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Sample records for pancreatic endocrine neoplasm

  1. Radiologic features of cystic, endocrine and other pancreatic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balci, N. Cem; Semelka, Richard C.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents imaging features of cystic, endocrine and other pancreatic neoplasms. Microcystic adenoma which is composed of small cysts ( 2 cm) are accounted for mucinous cystic neoplasms, its variant along pancreatic duct is ductectatic mucinous cystic neoplasm. Endocrine tumors of pancreas are hypervascular and can be depicted on early dynamic enhanced crosssectional imaging modalities or on angiography when they are <1 cm. Pancreatic metastases and lymphomas are rare neoplasms which should also be included in differential diagnosis for pancreatic masses

  2. ENDOCRINE PANCREATIC FUNCTION IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

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    P. V. Novokhatny

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Among the organs of internal secretion pancreas has a special place thanks to active exocrine function and a wide range of physiological actions of produced hormones. Violations of endocrine pancreas arises in 6.5-38 % of patients with acute pancreatitis. However, there is still no clear understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of hormonal dysfunction of the pancreas in acute pancreatitis, there is no uniform algorithms for its correction. Aim of the research was to study the endocrine function of pancreas in acute pancreatitis. To define the role of endocrine pancreatic function in the etiology and pathogenesis of the acute pancreatitis. To assess the prospects of the use of pancreatic hormones in the treatment and predicting the outcomes of acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods of the research Survey of publications in specialized periodical medical journals, PubMed sources developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Search in PubMed was carried out in the following databases: MEDLINE, Pre MEDLINE. Results of the research. In a significant proportion of patients who recovered from acute pancreatitis, exocrine and endocrine functional impairments were found. This finding was not detected only in patients after severe acute pancreatitis. Routine evaluation of pancreatic function after acute pancreatitis should be considered. The comparative analysis of the synthetic analogues (somatostatin, calcitonin, leu-enkefalin-dalargin influence on the glucose metabolism of rats in acute pancreatitis of was made. Physiological reaction of beta-cells is preserved in infusion of somatostatin. However, infusion of calcitonin results in the distortion of counterregulatory action of insulin and glucagon. It was detected that pancreatic renin-angiotensin system is markedly activated in the experimental rat models of chronic hypoxia and acute pancreatitis. The activation of the pancreatic renin-angiotensin system by

  3. Endocrine pancreatic function changes after acute pancreatitis.

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    Wu, Deqing; Xu, Yaping; Zeng, Yue; Wang, Xingpeng

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impairment of pancreatic endocrine function and the associated risk factors after acute pancreatitis (AP). Fifty-nine patients were subjected to tests of pancreatic function after an attack of pancreatitis. The mean time after the event was 3.5 years. Pancreatic endocrine function was evaluated by fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood insulin, and C-peptide. Homeostasis model assessment was used to evaluate insulin resistance and islet β-cell function. Pancreatic exocrine function was evaluated by fecal elastase 1. Factors that could influence endocrine function were also investigated. Nineteen patients (32%) were found to have elevated FBG, whereas 5 (8%) had abnormal glycosylated hemoglobin levels. The levels of FBG, fasting blood insulin, and C-peptide were higher in patients than in controls (P endocrine insufficiency. Pancreatic exocrine functional impairment was found at the same time. Endocrine functional impairment with insulin resistance was found in patients after AP. Obesity, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes-related symptoms increased the likelihood of developing functional impairment after AP.

  4. Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms; Neuroendokrine Neoplasien des Pankreas

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    Beiderwellen, K.; Lauenstein, T.C. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Essen (Germany); Sabet, A.; Poeppel, T.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany); Lahner, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Endokrinologie und Stoffwechselerkrankungen, Essen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2 % of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. (orig.) [German] Neuroendokrine Neoplasien (NEN) des Pankreas stellen mit einem Anteil von 1-2 % aller pankreatischen Tumoren eine seltene Differenzialdiagnose dar. Ein Teil der Tumoren ist hormonell aktiv und faellt klinisch durch charakteristische Symptome auf, wohingegen der ueberwiegende Anteil hormonell inaktiv ist. Bildgebende Verfahren wie Sonographie, Computertomographie (CT), Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und nicht zuletzt Positronenemissionstomographie (PET oder kombiniert als PET/CT) spielen eine zentrale Rolle fuer Erstdiagnose, Therapieplanung und -kontrolle. Die Endosonographie und die multiphasische CT stellen die Referenzmethoden zur Lokalisation des Primaertumors dar. Fuer die Differenzierung insbesondere kleiner Leberlaesionen bietet die MRT die hoechste Aussagekraft. Fuer das Ganzkoerperstaging und bestimmte Aspekte der Therapieplanung lassen sich die Somatostatinrezeptorszintigraphie und v. a. die Somatostatinrezeptor-PET/CT heranziehen. (orig.)

