders in pediatric residency programs and to identify barriers to providing such education. Surveys were completed by directors of 152 pediatric residency programs across 10 countries (Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, United States-Canada, and Vietnam). Overall, the average amount of time spent on sleep education is 4.4 hours (median = 2.0 hours), with 23% responding that their pediatric residency program provides no sleep education. Almost all programs (94.8%) offer less than 10 hours of instruction. The predominant topics covered include sleep-related development, as well as normal sleep, sleep-related breathing disorders, parasomnias, and behavioral insomnia of childhood. These results indicate that there is still a need for more efforts to include sleep-related education in all pediatric residency programs, as well as coverage of the breadth of sleep-related topics. Such education would be consistent with the increased recognition of the importance of sleep and under-diagnosis of sleep disorders in children and adolescents.

  6. Underserved Areas and Pediatric Resident Characteristics: Is There Reason for Optimism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraque-Arena, Danielle; Frintner, Mary Pat; Cull, William L

    2016-01-01

    To examine whether resident characteristics and experiences are related to practice in underserved areas. Cross-sectional survey of a national random sample of pediatric residents (n = 1000) and additional sample of minority residents (n = 223) who were graduating in 2009 was conducted. Using weighted logistic regression, we examined relationships between resident characteristics (background, values, residency experiences, and practice goals) and reported 1) expectation to practice in underserved area and 2) postresidency position in underserved area. Response rate was 57%. Forty-one percent of the residents reported that they had an expectation of practicing in an underserved area. Of those who had already accepted postresidency positions, 38% reported positions in underserved areas. Service obligation in exchange for loans/scholarships and primary care/academic pediatrics practice goals were the strongest predictors of expectation of practicing in underserved areas (respectively, adjusted odds ratio 4.74, 95% confidence interval 1.87-12.01; adjusted odds ratio 3.48, 95% confidence interval 1.99-6.10). Other significant predictors include hospitalist practice goals, primary care practice goals, importance of racial/ethnic diversity of patient population in residency selection, early plan (before medical school) to care for underserved families, mother with a graduate or medical degree, and higher score on the Universalism value scale. Service obligation and primary care/academic pediatrics practice goal were also the strongest predictors for taking a postresidency job in underserved area. Trainee characteristics such as service obligations, values of humanism, and desire to serve underserved populations offer the hope that policies and public funding can be directed to support physicians with these characteristics to redress the maldistribution of physicians caring for children. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  7. Self-assessment on the competencies and reported improvement priorities for pediatrics residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Ting T; Tancredi, Daniel J; Burke, Ann E; Guillot, Ann; Guralnick, Susan; Trimm, R Franklin; Mahan, John D

    2012-12-01

    Self-assessment and self-directed learning are essential to becoming an effective physician. To identify factors associated with resident self-assessment on the competencies, and to determine whether residents chose areas of self-assessed relative weakness as areas for improvement in their Individualized Learning Plan (ILP). We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the American Academy of Pediatrics' PediaLink ILP database. Pediatrics residents self-assessed their competency in the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies using a color-coded slider scale with end anchors "novice" and "proficient" (0-100), and then chose at least 1 competency to improve. Multivariate regression explored the relationship between overall confidence in core competencies, sex, level of training, and degree (MD or DO) status. Correlation examined whether residents chose to improve competencies in which they rated themselves as lower. A total of 4167 residents completed an ILP in academic year 2009-2010, with residents' ratings improving from advanced beginner (48 on a 0-100 scale) in postgraduate year-1 residents (PGY-1s) to competent (75) in PGY-3s. Residents rated themselves as most competent in professionalism (mean, 75.3) and least competent in medical knowledge (mean, 55.8) and systems-based practice (mean, 55.2). In the adjusted regression model, residents' competency ratings increased by level of training and whether they were men. In PGY-3s, there was no difference between men and women. Residents selected areas for improvement that correlated to competencies where they had rated themselves lower (P knowledge and systems-based practice, even as PGY-3s. Residents tended to choose subcompetencies, which they rated as lower to focus on improving.

  8. Immunization status of residents in pediatrics at the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Bernardi Viviani Silveira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination of health care workers is an efficient way to reduce the risk of occupational infection and to prevent nosocomial transmission to vulnerable patients. Despite this, achieving high immunization rates among those professionals is a challenge. We assessed the immunization status of Residents in Pediatrics at the Federal University of São Paulo from June to December 2008. Their immunization records were checked and evaluated according to the Brazilian Immunization Schedule for health care workers. Considering all required vaccines, only 3.1% of the 64 Residents were up-to-date with their immunizations. Influenza was the vaccine with the lowest uptake (3.1% and measles and rubella were diseases with the highest evidence of immunity (62.5% each. Only 37.5% of Residents had received three hepatitis B vaccine doses with a subsequent serology confirming seroconversion. Moreover, the vast majority of Residents in Pediatrics who were not up-to-date were unaware of the fact. Both medical schools and Pediatric Residence programs should not only offer information but also check vaccination records in an effort to keep their healthcare workers´ vaccinations up-to-date.

  9. Parents' experiences of pediatric palliative care and the impact on long-term parental grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geest, Ivana M M; Darlington, Anne-Sophie E; Streng, Isabelle C; Michiels, Erna M C; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2014-06-01

    Approximately 25% of children diagnosed with cancer eventually die. Losing a child puts parents at increased risk for developing psychological problems. To explore parents' perceptions of the interaction with health care professionals (communication, continuity of care, and parental involvement) and symptom management during the pediatric palliative phase, and to investigate the influence on long-term grief in parents who lost a child to cancer. A total of 89 parents of 57 children who died of cancer between 2000 and 2004 participated in this retrospective cross-sectional study by completing a set of questionnaires measuring grief (Inventory of Traumatic Grief), parents' perceptions of the interaction with health care professionals (communication, continuity of care, and parental involvement), and symptom management during the palliative phase. Care was assessed on a five point Likert scale (1=disagree and 5=agree). Parents highly rated communication (4.6±0.6), continuity of care (4.3±0.6), and parental involvement (4.6±0.7) during the palliative phase. Parents' most often reported physical and psychological symptoms of their child during the palliative phase were fatigue (75%), pain (74%), anxiety to be alone (52%), and anger (48%). Higher ratings of parents on communication (β=-9.08, P=0.03) and continuity of care (β=-11.74, P=0.01) were associated with lower levels of long-term parental grief. The severity of the child's dyspnea (β=2.96, P=0.05), anxiety to be alone (β=4.52, Pparental grief. Multivariate models combining the interaction with health care professionals and symptom management showed a significant influence of both aspects on long-term parental grief. Both interaction with health care professionals, especially communication and continuity of care, and symptom management in children dying of cancer are associated with long-term parental grief levels. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Perceptions of Pediatric Residents Regarding Counseling About Use of Social Networking Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, Sumeet L; Fenick, Ada M; Qin, Li; Talwalkar, Jaideep S

    2018-04-01

    Increasing use of social networking sites (SNS) among youth prompted professional organizations to urge pediatricians to promote healthy media use. Electronic questionnaires were distributed to 76 pediatric residents at one academic center measuring attitudes, practices, and familiarity with SNS. Of 43 respondents (response rate = 57%), most reported personal SNS use (98%) and familiarity with SNS used by youth (72%), and 88% agreed that pediatricians should provide counseling on SNS use. Only 5% felt they had adequate training on SNS use in children, and just 26% felt comfortable advising families. Residents were less likely to discuss SNS use than general media use (19% vs 56%, P = .007). Media counseling was correlated with SNS counseling ( r = .38, P = .01). Pediatric residents recognize the importance of guiding families on SNS use, yet do not routinely provide counseling despite high levels of personal SNS use and familiarity. Focused training is necessary for pediatricians to prioritize practical guidance.

  11. [Participation of one children hospital residents in scientific and training activities of Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, María Carolina; Domínguez, Paula Alejandra; Martins, Andrea Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    The Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría, SAP (Argentine Society of Pediatrics) offers courses and scientific activities for pediatricians and residents. We evaluated the participation of Pedro de Elizalde Hospital residents in the scientific and training activities of SAP and assessed the trend of participation throughout the residency; 107 residents were surveyed; 48% were members, and the participation increased significantly throughout the residence (p <0.01). None of the surveyed residents were part of any association; 84% did not know the "Pediatricians in Training Group"; 49% participated in continued training programs, with a growing tendency to participation through-out the residency (p <0.01); 80% considered that the SAP is a friendly entity. We concluded that participation of residents in the SAP is scarce during the first two years of training, and that it shows a growth in the senior residents' group. Encouraging the interest of first and second year residents in the activities is necessary.

  12. Remediation in the Context of the Competencies: A Survey of Pediatrics Residency Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebschleger, Meredith P.; Haftel, Hilary M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The 6 competencies defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education provide the framework of assessment for trainees in the US graduate medical education system, but few studies have investigated their impact on remediation. Methods We obtained data via an anonymous online survey of pediatrics residency program directors. For the purposes of the survey, remediation was defined as “any form of additional training, supervision, or assistance above that required for a typical resident.” Respondents were asked to quantify 3 groups of residents: (1) residents requiring remediation; (2) residents whose training was extended for remediation purposes; and (3) residents whose training was terminated owing to issues related to remediation. For each group, the proportion of residents with deficiencies in each of the 6 competencies was calculated. Results In all 3 groups, deficiencies in medical knowledge and patient care were most common; deficiencies in professionalism and communication were moderately common; and deficiencies in systems-based practice and practice-based learning and improvement were least common. Residents whose training was terminated were more likely to have deficiencies in multiple competencies. Conclusion Although medical knowledge and patient care are reported most frequently, deficiencies in any of the 6 competencies can lead to the need for remediation in pediatrics residents. Residents who are terminated are more likely to have deficits in multiple competencies. It will be critical to develop and refine tools to measure achievement in all 6 competencies as the graduate medical education community may be moving further toward individualized training schedules and competency-based, rather than time-based, training. PMID:24404228

  13. Active parenting or Solomon’s justice?
    Alternating residence in Sweden for children with separated parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Singer

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternating residence for children with separated parents has become increasingly popular in Sweden over the last few decades. In this article, a brief background to the use of alternating residence in Sweden will be provided. Relevant legislation will be described and some of the apparent problems in connection to this kind of living arrangement will also be discussed. It is estimated that approximately one out of every five children with separated parents today are living alternately with both parents. The high frequency of alternating residence can probably be explained, to a great extent, by determined legislative work to ensure that joint custody is the main rule for separated parents. Joint custody after separation encourages parents to take a more active part in the child’s life. Alternating residence can be seen as the optimal way to ensure that a child is provided natural and stress-free contact with both parents in the different events of everyday life that is not possible when the child lives with one parent. However, there are also problems related to alternating residence that need to be addressed. The possibility for the courts to decide on alternating residence against the will of one of the parents appears to have little justification considering that one of the prerequisites for this form of living arrangement is that it is beneficial for children if their parents can co-operate. There are also other aspects of the regulation of alternating residence that need to be improved, in particular questions concerning the child maintenance. Different aspects of the public social security system for children with separated parents also need to be adjusted to provide just and fair solutions for children with alternating residence. Finally, since alternating residence is motivated by a desire to protect the best interests of the child, further research clarifying the experiences of children with alternating residence needs to be carried

  14. Using Reflections of Recent Resident Graduates and their Pediatric Colleagues to Evaluate a Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Kamei, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purposes: In response to the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandate for residency programs to use feedback to improve its educational program, we piloted a novel evaluation strategy of a residency program using structured interviews of resident graduates working in a primary care practice and their physician associates. Methods: A research assistant performed a structured telephone interview. Quantitative data assessing the graduate’s self-assessment and the graduate’s clinical practice by the associate were analyzed. In addition, we performed a qualitative analysis of the interviews. Results: Thirteen resident graduates in primary care practice and seven physician practice associates participated in the study. Graduate self-assessment revealed high satisfaction with their residency training and competency. The associates judged our graduates as highly competent and mentioned independent decision-making and strong interpersonal skills (such as teamwork and communication as important. They specifically cited the graduate’s skills in intensive care medicine and adolescent medicine as well as communication and teamwork skills as important contributions to their practice. Conclusions: The ACGME Outcomes Project, which increases the emphasis on educational outcomes in the accreditation of residency education programs, requires programs to provide evidence of its effectiveness in preparing residents for practice. Direct assessment of the competency of our physician graduates in practice using structured interviews of graduates and their practice associates provide useful feedback information to a residency program as part of a comprehensive evaluation plan of our program’s curriculum and can be used to direct future educational initiatives of our training program

  15. Medical Decisions of Pediatric Residents Turn Riskier after a 24-Hour Call with No Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, Adi; Wasserteil, Netanel; Gross, Itai; Mendlovic, Joseph; Pollak, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    Despite a gradual reduction in the workload during residency, 24-hour calls are still an integral part of most training programs. While sleep deprivation increases the risk propensity, the impact on medical risk taking has not been studied. This study aimed to assess the clinical decision making and psychomotor performance of pediatric residents following a limited nap time during a 24-hour call. A neurocognitive battery (IntegNeuro) and a medical decision questionnaire were completed by 44 pediatric residents at 2 time points: after a 24-hour call and following 3 nights with no calls (sleep ≥5 hours). To monitor sleep, residents wore actigraphs and completed sleep logs. Nap time during the shift was change in risk taking) or 2 to 3 hours (4% decreased risk taking) (difference between groups, P = 0.001). Risk-taking tendency inversely correlated with sustained attention scores (Pearson = -0.433, P = 0.003). Sustained attention was the neurocognitive domain most affected by sleep deprivation (effect size = 0.29, P = 0.025). This study suggests that residents napping less than an hour during a night shift are prone to riskier clinical decisions. Hence, enabling residents to nap at least 1 hour during shifts is recommended. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Implementation and assessment of a training course for residents in neonatology and pediatric emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, D; Bellot, A; Villedieu, F; Fazilleau, L; Brouard, J; Guillois, B

    2017-05-01

    Residents must balance patient care and the ongoing acquisition of medical knowledge. With increasing clinical responsibilities and patient overload, medical training is often left aside. In 2010, we designed and implemented a training course in neonatology and pediatric emergency medicine for residents in pediatrics, in order to improve their medical education. The course was made of didactic sessions and several simulation-based seminars for each year of residency. We conducted this study to assess the impact of our program on residents' satisfaction and self-assessed clinical skills. A survey was conducted at the end of each seminar. The students were asked to complete a form on a five-point rating scale to evaluate the courses and their impact on their satisfaction and self-assessed clinical skills, following the French National Health Institute's adapted Kirkpatrick model. Sixty-four (84%) of the 76 residents who attended the courses completed the form. The mean satisfaction score for the entire course was 4.78±0.42. Over 80% of the students felt that their clinical skills had improved. Medical education is an important part of residency training. Our training course responded to the perceived needs of the students with consistently satisfactory evaluations. Before the evaluation of the impact of the course on patient care, further studies are needed to assess the acquisition of knowledge and skills through objective evaluations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Limitation of duty hour regulations for pediatric resident wellness: A mixed methods study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Osamu; Mishina, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Ishiguro, Akira; Sakai, Hirokazu; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Duty hour regulations have been placed in residency programs to address mental health concerns and to improve wellness. Here, we elucidate the prevalence of depressive symptoms after implementing an overnight call shift system and the factors associated with burnout or depression among residents.A sequential exploratory mixed methods study was conducted in a tertiary care pediatric and perinatal hospital in Tokyo, Japan. A total of 41 pediatric residents participated in the cross-sectional survey. We determined and compared the prevalence of depressive symptoms and the number of actual working hours before and after implementing the shift system. A follow-up focus-group interview with 4 residents was conducted to explore the factors that may trigger or prevent depression and burnout.Mean working hours significantly decreased from 75.2 hours to 64.9 hours per week. Prevalence of depressive symptoms remained similar before and after implementation of the shift system. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization from the burnout scale were markedly associated with depression. High workload, stress intolerance, interpersonal difficulties, and generation gaps regarding work-life balance could cause burnout. Stress tolerance, workload monitoring and balancing, appropriate supervision, and peer support could prevent burnout.Although the overnight call shift system was effective in reducing working hours, its effectiveness in managing mental health issues among pediatric residents remains unclear. Resident wellness programs represent an additional strategy and they should be aimed at fostering peer support and improvement of resident-faculty interactions. Such an approach could be beneficial to the relationship between physicians of different generations with conflicting belief structures.

  18. Demand in Pediatric Dentistry for Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentist Anesthesiologists: A Survey of Directors of Dentist Anesthesiologist and Pediatric Dentistry Residencies

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, C. Gray; Jones, James E.; Saxen, Mark A.; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J.; Walker, LaQuia A.; Weddell, James A.; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 1...

  19. Analysis of Medication Errors in Simulated Pediatric Resuscitation by Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Porter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of our study was to estimate the incidence of prescribing medication errors specifically made by a trainee and identify factors associated with these errors during the simulated resuscitation of a critically ill child. Methods: The results of the simulated resuscitation are described. We analyzed data from the simulated resuscitation for the occurrence of a prescribing medication error. We compared univariate analysis of each variable to medication error rate and performed a separate multiple logistic regression analysis on the significant univariate variables to assess the association between the selected variables. Results: We reviewed 49 simulated resuscitations . The final medication error rate for the simulation was 26.5% (95% CI 13.7% - 39.3%. On univariate analysis, statistically significant findings for decreased prescribing medication error rates included senior residents in charge, presence of a pharmacist, sleeping greater than 8 hours prior to the simulation, and a visual analog scale score showing more confidence in caring for critically ill children. Multiple logistic regression analysis using the above significant variables showed only the presence of a pharmacist to remain significantly associated with decreased medication error, odds ratio of 0.09 (95% CI 0.01 - 0.64. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the presence of a clinical pharmacist during the resuscitation of a critically ill child reduces the medication errors made by resident physician trainees.

  20. Pediatric neurofibromatosis 1 and parental stress: a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Rosa Marotta,2 Michele Roccella,3 Beatrice Gallai,4 Lucia Parisi,3 Serena Marianna Lavano,2 Marco Carotenuto1 1Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Psychiatry, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 4Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy Background: Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1 is a complex and multifaceted neurocutaneous syndrome with many and varied comorbidities. The literature about the prevalence and degree of maternal stress and the impact of NF1 in the parent–child interaction is still scant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of maternal stress in a large pediatric sample of individuals affected by NF1. Methods: Thirty-seven children (19 boys, 18 girls of mean age 7.86±2.94 (range 5–11 years affected by typical NF1 and a control group comprising 405 typically developing children (207 boys, 198 girls; mean age 8.54±2.47 years were included in this study. To assess parental stress, the mothers of all individuals (NF1 and comparisons filled out the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form test. Results: The two study groups were comparable for age (P=0.116, gender (P=0.886, and body mass index adjusted for age (P=0.305. Mothers of children affected by NF1 reported higher mean Parenting Stress Index-Short Form scores on the Parental Distress domain (P<0.001, Difficult Child domain (P<0.001, and Total Stress domain than the mothers of typically developing children (controls (P<0.001. No significant differences between the two groups were found for the Parent-Child Dysfunctional Interaction domain (P=0.566 or Defensive Responding domain scores (P=0.160. Conclusion: NF1 is considered a multisystemic and complex disease, with many

  1. Review of a Parent's Influence on Pediatric Procedural Distress and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erin A; De Young, Alexandra; Kimble, Roy; Kenardy, Justin

    2018-06-01

    Understanding how parents influence their child's medical procedures can inform future work to reduce pediatric procedural distress and improve recovery outcomes. Following a pediatric injury or illness diagnosis, the associated medical procedures can be potentially traumatic events that are often painful and distressing and can lead to the child experiencing long-term physical and psychological problems. Children under 6 years old are particularly at risk of illness or injury, yet their pain-related distress during medical procedures is often difficult to manage because of their young developmental level. Parents can also experience ongoing psychological distress following a child's injury or illness diagnosis. The parent and parenting behavior is one of many risk factors for increased pediatric procedural distress. The impact of parents on pediatric procedural distress is an important yet not well-understood phenomenon. There is some evidence to indicate parents influence their child through their own psychological distress and through parenting behavior. This paper has three purposes: (1) review current empirical research on parent-related risk factors for distressing pediatric medical procedures, and longer-term recovery outcomes; (2) consider and develop existing theories to present a new model for understanding the parent-child distress relationship during medical procedures; and (3) review and make recommendations regarding current assessment tools and developing parenting behavior interventions for reducing pediatric procedural distress.

  2. Melatonin treatment of pediatric residents for adaptation to night shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Anita; Ris, M Douglas; Succop, Paul; Jaskiewicz, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Night float rotations are used in residency training programs to reduce residents' sleep deprivation. Night shift work, however, is accompanied by deleterious effects on sleep, mood, and attention. To test whether melatonin reduces the deleterious effects of night shift work on sleep, mood, and attention in pediatric residents during night float rotation. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover. Participants took melatonin (3 mg) or a placebo before bedtime in the morning after night shift; completed a sleep diary and an adverse-effects questionnaire daily; and completed the Profile of Mood States and the Conners Continuous Performance Test 3 times in each study week to test mood and attention, respectively. A university-affiliated, tertiary-care pediatric hospital. Healthy second-year pediatric residents working 2 night float rotations. Standardized measures of sleep, mood, and attention. Twenty-eight residents completed both treatments; 17 completed 1 treatment (10 placebo, 7 melatonin). There was not a statistically significant difference in measures of sleep, mood, and 5 of 6 measures of attention during melatonin and placebo treatment. One measure of attention, the number of omission errors, was significantly lower on melatonin (3.0 +/- 9.6) than on placebo (4.5 +/- 17.5) (z = -2.12, P = .03). The isolated finding of improvement of 1 single measure of attention in a test situation during melatonin treatment was not sufficiently robust to demonstrate a beneficial effect of melatonin in the dose used. Other strategies need to be considered to help residents in adaptation to night shift work.

  3. Are Graduating Pediatric Residents Prepared to Engage in Obesity Prevention and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frintner, Mary Pat; Liebhart, Janice L; Lindros, Jeanne; Baker, Alison; Hassink, Sandra G

    2016-01-01

    Little information is available to gauge residents' perceived receipt of comprehensive training and preparedness to manage children with obesity in practice. A national, random sample of 1000 graduating pediatric residents were surveyed in 2013 on childhood overweight/obesity and preparedness to prevent and treat obesity. A composite training measure was created by summing the number of areas (10 possible) where training on overweight/obesity was received. Multivariable logistic regression explored relationships of resident and training characteristics to residents' belief that their own counseling on prevention and treatment of overweight/obesity is very effective (vs somewhat/slightly/not effective). Of 625 survey respondents (63% response), most (68-92%) reported receipt of training in each of 10 assessed areas on overweight/obesity prevention, assessment, and treatment. Most residents did not desire more training in the assessed areas; however, 54% wanted more training in motivational interviewing. About one-fourth believed that their own counseling on the prevention of overweight/obesity (26%) and treatment of obesity (22%) was very effective. Residents who rated their ability to use motivational interviewing as very good/excellent were more likely to rate their counseling on both the prevention and treatment of overweight/obesity as very effective (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.63-7.13; and aOR 4.69, 95% CI 2.72-8.07, respectively). Residents who received training in all 10 assessed areas were also more likely to rate their counseling on both prevention and treatment as very effective (aOR 2.58, 95% CI 1.61-4.14; aOR 2.41, 95% CI 1.46-3.97, respectively). Comprehensive training on overweight/obesity and inclusion of training in motivational interviewing may help residents feel better prepared to care for children with overweight/obesity. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Improving pediatric immunization rates: description of a resident-led clinical continuous quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kyle Bradford; Gren, Lisa H; Backman, Richard

    2014-09-01

    Increased emphasis is being placed on the continuous quality improvement (CQI) education of residents of all specialties. This article describes a resident-led continuous quality improvement (CQI) project, based on a novel curriculum, to improve the immunization rates of children under 2 years old at the Madsen Family Health Center (MHC). All third-year residents were trained in the FOCUS-PDSA CQI methodology through concurrent didactic lectures and experience leading the CQI team. The CQI team included clinical staff led by a third-year family medicine resident and mentored by a member of the family medicine faculty. Immunization records were distributed to provider-medical assistant teamlets daily for each pediatric patient scheduled in clinic as the intervention. Compliance with the intervention (process measure), as well as immunization rates at 2 and 5 months post-intervention (outcome measure), were monitored. Immunization records were printed on 84% of clinic days from October 24, 2011 to March 31, 2012. The percentage of patients immunized at baseline was 66%. The percentage immunized as of December 31, 2011 was 96% and was 91% as of March 31, 2012. An important educational experience was organized for third-year family medicine residents through learning CQI skills, leading a CQI team, and directing a CQI project to completion. Significant improvement in the percentage of patients under 2 years old immunized at the MHC was achieved by presenting provider-medical assistant teamlets with immunization records of all pediatric patients on the daily clinic schedule.

  5. The ACGME case log: General surgery resident experience in pediatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W.; Drake, F. Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Waldhausen, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Background General surgery (GS) residents in ACGME programs log cases performed during their residency. We reviewed designated pediatric surgery (PS) cases to assess for changes in performed cases over time. Methods The ACGME case logs for graduating GS residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989–1990 to 2010–2011 for designated pediatric cases. Overall and designated PS cases were analyzed. Data were combined into five blocks: Period I (AY1989–90 to AY1993–94), Period II (AY1994–95 to AY1998–99), Period III (AY1999–00 to AY2002–03), Period IV (AY2003–04 to AY2006–07), and Period V (AY2007–08 to AY2010–11). Periods IV and V were delineated by implementation of duty hour restrictions. Student t-tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at P < .05. Results Overall GS case load remained relatively stable. Of total cases, PS cases accounted for 5.4% in Period I and 3.7% in Period V. Designated pediatric cases declined for each period from an average of 47.7 in Period I to 33.8 in Period V. These changes are due to a decline in hernia repairs, which account for half of cases. All other cases contributed only minimally to the pediatric cases. The only laparoscopic cases in the database were anti-reflux procedures, which increased over time. Conclusions GS residents perform a diminishing number of designated PS cases. This decline occurred before the onset of work-hour restrictions. These changes have implications on the capabilities of the current graduating workforce. However, the case log does not reflect all cases trainees may be exposed to, so revision of this list is recommended. PMID:23932601

  6. Case based teaching at the bed side versus in classroom for undergraduates and residents of pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHDI SHAHRIARI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bedside teaching is defined as teaching in the presence of a patient, it is a vital component of medical education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two methods of case based teaching (at the bedside and in the classroom in the teaching hospitals (for both undergraduates and residents of pediatrics. Methods: Thirty undergraduates and twenty pediatric residents were asked to study a topic of their curriculum from their text then pretest was taken from learners in the two levels; then either lecture with power point or case presentation or bed side discussion were conducted. One week later posttest was taken, and then evaluation of these three methods was done by a questionnaire from learners. Results: The majority of under-graduates and all of pediatric residents had evaluated case based teaching superior to bedside teaching and these two methods superior to lecture method. Conclusion: They believed that in the case based teaching they are more relaxed and have more self-esteem than at the bedside of the patients. Clinician teacher must involve patients and learners in the process of bedside teaching, by preparing a comfortable situation and by using available technolgy.

  7. Use of a formal assessment instrument for evaluation of resident operative skills in pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Caroline; Lam, Sandi K; Briceño, Valentina; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2015-08-28

    OBJECT Currently there is no standardized tool for assessment of neurosurgical resident performance in the operating room. In light of enhanced requirements issued by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Milestone Project and the Matrix Curriculum Project from the Society of Neurological Surgeons, the implementation of such a tool seems essential for objective evaluation of resident competence. Beyond compliance with governing body guidelines, objective assessment tools may be useful to direct early intervention for trainees performing below the level of their peers so that they may be given more hands-on teaching, while strong residents can be encouraged by faculty members to progress to conducting operations more independently with passive supervision. The aims of this study were to implement a validated assessment tool for evaluation of operative skills in pediatric neurosurgery and determine its feasibility and reliability. METHODS All neurosurgery residents completing their pediatric rotation over a 6-month period from January 1, 2014, to June 30, 2014, at the authors' institution were enrolled in this study. For each procedure, residents were evaluated by means of a form, with one copy being completed by the resident and a separate copy being completed by the attending surgeon. The evaluation form was based on the validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills for Surgery (OSATS) and used a 5-point Likert-type scale with 7 categories: respect for tissue; time and motion; instrument handling; knowledge of instruments; flow of operation; use of assistants; and knowledge of specific procedure. Data were then stratified by faculty versus resident (self-) assessment; postgraduate year level; and difficulty of procedure. Descriptive statistics (means and SDs) were calculated, and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Student t-test. A p value assessment scores overall or in any of the 7 domains scores

  8. Barriers to pediatric cochlear implantation: A parental survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Charles Q; Reilly, Brian K; Preciado, Diego A

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to (1) determine barriers in the pediatric cochlear implantation process specific to publicly insured patients, wherein delayed implantation has been reported, and (2) compare the perceived barriers between publicly and privately insured patients. Tertiary care cochlear implantation center at academic pediatric hospital. Cross-sectional survey, retrospective chart review. The validated, 39 item Barriers to Care Questionnaire was administered to the parents of 80 recipients of cochlear implantation by two surgeons between 2013 and 2016. Survey results and diagnosis to implant interval were compared based on public or private insurance status. Two-tailed Mann-Whitney and Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. Of 110 cochlear implants, 27 of 80 (34%) English-speaking parents completed the survey. 15 were privately insured and 12 were publicly insured. 23 of 27 respondents received cochlear implantation for pre-lingual sensorineural hearing loss. Publicly insured patients had significantly longer median time from diagnosis to implant than privately insured (19 vs. 8 mo, p = 0.01). The three worst scoring barrier categories for privately insured families in order were Pragmatics, Expectations, and Marginalization, whereas for publicly insured families it was Pragmatics, Skills, and Expectations. The worst scoring question for privately insured patients was "Having to take time off work". For the publicly insured, it was "Lack of communication." Privately insured patients reported more barriers on the Barriers to Care Questionnaire than publicly insured patients did. Although pragmatics was the worst-scoring barrier category for both groups, difficulties found on the survey ranked differently for each group. This information can help providers address disparities and access barriers for vulnerable patients. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. The "zing factor"-how do faculty describe the best pediatrics residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbluth, Glenn; O'Brien, Bridget; Asher, Emily M; Cho, Christine S

    2014-03-01

    Faculty in graduate medical education programs may not have uniform approaches to differentiating the quality of residents, and reviews of evaluations suggest that faculty use different standards when assessing residents. Standards for assessing residents also do not consistently map to items on evaluation forms. One way to improve assessment is to reach consensus on the traits and behaviors that are (or should be) present in the best residents. A trained interviewer conducted semistructured interviews with faculty affiliated with 2 pediatrics residency programs until content saturation was achieved. Interviewees were asked to describe specific traits present in residents they identify as the best. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. We used an iterative, inductive approach to generate a coding scheme and identify common themes. From 23 interviews, we identified 7 thematic categories of traits and behaviors: personality, energy, professionalism, team behaviors, self-improvement behaviors, patient-interaction behaviors, and medical knowledge and clinical skills (including a subcategory, knowledge integration). Most faculty interviewees focused on traits like passion, enthusiasm, maturity, and reliability. Examination score or intelligence was mentioned less frequently than traits and behaviors categorized under personality and professionalism. Faculty identified many traits and behaviors in the residents they define as the best. The thematic categories had incomplete overlap with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and CanMEDS competencies. This research highlights the ongoing need to review our assessment strategies, and may have implications for the ACGME Milestone Project.

  10. Correlates of parental stress and psychopathology in pediatric epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Shatla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic conditions like epilepsy in a child can affect his/her entire family. The failure of the family members to adapt adequately to the unique demands of this childhood chronic illness can be considered as an important risk factor for development of psychopathology. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to study the profile of parenting stress in parents of children with epilepsy and its correlates; and, to examine the correlates of psychopathology in these children. Material and Methods: Twenty three epileptic children and their families were subjected to Parenting Stress Index (PSI, Scores for indices such as The Children′s Depression Inventory (CDI, Benton Visual Retention test, Spence anxiety scale for children, The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children were calculated. Results: Mean verbal and performance IQ score was 94, while the mean total IQ score was 95. Mean scores for all Wechsler IQ Scores as well as Benton Visual retention test were within the average range. Means for total internalizing CBCL t scores (M, Mean=70; Standard Deviation, SD=4.4, total externalizing CBCL t scores (M=60, SD=9.6, and total behavior problems CBCL t scores (M=67, SD=5.2 were above the standard cut off levels of 65 for clinical behavioral problems. Mean score on CDI was 42 ± 2. Scores of the PSI equal to or higher than 85 th percentile were considered pathologically high. Conclusion: The results of our study indicated that pediatric patients with epilepsy, specifically with intractable cases, are correlated with high levels of parental stress.

  11. Experiencing the genetic body: parents' encounters with pediatric clinical genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspberry, Kelly; Skinner, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Because of advancements in genetic research and technologies, the clinical practice of genetics is becoming a prevalent component of biomedicine. As the genetic basis for more and more diseases are found, it is possible that ways of experiencing health, illness, identity, kin relations, and the body are becoming geneticized, or understood within a genetic model of disease. Yet, other models and relations that go beyond genetic explanations also shape interpretations of health and disease. This article explores how one group of individuals for whom genetic disorder is highly relevant formulates their views of the body in light of genetic knowledge. Using data from an ethnographic study of 106 parents or potential parents of children with known or suspected genetic disorders who were referred to a pediatric genetic counseling and evaluation clinic in the southeastern United States, we find that these parents do, to some degree, perceive of their children's disorders in terms of a genetic body that encompasses two principal qualities: a sense of predetermined health and illness and an awareness of a profound historicity that reaches into the past and extends into the present and future. They experience this genetic body as both fixed and historical, but they also express ideas of a genetic body made less deterministic by their own efforts and future possibilities. This account of parents' experiences with genetics and clinical practice contributes to a growing body of work on the ways in which genetic information and technologies are transforming popular and medical notions of the body, and with it, health, illness, kinship relations, and personal and social identities.

  12. Rounds Today: A Qualitative Study of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Resident Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Raphael; Farnan, Jeanne; Hulland, Oliver; Kearns, Lisa; Long, Michele; Monash, Bradley; Bhansali, Priti; Fromme, H Barrett

    2016-10-01

    Attending rounds is a key component of patient care and education at teaching hospitals, yet there is an absence of studies addressing trainees' perceptions of rounds. To determine perceptions of pediatrics and internal medicine residents about the current and ideal purposes of inpatient rounds on hospitalist services. In this multi-institutional qualitative study, the authors conducted focus groups with a purposive sample of internal medicine and pediatrics residents at 4 teaching hospitals. The constant comparative method was used to identify themes and codes. The study identified 4 themes: patient care, clinical education, patient/family involvement, and evaluation. Patient care included references to activities on rounds that forwarded care of the patient. Clinical education pertained to teaching/learning on rounds. Patient/family involvement encompassed comments about incorporating patients and families on rounds. Evaluation described residents demonstrating skill for attendings. Resident perceptions of the purposes of rounds aligned with rounding activities described by prior observational studies of rounds. The influence of time pressures and the divergent needs of participants on today's rounds placed these identified purposes in tension, and led to resident dissatisfaction in the achievement of all of them. Suboptimal congruency exists between perceived resident clinical education and specialty-specific milestones. These findings suggest a need for education of multiple stakeholders by (1) enhancing faculty teaching strategies to maximize clinical education while minimizing inefficiencies; (2) informing residents about the value of patient interactions and family-centered rounds; and (3) educating program directors in proper alignment of inpatient rotational objectives to the milestones.

  13. Parental stress and perceived vulnerability at 5 and 10 years after pediatric SCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijmoet-Wiersma, C. M. J.; Egeler, R. M.; Koopman, H. M.; Bresters, D.; Norberg, A. L.; Grootenhuis, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of assessing parental stress after SCT, 73 parents of children and adolescents who underwent SCT 5 or 10 years ago responded to questionnaires on general distress (General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)), disease-related stress (Pediatric Inventory for Parents-short form (PIP-SF)) and

  14. The Mutual Prospective Influence of Child and Parental Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Pediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolt, Markus A.; Ystrom, Eivind; Sennhauser, Felix H.; Gnehm, Hanspeter E.; Vollrath, Margarete E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous studies found notable rates of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in pediatric patients and their parents and suggest a significant association between child and parent PTSS. However, little is known about mutual influences between child and parental PTSS over time. This study…

  15. Quality of life in pediatric cancer survivors: contributions of parental distress and psychosocial family risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, N M; Khu, M; Reynolds, K; Guilcher, G M T; Schulte, F S M

    2018-02-01

    Pediatric survivors of childhood cancer are at increased risk of poor quality of life and social-emotional outcomes following treatment. The relationship between parent psychological distress and child adjustment in pediatric cancer survivors has been well established. However, limited research has examined the factors that may buffer this association. The current study examined the associations between psychosocial family risk factors, parental psychological distress, and health-related quality of life (hrql) in pediatric cancer survivors. Fifty-two pediatric cancer survivors (34 males, 18 females, mean age = 11.92) and their parents were recruited from a long-term cancer survivor clinic. Children and their parents who consented to participate completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0. Parents completed a demographic information form, the Psychosocial Assessment Tool (pat 2.0) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (bsi). The Intensity of Treatment Rating (itr-3) was evaluated by the research team. Multiple regression analyses revealed that parental psychological distress negatively predicted parent-reported hrql, while treatment intensity, gender, and psychosocial risk negatively predicted parent and child-reported hrql. Psychosocial risk moderated the association between parent psychological distress and parent-reported child hrql ( p = 0.03), whereby parents with high psychological distress but low levels of psychosocial risk reported their children to have higher hrql. Low levels of family psychosocial risk buffer the impact of parent psychological distress on child hrql in pediatric cancer survivors. The findings highlight the importance of identifying parents and families with at-risk psychological distress and psychosocial risk in order to provide targeted support interventions to mitigate the impact on hrql.

  16. Knowledge and misconceptions about immunizations among medical students, pediatric, and family medicine resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tañón, Vilmarie; Borrero, Clarimar; Pedrogo, Yasmín

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that, despite being the most trusted source of health information, medical students, residents and other health related professionals lack accurate and current knowledge regarding immunization practices. To evaluate medical students and primary care resident knowledge about immunizations. Self-administered survey given to students from four medical schools, Pediatrics residents (2 training programs) and Family Medicine residents (2 programs). Data was analyzed using Statistix 8.0. One-way ANOVA test was used to compare means, and a p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Participants (N=376) included 3rd (64%) and 4th (18%) year medical students and a homogenous distribution of 1st, 2nd and 3rd year residents. The mean percent of correct answers about immunizations was 61%. The participants showed poor knowledge about indications (62% correct answers), contraindications (46% correct answers) and myths (71% correct answers). Knowledge about immunizations correlated with higher levels of education (p immunizations followed by books (48%) and the internet (36%). They referred poor exposure to immunizations in clinical settings. Most medical students do not have the expected knowledge about immunization indications and contraindications. Residents were not proficient in immunization contraindications. Both groups had an adequate understanding about vaccination myths. Efforts towards ensuring adequate exposure to immunizations education during training years are needed in order to eliminate one of the barriers to adequate immunizations in children.

  17. A Survey of Graduates of Combined Emergency Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Ashley M; Chasm, Rose M; Woolridge, Dale P

    2016-10-01

    In 1998, emergency medicine-pediatrics (EM-PEDS) graduates were no longer eligible for the pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) sub-board certification examination. There is a paucity of guidance regarding the various training options for medical students who are interested in PEM. We sought to to determine attitudes and personal satisfaction of graduates from EM-PEDS combined training programs. We surveyed 71 graduates from three EM-PEDS residences in the United States. All respondents consider their combined training to be an asset when seeking a job, 92% find it to be an asset to their career, and 88% think it provided added flexibility to job searches. The most commonly reported shortcoming was their ineligibility for the PEM sub-board certification. The lack of this designation was perceived to be a detriment to securing academic positions in dedicated children's hospitals. When surveyed regarding which training offers the better skill set for the practice of PEM, 90% (44/49) stated combined EM-PEDS training. When asked which training track gives them the better professional advancement in PEM, 52% (23/44) chose combined EM-PEDS residency, 27% (12/44) chose a pediatrics residency followed by a PEM fellowship, and 25% (11/44) chose an EM residency then a PEM fellowship. No EM-PEDS respondents considered PEM fellowship training after the completion of the dual training program. EM-PEDS graduates found combined training to be an asset in their career. They felt that it provided flexibility in job searches, and that it was ideal training for the skill set required for the practice of PEM. EM-PEDS graduates' practices varied, including mixed settings, free-standing children's hospitals, and community emergency departments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulation training for pediatric residents on central venous catheter placement: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Scott M; Burch, Wesley; Kuehnle, Sarah E; Flood, Robert G; Scalzo, Anthony J; Gerard, James M

    2013-11-01

    To assess the effect of simulation training on pediatric residents' acquisition and retention of central venous catheter insertion skills. A secondary objective was to assess the effect of simulation training on self-confidence to perform the procedure. Prospective observational pilot study. Single university clinical simulation center. Pediatric residents, postgraduate years 1-3. Residents participated in a 60- to 90-minute ultrasound-guided central venous catheter simulation training session. Video recordings of residents performing simulated femoral central venous catheter insertions were made before (baseline), after, and at 3-month following training. Three blinded expert raters independently scored the performances using a 24-item checklist and 100-mm global rating scale. At each time point, residents rated their confidence to perform the procedure on a 100-mm scale. Twenty-six residents completed the study. Compared with baseline, immediately following training, median checklist score (54.2% [interquartile range, 40.8-68.8%] vs 83.3% [interquartile range, 70.0-91.7%]), global rating score (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 0.0-64.3 mm] vs 79.5 mm [interquartile range, 16.3-91.7 mm]), success rate (38.5% vs 80.8%), and self-confidence (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 3.8-19.0 mm] vs 52.0 mm [interquartile range, 43.5-66.5 mm]) all improved (p interquartile range, 40.8-68.8%] vs 54.2% [interquartile range, 45.8-80.4%], p = 0.47), global rating score (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 0.0-64.3 mm] vs 35.5 mm [interquartile range, 5.3-77.0], p = 0.62), and success rate (38.5% vs 65.4%, p = 0.35) were similar at 3-month follow-up. Self-confidence, however, remained above baseline at 3-month follow-up (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 3.8-19.0 mm] vs 61.0 mm [interquartile range, 31.5-71.8 mm], p < 0.01). Simulation training improved pediatric residents' central venous catheter insertion procedural skills. Decay in skills was found at 3-month follow-up. This suggests that

  19. Black versus white differences in rates of addressing parental tobacco use in the pediatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Janelle; Regan, Susan; Drehmer, Jeremy E; Finch, Stacia; Hipple, Bethany; Klein, Jonathan D; Murphy, Sybil; Nabi-Burza, Emara; Ossip, Deborah; Woo, Heide; Winickoff, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    To examine racial differences in rates of screening parents for cigarette smoking during pediatric outpatient visits and to determine if a parental tobacco control intervention mitigates racial variation in whether cigarette smoking is addressed. As part of the Clinical Effort Against Secondhand Smoke Exposure (CEASE) randomized controlled trial, exit interviews were conducted with parents at 10 control and 10 intervention pediatric practices nationally. Parents were asked to report if during the visit did anyone ask if they smoke cigarettes. A generalized linear mixed model was used to estimate the effect of black vs white race on asking parents about cigarette smoking. Among 17,692 parents screened at the exit interview, the proportion of black parents who were current smokers (16%) was lower than the proportion of white parents who smoked (20%) (P whites. In intervention group practices both black and white parents were more likely to be asked about smoking than those in control practices and there was no significant difference between black and white parents in the likelihood of being asked (adjusted risk ratio 1.01; 95% confidence interval 0.93, 1.09). Although a smaller proportion of black parents in control practices smoked than white, black parents were more likely to be asked by pediatricians about smoking. The CEASE intervention was associated with higher levels of screening for smoking for both black and white parents. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Parenting stress in pediatric IBD: relations with child psychopathology, family functioning, and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wendy N; Graef, Danielle M; Schuman, Shana S; Janicke, David M; Hommel, Kevin A

    2013-05-01

    Parenting stress in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been under-examined. Data validating use of the Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP), a measure of parenting stress associated with caring for a chronically ill child, in chronic diseases with intermittent, unpredictable disease courses, such as IBD, are needed. This study presents validity data in support of the PIP in pediatric IBD and examines relations between parenting stress and important psychosocial and medical outcomes. Adolescents (N = 130) with IBD and their caregivers across 3 sites completed measures of parenting stress, family functioning, and emotional/behavioral functioning. Disease severity was also assessed for each participant. The PIP demonstrates excellent internal consistency. Parenting stress was significantly higher among those with unhealthy general family functioning and those with children with borderline or clinically elevated internalizing symptoms. Caregiving stress was greater among parents of youth with more active Crohn's disease. Results supported the reliability and validity of the PIP for assessing caregiving stress in pediatric IBD. Routine assessment of parenting stress is recommended, particularly among parents reporting unhealthy family functioning and parents of youth with borderline or clinically elevated internalizing symptoms and more active disease.

  1. Parents' Perception of Satisfaction With Pediatric Nurse Practitioners' Care And Parental Intent to Adhere To Recommended Health Care Regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, Frances DiAnna

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to explore parents' perceptions of satisfaction with care from primary care pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) and to explore the relationships of the four components of parental satisfaction with parents' intent to adhere to recommended health care regimen. The study used a descriptive correlational research design. A convenience sample of 91 participants was recruited from practices in southeastern Pennsylvania. The 28-item, Parents' Perceptions of Satisfaction with Care from Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (PPSC-PNP) tool was developed to measure four components of satisfaction and overall satisfaction of parents with PNP care after the health visit. A 100 mm visual analog (VAS) scale measured parental intent to adhere to the care regimen recommended by the PNP. Parents' perceptions of overall satisfaction with care from PNPs and satisfaction with each of the four components (communication, clinical competence, caring behavior, and decisional control) were high as measured by the PPSC-PNP. Multiple regression analysis revealed that clinical competence had the strongest positive relationship with parental intent to adhere to PNP recommended health regimen and was the only variable to enter the regression equation. The findings of this study have implications for nursing practice. The PPSC-PNP instrument may be used with a variety of pediatric populations and settings as a benchmark for quality care. Clinical competence is important for the role of the PNP. Other variables of parental intent to adhere to the health regimen should be explored in future studies.

  2. Evaluation of hospital-learning environment for pediatric residency in eastern region of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed H. BuAli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: No study had been conducted to assess the hospitals’ environment for learning purposes in multicenter sites in Saudi Arabia. It aims to evaluate the environment of hospitals for learning purposes of pediatric residents. Methods: We applied Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM to measure the learning environment at six teaching hospitals in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia from September to December 2013. Results: The number of respondents was 104 (86.7% out of 120 residents and 37 females and 67 male residents have responded. The residents’ response scored 100 out of 160 maximum score in rating of PHEEM that showed overall learning environment is favorable for training. There were some items in the social support domain suggesting improvements. There was no significant difference between male and female residents. There was a difference among the participant teaching hospitals (p<0.05. Conclusion: The result pointed an overall positive rating. Individual item scores suggested that their social life during residency could be uninspiring. They have the low satisfactory level and they feel racism, and sexual discrimination. Therefore, there is still a room for improvement.