  5. Surgical treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

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    Marcel Cerqueira Cesar Machado

    Full Text Available Surgical approaches to pancreatic endocrine tumors associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may differ greatly from those applied to sporadic pancreatic endocrine tumors. Presurgical diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is therefore crucial to plan a proper intervention. Of note, hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 should be surgically treated before pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 resection, apart from insulinoma. Non-functioning pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 >1 cm have a high risk of malignancy and should be treated by a pancreatic resection associated with lymphadenectomy. The vast majority of patients with gastrinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 present with tumor lesions at the duodenum, so the surgery of choice is subtotal or total pancreatoduodenectomy followed by regional lymphadenectomy. The usual surgical treatment for insulinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is distal pancreatectomy up to the mesenteric vein with or without spleen preservation, associated with enucleation of tumor lesions in the pancreatic head. Surgical procedures for glucagonomas, somatostatinomas, and vipomas/ multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 are similar to those applied to sporadic pancreatic endocrine tumors. Some of these surgical strategies for pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 still remain controversial as to their proper extension and timing. Furthermore, surgical resection of single hepatic metastasis secondary to pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may be curative and even in multiple liver metastases surgical resection is possible. Hepatic trans-arterial chemo-embolization is usually associated with surgical resection. Liver transplantation may be needed for select cases. Finally, pre-surgical clinical and genetic diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome and

  6. Radiology of pancreatic neoplasms: An update.

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    de la Santa, Luis Gijón; Retortillo, José Antonio Pérez; Miguel, Ainhoa Camarero; Klein, Lea Marie

    2014-09-15

    Diagnostic imaging is an important tool to evaluate pancreatic neoplasms. We describe the imaging features of pancreatic malignancies and their benign mimics. Accurate detection and staging are essential for ensuring appropriate selection of patients who will benefit from surgery and for preventing unnecessary surgeries in patients with unresectable disease. Ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography with multiplanar reconstruction and magnetic resonance imaging can help to do a correct diagnosis. Radiologists should be aware of the wide variety of anatomic variants and pathologic conditions that may mimic pancreatic neoplasms. The knowledge of the most important characteristic key findings may facilitate the right diagnosis.

  7. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

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    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2016-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  8. Ductuloinsular tumors of the pancreas - Endocrine tumors with entrapped nonneoplastic ductules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eeden, Susanne; de Leng, Wendy W. J.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Morsink, Folkert H.; Weterman, Marian A. J.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Klöppel, Günter; Klimstra, David S.

    2004-01-01

    Rare pancreatic neoplasms have been reported that show both endocrine and exocrine differentiation in the neoplastic components. In addition, pancreatic endocrine tumors may contain small, cytologically bland ductules intimately admixed with the endocrine component. It was recently suggested that

  9. Radiotherapy for unresectable endocrine pancreatic carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennvall, J.; Ljungberg, O.; Ahren, B.; Gustavsson, A.; Nillson, L.O.

    1992-01-01

    Surgery, when possible, is the treatment of choice for the uncommon endocrine tumours of pancreas. Unresectable cases are usually treated with cytostatic drugs or α-interferon. We describe a patient with unresectable, locally advanced endocrine pancreatic carcinoma (measuring 5 x 5 x 6 cm) that was totally cured by external radiation therapy only (40 Gy). This case together with four cases in the literature indicate that external radiation therapy should be considered in locally unresectable endocrine pancreatic carcinomas. (author)

  10. ENDOCRINE PANCREATIC FUNCTION IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    OpenAIRE

    P. V. Novokhatny

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Among the organs of internal secretion pancreas has a special place thanks to active exocrine function and a wide range of physiological actions of produced hormones. Violations of endocrine pancreas arises in 6.5-38 % of patients with acute pancreatitis. However, there is still no clear understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of hormonal dysfunction of the pancreas in acute pancreatitis, there is no uniform algorithms for its correction. Aim of the research was to study...

  11. Endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after acute pancreatitis: long-term follow-up study.

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    Tu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Jingzhu; Ke, Lu; Yang, Yue; Yang, Qi; Lu, Guotao; Li, Baiqiang; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2017-10-27