  3. Impact of Resident Surgeons on Procedure Length based on Common Pediatric Otolaryngology Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puram, Sidharth V.; Kozin, Elliott D.; Sethi, Rosh; Alkire, Blake; Lee, Daniel J.; Gray, Stacey T.; Shrime, Mark G.; Cohen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical education remains an important mission of academic medical centers. Financial pressures, however, may favor improved operating room (OR) efficiency at the expense of surgical education. We aim to characterize resident impact on the duration of procedural time using common pediatric otolaryngologic cases which do not necessitate a surgical assistant and assess whether other factors modify the extent to which residents impact OR efficiency. Study Design We retrospectively reviewed resident and attending surgeon total OR and procedural times for isolated tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy with adenoidectomy (T&A) and bilateral myringotomy with tube insertion between 2009 and 2013. We included cases supervised or performed by one of four teaching surgeons in children with ASA otolaryngology procedures. While residents may increase operative times, addressing other system-wide issues may decrease impact of time needed for education and added efficiencies of resident participation may exist throughout the perioperative period. Our model is applicable to surgical education across specialties. Level of Evidence 4 PMID:25251257

  4. What is known about parents' treatment decisions? A narrative review of pediatric decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipstein, Ellen A; Brinkman, William B; Britto, Maria T

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of decisions in pediatric medicine, there is a growing need to understand the pediatric decision-making process. To conduct a narrative review of the current research on parent decision making about pediatric treatments and identify areas in need of further investigation. Articles presenting original research on parent decision making were identified from MEDLINE (1966-6/2011), using the terms "decision making," "parent," and "child." We included papers focused on treatment decisions but excluded those focused on information disclosure to children, vaccination, and research participation decisions. We found 55 papers describing 52 distinct studies, the majority being descriptive, qualitative studies of the decision-making process, with very limited assessment of decision outcomes. Although parents' preferences for degree of participation in pediatric decision making vary, most are interested in sharing the decision with the provider. In addition to the provider, parents are influenced in their decision making by changes in their child's health status, other community members, prior knowledge, and personal factors, such as emotions and faith. Parents struggle to balance these influences as well as to know when to include their child in decision making. Current research demonstrates a diversity of influences on parent decision making and parent decision preferences; however, little is known about decision outcomes or interventions to improve outcomes. Further investigation, using prospective methods, is needed in order to understand how to support parents through the difficult treatment decisions.

  5. Parental perspectives of screening for adverse childhood experiences in pediatric primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Anne-Marie; Szilagyi, Moira A; Jee, Sandra H; Manly, Jody T; Briggs, Rahil; Szilagyi, Peter G

    2018-03-01

    Pediatricians recognize a need to mitigate the negative impact that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) can have on health and development. However, ACEs screening and interventions in primary care pediatrics may be inhibited by concerns about parental perceptions. We assessed parent perspectives of screening for ACEs in the pediatric primary care setting, to understand their views on the potential impact of their ACEs on their parenting and to identify opportunities for pediatric anticipatory guidance. We used purposive sampling to recruit parents of children <6 years receiving care at an urban, pediatric clinic. Semistructured questions guided 1:1 interviews that were later coded by multiple researchers to verify reliability. A thematic framework approach guided analysis and identified main themes and subthemes. We reached thematic saturation after 15 parent interviews, which consistently revealed 3 interrelated themes. First, parents strongly supported ACEs screening as a bridge to needed services, and they recommended using a trauma-sensitive, person-centered approach in pediatric practices. Second, parents understood the intergenerational impact of ACEs and expressed a desire to break the cycle of adversity. Finally, parents saw their child's pediatrician as a potential change-agent who could provide support to meet their parenting goals. Parents want to discuss their ACEs and receive help and guidance from pediatricians. Furthermore, they perceive their child's pediatrician as having an important role to play in meeting their parenting goals. It is important to ensure that pediatricians have the training, skills and familiarity with available resources to meet parental expectations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Education on, Exposure to, and Management of Vascular Anomalies During Otolaryngology Residency and Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Robert; Jabbour, Noel; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Bauman, Nancy; Darrow, David H; Elluru, Ravindhra; Grimmer, J Fredrik; Perkins, Jonathan; Richter, Gresham; Shin, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    The field of vascular anomalies presents diverse challenges in diagnosis and management. Although many lesions involve the head and neck, training in vascular anomalies is not universally included in otolaryngology residencies and pediatric otolaryngology (POTO) fellowships. To explore the education in, exposure to, and comfort level of otolaryngology trainees with vascular anomalies. A survey was distributed to 39 POTO fellows and 44 residents in postgraduate year 5 who matched into POTO fellowships from April 22 through June 16, 2014. Survey responses from trainees on exposure to, education on, and comfort with vascular anomalies. Forty-four residents in postgraduate year 5 who applied to POTO fellowships and 39 POTO fellows were emailed the survey. Fourteen respondents were unable to be contacted owing to lack of a current email address. Thirty-six of 69 residents and fellows (18 fellows and 18 residents [52%]) responded to the survey. Twenty-seven trainees (75%) reported no participation in a vascular anomalies clinic during residency; 6 of these 27 individuals (22%) trained at institutions with a vascular anomalies clinic but did not participate in the clinic, and 28 of the 36 respondents (78%) reported that they had less than adequate or no exposure to vascular anomalies in residency. Among POTO fellows, 11 of 17 (65%) did not participate in a vascular anomalies clinic during fellowship, even though 8 of the 11 had a vascular anomalies clinic at their fellowship program. During fellowship training, 12 of 18 fellows (67%) reported that they had adequate exposure to vascular anomalies. Only 20 respondents (56%) felt comfortable distinguishing among diagnoses of vascular anomalies, and only 4 residents (22%) and 9 fellows (50%) felt comfortable treating patients with vascular anomalies. All fellows believed that training in vascular anomalies was important in fellowship, and 100% of respondents indicated that increased exposure to diagnosis and management of

  7. A Qualitative Examination of Physician Gender and Parental Status in Pediatric End-of-Life Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Lori Brand; White, Marjorie Lee; Tofil, Nancy M; Clair, Jeffrey Michael; Needham, Belinda L

    2017-07-01

    In this study we utilized the framework of patient-centered communication to explore the influence of physician gender and physician parental status on (1) physician-parent communication and (2) care of pediatric patients at the end of life (EOL). The findings presented here emerged from a larger qualitative study that explored physician narratives surrounding pediatric EOL communication. The current study includes 17 pediatric critical care and pediatric emergency medicine physician participants who completed narrative interviews between March and October 2012 to discuss how their backgrounds influenced their approaches to pediatric EOL communication. Between April and June of 2013, participants completed a second round of narrative interviews to discuss topics generated out of the first round of interviews. We used grounded theory to inform the design and analysis of the study. Findings indicated that physician gender is related to pediatric EOL communication and care in two primary ways: (1) the level of physician emotional distress and (2) the way physicians perceive the influence of gender on communication. Additionally, parental status emerged as an important theme as it related to EOL decision-making and communication, emotional distress, and empathy. Although physicians reported experiencing more emotional distress related to interacting with patients at the EOL after they became parents, they also felt that they were better able to show empathy to parents of their patients.

  8. Interpersonal Stressors and Resources as Predictors of Parental Adaptation Following Pediatric Traumatic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Shari L.; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H. Gerry; Drotar, Dennis; Yeates, Keith Owen; Minish, Nori M.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship of preinjury interpersonal resources and stressors to parental adaptation following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) and orthopedic injury. Parents of children with severe TBI (n = 53), moderate TBI (n = 56), and orthopedic injuries (n = 80) were assessed soon after injury, 6 and 12 months after the…

  9. Is Whole Exome Sequencing an Ethically Disruptive Technology? Perspectives of Pediatric Oncologists and Parents of Pediatric Patients with Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laurence B.; Slashinski, Melody J.; McGuire, Amy L.; Street, Richard L.; Eng, Christine M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Parsons, D. Williams; Plon, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Some anticipate that physician and parents will be ill-prepared or unprepared for the clinical introduction of genome sequencing, making it ethically disruptive. Procedure As part of the Baylor Advancing Sequencing in Childhood Cancer Care (BASIC3) study, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 16 pediatric oncologists and 40 parents of pediatric patients with cancer prior to the return of sequencing results. We elicited expectations and attitudes concerning the impact of sequencing on clinical decision-making, clinical utility, and treatment expectations from both groups. Using accepted methods of qualitative research to analyze interview transcripts, we completed a thematic analysis to provide inductive insights into their views of sequencing. Results Our major findings reveal that neither pediatric oncologists nor parents anticipate sequencing to be an ethically disruptive technology, because they expect to be prepared to integrate sequencing results into their existing approaches to learning and using new clinical information for care. Pediatric oncologists do not expect sequencing results to be more complex than other diagnostic information and plan simply to incorporate these data into their evidence-based approach to clinical practice although they were concerned about impact on parents. For parents, there is an urgency to protect their chil's health and in this context they expect genomic information to better prepare them to participate in decisions about their chil's care. Conclusion Our data do not support concern that introducing genome sequencing into childhood cancer care will be ethically disruptive, i.e., leave physicians or parents ill-prepared or unprepared to make responsible decisions about patient care. PMID:26505993

  10. Demand in Pediatric Dentistry for Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentist Anesthesiologists: A Survey of Directors of Dentist Anesthesiologist and Pediatric Dentistry Residencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C. Gray; Jones, James E.; Saxen, Mark A.; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J.; Walker, LaQuia A.; Weddell, James A.; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 10 anesthesiology training program directors was 9 of 10 or 90%. The response rate for the 79 pediatric dentistry training program directors was 46 of 79 or 58%. Thirty-seven percent of pediatric dentistry programs use clinic-based deep sedation/general anesthesia for dental treatment in addition to hospital-based deep sedation/general anesthesia. Eighty-eight percent of those programs use dentist anesthesiologists for administration of deep sedation/general anesthesia in a clinic-based setting. Pediatric dentistry residency directors perceive a future change in the need for deep sedation/general anesthesia services provided by dentist anesthesiologists to pediatric dentists: 64% anticipate an increase in need for dentist anesthesiologist services, while 36% anticipate no change. Dental anesthesiology directors compared to 2, 5, and 10 years ago have seen an increase in the requests for dentist anesthesiologist services by pediatric dentists reported by 56% of respondents (past 2 years), 63% of respondents (past 5 years), and 88% of respondents (past 10 years), respectively. Predicting the future need of dentist anesthesiologists is an uncertain task, but these results show pediatric dentistry directors and dental anesthesiology directors are considering the need, and they recognize a trend of increased need for dentist anesthesiologist services over the past decade. PMID:22428968

  11. Demand in pediatric dentistry for sedation and general anesthesia by dentist anesthesiologists: a survey of directors of dentist anesthesiologist and pediatric dentistry residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C Gray; Jones, James E; Saxen, Mark A; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, Laquia A; Weddell, James A; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 10 anesthesiology training program directors was 9 of 10 or 90%. The response rate for the 79 pediatric dentistry training program directors was 46 of 79 or 58%. Thirty-seven percent of pediatric dentistry programs use clinic-based deep sedation/general anesthesia for dental treatment in addition to hospital-based deep sedation/general anesthesia. Eighty-eight percent of those programs use dentist anesthesiologists for administration of deep sedation/general anesthesia in a clinic-based setting. Pediatric dentistry residency directors perceive a future change in the need for deep sedation/general anesthesia services provided by dentist anesthesiologists to pediatric dentists: 64% anticipate an increase in need for dentist anesthesiologist services, while 36% anticipate no change. Dental anesthesiology directors compared to 2, 5, and 10 years ago have seen an increase in the requests for dentist anesthesiologist services by pediatric dentists reported by 56% of respondents (past 2 years), 63% of respondents (past 5 years), and 88% of respondents (past 10 years), respectively. Predicting the future need of dentist anesthesiologists is an uncertain task, but these results show pediatric dentistry directors and dental anesthesiology directors are considering the need, and they recognize a trend of increased need for dentist anesthesiologist services over the past decade.

  12. Multimedia based health information to parents in a pediatric acute ward: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botngård, Anja; Skranes, Lars P; Skranes, Jon; Døllner, Henrik

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether multimedia based health information presented to parents of children with breathing difficulties in a pediatric acute ward, is more effective than verbal information, to reduce parental anxiety and increase satisfaction. This randomized controlled trial was conducted in a pediatric acute ward in Norway, from January to March 2011. Parents were randomly assigned to a multimedia intervention (n=53), or verbal health information (n=48). Primary outcome measure was parental anxiety, and secondary outcome measures were parental satisfaction with nursing care and health information. Parental anxiety decreased from arrival to discharge within both groups. At discharge the anxiety levels in the intervention group were no lower than in the control group. There was no difference in satisfaction with nursing care between the groups, but parents in the intervention group reported higher satisfaction with the health information given in the acute ward (p=.005). Multimedia based health information did not reduce anxiety more than verbal information, among parents to children with breathing difficulties. However, after discharge the parents were more satisfied with the multimedia approach. More research is needed to recommend the use of multimedia based information as a routine to parents in pediatric emergency care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Working and training conditions of residents in pediatric surgery: a nationwide survey in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reismann, M; Ellerkamp, V; Dingemann, J

    2010-09-01

    As in other surgical specialties, increasing concern has been expressed worldwide about the shortage of trainees in pediatric surgery training programs. We performed a nationwide survey to investigate the current situation in Germany. An internet-based nationwide survey comprising 36 questions on training conditions in pediatric surgery was linked to the homepage of the German Society of Pediatric Surgery from June to September 2008. Statements on the following aspects were evaluated by responding residents using a scale from 1 (I do not agree at all) to 5 (I fully agree): workplace, cooperation with colleagues, head of the department, cooperation with other specialties, training and research conditions. A median value of 3 indicated an unsatisfactory assessment, with at least 50% of respondents giving an indifferent or negative response. 70 questionnaires were completed. Some of the evaluations revealed problematic areas. In particular, statements regarding working hours revealed dissatisfaction among the responding doctors. The median value accorded the statement "I am satisfied with the current working time regulation" was 2.9. With regard to departmental heads, some criticisms were directed against a perceived lack of soft skills. According to the respondents, their involvement in decision-making processes was insufficient ("We are involved in decision-making processes affecting our working conditions" - median value 2.4). Residents were also dissatisfied with the feedback they received for their work ("I get enough feedback regarding my achievement" - median value 2.6). Another problem area was career development ("I will finish my specialist training in time" - median value 2.9). However, these points did not affect overall satisfaction. Trainee satisfaction with regulations on working hours is low. Despite a general satisfaction with all fields appraised, improvements in various individual areas, e. g., the attitude of departmental heads and strategies of

  14. Associations among emergency room visits, parenting styles, and psychopathology among pediatric patients with sickle cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Robert D; Shishido, Yuri; Latzman, Natasha E; Elkin, T David; Majumdar, Suvankar

    2014-10-01

    To examine associations between frequency of emergency room (ER) visits and various parenting styles, both conjointly and interactively, and psychopathological outcomes among pediatric patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Ninety-eight parents/caregivers of 6- to 18-year-old patients with SCD completed instruments assessing parenting style, child psychopathology, and reported on the frequency of ER visits during the previous year. ER visits were found to significantly explain Withdrawn/Depressed problems and parenting styles were found to incrementally contribute to the explanation of all forms of psychopathology. Further, Permissive parenting was found to explain Rule Breaking Behavior for those patients with low ER visit frequency but not for those with high ER visit frequency. Results of the current study confirm the importance of considering both the frequency of ER visits and parenting style in the explanation of psychopathology among pediatric patients with SCD. Results have important implications for both research and treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Behavioral side effects of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment: the role of parenting strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lauren K; Lamb, Karen E; McCarthy, Maria C

    2014-11-01

    Behavioral and emotional difficulties are a recognised side effect of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment. Modifiable factors, such as parenting strategies, may be an appropriate target for interventions to assist families with managing their child's behavior, potentially leading to improved psychosocial and clinical outcomes. This study examined whether parenting strategies are associated with child behavioral and emotional problems in a pediatric oncology context, with the aim of establishing whether parenting is a potential modifiable target for psychosocial intervention. Participants included 73 parents of children aged 2-6 years who were either (i) in the maintenance phase of treatment for ALL at the Royal Children's Hospital Children's Cancer Centre, Melbourne (N = 43), or (ii) had no major medical history (healthy control group) (N = 30). Participants completed psychometrically validated questionnaires that assessed parenting strategies and child emotional and behavioral problems. Results revealed that the ALL group parents reported higher lax parenting and more spoiling and bribing of their child than the healthy control group. Results from regression models indicated that, after controlling for the significant contribution of illness status and child age on child emotional and behavioral difficulties, parental laxness and parental overprotection were significantly associated with child emotional and behavioral difficulties. Supporting parents to minimise sub-optimal parenting strategies, particularly lax parenting, may offer a fruitful avenue for future research directed toward modifiable factors associated with managing child emotional and behavioral problems in a pediatric oncology context. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodes Erinn T

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. Methods We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds, and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. Results The response rate was 42.2% (299/709 and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%, diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%, diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%, and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%. However, only 18.1% (N = 54 of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p Conclusions While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children.

  17. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Margaret S; Rhodes, Erinn T; Ludwig, David S

    2010-02-17

    Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. The response rate was 42.2% (299/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%), diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%), diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%), and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%). However, only 18.1% (N = 54) of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p obesity training was competing curricular demands (58.5%). While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children.

  18. Understanding parental behavior in pediatric palliative care: Attachment theory as a paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Joan A; Byrne, Mary W

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this conceptual paper was to present important constructs in attachment theory as they apply to parent and caregiver behavior in pediatric palliative care. Clarification of these constructs is provided with specific reference to their clinical application as well as their reflection in current empirical literature. Social attachment theory is proposed as a developmentally contextual model for the study of parenting in pediatric palliative and end-of-life care. A comprehensive search was conducted of pertinent literatures. These included classic as well as recent theory and research in attachment theory in addition to the empirical literatures on parent and family experience in pediatric palliative care, serious illness, and beyond to parental bereavement. Other relevant literature was examined with respect to the phenomena of concern. The empirical literature in pediatric palliative care supports the use of central concepts in attachment theory as foundational for further inquiry. This is evidenced in the emphasis on the importance of parental protection of the child, as well as executive activities such as decision making and other prominent parental operations, parental psychological resolution of the child's diagnosis and illness as well as coping and meaning making, and the core significance of parental relationships with providers who provide secure-base and safe-haven functions. The promise for developing integrated, conceptually based interventions from construction through implementation is of urgent importance to children and families receiving pediatric palliative care services. Focusing on key parental behaviors and processes within the context of a well-studied and contextually appropriate model will inform this task efficiently. The attachment paradigm meets these criteria and has promise in allowing us to move forward in developing well-defined, inclusive, and conceptually grounded protocols for child and family psychosocial research

  19. Analyzing reflective narratives to assess the ethical reasoning of pediatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Margaret; Taylor, Holly A; McDonald, Erin L; Hughes, Mark T; Beach, Mary Catherine; Carrese, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    A limiting factor in ethics education in medical training has been difficulty in assessing competence in ethics. This study was conducted to test the concept that content analysis of pediatric residents' personal reflections about ethics experiences can identify changes in ethical sensitivity and reasoning over time. Analysis of written narratives focused on two of our ethics curriculum's goals: 1) To raise sensitivity to ethical issues in everyday clinical practice and 2) to enhance critical reflection on personal and professional values as they affect patient care. Content analysis of written reflections was guided by a tool developed to identify and assess the level of ethical reasoning in eight domains determined to be important aspects of ethical competence. Based on the assessment of narratives written at two times (12 to 16 months/apart) during their training, residents showed significant progress in two specific domains: use of professional values, and use of personal values. Residents did not show decline in ethical reasoning in any domain. This study demonstrates that content analysis of personal narratives may provide a useful method for assessment of developing ethical sensitivity and reasoning.

  20. Improving parenting skills for families of young children in pediatric settings: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Ellen C; Sheldrick, R Christopher; McMenamy, Jannette M; Henson, Brandi S; Carter, Alice S

    2014-01-01

    Disruptive behavior disorders, such as attention-deficient/hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder, are common and stable throughout childhood. These disorders cause long-term morbidity but benefit from early intervention. While symptoms are often evident before preschool, few children receive appropriate treatment during this period. Group parent training, such as the Incredible Years program, has been shown to be effective in improving parenting strategies and reducing children's disruptive behaviors. Because they already monitor young children's behavior and development, primary care pediatricians are in a good position to intervene early when indicated. To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of parent-training groups delivered to parents of toddlers in pediatric primary care settings. This randomized clinical trial was conducted at 11 diverse pediatric practices in the Greater Boston area. A total of 273 parents of children between 2 and 4 years old who acknowledged disruptive behaviors on a 20-item checklist were included. A 10-week Incredible Years parent-training group co-led by a research clinician and a pediatric staff member. Self-reports and structured videotaped observations of parent and child behaviors conducted prior to, immediately after, and 12 months after the intervention. A total of 150 parents were randomly assigned to the intervention or the waiting-list group. An additional 123 parents were assigned to receive intervention without a randomly selected comparison group. Compared with the waiting-list group, greater improvement was observed in both intervention groups (P parenting practices and child disruptive behaviors that were attributable to participation in the Incredible Years groups. This study demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of parent-training groups conducted in pediatric office settings to reduce disruptive behavior in toddlers. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00402857.

  1. What Happened to the Complication? The Importance of ACS NSQIP Pediatric in Optimizing Quality Improvement Initiatives for Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Bennett W; Sakran, Joseph V; Streck, Christian J; Cina, Robert A

    Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) conference is considered the golden hour of surgical education. Most training programs lack standardized methods to evaluate self-reported outcomes and contributions to resident education. The purpose of this study was to determine whether residents underreport pediatric postoperative complications thereby limiting a comprehensive educational opportunity and the ability to adequately perform quality improvement during M&M conference. A retrospective analysis of resident reports submitted to the M&M committee at an academic medical center was conducted over 1 year. All complications were compared to the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Pediatric National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data abstracted over the same period. A descriptive analysis of perioperative events was performed. This study was conducted at the Medical University of South Carolina Medical Center and MUSC Children's Hospital, an academic tertiary care center located in Charleston, South Carolina. Overall, 81 complications were captured. Resident and NSQIP databases captured 27 (33%) and 68 (84%) complications, respectively. Residents were more likely to report major complications. More common sources of postoperative morbidity, including surgical site infection and transfusion, were underreported at 20% and 5%, respectively. Resident reporting inadequately captures the full complement of pediatric perioperative complications. NSQIP-abstracted data serve as a useful adjunct to traditional M&M reporting in capturing complications underreported by trainees. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. What is the Future of Pediatric Neurology in Canada? Resident and Faculty Perceptions of Training and Workforce Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Clarkin, Chantalle; Whiting, Sharon; Moharir, Mahendranath

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric neurology trainee numbers have grown considerably in Canada; recent research, however, has shown that the number of pediatric neurology graduates is outpacing the need for future pediatric neurologists. The purpose of this study was to seek the opinion of pediatric neurology program directors and trainees regarding possible solutions for this issue. Two focus groups were convened during the Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation annual congress in June 2012; one consisted of current and former program directors, and the other of current pediatric neurology trainees. Groups were asked for their perceptions regarding child neurology manpower issues in Canada as well as possible solutions. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed for analysis. Theme-based qualitative analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. Major themes emerging from both focus groups included the emphasis on community pediatric neurology as a viable option for trainees, including the need for community mentors; recognizing the needs of underserviced areas; and establishing academic positions for community preceptors. The need for career mentoring and support structures during residency training was another major theme which arose. Program directors and trainees also gave examples of ways to reduce the current oversupply of trainees in Canada, including limiting the number of trainees entering programs, as well as creating a long-term vision of child neurology in Canada. A nationwide dialogue to discuss the supply and demand of manpower in academic and community pediatric neurology is essential. Career guidance options for pediatric neurology trainees across the country merit further strengthening.

  3. Parents' perceived obstacles to pediatric clinical trial participation: Findings from the clinical trials transformation initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Rachel G; Gamel, Breck; Bloom, Diane; Bradley, John; Jafri, Hasan S; Hinton, Denise; Nambiar, Sumathi; Wheeler, Chris; Tiernan, Rosemary; Smith, P Brian; Roberts, Jamie; Benjamin, Daniel K

    2018-03-01

    Enrollment of children into pediatric clinical trials remains challenging. More effective strategies to improve recruitment of children into trials are needed. This study used in-depth qualitative interviews with parents who were approached to enroll their children in a clinical trial in order to gain an understanding of the barriers to pediatric clinical trial participation. Twenty-four parents whose children had been offered the opportunity to participate in a clinical trial were interviewed: 19 whose children had participated in at least 1 clinical trial and 5 who had declined participation in any trial. Each study aspect, from the initial explanation of the study to the end of the study, can affect the willingness of parents to consent to the proposed study and future studies. Establishing trust, appropriate timing, a transparent discussion of risks and benefits oriented to the layperson, and providing motivation for children to participate were key factors that impacted parents' decisions. In order for clinical trial accrual to be successful, parents' priorities and considerations must be a central focus, beginning with initial trial design. The recommendations from the parents who participated in this study can be used to support budget allocations that ensure adequate training of study staff and improved staffing on nights and weekends. Studies of parent responses in outpatient settings and additional inpatient settings will provide valuable information on the consent process from the child's and parent's perspectives. Further studies are needed to explore whether implementation of such strategies will result in improved recruitment for pediatric clinical trials.

  4. Parent-child Communication-centered Rehabilitative Approach for Pediatric Functional Somatic Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Maya; Barak, Sharon; Landa, Jana; Eisenstein, Etzyona

    2016-01-01

    Functional somatic symptoms (FSS) are a type of somatization phenomenon. Integrative rehabilitation approaches are the preferred treatment for pediatric FSS. Parental roles in the treatment process have not been established. to present 1) a parent-focused treatment (PFT) for pediatric FSS and 2) the approach's preliminary results. The sample included 50 children with physical disabilities due to FSS. All children received PFT including physical and psychological therapy. A detailed description of the program's course and guiding principles is provided. FSS extinction and age-appropriate functioning. Post-program, 84% of participants did not exhibit FSS and 94% returned to age-appropriate functioning. At one-year follow-up, only 5% of participants experienced symptom recurrence. No associations were found between pre-admission symptoms and intervention duration. PFT is beneficial in treating pediatric FSS. Therefore, intensive parental involvement in rehabilitation may be cardinal.

  5. Mastery of Status Epilepticus Management via Simulation-Based Learning for Pediatrics Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakooti, Marcelo R.; McBride, Mary E.; Mobley, Bonnie; Goldstein, Joshua L.; Adler, Mark D.; McGaghie, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management of status epilepticus (SE) in the pediatric population is highly time-sensitive. Failure to follow a standard management algorithm may be due to ineffective provider education, and can lead to unfavorable outcomes. Objective To design a learning module using high-fidelity simulation technology to teach mastery achievement of a hospital algorithm for managing SE. Methods Thirty pediatrics interns were enrolled. Using the Angoff method, an expert panel developed the minimal passing score, which defined mastery. Scoring of simulated performance was done by 2 observers. Sessions were digitally recorded. After the pretest, participants were debriefed on the algorithm and required to repeat the simulation. If mastery (minimal passing score) was not achieved, debriefing and the simulation were repeated until mastery was met. Once mastery was met, participants graded their comfort level in managing SE. Results No participants achieved mastery at pretest. After debriefing and deliberate simulator training, all (n = 30) achieved mastery of the algorithm: 30% achieved mastery after 1 posttest, 63% after a second, and 6.7% after a third. The Krippendorff α was 0.94, indicating strong interrater agreement. Participants reported more self-efficacy in managing SE, a preference for simulation-based education for learning practice-based algorithms of critical conditions, and highly rated the educational intervention. Conclusions A simulation-based mastery learning program using deliberate practice dramatically improves pediatrics residents' execution of a SE management protocol. Participants enjoyed and benefited from simulation education. Future applications include improving adherence to other hospital protocols. PMID:26221431

  6. Factors Associated with Parental Satisfaction with a Pediatric Crisis Clinic (PCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan; Korczak, Daphne

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about parental satisfaction with pediatric crisis clinics (PCCs) that provide a single consultation to families in need of urgent psychiatric care. Parental satisfaction may improve long-term adherence to physician recommendations. To explore parental satisfaction with a PCC. Parental satisfaction was ascertained by a structured telephone interview following crisis consultation at the PCC of an academic, tertiary care centre. Parents of 71% (n = 124) of 174 pediatric patients seen in the PCC from 2007-2008 participated in the post-consultation interview. The majority of parents stated they were either somewhat satisfied (49/122, 40.2%) or very satisfied (49/122, 40.2%) with the PCC. Parental satisfaction correlated with time between referral and consultation (p<0.05), the degree to which parents felt listened to by the consultant (p<0.01), the amount of psychoeducation parents felt they received (p<0.01), and appointment length (p<0.001). Parents were satisfied overall with an urgent care service model. Satisfaction was correlated with the time between referral and consultation, degree to which they felt their consultant had listened to them, and the amount of information they received at the consultation's conclusion.

  7. Does a Weekly Didactic Conference Improve Resident Performance on the Pediatric Domain of the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Corinna C; Bosch, Patrick P; Grudziak, Jan S; Dede, Ozgur; Ramirez, Rey N; Mendelson, Steven A; Ward, W Timothy; Brooks, Maria; Kenkre, Tanya; Lubahn, John D; Deeney, Vincent F; Roach, James W

    2017-03-01

    Performance on the Orthopaedic In-training Examination (OITE) has been correlated with performance on the written portion of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery examination. Herein we sought to discover whether adding a regular pediatric didactic lecture improved residents' performance on the OITE's pediatric domain. In 2012, a didactic lecture series was started in the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Hamot Orthopaedic Residency Program (Hamot). This includes all topics in pediatric orthopaedic surgery and has teaching faculty present, and occurs weekly with all residents attending. A neighboring program [UMPC Pittsburgh (Pitt)] shares in these conferences, but only during their pediatric rotation. We sought to determine the effectiveness of the conference by comparing the historic scores from each program on the pediatric domain of the OITE examination to scores after the institution of the conference, and by comparing the 2 programs' scores. Both programs demonstrated improvement in OITE scores. In 2008, the mean examination score was 19.6±4.3 (11.0 to 30.0), and the mean percentile was 57.7±12.6 (32.0 to 88.0); in 2014, the mean examination score was 23.5±4.2 (14.0 to 33.0) and the mean percentile was 67.1±12.1 (40.0 to 94.0). OITE scores and percentiles improved with post graduate year (Pdidactic pediatric lecture improved residents' scores on the OITE and indirectly suggests that more frequent attendance is associated with better scores. Level III-retrospective case-control study.

  8. Parents' perceived obstacles to pediatric clinical trial participation: Findings from the clinical trials transformation initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel G. Greenberg

    2018-03-01

    In order for clinical trial accrual to be successful, parents' priorities and considerations must be a central focus, beginning with initial trial design. The recommendations from the parents who participated in this study can be used to support budget allocations that ensure adequate training of study staff and improved staffing on nights and weekends. Studies of parent responses in outpatient settings and additional inpatient settings will provide valuable information on the consent process from the child's and parent's perspectives. Further studies are needed to explore whether implementation of such strategies will result in improved recruitment for pediatric clinical trials.

  9. Impact of pediatric epilepsy on sleep patterns and behaviors in children and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Anna M; Ryther, Robin C C; Jennesson, Melanie; Geffrey, Alexandra L; Bruno, Patricia L; Anagnos, Christina J; Shoeb, Ali H; Thibert, Ronald L; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2012-07-01

    Disrupted sleep patterns in children with epilepsy and their parents are commonly described clinically. A number of studies have shown increased frequency of sleep disorders among pediatric epilepsy patients; however, few have characterized the association between epilepsy and parental sleep quality and household sleeping arrangements. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of pediatric epilepsy on child sleep, parental sleep and fatigue, and parent-child sleeping arrangements, including room sharing and cosleeping. Parents of children 2 to 10 years of age with and without epilepsy completed written questionnaires assessing seizure history, child and parent sleep, and household sleeping arrangements. Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) scores were used to evaluate sleep disturbances for the child. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Iowa Fatigue Scale (IFS) were used to evaluate parental sleep and fatigue, respectively. The Early Childhood Epilepsy Severity Scale (E-Chess) was used to assess epilepsy severity. One hundred five households with a child with epilepsy and 79 controls participated in this study. Households with a child with epilepsy reported increased rates of both parent-child room sharing (p Children with epilepsy were found to have greater sleep disturbance by total CSHQ score (p Parents of children with epilepsy had increased sleep dysfunction (p = 0.005) and were more fatigued (p parental sleep dysfunction (0.273, p = 0.005), and parental fatigue (0.324, p = 0.001). Antiepileptic drug polytherapy was predictive of greater childhood sleep disturbances. Nocturnal seizures were associated with parental sleep problems, whereas room sharing and cosleeping behavior were associated with child sleep problems. Within the epilepsy cohort, 69% of parents felt concerned about night seizures and 44% reported feeling rested rarely or never. Finally, 62% of parents described decreased sleep quality and/or quantity with

  10. American parent perspectives on quality of life in pediatric cochlear implant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Roshini; Warner-Czyz, Andrea; Silver, Cheryl H; Loy, Betty; Tobey, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implantation influences not only communication but also psychosocial outcomes in children with severe to profound hearing loss. Focusing on issues specific to cochlear implantation (e.g., self-reliance, social relations, education, effects of implantation, and supporting the child) may provide a more accurate and relative view of functional status of pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients. The present study analyzes parental perspectives of CI-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children with CIs to determine (a) if parents differentially rate their child's quality of life according to psychosocial domain (e.g., communication, self-reliance, education); (b) if associations exist between quality of life domains specific to cochlear implantation in pediatric implant recipients; and (c) if demographic variables (i.e., chronologic age, age at cochlear implantation, duration of device experience) mediate parent ratings of quality of life in pediatric CI recipients. Parents of 33 children with CIs (mean age, 9.85 years; mean age of CI activation, 2.47 years; mean device experience, 7.47 years) completed a validated condition-specific questionnaire, Children With Cochlear Implants: Parental Perspectives. Parents positively rated most HRQoL domains, although education and effects of implantation received significantly less positive ratings (p self-reliance, and well-being) significantly correlated with at least 5 other domains, suggesting that positivity in one domain co-occurs with positivity in other domains. Demographic variables (chronologic age, CI activation age, and duration of CI use) did not correlate significantly with psychosocial outcomes; rather, parents reported positive HRQoL and successful functional use of CI across demographic variables. Parents of children and adolescents with CIs rate overall HRQoL positively across psychosocial domains. Significantly less positive ratings of education and effects of implantation may result

  11. Pediatric data sharing in genomic research: attitudes and preferences of parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Matthew D; Robinson, Jill Oliver; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; McGuire, Amy L; Lau, Ching C

    2014-04-01

    In the United States, data from federally funded genomics studies are stored in national databases, which may be accessible to anyone online (public release) or only to qualified researchers (restricted release). The availability of such data exposes participants to privacy risk and limits the ability to withdraw from research. This exposure is especially challenging for pediatric participants, who are enrolled in studies with parental permission. The current study examines genomic research participants' attitudes to explore differences in data sharing (DS) preferences between parents of pediatric patients and adult patients. A total of 113 parents of pediatric patients and 196 adult participants from 6 genomics studies were randomly assigned to 3 experimental consent forms. Participants were invited to a follow-up structured interview exploring DS preferences, study understanding, and attitudes. Descriptive analyses and regression models were built on responses. Most parents (73.5%) and adult participants (90.3%) ultimately consented to broad public release. However, parents were significantly more restrictive in their data release decisions, not because of understanding or perceived benefits of participation but rather autonomy and control. Parents want to be more involved in the decision about DS and are significantly more concerned than adult participants about unknown future risks. Parents have the same altruistic motivations and grasp of genomics studies as adult participants. However, they are more concerned about future risks to their child, which probably motivates them to choose more restrictive DS options, but only when such options are made available.

  12. The opinion of Greek parents on the advantages and disadvantages of the outpatient pediatric oncology setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matziou, Vasiliki; Servitzoglou, Marina; Vlahioti, Efrosini; Deli, Haralampia; Matziou, Theodora; Megapanou, Efstathia; Perdikaris, Pantelis

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess parental opinions on the advantages and disadvantages of a pediatric oncology outpatient setting in comparison to the inpatient oncology ward. The sample of the study consisted of 104 parents whose children were diagnosed and treated for pediatric cancer. The survey took place at the Pediatric Oncology Wards, as well as their respective outpatient settings of the two General Children's Hospitals in Athens, Greece from May 2010 to August 2010. According to parents' view the outpatient setting was preferable due to the maintenance keeping of their daily routine (x(2) = 75.9, p = 0.000), maintaining the family life (x(2) = 90.1, p = 0.000) and young patients' participation in activities (x(2) = 25.6, p = 0.000). Moreover, young patients were more happy, less anxious and less scared when they were attending in the daily clinic (x(2) = 25.9, p = 0.000). According to parents' view, the outpatient setting has many advantages. The judgment of children and parents on the services offered by the Pediatric Oncology Unit overall, in both inpatient and outpatient setting can give the necessary feedback to improve the qualitative provided care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Relilgious beliefs and practices of Taiwanese parents of pediatric patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, C H

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study was to increase understanding of religious beliefs and practices among Taiwanese parents of pediatric patients. Parents of 63 pediatric patients with cancer were interviewed to explore their related religious beliefs and practices, ie, worship at temple, drawing Chien, and divinations. Rituals were used to diminish the harmful effects of the child's disease, such as temple ceremonies, changing the child's name, and taking "Fu" water. Such practices were generally undertaken with a lack of medical guidance from oncologists largely because of poor interactions between parents and oncologists. The findings suggest that discovering a caregiver's worldview and cultural values is important to establish holistic nursing practices. Because immigrants increasingly move around the world, Taiwanese parents become a culturally diverse clientele for healthcare professionals who have to be aware of the existing cultural differences in healthcare values, patterns, and practices, particularly between Western and Eastern cultures.

  14. Parental Attitudes Toward Advanced Behavior Guidance Techniques Used in Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Monica; McTigue, Dennis J; Thikkurissy, Sarat; Fields, Henry W

    2016-01-01

    To re-examine parental attitudes toward advanced behavior management techniques in pediatric dentistry and determine whether cost, urgency, and amount of treatment influence parental preferences. Parents viewed previously validated videotaped clinical vignettes of four advanced behavior guidance techniques: (1) passive immobilization; (2) active immobilization; (3) general anesthesia; and (4) oral sedation. The study was conducted in a children's hospital dental clinic and a suburban private pediatric dentistry office. Parents rated overall acceptance of the techniques, and acceptance under specified conditions using an anchored visual analogue scale. One hundred five parents completed the survey; 55 from the children's hospital and 50 from private practice. Oral sedation was rated as the most acceptable technique, followed by general anesthesia, active immobilization, and passive immobilization. As urgency, convenience, and previous experience increased, parental acceptance of the technique increased. As cost of treatment increased, parental acceptance decreased. Ratings between the children's hospital group and private practice group differed, as did the demographic variables of insurance, income, and race. The hierarchy of parental acceptance of advanced behavior guidance techniques is changing with increasing approval of pharmacological management and decreasing approval of physical management. The health care delivery system, urgency, convenience, previous experience, and cost all influence parental acceptance.

  15. Parental stress and perceived vulnerability at 5 and 10 years after pediatric SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijmoet-Wiersma, C M J; Egeler, R M; Koopman, H M; Bresters, D; Norberg, A L; Grootenhuis, M A

    2010-06-01

    With the aim of assessing parental stress after SCT, 73 parents of children and adolescents who underwent SCT 5 or 10 years ago responded to questionnaires on general distress (General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)), disease-related stress (Pediatric Inventory for Parents-short form (PIP-SF)) and perceptions of child vulnerability (Child Vulnerability Scale (CVS)). General distress scores were comparable with the reference groups, but 40% of the mothers at 5 years after SCT reported increased stress levels as compared with 26% in the community-based reference group. Disease-related stress was comparable with the reference group of parents of children who were just off cancer treatment, 5 years after SCT. At 10 years after SCT, scores were lower than the reference group. Perceived child vulnerability did diminish over time, but remained high in parents of SCT survivors, compared with parents of healthy children: 96% of the parents at 5 years after SCT and 76% of the parents at 10 years after SCT scored above the cutoff point. Perceived vulnerability was found to be a predictor for parental disease-related stress. To conclude, although most parents of SCT survivors are resilient, the majority of parents perceive their child to be much more vulnerable as compared with parents of healthy children. This perception is associated with disease-related stress and may induce overprotective parenting.

  16. Adult children's relationships with married parents, divorced parents, and stepparents: biology, marriage or residence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmijn, M.

    2013-01-01

    The author compared the strength of the relationships that adult children have with different types of parents: biological parents who remained married, stepparents, and biological parents who divorced. He analyzed Dutch life history data containing detailed measures of living arrangements and used

  17. The association between pediatric injury risks and parenting behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaques, M L; Weaver, T L; Weaver, N L; Willoughby, L

    2018-03-01

    Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death in children ages 1-18 years. Many of these injuries to young children occur in their own homes. Although research has explored injury risk prevention strategies, historically, much of this research has focused on environmental changes and teaching safety practices. Currently, there appears to be a gap in current research exploring how parenting influences children's risk of injury. Mothers (n = 119) of children 5 years and younger were recruited from a paediatric clinic as a part of a larger study and completed measures of parenting challenges, developmentally sensitive parenting, child neglect, parental efficacy, and risk of potential injury situations. Hierarchical logistic regression was used to explore the extent to which developmentally insensitive parenting behaviours put parents at higher risk for behaviours that lead to unintentional injury in children and whether developmentally sensitive parenting behaviours protects children from injury. The association between demographic characteristics and injury risk behaviours was also examined. Parents who reported more frequent insensitive parenting behaviours (i.e., yelling, spanking, and putting child in time out) were more likely to report putting their child in an incorrect car seat or taking their child out of a car seat while the car is still moving. In addition, younger parents were at greater risk of storing cleaners and medications unsafely. Results from this study highlight the importance of supporting younger mothers and educating parents on effective parenting strategies when trying to prevent unintentional injury risks. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Parents' Voices Supporting Music Therapy within Pediatric Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kathryn Lindenfelser

    2005-01-01

    It has been my experience that parents are willing and open to express their voices to promote and advocate for music therapy services for their terminally ill children. By listening to parents' voices when providing care for terminally ill children, much can be done to ease the suffering of children and families at the end of life (Widger & Wilkins, 2004). My music therapy masters research at the University of Melbourne with Dr. Katrina McFerran will investigate bereaved parents' experie...

  19. Beyond Parenting Practices: Family Context and the Treatment of Pediatric Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, Katherine M.; Dalton, William T., III; Buscemi, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Many family-based treatments for pediatric obesity teach specific parenting practices related to weight management. Although youth in these programs show increases in positive health behaviors and reductions in the extent to which they are overweight, most remain overweight after treatment. A recent trend is to create tailored programs for…

  20. Child and Parent Attributions in Chronic Pediatric Conditions: Phenylketonuria (PKU) as an Exemplar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antshel, Kevin M.; Brewster, Scott; Waisbren, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Attribution theory, self-regulation, self-handicapping and sick role theories all suggest that children with chronic disease may be held to different standards. This study assesses child and parent attributions in pediatric chronic health conditions and addresses how attributional style may be related to treatment adherence. Methods:…

  1. Pediatric Resident Academic Projects While on Global Health Electives: Ten Years of Experience at the University of Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Michael B; Slusher, Tina M; Howard, Cynthia R; Cole, Valerie B; Gladding, Sophia P

    2017-07-01

    Many residency programs require residents to complete an academic project as part of a global health (GH) elective. However, there has been little description of the range of projects residents have pursued during GH electives or the extent to which these projects are consistent with proposed best practices. The authors conducted a document review of 67 written summaries or copies of presentations of academic projects (hereafter, summaries) completed by pediatric and medicine-pediatric residents at the University of Minnesota while on GH electives from 2005 to 2015. Two authors independently coded each summary for the type of project completed; when the project idea was generated; explicit mention of a mentor from the home institution, host institution, or both; whether a needs assessment was conducted; and whether there were plans for sustainability. Most of the 67 projects were categorized into one of three project types: quality/process improvement (28 [42%]), education (18 [27%]), or clinical research (14 [21%]). Most summaries explicitly mentioned a mentor (45 [67%]), reported conducting a needs assessment (38 [57%]), and indicated sustainability plans (45 [67%]). Of the 42 summaries that indicated the timing of idea generation, 30 (71%) indicated the idea was developed after arriving at the host site. Residents undertook a wide range of academic projects during GH electives, most commonly quality/process improvement and education projects. The projects were largely aligned with best practices, with most summaries indicating the resident worked with a mentor, conducted a needs assessment, and made plans for sustainability.

  2. Resident Perspectives of an Interactive Case Review Following Independent Didactic Study as a Method of Teaching a Pediatric Imaging Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, Aleksandr; Dheer, Sachin; Nazarian, Levon N; Long, Suzanne S

    The ABR has recently changed the format of the board examination, in which the oral examination was replaced by a computer based multiple-choice test. The purpose of this study was to determine resident's perceptions of a new conference resembling the new ABR format. Residents were requested to review a series of didactic pediatric imaging presentations prior to attending case conference. During conference, unknown cases reflecting the subject matter from the didactic presentations were presented along with multiple-choice questions. We then surveyed resident perspectives after each case conference. Between 14 and 18 residents were surveyed at the end of each subspecialty case review presentation. About 94% of resident respondents felt that the independent didactic study followed by an interactive case review session would better prepare them for the ABR certification exams, compared to didactic lectures alone. Furthermore, 95% of the respondents indicated that they preferred the independent didactic review followed by interactive case review versus didactic lecture alone. Most the respondents (85%) felt that combining independent didactic review with interactive unknown case sessions made the material more interesting and provided greater understanding of the material. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of answers across the subspecialty sessions (p > .05). Radiology residents favorably reviewed the combination of independent review of didactic material prior to interactive case review. Material presented in this fashion is felt to be more interesting and is thought to result in enhanced understanding of pediatric radiology material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment Expectations for CAM Interventions in Pediatric Chronic Pain Patients and their Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient expectations regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM interventions have important implications for treatment adherence, attrition and clinical outcome. Little is known, however, about parent and child treatment expectations regarding CAM approaches for pediatric chronic pain problems. The present study examined ratings of the expected benefits of CAM (i.e. hypnosis, massage, acupuncture, yoga and relaxation and conventional medicine (i.e. medications, surgery interventions in 45 children (32 girls; mean age = 13.8 years ± 2.5 and parents (39 mothers presenting for treatment at a specialty clinic for chronic pediatric pain. Among children, medications and relaxation were expected to be significantly more helpful than the remaining approaches (P < 0.01. However, children expected the three lowest rated interventions, acupuncture, surgery and hypnosis, to be of equal benefit. Results among parents were similar to those found in children but there were fewer significant differences between ratings of the various interventions. Only surgery was expected by parents to be significantly less helpful than the other approaches (P < 0.01. When parent and child perceptions were compared, parents expected hypnosis, acupuncture and yoga, to be more beneficial than did children, whereas children expected surgery to be more helpful than did parents (P < 0.01. Overall, children expected the benefits of CAM to be fairly low with parents' expectations only somewhat more positive. The current findings suggest that educational efforts directed at enhancing treatment expectations regarding CAM, particularly among children with chronic pain, are warranted.

  4. Parent-Reported Penicillin Allergy Symptoms in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyles, David; Chiu, Asriani; Simpson, Pippa; Nimmer, Mark; Adams, Juan; Brousseau, David C

    2017-04-01

    Children often present to the pediatric emergency department (ED) with a reported penicillin allergy. The true incidence of pediatric penicillin allergy is low, and patients may be inappropriately denied first-line antibiotics. We hypothesized that more than 70% of reported penicillin allergies in the pediatric ED are low risk for true allergy. Parents of children presenting to the pediatric ED with parent-reported penicillin allergy completed an allergy questionnaire. The questionnaire included age at allergy diagnosis, symptoms of allergy, and time to allergic reaction from first dose. The allergy symptoms were dichotomized into high and low risk in consultation with a pediatric allergist before questionnaire implementation. A total of 605 parents were approached; 500 (82.6%) completed the survey. The median (interquartile range) age of the children at diagnosis was 1 year (7 months, 2 years); 75% were diagnosed before their third birthday. Overall, 380 (76%) (95% confidence interval 72.3, 79.7) children had exclusively low-risk symptoms. The most commonly reported symptoms were rash (466, 92.8%) and itching (203, 40.6%). Of the 120 children with one or more high-risk symptom, facial swelling (50, 10%) was the most common. Overall, 354 children (71%) were diagnosed after their first exposure to penicillin. Symptom onset within 24 hours of medication administration occurred in 274 children (54.8%). Seventy-six percent of patients with parent-reported penicillin allergy have symptoms unlikely to be consistent with true allergy. Determination of true penicillin allergy in patients with low-risk symptoms may permit the increased use of first-line penicillin antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Parenting Practices of Resident Fathers: The Role of Marital and Biological Ties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Lawrence M.; Carlson, Marcia J.; Bzostek, Sharon H.; Osborne, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 2,098) to examine differences in the parenting practices of four types of resident fathers, defined by their biological relationship to a focal child and their marital status with regard to the focal child's mother. Regression results suggest that biological fathers and…

  6. Physical activity of rurally residing children with a disability: A survey of parents and carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakely, Luke; Langham, Jessica; Johnston, Catherine; Rae, Kym

    2018-01-01

    Children residing in rural areas face unique barriers to physical activity participation. Further, while children with a disability who reside in metropolitan areas face barriers hindering physical activity, rurally residing children with a disability may face the augmented combination of these barriers that could have negative health implications. Parents are often the key advocates for children with disabilities and are likely to have valuable insight into the opportunities and barriers to physical activity for their child. The aim of this study was to investigate parents' perceptions of physical activity opportunities for their child with a disability in a rural area. A mixed method survey examining parent's perceptions of their child's physical activity and possible barriers to participation was mailed to rurally residing parents of children with a disability. Quantitative data were analyzed descriptively using frequencies and proportions. Qualitative data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. There were 34 completed surveys, a response rate of 37%. Participants' responses indicated 74% of children were not meeting daily recommendations of physical activity. Participation barriers including emotional, physical and environmental issues. Three main themes emerged from qualitative data; segregation, access to facilities and resources and barriers specific to the child. The children in this study were from rural areas and face similar barriers to children in metropolitan areas. However, they are also confronted with the same barriers children without a disability in rural areas face, participating in physical activity. This may have detrimental effects on their health and development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Residency program characteristics that are associated with pass rate of the American Board of Pediatrics certifying exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsawarungruangkit, Amporn

    2015-01-01

    The US is home to almost 200 pediatrics residency programs; despite this, there is little information about the relationship between program characteristics and performance in the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) certifying exam. To evaluate the relationship between pass rate of the ABP certifying exam with the characteristics of categorical pediatrics residency programs. This retrospective, cross-sectional study used publicly available data from the ABP website and the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database. All programs that reported pass rates were included. The analysis, comprising univariate and multivariate linear regression, involved determining how 69 factors (eg, general information, number of faculty and trainees, work schedule, educational environment) related to the pass rate. Of 199 programs, 194 reported pass rates. The univariate analysis revealed 20 program characteristics with P-values program characteristics: ratio of full-time equivalent paid faculty to positions, percentage of US medical graduates, and average hours per week of regularly scheduled lectures or conferences. Unlike in previous studies, location and program size were not significantly associated with the pass rate in this multivariate analysis. The finding regarding the ratio of full-time equivalent paid faculty to positions highlighted the benefits of a well-supervised training environment, while that regarding the percentage of US medical graduates indicated the necessity of high competition in residency programs. Finally, longer hours per week of regularly scheduled lectures or conferences were associated with better academic outcomes, both statistically and intuitively.

  8. Resident and Staff Satisfaction of Pediatric Graduate Medical Education Training on Transition to Adult Care of Medically Complex Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Matthew; Cole, Brandon; Flake, Eric; Roy, Daniel

    2018-04-11

    This study aims to describe the quantity and satisfaction current residents and experienced pediatricians have with graduate medical education on transitioning medically complex patients to adult care. There is an increasing need for transitioning medically complex adolescents to adult care. Over 90% now live into adulthood and require transition to adult healthcare providers. The 2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs found that only 40% of youth 12-17 yr receive the necessary services to appropriately transition to adult care. Prospective, descriptive, anonymous, web-based survey of pediatric residents and staff pediatricians at Army pediatric residency training programs was sent in March 2017. Questions focused on assessing knowledge of transition of care, satisfaction with transition training, and amount of education on transition received during graduate medical education training. Of the 145 responders (310 potential responders, 47% response rate), transition was deemed important with a score of 4.3 out of 5. The comfort level with transition was rated 2.6/5 with only 4.2% of participants receiving formal education during residency. The most commonly perceived barriers to implementing a curriculum were time constraints and available resources. Of the five knowledge assessment questions, three had a correct response rate of less than 1/3. The findings show the disparity between the presence of and perceived need for a formal curriculum on transitioning complex pediatric patients to adult care. This study also highlighted the knowledge gap of the transition process for novice and experienced pediatricians alike.

  9. Choices and control: parental experiences in pediatric terminal home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, J L; Carlisle, C

    2000-01-01

    During the past decade, palliative care at home has become an alternative option to hospital care for terminally ill children. This study describes the experience of caring for a dying child at home from a parent's perspective. A qualitative research design was used to conduct and analyze data. Nonstandardized, focused interviews were conducted with 10 families. Thematic content analysis assisted in deriving themes from the transcripts of the interviews. "Choice and control" was the major theme that linked all the other concepts, and it appeared to be fundamental to parental coping strategies. Most parents were willing to take responsibility for the nursing care of their child, including administration of intravenous medication. The patient's home was the overwhelming choice of parents for delivery of terminal care, with most parents perceiving it as their child's choice also.

  10. Listening to parents: The role of symptom perception in pediatric palliative home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollenbroich, René; Borasio, Gian Domenico; Duroux, Ayda; Grasser, Monika; Brandstätter, Monika; Führer, Monika

    2016-02-01

    This study analyzes symptom perception by parents and healthcare professionals and the quality of symptom management in a pediatric palliative home care setting and identifies which factors contribute to a high quality of palliative and end-of-life care for children. In this retrospective, cross-sectional study, parents were surveyed at the earliest three months after their child's death. All children were cared for by a specialized home pediatric palliative care team that provides a 24/7 medical on-call service. Questionnaires assessed symptom prevalence and intensity during the child's last month of life as perceived by parents, symptom perception, and treatment by medical staff. The responses were correlated with essential palliative care outcome measures (e.g., satisfaction with the care provided, quality-of-life of affected children and parents, and peacefulness of the dying phase). Thirty-eight parent dyads participated (return rate 84%; 35% oncological disorders). According to parental report, dyspnea (61%) and pain (58%) were the dominant symptoms with an overall high symptom load (83%). Pain, agitation, and seizures could be treated more successfully than other symptoms. Successful symptom perception was achieved in most cases and predicted the quality of symptom treatment (R 2, 0.612). Concordant assessment of symptom severity between parents and healthcare professionals (HCPs) improved the satisfaction with the care provided (p = 0.037) as well as the parental quality-of-life (p = 0.041). Even in cases with unsuccessful symptom control, parents were very satisfied with the SHPPC team's care (median 10; numeric rating scale 0-10) and rated the child's death as highly peaceful (median 9). Significance of the results: The quality and the concordance of symptom perception between parents and HCPs essentially influence parental quality-of-life as well as parental satisfaction and constitute a predictive factor for the quality of symptom treatment and

  11. Family residency and psychosomatic problems among adolescents in Sweden: The impact of child-parent relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagquist, Curt

    2016-02-01

    Profound changes in family structure took place in many countries, during the second part of the previous century. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the association between the type of family residency and psychosomatic problems in younger and older adolescents, particularly focusing on alternate residency, and to examine the impact of child-parent relations. We used data collected in 2009 by Statistics Sweden among 172,298 Swedish students in Grade 6 and Grade 9 (approximate ages 12 and 15 years old); comprising 80% and 86%, respectively, of the entire population of students in those grades. We collected the data with a questionnaire, completed anonymously in school: We used the Psychosomatic Problems (PSP) scale as the outcome measure. The type of family residency showed a weaker association with psychosomatic problems than the child-parent relationships did. Living in non-intact families increased the probability of adolescent psychosomatic problems by 0-0.05, compared to intact families. In Grade 9, there were no differences in psychosomatic problems between the students in alternate residency and those living with their two parents; and in Grade 6, these differences were relatively small. In comparison, a worse relationship with parents increased the probability of psychosomatic problems by 0.11-0.17, depending on the school grade and type of family residency. The structure of the family, as well as the child-parent relationships needs to be taken into account, to properly estimate the magnitude of the family situation as a determinant of adolescent psychosomatic problems. Our results justify universal intervention at the policy level. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  12. Meaning of caring in pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne; Arman, Maria; Castren, Maaret; Forsner, Maria

    2014-12-01

    When children are critically ill, parents still strive to be present and participate in the care of their child. Pediatric intensive care differs from other realms of pediatric care as the nature of care is technically advanced and rather obstructing than encouraging parental involvement or closeness, either physically or emotionally, with the critically ill child. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of caring in the pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents. The design of this study followed Benner's interpretive phenomenological method. Eleven parents of seven children participated in observations and interviews. The following aspects of caring were illustrated in the themes arising from the findings: being a bridge to the child on the edge, building a sheltered atmosphere, meeting the child's needs, and adapting the environment for family life. The overall impression is that the phenomenon of caring is experienced exclusively when it is directed toward the exposed child. The conclusion drawn is that caring is present when providing expert physical care combined with fulfilling emotional needs and supporting continuing daily parental care for the child in an inviting environment. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Predictors of stress among parents in pediatric intensive care unit: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Mohd; Mittal, Kundan; Kaushik, Jaya Shankar; Kashyap, Haripal; Kaur, Gurpreet

    2014-11-01

    To determine the sociodemographic and clinical factors leading to stress among parents whose children are admitted in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). A prospective observational study was conducted in PICU of a tertiary care hospital of north India. Parents of children admitted to PICU for at least 48 h duration were eligible for participation. At the end of 48 h, parental stress was assessed using parental stress scale (PSS:PICU) questionnaire which was administered to the parents. Baseline demographic and clinical parameters of children admitted to PICU were recorded. The parental stress was compared with demographic and clinical characteristics of children using appropriate statistical methods. A total of 49 parents were finally eligible for participation. Mean (SD) parental stress scores was highest in domains of procedures [1.52 (0.66)] and behavior and emotional [1.32 (0.42)] subscales. Mean (SD) total parental stress score among intubated children [1.31 (0.25)] was significantly more than among non intubated children [0.97 (0.26)] (p parental stress score were comparable in terms of gender (p = 0.15) and socioeconomic status (p = 0.32). On subscale analysis, it was found that professional communication is a significant stressor in age groups 0-12 mo [0.61(0.41)] (p = 0.02). It was observed that parents of intubated children were significantly stressed by the physical appearance of their children (p parental role (p = 0.002). Total parental stress score had a positive correlation with PRISM score (r = 0.308). Indian parents are stressed maximally with environment of PICU. Factor leading to parental stress was intubation status of the child and was not affected by gender or socio demographic profile of the parents.

  14. Treatment expectations for CAM interventions in pediatric chronic pain patients and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jennie C I; Meldrum, Marcia; Bursch, Brenda; Jacob, Margaret C; Kim, Su C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2005-12-01

    Patient expectations regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions have important implications for treatment adherence, attrition and clinical outcome. Little is known, however, about parent and child treatment expectations regarding CAM approaches for pediatric chronic pain problems. The present study examined ratings of the expected benefits of CAM (i.e. hypnosis, massage, acupuncture, yoga and relaxation) and conventional medicine (i.e. medications, surgery) interventions in 45 children (32 girls; mean age = 13.8 years +/- 2.5) and parents (39 mothers) presenting for treatment at a specialty clinic for chronic pediatric pain. Among children, medications and relaxation were expected to be significantly more helpful than the remaining approaches (P CAM to be fairly low with parents' expectations only somewhat more positive. The current findings suggest that educational efforts directed at enhancing treatment expectations regarding CAM, particularly among children with chronic pain, are warranted.

  15. Parental expectations and outcomes of pediatric cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Elizabeth; Kandathil, Cherian; Carron, Jeffrey D

    2009-10-01

    Cochlear implants have been used with increasing frequency over the past twenty years, including very young patients. To determine if parents are satisfied with their children's performance after cochlear implantation. Survey mailed to parents of children receiving cochlear implants. 31 questionnaires were returned out of 69 mailed (45 %). The vast majority of responding parents felt that their children benefited substantially from cochlear implant surgery. Cochlear implantation is effective in helping children develop auditory-oral communication skills. Access to auditory/oral communication programs in this state remains an obstacle in postoperative habilitation.

  16. Is There a Return on a Children's Hospital's Investment in a Pediatric Residency's Community Health Track? A Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Cara; Cora-Bramble, Denice; Ottolini, Mary; Agrawal, Dewesh

    2018-04-01

    Academic Medical Centers incur significant expenses associated with training residents and caring for underserved populations. No previous studies have analyzed hospital-level graduate medical education economics for pediatric residency training. Using data from the 2010-2011 academic year, we quantified total direct costs per year for training 12 community health track (CHT) residents. Utilizing sensitivity analyses, we estimated revenues generated by residents in inpatient and outpatient settings. The total yearly direct cost of training 12 CHT residents was $922,640 including salaries, benefits, and administrative costs. The estimated additional yearly inpatient net revenue from attending-resident clinical teams compared to attendingonly service was $109,452. For primary care clinics, the estimated yearly revenue differential of resident-preceptor teams was $455,940, compared to attending-only clinics. The replacement cost of 12 CHT residents with advanced practitioners was $457,596 per year.This study suggests there is positive return on a children's hospital's investment in a CHT.

  17. Pattern of parental acceptance of management techniques used in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Benjamin; Kharouba, Johnny; Blumer, Sigalit

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate parents' acceptance of management techniques in Israeli pediatric dental clinics. Ninety parents who accompanied their children to three pediatric dental clinics provided information on selected parameters including their attitudes about management techniques. 68.9% of the parents preferred to stay in the treatment room. The most accepted technique was positive reinforcement (81.1%) followed by tell-show-do (TSD) (76.7%, with younger parents more accepting than older, p = 0.049). The least accepted techniques were restraint (1.1%) and voice control (7.8%, especially by parents with the highest dental anxiety, p = 0.002). Sedation was unacceptable by 15.6% of the parents: those with the lowest dental anxiety agreed to sedation significantly more than those with greater dental anxiety (p = 0.031). Parents preferred more positive approaches and management techniques that involve demonstrations geared for the child's level of understanding. Restraint and voice control were more strongly rejected than sedation.

  18. Parental language and dosing errors after discharge from the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels-Kalow, Margaret E; Stack, Anne M; Porter, Stephen C

    2013-09-01

    Safe and effective care after discharge requires parental education in the pediatric emergency department (ED). Parent-provider communication may be more difficult with parents who have limited health literacy or English-language fluency. This study examined the relationship between language and discharge comprehension regarding medication dosing. We completed a prospective observational study of the ED discharge process using a convenience sample of English- and Spanish-speaking parents of children 2 to 24 months presenting to a single tertiary care pediatric ED with fever and/or respiratory illness. A bilingual research assistant interviewed parents to ascertain their primary language and health literacy and observed the discharge process. The primary outcome was parental demonstration of an incorrect dose of acetaminophen for the weight of his or her child. A total of 259 parent-child dyads were screened. There were 210 potential discharges, and 145 (69%) of 210 completed the postdischarge interview. Forty-six parents (32%) had an acetaminophen dosing error. Spanish-speaking parents were significantly more likely to have a dosing error (odds ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-8.1), even after adjustment for language of discharge, income, and parental health literacy (adjusted odds ratio, 6.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-31.7). Current ED discharge communication results in a significant disparity between English- and Spanish-speaking parents' comprehension of a crucial aspect of medication safety. These differences were not explained purely by interpretation, suggesting that interventions to improve comprehension must address factors beyond language alone.

  19. Pediatric hearing aid use: parent-reported challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Karen; Olson, Whitney A; Twohig, Michael P; Preston, Elizabeth; Blaiser, Kristina; White, Karl R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate parent-reported challenges related to hearing aid management and parental psychosocial characteristics during the first 3 years of the child's life. Using a cross-sectional survey design, surveys were distributed to parents of children with hearing loss via state Early Intervention programs in Utah and Indiana. Packets contained one family demographic form and two sets of three questionnaires to obtain responses from mothers and fathers separately: the Parent Hearing Aid Management Inventory explored parent access to information, parent confidence in performing skills, expectations, communication with the audiologist, and hearing aid use challenges. The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire measured psychological flexibility, experiential avoidance, and internal thought processes that can affect problem-solving ability and decrease an individual's ability to take value-based actions. The Patient Health Questionnaire identified symptoms of depression. Thirty-seven families completed questionnaires (35 mothers and 20 fathers). Most responses were parents of toddlers (M = 22 months) who had been wearing binaural hearing aids for an average of 15 months. Both mothers and fathers reported that even though the amount of information they received was overwhelming, most (84%) preferred to have all the information at the beginning, rather than to receive it over an extended time period. Parents reported an array of challenges related to hearing aid management, with the majority related to daily management, hearing aid use, and emotional adjustment. Sixty-six percent of parents reported an audiologist taught them how to complete a listening check using a stethoscope, however, only one-third reported doing a daily hearing aid listening check. Both mothers and fathers reported a wide range of variability in their confidence in performing activities related to hearing aid management, and most reported minimal confidence in their ability to

  20. [Infant food diversification. Assessment of practices in relation to French recommendations in pediatricians and pediatric residents in southern France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banti, T; Carsin, A; Chabrol, B; Reynaud, R; Fabre, A

    2016-10-01

    Infant food diversification has undergone a rapid succession of good practice recommendations in France, but there has been no assessment of pediatrician practices on food diversification. To assess the practices of pediatricians in relation to current recommendations of the French Society of Pediatrics on infant food diversification. This was an observational study conducted from 1 November 2014 to 31 March 2015. The study population consisted of 97 pediatricians in the Var department and 84 pediatric residents assigned to the University of Aix-Marseille in France. A questionnaire was sent by email or post to determine physician characteristics, food diversification methods in healthy children and those at atopic risk, and how the pediatric consultation was conducted. The expected answers were based on the most recent recommendations of the French Society of Pediatrics published in 2008, updated from 2003. In summary, breastfeeding is recommended up to 6 months. Food diversification can be started between 4 and 6 months in children with no allergy risk. Gluten, honey, legumes and cow's milk are introduced between 4 and 7 months, after 12 months and after 36 months, respectively. In atopic children, food diversification is delayed until after 6 months and the most allergenic foods (nuts, exotic fruits, peanuts, and shellfish) are introduced after the age of 12 months. Eighty-four responses were obtained (51%): 50 pediatricians and 34 pediatric residents. Sixteen items were classified depending on whether or not an update after 2003 existed. Over 80% of the physicians responded as recommended for the recently updated items for the age of introduction of "solid food in healthy children", "gluten", "cow's milk protein hydrolysates", and "the time until introduction of cow's milk in the atopic child". At best, 65% of physicians responded in accordance with recommendations for items without a recent update, age of introduction of "cow's milk", "milk desserts

  1. Construction and psychometric testing of the EMPATHIC questionnaire measuring parent satisfaction in the pediatric intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour, Jos M.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; van Dam, Nicolette A. M.; Dullaart, Eugenie; van Heerde, Marc; de Neef, Marjorie; Verlaat, Carin W. M.; van Vught, Elise M.; Hazelzet, Jan A.

    To construct and test the reliability and validity of the EMpowerment of PArents in THe Intensive Care (EMPATHIC) questionnaire measuring parent satisfaction in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Structured development and psychometric testing of a parent satisfaction-with-care instrument

  2. Construction and psychometric testing of the EMPATHIC questionnaire measuring parent satisfaction in the pediatric intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour, J.M.; van Goudoever, J.B.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Albers, M.J.I.J.; van Dam, N.A.M.; Dullaart, E.; van Heerde, M.; de Neef, M.; Verlaat, C.W.M.; van Vught, E.M.; Hazelzet, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    To construct and test the reliability and validity of the EMpowerment of PArents in THe Intensive Care (EMPATHIC) questionnaire measuring parent satisfaction in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Structured development and psychometric testing of a parent satisfaction-with-care instrument

  3. Taiwanese Parents' Experience of Making a “Do Not Resuscitate” Decision for Their Child in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Mei Liu, RN, MN

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Open family visiting hours plus staff sensitivity and communication skills training are needed. To help parents with this difficult signing process, nurses and other professionals in the pediatric intensive care unit need education on initiating the conversation, guiding the parents in expressing their fears, and providing continuing support to parents and children throughout the child's end of life process.

  4. Evaluation of medical record quality and communication skills among pediatric interns after standardized parent training history-taking in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mu Xue; Jiang, Xiao Yun; Li, Yi Juan; Shen, Zhen Yu; Zhuang, Si Qi; Gu, Yu Fen

    2018-02-01

    The effect of using standardized parent training history-taking on the quality of medical records and communication skills among pediatric interns was determined. Fifth-year interns who were undertaking a pediatric clinical practice rotation were randomized to intervention and control groups. All of the pediatric interns received history-taking training by lecture and bedside teaching. The pediatric interns in the intervention group also received standardized parent history-taking training. The following two outcome measures were used: the scores of medical records, which were written by the pediatric interns after history-taking from real parents of pediatric patients; and the communication assessment tool (CAT) assessed by real parents. The general information, history of present illness (HPI), past medical history, personal history, family history, diagnosis, diagnostic analysis, and differential diagnosis scores in the intervention group were significantly higher than the control group (p history-taking is effective in improving the quality of medical records by pediatric interns. Standardized parent training history-taking is a superior teaching tool for clinical reasoning ability, as well as communication skills in clinical pediatric practice.

  5. Behavior guidance techniques in Pediatric Dentistry: attitudes of parents of children with disabilities and without disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Alessandra Maia; de Oliveira, Fabiana Sodré; de Paiva Novaes, Myrian Stella; Araújo Ferreira, Danielly Cunha

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the parental acceptance of pediatric behavior guidance techniques (BGT). Forty parents of children without disabilities (Group A) and another 40 parents of children with disabilities (Group B) were selected. Each BGT was explained by a single examiner and it was presented together with a photograph album. After that parents evaluated the acceptance in: totally unacceptable, somewhat acceptable, acceptable, and totally acceptable. Results indicated that in Group A, the BGT based on communicative guidance was accepted by most participants. In Group B, just one mother considered totally unacceptable the voice control method and other two, tell-show-do. For both groups, the general anesthesia was the less accepted BGT. There was statistically significant difference in acceptance for protective stabilization with a restrictive device in Group B. Children's parents with and without disabilities accepted behavioral guidance techniques, but basic techniques showed higher rates of acceptance than advanced techniques. ©2013 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Infancy and pediatric cancer: an exploratory study of parent psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, L; Eyles, D; Hulbert, C; Bretherton, L; McCarthy, M C

    2017-03-01

    Research on the psychological experiences of parents of infants within pediatric oncology is sparse. This study examined rates and indicative risk factors for psychological distress in parents where there is either an infant patient or infant sibling of a patient. Participants were mothers (n = 41) and fathers (n = 25) of infants under 2 years who either had a cancer diagnosis (n = 37; infant patients) or was an infant sibling of an older child with cancer (n = 29; infant siblings) recruited from a single oncology center. There were 21 couple dyads. Parents completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales short form and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist. Mothers (47.5%) and fathers (37.5%) reported elevated, cancer-related posttraumatic stress symptoms. Rates of depression (12.2% of mothers and 12.0% of fathers) and anxiety symptoms (17.1% of mothers and 8.0% of fathers) were lower. Compared with parents of infant patients, parents of infant siblings reported significantly higher rates of depressive symptoms and trends toward higher rates of posttraumatic stress symptoms and anxiety symptoms. Parent anxiety was higher with increased time post diagnosis. No demographic or illness-related variables were associated with psychological distress, with the exception of the number of children in the family. Parent-child relationships are of fundamental importance during infancy. This study provides novel data highlighting the psychological impact for parents when a cancer diagnosis is made during this critical developmental period, including the contribution of family structure to parental distress. Results provide further support for applying a traumatic stress framework when exploring parent experiences of pediatric cancer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Influences on Decision Making Identified by Parents of Children Receiving Pediatric Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Karen W; Mollen, Cynthia J; Aldridge, Sarah; Hexem, Kari R; Feudtner, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Parental decision making is a critical component in the provision of palliative and end-of-life care, yet factors that parents perceive as influencing this process, when they are making decisions for their children, have not been well characterized. As part of a mixed-methods cohort study, we interviewed 73 parents of 50 pediatric patients who were referred to the hospital's pediatric palliative care service. The semistructured interviews focused on "decision making for your child"; the interviews were recorded and transcribed. A random sample (n = 13) was first coded and analyzed for core themes, and these themes were then cross-validated with a second random sample (n = 3) of interviews. Four dominant interrelated themes permeated parents' discussions about the decisions they were making for their children and the process of decision making. First, Orientation and Direction (including the subthemes of Goals and Hopes, Spirituality and Meaning, and Purposeful Effort) connotes the parents' effort to establish and clarify the broad context of decision making. Second, Defining What Is Good for the Child (including the subthemes of Quality of Life and Suffering, and Normalcy and Normalization) conveys how the parents posed questions and pondered what decisions would be in the child's best interests. Third, the entwined theme of Relationships, Communication, and Support reflects how parents reported the social and interactive nature of decision making. Fourth, the theme of Feelings and Personal Accountability focuses inward as parents report efforts to deal with their emotional responses and self-judgments. Parents report grappling with several influences upon their decision-making processes that extend well beyond the standard discussions of medical information exchanges and the evaluation of risks and benefits. Decision support for these parents should account for these diverse influences.

  8. Parental separation and pediatric cancer: a Danish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Sally; Carlsen, Kathrine; Bidstrup, Pernille Envold; Bastian, Gro Samsø; Lund, Lasse Wegener; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Johansen, Christoffer

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the risk for separation (ending cohabitation) of the parents of a child with a diagnosis of cancer. In a nationwide cohort, we compared the risk for ending cohabitation of the parents of 2450 children (aged 0-20 years) given a diagnosis of cancer with the risk of parents of 44 853 randomly selected, gender- and age-matched cancer-free children. We adjusted for socioeconomic position and demographic factors. Rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals for separation were estimated in a Cox proportional hazards model. The parents of children with cancer did not have a higher risk for separation than the general population (rate ratio: 1.00 [95% confidence interval: 0.91-1.10]). Separate analyses according to type of cancer and survival of the child similarly yielded null results. Experiencing cancer in a child does not seem to be a risk factor for separation. Our study will allow clinicians to reassure parents and to support them in facing the trauma of cancer in their child.

  9. Breaking bad news is a teachable skill in pediatric residents: A feasibility study of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Suzanne; Kassis, Karyn; Nagel, Rollin; Verbeck, Nicole; Mahan, John D; Shell, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Patients and physicians identify communication of bad news as a skill in need of improvement. Our objectives were to measure change in performance of first-year pediatric residents in the delivery of bad news after an educational intervention and to measure if changes in performance were sustained over time. Communication skills of 29 residents were assessed via videotaped standardized patient (SP) encounters at 3 time points: baseline, immediately post-intervention, and 3 months post-intervention. Educational intervention used was the previously published "GRIEV_ING Death Notification Protocol." The intraclass correlation coefficient demonstrated substantial inter-rater agreement with the assessment tool. Performance scores significantly improved from baseline to immediate post-intervention. Performance at 3 months post-intervention showed no change in two subscales and small improvement in one subscale. We concluded that breaking bad news is a complex and teachable skill that can be developed in pediatric residents. Improvement was sustained over time, indicating the utility of this educational intervention. This study brings attention to the need for improved communication training, and the feasibility of an education intervention in a large training program. Further work in development of comprehensive communication curricula is necessary in pediatric graduate medical education programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Diagnostic Accuracy of Pediatric Teledermatology Using Parent-Submitted Photographs: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Daniel M; Jew, Olivia S; Perman, Marissa J; Castelo-Soccio, Leslie A; Winston, Flaura K; McMahon, Patrick J

    2017-12-01

    Advances in smartphone photography (both quality and image transmission) may improve access to care via direct parent-to-clinician telemedicine. However, the accuracy of diagnoses that are reliant on parent-provided photographs has not been formally compared with diagnoses made in person. To assess whether smartphone photographs of pediatric skin conditions taken by parents are of sufficient quality to permit accurate diagnosis. A prospective study was conducted among 40 patient-parent dyads at a pediatric dermatology clinic at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from March 1 to September 30, 2016, to assess concordance between diagnoses made by an independent pediatric dermatologist based on in-person examination and those based on parental photographs. Half of the patient-parent dyads were randomized for a secondary analysis to receive instructions on how best to take photographs with smartphones. Clinicians were blinded to whether parents had received photography instructions. Half of the patient-parent dyads received a simple, 3-step instruction sheet on how best to take photographs using a smartphone (intervention group); the other half did not (control group). Concordance between photograph-based vs in-person diagnosis in the intervention vs control groups, as quantified using Cohen κ, a measure of interrater agreement that takes into account the possibility of agreement occurring by chance. Among the 40 patient-parent dyads (22 female children and 18 male children; mean [SD] age, 6.96 [5.23] years), overall concordance between photograph-based vs in-person diagnosis was 83% (95% CI, 71%-94%; κ = 0.81). Diagnostic concordance was 89% (95% CI, 75%-97%; κ = 0.88) in a subgroup of 37 participants with photographs considered of high enough quality to make a diagnosis. No statistically significant effect of photography instructions on concordance was detected (group that received instructions, 85%; group that did not receive instructions, 80%; P

  11. Adolescent psychological development, parenting styles, and pediatric decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Brian C

    2010-10-01

    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child risks harm to adolescents insofar as it encourages not only poor decision making by adolescents but also parenting styles that will have an adverse impact on the development of mature decision-making capacities in them. The empirical psychological and neurophysiological data weigh against augmenting and expression of the rights of children. Indeed, the data suggest grounds for expanding parental authority, not limiting its scope. At the very least, any adequate appreciation of the moral claims regarding the authority of parents with respect to the decision-making capacity of adolescents needs to be set within an understanding of the psychological and neurophysiological facts regarding the development of adolescent decision-making capacity.

  12. Pediatric Primary Care-Based Obesity Prevention for Parents of Preschool Children: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Nancy E; JaKa, Meghan M; Crain, A Lauren; Martinson, Brian C; Hayes, Marcia G; Anderson, Julie D

    2015-12-01

    The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids Preschool (HHHK-Preschool) pilot program is an obesity prevention intervention integrating pediatric care provider counseling and a phone-based program to prevent unhealthy weight gain among 2- to 4-year-old children at risk for obesity (BMI percentile between the 50th and 85th percentile and at least one overweight parent) or currently overweight (85th percentile ≤ BMI pediatric primary care clinics were randomized to: (1) the Busy Bodies/Better Bites Obesity Prevention Arm or the (2) Healthy Tots/Safe Spots safety/injury prevention Contact Control Arm. Baseline and 6-month data were collected, including measured height and weight, accelerometry, previous day dietary recalls, and parent surveys. Intervention process data (e.g., call completion) were also collected. High intervention completion and satisfaction rates were observed. Although a statistically significant time by treatment interaction was not observed for BMI percentile or BMI z-score, post-hoc examination of baseline weight status as a moderator of treatment outcome showed that the Busy Bodies/Better Bites obesity prevention intervention appeared to be effective among children who were in the overweight category at baseline relative to those who were categorized as at risk for obesity (p = 0.04). HHHK-Preschool pilot study results support the feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy in already overweight children of a pediatric primary care-based obesity prevention intervention integrating brief provider counseling and parent-targeted phone coaching. What's New: Implementing pediatric primary care-based obesity interventions is challenging. Previous interventions have primarily involved in-person sessions, a barrier to sustained parent involvement. HHHK-preschool pilot study results suggest that integrating brief provider counseling and parent-targeted phone coaching is a promising approach.

  13. Parent-controlled PCA for pain management in pediatric oncology: is it safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghelescu, Doralina L; Faughnan, Lane G; Oakes, Linda L; Windsor, Kelley B; Pei, Deqing; Burgoyne, Laura L

    2012-08-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia offers safe and effective pain control for children who can self-administer medication. Some children may not be candidates for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) unless a proxy can administer doses. The safety of proxy-administered PCA has been studied, but the safety of parent-administered PCA in children with cancer has not been reported. In this study, we compare the rate of complications in PCA by parent proxy versus PCA by clinician (nurse) proxy and self-administered PCA. Our pediatric institution's quality improvement database was reviewed for adverse events associated with PCA from 2004 through 2010. Each PCA day was categorized according to patient or proxy authorization. Data from 6151 PCA observation days were included; 61.3% of these days were standard PCA, 23.5% were parent-proxy PCA, and 15.2% were clinician-proxy PCA days. The mean duration of PCA use was 12.1 days, and the mean patient age was 12.3 years. The mean patient age was lower in the clinician-proxy (9.4 y) and parent-proxy (5.1 y) groups, respectively. The complication rate was lowest in the parent-proxy group (0.62%). We found that proxy administration of PCA by authorized parents is as safe as clinician administered and standard PCA at our pediatric institution.

  14. Training Pediatric Residents and Pediatricians about Adolescent Mental Health Problems: A Proof-of-Concept Pilot for a Proposed National Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutner, Lawrence; Olson, Cheryl K.; Schlozman, Steven; Goldstein, Mark; Warner, Dorothy; Beresin, Eugene V.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article presents a DVD-based educational program intended to help pediatric residents and practicing pediatricians recognize and respond to adolescent depression in busy primary care settings. Methods: Representatives from pediatrics and adolescent medicine, child and adolescent psychiatry and psychology, and experts in the…

  15. Longitudinal study of parent caregiving self-efficacy and parent stress reactions with pediatric cancer treatment procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Felicity W. K.; Peterson, Amy M.; Uphold, Heatherlun; Albrecht, Terrance L.; Taub, Jeffrey W.; Orom, Heather; Phipps, Sean; Penner, Louis A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain/distress during pediatric cancer treatments has substantial psychosocial consequences for children and families. We examined relationships between parents’ caregiving self-efficacy, parents’ affect in response to their children’s cancer-related treatment procedures, and parents’ symptoms of post-traumatic stress at follow-up. Methods Participants were 75 pediatric cancer patients and parents. On the day of each of three procedures (i.e., port-start, lumbar puncture, or bone marrow aspiration), parents rated their self-efficacy for six caregiving goals. Parents also self-reported their negative affect (i.e., state anxiety, negative mood, and distress) in response to each procedure. Three months after the last procedure, parents reported their level of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Results Higher parent self-efficacy about keeping children calm before treatment and/or keeping children calm during the procedure was associated with lower state anxiety. Self-efficacy for keeping the child calm during procedures was significantly correlated with distress in parents at the time of procedures, and self-efficacy for keeping the child calm before procedures was significantly correlated with PTSS. All three negative affect measures significantly mediated the effects of parents’ caregiving self-efficacy for both goals on parents’ PTSS 3 months later. Conclusions Parents’ caregiving self-efficacy influences their immediate and longer-term distress reactions to their children’s treatment procedures. These findings provide a more nuanced understanding of how parents’ cognitions contribute to their ability to cope with their children’s treatment and suggest the benefit of an intervention that targets parents’ procedure-specific caregiver self-efficacy. PMID:23034930

  16. [Communication, information, and roles of parents in the pediatric intensive care unit: A review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béranger, A; Pierron, C; de Saint Blanquat, L; Jean, S; Chappuy, H

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), whose accessibility to parents raises controversy, often operate under their own rules. Patients are under critical and unstable conditions, often in a life-threatening situation. In this context, the communication with the parents and their participation in the unit may be difficult. Information is a legal, deontological, and moral duty for caregivers, confirmed by the parents' needs. But the ability to enforce them is a challenge, and there is a gap between the theory and the reality. The communication between the parents and the physicians starts at the admission of the child with a family conference. According to the Société de réanimation de langue française (SRLF), the effectiveness of the communication is based on three criteria: the patients' comprehension, their satisfaction and their anxiety and depression. It has been shown that comprehension depends on multiple factors, related on the parents, the physicians, and the medical condition of the child. Regarding the parents' participation in the organization of the service, the parents' presence is becoming an important factor. In the PICU, the parents' status has evolved. They become a member of the care team, as a partner. The best interest of the child is always discussed with the parents, as the person knowing the best their child. This partnership gives them a responsibility, which is complementary to the physician's one, but does not substitute it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Parental perspectives on inpatient versus outpatient management of pediatric febrile neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diorio, Caroline; Martino, Julia; Boydell, Katherine Mary; Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Mayo, Chris; Wing, Richard; Teuffel, Oliver; Sung, Lillian; Tomlinson, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    To describe parent preference for treatment of febrile neutropenia and the key drivers of parental decision making, structured face-to-face interviews were used to elicit parent preferences for inpatient versus outpatient management of pediatric febrile neutropenia. Parents were presented with 4 different scenarios and asked to indicate which treatment option they preferred and to describe reasons for this preference during the face-to-face interview. Comments were recorded in writing by research assistants. A consensus approach to thematic analysis was used to identify themes from the written comments of the research assistants. A total of 155 parents participated in the study. Of these, 80 (51.6%) parents identified hospital-based intravenous treatment as the most preferred treatment scenario for febrile neutropenia. The major themes identified included convenience/disruptiveness, physical health, emotional well-being, and modifiers of parental decision making. Most parents preferred hospital-based treatment for febrile neutropenia. An understanding of issues that influence parental decision making may assist health care workers in planning program implementation and further support families in their decision-making process.

  18. Parental knowledge in pediatric otolaryngology surgical consultations: A qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodzinsky, Ayala Y; Hong, Paul; Chorney, Jill MacLaren

    2015-07-01

    To understand the source of parents' knowledge prior to and desire for further information following pediatric otolaryngology surgical consultations. Mixed-methods approach using descriptive and qualitative content analysis of interviews with parents following otolaryngology consultations for children under the age of 6 years was performed. The children were being seen for either tonsillitis, obstructive sleep apnea, otitis media, and/or sinusitis/nasal obstruction. Forty-one parents completed a phone interview two weeks following their child's surgical consultation. The majority of parents indicated that their primary care physician referred their child for either: investigation of symptoms (50%), to have a specific discussion about surgery (27.5%), or because other treatment options were no longer working (20%). Many parents (56.5%) indicated that the Internet was their primary source of information prior to the appointment. Most parents (93%) wanted more information; majority of these parents noted that a technology-based mode of delivery of information available prior to the appointment would be most desirable. Desired information was most often regarding the surgical procedure, including risks and benefits, and symptoms of concern prior to surgery. This study provides a description of parental knowledge and information sources prior to their child's surgical consultation and continued desire for information. This information may lead to decreased knowledge barriers and increased communication to facilitate shared decision-making between the provider and parents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of Nutritional Problems in Pediatric Patients with Cancer and the Information Needs of Their Parents: A Parental Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Arpaci

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The majority of problems and symptoms occur in the gastrointestinal system in children with cancer. Parents have difficulty in coping with the nutritional problems and changing routines of children and need support in this respect. This study aimed to assess the nutritional problems of children with cancer and the information needs of their parents. Methods: This descriptive study was performed among children with cancer aged 3–18 years and their parents (n = 69. The data were collected through a data collection form developed by the researchers based on the literature. Results: The most prominent nutritional problems experienced by children were loss of appetite (85.5%, nausea (84.1%, vomiting (81.2%, fatigue (79.7%, and mucositis (66.7%. According to the parents, the factors causing these nutritional problems in children were physiological factors (100% and the foods given to children in the hospital (65.2%. The parents mostly needed information about food–drug interactions (58.0%, food–disease interactions (52.2%, foods that children with neutropenia should avoid or should eat (neutropenic diet (46.4%, and frequency of nutritional intake (36.2%. Conclusions: This study has shown that most children experience at least one nutritional problem, and the parents need comprehensive and regular information about nutrition. Pediatric oncology nurses have a significant responsibility in the evaluation, education, and monitoring of these children.

  20. Assessment of Nutritional Problems in Pediatric Patients with Cancer and the Information Needs of Their Parents: A Parental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaci, Tuba; Toruner, Ebru Kilicarslan; Altay, Naime

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The majority of problems and symptoms occur in the gastrointestinal system in children with cancer. Parents have difficulty in coping with the nutritional problems and changing routines of children and need support in this respect. This study aimed to assess the nutritional problems of children with cancer and the information needs of their parents. Methods: This descriptive study was performed among children with cancer aged 3–18 years and their parents (n = 69). The data were collected through a data collection form developed by the researchers based on the literature. Results: The most prominent nutritional problems experienced by children were loss of appetite (85.5%), nausea (84.1%), vomiting (81.2%), fatigue (79.7%), and mucositis (66.7%). According to the parents, the factors causing these nutritional problems in children were physiological factors (100%) and the foods given to children in the hospital (65.2%). The parents mostly needed information about food–drug interactions (58.0%), food–disease interactions (52.2%), foods that children with neutropenia should avoid or should eat (neutropenic diet) (46.4%), and frequency of nutritional intake (36.2%). Conclusions: This study has shown that most children experience at least one nutritional problem, and the parents need comprehensive and regular information about nutrition. Pediatric oncology nurses have a significant responsibility in the evaluation, education, and monitoring of these children. PMID:29607385

  1. Assessment of Nutritional Problems in Pediatric Patients with Cancer and the Information Needs of Their Parents: A Parental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaci, Tuba; Toruner, Ebru Kilicarslan; Altay, Naime

    2018-01-01

    The majority of problems and symptoms occur in the gastrointestinal system in children with cancer. Parents have difficulty in coping with the nutritional problems and changing routines of children and need support in this respect. This study aimed to assess the nutritional problems of children with cancer and the information needs of their parents. This descriptive study was performed among children with cancer aged 3-18 years and their parents ( n = 69). The data were collected through a data collection form developed by the researchers based on the literature. The most prominent nutritional problems experienced by children were loss of appetite (85.5%), nausea (84.1%), vomiting (81.2%), fatigue (79.7%), and mucositis (66.7%). According to the parents, the factors causing these nutritional problems in children were physiological factors (100%) and the foods given to children in the hospital (65.2%). The parents mostly needed information about food-drug interactions (58.0%), food-disease interactions (52.2%), foods that children with neutropenia should avoid or should eat (neutropenic diet) (46.4%), and frequency of nutritional intake (36.2%). This study has shown that most children experience at least one nutritional problem, and the parents need comprehensive and regular information about nutrition. Pediatric oncology nurses have a significant responsibility in the evaluation, education, and monitoring of these children.

  2. [Difficulties in communication with parents of pediatric cancer patients during the transition to palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirő, Judit; Hauser, Péter; Zörgő, Szilvia; Hegedűs, Katalin

    2017-07-01

    Adequate communication by medical personnel is especially important at certain points during the treatment of childhood cancer patients. To investigate the timing and manner of communication with parents concerning the introduction of palliative care in pediatric oncology. Structured interviews, containing 14 questions, were carried out with physicians working in pediatric oncology (n = 22). Codes were generated inductively with the aid of Atlas.ti 6.0 software. Interviews show a tendency of a one-step transition to palliative care following curative therapy. Another expert is usually involved in communication, most likely a psychologist. Regarding communication, there are expressions utilized or avoided, such as expressing clarity, self-defense and empathy. The communication of death and dying was the most contradictory. This was the first investigation regarding communication in pediatric palliative care in Hungary. Our results show that a modern perspective of palliative communication is present, but necessitates more time to become entrenched. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(30): 1175-1181.

  3. The moral landscape of pediatric oncology : an empirical study on best interests, parental authority and child participation in decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, Martine Charlotte de

    2012-01-01

    Few medical specialties encounter so many ethical challenges as pediatrics does. It is a specialty that inherently has features that are morally charged. Pediatric ethics examines the broad issues of (1) the concept of the child’s best interest; (2) parental responsibility and authority in

  4. Adaptive functioning in pediatric epilepsy: contributions of seizure-related variables and parental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerne, Valerie; Chapieski, Lynn

    2015-02-01

    Young people with epilepsy are less likely to achieve the level of independence attained by their peers. We examined the seizure-related variables that placed a group of 97 pediatric patients with intractable seizures at risk for poor adaptive functioning. Analyses evaluated both the direct effects of the medical variables and indirect effects that were mediated through increased parental anxiety about their child's epilepsy. Higher numbers of anticonvulsants, presence of seizures that secondarily generalize, longer duration of seizure disorder, and younger age at onset were all identified as risk factors for poor adaptive functioning. Depending on the specific behavioral domain of adaptive functioning, the effects were sometimes direct and sometimes indirect. Lower levels of parental education and positive family history of seizures were associated with higher levels of parental anxiety. Interventions that target parental anxiety about seizures may mitigate the deleterious effects of epilepsy on social development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Parent and family factors associated with child adjustment to pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kristen E; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Vannatta, Kathryn; Noll, Robert B

    2007-05-01

    To identify factors that influence the association between parent and child distress among families of children with cancer and comparison peers. Parent and child distress, social support, and family environment were assessed among families of 95 children with cancer (94 mothers, 67 fathers) and 98 comparison peers (97 mothers, 77 fathers). Significant associations were found between parent and child distress. For models examining the impact of fathers' distress on children, several moderators were identified (i.e., family environment, child age and gender, a cancer diagnosis, and treatment severity). Family environment also partially mediated father and child distress. Children whose parents were distressed were more likely to be distressed themselves. Subgroups of children were particularly vulnerable, indicating a need to identify further mechanisms of risk and resilience and to develop family-based interventions. Support was found for including fathers as independent sources of information in pediatric psychology research and clinical practice.

  6. Parental Reports of Prodromal Psychopathology in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Mariely; Marangoni, Ciro; Grant, Marie C; Estrada, Jezelle; Faedda, Gianni L

    2017-04-01

    Early psychopathology in children diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder (BD) remains poorly characterized. Parental retrospective reports provide helpful details on the earliest manifestations and their evolution over time. These symptoms occur early in the course of BD, often before a formal diagnosis is made and/or treatment is implemented, and are of great importance to early recognition and prevention. Parents of pre-pubertal children and adolescents with DSM-IV diagnoses of BD attending an outpatient mood disorders clinic provided retrospective ratings of 37 symptoms of child psychopathology. Stability and comorbidity of diagnoses were evaluated, and severity of symptoms for each subject was assessed by identifying the earliest occurrence of the reported symptoms causing impairment. Severe mood instability, temper tantrums, anxiety symptoms, sleep disturbances and aggression were among the most common signs of psychopathology reported in children diagnosed with BD before puberty. Symptoms were already apparent in the first three years in 28%, and formal diagnoses were made before the age of 8 y in the majority of cases. Retrospective parental reports of early symptoms of psychopathology in pre-pubertal children with BD revealed a very early occurrence of affective precursors (irritability and mood dysregulation) and clinical risk factors like impulsive aggression and anxiety that can precede the syndromal onset of mania by several years. These findings support previous reports suggesting a progression of symptoms from abnormal, non-specific presentations to sub-threshold and finally syndromal BD. The importance of early identification and intervention is discussed.

  7. Pregnancy and parental leave among obstetrics and gynecology residents: results of a nationwide survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariton, Eduardo; Matthews, Benjamin; Burns, Abigail; Akileswaran, Chitra; Berkowitz, Lori R

    2018-04-16

    The health and economic benefits of paid parental leave have been well-documented. In 2016, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists released a policy statement about recommended parental leave for trainees; however, data on adoption of said guidelines are nonexistent, and published data on parental leave policies in obstetrics-gynecology are outdated. The objective of our study was to understand existing parental leave policies in obstetrics-gynecology training programs and to evaluate program director opinions on these policies and on parenting in residency. A Web-based survey regarding parental leave policies and coverage practices was sent to all program directors of accredited US obstetrics-gynecology residency programs. Cross-sectional Web-based survey. Sixty-five percent (163/250) of program directors completed the survey. Most program directors (71%) were either not aware of or not familiar with the recommendations of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 2016 policy statement on parental leave. Nearly all responding programs (98%) had arranged parental leave for ≥1 residents in the past 5 years. Formal leave policies for childbearing and nonchildbearing parents exist at 83% and 55% of programs, respectively. Program directors reported that, on average, programs offer shorter parental leaves than program directors think trainees should receive. Coverage for residents on leave is most often provided by co-residents (98.7%), usually without compensation or schedule rearrangement to reduce work hours at another time (45.4%). Most program directors (82.8%) believed that becoming a parent negatively affected resident performance, and approximately one-half of the program directors believed that having a child in residency decreased well-being (50.9%), although 19.0% believed that it increased resident well-being. Qualitative responses were mixed and highlighted the complex challenges and competing priorities related to parental

  8. Parent-Controlled PCA for Pain Management in Pediatric Oncology: Is it Safe?

    OpenAIRE

    Anghelescu, Doralina L.; Faughnan, Lane G.; Oakes, Linda L.; Windsor, Kelley B.; Pei, Deqing; Burgoyne, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia offers safe and effective pain control for children who can self-administer medication. Some children may not be candidates for PCA unless a proxy can administer doses. The safety of proxy-administered PCA has been studied, but the safety of parent-administered PCA in children with cancer has not been reported. In this study we compare the rate of complications in PCA by parent proxy versus PCA by clinician (nurse) proxy and self-administered PCA. Our pediatric in...

  9. Day-care versus inpatient pediatric surgery: a comparison of costs incurred by parents.

    OpenAIRE

    Stanwick, R S; Horne, J M; Peabody, D M; Postuma, R

    1987-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness for parents of day-care pediatric surgery was assessed by comparing time and financial costs associated with two surgical procedures, one (squint repair) performed exclusively as a day-care procedure, the other (adenoidectomy) performed exclusively as an inpatient procedure. All but 1 of 165 eligible families participated. The children underwent surgery between February and July 1981. The day-care surgery group (59 families) incurred average total time costs of 16.1 hou...

  10. Parent and medical professional willingness to enroll children in a hypothetical pediatric optic neuritis treatment trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy eWaldman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial and subsequent studies have had a tremendous impact on the treatment and prognosis of optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis in adults. The results of these studies have been extrapolated to children; however, pediatric data are sparse. Using the method of prospective preference assessment, the willingness of parents and medical professionals to enroll children in a hypothetical Pediatric Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial was assessed using a mock consent form and questionnaire. A 3-arm trial was proposed: 1 intravenous corticosteroids, 2 high-dose oral corticosteroids, and 3 an oral placebo. The forms were completed by 198 parents and 49 physicians. After reviewing the hypothetical scenario, trial design, risks and benefits, and alternatives to the study, 21% of parents would enroll their children in the trial whereas 98% of medical professionals would enroll their patients. With medical professional recommendation, 43% of parents would enroll their children. The manner in which this hypothetical trial was presented to parents, specifically with respect to the recommendation of their child’s health care team, influenced a parent’s willingness to participate.

  11. Informing Parents about the Pharmacological and Invasive Behavior Management Techniques Used in Pediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrysa Paryab

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Parental acceptance and consent are important parameters in selecting the required behavior management technique during pediatric dental treatment. The present study sought to assess the effect of three different informing methods on the parental acceptance, consent and concern regarding the pharmacological and invasive behavior management techniques used in pediatric dentistry. Materials and methods. Ninety mothers of 3-6-year-old uncooperative children were selected and randomly assigned to three study groups. The parents in each group were initially asked to answer three questions related to their levels of ‘acceptance’, ‘consent’, and ‘concern’ toward the five behavior management techniques. Then, the information about the techniques was presented through a piece of writing in group I, verbal presentation in group II and showing a film in group III. At last, the parents answered the same three questions again. Score changes were analyzed by using ANOVA, correlations, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis methods. Results. There were no statistically significant differences in score changes of parental acceptance, consent and concern between the three groups, overall and in relation to each behaviour management technique (P > 0.05. Mothers with academic education revealed more statistically significant concern following presentation of information by film (P < 0.05. Conclusion. None of the presentation methods had a significant preference over the others; in selecting the behavioral management techniques, it is advisable to observe individual factors, such as the level of education of the mothers.

  12. Peering into a Chilean black box: parental storytelling in pediatric genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, Jessica; Margarit, Sonia; Downs, Katy; Yashar, Beverly M

    2013-12-01

    While genetic counseling has expanded to multiple international settings, research about providing culturally sensitive services to non-U.S. patients is limited. To gain insights, we utilized a process study to explore parental communication in pediatric genetics clinics in Chile. We utilized a phenomenological hermeneutic approach to assess storytelling in six pediatric sessions that were conducted in Spanish, and translated into English. The majority of the sessions focused on information gathering (35 %), and providing medical (20 %) and genetics education (18 %). The 14 instances of storytelling we identified usually emerged during information gathering, genetics education, and the closing of the session. Stories illustrated parental efforts to create a cognitive and emotional context for their child's genetic diagnosis. Parents emerged as competent caregivers who discussed the role of the child as a social being in the family and the larger community. Our analysis found that genetic counseling sessions in the U.S. and Chile are structured similarly and although communication is not a balanced process, parents use storytelling to participate as active agents in the session. Via storytelling, we learned that parents are working to understand and gain control over their child's genetic diagnosis by relying on mechanisms that extend beyond the genetics appointment.

  13. The effects of the addition of a pediatric surgery fellow on the operative experience of the general surgery resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Alexander; Garwe, Tabitha; Adeseye, Ademola; Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro; Churchill, Warren; Tuggle, David; Mantor, Cameron; Lees, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Adding fellows to surgical departments with residency programs can affect resident education. Our specific aim was to evaluate the effect of adding a pediatric surgery (PS) fellow on the number of index PS cases logged by the general surgery (GS) residents. At a single institution with both PS and GS programs, we examined the number of logged cases for the fellows and residents over 10 years [5 years before (Time 1) and 5 years after (Time 2) the addition of a PS fellow]. Additionally, the procedure related relative value units (RVUs) recorded by the faculty were evaluated. The fellows averaged 752 and 703 cases during Times 1 and 2, respectively, decreasing by 49 (P = 0.2303). The residents averaged 172 and 161 cases annually during Time 1 and Time 2, respectively, decreasing by 11 (P = 0.7340). The total number of procedure related RVUs was 4627 and 6000 during Times 1 and 2, respectively. The number of cases logged by the PS fellows and GS residents decreased after the addition of a PS fellow; however, the decrease was not significant. Programs can reasonably add an additional PS fellow, but care should be taken especially in programs that are otherwise static in size.

  14. Parental asthma education and risks for nonadherence to pediatric asthma treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Eva M; Cho, Christine S; Gildengorin, Ginny; Leibovich, Sara A; Morris, Claudia R

    2014-11-01

    Targeted parental education reduces acute visits for pediatric asthma. Whether the use of education sources readily available to parents relates to nonadherence to asthma treatments is uncertain. This study describes asthma education sources and assesses for a relationship to risks for nonadherence. Caregivers of children with asthma completed a cross-sectional survey at 2 sites: a pediatric emergency department (ED) and an asthma clinic (AC). Measured items included the use of 7 education sources (primary care, ED, AC, friends/family, TV, internet, and printed materials), scores of child asthma morbidity, parental asthma knowledge, and risks for nonadherence, the primary outcome. Recruitment site, preferred language (English/Spanish), and demographics were recorded. Descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses, and multivariate regressions were performed. A total of 260 participants, 158 from ED and 102 from AC, used a variety of education sources. They reported 4.1 (2.0) of 13 risk factors for nonadherence, with more risks in ED parents than AC parents (4.8 vs 3.9, P The ED parents worried more about medications and had worse access to primary care. The regression did not show a significant relationship between education sources and risks for nonadherence, but ED recruitment, Spanish language, and worse morbidity contributed to higher risks. The use of more asthma education sources was not associated with reduced risks for nonadherence. Of the education sources, a primary care provider may benefit ED parents, who also need refills and education about medications. Spanish-speaking parents report more risks for nonadherence, warranting further study of Spanish-language asthma education.

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Focused Assessment with Sonography for Blunt Abdominal Trauma in Pediatric Patients Performed by Emergency Medicine Residents versus Radiology Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Heydari

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST has been shown to be useful to detect intraperitoneal free fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT. Objective: We compared the diagnostic accuracy of FAST performed by emergency medicine residents (EMRs and radiology residents (RRs in pediatric patients with BAT. Method: In this prospective study, pediatric patients with BAT and high energy trauma who were referred to the emergency department (ED at Al-Zahra and Kashani hospitals in Isfahan, Iran, were evaluated using FAST, first by EMRs and subsequently by RRs. The reports provided by the two resident groups were compared with the final outcome based on the results of the abdominal computed tomography (CT, operative exploration, and clinical observation. Results: A total of 101 patients with a median age of 6.75 ± 3.2 years were enrolled in the study between January 2013 and May 2014. These patients were evaluated using FAST, first by EMRs and subsequently by RRs. A good diagnostic agreement was noted between the results of the FAST scans performed by EMRs and RRs (κ = 0.865, P < 0.001. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy in evaluating the intraperitoneal free fluid were 72.2%, 85.5%, 52%, 93.3%, and 83.2%, respectively, when FAST was performed by EMRs and 72.2%, 86.7%, 54.2%, 93.5%, and 84.2%, respectively, when FAST was performed by RRs. No significant differences were seen between the EMR- and RR-performed FAST. Conclusion: In this study, FAST performed by EMRs had acceptable diagnostic value, similar to that performed by RRs, in patients with BAT.

  16. Latino parents' perceptions of weight terminology used in pediatric weight counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierim, Shanna Doucette; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Haemer, Matthew; Raghunath, Silvia; Martin, Carmen; Yang, Alyssa; Clarke, Christina; Hambidge, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    To identify which English and Spanish terms Latino parents consider motivating, as well as culturally and linguistically appropriate, for provider use during weight counseling of overweight and obese Latino youth. Latino parent perceptions of common Spanish and English terms for overweight were discussed with 54 parents in 6 focus groups (3 English, 3 Spanish). Atlas.ti software was used for qualitative analysis. An initial codebook was used to code passages for English and Spanish terminology separately. Subsequent changes to the coded passages and creation of new codes were made by team consensus. "Demasiado peso para su salud" (too much weight for his/her health) was the only phrase for excess weight that was consistently identified as motivating and inoffensive by Spanish-speaking parents. "Sobrepeso" (overweight), a commonly used term among health care providers, was motivating to some parents but offensive to others. English-speaking parents had mixed reactions to "unhealthy weight," "weight problem," and "overweight," finding them motivating, confusing, or insulting. Parents found "fat" "gordo" and "obese" "obeso" consistently offensive. Most participants found growth charts and the term "BMI" confusing. Parents consistently reported that providers could enhance motivation and avoid offending families by linking a child's weight to health risks, particularly diabetes. "Demasiado peso para su salud" (too much weight for his/her health) was motivating to many Spanish-speaking Latino parents. Among English-speaking Latino parents, no single English term emerged as motivating, well-understood, and inoffensive. Linking a child's excess weight with increased health risks was motivating and valuable to many parents regardless of language spoken. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Parent Participation in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Rounds via Telemedicine: Feasibility and Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Phoebe H; Clark, Maureen; Cummings, Brian M; Noviski, Natan

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate feasibility and impact of telemedicine for remote parent participation in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) rounds when parents are unable to be present at their child's bedside. Parents of patients admitted to a 14-bed PICU were approached, and those unable to attend rounds were eligible subjects. Nurse and physician caregivers were also surveyed. Parents received an iPad (Apple Inc, Cupertino, California) with an application enabling audio-video connectivity with the care team. At a predetermined time for bedside rounds with the PICU team, parents entered a virtual meeting room to participate. Following each telemedicine encounter, participants (parent, physician, nurse) completed a brief survey rating satisfaction (0?=?not satisfied, 10?=?completely satisfied) and disruption (0?=?no disruption at all, 10?=?very disruptive). A total of 153 surveys were completed following 51 telemedicine encounters involving 13 patients. Parents of enrolled patients cited work demands (62%), care for other dependents (46%), and transportation difficulties (31%) as reasons for study participation. The median levels of satisfaction and disruption were 10 (range 5-10) and 0 (range 0-5), respectively. All parents reported that telemedicine encounters had a positive effect on their level of reassurance regarding their child's care and improved communication with the care team. This proof-of-concept study indicates that remote parent participation in PICU rounds is feasible, enhances parent-provider communication, and offers parents reassurance. Providers reported a high level of satisfaction with minimal disruption. Technological advancements to streamline teleconferencing workflow are needed to ensure program sustainability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Health Literacy Among Parents of Pediatric Patients Seen in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran, T. Paul

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Health literacy is an important predictor of healthcare outcomes, but research on this topic has largely been absent from the emergency medicine literature.OBJECTIVE: We measured the prevalence of health literacy in parents or guardians of pediatric patients seen in the emergency department (ED.METHODS: This was an observational study conducted in a Midwestern urban, university-based, tertiary, Level 1 trauma center ED with 33,000 visits/year. Using convenience sampling during a three-month period, English-speaking parents or guardians of pediatric patients (< 19 yrs. were asked to complete the short version of the Test of Functional Health Literacy for Adults (s-TOFHLA. Parents/guardians were excluded if they had uncorrected visual impairment, required an interpreter, had altered mental status, or if the patients they accompanied were the subjects of a medical or trauma activation.RESULTS: Of the 188 parents or guardians approached, six did not consent or withdrew, one was excluded, leaving 181 (96.3% in the study. Of these, 19 (10.5% had either "marginal" or "inadequate" health literacy, while 162 (89.5%, 95% CI: 84.1%, 93.6% had "adequate" health literacy.CONCLUSION: A large majority (89.5% of English-speaking parents or guardians of pediatric patients evaluated in the ED have adequate health literacy. This data may prompt ED professionals to adjust their communication styles in the evaluation of children. Future multi-center studies are needed to confirm the findings in this pilot study.

  19. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery: Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident's training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.T. Velde (Te); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); S.H.A.J. Tytgat; J.R. de Jong (Justin); D.V. Travassos (Vieira); W.L.M. Kramer; D.C. van der Zee (David)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods: A

  20. Using an Audience Response System Smartphone App to Improve Resident Education in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoyoung; Kallay, Tom; Anas, Nick; Bruno, Diana; Decamps, Jose; Evans, Darci; Vilasagar, Niveditha; Mink, Richard B

    2018-01-01

    In the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), most teaching occurs during bedside rounds, but technology now provides new opportunities to enhance education. Specifically, smartphone apps allow rapid communication between instructor and student. We hypothesized that using an audience response system (ARS) app can identify resident knowledge gaps, guide teaching, and enhance education in the PICU. Third-year pediatric residents rotating through the PICU participated in ARS-based education or received traditional teaching. Before rounds, experimental subjects completed an ARS quiz using the Socrative app. Concomitantly, the fellow leading rounds predicted quiz performance. Then, discussion points based on the incorrect answers were used to guide instruction. Scores on the pre-rotation test were similar between groups. On the post-rotation examination, ARS participants did not increase their scores more than controls. The fellow's prediction of performance was poor. Residents felt that the method enhanced their education whereas fellows reported that it improved their teaching efficiency. Although there was no measurable increase in knowledge using the ARS app, it may still be a useful tool to rapidly assess learners and help instructors provide learner-centered education.

  1. Reflective Practice in the Clinical Setting: A Multi-Institutional Qualitative Study of Pediatric Faculty and Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Jennifer; Li, Su-Ting T; Blankenburg, Rebecca; Bogetz, Alyssa L; Long, Michele; Butani, Lavjay

    2017-11-01

    To explore when and in what form pediatric faculty and residents practice reflection. From February to June 2015, the authors conducted focus groups of pediatric faculty and residents at the University of California, Davis; Stanford University; and the University of California, San Francisco, until thematic saturation occurred. Transcripts were analyzed based on Mezirow's and Schon's models of reflection, using the constant comparative method associated with grounded theory. Two investigators independently coded transcripts and reconciled codes to develop themes. All investigators reviewed the codes and developed a final list of themes through consensus. Through iterative discussions, investigators developed a conceptual model of reflection in the clinical setting. Seventeen faculty and 20 residents from three institutions participated in six focus groups. Five themes emerged: triggers of reflection, intrinsic factors, extrinsic factors, timing, and outcome of reflection. Various triggers led to reflection; whether a specific trigger led to reflection depended on intrinsic and extrinsic factors. When reflection occurred, it happened in action or on action. Under optimal conditions, this reflection was goal and action directed and became critical reflection. In other instances, this process resulted in unproductive rumination or acted as an emotional release or supportive therapy. Participants reflected in clinical settings, but did not always explicitly identify it as reflection or reflect in growth-promoting ways. Strategies to enhance critical reflection include developing knowledge and skills in reflection, providing performance data to inform reflection, creating time and space for safe reflection, and providing mentorship to guide the process.

  2. [Utility of conceptual schemes and mental maps on the teaching-learning process of residents in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruza, Norberto Sotelo; Fierros, Luis E

    2006-01-01

    The present study was done at the internal medicine service oft he Hospital lnfantil in the State of Sonora, Mexico. We tried to address the question of the use of conceptual schemes and mind maps and its impact on the teaching-learning-evaluation process among medical residents. Analyze the effects of conceptual schemes, and mind maps as a teaching and evaluation tool and compare them with multiple choice exams among Pediatric residents. Twenty two residents (RI, RII, RIII)on service rotation during six months were assessed initially, followed by a lecture on a medical subject. Conceptual schemes and mind maps were then introduced as a teaching-learning-evaluation instrument. Comprehension impact and comparison with a standard multiple choice evaluation was done. The statistical package (JMP version 5, SAS inst. 2004) was used. We noted that when we used conceptual schemes and mind mapping, learning improvement was noticeable among the three groups of residents (P evaluation tool when compared with multiple choice exams (P < 0.0005). Based on our experience we recommend the use of this educational technique for medical residents in training.

  3. Critical assessment of pediatric neurosurgery patient/parent educational information obtained via the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Michael; Daugherty, Christopher; Ben Khallouq, Bertha; Maugans, Todd

    2018-05-01

    information was relevant and accurate; however, the depth and breadth of information was variable. Search results over a 6-month period were moderately stable. Pediatric neurosurgery practices and neurosurgical professional organization websites were inferior (less current, less accurate, less authoritative, and less purposeful) to governmental and encyclopedia-type resources such as Wikipedia. This presents an opportunity for pediatric neurosurgeons to participate in the creation of better online patient/parent educational material.

  4. Pediatric Audiology Report: Assessment and Revision of an Audiology Report Written to Parents of Children with Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Ashleigh J.; Kelly-Campbell, Rebecca J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to evaluate a typical pediatric diagnostic audiology report to establish its readability and comprehensibility for parents and, second, to revise the report to improve its readability, as well as the comprehension, sense of self-efficacy, and positive opinions of parent readers. Method: In…

  5. Current state of professional and core competency in pediatric residency program at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences: A local survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEDIGHEH EBRAHIMI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Accreditation assesses performance, or capacity to perform, against predetermined standards. It typically combines external quality assurance, through a process of peers review, with elements of self-regulation through internal and selfdirected assessment. This study is an attempt to identify the quality of pediatrics residency educational programs regarding predetermined standards. Methods: This descriptive-analytical evaluation study of applied type was conducted during 2010 and 2011 in the pediatrics department of Shiraz Medical School, Iran. The assessment process occurred in several phases; at first an assessment model for a residency educational development and a series of educational criteria and indices were created based on WFME Standards. Multiple methods including a self-assessment questionnaire and several checklists were used to collect data, whereas systematic site visit, peer review and document reviewing were conducted with survey team. Due to limitation of the statistical society, all faculty members (n=34 and residents (n=41 of the pediatric department were asked to complete the survey. At last, descriptive and deductive statistics data analysis was performed using SPSS version 14. Results: According to the records available in assessing program quality, it seems that the input criteria were desirable for the program based on the residents’ viewpoints (86.6%.There were proper physical facilities for them to meet the residency program goals. The study indicated that the learning environment needed to be revised for the educational needs (Likert scale: 2.96±1.05. The peer evaluation team demonstrated achievement of mission fulfillment in the context of the objectives and indicators by meeting the desired themes. In spite of some weaknesses in the process criteria, the criteria for output indicators were good according to the report (more than desired level of 75-80%. Conclusion: Accreditation is an important step

  6. CBT for Pediatric Migraine: A Qualitative Study of Patient and Parent Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M; Ernst, Michelle M; Vaughn, Lisa; Slater, Shalonda; Powers, Scott W

    2018-03-08

    The goal of this study was to determine which cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-HA) treatment components pediatric headache patient stakeholders would report to be most helpful and essential to reducing headache frequency and related disability to develop a streamlined, less burdensome treatment package that would be more accessible to patients and families. Pediatric migraine is a prevalent and disabling condition. CBT-HA has been shown to reduce headache frequency and related disability, but may not be readily available or accepted by many migraine sufferers due to treatment burden entailed. Research is needed to determine systematic ways of reducing barriers to CBT-HA. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 patients and 9 of their parents who had undergone CBT-HA. Interviews were analyzed using an inductive thematic analysis approach based upon modified grounded theory. Patients were 13-17.5 years of age (M = 15.4, SD = 1.63) and had undergone CBT-HA ∼1-2 years prior to participating in the study. Overall, patients and their parents reported that CBT-HA was helpful in reducing headache frequency and related disability. Although patients provided mixed reports on the effectiveness of different CBT-HA skills, the majority of patients indicated that the mind and body relaxation skills of CBT-HA (deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and activity pacing in particular) were the most helpful and most frequently used skills. Patients and parents also generally reported that treatment was easy to learn, and noted at least some aspect of treatment was enjoyable. Results from these qualitative interviews indicate that mind and body CBT-HA relaxation skills emerged as popular and effective based on patient and parent report. Future research examining the effectiveness of streamlined pediatric migraine nonpharmacological interventions should include these patient-preferred skills. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  7. Aptitud clínica ante el paciente pediátrico con asma grave en residentes de pediatría y urgencias Clinical skills at the pediatric patient with severe asthma of Pediatrics and Emergency residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Loría-Castellanos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Construir, validar y aplicar un instrumento para evaluar la aptitud clínica de los residentes de pediatría y urgencia ante los pacientes pediátricos con asma grave. Sujetos y métodos. Estudio observacional autorizado por el comité de investigación. El instrumento se construyó a través de cinco casos clínicos reales, validado por consenso de expertos en pediatría, urgencias e investigación educativa, obteniéndose una versión final de 150 ítems con una consistencia de 0,89. Se evaluaron 10 residentes de pediatría y 21 de urgencias. Se realizó un análisis estadístico no paramétrico. Resultados. La mayoría de los residentes (79,73% se ubicaron en los niveles bajos-muy bajos de aptitud clínica, ninguno alcanzó niveles superiores. Las pruebas estadísticas no encontraron diferencias entre los grados académicos o la especialidad. Conclusiones. El instrumento construido tiene una adecuada consistencia. El proceso educativo al que se han sometido estos residentes parece no favorecer el desarrollo de reflexión, lo que podría limitar su práctica profesional real.Aim. To develop, validate and implement a tool to assess the clinical competence of pediatric residents and medical emergencies to pediatric patients with severe asthma. Subjects and methods. An observational study approved by the research committee. The instrument was built through five problematized clinical cases, validated by consensus by experts in pediatrics, emergency and educational research, obtaining a final version of 150 items with a consistency of 0.89. It evaluated 10 pediatric residents and 21 of emergency. We performed a nonparametric statistical analysis. Results. Most residents (79.73% were located in low-very low levels of clinical competence, none reached higher levels. Statistical tests found no differences between academic degrees or specialty. Conclusions. The educational process that these students have had seems to favor the development

  8. Immunological considerations regarding parental concerns on pediatric immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, Francesco; Appay, Victor

    2017-05-25

    Despite the fundamental role of vaccines in the decline of infant mortality, parents may decide to decline vaccination for their own children. Many factors may influence this decision, such as the belief that the infant immune system is weakened by vaccines, and concerns have been raised about the number of vaccines and the early age at which they are administered. Studies focused on the infant immune system and its reaction to immunizations, summarized in this review, show that vaccines can overcome those suboptimal features of infant immune system that render them more at risk of infections and of their severe manifestations. In addition, many vaccines have been shown to improve heterologous innate and adaptive immunity resulting in lower mortality rates for fully vaccinated children. Thus, multiple vaccinations are necessary and not dangerous, as infants can respond to several antigens as well as when responding to single stimuli. Current immunization schedules have been developed and tested to avoid vaccine interference, improve benefits and reduce side effects compared to single administrations. The infant immune system is therefore capable, early after birth, of managing several antigenic challenges and exploits them to prompt its development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Investigation and analysis of the cognition degree of parents of 150 pediatric burn patients on scar rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Da-wei; Fu, Jin-feng; Yan, Gang; Jiang, He; Liu, Wen-jun

    2013-02-01

    To analyze the cognition degree of parents of pediatric burn patients on hyperplasia of scar and its prevention and rehabilitation, so as to provide a guidance for preventing deformity and dysfunction caused by scar hyperplasia. Questionnaire survey was carried out among parents of 150 pediatric burn patients hospitalized from October 2010 to November 2011 to analyze the cognition degree of patients on the formation of scar after burns, the demand degree for scar treatment between parents of different genders of patients and among parents of patients with burn injury occurred in different body sites, the relationship between the literacy level of parents and their degree of willingness of undergoing scar treatment, and the degree of comprehension and acceptance on the part of parents regarding the methods of prevention and treatment of scar. Data were processed with chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. (1) Only the parents of 19 pediatric burn patients (accounting for 12.7%) realized the possibility of scar formation before admission. After admission, more than half of the parents were told that their children would bear scar and need regular follow-up, while only parents of 52 patients (34.7%) were instructed the methods of preventing and treating scar. (2) One hundred and forty parents (93.3%) considered their children need prevention and treatment of scar after burns. There was no statistically significant difference between parents of male patients and female patients in the demand for scar treatment (χ(2) = 0.825, P > 0.05). The demand degree of parents for rehabilitation treatment for the upper limbs after burns surpassed those of the other sites of body, and altogether there were 85 parents accounting for 97.7% of all. (3) The difference among parents with different levels of literacy was not obvious in the willingness of receiving treatment for scar hyperplasia (P > 0.05). (4) Eight methods were chosen by parents to prevent and treat scars of patients

  10. Patients' and Parents' Needs, Attitudes, and Perceptions About Early Palliative Care Integration in Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Deena R; Mandrell, Belinda N; Sykes, April; Pritchard, Michele; Gibson, Deborah; Symons, Heather J; Wendler, David; Baker, Justin N

    2017-09-01

    Early palliative care integration for cancer patients is now touted as the optimal care model, yet significant barriers often prevent its implementation. A perceived barrier, especially for pediatric oncology patients, is the notion that patients and their families may not need or want palliative care involvement early in the disease trajectory. To determine the perception of symptom burden early in treatment and assess attitudes toward early integration of palliative care in pediatric oncology patient-parent pairs. Novel but pretested survey tools were administered to 129 patient-parent dyads of hospital-based pediatric oncology ambulatory clinics and inpatient units between September 2011 and January 2015. All patient participants were aged between 10 and 17 years and were diagnosed as having an oncologic condition 1 month to 1 year before enrollment. Both the patient and the parent in the dyad spoke English, and all participating parents provided written informed consent. A convenience sample was used for selection, with participants screened when otherwise presenting at a participating site. A total of 280 eligible participants were approached for study inclusion, 258 of whom were enrolled in the study (92.1% positive response-rate). Degree of perceived suffering from early symptom-related causes, attitudes toward early palliative care integration, and patient-parent concordance. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, calculation of concordance, McNemar test results, and Cochran-Armitage trend test results. Of the 129 patients in the dyads, 68 were boys, and 61 girls; of the 129 parents, 15 were men, and 114 women. Patients reported the following symptoms in the first month of cancer therapy: nausea (n = 109; 84.5%), loss of appetite (n = 97; 75.2%), pain (n = 96; 74.4%), anxiety (n = 77; 59.7%), constipation (n = 69; 53.5%), depression (n = 64; 49.6%), and diarrhea (n = 52; 40.3%). A large proportion of those

  11. Parents' experiences discussing pediatric vaccination with healthcare providers: a survey of Canadian naturopathic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Jason W; Walji, Rishma; Wilson, Kumanan

    2011-01-01

    Parents who choose to selectively vaccinate or avoid vaccination for their children may do so at risk of compromising relations with their family physician or pediatrician. Groups that are associated with reduced rates of pedicatic vaccination, such as parents who access naturopathic care, may be particularly vulnerable to this issue. In March through September 2010, we administered a 26-item cross-sectional survey to 129 adult patients, all of whom were parents with children ≤ 16 years of age, presenting for naturopathic care in Ontario, Canada. Ninety-five parents completed the survey (response rate 74%), and only 50.5% (48 of 95) reported that their children had received all recommended vaccines. Most parents (50.5%; 48 of 95) reported feeling pressure to vaccinate from their allopathic physician and, of those who discussed vaccination with their physician, 25.9% (21 of 81) were less comfortable continuing care as a result. Five percent (4 of 81) of respondents were advised by their physician that their children would be refused care if they decided against vaccination. In our adjusted generalized linear model, feeling pressure to vaccinate (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14 to 8.26) or endorsing a naturopathic physician as their most trusted source of information regarding vaccination (OR = 3.57; 95% CI = 1.22 to 10.44) were associated with greater odds of having a partially vaccinated or unvaccinated child. The majority (69.6%; 32 of 46) of parent's with partially vaccinated or unvaccinated children reported a willingness to re-consider this decision. Use of naturopathic care should be explored among parents in order to identify this high-risk group and engage them in discussion regarding pediatric vaccination to encourage evidence-based, shared decision making. Physicians should ensure that discussions regarding vaccination are respectful, even if parents are determined not to vaccinate their children.

  12. Parents' experiences discussing pediatric vaccination with healthcare providers: a survey of Canadian naturopathic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W Busse

    Full Text Available Parents who choose to selectively vaccinate or avoid vaccination for their children may do so at risk of compromising relations with their family physician or pediatrician. Groups that are associated with reduced rates of pedicatic vaccination, such as parents who access naturopathic care, may be particularly vulnerable to this issue.In March through September 2010, we administered a 26-item cross-sectional survey to 129 adult patients, all of whom were parents with children ≤ 16 years of age, presenting for naturopathic care in Ontario, Canada. Ninety-five parents completed the survey (response rate 74%, and only 50.5% (48 of 95 reported that their children had received all recommended vaccines. Most parents (50.5%; 48 of 95 reported feeling pressure to vaccinate from their allopathic physician and, of those who discussed vaccination with their physician, 25.9% (21 of 81 were less comfortable continuing care as a result. Five percent (4 of 81 of respondents were advised by their physician that their children would be refused care if they decided against vaccination. In our adjusted generalized linear model, feeling pressure to vaccinate (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14 to 8.26 or endorsing a naturopathic physician as their most trusted source of information regarding vaccination (OR = 3.57; 95% CI = 1.22 to 10.44 were associated with greater odds of having a partially vaccinated or unvaccinated child. The majority (69.6%; 32 of 46 of parent's with partially vaccinated or unvaccinated children reported a willingness to re-consider this decision.Use of naturopathic care should be explored among parents in order to identify this high-risk group and engage them in discussion regarding pediatric vaccination to encourage evidence-based, shared decision making. Physicians should ensure that discussions regarding vaccination are respectful, even if parents are determined not to vaccinate their children.

  13. Pediatric Depression: When Does Parental Refusal for Treatment Constitute Medical Neglect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Depression is a common disorder in youth, and 10% to 15% of individuals have a lifetime prevalence by 18 years of age. Youth who receive treatment typically have a positive outcome, but many remain undiagnosed and untreated. 1 There is a dearth of literature on parental refusal to consent to treatment for pediatric depression and the circumstances under which such refusal could be considered medical neglect. In general, it appears that mental health diagnoses are rarely reported in cases of medical neglect. 2 . Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Needs of Parents in Caring for Their Children in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mery Luz Valderrama Sanabria

    Full Text Available Objective.This work sought to describe the needs of parents to participate in caring for their children hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. Methods. This is a qualitative study based on the ethno-nursing research method proposed by Leininger. For data collection and analysis, in-depth open interviews were used, along with field notes and enabler guidelines proposed by Leininger: stranger-friend, observation, participation, reflexion, and the Sunrise model. Parents of children hospitalized in a PICU in the city of Tunja (Boyacá, Colombia participated between February 2012 and October 2013. Results. The needs of parents to care for their children were described in the following themes: clear and timely communication, familiarization with technology, the value of the family, favoring the parent-children interaction during visits, and valuing and respecting generic (folk knowledge. Conclusion. The study provides knowledge, from the cultural perspective of parents with children hospitalized in PICU, as input to plan and develop care actions with them, according to their own needs.

  15. Parental Evaluation of a Nurse Practitioner-Developed Pediatric Neurosurgery Website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Tina Kovacs; Kleib, Manal; Davidson, Sandra J; Scott, Shannon D

    2016-04-12

    Parents often turn to the Internet to seek health information about their child's diagnosis and condition. Information, support, and resources regarding pediatric neurosurgery are scarce, hard to find, and difficult to comprehend. To address this gap, a pediatric nurse practitioner designed a website called the Neurosurgery Kids Fund (NKF). Analyzing the legitimacy of the NKF website for parents seeking health information and fulfilling their social and resource needs is critical to the website's future development and success. To explore parental usage of the NKF website, track visitor behavior, evaluate usability and design, establish ways to improve user experience, and identify ways to redesign the website. The aim of this study was to assess and evaluate whether a custom-designed health website could meet parents' health information, support, and resource needs. A multimethod approach was used. Google Analytic usage reports were collected and analyzed for the period of April 23, 2013, to November 30, 2013. Fifty-two online questionnaires that targeted the website's usability were collected between June 18, 2014, and July 30, 2014. Finally, a focus group was conducted on August 20, 2014, to explore parents' perceptions and user experiences. Findings were analyzed using an inductive content analysis approach. There were a total of 2998 sessions and 8818 page views, with 2.94 pages viewed per session, a 56.20% bounce rate, an average session duration of 2 minutes 24 seconds, and a 56.24% new sessions rate. Results from 52 eligible surveys included that the majority of NKF users were Caucasian (90%), females (92%), aged 36-45 years (48%), with a university or college degree or diploma (69%). Half plan to use the health information. Over half reported turning to the Internet for health information and spending 2 to 4 hours a day online. The most common reasons for using the NKF website were to (1) gather information about the 2 summer camps, (2) explore the Media

  16. Is Whole-Exome Sequencing an Ethically Disruptive Technology? Perspectives of Pediatric Oncologists and Parents of Pediatric Patients With Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laurence B; Slashinski, Melody J; McGuire, Amy L; Street, Richard L; Eng, Christine M; Gibbs, Richard A; Parsons, D William; Plon, Sharon E

    2016-03-01

    It has been anticipated that physician and parents will be ill prepared or unprepared for the clinical introduction of genome sequencing, making it ethically disruptive. As a part of the Baylor Advancing Sequencing in Childhood Cancer Care study, we conducted semistructured interviews with 16 pediatric oncologists and 40 parents of pediatric patients with cancer prior to the return of sequencing results. We elicited expectations and attitudes concerning the impact of sequencing on clinical decision making, clinical utility, and treatment expectations from both groups. Using accepted methods of qualitative research to analyze interview transcripts, we completed a thematic analysis to provide inductive insights into their views of sequencing. Our major findings reveal that neither pediatric oncologists nor parents anticipate sequencing to be an ethically disruptive technology, because they expect to be prepared to integrate sequencing results into their existing approaches to learning and using new clinical information for care. Pediatric oncologists do not expect sequencing results to be more complex than other diagnostic information and plan simply to incorporate these data into their evidence-based approach to clinical practice, although they were concerned about impact on parents. For parents, there is an urgency to protect their child's health and in this context they expect genomic information to better prepare them to participate in decisions about their child's care. Our data do not support the concern that introducing genome sequencing into childhood cancer care will be ethically disruptive, that is, leave physicians or parents ill prepared or unprepared to make responsible decisions about patient care. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Hispanic parents' reading language preference and pediatric oral health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazicioglu, Iffet; Jones, Judith A; Cortés, Dharma; Rich, Sharron; Garcia, Raul

    2013-01-01

    This study compared scores and psychometric properties from self-identified Hispanic parents who completed Pediatric Oral Health-related Quality of life (POQL) parent report-on-child questionnaires in Spanish or English. The study hypothesized that there were no differences in psychometric properties or POQL scores by parent reading language preference, controlling for dental needs, child's place of birth, age, insurance and use of care. POQL scores were computed, and the internal consistency, feasibility, factor structure and construct validity of the Spanish language version assessed. Hispanic parents (N = 387) of 8-14 year old children (mean age 10.2) completed the survey; 237 in Spanish and 150 in English. Internal consistency scores were higher (Cronbach α range = .86-.93) among Hispanic parents who completed the questionnaire in Spanish than in English (.66-.86). POQL scores from parents who completed questionnaires in Spanish were higher (worse) overall (6.03 vs. 3.82, P = 0.022), as were physical (11.61 vs. 6.54, P = 0.001) and role functioning domains (1.87 vs. 0.82, P = 0.029). Items for crying, pain, and eating were higher (P parent reports of dental visit in the last year (P = 0.05) and worse oral health than a year ago (P = 0.002), controlling for reading language (not significant) and visit in last year in the final multivariate linear regression. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  18. Decision making in pediatric oncology: Views of parents and physicians in two European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badarau, Domnita O; Ruhe, Katharina; Kühne, Thomas; De Clercq, Eva; Colita, Anca; Elger, Bernice S; Wangmo, Tenzin

    2017-01-01

    Decision making is a highly complex task when providing care for seriously ill children. Physicians, parents, and children face many challenges when identifying and selecting from available treatment options. This qualitative interview study explored decision-making processes for children with cancer at different stages in their treatment in Switzerland and Romania. Thematic analysis of interviews conducted with parents and oncologists identified decision making as a heterogeneous process in both countries. Various decisions were made based on availability and reasonableness of care options. In most cases, at the time of diagnosis, parents were confronted with a "choiceless choice"-that is, there was only one viable option (a standard protocol), and physicians took the lead in making decisions significant for health outcomes. Parents' and sometimes children's role increased during treatment when they had to make decisions regarding research participation and aggressive therapy or palliative care. Framing these results within the previously described Decisional Priority in Pediatric Oncology Model (DPM) highlights family's more prominent position when making elective decisions regarding quality-of-life or medical procedures, which had little effect on health outcomes. The interdependency between oncologists, parents, and children is always present. Communication, sharing of information, and engaging in discussions about preferences, values, and ultimately care goals should be decision making's foundation. Patient participation in these processes was reported as sometimes limited, but parents and oncologists should continue to probe patients' abilities and desire to be involved in decision making. Future research should expand the DPM and explore how decisional priority and authority can be shared by oncologists with parents and even patients.

  19. Pediatric cardiac surgery Parent Education Discharge Instruction (PEDI) program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staveski, Sandra L; Zhelva, Bistra; Paul, Reena; Conway, Rosalind; Carlson, Anna; Soma, Gouthami; Kools, Susan; Franck, Linda S

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries, more children with complex cardiac defects now receive treatment for their condition. For successful long-term outcomes, children also need skilled care at home after discharge. The Parent Education Discharge Instruction (PEDI) program was developed to educate nurses on the importance of discharge teaching and to provide them with a structured process for conducting parent teaching for home care of children after cardiac surgery. The aim of this pilot study was to generate preliminary data on the feasibility and acceptability of the nurse-led structured discharge program on an Indian pediatric cardiac surgery unit. A pre-/post-design was used. Questionnaires were used to evaluate role acceptability, nurse and parent knowledge of discharge content, and utility of training materials with 40 nurses and 20 parents. Retrospective audits of 50 patient medical records (25 pre and 25 post) were performed to evaluate discharge teaching documentation. Nurses' discharge knowledge increased from a mean of 81% to 96% (P = .001) after participation in the training. Nurses and parents reported high levels of satisfaction with the education materials (3.75-4 on a 4.00-point scale). Evidence of discharge teaching documentation in patient medical records improved from 48% (12 of 25 medical records) to 96% (24 of 25 medical records) six months after the implementation of the PEDI program. The structured nurse-led parent discharge teaching program demonstrated feasibility, acceptability, utility, and sustainability in the cardiac unit. Future studies are needed to examine nurse, parent, child, and organizational outcomes related to this expanded nursing role in resource-constrained environments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. The impact of pediatric blood and marrow transplant on parents: introduction of the parent impact scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Katherine E; Rodday, Angie Mae; Nolan, Marie T; Bingen, Kristin; Kupst, Mary Jo; Patel, Sunita K; Syrjala, Karen; Harris, Lynnette; Recklitis, Christopher; Schwartz, Lisa; Davies, Stella; Guinan, Eva C; Noll, Robert; Chang, Grace; Parsons, Susan K

    2015-04-09

    Parents often experience stress-related complications when their child requires blood and marrow transplant (BMT). Previous studies have described the emotional toll BMT places on parents during the acute phase of care and within the context of clinical complications. In this paper we introduce the Parent Impact Scale (PARimpact), designed to capture physical and emotional challenges of the child's health on the parent. The primary aim of this paper is to examine psychometric properties of PARimpact, and the secondary aim is to explore factors associated with PARimpact scores for further hypothesis generation. This analysis used a merged dataset of two longitudinal studies. Accompanying parents (n = 363) of children undergoing BMT were surveyed up to six times from pre-BMT baseline to one year after their child's BMT. For this analysis, pre-BMT baseline responses to PARimpact were used to examine the factor structure with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA). Construct validity was assessed, and multivariable regression was used to examine relationships between PARimpact and BMT clinical variables. PCA and EFA revealed a one-factor solution with acceptable item loading; Cronbach's α was 0.83 at baseline. Hypothesized differences in known groups were detected for BMT complications with significantly higher PARimpact scores for those with vs. without each complication. In the adjusted multivariable regression models, acute graft versus host disease (b = 5.3; p = 0.03), end organ toxicity (b = 5.9; p < 0.01), and systemic infection (b = 9.1; p < 0.01) were associated with significantly higher mean PARimpact scores in the first 3 months following transplant. After the first 3 months to 1 year post BMT, systemic infection was associated with increased mean PARimpact scores (b = 19.2; p < 0.01). Initial results suggest that the PARimpact is valid and reliable. Our finding that clinical

  1. Child maltreatment between knowledge, attitude and beliefs among Saudi pediatricians, pediatric residency trainees and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossef Alnasser, MBBS

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Saudi medical students, pediatrics trainees and pediatricians have good basic knowledge, positive attitude and willingness to learn more to provide a safe environment for children in Saudi Arabia. However, knowledge in regards to reporting child maltreatment is a major observed defect. Still, further education and training are needed to combat CAN in Saudi Arabia.

  2. Enhancing pediatric safety: assessing and improving resident competency in life-threatening events with a computer-based interactive resuscitation tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, Catherine; Gaca, Ana M.; Frush, Donald P.; Ancarana, Anjanette; Hohenhaus, Sue; Seelinger, Terry A.; Frush, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Though rare, allergic reactions occur as a result of administration of low osmolality nonionic iodinated contrast material to pediatric patients. Currently available resuscitation aids are inadequate in guiding radiologists' initial management of such reactions. To compare radiology resident competency with and without a computer-based interactive resuscitation tool in the management of life-threatening events in pediatric patients. The study was approved by the IRB. Radiology residents (n=19; 14 male, 5 female; 19 certified in basic life support/advanced cardiac life support; 1 certified in pediatric advanced life support) were videotaped during two simulated 5-min anaphylaxis scenarios involving 18-month-old and 8-year-old mannequins (order randomized). No advance warning was given. In half of the scenarios, a computer-based interactive resuscitation tool with a response-driven decision tree was available to residents (order randomized). Competency measures included: calling a code, administering oxygen and epinephrine, and correctly dosing epinephrine. Residents performed significantly more essential interventions with the computer-based resuscitation tool than without (72/76 vs. 49/76, P<0.001). Significantly more residents appropriately dosed epinephrine with the tool than without (17/19 vs. 1/19; P<0.001). More residents called a code with the tool than without (17/19 vs. 14/19; P = 0.08). A learning effect was present: average times to call a code, request oxygen, and administer epinephrine were shorter in the second scenario (129 vs. 93 s, P=0.24; 52 vs. 30 s, P<0.001; 152 vs. 82 s, P=0.025, respectively). All the trainees found the resuscitation tool helpful and potentially useful in a true pediatric emergency. A computer-based interactive resuscitation tool significantly improved resident performance in managing pediatric emergencies in the radiology department. (orig.)

  3. Impact of parental presence during induction of anesthesia on anxiety level among pediatric patients and their parents: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Afsaneh Sadeghi, Ahmad Khaleghnejad Tabari, Alireza Mahdavi, Sara Salarian, Seyed Sajjad Razavi Department of Anesthesiology, Pediatric Surgery Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Introduction: Anesthesia induction is a stressful event for children and their parents, and may have potentially harmful consequences on the patient’s physiological and mental situation. Stressful anesthesia induction has psychological adverse effects that recur with repeated anesthesia, can lead to increased pediatric discomfort during the recovery period, and may even induce reactionary postoperative behavior. A randomized controlled trial was performed to assess the impact of parental presence during induction of anesthesia (PPIA on preoperative anxiety of pediatric patients and their parents at three different times, cooperation of child with anesthesiologist at induction of anesthesia, and parental satisfaction.Patients and methods: A total of 96 pediatric patients undergoing elective minor surgery (ASA 1–2 were randomly divided into two groups. Both groups received oral midazolam (0.5 mg/kg at least 20 minutes before surgery, but in the PPIA group, the parents were also present in the operating room until loss of consciousness of child at anesthesia induction. Anxiety in the patients (as measured by the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale [mYPAS] and parents (as measured by the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI], the Induction Compliance Checklist (ICC, and parental satisfaction (as measured by visual analog scale were assessed. Results: There was no significant difference in the mean anxiety scores (mYPAS of participants in the control and PPIA groups at ward T0 and upon arrival to operating room T1 (P>0.05. However, between the PPIA and control groups, mean mYPAS score was different at the time of induction of anesthesia T2 (35.5±16.6 vs 59.8±22.4; P<0.001. The ICC scores showed that perfect score was

  4. Parent perspectives on privacy and governance for a pediatric repository of non-biological, research data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhas, Kiran P; Page, Stacey; Dodd, Shawn X; Letourneau, Nicole; Ambrose, Aleta; Cui, Xinjie; Tough, Suzanne C

    2015-02-01

    Research data repositories (RDRs) are data storage entities where data can be submitted, stored, and subsequently accessed for purposes beyond the original intent. There is little information relating to non-biological RDRs, nor considerations regarding pediatric data storage and re-use. We examined parent perspectives on pediatric, non-biological RDRs. Qualitative, descriptive methods including both interviews and focus groups were used. Purposive sampling of adult participants in two provincial birth cohorts yielded 19 interviewees and 18 focus group participants (4 groups). Transcripts were analyzed by thematic content analysis. Parent research participants strongly supported the sharing of their own, and their child's, non-biological research data. Four themes emerged: that altruism has limits, that participants have ongoing privacy concerns, that some participants need the assurance of congruent values between themselves and researchers/research questions, and that opinions diverge for some governance issues. The establishment of RDRs is important and maximizes participants', researchers', and funders' investments. Participants as data donors have concerns relating to privacy, relationships, and governance that must be considered in RDR development. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Impact of resident duty hour limits on safety in the intensive care unit: a national survey of pediatric and neonatal intensivists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typpo, Katri V; Tcharmtchi, M Hossein; Thomas, Eric J; Kelly, P Adam; Castillo, Leticia D; Singh, Hardeep

    2012-09-01

    Resident duty-hour regulations potentially shift the workload from resident to attending physicians. We sought to understand how current or future regulatory changes might impact safety in academic pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. Web-based survey. U.S. academic pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. Attending pediatric and neonatal intensivists. We evaluated perceptions on four intensive care unit safety-related risk measures potentially affected by current duty-hour regulations: 1) attending physician and resident fatigue; 2) attending physician workload; 3) errors (self-reported rates by attending physicians or perceived resident error rates); and 4) safety culture. We also evaluated perceptions of how these risks would change with further duty-hour restrictions. We administered our survey between February and April 2010 to 688 eligible physicians, of whom 360 (52.3%) responded. Most believed that resident error rates were unchanged or worse (91.9%) and safety culture was unchanged or worse (84.4%) with current duty-hour regulations. Of respondents, 61.9% believed their own work-hours providing direct patient care increased and 55.8% believed they were more fatigued while providing direct patient care. Most (85.3%) perceived no increase in their own error rates currently, but in the scenario of further reduction in resident duty-hours, over half (53.3%) believed that safety culture would worsen and a significant proportion (40.3%) believed that their own error rates would increase. Pediatric intensivists do not perceive improved patient safety from current resident duty-hour restrictions. Policies to further restrict resident duty-hours should consider unintended consequences of worsening certain aspects of intensive care unit safety.

  6. Preliminary Study of Neurodevelopmental Outcomes and Parenting Stress in Pediatric Mitochondrial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Soyong; Lee, Young-Mock

    2017-06-01

    Little is known regarding the neuropsychological profiles of pediatric patients with mitochondrial diseases or their parents, information that is crucial for improving the quality of life (QOL) for both patients and parents. We aimed to delineate neurodevelopment and psychological comorbidity in children with mitochondrial diseases in the preliminary investigation of adequate intervention methods, better prognoses, and improved QOL for both patients and parents. Seventy children diagnosed with mitochondrial diseases were neuropsychologically evaluated. Neurocognitive (development, intelligence) and psychological (behavior, daily living function, maternal depression, parenting stress) functions were analyzed. Clinical variables, including the first symptom, epileptic classification, organ involvement, lactic acidosis, brain magnetic resonance imaging findings, muscle pathology, biochemical enzyme assay results, and syndromic diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases, were also reviewed. Prediagnostic assessments indicated that cognitive and psychomotor developments were significantly delayed. Group mean full scale intelligence quotient (IQ) scores indicated mild levels of intellectual disability, borderline levels of verbal IQ impairment, and mild levels of intellectual disability on performance IQ. Many children exhibited clinically significant levels of behavioral problems, whereas mothers of children with mitochondrial diseases exhibited significant increases in parenting stress relative to mothers of healthy children. Furthermore, 65% of mothers exhibited significant levels of depression. Early onset of the first symptoms, diffuse brain atrophy, and drug-resistant epilepsy negatively influenced neurodevelopmental and adaptive functions. Better understanding of the functional levels and profiles of neurodevelopment and psychological comorbidity in children with mitochondrial diseases in the prediagnostic period is essential for adequate support and QOL of children with

  7. Parental risk factors for the development of pediatric acute and chronic postsurgical pain: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagé MG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available M Gabrielle Pagé,1 Fiona Campbell,2,3 Lisa Isaac,2,3 Jennifer Stinson,2,4 Joel Katz1,3,5 1Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Department of Anesthesia, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 4Lawrence S Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Department of Psychology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: The goal of this longitudinal study was to examine the associations among psychological factors and pain reports of children and their parents over the 12 month period after pediatric surgery. Materials and methods: Included in the study were 83 children aged 8–18 years undergoing major surgery. In each case, the child and one of their parents completed measures of pain intensity and unpleasantness, psychological function, and functional disability at 48–72 hours, 2 weeks (child only, 6 months, and 12 months after surgery. Results: The strength of the correlation coefficients between the psychological measures of the parent and their child increased significantly over time. There was a fair level of agreement between parent ratings of child acute and chronic pain (6 months after surgery and the child's actual ratings. Parent and child pain anxiety scores 48–72 hours after surgery interacted significantly to predict pain intensity, pain unpleasantness, and functional disability levels 2 weeks after discharge from hospital. Parent pain catastrophizing scores 48–72 hours after surgery predicted child pain intensity reports 12 months later. Conclusion: These results raise the possibility that as time from surgery increases, parents exert greater and greater influence over the pain response of their children, so that by 12 months postsurgery mark, parent pain catastrophizing (measured in the days after surgery is the

  8. Inpatient Nursing and Parental Comfort in Managing Pediatric Tracheostomy Care and Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Cedric V; Foster Rietz, Melissa; Ray, Amrita; Brenner, Michael J; Brown, David

    2016-02-01

    Tracheostomy is a critical and often life-saving intervention, but associated risks are not negligible. The vulnerability of the pediatric population underlies the importance of caregiver comfort and competence in tracheostomy care. To assess inpatient nursing staff and parental perspectives in managing tracheostomy care. Cross-sectional analysis of survey data from (1) a volunteer sample of inpatient nurses in a tertiary care, freestanding pediatric hospital in the Midwest, assigned to clinical wards that provide care for children with tracheostomy tubes and (2) a consecutive sample of families whose child underwent tracheostomy tube placement at the same institution between March 1 and December 31, 2013. Nurse and parental comfort in managing acute and established tracheostomy tubes. Nursing data were analyzed with attention to years' experience and primary unit of practice. Respondents included 129 of 820 nurses (16% response rate) and family members of 19 of 38 children (50% response rate). When queried about changing established tracheostomies, 59 of 128 nurses (46%) reported being "totally comfortable," including 46 of 82 intensive care unit (ICU) nurses (56%) vs 13 of 46 floor nurses (28%) (P = .002) and 48 of 80 nurses with at least 5 years' experience (60%) vs 12 of 49 less experienced nurses (24%) (P tracheostomy, 61 nurses (47%) described being completely uncomfortable, including 27 of 83 ICU nurses (33%) vs 34 of 46 floor nurses (73%) (P = .006), and 33 of 80 nurses with at least 5 years' experience (41% ) vs 28 of 49 less experienced nurses (57%) (P = .03). Most families felt prepared for discharge (16 of 17 [94%]) and found the health care team accessible (16 of 17 [94%]), although only 5 of 18 families (28%) indicated that tracheostomy teaching was consistent. Nurses' comfort with tracheostomy was higher among nurses with at least 5 years' experience and primary ICU location. Whereas parental comfort with tracheostomy care was high

  9. Managing medical equipment used by technology-dependent children: evaluation of an instructional tool for pediatric residents and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jennifer M; Radulovic, Andrea; Nageswaran, Savithri

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a workshop on managing medical devices used in technology-dependent children. Study participants included residents and medical students rotating in the pediatrics department at the time of the study. A workshop was conducted consisting of learning stations for common medical devices, including brief presentations and opportunities for hands-on practice with each device. Participants completed surveys before and after the workshop assessing their perceived ability to manage medical equipment before and after the workshop and their ongoing learning needs. All participants indicated a substantial need for training on how to manage medical devices used by technology-dependent patients. Scores for perceived ability to manage the devices improved significantly after workshop participation for nearly all devices taught. Medical trainees have significant learning needs for managing devices used by technology-dependent patients. Hands-on, small-group training can be an effective instructional tool for improving confidence in these skills.

  10. Quality of life among pediatric patients with cancer: Contributions of time since diagnosis and parental chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamner, Taralee; Latzman, Robert D; Latzman, Natasha E; Elkin, T David; Majumdar, Suvankar

    2015-07-01

    Pediatric cancer is associated with a host of negative psychosocial consequences; however, outcomes vary extensively suggesting a need to better understand this variation. Empirical research suggests a positive association between time since diagnosis (TSD) and Quality of Life (QoL). In addition to TSD, family stressors have been found to be particularly important in predicting QoL among children. The current study examined parental chronic stress beyond TSD in explanation of QoL functioning among a sample of pediatric patients with cancer. Participants included 43 pediatric patients aged 5-18 years (M(age) = 10.2 ± 3.6) who were undergoing oncological treatment. Parents reported on TSD, child's QoL, and their own chronic stress. TSD was associated with greater physical functioning (r = 0.30, P stress was associated with poorer emotional (r = -0.54, P stress contributed incrementally beyond TSD in the explanation of physical (β = -0.37, t = -2.58, P stress is associated with reduced levels of emotional, physical, and social functioning among pediatric patients. Future research is needed to further investigate the process by which chronic stress within the family interferes with adaptive coping among pediatric patients. In addition, clinical services may benefit from increased consideration of family factors, such as parental chronic stress, during oncological treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Differential Impact of Clerk Interest and Participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clerkship Rotation upon Psychiatry and Pediatrics Residency Matches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D.; Szatmari, Peter; Eva, Kevin W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated the differential impact of clerk interest and participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) clerkship rotation upon psychiatry and pediatrics residency matches. Method: Authors studied clerks from the McMaster University M.D. program graduating years of 2005-2007. Participants were categorized as 1)…

  12. Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  13. Pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasheed, Shabana; Teo, Harvey James Eu Leong; Littooij, Annemieke Simone

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of pediatric patients involves many diverse modalities, including radiography, ultrasound imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic and angiographic studies. It is therefore important to be aware of potential pitfalls that may be related to these modalities

  14. Predictors of parent post-traumatic stress symptoms after child hospitalization on general pediatric wards: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Linda S; Wray, Jo; Gay, Caryl; Dearmun, Annette K; Lee, Kirsty; Cooper, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of parental post-traumatic stress symptoms following child hospitalization. In this prospective cohort study, a sample of 107 parents completed questionnaires during their child's hospitalization on pediatric (non-intensive care) wards and again three months after discharge. Eligible parents had a child expected to be hospitalized for three or more nights. Standardized questionnaires were used to assess parent distress during the child's hospitalization, parent coping strategies and resources, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress after the hospitalization. Correlations and multiple regressions were used to determine whether parent distress during hospitalization and coping strategies and resources predicted post-traumatic stress symptoms three months after the child's discharge, while controlling for relevant covariates. Three months after the child's hospital discharge, 32.7% of parents (n=35) reported some degree of post-traumatic stress symptoms, and 21.5% (n=23) had elevated (≥34) scores consistent with a probable diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder. In the multivariable model, parent anxiety and uncertainty during hospitalization and use of negative coping strategies, such as denial, venting and self-blame, were associated with higher post-traumatic stress symptoms scores at three months post-discharge, even after controlling for the child's health status. Parental anxiety and depression during hospitalization moderated the relationship between negative coping strategies and post-traumatic stress symptoms. More than one quarter of parents of children hospitalized on pediatric (non-intensive care) wards experienced significant post-traumatic stress symptoms after their child's discharge. Parents' hospital-related anxiety, uncertainty and use of negative coping strategies are potentially modifiable factors that most strongly influenced post-traumatic stress symptoms. Further research is urgently needed

  15. Compliance of Parenting Magazines Advertisements with American Academy of Pediatrics Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Michael B; Berger, Jennifer N; Sheehan, Karen M

    2016-11-01

    This study examined 3218 advertisements from the two parenting magazines with highest circulation in the United States. The authors compared each advertisement for a product for use by children, against all the published recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) on topics such as toy safety, helmet use, age-defined choking hazards, infant sleep safety, and others. Any advertisement with images or products which went against a published AAP recommendation was deemed as non-adherence and was categorized according to the statement it contradicted. Nearly one in six (15.7%) of the advertisements contained example(s) of non-adherence to AAP recommendations, with twelve categories of offense represented. Categories ranked by overall share from most to least include: non-Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medical treatments, age-defined choking hazards, vitamins, cold medicine, formula, oral care, screen time, toy/playground safety, infant sleep, nutrition, water safety, and fall risk. Given that repeated exposure to messages in advertisements has been associated with changes in health decision-making, and parents often turn to parenting magazines for advice and ideas regarding their children, the publishers might consider screening the content in order to prevent confusing and potentially dangerous messages from being disseminated in the media.

  16. Compliance of Parenting Magazines Advertisements with American Academy of Pediatrics Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Michael B.; Berger, Jennifer N.; Sheehan, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined 3218 advertisements from the two parenting magazines with highest circulation in the United States. The authors compared each advertisement for a product for use by children, against all the published recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) on topics such as toy safety, helmet use, age-defined choking hazards, infant sleep safety, and others. Any advertisement with images or products which went against a published AAP recommendation was deemed as non-adherence and was categorized according to the statement it contradicted. Nearly one in six (15.7%) of the advertisements contained example(s) of non-adherence to AAP recommendations, with twelve categories of offense represented. Categories ranked by overall share from most to least include: non-Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medical treatments, age-defined choking hazards, vitamins, cold medicine, formula, oral care, screen time, toy/playground safety, infant sleep, nutrition, water safety, and fall risk. Given that repeated exposure to messages in advertisements has been associated with changes in health decision-making, and parents often turn to parenting magazines for advice and ideas regarding their children, the publishers might consider screening the content in order to prevent confusing and potentially dangerous messages from being disseminated in the media. PMID:27809284

  17. Accounting for medical communication: parents' perceptions of communicative roles and responsibilities in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Cynthia; Barton, Ellen; Meert, Kathleen L; Eggly, Susan; Pollacks, Murray; Zimmerman, Jerry; Anand, K J S; Carcillo, Joseph; Newth, Christopher J L; Dean, J Michael; Willson, Douglas F; Nicholson, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Through discourse analysis of transcribed interviews conducted over the phone with parents whose child died in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) (n = 51), this study uncovers parents' perceptions of clinicians' and their own communicative roles and responsibilities in the context of team-based care. We examine parents' descriptions and narratives of communicative experiences they had with PICU clinicians, focusing on how parents use accounts to evaluate the communicative behaviors they report (n = 47). Findings indicate that parental perceptions of communicative responsibilities are more nuanced than assumed in previous research: Parents identified their own responsibilities as participating as part of the team of care, gathering information, interacting with appropriate affect, and working to understand complex and uncertain medical information. Complementarily, parents identified clinician responsibilities as communicating professionally, providing medical information clearly, managing parents' hope responsibly, and communicating with appropriate affect. Through the accounts they provide, parents evaluate both parental and clinician role-responsibilities as fulfilled and unfulfilled. Clinicians' management of prognostic uncertainty and parents' struggles to understand that uncertainty emerged as key, complementary themes with practical implications for incorporating parents into the PICU care team. The study also highlights insights retrospective interview data bring to the examination of medical communication.

  18. Taiwanese parents' experience of making a "do not resuscitate" decision for their child in pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Mei; Lin, Hung-Ru; Lu, Frank L; Lee, Tzu-Ying

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore the parental experience of making a "do not resuscitate" (DNR) decision for their child who is or was cared for in a pediatric intensive care unit in Taiwan. A descriptive qualitative study was conducted following parental signing of a standard hospital DNR form on behalf of their critically ill child. Sixteen Taiwanese parents of 11 children aged 1 month to 18 years were interviewed. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, analyzed and sorted into themes by the sole interviewer plus other researchers. Three major themes were identified: (a) "convincing points to sign", (b) "feelings immediately after signing", and (c) "post-signing relief or regret". Feelings following signing the DNR form were mixed and included "frustration", "guilt", and "conflicting hope". Parents adjusted their attitudes to thoughts such as "I have done my best," and "the child's life is beyond my control." Some parents whose child had died before the time of the interview expressed among other things "regret not having enough time to be with and talk to my child". Open family visiting hours plus staff sensitivity and communication skills training are needed. To help parents with this difficult signing process, nurses and other professionals in the pediatric intensive care unit need education on initiating the conversation, guiding the parents in expressing their fears, and providing continuing support to parents and children throughout the child's end of life process. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Familiarity with Long-acting Reversible Contraceptives among Obstetrics and Gynecology, Family Medicine, and Pediatrics Residents: Results of a 2015 National Survey and Implications for Contraceptive Provision for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Susan A; Braykov, Nikolay P; Lathrop, Eva; Haddad, Lisa B

    2018-02-01

    To assess familiarity with long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) among current obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN), family medicine (FM), and pediatrics senior residents in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We selected 156 OB/GYN, FM, and pediatrics residency programs using the American Medical Association Freida database. Senior residents completed a survey addressing any training they had received on LARC, and rated their comfort level counseling about and inserting LARC. Residents rated their likelihood of recommending LARC to an adolescent, nulliparous patient, and indicated whether they would like additional training on LARC. Descriptive and analytic statistics were generated using R statistical software (The R Project for Statistical Computing; https://www.r-project.org). The survey was completed by 326 of 1,583 residents (20.6% response rate); at least 1 resident completed the survey at 105 (67.3%) of the residency programs contacted. Most programs (84.8%) provided some training on LARC. Residents in OB/GYN programs were comfortable counseling about and inserting contraceptive implants (97%, 83%), copper intrauterine devices (IUDs; 100%, 86%), and levonorgestrel (LNG) IUDs (100%, 86%). In FM programs, fewer residents were comfortable counseling about and inserting contraceptive implants (71%, 47%), copper IUDs (68%, 21%), and LNG IUDs (79%, 18%). Residents in pediatrics programs had low comfort levels counseling about contraceptive implants (14%), copper IUDs (14%), and LNG IUDs (25%); no pediatrics residents were comfortable inserting LARC. OB/GYN residents were significantly more likely to recommend a LARC to an adolescent, nulliparous patient (P = .019). Most pediatric and FM residents desired additional training on LARC (82.7% and 60.7%, respectively). This study shows that knowledge gaps exist regarding LARC among FM and pediatrics residents. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for

  20. Exploring the relationship between parental worry about their children's health and usage of an internet intervention for pediatric encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Joshua C; Ritterband, Lee M; Thorndike, Frances P; Cox, Daniel J; Borowitz, Stephen M

    2009-06-01

    To investigate whether parental worry about their children's health predicts usage of a pediatric Internet intervention for encopresis. Thirty-nine families with a child diagnosed with encopresis completed a national clinical trial of an Internet-based intervention for encopresis (www.ucanpooptoo.com). Parents rated worry about their children's health, encopresis severity, current parent treatment for depression, and parent comfort with the Internet. Usage indicators were collected while participants utilized the intervention. Regression analyses showed that parents who reported higher baseline levels of worry about their children's health showed greater subsequent intervention use (beta =.52, p =.002), even after accounting for other plausible predictors. Exploratory analyses indicated that this effect may be stronger for families with younger children. Characteristics of individuals using Internet-based treatment programs, such as parental worry about their children's health, can influence intervention usage, and should be considered by developers of Internet interventions.

  1. Watchful Waiting for Cases of Pediatric Otitis Media: Modeling Parental Response to Physician Advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGeorge, Erina L; Smith, Rachel A; Caldes, Emily P; Hackman, Nicole M

    2016-08-01

    Watchful waiting (WW) can reduce unnecessary antibiotic use in the treatment of pediatric otitis media (ear infection), but its utility is impaired by underutilization and noncompliance. Guided by advice response theory, the current study proposes advantage and capacity as factors that predict how caregivers evaluate and respond affectively to WW. Parents (N = 373) of at least 1 child age 5 years or younger completed questionnaires that assessed responses to hypothetical WW advice for their youngest child. Perceptions of advantage from WW and the capacity to monitor and manage symptoms predicted advice quality, physician trust, and future compliance both directly and indirectly through negative affect. The findings suggest the elaboration of advice response theory to include more aspects of advice content evaluation (e.g., advantage) and the influence of negative affect. The study also provides practical guidance for physicians seeking to improve caregiver reception of WW advice.

  2. Functional priorities reported by parents of children with cerebral palsy: contribution to the pediatric rehabilitation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina B. Brandão

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Collaborative actions between family and therapist are essential to the rehabilitation process, and they can be a catalyst mechanism to the positive outcomes in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Objectives: To describe functional priorities established by caregivers of CP children by level of severity and age, and to assess changes on performance and satisfaction on functional priorities reported by caregivers, in 6-month interval. Method: 75 CP children, weekly assisted at Associação Mineira de Reabilitação, on physical and occupational therapy services. The following information was collected: gross motor function (Gross Motor Function Classification System-GMFCS and functional priorities established by caregivers (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure-COPM. Data were collected in two moments, with a 6-month interval. Results: The main functional demands presented by caregivers were related to self-care activities (48.2%. Parents of children with severe motor impairment (GMFCS V pointed higher number of demands related to play (p=0.0036, compared to the other severity levels. Parents of younger children reported higher number of demands in mobility (p=0.025 and play (p=0.007, compared to other age groups. After 6 months, there were significant increase on COPM performance (p=0.0001 and satisfaction scores (p=0.0001. Conclusions: Parents of CP children identified functional priorities in similar performance domains, by level of severity and age. Orienting the pediatric rehabilitation process to promote changes in functional priorities indentified by caregivers can contribute to the reinforcement of the parent-therapist collaboration.

  3. Parental attitudes toward pediatric use of complementary/alternative medicine in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustuner Top, Fadime; Konuk Sener, Dilek; Cangur, Sengul

    2017-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the pediatric usage of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) by parents in Turkey, the incidence of using these methods, and the factors affecting their use. The sectional and relational design of the study included a sample of 497 parents who took children for treatment at the Maternity and Children's Hospital in Giresun, Turkey. Data for the study were collected via the Personal Information Form and the Evaluation Form for Complementary/Alternative Treatment Use. The data collection tools were filled out by the researchers during the face-to-face interviews. Data obtained from the study were analyzed by Pearson chi-square, Fisher-Freeman-Halton and Fisher's exact (posthoc Bonferroni) tests and Z-test. It was determined that 97.7% of the parents had used at least one CAM method. Moreover, the parents had used CAM methods mostly for respiratory complaints. The CAM methods were most commonly used for the symptoms of fever, diarrhea, and cough. It was observed that the most commonly used alternative methods in the past were vitamin/mineral remedies, cold treatments, and hodja (Islamic teacher) consultations, while the most common alternative methods currently used are massage, music, and cold treatment. In addition, the differences found between CAM users in terms of sociodemographic characteristics were not statistically significant. It is crucial for nurses to learn the characteristics of the health/disease treatments used by those with whom they work in order to increase the efficiency of the service they provide. Thus, it was recommended that nurses should be knowledgeable and aware of the benefits/side effects, treatment methods, and contraindications of CAM. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. "What about FH of my child?" parents' opinion on family history collection in preventive primary pediatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syurina, Elena V; Gerritsen, Anne-Marie Jm; Hens, Kristien; Feron, Frans Jm

    2015-08-01

    Family history (FH) in Preventive Primary Pediatric Care is to identify children at risk for complex diseases and provide personal preventive strategies. This study was to assess parents' opinion on FH collection. Semi-structured interviews were conducted. Among issues addressed were: former experiences with FH, knowledge about FH, family definition and sharing information about FH. The importance of FH for participants depended on their knowledge, perceived family health status and former experiences. After insight into FH, parents shift to believing it to be important, but certain barriers exist in reporting FH. Parents suggest that the importance of FH should be more emphasized and more trusting relationship with Preventive Primary Pediatric Care should be invested in.

  5. "Hope for the best, prepare for the worst": A qualitative interview study on parents' needs and fears in pediatric advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Julia Desiree; Daxer, Marion; Jox, Ralf J; Borasio, Gian Domenico; Führer, Monika

    2017-09-01

    Pediatric advance care planning is advocated by healthcare providers because it may increase the chance that patient and/or parent wishes are respected and thus improve end-of-life care. However, since end-of-life decisions for children are particularly difficult and charged with emotions, physicians are often afraid of addressing pediatric advance care planning. We aimed to investigate parents' views and needs regarding pediatric advance care planning. We performed a qualitative interview study with parents of children who had died from a severe illness. The interviews were analyzed by descriptive and evaluation coding according to Saldaña. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 11 parents of 9 children. Maximum variation was sought regarding the child's illness, age at death, care setting, and parent gender. Parents find it difficult to engage in pediatric advance care planning but consider it important. They argue for a sensitive, individualized, and gradual approach. Hope and quality of life issues are primary. Parents have many non-medical concerns that they want to discuss. Written advance directives are considered less important, but medical emergency plans are viewed as necessary in particular cases. Continuity of care and information should be improved through regular pediatric advance care planning meetings with the various care providers. Parents emphasize the importance of a continuous contact person to facilitate pediatric advance care planning. Despite a need for pediatric advance care planning, it is perceived as challenging. Needs-adjusted content and process and continuity of communication should be a main focus in pediatric advance care planning. Future research should focus on strategies that facilitate parent engagement in pediatric advance care planning to increase the benefit for the families.

  6. Fear of Progression in Parents of Children with Cancer: Results of An Online Expert Survey in Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clever, Katharina; Schepper, Florian; Küpper, Luise; Christiansen, Holger; Martini, Julia

    2018-04-01

    Fear of Progression (FoP) is a commonly reported psychological strain in parents of children with cancer. This expert survey investigates how professionals in pediatric oncology estimate the burden and consequences of FoP in parents and how they assess and treat parental FoP. N=77 professionals in pediatric oncology (members and associates of the Psychosocial Association in Paediatric Oncology and Haematology, PSAPOH) were examined in an online survey with a self-developed questionnaire. Data were analyzed via descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis. Three of four experts in clinical practice were (very) often confronted with parental FoP which was associated with more negative (e. g., psychosomatic reactions, reduced family functioning) than positive (e. g., active illness processing) consequences. N=40 experts indicated that they mainly assess parents' anxiety via clinical judgment (72.5%) and/or according to ICD-10/DSM-5 diagnostic criteria (37.5%), whereas standardized methods such as psycho-oncological questionnaires (12.5%) were applied less often. Only n=6 experts named a specific diagnostic approach to assess parental FoP. The most common treatment approaches for FoP were supportive counseling (74.0%), psychotherapy (59.7%) and/or relaxation techniques (55.8%). Parental FoP is frequently perceived by experts in clinical practice. A standardized diagnostic procedure would increase comparability of diagnostic judgments and harmonize treatment indications. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. How parents of children receiving pediatric palliative care use religion, spirituality, or life philosophy in tough times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexem, Kari R; Mollen, Cynthia J; Carroll, Karen; Lanctot, Dexter A; Feudtner, Chris

    2011-01-01

    How parents of children with life threatening conditions draw upon religion, spirituality, or life philosophy is not empirically well described. Participants were parents of children who had enrolled in a prospective cohort study on parental decision-making for children receiving pediatric palliative care. Sixty-four (88%) of the 73 parents interviewed were asked an open-ended question on how religion, spirituality, or life philosophy (RSLP) was helpful in difficult times. Responses were coded and thematically organized utilizing qualitative data analysis methods. Any discrepancies amongst coders regarding codes or themes were resolved through discussion that reached consensus. Most parents of children receiving palliative care felt that RSLP was important in helping them deal with tough times, and most parents reported either participation in formal religious communities, or a sense of personal spirituality. A minority of parents, however, did not wish to discuss the topic at all. For those who described their RSLP, their beliefs and practices were associated with qualities of their overall outlook on life, questions of goodness and human capacity, or that "everything happens for a reason." RSLP was also important in defining the child's value and beliefs about the child's afterlife. Prayer and reading the bible were important spiritual practices in this population, and parents felt that these practices influenced their perspectives on the medical circumstances and decision-making, and their locus of control. From religious participation and practices, parents felt they received support from both their spiritual communities and from God, peace and comfort, and moral guidance. Some parents, however, also reported questioning their faith, feelings of anger and blame towards God, and rejecting religious beliefs or communities. RSLP play a diverse and important role in the lives of most, but not all, parents whose children are receiving pediatric palliative care.

  8. Using Intervention Mapping to develop the Parents as Agents of Change (PAC©) intervention for managing pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Geoff D C; Mushquash, Aislin R; Keaschuk, Rachel A; Ambler, Kathryn A; Newton, Amanda S

    2017-01-13

    Pediatric obesity has become increasingly prevalent over recent decades. In view of the psychosocial and physical health risks, and the high likelihood that children with obesity will grow to become adults with obesity, there is a clear need to develop evidence-based interventions that can be delivered in the health care system to optimize the health and well-being of children with obesity and their families. The aim of this paper is to describe the development, implementation, and planned evaluation of a parent-based weight management intervention designed for parents of 8-12 year olds with obesity. The principles of Intervention Mapping (IM) were used to develop an intervention called Parents as Agents of Change (PAC © ). From 2006 to 2009, an environmental scan plus qualitative (individual interviews with parents and children), quantitative (medical record reviews), and literature review data were collected to gain broad insight into family factors related to pediatric obesity and its management. Theoretical frameworks and empirical evidence guided curriculum development, which was founded primarily on the tenets of family systems theory and cognitive behavioral theory. PAC was developed as a manualized, 16-session, group-based, health care professional-led intervention for parents to address individual, family, and environmental factors related to the management of pediatric obesity. The intervention was refined based on feedback from local and international experts, and has been implemented successfully in a multi-disciplinary weight management centre in a children's hospital. IM provided a practical framework to guide the systematic development of a pediatric weight management intervention for parents of children with obesity. This logical, step-by-step process blends theory and practice and is broadly applicable in the context of obesity management intervention development and evaluation. Following intervention development, the PAC intervention was

  9. The moral landscape of pediatric oncology: an empirical study on best interests, parental authority and child participation in decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Vries, Martine Charlotte de

    2012-01-01

    Few medical specialties encounter so many ethical challenges as pediatrics does. It is a specialty that inherently has features that are morally charged. Pediatric ethics examines the broad issues of (1) the concept of the child’s best interest; (2) parental responsibility and authority in decision-making about the life and health of a child; (3) the emerging desire and capacity for self-determination of an older child, and (4) the professional obligation of a pediatrician to act in the best ...

  10. Evaluating Parents' Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Management in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noser, Amy E; Patton, Susana R; Van Allen, Jason; Nelson, Michael B; Clements, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    To examine the factor structure and construct validity of the Maternal Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Management Scale (MSED) in 135 youth ( Mage  = 13.50  ±  1.83 years), with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The study used exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to examine the factor structure and correlations to examine relationships among MSED factors and select parent and child diabetes-related health behaviors and outcomes. EFA identified an 11-item three-factor solution (χ 2 (25, n  = 133)  = 40.22, p  manage their child's diabetes (MSED-M), problem-solve issues surrounding glycemic control (MSED-P), and teach their child about diabetes care (MSED-T). Correlational analyses revealed significant associations between the MSED-M and MSED-T and parent-reported optimism and youth's diabetes-specific self-efficacy. The MSED-T was also associated with glycated hemoglobin and self-monitoring blood glucose. Results provide preliminary evidence for the reliability and validity of a three-factor solution of the MSED. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Association of Parental Overweight and Cardiometabolic Diseases and Pediatric Adiposity and Lifestyle Factors with Cardiovascular Risk Factor Clustering in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ying Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiometabolic risk factors or their precursors are observed in childhood and may continue into adulthood. We investigated the effects of parental overweight and cardiometabolic diseases and pediatric lifestyle factors on the clustering of cardiovascular risk factors among adolescents, and examined the mediating and modifying effects of pediatric adiposity on these associations. Representative adolescents (n = 2727; age, 12–16 years were randomly recruited through multistage stratified sampling from 36 schools in Southern Taiwan. Adolescent and parent surveys were conducted in schools and participant homes, respectively. Their demographic factors, diet patterns, and physical, anthropometric, and clinical parameters were collected and analyzed. Adolescents with 1–2 and ≥3 risk components for pediatric metabolic syndrome (MetS were defined as potential MetS (pot-MetS and MetS, respectively. Adolescents whose parents were overweight/obese, or with diabetes and hypertension had a higher prevalence ratio of pot-MetS and MetS (1.5–1.6 and 1.9–4.2-fold, respectively. Low physical activity (<952.4 MET·min/week, long screen time (≥3 h/day and high sugar-sweetened beverage intake (>500 mL/day were associated with a 3.3- (95% confidence intervals (CI = 1.5–7.3, 2.2- (95% CI = 1.1–4.4, and 26.9-fold (95% CI = 3.2–229.0 odds ratio (OR of MetS, respectively. Pediatric body mass index (BMI accounted for 18.8%–95.6% and 16.9%–60.3% increased prevalence ratios of these parental and pediatric risk factors for MetS. The OR of pot-MetS + MetS for sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was multiplicatively enhanced among adolescents with overweight/obesity (combined OR, 8.6-fold (95% CI = 4.3–17.3; p for multiplicative interaction, 0.009. The results suggest that parental overweight and cardiometabolic diseases and pediatric sedentary and high sugar-intake lifestyles correlate with the development of adolescent MetS, and an elevated child BMI

  12. Fertility preservation in the male pediatric population: factors influencing the decision of parents and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyns, C; Collienne, C; Shenfield, F; Robert, A; Laurent, P; Roegiers, L; Brichard, B

    2015-09-01

    How can the decision process for fertility preservation (FP) in adolescents and prepubertal boys be improved based on patient and parent feelings about FP counseling? The content of information given to patients and parents and hope for future parenthood appeared to positively impact on the decision to preserve fertility in the pediatric population and, therefore, deserves special attention to improve FP care. A vast body of literature on adult cancer patients shows that reproductive capacity is a major quality-of-life issue. Patients also have a strong desire to be informed of available FP options with a view to future parenthood of their own genetic child, considering that parents were able to make an informed and voluntary decision for their prepubertal sons despite the heavy emotional burden at the time of diagnosis, there is so far very limited information on patient expectations regarding FP. A lack of awareness often equates to suboptimal care by oncologists and FP specialists, and poor access to FP, therefore improving knowledge and identifying the expectations of pediatric patients and their parents are crucial for optimizing multidisciplinary collaborative care pathways (MCCPs), including counseling and access to FP methods, in the youngest population. A questionnaire survey was posted to an eligible population between May 2005 and May 2013. A total of 348 prepubertal boys and adolescents aged 0-18 years, diagnosed with cancer in a university hospital setting, were eligible. Three different questionnaires for two age groups of children (parents were established based on information from focus groups. Questions were subsequently reviewed by the institutional ethics board before being sent. Of the 348 eligible patients, 44 died and 14 were lost to follow-up. Thus, 290 patients (77 aged 12-18 years and 213 aged questionnaire. In total, 120 questionnaires were recovered, 45.5% (n = 35/77) from adolescents and 39.9% (n = 85/213) from children. FP acceptance

  13. How can we cooperate better? The determinants of conflict solving competence in Polish pediatric nurses’ relations with parents of hospitalized children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Chrzan-Dętkoś

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Our pilot study carried out at two Polish pediatric hospital departments revealed that conflicts with parents of hospitalized children represent the main concern of pediatric nurses. The aim of this study was to examine factors determining the conflict solving competence in pediatric nurses in order to develop effective communication training programs for pediatric ward staff. Participants and procedure A total of 78 pediatric nurses completed measures of occupational and perceived stress, conflict modes and competence in solving conflicts with parents of hospitalized children. Results The key factor influencing conflict solving competence was the level of perceived stress and supervisor support. Conclusions Systemic supervised activities aimed at reducing the level of stress, e.g. Balint groups or reflective supervision, could be helpful in mastering the conflict solving competences. Also a paradigm shift from the individual patient to his/her family considered as a patient could potentially improve nurse-parent relations.

  14. Comparison of pediatric self reports and parent proxy reports utilizing PROMIS: Results from a chiropractic practice-based research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Joel; Ohm, Jeanne; Alcantara, Junjoe

    2017-11-01

    To measure the cross-informant variant of pediatric quality of life (QoL) based on self-reports and parent proxy measures. A secondary analysis of baseline data obtained from two independent studies measuring the QoL based on the pediatric PROMIS-25 self-report and the PROMIS parent-proxy items banks. A scoring manual associated raw scores to a T score metric (mean = 50; SD = 10). Reliability of QoL ratings utilized the ICC while comparison of mean T Scores utilized the unpaired t-test. A total of 289 parent-child dyads comprised our study responders. Average age for parents and children was 41.27 years and 12.52 years, respectively. The mean T score (child self-report: parent proxy) for each QoL domains were: mobility (50.82:52.58), anxiety (46.73:44.21), depression (45.18:43.60), fatigue (45.59:43.92), peer-relationships (52.15:52.88) and pain interference (47.47:44.80). Parents tend to over-estimate their child's QoL based on measures of anxiety, depression, fatigue, peer-relationships and pain interference. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. The Bereaved Parent Needs Assessment: a new instrument to assess the needs of parents whose children died in the pediatric intensive care unit*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Kathleen L; Templin, Thomas N; Michelson, Kelly N; Morrison, Wynne E; Hackbarth, Richard; Custer, Joseph R; Schim, Stephanie M; Briller, Sherylyn H; Thurston, Celia S

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the reliability and validity of the Bereaved Parent Needs Assessment, a new instrument to measure parents' needs and need fulfillment around the time of their child's death in the pediatric intensive care unit. We hypothesized that need fulfillment would be negatively related to complicated grief and positively related to quality of life during bereavement. Cross-sectional survey. Five U.S. children's hospital pediatric intensive care units. Parents (n = 121) bereaved in a pediatric intensive care unit 6 months earlier. Surveys included the 68-item Bereaved Parent Needs Assessment, the Inventory of Complicated Grief, and the abbreviated version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. Each Bereaved Parent Needs Assessment item described a potential need and was rated on two scales: 1) a 5-point rating of importance (1 = not at all important, 5 = very important) and 2) a 5-point rating of fulfillment (1 = not at all met, 5 = completely met). Three composite scales were computed: 1) total importance (percentage of all needs rated ≥4 for importance), 2) total fulfillment (percentage of all needs rated ≥4 for fulfillment), and 3) percent fulfillment (percentage of important needs that were fulfilled). Internal consistency reliability was assessed by Cronbach's α and Spearman-Brown-corrected split-half reliability. Generalized estimating equations were used to test predictions between composite scales and the Inventory of Complicated Grief and World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. Two items had mean importance ratings 4. Reliability of composite scores ranged from 0.92 to 0.94. Total fulfillment was negatively correlated with Inventory of Complicated Grief (r = -.29; p Quality of Life questionnaire (r = .21; p education, and loss of an only child, percent fulfillment remained significantly correlated with Inventory of Complicated Grief but not with World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. The

  16. Needs of Parents in Caring for Their Children in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama Sanabria, Mery Luz; Muñoz de Rodríguez, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    This work sought to describe the needs of parents to participate in caring for their children hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). This is a qualitative study based on the ethno-nursing research method proposed by Leininger. For data collection and analysis, in-depth open interviews were used, along with field notes and enabler guidelines proposed by Leininger: stranger-friend, observation, participation, reflexion, and the Sunrise model. Parents of children hospitalized in a PICU in the city of Tunja (Boyacá, Colombia) participated between February 2012 and October 2013. The needs of parents to care for their children were described in the following themes: clear and timely communication, familiarization with technology, the value of the family, favoring the parent-children interaction during visits, and valuing and respecting generic (folk) knowledge. The study provides knowledge, from the cultural perspective of parents with children hospitalized in PICU, as input to plan and develop care actions with them, according to their own needs.Objetivo.Describir las necesidades de padres para participar del cuidado de sus hijos hospitalizados en la Unidad de Cuidado Intensivo Pediátrico (UCIP). Métodos. Investigación cualitativa basada en el método de la etnoenfermería propuesto por Leininger. Para la recolección y análisis de la información se utilizaron la entrevista abierta a profundidad, las notas de campo y guías facilitadoras propuestas por Leininger: Extraño amigo, Observación, Participación Reflexión y el modelo del sol naciente. Participaron los padres de niños hospitalizados en una UCIP de Tunja (Boyacá, Colombia) entre febrero de 2012 y Octubre de 2013. Resultados. Se describen las necesidades de los padres para cuidar a sus hijos en los siguientes temas: Comunicación clara y oportuna, Familiarización con la Tecnología, El valor de la familia, Favorecer la interacción de padres-hijos durante la visita y Valorar y

  17. Developing the Scale for Quality of Life in Pediatric Oncology Patients Aged 13-18: Adolescent Form and Parent Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Murat; Akdeniz Kudubes, Aslı; Ugur, Ozlem; Vergin, Canan; Demirag, Bengü

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to develop the Scale for Quality of Life in Pediatric Oncology Patients Aged 13-18: Adolescent Form and Parent Form. We used the child and parent information form, Visual Quality of Life Scale, and our own scale, the Scale for Quality of Life in Pediatric Oncology Patients Aged 13-18: Adolescent Form and Parent Form. We finalized the 35-item scale to determine the items, received opinions from 14 specialists on the scale, and pilot-tested the scale in 25 children and their parents. We used Pearson correlation analysis, Cronbach α coefficient, factor analysis and receiver operating characteristics analysis to analyze the data. The total Cronbach α of the parent form was .97, the total factor load was .60-.97 and the total variance was 80.4%. The cutoff point of the parent form was 85.50. The total Cronbach α of the adolescent form was .98, the total factor load was .62-.96, and the total variance explained was 83.4%. The cutoff point of the adolescent form was 75.50. As a result of the parent form factor analysis, we determined the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin coefficient as .83, the Barlett test χ(2) as 12,615.92; the factor coefficients of all items of the parent form ranged from .63 to .98. The factor coefficients of all items of the adolescent form ranged from .34 to .99. As a result of the adolescent form factor analysis, we determined the KMO as .79, and the Barlett test χ(2) as 13,970.62. Conclusively, we found that the adolescent form and the parent form were valid and reliable in assessing the children's quality of life. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Parents' Perceived Satisfaction of Care, Communication and Environment of the Pediatric Intensive Care Units at a Tertiary Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuqamar, Maram; Arabiat, Diana H; Holmes, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify parental perceptions on pediatric intensive care-related satisfaction within three domains: environment, child's care provided and communication. In addition, it aims to identify whether parent's socio-demographics and child's clinical variables predict parents' perceived satisfaction. In this study, a total of 123 parents whose child received care in the PICU of a tertiary children's hospital in Amman completed the Arabic version of the parents satisfaction survey (PSS). A cross-sectional, descriptive-correlational design was used to collect data. All data were collected between June and October of 2013. Central tendency measures and percentages of replies for each domain revealed that at least 7 items were rated poorly satisfied. More than half of the parents were not satisfied with the noise level of the PICU, the time nurses spent at the child's bedside, as well as the way the healthcare team prepare them for the child's admission. Almost 90% of the parents believed that the nurses ignored their child's needs by not listening to parents and by responding slowly to child's needs. Stepwise regression analysis showed that that the number of hospital admissions, health insurance and the severity of illness was the main predictor of parents' satisfaction. In conclusion, the availability of health care professionals, the support and the information they share with the child's parents are all significant to parent's satisfaction and hence to better quality of care. Targeting the domains of low satisfaction reported by the parents could increase parent's satisfaction and achieve quality improvement required for this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 5-4-3-2-1 go! Coordinating pediatric resident education and community health promotion to address the obesity epidemic in children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Christiane Ellen; Necheles, Jonathan Wolf; Mayefsky, Jay Hirsh; Wright, Lydia Katherine; Rankin, Kristin Michele

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of training pediatric residents to conduct a brief clinic-based behavioral intervention in coordination with community dissemination of a health promotion message developed by the Consortium for Lowering Obesity in Chicago Children. A total of 113 residents completed a short (obesity rates: increased intake of fruits and vegetables (28% vs 16%, P < .01), increased intake of water (30% vs 19%, P < .01), increased physical activity (40% vs 29%, P < .03), and decreased television time (36% vs 24%, P < .01). Brief training using the 5-4-3-2-1-Go! message seems to be feasible and effective.

  20. Posttraumatic stress disorder in children and their parents following admission to the pediatric intensive care unit: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lara P; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate posttraumatic stress disorder in children who have been admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit and their families. Studies were identified through PubMed, MEDLINE, and Ovid. All descriptive, observational, and controlled studies with a focus on posttraumatic stress disorder and the pediatric intensive care unit were included. Posttraumatic stress disorder rates in children following admission to the pediatric intensive care unit were between 5% and 28%, while rates of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms were significantly higher, 35% to 62%. There have been inconsistencies noted across risk factors. Objective and subjective measurements of disease severity were intermittently positively associated with development of posttraumatic stress disorder. There was a positive relationship identified between the child's symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and their parents' symptoms.The biological mechanisms associated with the development of posttraumatic stress disorder in children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit have yet to be explored. Studies in children following burn or other unintentional injury demonstrate potential relationships between adrenergic hormone levels and a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder. Likewise genetic studies suggest the importance of the adrenergic system in this pathway.The rates of posttraumatic stress disorder in parents following their child's admission to the pediatric intensive care unit ranged between 10.5% and 21%, with symptom rates approaching 84%. It has been suggested that mothers are at increased risk for the development of posttraumatic stress disorder compared to fathers. Objective and subjective measures of disease severity yielded mixed findings with regard to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder. Protective parental factors may include education or the opportunity to discuss the parents' feelings during the admission. Following admission to the pediatric intensive

  1. Parental Health Attributions of Childhood Health and Illness: Development of the Pediatric Cultural Health Attributions Questionnaire (Pedi-CHAQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Lisa M; McLinden, Daniel J; Shellmer, Diana; Baker, Raymond C

    2011-01-01

    The causes attributed to childhood health and illness across cultures (cultural health attributions) are key factors that are now more frequently identified as affecting the health outcomes of children. Research suggests that the causes attributed to an event such as illness are thought to affect subsequent motivation, emotional response, decision making, and behavior. To date, there is no measure of health attributions appropriate for use with parents of pediatric patients. Using the Many-Facets approach to Rasch analysis, this study assesses the psychometrics of a newly developed instrument, the Pediatric Health Attributions Questionnaire (Pedi-CHAQ), a measure designed to assess the cultural health attributions of parents in diverse communities. Results suggest acceptable Rasch model statistics of fit and reliability for the Pedi-CHAQ. A shortened version of the questionnaire was developed as a result of this study and next steps are discussed.

  2. Hidden consequences of success in pediatrics: parental health-related quality of life--results from the Care Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzmann, Janneke; Heymans, Hugo S A; Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada; van Praag, Bernard M S; Grootenhuis, Martha A

    2008-11-01

    The number of parents who care for a chronically ill child is increasing. Because of advances in medical care, parental caring tasks are changing. A detailed description of parental health-related quality of life will add to the understanding of the impact of caring for a chronically ill child. This will contribute to pediatric family care. Our goal was to determine the health-related quality of life of parents of chronically ill children compared with parents of healthy schoolchildren. A survey of 533 parents of children with chronic conditions (10 diagnosis groups, children aged 1-19 years, diagnosed >1 year ago, living at home) and 443 parents of schoolchildren was conducted between January 2006 and September 2007. Parents were approached through Emma Children's Hospital (which has a tertiary referral and a regional function) and through parent associations. The comparison group included parents of healthy schoolchildren. Health-related quality of life was assessed with the TNO-AZL Questionnaire for Adult's Health Related Quality of Life. Health-related quality of life measures gross and fine motor function, cognitive functioning, sleep, pain, social functioning, daily activities, sexuality, vitality, positive and depressive emotions, and aggressiveness. The health-related quality of life of the study group was compared with that of the comparison group, and effect sizes were estimated. The percentages of parents at risk for a low health-related quality of life were compared with the 25th percentile scores of the comparison group. RESULTS. Parents of chronically ill children had a significantly lower health-related quality of life. Subgroup analysis showed lower health-related quality of life on sleep, social functioning, daily activities, vitality, positive emotions, and depressive emotions in disease-specific groups. On average, 45% of the parents were at risk for health-related quality-of-life impairment. Parents of chronically ill children report a seriously

  3. Opportunities lost and found: experiences of patients with cerebral palsy and their parents transitioning from pediatric to adult healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFazio, Rachel L; Harris, Marie; Vessey, Judith A; Glader, Laurie; Shanske, Susan

    2014-01-01

    To describe and define the experiences of adults with cerebral palsy (CP) and parents of adults with CP who have been involved in a transfer of physiatry care from pediatric to adult healthcare and to explore their experiences more generally in the transition from pediatric to adult services. A qualitative research approach was used. Semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with adults with CP (n=5) and parents of adults with CP (n=8) to explore the health care transition (HCT) process from pediatric to adult healthcare. Four key content domains were used to facilitate the focus groups; 1) Transition Planning, 2) Accessibility of Services, 3) Experience with Adult Providers, and 4) Recommendations for Improving the Transition Process. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze the data. Four themes emerged from the focus groups; Lost in Transition, Roadmap to Care, List of None, and One Stop Shopping. Participants felt lost in the HCT process, requested a transparent transition plan, expressed concern regarding access to adult healthcare, and made recommendations for improvements. Challenges in transitioning from pediatric to adult health care were identified by all participants and several strategies were recommended for improvement.

  4. Evaluation of a web-based asynchronous pediatric emergency medicine learning tool for residents and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, Kreg; Ramundo, Maria; Stevenson, Michelle; Beeson, Michael S

    2009-12-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an asynchronous learning tool consisting of web-based lectures for trainees covering major topics pertinent to pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) and to assess resident and student evaluation of this mode of education. PEM faculty and fellows created a 21-lecture, web-based curriculum. These 20-minute online lectures used Microsoft PowerPoint with the voice-over feature. A 75-question test was created to assess the effectiveness of the web-based learning model, administered online before and after the rotation in the pediatric emergency department (PED). All fourth-year medical students and residents (across all specialties) rotating through the PED were required to complete 10 of the 21 lectures during their 1-month rotation. The main outcome variable was difference in score between pre- and post-rotation tests of participants who viewed no lectures and those who viewed at least one lecture. Evaluation of the program was assessed by anonymous survey using 5-point discrete visual analog scales. Responses of 4 or 5 were considered positive for analysis. One hundred eleven residents and fourth-year medical students participated in the program. An initial 32 completed testing before implementation of the on-line lectures (March 2007-August 2007), and another five did not complete the on-line lectures after implementation (September 2007-February 2008). Seventy-one completed testing and on-line lectures, and all but three completed at least 10 on-line lectures during their rotation. Fourteen of 111 trainees did not complete the pre- or post-test (including two who viewed the lectures). The mean change in score was a 1% improvement from pre-test to post-test for trainees who viewed no lectures and a 6.2% improvement for those who viewed the lectures (mean difference = 5.2%, 95% confidence interval = 2.5% to 7.9%). In the linear regression model, the estimate of the coefficient was 0.43 (p lecture viewed, post-test score rose by 0

  5. Parental Self-Assessment of Behavioral Effectiveness in Young Children and Views on Corporal Punishment in an Academic Pediatric Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Lance B; Flatin, Heidi; Harrington, Maya T; Vazifedan, Turaj; Harrington, John W

    2018-03-01

    This article assesses parental confidence and current behavioral techniques used by mostly African American caregivers of young children in an urban Southeastern setting, including their use and attitudes toward corporal punishment (CP). Two hundred and fifty parental participants of children aged 18 months to 5 years completed a survey on factors affecting their behavioral management and views on CP. Statistical analysis included χ 2 test and logistic regression with confidence interval significance determined at P <.05. Significant associations of CP usage were found in parents who were themselves exposed to CP and parental level of frustration with child disobedience. A total of 40.2% of respondents answered that they had not received any discipline strategies from pediatricians and 47.6% were interested in receiving more behavioral strategies. Clear opportunities exist for pediatricians to provide information on evidence-based disciplinary techniques, and these discussions may be facilitated through the creation of a No Hit Zone program in the pediatric practice.

  6. Measuring the Effects of an Animal-Assisted Intervention for Pediatric Oncology Patients and Their Parents: A Multisite Randomized Controlled Trial [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Amy; Ruehrdanz, Ashleigh; Jenkins, Molly A; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Olson, Janice; Pawar, Anjali; Holley, Leslie; Sierra-Rivera, Shirley; Linder, Deborah E; Pichette, Danielle; Grossman, Neil J; Hellman, Cynthia; Guérin, Noémi A; O'Haire, Marguerite E

    2018-05-01

    This multicenter, parallel-group, randomized trial examined the effects of an animal-assisted intervention on the stress, anxiety, and health-related quality of life for children diagnosed with cancer and their parents. Newly diagnosed patients, aged 3 to 17 years (n = 106), were randomized to receive either standard care plus regular visits from a therapy dog (intervention group), or standard care only (control group). Data were collected at set points over 4 months of the child's treatment. Measures included the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory™, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Pediatric Inventory for Parents, and child blood pressure and heart rate. All instruments were completed by the child and/or his/her parent(s). Children in both groups experienced a significant reduction in state anxiety ( P Animal-assisted interventions may provide certain benefits for parents and families during the initial stages of pediatric cancer treatment.

  7. Validation of parental reports of asthma trajectory, burden, and risk by using the pediatric asthma control and communication instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okelo, Sande O; Eakin, Michelle N; Riekert, Kristin A; Teodoro, Alvin P; Bilderback, Andrew L; Thompson, Darcy A; Loiaza-Martinez, Antonio; Rand, Cynthia S; Thyne, Shannon; Diette, Gregory B; Patino, Cecilia M

    2014-01-01

    Despite a growing interest, few pediatric asthma questionnaires assess multiple dimensions of asthma morbidity, as recommended by national asthma guidelines, or use patient-reported outcomes. To evaluate a questionnaire that measures multiple dimensions of parent-reported asthma morbidity (Direction, Bother, and Risk). We administered the Pediatric Asthma Control and Communication Instrument (PACCI) and assessed asthma control (PACCI Control), quality of life, and lung function among children who presented for routine asthma care. The PACCI was evaluated for discriminative validity. A total of 317 children participated (mean age, 8.2 years; 58% boys; 44% African American). As parent-reported PACCI Direction changed from "better" to "worse," we observed poorer asthma control (P < .001), mean Pediatric Asthma Caregiver Quality of Life Questionnaire (PACQLQ) scores (P < .001), and FEV1% (P = .025). Linear regression showed that, for each change in PACCI Direction, the mean PACQLQ score decreased by -0.6 (95% CI, -0.8 to -0.4). As parent-reported PACCI Bother changed from "not bothered" to "very bothered," we observed poorer asthma control (P < .001) and lower mean PACQLQ scores (P < .001). Linear regression showed that, for each change in PACCI Bother category, the mean PACQLQ score decreased by -1.1 (95% CI, -1.3 to -0.9). Any reported PACCI Risk event (emergency department visit, hospitalization, or use of an oral corticosteroid) was associated with poorer asthma control (P < .05) and PACQLQ scores (P < .01). PACCI Direction, Bother, and Risk are valid measures of parent-reported outcomes and show good discriminative validity. The PACCI is a simple clinical tool to assess multiple dimensions of parent-reported asthma morbidity, in addition to risk and control. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of parental presence during bedside pediatric intensive care unit rounds: effect on duration, teaching, and privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Lorri M; Bartke, Cheryl N; Spear, Debra A; Jones, Linda F; Foerster, Carolyn P; Killian, Marie E; Hughes, Jennifer R; Hess, Joseph C; Johnson, David R; Thomas, Neal J

    2007-05-01

    There is a paucity of literature evaluating the effects of family member presence during bedside medical rounds in the pediatric intensive care unit. We hypothesized that, when compared with rounds without family members, parental presence during morning medical rounds would increase time spent on rounds, decrease medical team teaching/education, increase staff dissatisfaction, create more stress in family members, and violate patient privacy in our open unit. Prospective, blinded, observational study. Academic pediatric intensive care unit with 12 beds. A total of 105 admissions were studied, 81 family members completed a survey, and 187 medical team staff surveys were completed. Investigators documented parental presence and time allocated for presentation, teaching, and answering questions. Surveys related to perception of goals, teaching, and privacy of rounds were distributed to participants. Time spent on rounds, time spent teaching on rounds, and medical staff and family perception of the effects of parental presence on rounds. There was no significant difference between time spent on rounds in the presence or absence of family members (p = NS). There is no significant difference between the time spent teaching by the attending physician in the presence or absence of family members (p = NS). Overall, parents reported that the medical team spent an appropriate amount of time discussing their child and were not upset by this discussion. Parents did not perceive that their own or their child's privacy was violated during rounds. The majority of medical team members reported that the presence of family on rounds was beneficial. Parental presence on rounds does not seem to interfere with the educational and communication process. Parents report satisfaction with participation in rounds, and privacy violations do not seem to be a concern from their perspective.

  9. Trending Longitudinal Agreement between Parent and Child Perceptions of Quality of Life for Pediatric Palliative Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaghann S. Weaver

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric palliative care studies often rely on proxy-reported instead of direct child-reported quality of life metrics. The purpose of this study was to longitudinally evaluate quality of life for pediatric patients receiving palliative care consultations and to compare patient-reported quality of life with parent perception of the child’s quality of life across wellness domains. The 23-item PedsQL™ V4.0 Measurement Model was utilized for ten child and parent dyads at time of initial palliative care consultation, Month 6, and Month 12 to assess for physical, emotional, social, and cognitive dimensions of quality of life as reported independently by the child and by the parent for the child. Findings were analyzed using Bland–Altman plots to compare observed differences to limits of agreement. This study revealed overall consistency between parent- and child-reported quality of life across domains. Physical health was noted to be in closest agreement. At the time of initial palliative care consult, children collectively scored their social quality of life higher than parental perception of the child’s social quality of life; whereas, emotional and cognitive quality of life domains were scored lower by children than by the parental report. At the one year survey time point, the physical, emotional, and social domains trended toward more positive patient perception than proxy perception with congruence between quality of life scores for the cognitive domain. Findings reveal the importance of eliciting a child report in addition to a parent report when measuring and longitudinally trending perceptions on quality of life.

  10. Effects of pediatric asthma care coordination in underserved communities on parent perceptions of care and asthma-management confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevic, Mary R; Baptist, Alan P; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Lara, Marielena; Persky, Victoria; Ramos-Valencia, Gilberto; Uyeda, Kimberly; Hazan, Rebecca; Garrity, Ashley; Malveaux, Floyd J

    2017-06-01

    Disparities by race and socioeconomic status persist in pediatric asthma morbidity, mortality, and treatment. Improving parent/provider communication and parents' asthma-management confidence may result in better asthma control in vulnerable populations. The Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. funded an initiative to implement medical-social care coordination to improve asthma outcomes at sites in four low-income, urban communities (Los Angeles, CA; Philadelphia, PA; Chicago, IL; and San Juan, PR.) As part of a cross-site evaluation of this effort, pre- post-program changes in parents' reports of asthma care and management were assessed. Across sites, 805 parents or other caregivers responded to a baseline survey that was repeated one year later following their child's participation in care coordination. Parents' asthma-management confidence, as well as their perceptions of provider access, trust, and communication, were measured with Likert scales. Linear mixed models were used to assess improvement in these variables, across and within sites, adjusting for sociodemographics. Pooled across sites, the adjusted mean estimate for all outcomes showed a significant improvement (p asthma care coordination, as implemented variously in diverse settings, was associated with improvement in parents' perceptions of asthma care and self-reported asthma-management knowledge and confidence. This positive impact on parents may help sustain care coordination's impact on children.

  11. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Parental Refusal of Consent in a Large, Multisite Pediatric Critical Care Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Joanne E; Lebet, Ruth; Joseph, Jill G; Ulysse, Christine; Ascenzi, Judith; Wypij, David; Curley, Martha A Q

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate whether race or ethnicity was independently associated with parental refusal of consent for their child's participation in a multisite pediatric critical care clinical trial. We performed a secondary analyses of data from Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure (RESTORE), a 31-center cluster randomized trial of sedation management in critically ill children with acute respiratory failure supported on mechanical ventilation. Multivariable logistic regression modeling estimated associations between patient race and ethnicity and parental refusal of study consent. Among the 3438 children meeting enrollment criteria and approached for consent, 2954 had documented race/ethnicity of non-Hispanic White (White), non-Hispanic Black (Black), or Hispanic of any race. Inability to approach for consent was more common for parents of Black (19.5%) compared with White (11.7%) or Hispanic children (13.2%). Among those offered consent, parents of Black (29.5%) and Hispanic children (25.9%) more frequently refused consent than parents of White children (18.2%, P refuse consent. Parents of children offered participation in the intervention arm were more likely to refuse consent than parents in the control arm (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.37-3.36, P care clinical trial. Ameliorating this racial disparity may improve the validity and generalizability of study findings. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00814099. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transparency in a Pediatric Quality Improvement Collaborative: A Passionate Journey by NPC-QIC Clinicians and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihn, Stacey L; Kugler, John D; Peterson, Laura E; Lannon, Carole M; Pickles, Diane; Beekman, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Transparency-sharing data or information about outcomes, processes, protocols, and practices-may be the most powerful driver of health care improvement. In this special article, the development and growth of transparency within the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative is described. The National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative transparency journey is guided by equal numbers of clinicians and parents of children with congenital heart disease working together in a Transparency Work Group. Activities are organized around four interrelated levels of transparency (individual, organizational, collaborative, and system), each with a specified purpose and aim. A number of Transparency Work Group recommendations have been operationalized. Aggregate collaborative performance is now reported on the public-facing web site. Specific information that the Transparency Work Group recommends centers provide to parents has been developed and published. Almost half of National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative centers participated in a pilot of transparently sharing their outcomes achieved with one another. Individual centers have also begun successfully implementing recommended transparency activities. Despite progress, barriers to full transparency persist, including health care organization concerns about potential negative effects of disclosure on reputation and finances, and lack of reliable definitions, data, and reporting standards for fair comparisons of centers. The National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative's transparency efforts have been a journey that continues, not a single goal or destination. Balanced participation of clinicians and parents has been a critical element of the collaborative's success on this issue. Plans are in place to guide implementation of additional transparency recommendations across all four levels, including extension of the activities beyond the

  13. Development and psychometric evaluation of the PROMIS Pediatric Life Satisfaction item banks, child-report, and parent-proxy editions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Christopher B; Devine, Janine; Bevans, Katherine B; Becker, Brandon D; Carle, Adam C; Teneralli, Rachel E; Moon, JeanHee; Tucker, Carole A; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike

    2018-01-01

    To describe the psychometric evaluation and item response theory calibration of the PROMIS Pediatric Life Satisfaction item banks, child-report, and parent-proxy editions. A pool of 55 life satisfaction items was administered to 1992 children 8-17 years old and 964 parents of children 5-17 years old. Analyses included descriptive statistics, reliability, factor analysis, differential item functioning, and assessment of construct validity. Thirteen items were deleted because of poor psychometric performance. An 8-item short form was administered to a national sample of 996 children 8-17 years old, and 1294 parents of children 5-17 years old. The combined sample (2988 children and 2258 parents) was used in item response theory (IRT) calibration analyses. The final item banks were unidimensional, the items were locally independent, and the items were free from impactful differential item functioning. The 8-item and 4-item short form scales showed excellent reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity. Life satisfaction decreased with declining socio-economic status, presence of a special health care need, and increasing age for girls, but not boys. After IRT calibration, we found that 4- and 8-item short forms had a high degree of precision (reliability) across a wide range (>4 SD units) of the latent variable. The PROMIS Pediatric Life Satisfaction item banks and their short forms provide efficient, precise, and valid assessments of life satisfaction in children and youth.

  14. Chemotherapy versus supportive care alone in pediatric palliative care for cancer: comparing the preferences of parents and health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Deborah; Bartels, Ute; Gammon, Janet; Hinds, Pamela S; Volpe, Jocelyne; Bouffet, Eric; Regier, Dean A; Baruchel, Sylvain; Greenberg, Mark; Barrera, Maru; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Sung, Lillian

    2011-11-22

    The choice between palliative chemotherapy (defined as the use of cytotoxic medications delivered intravenously for the purpose of our study) and supportive care alone is one of the most difficult decisions in pediatric oncology, yet little is known about the preferences of parents and health care professionals. We compared the strength of these preferences by considering children's quality of life and survival time as key attributes. In addition, we identified factors associated with the reported preferences. We included parents of children whose cancer had no reasonable chance of being cured and health care professionals in pediatric oncology as participants in our study. We administered separate interviews to parents and to health care professionals. Visual analogue scales were shown to respondents to illustrate the anticipated level of the child's quality of life, the expected duration of survival and the probability of cure (shown only to health care professionals). Respondents were then asked which treatment option they would favour given these baseline attributes. In addition, respondents reported what factors might affect such a decision and ranked all factors identified in order of importance. The primary measure was the desirability score for supportive care alone relative to palliative chemotherapy, as obtained using the threshold technique. A total of 77 parents and 128 health care professionals participated in our study. Important factors influencing the decision between therapeutic options were child quality-of-life and survival time among both parents and health care professionals. Hope was particularly important to parents. Parents significantly favoured chemotherapy (42/77, 54.5%) compared with health care professionals (20/128, 15.6%; p parents' desire for supportive care; for health care professionals, the opinions of parents and children were significant factors influencing this decision. Compared with health care professionals, parents more

  15. Preventing Complications of Pediatric Tracheostomy Through Standardized Wound Care and Parent Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, Philip A; Greenlick, Hannah; Dong, Tiffany; Levy, Michelle; Hackett, Alyssa; Preciado, Diego; Zalzal, George; Reilly, Brian K

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric tracheostomy is commonly performed for upper airway obstruction and prolonged mechanical ventilation. Children undergoing tracheostomy typically have multiple chronic medical problems that place them at high risk for readmission and additional complications. To determine whether the institution of a postoperative protocol for parent education and wound care with a nurse trained in tracheostomy care decreases the rate of readmission and other complications. A case series and medical record review was conducted of children 18 years and younger who underwent tracheostomy at a tertiary pediatric medical center between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014. A postoperative tracheostomy care and education protocol. Overall 30-day readmission rate, 30-day tracheostomy-related readmission rate, tracheostomy wound complications, and additional factors that may have affected readmission rates and wound complications (age at the time of tracheostomy, discharge location, indication for tracheostomy). A total of 191 children (118 boys and 73 girls) were included; of these, 112 participated in the education protocol and 79 children did not. Following institution of the education protocol, there was no decrease in the overall readmission rate (26.8% before the protocol vs 26.6% after the protocol; difference, 0.2%; 95% CI, -12.5% to 13.0%) or in the tracheostomy-related readmission rate (10.1% before the protocol vs 7.1% after the protocol; difference, 3.0%; 95% CI, -5.0% to 11.0%). Overall, 68.6% of readmissions were associated with medical comorbidities (95% CI, 55.9% to 81.3%). There was a significant decrease in tracheostomy-related wound complications after institution of the protocol (31.6% to 17.9%; difference, 13.7%; 95% CI, 1.6% to 26.0%). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that children who were discharged home were significantly more likely to be readmitted for a tracheostomy-related complication than were patients discharged to an advanced care

  16. Parents as Agents of Change (PAC in pediatric weight management: The protocol for the PAC randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball Geoff D C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need to develop and evaluate weight management interventions to address childhood obesity. Recent research suggests that interventions designed for parents exclusively, which have been named parents as agents of change (PAC approaches, have yielded positive outcomes for managing pediatric obesity. To date, no research has combined a PAC intervention approach with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT to examine whether these combined elements enhance intervention effectiveness. This paper describes the protocol our team is using to examine two PAC-based interventions for pediatric weight management. We hypothesize that children with obesity whose parents complete a CBT-based PAC intervention will achieve greater reductions in adiposity and improvements in cardiometabolic risk factors, lifestyle behaviours, and psychosocial outcomes than children whose parents complete a psycho-education-based PAC intervention (PEP. Methods/Design This study is a pragmatic, two-armed, parallel, single-blinded, superiority, randomized clinical trial. The primary objective is to examine the differential effects of a CBT-based PAC vs PEP-based PAC intervention on children’s BMI z-score (primary outcome. Secondary objectives are to assess intervention-mediated changes in cardiometabolic, lifestyle, and psychosocial variables in children and parents. Both interventions are similar in frequency of contact, session duration, group facilitation, lifestyle behaviour goals, and educational content. However, the interventions differ insofar as the CBT-based intervention incorporates theory-based concepts to help parents link their thoughts, feelings, and behaviours; these cognitive activities are enabled by group leaders who possess formal training in CBT. Mothers and fathers of children (8–12 years of age; BMI ≥85th percentile are eligible to participate if they are proficient in English (written and spoken and agree for at least

  17. Putting a face and context on pediatric surgery cancelations: The development of parent personas to guide equitable surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Lisa M; DeJonckheere, Melissa; Pratap, Jayant Nick

    2016-06-09

    Last-minute cancelation of planned surgery can have substantial psychological, social, and economic effects for patients/families and also leads to wastage of expensive health-care resources. In order to have a deeper understanding of the contextual, psychological, practical, and behavioral factors that potentially impact pediatric surgery cancelation, we conducted a qualitative study to create 'personas' or fictional portraits of parents who are likely to cancel surgery. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 21 parents of children who were considered 'at risk' for surgical cancelation and whose scheduled surgery was canceled at late notice. From the themes, patterns, and associated descriptive phrases in the data, we developed and validated five different personas of typical scenarios reflecting parent experiences with surgery and surgery cancelations. The personas are being employed to guide contextualized development of interventions tailored to prototypical families as they prepare and attend for surgery. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Satisfaction with support versus size of network: differential effects of social support on psychological distress in parents of pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Felicity W K; Peterson, Amy M; Albrecht, Terrance L; Taub, Jeffrey W; Phipps, Sean; Penner, Louis A

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the direct and buffering effects of social support on longer-term global psychological distress among parents coping with pediatric cancer. In both sets of analyses, we examined whether these effects depended on the dimension of social support provided (i.e., satisfaction with support versus size of support network). Participants were 102 parents of pediatric cancer patients. At study entry, parents reported their trait anxiety, depression, and two dimensions of their social support network (satisfaction with support and size of support network). Parents subsequently reported their psychological distress in 3- and 9-month follow-up assessments. Parents' satisfaction with support had a direct effect on longer-term psychological distress; satisfaction was negatively associated with distress at both follow-ups. In contrast, size of support network buffered (moderated) the impact of trait anxiety and depression on later distress. Parents with smaller support networks and higher levels of trait anxiety and depression at baseline had higher levels of psychological distress at both follow-ups; for parents with larger support networks, there was no relationship. Social support can attenuate psychological distress in parents coping with pediatric cancer; however, the nature of the effect depends on the dimension of support. Whereas interventions that focus on increasing satisfaction with social support may benefit all parents, at-risk parents will likely benefit from interventions that ensure they have an adequate number of support resources. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. “A journey around the world”: Parent narratives of the journey to pediatric resective epilepsy surgery and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Christine B.; Pieters, Huibrie C.; Iwaki, Tomoko J.; Mathern, Gary W.; Vickrey, Barbara G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although shorter time to pediatric resective epilepsy surgery is strongly associated with greater disease severity, other non-clinical diagnostic and sociodemographic factors also play a role. We aimed to examine parent-reported barriers to timely receipt of pediatric epilepsy surgery. METHODS We conducted 37 interviews of parents of children who previously had resective epilepsy surgery at UCLA (2006–2011). Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and systematically coded using thematic analysis by two independent coders and subsequently checked for agreement. Clinical data, including `time to surgery' (age of epilepsy onset to surgery) were abstracted from medical records. RESULTS The mean time to surgery was 5.3 years (SD=3.8); surgery types included 32% hemispherectomy, 43% lobar/focal, 24% multilobar. At surgery, parents were on average 38.4 years (SD=6.6) and children were 8.2 years (SD=4.7). The more arduous and longer aspect of the journey to surgery was perceived by parents to be experienced prior to presurgical referral. The time from second anti-epileptic drug failure to presurgical referral was ≥1 year in 64% of children. Thematic analysis revealed four themes (with subthemes) along the journey to surgery and beyond: (1) recognition: “something is wrong” (unfamiliarity with epilepsy, identification of medical emergency), (2) searching and finding: “a circuitous journey” (information seeking, finding the right doctors, multiple medications, insurance obstacles, parental stress), (3) surgery is a viable option: “the right spot” (surgery as last resort, surgery as best option, hoping for candidacy), and (4) life now: “we took the steps we needed to” (a new life, giving back). SIGNIFICANCE Multi-pronged interventions targeting parent-, provider- and system-based barriers should focus on the critical presurgical referral period; such interventions are needed to remediate delays and improve access to subspecialty care for

  20. Adolescents' Observations of Parent Pain Behaviors: Preliminary Measure Validation and Test of Social Learning Theory in Pediatric Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Amanda L; Walker, Lynn S

    2017-01-01

    Evaluate psychometric properties of a measure of adolescents’ observations of parental pain behaviors and use this measure to test hypotheses regarding pain-specific social learning. We created a proxy-report of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Pain Behavior–Short Form (PPB) for adolescents to report on parental pain behaviors, which we labeled the PPB-Proxy. Adolescents (n = 138, mean age = 14.20) with functional abdominal pain completed the PPB-Proxy and a parent completed the PPB. Adolescents and their parents completed measures of pain and disability during the adolescent’s clinic visit for abdominal pain. Adolescents subsequently completed a 7-day pain diary period. The PPB-Proxy moderately correlated with the PPB, evidencing that adolescents observe and can report on parental pain behaviors. Both the PPB-Proxy and PPB significantly correlated with adolescents’ pain-related disability. Parental modeling of pain behaviors could represent an important target for assessment and treatment in pediatric chronic pain patients.

  1. Physician and Parent Perspectives on Psychosocial and Emotional Data Entry in the Electronic Medical Record in a Pediatric Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Busack BS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This pilot study was conducted to evaluate physician and patient preferences for documentation of emotional and psychosocial information in the electronic medical record (EMR. Methods: Pediatricians from an academic medical center and parents of patients in an academic pediatric rheumatology practice were surveyed on 10 different elements using Likert-type scale items (1 = not at all important, 10 = extremely important. The importance of the proposed categories was evaluated by means testing and pairwise comparisons of the responses. Results: Responses were obtained from 45 physicians and 35 parents. The overall mean scores for physicians and parents were 7.70 and 7.44, respectively. Scores on personality, friends, and school differed between physicians and parents, but those differences were not significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons (P = .13, .17, and .26, respectively. Fears, special requests, and special needs were in the high-score group for both physicians and parents. Conclusion: Physicians and parents reported that the incorporation of emotional and psychosocial information into the EMR added value to the health care of children.

  2. Parents' Faith and Hope during the Pediatric Palliative Phase and the Association with Long-Term Parental Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geest, Ivana M M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Falkenburg, Nette; Michiels, Erna M C; van Vliet, Liesbeth; Pieters, Rob; Darlington, Anne-Sophie E

    2015-05-01

    The loss of a child is associated with an increased risk for developing psychological problems. However, studies investigating the impact of parents' faith and hope for a cure during the palliative phase on long-term parental psychological functioning are limited. The study's objective was to explore the role of faith and hope as a source of coping and indicator of long-term parental adjustment. Eighty-nine parents of 57 children who died of cancer completed questionnaires retrospectively, exploring faith, hope, and sources of coping, and measuring parents' current level of grief and depression. For 19 parents (21%) faith was very important during the palliative phase. The majority of parents remained hopeful for a meaningful time with their child (n=68, 76%); a pain-free death (n=58, 65%); and a cure (n=30, 34%). Their child (n=70, 79%) was parents' main source of coping. Twelve parents (14%) suffered from traumatic grief, and 22 parents (25%) showed symptoms of depression. Parents' faith was not associated with less long-term traumatic grief (OR=0.86, p=0.51) or symptoms of depression (OR=0.95, p=0.74), and parents' hope for a cure was not related to more long-term traumatic grief (OR=1.07, p=0.71) or symptoms of depression (OR=1.12, p=0.47). Faith was important for a minority of parents and was not associated with less long-term traumatic grief or symptoms of depression. The majority of parents remained hopeful. Hope for a cure was not associated with more long-term traumatic grief or symptoms of depression.

  3. Predictors of Short- and Long-Term Attrition From the Parents as Agents of Change Randomized Controlled Trial for Managing Pediatric Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Nicholas D; Newton, Amanda S; Keaschuk, Rachel A; Ambler, Kathryn A; Jetha, Mary M; Holt, Nicholas L; Rosychuk, Rhonda J; Spence, John C; Sharma, Arya M; Ball, Geoff D C

    Attrition in pediatric weight management is a substantial problem. This study examined factors associated with short- and long-term attrition from a lifestyle and behavioral intervention for parents of children with overweight or obesity. Fifty-two families with children ages 6 to 12 years old and body mass index at or above the 85th percentile participated in a randomized controlled trial focused on parents, comparing parent-based cognitive behavioral therapy with parent-based psychoeducation for pediatric weight management. We examined program attrition using two clinical phases of the intervention: short-term and long-term attrition, modeled using the general linear model. Predictors included intervention type, child/parent weight status, sociodemographic factors, and health of the family system. Higher self-assessed health of the family system was associated with lower short-term attrition; higher percentage of intervention sessions attended by parents was associated with lower long-term attrition. Different variables were significant in our short- and long-term models. Attrition might best be conceptualized based on short- and long-term phases of clinical, parent-based interventions for pediatric weight management. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Health-related quality of life in parents of pediatric brain tumor survivors at the end of tumor-directed therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Lauren F; Turner, Elise M; McCurdy, Mark D; Hocking, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    This study examines theoretical covariates of health-related quality of life (HRQL) in parents of pediatric brain tumor survivors (PBTS) following completion of tumor-directed therapy. Fifty PBTS (ages 6-16) completed measures of neurocognitive functioning and their parents completed measures of family, survivor, and parent functioning. Caregiving demand, caregiver competence, and coping/supportive factors were associated with parental physical and psychosocial HRQL, when controlling for significant background and child characteristics. Study findings can inform interventions to strengthen caregiver competence and family functioning following the completion of treatment, which may improve both parent and survivor outcomes.

  5. Resident and parental perceptions of adolescent problems and family communications in a low socioeconomic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, L E; Shear, C L; Stark, A M; Goodman, P R

    1984-11-01

    This cross-sectional survey of a low socioeconomic patient group was designed to determine the prevalence and severity of parentally perceived behavioral problems in adolescents as well as to investigate the correlation between such problems and single parenting, family communications, and medical care delivered. The sample population consisted of 79 parents and 121 teenagers selected from a family practice center. The medical record and telephone interview were the sources of information. Results include a parental perception of a high prevalence of problems with school grades (48 percent), school attendance (38 percent), and household problems (chores and sibling rivalry). Of low prevalence but high severity were perceived problems related to suicidal ideation, running away, sexual activity, and gang membership. Single-parent homes had a threefold higher incidence of behavioral problems, a greater degree of communication, and a lower use of community resources than two-parent families. None of the approximately 400 perceived behavioral problems listed by parents was found in the family physicians' master problem list. The results indicate the need for physician education of low socioeconomic and single-parent patients with regard to communication and coping style. In addition, it appears that training programs should provide more education in the care of adolescents.

  6. Development and Evaluation of the PROMIS® Pediatric Positive Affect Item Bank, Child-Report and Parent-Proxy Editions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Christopher B; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Devine, Janine; Becker, Brandon D; Teneralli, Rachel; Moon, JeanHee; Carle, Adam; Tucker, Carole A; Bevans, Katherine B

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the psychometric evaluation and item response theory calibration of the PROMIS Pediatric Positive Affect item bank, child-report and parent-proxy editions. The initial item pool comprising 53 items, previously developed using qualitative methods, was administered to 1,874 children 8-17 years old and 909 parents of children 5-17 years old. Analyses included descriptive statistics, reliability, factor analysis, differential item functioning, and construct validity. A total of 14 items were deleted, because of poor psychometric performance, and an 8-item short form constructed from the remaining 39 items was administered to a national sample of 1,004 children 8-17 years old, and 1,306 parents of children 5-17 years old. The combined sample was used in item response theory (IRT) calibration analyses. The final item bank appeared unidimensional, the items appeared locally independent, and the items were free from differential item functioning. The scales showed excellent reliability and convergent and discriminant validity. Positive affect decreased with children's age and was lower for those with a special health care need. After IRT calibration, we found that 4 and 8 item short forms had a high degree of precision (reliability) across a wide range of the latent trait (>4 SD units). The PROMIS Pediatric Positive Affect item bank and its short forms provide an efficient, precise, and valid assessment of positive affect in children and youth.

  7. A qualitative study of sleep quality in children and their resident parents when in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickland, Alice; Clayton, Esther; Sankey, Ruth; Hill, Catherine M

    2016-06-01

    Poor sleep quality impairs immune responses and pain tolerance, both key to recovery from acute illness. Hospitalised children and their co-sleeping parents also risk emotional lability and impaired coping skills when sleep-deprived. We aimed to study the experiences of children and parents during hospital admissions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents within a week of their child's discharge. Questions explored parent and child sleep quality, factors contributing to this, perceived impact on day-time functioning and suggested improvements to ward sleep environment. Southampton Children's Hospital, UK. 17 co-sleeping parents of 16 children aged 3-12 years completed interviews. Children admitted for surgical procedures and those with established sleep disorders or nocturnal seizures were excluded. Constant comparative methods identified themes within the data using a grounded theory approach. Parents reported that they, and to a lesser extent their children, experienced reduced sleep quality. Noise and light as well as ward schedules were identified as key factors disrupting sleep. Parents reported that lack of sleep caused difficulties with their own emotional regulation and that of their child, affecting daytime parent-child relationships. Furthermore, they reported a negative impact of sleep deprivation on decision-making about their child's medical care. Parents identified poor sleep in hospital as a significant additional burden to their child's hospital admission. Importantly, they identified potential improvements to the ward sleep environment. Intervention studies that target modifiable, child-centred alterations to night-time ward culture are recommended, focusing on measurable child and parental outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Orthopaedic resident preparedness for closed reduction and pinning of pediatric supracondylar fractures is improved by e-learning: a multisite randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearty, Thomas; Maizels, Max; Pring, Maya; Mazur, John; Liu, Raymond; Sarwark, John; Janicki, Joseph

    2013-09-04

    There is a need to provide more efficient surgical training methods for orthopaedic residents. E-learning could possibly increase resident surgical preparedness, confidence, and comfort for surgery. Using closed reduction and pinning of pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures as the index case, we hypothesized that e-learning could increase resident knowledge acquisition for case preparation in the operating room. An e-learning surgical training module was created on the Computer Enhanced Visual Learning platform. The module provides a detailed and focused road map of the procedure utilizing a multimedia format. A multisite prospective randomized controlled study design compared residents who used a textbook for case preparation (control group) with residents who used the same textbook plus completed the e-learning module (test group). All subjects completed a sixty-question test on the theory and methods of the case. After completion of the test, the control group then completed the module as well. All subjects were surveyed on their opinion regarding the effectiveness of the module after performing an actual surgical case. Twenty-eight subjects with no previous experience in this surgery were enrolled at four academic centers. Subjects were randomized into two equal groups. The test group scored significantly better (p < 0.001) and demonstrated competence on the test compared with the control group; the mean correct test score (and standard deviation) was 90.9% ± 6.8% for the test group and 73.5% ± 6.4% for the control group. All residents surveyed (n = 27) agreed that the module is a useful supplement to traditional methods for case preparation and twenty-two of twenty-seven residents agreed that it reduced their anxiety during the case and improved their attention to surgical detail. E-learning using the Computer Enhanced Visual Learning platform significantly improved preparedness, confidence, and comfort with percutaneous closed reduction and pinning of a

  9. DEGRADATION OF PARENTAL BONDING AND VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN: THE USE OF FAMILY GENOGRAM IN THE PEDIATRIC CLINIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoncio, Égle Thomaz; Souza, Sonia Regina Pereira de; Machado, José Lúcio Martins

    2017-01-01

    To demonstrate the importance of using the family genogram in pediatric consultation, as an analysis tool to evaluate the degradation of parental bonding and also violence against children. A qualitative study was conducted in 2011 wherein 63 children, aged between 2 and 6 years, enrolled in a slum nursery, was studied. In order to construct the genogram, data were collected in four stages: pediatric evaluation at nursery; interview with caregivers; interview with teachers; and interview with the nursery coordinator. The data about the families were used to construct the genograms with the aid of GenoPro®-2016 software. In order to evaluate the quality of bonding, the following items were included in the genograms: violence against children, drug addiction, neglect, mental disorder, type of relationship among family members. The evaluated children and their families generated 55 genograms. In 38 of them, functional family arrangements, and close or very close emotional ties were observed. In 17 cases, situations involving physical, emotional, or sexual violence against children were perceived. Among these, four represented extreme cases, with fraying parental bonding, and dysfunctional family arrangements. In these families, chemical addiction was prevalent among multiple members, as well as severe mental disorder, persistent physical and verbal abuse, and sexual abuse. The use of the genogram helps to identify at an early stage the degradation of parental bonding and violence against children, and when it is incorporated into the pediatric practice routine, it may contribute to the promotion of the comprehensive health care of the child, regardless of the presence of social vulnerability.

  10. Family participation during intensive care unit rounds: attitudes and experiences of parents and healthcare providers in a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickney, Carolyn A; Ziniel, Sonja I; Brett, Molly S; Truog, Robert D

    2014-02-01

    To compare the experiences and attitudes of healthcare providers and parents regarding parental participation in morning rounds, in particular to evaluate for differences in perception of parental comprehension of rounds content and parental comfort with attendance, and to identify subgroups of parents who are more likely to report comfort with attending rounds. Cross-sectional survey of 100 parents and 131 healthcare providers in a tertiary care pediatric medical/surgical intensive care unit. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze survey responses; univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to compare parent and healthcare provider responses. Of parents, 92% reported a desire to attend rounds, and 54% of healthcare providers reported a preference for parental presence. There were significant discrepancies in perception of understanding between the 2 groups, with healthcare providers much less likely to perceive that parents understood both the format (30% vs 73%, P parents. Analysis of parent surveys did not reveal characteristics correlated with increased comfort or desire to attend rounds. A majority of parents wish to participate in morning rounds, whereas healthcare provider opinions are mixed. Important discrepancies exist between parent and healthcare provider perceptions of parental comfort and comprehension on rounds, which may be important in facilitating parental presence. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Behavioral and Pharmacological Adherence in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: Parent-Child Agreement and Family Factors Associated With Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzman, Page H; Carmody, Julia K; Belkin, Mary H; Janicke, David M

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate agreement between children and parents on a measure of behavioral and pharmacological adherence in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), and the associations among family factors (i.e., problem-solving skills, routines, communication) and adherence behaviors. In all, 85 children (aged 8-18 years) with SCD and their parents completed questionnaires assessing individual and family factors. Overall parent-child agreement on an adherence measure was poor, particularly for boys and older children. Greater use of child routines was associated with better overall child-reported adherence. Open family communication was associated with higher overall parent-reported adherence. While further research is needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn, results suggest the need to assess child adherence behaviors via both child and parent reports. Findings also suggest that more daily family routines and open family communication may be protective factors for better disease management. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Coping with pediatric cancer: strategies employed by children and their parents to manage cancer-related stressors during treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, Aimee K; Clawson, Kathleen J; Alderfer, Melissa A; Marsac, Meghan L

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric cancer patients and their families face significant physical, emotional, and psychosocial challenges. Few studies have investigated how children manage these challenges and how parents may help in the process. This qualitative study aimed to explore common cancer-related stressors for children and to examine child coping and parental assistance in coping with these stressors during treatment. Fifteen children undergoing cancer treatment and their parents participated in semistructured interviews. Four themes emerged capturing cancer-related stressors: cancer treatment/side effects, distressing emotions, disruption in daily routines, and social challenges. Six themes emerged regarding child coping strategies that were classified within an approach/avoidance coping framework. Approach coping strategies included the following: cognitive restructuring, relaxation, practical strategies, seeking social support, and emotional expression. Distraction was the only avoidant coping strategy. Parents tended to encourage approach coping strategies (eg, cognitive restructuring, social support). Within families, few coping strategies were reported (child: M = 1.47, SD = 0.99; parent: M = 3.33, SD = 1.18), suggesting that early family-based interventions teaching coping techniques for cancer-related stressors may be beneficial.

  13. Importance ratings on patient-reported outcome items for survivorship care: comparison between pediatric cancer survivors, parents, and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Conor M; Baker, Justin N; Keesey, Rachel M; Eliason, Ruth J; Lanctot, Jennifer Q; Clegg, Jennifer L; Mandrell, Belinda N; Ness, Kirsten K; Krull, Kevin R; Srivastava, Deokumar; Forrest, Christopher B; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Leslie L; Huang, I-Chan

    2018-04-18

    To compare importance ratings of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) items from the viewpoints of childhood cancer survivors, parents, and clinicians for further developing short-forms to use in survivorship care. 101 cancer survivors, 101 their parents, and 36 clinicians were recruited from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Participants were asked to select eight items that they deemed useful for clinical decision making from each of the four Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Pediatric item banks. These item banks were pain interference (20 items), fatigue (23 items), psychological stress (19 items), and positive affect (37 items). Compared to survivors, clinicians rated more items across four domains that were statistically different than did parents (23 vs. 13 items). Clinicians rated five items in pain interference domain (ORs 2.33-6.01; p's important but rated three items in psychological stress domain (ORs 0.14-0.42; p's important than did survivors. In contrast, parents rated seven items in positive affect domain (ORs 0.25-0.47; p's important than did survivors. Survivors, parents, and clinicians viewed importance of PRO items for survivorship care differently. These perspectives should be used to assist the development of PROs tools.

  14. Relationship between problems related to child late effects and parent burnout after pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl Norberg, Annika; Mellgren, Karin; Winiarski, Jacek; Forinder, Ulla

    2014-05-01

    A few studies have indicated that parents' reactions to a child's serious disease may entail long-term stress for the parents. However, further knowledge of its consequences is valuable. The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence of burnout in a Swedish national sample of parents of children who had undergone HSCT and survived. Burnout (Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire) and estimations of the child's health status (Lansky/Karnofsky estimations and study-specific questions) were self-reported by 159 mothers and 123 fathers. In addition, physicians made estimations of the child's health status (Lansky/Karnofsky estimations). Nonparametric tests revealed that burnout symptoms occurred more often among fathers of children who had undergone transplantation within the last five yr compared to fathers of children with no history of serious disease (34.4% vs. 19.9%). Burnout among mothers and fathers was associated with the child's number and severity of health impairments up to five yr after the child underwent HSCT (Spearman's rho for mothers 0.26-0.36 and for fathers 0.36-0.61). In conclusion, chronic stress in parents after a child's HSCT seems to abate eventually. However, parents should be monitored and offered adequate support when needed. Moreover, the situation of fathers in the often mother-dominated pediatric setting should receive more attention in research as well as in the clinic. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Novopen Echo® for the delivery of insulin: a comparison of usability, functionality and preference among pediatric subjects, their parents, and health care professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Birthe S; Lilleøre, Søren Kruse; Korsholm, Conny Nøhr

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in insulin pen design and functionality, the selection of pens available for children with diabetes is limited. This study assessed the usability, functionality and attitudes towards NovoPen Echo®, a new durable insulin pen designed for pediatric patients that combines a simple...... memory function with half-increment dosing, versus NovoPen® Junior and HumaPen® Luxura™ HD in pediatric subjects, their parents, and health care professionals (HCPs)....

  16. Measuring Child Work and Residence Adjustments to Parents'Long-Term Care Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Stern

    1996-01-01

    This article estimates the effects of various parent and child characteristics on the choice of care arrangements of the parent, taking inot account the potential endogeneity of some of the child chararcteristics. Three equations are estimated: a care choice equation, a child location equation, and a child work equation. Results suggest a hieracrchy of family decision making; child locations affect the care decision, which affect child work decisions. The results also question previous resear...

  17. Longitudinal assessment of maternal parenting capacity variables and child adjustment outcomes in pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, David A; Mullins, Larry L; Wolfe-Christensen, Cortney; Carpentier, Melissa Y

    2011-04-01

    This preliminary investigation aimed to longitudinally examine parenting capacity variables, namely parental overprotection, perceived child vulnerability, and parenting stress and their relation to child adjustment in mothers of children on treatment for cancer. As part of a larger study, biological mothers (N=22) completed measures of parental overprotection, perceived child vulnerability, parenting stress, and child adjustment at Time 1 and a follow-up time point. Analyses were conducted to determine whether (1) levels of parental overprotection, perceived child vulnerability, and parenting stress declined from Time 1 to follow-up and (2) if Time 1 parenting capacity variables were associated with child adjustment at follow-up. Results revealed that parental overprotection, perceived child vulnerability, and parenting stress declined from Time 1 to follow-up, and levels of parental overprotection, perceived child vulnerability, and parenting stress at Time 1 were significantly related to child adjustment at follow-up. Collectively, the preliminary findings of this study indicate that mothers of children with cancer evidence improved parenting capacity over time. Furthermore, it seems that Time 1 parenting capacity variables are significantly related to later child adjustment.

  18. Early psychological reactions in parents of children with a life threatening illness within a pediatric hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscara, F; McCarthy, M C; Woolf, C; Hearps, S J C; Burke, K; Anderson, V A

    2015-07-01

    Parents of children with life threatening illness or injuries are at elevated risk of distress reactions, involving symptoms of acute stress disorder, depression and anxiety. Currently, the impact of child illness factors is unclear, and to date research systematically examining the prevalence of these psychological reactions across different illness groups with an acute life threat is sparse. This is important to explore given that studies show that parent functioning impacts on the psychological adjustment and recovery of the ill child. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: At four weeks following a child's diagnosis of a serious illness, 49-54% of parents met DSM-IV criteria for acute stress disorder, across a number of illness groups, whereas 15-27% of parents were in the moderate/severe range for depression and anxiety, and 25-31% for stress. Results from this study demonstrate that rates and severity of these psychological reactions in parents of seriously ill children do not vary according to illness type. A life threatening childhood illness/injury can lead to significant distress reactions in parents, with independent studies finding such reactions in several different illness groups. To date, there is limited research systematically comparing the prevalence of adverse parental psychological reactions across different childhood illness groups with an acute life threat. This study aimed to investigate the frequency and severity of symptoms of acute traumatic stress, depression, anxiety and general stress in parents, following admission of their child to hospital for a life threatening illness. The study also aimed to explore the relationship between these symptoms, and to determine whether they differ according to illness/injury. Cross-sectional data from a prospective, longitudinal study are reported. Participants were 194 parents of 145 children (49 couples), admitted to cardiology (n=53), oncology (n=40) and pediatric intensive care units (n=52), for serious

  19. Parents' knowledge and attitude regarding their child's cancer and effectiveness of initial disease counseling in pediatric oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjusha Nair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine parent's knowledge, attitude and psychosocial response regarding their child's cancer and treatment after initial disease counseling by doctor. Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaire based study of 43 mothers of newly diagnosed pediatric cancer patients undergoing treatment in pediatric oncology division. Mothers received initial counseling regarding their child's cancer and treatment from the doctor. Questionnaire was administered 2-6 months after initial counseling and mothers self-reported their responses. Results: 83% mothers had school level education only and 84% belonged to lower and middle socio-economic status. More than 80% mothers knew the name of their child's cancer, type of treatment received by child and approximate duration of treatment. 93% knew regarding painful procedures and 84% mothers reported knowledge about chemotherapy side effects. Hope of cure and satisfaction with treatment were reported by 90% mothers. 81% mothers reported high levels of anxiety and 66% worried regarding painful procedures. As high as 60% of parents were afraid to send their child outside to play and 40% were afraid to send their child to school. 40% mothers wanted more information regarding child's higher education, married life & fertility. On statistical analysis, mother's age, educational status or family background did not influence their knowledge and attitude. Conclusion: Relevant information about child's cancer and treatment can be imparted effectively even to mothers with school level education. This knowledge helps to instill hopeful attitude, confidence and satisfaction in parents. Anxiety and fear related to cancer persists in mothers even after the initial stress period is over. Pain related to injections and procedures is a major concern in parents. Involvement of counselor in the treating team is desirable to overcome these problems.

  20. Parental knowledge, beliefs and behaviours for oral health of toddlers residing in rural Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussy, M G; Waters, E B; Riggs, E M; Lo, S K; Kilpatrick, N M

    2008-03-01

    Little is known about the oral health of children under the age of four years. The determinants of early childhood caries (ECC) in this young age group are also not well understood despite a growing recognition that early interventions may deliver the greatest benefits. The aim of this study was to examine the oral health-related knowledge, attitudes and reported behaviours of parents of children aged 12-24 months living in rural areas of Victoria, Australia. A robust theoretical model was utilized to identify oral health-related behaviours and their antecedent and reinforcing conditions within the context of this specific population group. Two hundred and ninety-four parent/child dyads were recruited through their maternal and child health nurses as part of a larger intervention trial. Parents completed a self-report questionnaire. Knowledge regarding risk and protective factors amongst parents was variable and sometimes at odds with contemporary evidence. Knowledge of the role of early infection with S. mutans was very low, with high levels of behaviours that may promote early transmission reported. Tooth cleaning was reported by most parents at least sometimes, however a large proportion lacked confidence and this was significantly related to the frequency of the cleaning. Parents were confused about the fluoride status of their water supplies. Most parents believed fluoride toothpaste reduced the risk of ECC but did not know whether it should be used with toddlers. The results of this study have implications for efforts to prevent dental decay in this very young age group. Health care professionals other than dentists need support to provide information and promote confidence with regard to optimal fluoride exposure. Attention should also be given to the contribution of early contact with particular bacteria in oral health education and promotion programmes.

  1. Parental immigration status is associated with children's health care utilization: findings from the 2003 new immigrant survey of US legal permanent residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Katherine; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Curry, Leslie A; Krumholz, Harlan M; Desai, Mayur M

    2013-12-01

    Our objective was to examine the association between parental immigration status and child health and health care utilization. Using data from a national sample of immigrant adults who had recently become legal permanent residents (LPR), children (n = 2,170) were categorized according to their parents' immigration status prior to LPR: legalized, mixed-status, refugee, temporary resident, or undocumented. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to compare child health and health care utilization by parental immigration status over the prior 12 months. Nearly all children in the sample were reported to be in good to excellent health. Children whose parents had been undocumented were least likely to have had an illness that was reported to have required medical attention (5.4 %). Children whose parents had been either undocumented or temporary residents were most likely to have a delayed preventive annual exam (18.2 and 18.7 %, respectively). Delayed dental care was most common among children whose parents had come to the US as refugees (29.1 %). Differences in the preventive annual exam remained significant after adjusting for socioeconomic characteristics. Parental immigration status before LPR was not associated with large differences in reported child health status. Parental immigration status before LPR was associated with the use of preventive annual exams and dental services. However, no group of children was consistently disadvantaged with respect to all measures.

  2. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Pediatric Surgical Association Search for: Login Resources + For Members For Professionals For Training Program Directors For Media For ... Surgical Outcomes Surveys & Results Publications Continuing Education + ExPERT Pediatric Surgery NaT Annual Meeting CME MOC Requirements Residents / ...

  3. Behavioral Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale in Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Psychometrics and Associations With Child and Parent Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Stephanie L; Smith, Isabel M; Duku, Eric; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Szatmari, Peter; Bryson, Susan; Fombonne, Eric; Volden, Joanne; Waddell, Charlotte; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Mirenda, Pat; Bennett, Teresa; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Georgiades, Stelios

    2015-07-01

    The factor structure and validity of the Behavioral Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale (BPFAS; Crist & Napier-Phillips, 2001) were examined in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the original BPFAS five-factor model, the fit of each latent variable, and a rival one-factor model. None of the models was adequate, thus a categorical exploratory factor analysis (CEFA) was conducted. Correlations were used to examine relations between the BPFAS and concurrent variables of interest. The CEFA identified an acceptable three-factor model. Correlational analyses indicated that feeding problems were positively related to parent-reported autism symptoms, behavior problems, sleep problems, and parenting stress, but largely unrelated to performance-based indices of autism symptom severity, language, and cognitive abilities, as well as child age. These results provide evidence supporting the use of the identified BPFAS three-factor model for samples of young children with ASD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Effects of communication styles on marital satisfaction and distress of parents of pediatric cancer patients: a prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnberg-Williams, Barbara J; Van de Wiel, Harry B M; Kamps, Willem; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E H M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the longitudinal effects of communication styles on marital satisfaction and distress of parents of children treated for cancer. Marital dissatisfaction (Maudsley Marital Questionnaire), intimacy, avoidance, destructive and incongruent communication (Communication Skills Inventory) and psychological distress (General Health Questionnaire) were assessed in 115 parents of pediatric cancer patients shortly after diagnosis (T1) and 5 years later (T2). Only mothers' marital dissatisfaction increased significantly over time. No gender differences in dissatisfaction were found. Mothers had a significantly higher lack of intimacy score than fathers. All T1 communication styles were significantly univariately related to fathers' and mothers' T2 marital dissatisfaction, while not to T2 distress. Mothers' T1 marital dissatisfaction accounted for 67% and fathers' for 12% in the explained variance of T2 dissatisfaction. T1 destructive communication uniquely affected fathers' T2 marital dissatisfaction and T1 avoidant communication that of mothers. Five years after cancer diagnosis in their children, the quality of parents' marital relationships seemed largely unchanged. Parents' use of communication skills at diagnosis appeared to have limited effect on their marital dissatisfaction and no effect on their distress 5 years later. While avoidant communication seemed indicative of mothers' marital distress, fathers' seemed affected by destructive communication. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Audiovisual aid viewing immediately before pediatric induction moderates the accompanying parents' anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghmans, Johan; Weber, Frank; van Akoleyen, Candyce; Utens, Elisabeth; Adriaenssens, Peter; Klein, Jan; Himpe, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Parents accompanying their child during induction of anesthesia experience stress. The impact of audiovisual aid (AVA) on parental state anxiety and assessment of the child's anxiety at induction have been studied previously but need closer scrutiny. One hundred and twenty parents whose children

  6. Agreement between child self-reported and parent-reported scores for chronic pain secondary to specific pediatric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez Rodriguez-Labajo, A; Castarlenas, E; Miró, J; Reinoso-Barbero, F

    2017-03-01

    Parental report on a child's secondary chronic pain is commonly requested by anesthesiologists when the child cannot directly provide information. Daily pain intensity is reported as highest, average and lowest. However, it is unclear whether the parents' score is a valid indicator of the child's pain experience. Nineteen children (aged 6-18years) with secondary chronic pain attending our anesthesiologist-run pediatric pain unit participated in this study. Identification of highest, average and lowest pain intensity levels were requested during initial screening interviews with the child and parents. Pain intensity was scored on a 0-10 numerical rating scale. Agreement was examined using: (i) intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and (ii) the Bland-Altman method. The ICC's between the children and the parents' pain intensity reports were: 0.92 for the highest, 0.68 for the average, and 0.50 for the lowest pain intensity domains. The limits of agreement set at 95% between child and parental reports were respectively +2.19 to -2.07, +3.17 to -3.88 and +5.15 to -5.50 for the highest, average and lowest pain domains. For the highest pain intensity domain, agreement between parents and children was excellent. If replicated this preliminary finding would suggest the highest pain intensity is the easiest domain for reporting pain intensity when a child cannot directly express him or herself. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Communicating with child patients in pediatric oncology consultations: a vignette study on child patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaanswijk, Marieke; Tates, Kiek; van Dulmen, Sandra; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Kamps, Willem A; Beishuizen, A; Bensing, Jozien M

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the preferences of children with cancer, their parents, and survivors of childhood cancer regarding medical communication with child patients and variables associated with these preferences. Preferences regarding health-care provider empathy in consultations, and children's involvement in information exchange and medical decision making were investigated by means of vignettes. Vignettes are brief descriptions of hypothetical situations, in which important factors are systematically varied following an experimental design. In total, 1440 vignettes were evaluated by 34 children with cancer (aged 8-16), 59 parents, and 51 survivors (aged 8-16 at diagnosis, currently aged 10-30). Recruitment of participants took place in three Dutch university-based pediatric oncology centers. Data were analyzed by multilevel analyses. Patients, parents, and survivors indicated the importance of health-care providers' empathy in 81% of the described situations. In most situations (70%), the three respondent groups preferred information about illness and treatment to be given to patients and parents simultaneously. Preferences regarding the amount of information provided to patients varied. The preference whether or not to shield patients from information was mainly associated with patients' age and emotionality. In most situations (71%), the three respondent groups preferred children to participate in medical decision making. This preference was mainly associated with patients' age. To be able to adapt communication to parents' and patients' preferences, health-care providers should repeatedly assess the preferences of both groups. Future studies should investigate how health-care providers balance their communication between the sometimes conflicting preferences of patients and parents. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. Langenau

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and American Osteopathic Association (AOA, residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE, also assess competency in several clinical domains.The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009.The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component were merged and analyzed for relationships.Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings.A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA and ACGME core competencies.

  9. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik E.; Pugliano, Gina; Roberts, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Osteopathic Association (AOA), residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP) program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE), also assess competency in several clinical domains. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009. Methods The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component) were merged and analyzed for relationships. Results Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings. Discussion A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA

  10. Experiences of four parents with physical therapy and early mobility of their children in a pediatric critical care unit: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisien, Rachel B; Gillanders, Kirstie; Hennessy, Erin K; Herterich, Lisa; Saunders, Kendra; Lati, Jamil; Dos Santos, Stephanie; Hassall, Alison; O'Brien, Kelly K

    2016-05-31

    The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary investigation into parents' experiences of physical therapy and early mobility (EM) for their children in a pediatric critical care unit (PCCU). We conducted a series of four qualitative case studies using in-depth semi-structured face-to-face interviews. We recruited parents of children who had undergone surgery and received at least one EM physical therapy intervention while intubated. We conducted a thematic analysis of transcribed interviews to illuminate the factors that influenced EM experiences. Four parents participated in the study. We developed an overview of Parental Experiences with Physical Therapy and Early Mobility in a PCCU, which includes four themes that parents believed influenced their experiences: (1) environmental factors; (2) awareness of physical therapist and health care professional (HCP) roles; (3) communication among parents and HCPs; and (4) parental participation in their child's EM, within the overarching parental experiences in the PCCU. This study affords a preliminary understanding of parents' experiences with physical therapy and EM in a PCCU setting. Results provide an important foundation for future research on mobility in the context of pediatric critical care research and practice.

  11. Residência médica em pediatria: no campo de prática Medical residence in pediatrics: in the field of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora Monteiro Villar

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetivou identificar em que medida a especificidade do campo de prática do Instituto Fernandes Figueira, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, contribui para que os médicos residentes em pediatria desenvolvam seu raciocínio clínico, o feeling de gravidade e o domínio de técnicas diagnóstico-terapêuticas. Os dados foram coletados mediante entrevistas temáticas e analisados tendo por base o modelo indiciário. Os resultados apontam para a visão da medicina como ciência e como arte; para o encontro médico-paciente enquanto instância de legitimidade do saber médico; para o conteúdo específico do saber pediátrico como especialidade e para um postulado de gravidade que dificulta a construção do raciocínio clínico e, conseqüentemente, do feeling de gravidade.The study focuses on how specificity of pediatric practice at the Fernandes Figueira Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, contributes to the development of clinical reasoning, the ability to detect evolution in serious illness, and the capacity to use diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Data were collected using a thematic interview and analyzed by a semiotic model. The results showed a common view of medicine as both science and art, the doctor-patient relationship as legitimating medical knowledge, pediatrics as having its own peculiarities (thus being defined as a medical specialty, and a severity postulate that hinders the development of clinical reasoning and thus the ability to detect evolution in serious illness.

  12. Parental role in decision making about pediatric cardiac transplantation: familial and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, S S

    2001-10-01

    Parents of children with complex or terminal heart conditions often face agonizing decisions about cardiac transplantation. There are differences in the level of involvement that parents prefer when making such decisions. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe parents' preferences for their roles in decisions related to cardiac transplantation. A prospective ethnographic method was used to study 24 parents of 15 children prior to their decision of accepting or rejecting the transplant option for their children. Findings revealed that the style of parent decision making ranged from a desire to make an independent, autonomous choice to a wish for an authoritarian, paternalistic choice. Nurses and physicians can best support families in this situation, showing sensitivity to the steps that parents use to make their decisions. An ethical model of decision making is proposed that includes respect for differences in beliefs and values of all persons involved in the transplantation discussion. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  13. Parental satisfaction with pediatric day-care surgery and its determinants in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenita James Sam

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Perception of quality of pediatric day-care surgery was assessed with a questionnaire and was found to be good. Variables related to surgery such as pain may be included in the questionnaire for assessing satisfaction in the day-care surgery.

  14. Parental Distress and Quality of Life in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Implications for the Outpatient Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diederen, Kay; Haverman, Lotte; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    The interrelation between the course of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in children and parent's distress, and the subsequent impact this may have on Health-Related Quality Of Life (HRQOL) of the child is unclear. Therefore, we investigated (I) patient's HRQOL and parental distress, and (II) the

  15. Descriptive Analyses of Pediatric Food Refusal: The Structure of Parental Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Julia N.; Borrero, John C.; Laud, Rinita B.; Borrero, Carrie S. W.

    2010-01-01

    Mealtime observations were conducted and occurrences of appropriate and inappropriate mealtime behavior and various forms of parental attention (e.g., coaxing, reprimands) were recorded for 25 children admitted to an intensive feeding program and their parents. Using the data from the observations, lag sequential analyses were conducted to…

  16. Correlation of parenting style and pediatric behavior guidance strategies in the dental setting: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminabadi, Naser Asl; Farahani, Ramin Mostofi Zadeh

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of parenting style on the choice of proper behavior guidance strategies in pedodontics. Seventy-two children aged between 4 and 6 years (mean 5.12 years) with carious primary mandibular molars were selected. The Primary Caregivers' Practices Report (PCPR) was used to quantify authoritarian, permissive and authoritative aspects of the caregivers' parenting style. After inferior alveolar nerve block, carious lesions were removed and the teeth were restored using amalgam. The children's behavior during operation was assessed according to the sound, eye, and motor (SEM) scale. Communicative guidance, advance behavior guidance, parental separation, and deferred treatment were used for behavior management. The dominant authoritative score was observed in 50% of parents, permissive in 37.5%, and authoritarian in 12.5%. The mean SEM score in children belonging to authoritative parents was significantly lower than in children of permissive and of authoritarian parents (pparenting style. Advanced behavior guidance (protective stabilization) was applied in 16.7% of cases in the authoritative category and in 100% in the permissive and authoritarian categories. The use of restrictive devices (7.4%) and sedation (3.7%) was limited to the permissive category. Parental separation (40.7%) and deferred treatment (3.7%) were performed only in the permissive category. This study provides preliminary evidence that a child's reaction to restorative dental procedures is influenced by the nature of the caregiver's parenting style.

  17. Parent and Child Psychological Factors in Pediatric Syncope and Other Somatic Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Ronald L.; Morris, Julie A. B.; Cheng, Patricia S.; Campbell, Robert M.; Brown, Ronald T.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined associations among parental and child adjustment, child syncope, somatic, and school problems. Participants were children (N = 56) ages 7-18 years with syncope. Measures included syncope severity, parental distress, and children's internalizing symptoms. For children diagnosed negative for neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS), their…

  18. Perspectives toward oral mucositis prevention from parents and health care professionals in pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Regier, Dean A; Tomlinson, Deborah; Judd, Peter; Doyle, John; Gassas, Adam; Naqvi, Ahmed; Sung, Lillian

    2012-08-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe parents and health care professionals (HCPs) perceived importance of oral mucositis prevention in children with cancer; (2) To describe utilities and willingness-to-pay (WTP) to prevent mucositis. Respondents included parents of children receiving intensive chemotherapy for leukemia/lymphoma or undergoing stem cell transplantation and HCPs caring for children with cancer. Importance of mild and severe oral mucositis was estimated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Mucositis-associated utilities were elicited using the time trade-off technique (TTO). WTP to avoid mucositis was obtained using contingent valuation. These techniques quantify how much time or money the participant is willing to relinquish in order to prevent mucositis. Eighty-two parents and 60 HCPs were included. Parents and HCPs believed mild mucositis to be of similar importance (median VAS 2.5 versus 3.6; P = 0.357) while parents considered severe mucositis less important than HCPs (median VAS 8.3 versus 9.0; P parent versus HCP responses were seen with TTO (mild or severe mucositis) and most parents were not willing to trade any survival time to prevent severe mucositis. Parents were willing to pay significantly more than HCPs to prevent mild mucositis (average median WTP $1,371 CAN vs. $684 CAN, P = 0.031). No differences were seen in WTP to prevent severe mucositis. Parents and HCP believe severe mucositis to be important, although it is more important to HCPs. Parents would not be willing to reduce life expectancy to eliminate mucositis.

  19. Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parents, people are always ready to offer advice. Parenting tips, parents' survival guides, dos, don'ts, shoulds ... right" way to be a good parent. Good parenting includes Keeping your child safe Showing affection and ...

  20. Ethical issues at the interface of clinical care and research practice in pediatric oncology: a narrative review of parents' and physicians' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Martine C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatric oncology has a strong research culture. Most pediatric oncologists are investigators, involved in clinical care as well as research. As a result, a remarkable proportion of children with cancer enrolls in a trial during treatment. This paper discusses the ethical consequences of the unprecedented integration of research and care in pediatric oncology from the perspective of parents and physicians. Methodology An empirical ethical approach, combining (1 a narrative review of (primarily qualitative studies on parents' and physicians' experiences of the pediatric oncology research practice, and (2 comparison of these experiences with existing theoretical ethical concepts about (pediatric research. The use of empirical evidence enriches these concepts by taking into account the peculiarities that ethical challenges pose in practice. Results Analysis of the 22 studies reviewed revealed that the integration of research and care has consequences for the informed consent process, the promotion of the child's best interests, and the role of the physician (doctor vs. scientist. True consent to research is difficult to achieve due to the complexity of research protocols, emotional stress and parents' dependency on their child's physician. Parents' role is to promote their child's best interests, also when they are asked to consider enrolling their child in a trial. Parents are almost never in equipoise on trial participation, which leaves them with the agonizing situation of wanting to do what is best for their child, while being fearful of making the wrong decision. Furthermore, a therapeutic misconception endangers correct assessment of participation, making parents inaccurately attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures. Physicians prefer the perspective of a therapist over a researcher. Consequently they may truly believe that in the research setting they promote the child's best interests, which maintains the

  1. Measuring emotion socialization in families affected by pediatric cancer: Refinement and reduction of the Parents' Beliefs about Children's Emotions questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitra, Danette; El-Behadli, Ana F; Faith, Melissa A

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to conduct a multimethod psychometric reduction in the Parents' Beliefs about Children's Emotions (PBCE) questionnaire using an item response theory framework with a pediatric oncology sample. Participants were 216 pediatric oncology caregivers who completed the PBCE. The PBCE contains 105 items (11 subscales) rated on a 6-point Likert-type scale. We evaluated the PBCE subscale performance by applying a partial credit model in WINSTEPS. Sixty-six statistically weak items were removed, creating a 44-item PBCE questionnaire with 10 subscales and 3 response options per item. The refined scale displayed good psychometric properties and correlated .910 with the original PBCE. Additional analyses examined dimensionality, item-level (e.g. difficulty), and person-level (e.g. ethnicity) characteristics. The refined PBCE questionnaire provides better test information, improves instrument reliability, and reduces burden on families, providers, and researchers. With this improved measure, providers can more easily identify families who may benefit from psychosocial interventions targeting emotion socialization. The results of the multistep approach presented should be considered preliminary, given the limited sample size.

  2. Toward creating family-friendly work environments in pediatrics: baseline data from pediatric department chairs and pediatric program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Burke, Ann E; Sheppard, Kate; Pallant, Adam; Stapleton, F Bruder; Stanton, Bonita

    2007-03-01

    The objective was to determine baseline characteristics of pediatric residency training programs and academic departments in regard to family-friendly work environments as outlined in the Report of the Task Force on Women in Pediatrics. We conducted Web-based anonymous surveys of 147 pediatric department chairs and 203 pediatric program directors. The chair's questionnaire asked about child care, lactation facilities, family leave policies, work-life balance, and tenure and promotion policies. The program director's questionnaire asked about family leave, parenting, work-life balance, and perceptions of "family-friendliness." The response rate was 52% for program directors and 51% for chairs. Nearly 60% of chairs reported some access to child care or provided assistance locating child care; however, in half of these departments, demand almost always exceeded supply. Lactation facilities were available to breastfeeding faculty in 74% of departments, although only 57% provided access to breast pumps. A total of 78% of chairs and 90% of program directors reported written maternity leave policies with slightly fewer reporting paternity leave policies. The majority (83%) of chairs reported availability of part-time employment, whereas only 27% of program directors offered part-time residency options. Most departments offered some flexibility in promotion and tenure. Although progress has been made, change still is needed in many areas in pediatric departments and training programs, including better accessibility to quality child care; improved lactation facilities for breastfeeding mothers; clear, written parental leave policies; and flexible work schedules to accommodate changing demands of family life.

  3. [End-of-life care in a Spanish Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: staff and parental evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagarro García, A; Dorao Martínez-Romillo, P; Moraleda, S; López, P; Moreno, T; San-José, B; Martínez Biarge, M; Tapia Moreno, R; Ruza-Tarrío, F

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate end-of-life care in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Retrospective study developed in a PICU. 41 workers from the PICU and parents of 26 deceased children (from 2001 to 2005). A questionnaire was designed to investigate end-of-life care. An age parents were with their children at the time of death; 64 % of all parents consider this "positive", and 13 % consider it "negative". Forty per cent of staff stated that it is "positive" for parents to be by the side of their child at the time of death, and 52 % do not know. Seventy-three per cent of staff, but only 29 % of parents want further professional psychological support for parents. Twenty per cent of children died following withdrawal of life support. The most important factors for this decision were the possibility of survival and quality of life. The majority (73 %) of caregivers express the view that often, this decision should be taken earlier. Analysis of staff opinions underlines the importance of the way news is communicated, the timing of withdrawal of life support, and the need for psychological support. Parents emphasized the role of the family during time spent in a PICU and during the last moments.

  4. [The pediatric patient at the end-of-life. A challenge for its identification and treatment. A survey in pediatricians and medical residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique; Olvera-González, Héctor; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Angel

    2011-01-01

    Identification of pediatric patients at the end-of-life is not easy because criteria used are based on adults' criteria. In this survey we explore the children end-of-life definition pediatricians have, as well as to determine which interventions they use when caring a patient at end-of-life. Tertiary referral pediatric hospital. Staff pediatricians (SP) and medical residents (MR). A self-administrated questionnaire was built and validated. It contains five vignettes of pediatric patients: Two with WHO criteria for an end-of-life condition (EC) and three without an end-of-life condition (NEC). PARTICIPANTS identified each patient with or without an end-of-life condition, and which palliative actions they would perform accordingly Their responses were recorded in a 4-option Likert scale. Ordinal regression was used to assess if some of the participants' characteristics were related to the identification of an end-of-life condition. Response rate was 84.2% (128/152); of whom 63 were SP and 65 MR. EC cases were well identified in 90 and 93%, while NEC in 30 and 40%, respectively Palliative actions were more according in EC patients, but around 20% would not provide them. Among NEC patients, there were more disparities of palliative actions to be delivered, and it was statistically significantly. Ordinal regression showed that some participants' characteristics are associated to the appropriate identification of end-of-life patients; however, these factors were not consistent across the five scenarios. Among pediatricians, criteria of end-of-life conditions are not well established, neither the palliative actions. Educational interventions are needed to improve the quality of life of these children.

  5. Audiovisual aid viewing immediately before pediatric induction moderates the accompanying parents' anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghmans, Johan; Weber, Frank; van Akoleyen, Candyce; Utens, Elisabeth; Adriaenssens, Peter; Klein, Jan; Himpe, Dirk

    2012-04-01

    Parents accompanying their child during induction of anesthesia experience stress. The impact of audiovisual aid (AVA) on parental state anxiety and assessment of the child's anxiety at induction have been studied previously but need closer scrutiny. One hundred and twenty parents whose children were scheduled for day-care surgery entered this randomized, controlled study. The intervention group (n = 60) was exposed to an AVA in the holding area. Parental anxiety was measured with the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) at three time points: (i) on admission [T1]; (ii) in the holding area just before entering the operating theater [T2]; and (iii) after leaving [T3]. Additionally, at [T3], both parent and attending anesthetist evaluated the child's anxiety using a visual analogue scale. The anesthetist also filled out the Induction Compliance Checklist. On the state anxiety subscale, APAIS parental anxiety at T2 (P = 0.015) and T3 (P = 0.009) was lower in the AVA intervention group than in the control group. After induction, the child's anxiety rating by the anesthetist was significantly lower than by the parent, in both intervention and control groups. Preoperative AVA shown to parents immediately before induction moderates the increase in anxiety associated with the anesthetic induction of their child. Present results suggest that behavioral characteristics seem better predictors of child's anxiety during induction than anxiety ratings per se and that anesthetists are better than parents in predicting child's anxiety during induction. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Communication During Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Family Conferences: A Pilot Study of Content, Communication, and Parent Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Kelly; Clayman, Marla L; Ryan, Claire; Emanuel, Linda; Frader, Joel

    2017-10-01

    While there is a robust literature describing family conferences (FCs) in adult intensive care units (ICUs), less information exists about FCs in pediatric ICUs (PICUs). We conducted a pilot study to describe the focus of discussion, communication patterns of health care team members (HTMs) and parents, and parents' perspectives about clinician communication during PICU FCs. We analyzed data from 22 video- or audiorecorded PICU FCs and post-FC questionnaire responses from 27 parents involved in 18 FCs. We used the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) to describe FC dialogue content. Our questionnaire included the validated Communication Assessment Tool (CAT). FCs were focused on care planning (n = 5), decision making (n = 6), and updates (n = 11). Most speech came from HTMs (mean 85%; range, 65-94%). Most HTM utterances involved medical information. Most parent utterances involved asking for explanations. The mean overall CAT score was 4.62 (using a 1-5 scale where 5 represents excellent and 1 poor) with a mean of 73.02% "excellent" responses. Update and care-planning FCs had lower CAT scores compared to decision-making FCs. The lowest scoring CAT items were "Involved me in decisions as much as I wanted," "Talked in terms I could understand," and "Gave me as much information as I wanted." These findings suggest that while health care providers spend most of their time during FCs relaying medical information, more attention should be directed at providing information in an understandable manner. More work is needed to improve communication when decision making is not the main focus of the FC.

  7. RADIONUCLIDE STUDIES IN PEDIATRIC PRACTICE: INTERACTION OF RESEARCHER, CHILD AND PARENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.K. Fomin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the issues interaction between a doctor and a child during the radionuclide study. They also give recommendations of the pediatric council under auspices of the European society of the nuclear medicine to carry on the scintigraphic studies among the children. The article high lights the basic moments as to the psychoprophylactic preparation of the children for the radionuclide study with regard to their age and character peculiarities. The researchers offer approaches to define the psychic and emotional status of the child, degree of anxiety before the study and methods to eliminate it, allowing for considerable quality improvement of the performed procedure.Key words: children, radionuclide diagnostics, pediatric radiology, psychoprophylactic preparation.

  8. Acculturation Needs of Pediatric International Medical Graduates: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osta, Amanda D; Barnes, Michelle M; Pessagno, Regina; Schwartz, Alan; Hirshfield, Laura E

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: International medical graduates (IMGs) play a key role in host countries' health systems but face unique challenges, which makes effective, tailored support for IMGs essential. Prior literature describing the acculturation needs of IMGs focused primarily on communication content and style. We conducted a qualitative study to explore acculturation that might be specific to IMG residents who care for children. In a study conducted from November 2011 to April 2012, we performed four 90-minute semistructured focus groups with 26 pediatric IMG residents from 12 countries. The focus group transcripts were analyzed using open and focused coding methodology. The focus groups and subsequent analysis demonstrated that pediatric IMG residents' socialization to their home culture impacts their transition to practice in the United States; they must adjust not only to a U.S. culture, different from their own, but also to the culture of medicine in the United States. We identified the following new acculturation themes: understanding the education system and family structure, social determinants of health, communication with African American parents, contraception, physician handoffs, physicians' role in prevention, adolescent health, and physicians' role in child advocacy. We further highlight the acculturation challenges faced by pediatric IMG residents and offer brief recommendations for the creation of a deliberate acculturation curriculum for pediatric IMG residents. Insight: Residency training is a unique period in physicians' personal and professional development and can be particularly challenging for IMGs. There is a significant gap in the identified acculturation needs and the current curricula available to IMG residents who care for children.

  9. Parents, Mental Illness, and the Primary Health Care of Infants and Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This bulletin issue contains five papers on the theme of adults with mental illness who are parents of very young children. "Parents, Mental Illness, and the Primary Health Care of Infants and Young Children" (John N. Constantino) offers the experience of a trainee in a combined residency in pediatrics and psychiatry, focusing on…

  10. Parent-identified barriers to pediatric health care: a process-oriented model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobo, Elisa J; Seid, Michael; Reyes Gelhard, Leticia

    2006-02-01

    To further understand barriers to care as experienced by health care consumers, and to demonstrate the importance of conjoining qualitative and quantitative health services research. Transcripts from focus groups conducted in San Diego with English- and Spanish-speaking parents of children with special health care needs. Participants were asked about the barriers to care they had experienced or perceived, and their strategies for overcoming these barriers. Using elementary anthropological discourse analysis techniques, a process-based conceptual model of the parent experience was devised. The analysis revealed a parent-motivated model of barriers to care that enriched our understanding of quantitative findings regarding the population from which the focus group sample was drawn. Parent-identified barriers were grouped into the following six temporally and spatially sequenced categories: necessary skills and prerequisites for gaining access to the system; realizing access once it is gained; front office experiences; interactions with physicians; system arbitrariness and fragmentation; outcomes that affect future interaction with the system. Key to the successful navigation of the system was parents' functional biomedical acculturation; this construct likens the biomedical health services system to a cultural system within which all parents/patients must learn to function competently. Qualitative analysis of focus group data enabled a deeper understanding of barriers to care--one that went beyond the traditional association of marker variables with poor outcomes ("what") to reveal an understanding of the processes by which parents experience the health care system ("how,"why") and by which disparities may arise. Development of such process-oriented models furthers the provision of patient-centered care and the creation of interventions, programs, and curricula to enhance such care. Qualitative discourse analysis, for example using this project's widely applicable

  11. Communicating doses of pediatric liquid medicines to parents/caregivers: a comparison of written dosing directions on prescriptions with labels applied by dispensed pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rita; Blustein, Leona; Kuffner, Ed; Davis, Lisa

    2014-03-01

    To identify and compare volumetric measures used by healthcare providers in communicating dosing instructions for pediatric liquid prescriptions to parents/caregivers. Dosing instructions were retrospectively reviewed for the 10 most frequently prescribed liquid medications dispensed from 4 community pharmacies for patients aged ≤ 12 years during a 3-month period. Volumetric measures on original prescriptions (ie, milliliters, teaspoons) were compared with those utilized by the pharmacist on the pharmacy label dispensed to the parent/caregiver. Of 649 prescriptions and corresponding pharmacy labels evaluated, 68% of prescriptions and 62% of pharmacy labels communicated dosing in milliliters, 24% of prescriptions and 29% of pharmacy labels communicated dosing in teaspoonfuls, 7% of prescriptions and 0% of pharmacy labels communicated dosing in other measures (ie, milligrams, cubic centimeters, "dose"), and 25% of dispensed pharmacy labels did not reflect units as written in the prescription. Volumetric measures utilized by healthcare professionals in dosing instructions for prescription pediatric oral liquid medications are not consistent. Healthcare professionals and parents/caregivers should be educated on safe dosing practices for liquid pediatric medications. Generalizability to the larger pediatric population may vary depending on pharmacy chain, location, and medications evaluated. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bloodless pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass for a 3.2-kg patient whose parents are of Jehovah's Witness faith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Todd M; Hodge, Ashley B; Preston, Thomas J; Galantowicz, Mark; Naguib, Aymen; Gomez, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Patients and parents of Jehovah's Witness (JW) faith present multiple challenges to a medical team, especially in the neonatal and pediatric population. The medical team must balance honoring the parents' request of not receiving blood products and fulfilling our commitment as advocates for the child's wellbeing. A multidisciplinary approach to cardiac surgery must be embraced for bloodless cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to be successful. At our institution, we have developed strategies and techniques for blood conservation that are used preoperatively, intraoperatively, and postoperatively for every CPB case with the goal of a bloodless procedure. These protocols include: preoperative erythropoietin, preoperative iron administration, selection of a CPB circuit specific to the patient's height and weight, acute normovolemic hemodilution, retrograde autologous prime and venous autologous prime, tranexamic acid administration, zero-balance ultrafiltration, flushing of the pump suckers post-CPB, modified ultrafiltration, and cell salvage. We present an 8-day-old, 3.2-kg patient of JW faith with aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation and a patent foramen ovale who underwent a bloodless left ventricle-to-aorta tunnel repair and aortic valve repair on CPB.

  13. Pediatric Oncology Palliative Care: Experiences of General Practitioners and Bereaved Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Sue J; Gibson, Faith; Greenfield, Sheila M

    2015-03-01

    This qualitative study set in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom, aimed to examine the role of the general practitioner (GP) in children's oncology palliative care from the perspective of GPs who had cared for a child with cancer receiving palliative care at home and bereaved parents. One-to-one semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 18 GPs and 11 bereaved parents following the death. A grounded theory data analysis was undertaken; identifying generated themes through chronological comparative data analysis. Similarity in GP and parent viewpoints was found, the GPs role seen as one of providing medication and support. Time pressures GPs faced influenced their level of engagement with the family during palliative and bereavement care and their ability to address their identified learning deficits. Lack of familiarity with the family, coupled with an acknowledgment that it was a rare and could be a frightening experience, also influenced their level of interaction. There was no consistency in GP practice nor evidence of practice being guided by local or national policies. Parents lack of clarity of their GPs role resulted in missed opportunities for support. Time pressures influence GP working practices. Enhanced communication and collaboration between the GP and regional childhood cancer centre may help address identified GP challenges, such as learning deficits, and promote more time-efficient working practices through role clarity. Parents need greater awareness of their GP's wide-ranging role; one that transcends palliative care incorporating bereavement support and on-going medical care for family members.

  14. Patterns of Spillover Between Marital Adjustment and Parent-Child Conflict During Pediatric Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fladeboe, Kaitlyn; Gurtovenko, Kyrill; Keim, Madelaine; Kawamura, Joy; King, Kevin M; Friedman, Debra L; Compas, Bruce E; Breiger, David; Lengua, Liliana J; Katz, Lynn Fainsilber

    2018-03-17

     When a child is diagnosed with cancer, problems may arise in family relationships and negatively affect child adjustment. The current study examined patterns of spillover between marital and parent-child relationships to identify targets for intervention aimed at ameliorating family conflict.  Families (N = 117) were recruited from two US children's hospitals within 2-week postdiagnosis to participate in a short-term prospective longitudinal study. Children with cancer were 2-10 years old (M = 5.42 years, SD = 2.59). Primary caregivers provided reports of marital and parent-child conflict at 1-, 6-, and 12-month postdiagnosis.  Results indicated that a unidirectional model of spillover from the marital to the parent-child relationship best explained the data. In terms of specific temporal patterns, lower marital adjustment soon after diagnosis was associated with an increase in parent-child conflict 6 months later, though this pattern was not repeated in the latter 6 months of treatment.  Targeting problems in marital relationships soon after diagnosis may prevent conflict from developing in the parent-child relationship.

  15. Childhood overweight/obesity and pediatric asthma: the role of parental perception of child weight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaad, Salma M A; Paige, Katie N; Teran-Garcia, Margarita; Donovan, Sharon M; Fiese, Barbara H; The Strong Kids Research Team

    2013-09-23

    Childhood obesity and asthma are on the rise in the U.S. Clinical and epidemiological data suggest a link between the two, in which overweight and obese children are at higher risk for asthma. Prevention of childhood obesity is preferred over treatment, however, in order to be receptive to messages, parents must perceive that their child is overweight. Many parents do not accurately assess their child's weight status. Herein, the relation between parental perceptions of child weight status, observed body mass index (BMI) percentiles, and a measure of child feeding practices were explored in the context of asthma, food allergy, or both. Out of the children with asthma or food allergy that were classified as overweight/obese by BMI percentiles, 93% were not perceived as overweight/obese by the parent. Mean scores for concern about child weight were higher in children with both asthma and food allergy than either condition alone, yet there were no significant differences among the groups in terms of pressure to eat and restrictive feeding practices. In summary, parents of children with asthma or food allergy were less likely to recognize their child's overweight/obese status and their feeding practices did not differ from those without asthma and food allergy.

  16. Asthma exacerbation and proximity of residence to major roads: a population-based matched case-control study among the pediatric Medicaid population in Detroit, Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahl Robert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between asthma and traffic-related pollutants has received considerable attention. The use of individual-level exposure measures, such as residence location or proximity to emission sources, may avoid ecological biases. Method This study focused on the pediatric Medicaid population in Detroit, MI, a high-risk population for asthma-related events. A population-based matched case-control analysis was used to investigate associations between acute asthma outcomes and proximity of residence to major roads, including freeways. Asthma cases were identified as all children who made at least one asthma claim, including inpatient and emergency department visits, during the three-year study period, 2004-06. Individually matched controls were randomly selected from the rest of the Medicaid population on the basis of non-respiratory related illness. We used conditional logistic regression with distance as both categorical and continuous variables, and examined non-linear relationships with distance using polynomial splines. The conditional logistic regression models were then extended by considering multiple asthma states (based on the frequency of acute asthma outcomes using polychotomous conditional logistic regression. Results Asthma events were associated with proximity to primary roads with an odds ratio of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.94, 0.99 for a 1 km increase in distance using conditional logistic regression, implying that asthma events are less likely as the distance between the residence and a primary road increases. Similar relationships and effect sizes were found using polychotomous conditional logistic regression. Another plausible exposure metric, a reduced form response surface model that represents atmospheric dispersion of pollutants from roads, was not associated under that exposure model. Conclusions There is moderately strong evidence of elevated risk of asthma close to major roads based on the results obtained

  17. Asthma exacerbation and proximity of residence to major roads: a population-based matched case-control study among the pediatric Medicaid population in Detroit, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between asthma and traffic-related pollutants has received considerable attention. The use of individual-level exposure measures, such as residence location or proximity to emission sources, may avoid ecological biases. Method This study focused on the pediatric Medicaid population in Detroit, MI, a high-risk population for asthma-related events. A population-based matched case-control analysis was used to investigate associations between acute asthma outcomes and proximity of residence to major roads, including freeways. Asthma cases were identified as all children who made at least one asthma claim, including inpatient and emergency department visits, during the three-year study period, 2004-06. Individually matched controls were randomly selected from the rest of the Medicaid population on the basis of non-respiratory related illness. We used conditional logistic regression with distance as both categorical and continuous variables, and examined non-linear relationships with distance using polynomial splines. The conditional logistic regression models were then extended by considering multiple asthma states (based on the frequency of acute asthma outcomes) using polychotomous conditional logistic regression. Results Asthma events were associated with proximity to primary roads with an odds ratio of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.94, 0.99) for a 1 km increase in distance using conditional logistic regression, implying that asthma events are less likely as the distance between the residence and a primary road increases. Similar relationships and effect sizes were found using polychotomous conditional logistic regression. Another plausible exposure metric, a reduced form response surface model that represents atmospheric dispersion of pollutants from roads, was not associated under that exposure model. Conclusions There is moderately strong evidence of elevated risk of asthma close to major roads based on the results obtained in this population

  18. Report of a parent survey of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis use in pediatric treatment-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Brenda E; Jacobson, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Severe childhood epilepsies are characterized by frequent seizures, neurodevelopmental delays, and impaired quality of life. In these treatment-resistant epilepsies, families often seek alternative treatments. This survey explored the use of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis in children with treatment-resistant epilepsy. The survey was presented to parents belonging to a Facebook group dedicated to sharing information about the use of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis to treat their child's seizures. Nineteen responses met the following inclusion criteria for the study: a diagnosis of epilepsy and current use of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis. Thirteen children had Dravet syndrome, four had Doose syndrome, and one each had Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and idiopathic epilepsy. The average number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) tried before using cannabidiol-enriched cannabis was 12. Sixteen (84%) of the 19 parents reported a reduction in their child's seizure frequency while taking cannabidiol-enriched cannabis. Of these, two (11%) reported complete seizure freedom, eight (42%) reported a greater than 80% reduction in seizure frequency, and six (32%) reported a 25-60% seizure reduction. Other beneficial effects included increased alertness, better mood, and improved sleep. Side effects included drowsiness and fatigue. Our survey shows that parents are using cannabidiol-enriched cannabis as a treatment for their children with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Because of the increasing number of states that allow access to medical cannabis, its use will likely be a growing concern for the epilepsy community. Safety and tolerability data for cannabidiol-enriched cannabis use among children are not available. Objective measurements of a standardized preparation of pure cannabidiol are needed to determine whether it is safe, well tolerated, and efficacious at controlling seizures in this pediatric population with difficult-to-treat seizures. © 2013.

  19. Pediatric Oncology Palliative Care: Experiences of General Practitioners and Bereaved Parents.

    OpenAIRE

    Neilson, SJ; Gibson, F; Greenfield, SM

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This qualitative study set in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom, aimed to examine the\\ud role of the general practitioner (GP) in children's oncology palliative care from the perspective of GPs who had cared for a child with cancer receiving palliative care at home and bereaved parents.\\ud Methods: One-to-one semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 18 GPs and 11 bereaved parents\\ud following the death. A grounded theory data analysis was undertaken; identifying...

  20. Parental Internet Use and Health Information Seeking Behavior Comparing Elective and Emergency Pediatric Surgical Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael Kien Yee; Sivasegaran, Daveraj; Choo, Candy Suet Cheng; Nah, Shireen Anne

    2018-02-01

     This study evaluates usage patterns of online health information in parents with children undergoing elective or emergency surgical procedures.  We prospectively surveyed parents of children admitted to our institution for common emergency (appendicectomy, abscess drainage, gonadal torsion) or elective (herniotomy, orchidopexy) operations between March and September 2016. Each completed an anonymized modification of a previously published survey comprising 19 questions on demographic data, Internet usage, and review of Internet resources. Chi-square tests were used for categorical data with p  information in elective ( n  = 27; 54%) and emergency groups ( n  = 24;70.6%) than general practitioners or other health care workers. When condition-specific online information was sought, more than 95% felt that the information concurred with the doctor's. Most common reasons were for more information on the condition ( n  = 56; 90.3%) and on medical treatment ( n  = 52; 83.9%). Eighteen (18/62; 29%) parents reported excessively technical information. No significant difference in behavior was found comparing elective and emergency groups.  Approximately one quarter of parents do not access condition-specific online medical information despite high Internet penetration rates. More than half depend on friends and family for additional information, reflecting societal and cultural norms in our population. Surgeons must incorporate awareness of these behaviors during counselling. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Awareness and attitude of parents toward pediatric dental treatment under ‎general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effat Khodadadi

    2015-10-01

    CONCLUSION: This study showed parents accepted the costs and risks of this approach to maintain the oral health of their children after it was recommended by the pediatrician. Therefore, with sufficient awareness of society toward this treatment option, we can improve children’s oral health and performance.

  2. Trajectories of marital, parent-child, and sibling conflict during pediatric cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Fladeboe, Kaitlyn; Lavi, Iris; King, Kevin; Kawamura, Joy; Friedman, Debra; Compas, Bruce; Breiger, David; Lengua, Liliana; Gurtovenko, Kyrill; Stettler, Nicole

    2018-05-28

    The stress of having a child with cancer can impact the quality of relationships within the family. The current study describes the longitudinal trajectory of marital, parent-child, and sibling conflict beginning around the time of diagnosis through the first year of treatment. We examined the average level of marital, parent-child, and sibling conflict at each monthly time point in the first year of treatment; the proportion of families that fall into the distressed range of marital, parent-child, and sibling conflict at each time point; the typical trajectory of conflict during the first year of treatment and whether there are differences in trajectories across families. A total of 160 families of children newly diagnosed with cancer (Mage = 5.6 years; range = 2-18 years) participated in a short-term prospective longitudinal study. Primary caregivers provided monthly reports of marital, parent-child, and sibling conflict. Using multilevel modeling (MLM), most families showed stability in quality of family relationships, although considerable between-family variability was observed. For married couples, 25-36% of couples were in the distressed range at one time point over the first year of treatment. For married couples, more distress occurred at earlier months, particularly month 3. For parent-child and sibling dyads, the most difficult time periods were during later months. Implications for development of interventions that target at-risk family relationships are discussed. Identifying processes that predict between-family variability in trajectories of family relationships is an important next step, particularly for the marital relationship. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Randomized trial of teaching brief motivational interviewing to pediatric trainees to promote healthy behaviors in families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Paula; McPhillips, Heather A; Hartzler, Bryan; Robertson, Andrea S; Runkle, Cecilia; Scholz, Kelley A; Stout, James W; Kieckhefer, Gail M

    2010-06-01

    That pediatric resident trainees would demonstrate increased counseling skill following training in brief motivational interviewing (MI). Randomized controlled trial. University of Washington Pediatric Residency. Pediatric residents (N = 18), including residents in postgraduate years 1, 2, 3, and 4. Collaborative Management in Pediatrics, a 9-hour behavior change curriculum based on brief MI plus written feedback on communication skills (based on a 3-month Objective Standardized Clinical Evaluation [OSCE]). The percentage of MI-consistent behavior (%MICO), a summary score for MI skill, was assessed via OSCEs in which standardized patients portray parents of children with asthma in 3 clinical scenarios (stations). The OSCEs were conducted at baseline and 3 and 7 months. Blinded coders rated videotaped OSCEs using a validated tool to tally communication behaviors. Training effects were assessed using linear regression controlling for baseline %MICO. Global ratings of counseling style served as secondary outcome measures. Trained residents demonstrated a trend toward increased skill (%MICO score) at 3 months compared with control residents. At 7 months, %MICO scores increased 16% to 20% (P < .02) across all OSCE stations after the combined intervention of Collaborative Management in Pediatrics training plus written feedback. The effect of training on global ratings supported the main findings. Pediatric trainees' skills in behavior change counseling improved following the combination of training in brief MI plus personalized feedback.

  4. Competencias transversales en la formación de especialistas en pediatría, Universidad de Chile Transversal competencies for specialists training in the Pediatrics Residency Program, University of Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Schonhaut-Berman

    2009-03-01

    specialties training programs (CT, that are important for the Pediatrics Residency Program (PFEP at the Chile University. Subjects and methods. Qualitative and interpretive study, performed between November 2006 and January 2007. Key persons were interviewed (6 residents, 6 graduates and 8 opinion leaders about the relevance and achievement of six CT. Results. The interviewed highlighted the necessity of trained pediatricians in ambulatory settings and continuity clinics, the acquisition of competencies in emergency units and basic skills in hospital training. They considered that the current training is lacking of important CT such as bioethics, physician-patient and family communication, public health, team work and evidence based medicine. Teaching skills and practice management are part of the medical profession; they could be introduced as an elective activity. Conclusion. The acquisition of CT during the PFEP transcend beyond the traditional clinical competencies, it is a challenge to introduce them in the PFEP.

  5. United States Medical Licensing Examination and American Board of Pediatrics Certification Examination Results: Does the Residency Program Contribute to Trainee Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Thomas R; Olson, Brad G; Nelsen, Elizabeth; Beck Dallaghan, Gary L; Kennedy, Gloria A; Botash, Ann

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether training site or prior examinee performance on the US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step 1 and step 2 might predict pass rates on the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) certifying examination. Data from graduates of pediatric residency programs completing the ABP certifying examination between 2009 and 2013 were obtained. For each, results of the initial ABP certifying examination were obtained, as well as results on National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) step 1 and step 2 examinations. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to nest first-time ABP results within training programs to isolate program contribution to ABP results while controlling for USMLE step 1 and step 2 scores. Stepwise linear regression was then used to determine which of these examinations was a better predictor of ABP results. A total of 1110 graduates of 15 programs had complete testing results and were subject to analysis. Mean ABP scores for these programs ranged from 186.13 to 214.32. The hierarchical linear model suggested that the interaction of step 1 and 2 scores predicted ABP performance (F[1,1007.70] = 6.44, P = .011). By conducting a multilevel model by training program, both USMLE step examinations predicted first-time ABP results (b = .002, t = 2.54, P = .011). Linear regression analyses indicated that step 2 results were a better predictor of ABP performance than step 1 or a combination of the two USMLE scores. Performance on the USMLE examinations, especially step 2, predicts performance on the ABP certifying examination. The contribution of training site to ABP performance was statistically significant, though contributed modestly to the effect compared with prior USMLE scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. INTERNATIONAL JURISDICTION RULES IN MATTERS OF PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITY IN THE EUROPEAN UNION AND BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA: THE CONCEPT OF HABITUAL RESIDENCE V NATIONALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Alihodzic

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The rules of jurisdiction in matters of parental responsibility contained in the Brussels II bis Regulation are based on the concept of habitual residence, while the legislation in B&H in this area gave priority to the principle of nationality. Analyzing these concepts, the author of the paper points to the importance of interpreting the concept of habitual residence by the European Court of Justice, and gives possible directions for reform of the relevant provisions of the PIL Act in terms of their compliance with EU law.

  7. Attitudes of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners Towards Parental Use of Corporal Punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    1974; Baumrind , 1967; Sears, Maccoby, & Levin, 1957). Sears, Maccoby, and Levin’s (1957) classic study examining the child-rearing practices of 379...34 (Sears, Maccoby, & Levin, 1957, pg 484). In a series of studies, Baumrind (1967) found that punishment, even corporal punishment, was an effective...1993; Lamb, Ketterlenus, & Fracasso, 1992; Baumrind , 1967). Baumrind’s research assessed patterns of parental behavior using interviews, standardized

  8. Parental Perspectives of Communication at the End of Life at a Pediatric Oncology Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaman, Jennifer M; Torres, Carlos; Duffy, Brian; Levine, Deena R; Gibson, Deborah V; Baker, Justin N

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of health care providers and hospital staff with patients and families at the end of life affects the parental grief experience. Both verbal and nonverbal communication are key components of this interaction. The study objective was to explore the communication between hospital staff members and patients and families at the time of patients' health decline near the end of life. Twelve bereaved parents participated in a focus group. Semantic content analysis was used to analyze the transcript. Parents' responses to the prompt about typical ways the medical team communicated yielded 109 codes, which were grouped into 12 themes. The most common themes were "patient inclusion" and "explanation of medical plan," both used in 17% of responses. Responses to the prompt about positive and negative aspects of communication generated 208 codes, yielding 15 different themes. The most common theme about positive communication was the "strong relationship between family and staff." The theme "variations in care with a negative impact" was used most frequently in describing negative communication. This study helps to identify techniques that should be used by clinicians as they work with children with cancer and their families, particularly including patients in treatment decisions, ongoing relationship building, communicating with caring and empathy, using an interdisciplinary team for additional support, and pairing bad news with a plan of action.

  9. Parents were accurate proxy reporters of urgent pediatric asthma health services: a retrospective agreement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Wendy J; Davidson-Grimwood, Sara R; Cousins, Martha

    2007-11-01

    To assess agreement between parents' proxy reports of children's respiratory-related health service use and administrative data. A retrospective analysis of statistical agreement between clinical and claims data for reports of physician visits, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations in 545 asthmatic children recruited from sites in the greater Toronto area was conducted. Health services use data were extracted from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan and Canadian Institute for Health Information databases for each child for the interval coinciding with the proxy report for each health service type. Agreement between administrative data and respondent reports (n=545) was substantial for hospitalizations in the past year (kappa=0.80 [0.74, 0.86]), moderate for ED visits in the past year (kappa=0.60 [0.53, 0.67]), and slight for physician visits (kappa=0.13 [0.00, 0.27]) in the past 6 months. Income, parent's education, and child quality-of-life symptom scores did not affect agreement. Agreement for ED visits was significantly higher (Pasthma attack in the past 6 months (kappa=0.61 [0.54, 0.68]) compared to children who did not (kappa=0.25 [0.00, 0.59]). Parents of asthmatic children are reliable reporters of their child's respiratory-related urgent health services utilization.

  10. What Do the Parents of Children Who Have Chronic Pain Expect from Their First Visit to a Pediatric Chronic Pain Clinic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Reid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic pain in childhood is increasingly recognized as a significant clinical problem. Best-practice management of pediatric chronic pain in a multidisciplinary pain clinic involves a variety of treatment modalities. It is important that parents of children treated in these settings understand the different treatment options available for their children. By involving parents more effectively, care providers may more efficiently address unmet treatment needs and improve tailoring of treatment programs aimed at increasing function, reducing pain-related disability and improving quality of life.

  11. The Effect of a Pilot Pediatric In-Patient Department-Based Smoking Cessation Intervention on Parental Smoking and Children's Secondhand Smoke (SHS) Exposure in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kaiyong; Yang, Li; Winickoff, Jonathan P; Liao, Jing; Nong, Guangmin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liang, Xia; Liang, Gang; Abdullah, Abu S

    2016-11-08

    Children's exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) at home has numerous adverse health effects. This study evaluated the effects of a pediatric in-patient department-based pilot smoking cessation intervention for household members to reduce children's SHS exposure and encourage smoking cessation. A pre-post test design study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a telephone counseling intervention on household members of hospitalized children in pediatric departments. Data were collected with a standardized Chinese language questionnaire. At the three-month follow-up survey, the proportions of household members who reported adopting complete smoking restriction at home (55%), did not smoke at home at all (37%), did not allow others to smoke in the car (70%), or did not allow others to smoke around the child (57%) were significantly higher than the self-reported responses at the baseline survey. The proportions of household members who reported smoking at home (49%) and in the car (22%) were significantly lower than the baseline survey. Overall, 7% of the participants had reported quitting smoking after three months. Pediatric in-patient department-based telephone counseling for smoking cessation was found to be acceptable to Chinese parents. The intervention encouraged few parents to quit smoking, but encouraged more parents to take measures to reduce children's SHS exposure.

  12. Safety profile of parental ketamine and lignocaine infiltration in pediatric operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osifo, David O; Emeagui, Kennedy N [Dept. of Surgery, Pediatric Surgery Unit, Univ. of Benin (Nigeria); Aghahowa, Sylvester E [Pharmacy Dept., Univ. of Benin, Benin City (Nigeria)

    2008-07-01

    Objective was to study the safety and benefits of parenteral ketamine and lignocaine infiltration among pediatric surgical patients with co-morbidities that would preclude the use of general anesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation/ face mask in a developing country. This prospective study was undertaken at the Leadeks Medical Centre, Benin City Edo State, Nigeria between January 2002 and December 2006. Patients requiring surgery were safely operated even in the presence of co-morbidity. A total of 416 children were recruited and they were aged 6 days to16 years (mean 12-/+ 2.04 years) with a male/ female ratio of 1:1.1. Appendectomy (33.2%), herniotomy (20.2%) and suturing of laceration (15.9%) were the most common indications for surgery. Anemia, upper respiratory tract infections, malnutrition, malaria fever, typhoid fever and retroviral infections were co-morbidities. Ambulatory surgery was carried out in 48.6% patients. Overall, only 23.3% experienced postoperative pain which was statistically significant in those that had laparotomy and appendectomy (p<0.0001) and analgesics such as paracetamol were enough to relieve the pain. Complications recorded such as postoperative vomiting, emergence reaction, wound infection, post operative fever and apnea occurring after ketamine injections were tolerated and no mortality was recorded. The satisfactory anesthesia and analgesia recorded with this combination and the low complications observed in the presence of co-morbidity showed that these agents have much to offer in a developing country. (author)

  13. Safety profile of parental ketamine and lignocaine infiltration in pediatric operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osifo, David O.; Emeagui, Kennedy N.; Aghahowa, Sylvester E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to study the safety and benefits of parenteral ketamine and lignocaine infiltration among pediatric surgical patients with co-morbidities that would preclude the use of general anesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation/ face mask in a developing country. This prospective study was undertaken at the Leadeks Medical Centre, Benin City Edo State, Nigeria between January 2002 and December 2006. Patients requiring surgery were safely operated even in the presence of co-morbidity. A total of 416 children were recruited and they were aged 6 days to16 years (mean 12-/+ 2.04 years) with a male/ female ratio of 1:1.1. Appendectomy (33.2%), herniotomy (20.2%) and suturing of laceration (15.9%) were the most common indications for surgery. Anemia, upper respiratory tract infections, malnutrition, malaria fever, typhoid fever and retroviral infections were co-morbidities. Ambulatory surgery was carried out in 48.6% patients. Overall, only 23.3% experienced postoperative pain which was statistically significant in those that had laparotomy and appendectomy (p<0.0001) and analgesics such as paracetamol were enough to relieve the pain. Complications recorded such as postoperative vomiting, emergence reaction, wound infection, post operative fever and apnea occurring after ketamine injections were tolerated and no mortality was recorded. The satisfactory anesthesia and analgesia recorded with this combination and the low complications observed in the presence of co-morbidity showed that these agents have much to offer in a developing country. (author)

  14. Satisfaction with care and decision making among parents/caregivers in the pediatric intensive care unit: a comparison between English-speaking whites and Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, David; Unger, Jennifer B; Ornelas, Beatriz; Chang, Jennifer C; Markovitz, Barry P; Dodek, Peter M; Heyland, Daren K; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2015-04-01

    Because of previously documented health care disparities, we hypothesized that English-speaking Latino parents/caregivers would be less satisfied with care and decision making than English-speaking non-Latino white (NLW) parents/caregivers. An intensive care unit (ICU) family satisfaction survey, Family Satisfaction in the Intensive Care Unit Survey (pediatric, 24 question version), was completed by English-speaking parents/caregivers of children in a cardiothoracic ICU at a university-affiliated children's hospital in 2011. English-speaking NLW and Latino parents/caregivers of patients, younger than 18 years, admitted to the ICU were approached to participate on hospital day 3 or 4 if they were at the bedside for greater than or equal to 2 days. Analysis of variance, χ(2), and Student t tests were used. Cronbach αs were calculated. Fifty parents/caregivers completed the survey in each group. Latino parents/caregivers were younger, more often mothers born outside the United States, more likely to have government insurance or no insurance, and had less education and income. There were no differences between the groups' mean overall satisfaction scores (92.6 ± 8.3 and 93.0 ± 7.1, respectively; P = .80). The Family Satisfaction in the Intensive Care Unit Survey (pediatric, 24 question version) showed high internal consistency reliability (α = .95 and .91 for NLW and Latino groups, respectively). No disparities in ICU satisfaction with care and decision making between English-speaking NLW and Latino parents/caregivers were found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development and Usability Evaluation of an Art and Narrative-Based Knowledge Translation Tool for Parents With a Child With Pediatric Chronic Pain: Multi-Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kathy; Hartling, Lisa; Ali, Samina; Le, Anne; Norris, Allison; Scott, Shannon D

    2017-12-14

    Chronic pain in childhood is increasingly being recognized as a significant clinical problem for children and their families. Previous research has identified that families want information about the causes of their child's chronic pain, treatment options, and effective strategies to help their child cope with the pain. Unfortunately, parents have reported that finding this information can be challenging. The aim of this study was to actively work together with children attending a pediatric chronic pain clinic and their parents to develop, refine, and evaluate the usability of an art and narrative-based electronic book (e-book) for pediatric chronic pain. A multiphase, multi-method research design employing patient engagement techniques was used to develop, refine, and evaluate the usability of an art and narrative based e-book for pediatric chronic pain management to facilitate knowledge translation for parents with a child with chronic pain. The multiple phases included the following: (1) qualitative interviews to compile parents' narratives using qualitative interviews; (2) qualitative data analysis; (3) development of an e-book prototype; (4) expert clinician feedback; (5) parent usability evaluation, knowledge change, and confidence in knowledge responses using an electronic survey; (6) e-book refinement; and (7) dissemination of the e-book. A 48-page e-book was developed to characterize the experiences of a family living with a child with chronic pain. The e-book was a composite narrative of the parent interviews and encompassed descriptions of the effects the condition has on each member of the family. This was merged with the best available research evidence on the day-to-day management of pediatric chronic pain. The e-book was vetted for clinical accuracy by expert pediatric pain clinicians. All parents that participated in the usability evaluation (N=14) agreed or strongly agreed the content of the e-book was easy to understand and stated that they would

  16. [Anxiety in the parents of children treated in pediatric emergency services in Andalusia and its association with aspects of family functioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Castillo, Antonio; Vílchez-Lara, María J

    2016-01-01

    To assess the level of anxiety in the parents of children treated in hospital emergency departments in Andalusia and its association with dimensions of family functioning. Descriptive observational study based on a cross-sectional survey. We recruited a convenience sample of parents bringing children to 6 pediatric emergency services in the Spanish autonomous community of Andalusia in 2012. The variables recorded were place of origin, educational level, anxiety level on the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and family functioning according to the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale, version 2. A total of 637 parents were included. Their mean (SD) age was 35.4 (8.4) years; 399 (62.6%) were women. The mean anxiety score was 44.26 (10.15), and we found no differences between mothers and fathers. Lower anxiety levels were associated with higher levels of family cohesion (r = -0.37; P < .001) and adaptability (r = -0.36; P < .001). The parents of children attended in pediatric emergency departments in Andalusia have high levels of anxiety. Anxiety is inversely associated with family adaptability and cohesion.

  17. Psychometric evaluation of the pediatric and parent-proxy Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System and the Neurology and Traumatic Brain Injury Quality of Life measurement item banks in pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertisch, Hilary; Rivara, Frederick P; Kisala, Pamela A; Wang, Jin; Yeates, Keith Owen; Durbin, Dennis; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Bell, Michael J; Temkin, Nancy; Tulsky, David S

    2017-07-01

    The primary objective is to provide evidence of convergent and discriminant validity for the pediatric and parent-proxy versions of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Anxiety, Depression, Anger, Peer Relations, Mobility, Pain Interference, and Fatigue item banks, the Neurology Quality of Life measurement system (Neuro-QOL) Cognition-General Concerns and Stigma item banks, and the Traumatic Brain Injury Quality of Life (TBI-QOL) Executive Function and Headache item banks in a pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) sample. Participants were 134 parent-child (ages 8-18 years) days. Children all sustained TBI and the dyads completed outcome ratings 6 months after injury at one of six medical centers across the United States. Ratings included PROMIS, Neuro-QOL, and TBI-QOL item banks, as well as the Pediatric Quality of Life inventory (PedsQL), the Health Behavior Inventory (HBI), and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) as legacy criterion measures against which these item banks were validated. The PROMIS, Neuro-QOL, and TBI-QOL item banks demonstrated good convergent validity, as evidenced by moderate to strong correlations with comparable scales on the legacy measures. PROMIS, Neuro-QOL, and TBI-QOL item banks showed weaker correlations with ratings of unrelated constructs on legacy measures, providing evidence of discriminant validity. Our results indicate that the constructs measured by the PROMIS, Neuro-QOL, and TBI-QOL item banks are valid in our pediatric TBI sample and that it is appropriate to use these standardized scores for our primary study analyses.

  18. Proactive enrollment of parents to tobacco quitlines in pediatric practices is associated with greater quitline use: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy E. Drehmer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Every U.S. state has a free telephone quitline that tobacco users can access to receive cessation assistance, yet referral rates for parents in the pediatric setting remain low. This study evaluates, within pediatric offices, the impact of proactive enrollment of parents to quitlines compared to provider suggestion to use the quitline and identifies other factors associated with parental quitline use. Methods As part of a cluster randomized controlled trial (Clinical Effort Against Secondhand Smoke Exposure, research assistants completed post-visit exit interviews with parents in 20 practices in 16 states. Parents’ quitline use was assessed at a 12-month follow-up interview. A multivariable analysis was conducted for quitline use at 12 months using a logistic regression model with generalized estimating equations to account for provider clustering. Self-reported cessation rates were also compared among quitline users based on the type of referral they received at their child’s doctor’s office. Results Of the 1980 parents enrolled in the study, 1355 (68 % completed a 12-month telephone interview and of those 139 (10 % reported talking with a quitline (15 % intervention versus 6 % control; p < .0001. Parents who were Hispanic (aOR 2.12 (1.22, 3.70, black (aOR 1.57 (1.14, 2.16, planned to quit smoking in the next 30 days (aOR 2.32 (1.47, 3.64, and had attended an intervention practice (aOR 2.37 (1.31, 4.29 were more likely to have talked with a quitline. Parents who only received a suggestion from a healthcare provider to use the quitline (aOR 0.45 (0.23, 0.90 and those who were not enrolled and did not receive a suggestion (aOR 0.33 (0.17, 0.64 were less likely to talk with a quitline than those who were enrolled in the quitline during the baseline visit. Self-reported cessation rates among quitline users were similar regardless of being proactively enrolled (19 %, receiving only a suggestion (25 %, or

  19. Pediatric MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatric MS Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Pediatric MS Pediatric MS Pediatric MS Support Pediatric Providers ... system through the Pediatric MS Support Group . Treating pediatric MS In 2018 the U.S. Food and Drug ...

  20. Assessment of Knowledge Regarding Oral Hygiene among Parents of Pre-School Children Attending Pediatric Out Patient Department in Dhulikhel Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, K; Shrestha, D; Ghimire, N; Younjan, R; Sanjel, S

    2015-01-01

    Level of knowledge regarding oral hygiene among the parents of pre-school children plays an important role on maintaining the good oral hygiene of their children. In Nepal, sufficient research has not been carried out on this area. Objective of this study is to assess the level of knowledge on oral hygiene of preschool children's parents attending pediatric outpatient department in Dhulikhel Hospital. A descriptive study was conducted from November 2012 to January 2013 among one hundred parents of preschool children visiting pediatrics outpatient department of Dhulikhel Hospital. Paper and pencil based semi structured questionnaire was used for collecting data. Questions related to demographic information and knowledge were asked. Thirty questions were used for assessing knowledge level. Knowledge score was calculated by allocating one point for each correct answer and zero point for each wrong answer. Analyzed data were presented in terms of numbers and percentages. Total knowledge scores were categorized based on percentage. Knowledge score was categorized on four group - exclusive intervals - namely-poor (0-40%), moderate (40-60%), good (60-80%) and excellent (80-100%). Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test were applied to check significance difference and chisquare test was used to check association among different background characteristic. It was found that 81% had moderate knowledge, 15% had poor knowledge and 4% had good knowledge about oral hygiene. Median knowledge score was found to be 15 with range 10 to 21. Following variables were found to be significant difference on knowledge category: Education status (poral health problem (p = 0.008), Further significant association was found between knowledge category and educational status (pknowledge category and past experience (pKnowledge regarding oral hygiene was found satisfactory among the parents of preschool children visiting pediatric OPD of Dhulikhel Hospital.

  1. Validity and Reliability of the Turkish Version of the Adapted Rhodes Index of Nausea and Vomiting for Pediatrics by Child (ARINVc) and by Parent (ARINVp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay Didişen, Nurdan; Yavuz, Betül; Yardimci, Figen; Basbakkal, D Zümrüt

    2018-04-01

    The study was conducted methodologically to adapt the Adapted Rhodes Index of Nausea and Vomiting for Pediatrics by Child (ARINVc) and Adapted Rhodes Index of Nausea and Vomiting for Pediatrics by Parent (ARINVp) into Turkish. The scales are administered to children who receive chemotherapy and to their parents, respectively. The study sample consisted of 8- to 18-year-old children who were hospitalized in the pediatric oncology and hematology clinics of a university hospital, met the sampling criteria, and agreed to participate in the research. The study data were collected with the Sociodemographic Attributes Information Form, ARINVc, and ARINVp using the face-to-face interview method. The mean ages of the children and their mothers and fathers who participated in the study were 13.26 ± 2.01, 36.33 ± 5.10, and 40.17 ± 4.94 years, respectively. The mean total scores obtained from the ARINVc and ARINVp were 5.43 ± 4.06 and 5.70 ± 3.77, respectively. While Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients of the scales were .85 for the ARINVc and .84 for the ARINVp, the item-total correlation coefficients were between 0.60 and 0.89 for the ARINVc and between 0.66 and 0.85 for the ARINVp ( P < .01). The Turkish versions of ARINVc and ARINVp were determined to be valid and reliable scales.

  2. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  3. Assessing attitudes and actions of pediatric dentists toward childhood obesity and sugar-sweetened beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin; Casamassimo, Paul S

    2017-06-01

    Childhood obesity is a major US health concern, and oral health professionals have opportunities to participate in an interprofessional effort to intervene owing to their access to young patients and their abilities in addressing obesity-related dietary habits like consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). This study determined attitudes, behaviors, future intentions, and perceived barriers of pediatric dentists regarding efforts to prevent childhood obesity and reduce children's consumption of SSBs. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry conducted an online electronic survey with a convenience sample of approximately 7,450 pediatric dentists and pediatric dental residents during spring 2016. Over 17 percent of pediatric dentists offer childhood obesity interventions. Of those not providing interventions, 67 percent were interested in offering obesity-prevention services. Nearly 94 percent of pediatric dentists offer information or other interventions on consumption of SSBs. Statistically significant barriers to providing healthy weight interventions were fear of offending parents, appearing judgmental, or creating parent dissatisfaction and a lack of parental acceptance of guidance about weight management from a dentist. Significant barriers to SSB interventions were sufficient time and health professional education. More pediatric dentists stated they offer childhood obesity interventions than in previous surveys reporting 6 percent, but respondents suggested that a child's weight is seen as a medical rather than dental issue. Most pediatric dentists provide interventions related to consumption of SSBs, perceiving the issue as integral to their care of children. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  4. Telemedicine and other care models in pediatric rheumatology: an exploratory study of parents' perceptions of barriers to care and care preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Danielle R; Vehe, Richard K; Zhang, Lei; Correll, Colleen K

    2017-07-11

    The United States pediatric rheumatology workforce is committed to a mission of providing children access to pediatric rheumatology care. With a limited number and distribution of pediatric rheumatologists, telemedicine has been proposed as one way to meet this mission, yet the adoption of this modality has been slower than expected. The purpose of this study was to explore the parent perspective on barriers to accessing pediatric rheumatology care and to explore the acceptability of telemedicine and other alternative care models. Over a period of six weeks, all new and return English-speaking parents/guardians of patients visiting a single center were offered an opportunity to complete a survey which assessed barriers to care and interest in alternative models of care. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Survey response rate was 72% (159/221). Twenty-eight percent (45/159) traveled more than three hours to the pediatric rheumatology clinic, and 43% (65/152) reported travel as inconvenient. An overwhelming majority of respondents (95%, 144/152) reported a preference for in-person visits over the option of telemedicine. This preference was similar regardless of whether respondents reported travel to the clinic as inconvenient vs convenient (inconvenient 92%, 60/65; convenient 97%, 84/87; p = 0.2881) and despite those reporting travel as inconvenient also reporting greater difficulty with several barriers to care. Those familiar with telemedicine were more likely to report a preference for telemedicine over in-person visits (27%, 3/11 vs 3%, 4/140; p = 0.0087). The option of an outreach clinic was acceptable to a majority (63%, 97/154); however, adult rheumatology and shared-care options were less acceptable (22%, 35/156 and 34%, 53/156 respectively). Among survey respondents, in-person visits were preferred over the option of telemedicine, even when travel was noted to be inconvenient. Telemedicine familiarity increased its acceptability

  5. Use of a low-literacy written action plan to improve parent understanding of pediatric asthma management: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hsiang Shonna; Gupta, Ruchi S; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Dreyer, Benard; van Schaick, Linda; Brown, Christina R; Encalada, Karen; Sanchez, Dayana C; Warren, Christopher M; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether parents who use a low-literacy, pictogram- and photograph-based written asthma action plan (WAAP) have a better understanding of child asthma management compared to parents using a standard plan. A randomized controlled study was carried out in 2 urban pediatric outpatient clinics. Inclusion criteria were English- and Spanish-speaking parents of 2- to 12-year-old asthmatic children. Parents were randomized to receive a low-literacy or standard asthma action plan (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology) for a hypothetical patient on controller and rescue medications. A structured questionnaire was used to assess whether there was an error in knowledge of (1) medications to give everyday and when sick, (2) need for spacer use, and (3) appropriate emergency response to give albuterol and seek medical help. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed, adjusting for parent age, health literacy (Newest Vital Sign); child asthma severity, medications; and site. 217 parents were randomized (109 intervention and 108 control). Parents who received the low-literacy plan were (1) less likely to make an error in knowledge of medications to take everyday and when sick compared to parents who received the standard plan (63.0 vs. 77.3%, p = 0.03; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.5[95% confidence interval: 0.2-0.9]) and (2) less likely to make an error regarding spacer use (14.0 vs. 51.1%, p plan improves child asthma outcomes.

  6. Impact of Pediatric Acute Otitis Media on Child and Parental Quality of Life and Associated Productivity Loss in Malaysia: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Bruce; Hashim, Siti Sabzah Mohd; Prepageran, Narayanan; See, Goh Bee; Meier, Genevieve; Wada, Keiko; Coon, Cheryl; Delgleize, Emmanuelle; DeRosa, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) affects both child and parental quality of life (QoL). Data on QoL associated with AOM in Malaysia is sparse, and the burden of indirect costs have not been previously reported. To determine the effect of pediatric AOM on child and parental QoL in Malaysia and its economic impact (indirect costs). We utilized a set of QoL questionnaires (PAR-AOM-QOL, OM-6, and EQ-5D) combined with questions addressing work/productivity loss and financial costs associated with caring for a child during his or her illness in an observational, multicenter, prospective study. One hundred and ten AOM patients aged ≤5 years were included in the analysis. The majority of respondents were the patient's mother. Parental QoL was negatively affected for both emotional and daily disturbance scales, but the level of disturbance was low. Using OM-6, the greatest negative impact was on the child's QoL, followed by caregiver concerns, physical suffering, and emotional distress. Using EQ-5D, a moderately positive relationship between parents' emotional disturbance and daily disturbance, and a weak, negative correlation between parental emotional disturbance and parental health status was found. Parents with paid employment took an average of 21 h from work to care for their child, at an average cost of 321.8 Malaysian ringgit (US$97) in addition to their contribution to direct medical costs. Productivity losses whilst at work, uncompensated wage losses, and leisure time losses are also reported. This study found that AOM is associated with some negative impact on parental QoL and significant economic impact at both patient and societal levels. The findings provide useful data on healthcare resource utilization and disease burden of AOM in Malaysia.

  7. Mothers' Perspectives on the Development of Their Preschoolers' Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviors and Parent-Child Relationship: Implications for Pediatric Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Keeley J; Van Fossen, Catherine; Cotto-Maisonet, Jennifer; Palmer, Elizabeth N; Eneli, Ihuoma

    2017-07-01

    The study explores female caregivers' reflections on their relationship with their child (2-5 years old) and the development of their child's dietary and physical activity behaviors. Five, 90-minute semistructured focus groups were conducted to inquire about children's growth, eating behaviors and routines, physical activity, personality, and the parent-child relationship. Nineteen female caregivers diverse in race/ethnicity, age, and educational attainment participated. Participants reported that they maintained a schedule, but needed to be flexible to accommodate daily responsibilities. Family, social factors, and day care routines were influences on their children's behaviors. The main physical activity barriers were safety and time constraints. Guidance from pediatric primary care providers aimed at supporting female caregivers to build a positive foundation in their parent-child relationship, and to adopt and model healthy diet and physical activity behaviors that are respectful of schedules and barriers should be a priority for childhood obesity prevention.

  8. Parental versus non-parental-directed donation: an 11-year experience of infectious disease testing at a pediatric tertiary care blood donor center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquot, Cyril; Seo, Andrew; Miller, Peter M; Lezama, Niara; Criss, Valli R; Colvin, Camilla; Luban, Naomi L C; Wong, Edward C C

    2017-11-01

    Directed donation is associated with a higher prevalence of donations that are positive for infectious disease markers; however, little is known about the positive rates among parental-directed, non-parental-directed, and allogeneic donations. We reviewed blood-collection records from January 1997 through December 2008, including infectious disease results, among parental, non-parental, and community donations. Infectious disease rates were compared by Mann-Whitney U test. In total, 1532 parental, 4910 non-parental, and 17,423 community donations were examined. Among parental donors, the median rate of positive infectious disease testing was 8.66% (interquartile range (IQR), 4.49%) for first-time donors and 1.26% (IQR, 5.86%) for repeat donors; among non-parental donors, the rate was 1.09% (IQR, 0.98%) for first-time donors and 0% (IQR, 0.83%) for repeat donors; and, among community donors, the rate was 2.95% (IQR, 1.50%) for first-time donors and 0.45% (IQR, 0.82%) for repeat donors. The mean rate of positive infectious disease testing for first-time parental donors was significantly higher (7.63%), whereas all repeat donors had similar rates. However, the rate of positive infectious disease testing among first-time non-parental donors was significantly lower than that in the other groups, especially for the period from 2001 through 2008. First-time non-parental and community donors had significantly higher infectious disease risk than the respective repeat donors. First-time parental donors had the highest rates of positive infectious disease testing. We suggest that first-time parental blood donation should be discouraged. Repeat community donors or first-time non-parental donors provide a safer alternative. These findings can foster better patient education, donor selection, and possibly a reduced risk of infectious disease. © 2017 AABB.

  9. Development and validation of a pediatric IBD knowledge inventory device: the IBD-KID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaland, Derek; Day, Andrew S; Otley, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Questionnaires exist to assess inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related knowledge of adults. Owing to wording and content concerns, these were believed to be inappropriate for use in pediatric patients. The aim of this study was to develop a questionnaire to assess disease-related knowledge of pediatric patients with IBD and their parents. Following a formal process of item generation and reduction, the IBD-Knowledge Inventory Device was developed and pilot tested. It was administered to 10- to 17-year-old patients with IBD, and to 1 of each of their parents. To evaluate its discriminatory validity, pediatric residents, nurses, and ward clerks completed the questionnaire. A total of 99 patients (mean 42, Crohn disease 46, age 14(±2) years) and 99 parents completed the IBD-Knowledge Inventory Device. Parent knowledge scores, 15(±4), were higher than those of patients, 11(±4), P sex (girls scored higher, P = 0.014), postsecondary education (P < 0.001), and perceived knowledge level (P = 0.002). The questionnaire scores of 23 were 19, 16, and 10, respectively, for residents, nurses, and ward clerks. Both residents and nurses scored significantly higher than ward clerks (P = 0.001 for both). A valid IBD-related knowledge assessment questionnaire was developed for use in older children and adolescents with IBD and their parents.

  10. Hidden consequences of success in pediatrics: parental health-related quality of life—results from the Care Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatzmann, J.; Heymans, H.S.A.; Ferrer-i-Carbonell, A.; van Praag, B.M.S.; Grootenhuis, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT. The number of parents who care for a chronically ill child is increasing. Because of advances in medical care, parental caring tasks are changing. A detailed description of parental health-related quality of life will add to the understanding of the impact of caring for a chronically ill

  11. Hidden Consequences of Success in Pediatrics: Parental Health-Related Quality of Life-Results From the Care Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatzmann, Janneke; Heymans, Hugo S. A.; Ferrer-I-Carbonell, Ada; van Praag, Bernard M. S.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT. The number of parents who care for a chronically ill child is increasing. Because of advances in medical care, parental caring tasks are changing. A detailed description of parental health-related quality of life will add to the understanding of the impact of caring for a chronically ill

  12. Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This document contains the fifth volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of the family and delinquency, examining the impact of parental behavior on the production of delinquent behavior. "Parents: Neglectful and Neglected" (Laurence D. Steinberg) posits…

  13. Leveraging text messaging and mobile technology to support pediatric obesity-related behavior change: a qualitative study using parent focus groups and interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Mona; Dryden, Eileen M; Horan, Christine M; Price, Sarah; Marshall, Richard; Hacker, Karen; Finkelstein, Jonathan A; Taveras, Elsie M

    2013-12-06

    Text messaging (short message service, SMS) is a widely accessible and potentially cost-effective medium for encouraging behavior change. Few studies have examined text messaging interventions to influence child health behaviors or explored parental perceptions of mobile technologies to support behavior change among children. Our aim was to examine parental acceptability and preferences for text messaging to support pediatric obesity-related behavior change. We conducted focus groups and follow-up interviews with parents of overweight and obese children, aged 6-12 years, seen for "well-child" care in eastern Massachusetts. A professional moderator used a semistructured discussion guide and sample text messages to catalyze group discussions. Seven participants then received 3 weeks of text messages before a follow-up one-on-one telephone interview. All focus groups and interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Using a framework analysis approach, we systematically coded and analyzed group and interview data to identify salient and convergent themes. We reached thematic saturation after five focus groups and seven follow-up interviews with a total of 31 parents of diverse race/ethnicity and education levels. Parents were generally enthusiastic about receiving text messages to support healthy behaviors for their children and preferred them to paper or email communication because they are brief and difficult to ignore. Participants anticipated high responsiveness to messaging endorsed by their child's doctor and indicated they would appreciate messages 2-3 times/week or more as long as content remains relevant. Suggestions for maintaining message relevance included providing specific strategies for implementation and personalizing information. Most felt the negative features of text messaging (eg, limited message size) could be overcome by providing links within messages to other media including email or websites. Text messaging is a promising medium for

  14. Parental stress, pediatric quality of life, and behavior at baseline and one-year follow-up: Results from the FEBSTAT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnar, Ruth C; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hesdorffer, Dale C; O'Hara, Kathryn; Conklin, Terrie; Cornett, Karen Mohler; Miazga, Diana; Sun, Shumei

    2017-04-01

    Febrile status epilepticus is a serious and frightening event in the life of the child and parent. It is regarded as a medical emergency with potential long lasting consequences. The purpose of this study was to look at the immediate and long term effects of such an event on parental stress and parents' perception of their child's physical and psychosocial wellbeing. From 2003 to 2010, 199 subjects, age 1 month to 5 years, were recruited as part of a prospective, multicenter study (FEBSTAT) of consequences of febrile status epilepticus (FSE). At one month and one year after the episode of FSE, parents were asked to complete the Parenting Stress Index, short form (PSI/SF), the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). In addition to PedsQL and CBCL in the FEBSTAT subjects only, a comparison was made between Columbia Study of First Febrile Seizures subjects with a first simple febrile seizure (SFS) and the FEBSTAT group, including 15 subjects with FSE from the Columbia group, in the area of parental stress which was administered at the same time intervals in both studies. At baseline, the PSI/SF was statistically significantly higher for SFS versus FSE on the parent-child dysfunctional score and the total raw score, however at one year this difference resolved. In the FSE group, significantly higher parental stress over one year was reported in children with abnormal versus normal prior development (p= 0.02). Prior abnormal development was a risk factor at 1 year for lower total PEDSQL (p=0.01) versus prior normal development. Mean scores on the CBCL at baseline and 1 year were within the normal range for both empirically based scales and major risk factors. Parents of children experiencing a SFS experienced more stress at baseline than those with FSE. Families of children in the FEBSTAT cohort with identified development problems at baseline that continued, or progressed over the one year period, reported decreasing QOL

  15. Prospective evaluation of parent distress following pediatric burns and identification of risk factors for young child and parent posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Alexandra C; Hendrikz, Joan; Kenardy, Justin A; Cobham, Vanessa E; Kimble, Roy M

    2014-02-01

    Early childhood is a high-risk time for exposure to potentially traumatic medical events. We have previously reported that 10% of young children continue to have posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 6 months after burn injury. This study aimed to 1) document the prevalence and prospective change in parental psychological distress over 6 months following their child's burn injury and 2) identify risk factors for posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in young children and their parents. Participants were 120 parents of 1-6-year-old children with unintentional burn injuries. Data were collected within 2 weeks, 1 month, and 6 months of burn injury using developmentally sensitive diagnostic interviews and questionnaires. Within the first month, ∼ 25% of parents had a probable PTSD diagnosis, and moderate to extremely severe levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. Distress levels decreased significantly over time; however, 5% of parents still had probable PTSD at 6 months. Hierarchical multiple regression and path analyses indicated that parent posttraumatic stress reactions contributed significantly to the development and maintenance of child PTSS. Other risk factors for child PTSS included premorbid emotional and behavioral difficulties and larger burn size. Risk factors identified for parent PTSS included prior trauma history, acute distress, greater number of child invasive procedures, guilt, and child PTSS. The findings from this study suggest that parents' responses to a traumatic event may play a particularly important role in a young child's psychological recovery. However, further research is needed to confirm the direction of the relationship between child and parent distress. This study identified variables that could be incorporated into screening tools or targeted by early intervention protocols to prevent the development of persistent child and parent PTSS following medical trauma.

  16. Management of pediatric patients with DSD and ambiguous genitalia: Balancing the child's moral claims to self-determination with parental values and preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, David A; Swartz, Jonathan; Tishelman, Amy; Johnson, Judith; Chan, Yee-Ming

    2018-06-01

    process as balanced and supportive. In the setting of exposure of the neonatal brain to testosterone, vaginoplasty and phallic preservation afforded a balance between parental preferences and preservation of anatomic options, allowing potential reconstruction of male or female phenotype as gender identity is ascertained thereby respecting both parent and patient rights. Parents valued a spectrum of options, transparency, and the team decision-making process. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A pilot study on peritraumatic dissociation and coping styles as risk factors for posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depression in parents after their child's unexpected admission to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, Madelon B.; Kayser, Anne-Marie; Knoester, Hendrika; Bos, Albert P.; Last, Bob F.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Aim: To study the prevalence of posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depression in parents three months after pediatric intensive care treatment of their child and examine if peritraumatic dissocation and coping styles are related to these mental health problems. METHODS: This is a

  18. Pediatric eating behaviors as the intersection of biology and parenting: Lessons from the birds and the bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current feeding advice to prevent pediatric obesity focuses on caregiver feeding behaviors. This review integrates newer data showing that child appetitive traits also have a genetic component. Caregiver feeding behaviors robustly correlate with child eating behaviors; however, there is also a stron...

  19. The controversy over pediatric bariatric surgery: an explorative study on attitudes and normative beliefs of specialists, parents, and adolescents with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geelen, Stefan M; Bolt, Ineke L E; van der Baan-Slootweg, Olga H; van Summeren, Marieke J H

    2013-06-01

    Despite the reported limited success of conventional treatments and growing evidence of the effectiveness of adult bariatric surgery, weight loss operations for (morbidly) obese children and adolescents are still considered to be controversial by health care professionals and lay people alike. This paper describes an explorative, qualitative study involving obesity specialists, morbidly obese adolescents, and parents and identifies attitudes and normative beliefs regarding pediatric bariatric surgery. Views on the etiology of obesity-whether it should be considered primarily a medical condition or more a psychosocial problem-seem to affect the specialists' normative opinions concerning the acceptability of bariatric procedures as a treatment option, the parents' feelings regarding both being able to influence their child's health and their child being able to control their own condition, and the adolescents' sense of competence and motivation for treatment. Moreover, parents and adolescents who saw obesity as something that they could influence themselves were more in favor of non-surgical treatment and vice versa. Conflicting attitudes and normative views-e.g., with regard to concepts of disease, personal influence on health, motivation, and the possibility of a careful informed consent procedure-play an important role in the acceptability of bariatric surgery for childhood obesity.

  20. A pilot study on peritraumatic dissociation and coping styles as risk factors for posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depression in parents after their child's unexpected admission to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Last Bob F

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To study the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, anxiety and depression in parents three months after pediatric intensive care treatment of their child and examine if peritraumatic dissocation and coping styles are related to these mental health problems. Methods This is a prospective cohort study and included parents of children unexpectedly admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU from January 2006 to March 2007. At three months follow-up parents completed PTSD (n = 115, anxiety and depression (n = 128 questionnaires. Immediately after discharge, parents completed peritraumatic dissocation and coping questionnaires. Linear regression models with generalized estimating equations examined risk factors for mental health problems. Results Over 10% of the parents were likely to meet criteria for PTSD and almost one quarter for subclinical PTSD. Respectively 15% to 23% of the parents reported clinically significant levels of depression and anxiety. Peritraumatic dissocation was most strongly associated with PTSD, anxiety as well as depression. Avoidance coping was primarily associated with PTSD. Conclusion A significant number of parents have mental health problems three months after unexpected PICU treatment of their child. Improving detection and raise awareness of mental health problems is important to minimize the negative effect of these problems on parents' well-being.

  1. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  2. Attitudes and education of pediatric house staff concerning breast-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, G L; Jones, T M; Fraley, J K

    1992-05-01

    Pediatricians are expected to offer information and advice on breast-feeding to expectant and lactating mothers, but the educational experience for pediatric residents may not adequately prepare them for this responsibility. To examine knowledge and confidence regarding breast-feeding gained by pediatric house staff during their residency, a survey was administered to pediatric residents in a large, hospital-based training program. Of 108 program residents, 87 (81%) participated. Forty-one percent of the respondents were postgraduate level I (PL-I), 29% were PL-II, and 30% were PL-III. There was no evidence that PL-III residents were more competent or comfortable with routine breast-feeding counseling or intervention than their PL-I counterparts. Residents who had breast-fed, those with spouses who had breast-fed, and those with children of their own had the greatest knowledge and confidence base in several areas, such as their ability to teach breast-feeding techniques and to treat cracked nipples. They were also more familiar with different types of breastpumps. There were no significant differences among those who were or were not breast-fed as a child nor among men versus women. Residency programs must provide comprehensive education on breast-feeding to prepare future pediatricians to meet the needs of patients and their parents.

  3. Determinaton of Depression, Anxiety and Hopelessness Situations at Parents whose Children Are Followed in Gulhane Military Medical Faculty, Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Clinics Due to Any Malignancy or Chronic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kamil Tuna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic systemic diseases in childhood have negatively affecting the quality of life and debilitating effects for both children and parents. In our study, we investigated depression, anxiety and hopelessness situations at parents of children with these diseases. Materials and methods: The study was done at parents of children diagnosed with malignancy or chronic disease in GATA Department of Pediatrics Heath and Disease, Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Clinics. Beck Depression Scale, Beck Anxiety Scale and Beck Hopelessness Scale were applied to the participants. Results: Parents of children, who are followed due to malignancy or chronic disease in department of pediatrics heath and disease, pediatric hematology and oncology clinics, constituted the study group. 60 mothers and 51 fathers as study group and 64 mothers and 45 fathers as control group were enrolled in the study between 1st July 2009 and 1st June 2010. The mean age of the parents in study group was 35,7±5,1 and 33,3 5,6 age in control group. The depression score was significantly higher statistically in study group (p=0,035. No difference was fond for the anxiety and hopelessness scores between the groups (p=0,064 and p=0,695 respectively. There was no difference for depression, hopelessness and anxiety scores between mothers and fathers of the children (p=0,217, p=0,447, p=0,102, respectively. Conclusion: Without gender discrimination the parents of children with malignancy and chronic disease are in the risk group for depression. It is necessary to support the parents both socially and psychologically. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(5.000: 577-582

  4. Counseling parents to quit smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, Sharon L; Free, Teresa A

    2005-01-01

    It is estimated that 20%-50% of adult smokers reside with children, and the majority of these smokers (70%) continue to smoke inside their homes despite the adverse health effects of second hand smoke (SHS) for their children (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1997). Smoking is more prevalent among parents with lower incomes and less education (U.S. Surgeon General's Report, 2002a). Young persons, ages 20-40 in the family child-rearing stage, are more likely to be smokers. However, they usually have less time and financial resources for quitting smoking. To prevent the adverse health effects of SHS for children, pediatric nurses must provide parents with accurate information on affordable smoking cessation education resources. Evidenced-based smoking cessation guidelines, the cost and efficacy of prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) pharmacological aids, and essential counseling tips for parents are reviewed.

  5. Barriers and facilitators for mental healthcare in pediatric lupus and mixed connective tissue disease: a qualitative study of youth and parent perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrea M; Vickery, Michelle E; Fiks, Alexander G; Barg, Frances K

    2015-11-24

    Untreated mental health problems may result in poor outcomes for youth with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). We investigated perceptions, barriers and facilitators for mental healthcare of these youth. We conducted 32 semi-structured interviews with 16 outpatient youth with SLE/MCTD, ages 11-22 years, and their parents. We used purposive sampling to deliberately obtain the experiences of youth screened during a previous study for depression and anxiety with the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 and the Screen for Childhood Anxiety and Related Disorders, respectively. We recruited 6 youth with previous positive screens and 10 with negative screens. We assessed interim mental health history, and qualitatively examined perceptions, barriers and facilitators for mental healthcare. Youth with a mental health history increased from 6 (38%) at initial screening to 9 (56%) at interview (mean follow-up = 2.1 years). Youth receiving mental health treatment increased from 33 to 67%. Youth and parents identified rheumatologists as primary physicians and found mental health screening in rheumatology acceptable. Barriers to mental healthcare included: stigma; fear; uncertainty about getting help; parental emotional burden; minimization by doctors; and limited mental healthcare access. Facilitators included: strong clinician relationships; clinician initiative, sincerity and normalization in discussing mental health; and increased patient/family awareness of mental health issues in SLE/MCTD. Youth with SLE/MCTD and their parents perceive pediatric rheumatologists as a preferred source for mental health screening, guidance and referral. Interventions addressing barriers and enhancing facilitators may improve mental healthcare for youth with SLE/MCTD.

  6. Parent-child reading interactions among English and English as a second language speakers in an underserved pediatric clinic in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabayashi, Kristyn M; Huang, Gary Y; Linskey, Katy R; Pirga, Jason; Bane-Terakubo, Teresa; Lee, Meta T

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare reading patterns between English-speaking and English as a Second Language (ESL) families in a health care setting in Hawai'i. A cross-sectional study was performed at an underserved pediatric primary care clinic in Hawai'i. Caregivers of patients between the ages of 6 months to 5 years were asked questions regarding demographics and parent-child reading interactions. Respondents were categorized into English-speaking or ESL groups based on primary language spoken at home. Pearson chi2 tests and Fisher exact tests were performed to compare demographic differences, reading frequency, and reading attitudes between groups. One-hundred three respondents completed the survey Fifty percent