    Patients could develop endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after acute pancreatitis (AP), but the morbidity, risk factors and outcome remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after AP and the risk factors of endocrine pancreatic insufficiency through a long-term follow-up investigation. Follow-up assessment of the endocrine and exocrine function was conducted for the discharged patients with AP episodes. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) and faecal elastase-1(FE-1) test were used as primary parameters. Fasting blood-glucose (FBG), fasting insulin (FINS), glycosylated hemoglobin HBA1c, 2-h postprandial blood glucose (2hPG), Homa beta cell function index (HOMA-β), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and FE-1 were collected. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) was performed to investigate the pancreatic morphology and the other related data during hospitalization was also collected. One hundred thirteen patients were included in this study and 34 of whom (30.1%) developed diabetes mellitus (DM), 33 (29.2%) suffered impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Moreover, 33 patients (29.2%) developed mild to moderate exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with 100μg/gpancreatic insufficiency with FE-1pancreatic necrosis was significant higher than that in the non-pancreatic necrosis group (X 2  = 13.442,P = 0.001). The multiple logistic regression analysis showed that extent of pancreatic necrosisendocrine pancreatic insufficiency. HOMA-IR (P = 0.002, OR = 6.626), Wall-off necrosis (WON) (P = 0.013, OR = 184.772) were the risk factors. The integrated morbidity of DM and IGT after AP was 59.25%, which was higher than exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. 6.2% and 29.2% of patients developed severe and mild to moderate exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, respectively. The extent of pancreatic necrosis>50%, WON and insulin resistance were

  12. Specifying pancreatic endocrine cell fates.

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    Collombat, Patrick; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob; Serup, Palle; Mansouri, Ahmed

    2006-07-01

    Cell replacement therapy could represent an attractive alternative to insulin injections for the treatment of diabetes. However, this approach requires a thorough understanding of the molecular switches controlling the specification of the different pancreatic cell-types in vivo. These are derived from an apparently identical pool of cells originating from the early gut endoderm, which are successively specified towards the pancreatic, endocrine, and hormone-expressing cell lineages. Numerous studies have outlined the crucial roles exerted by transcription factors in promoting the cell destiny, defining the cell identity and maintaining a particular cell fate. This review focuses on the mechanisms regulating the morphogenesis of the pancreas with particular emphasis on recent findings concerning the transcription factor hierarchy orchestrating endocrine cell fate allocation.

  13. Surgical and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasms.

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    Hackeng, Wenzel M; Hruban, Ralph H; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Brosens, Lodewijk A A

    2016-06-07

    Histologic characteristics have proven to be very useful for classifying different types of tumors of the pancreas. As a result, the major tumor types in the pancreas have long been classified based on their microscopic appearance. Recent advances in whole exome sequencing, gene expression profiling, and knowledge of tumorigenic pathways have deepened our understanding of the underlying biology of pancreatic neoplasia. These advances have not only confirmed the traditional histologic classification system, but also opened new doors to early diagnosis and targeted treatment. This review discusses the histopathology, genetic and epigenetic alterations and potential treatment targets of the five major malignant pancreatic tumors - pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm, acinar cell carcinoma and pancreatoblastoma.

  14. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with complete replacement of the pancreas by serous cystic neoplasms in a patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease: a case report.

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    Maeda, Shimpei; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Oana, Shuhei; Ariake, Kyohei; Mizuma, Masamichi; Morikawa, Takanori; Hayashi, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Kei; Kamei, Takashi; Naitoh, Takeshi; Unno, Michiaki

    2017-09-25

    von Hippel-Lindau disease is a dominantly inherited multi-system syndrome with neoplastic hallmarks. Pancreatic lesions associated with von Hippel-Lindau include serous cystic neoplasms, simple cysts, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and serous cystic neoplasms is relatively rare, and the surgical treatment of these lesions must consider both preservation of pancreatic function and oncological clearance. We report a patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease successfully treated with pancreas-sparing resection of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor where the pancreas had been completely replaced by serous cystic neoplasms, in which pancreatic function was preserved. A 39-year-old female with von Hippel-Lindau disease was referred to our institution for treatment of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a well-enhanced mass, 4 cm in diameter in the tail of the pancreas, and two multilocular tumors with several calcifications, 5 cm in diameter, in the head of the pancreas. There was complete replacement of the pancreas by multiple cystic lesions with diameters ranging from 1 to 3 cm. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed innumerable cystic lesions on the whole pancreas and no detectable main pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the mass in the pancreatic tail showed characteristic features of a neuroendocrine tumor. A diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in the tail of the pancreas and mixed-type serous cystic neoplasms replacing the whole pancreas was made and she underwent distal pancreatectomy while avoiding total pancreatectomy. The stump of the pancreas was sutured as firm as possible using a fish-mouth closure. The patient made a good recovery and was discharged on postoperative day 9. She is currently alive and well with no symptoms of endocrine or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency 8 months after surgery. A pancreas

  15. A prospective evaluation of pancreatic exocrine function in patients with acute pancreatitis: correlation with extent of necrosis and pancreatic endocrine insufficiency.

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    Boreham, B; Ammori, B J

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess pancreatic exocrine function in patients recovering from a first attack of acute pancreatitis, and to evaluate its relationship to severity of attack, extent of pancreatic necrosis and severity of pancreatic endocrine insufficiency. Between December 2000 and November 2001, 23 patients were prospectively evaluated. Pancreatic exocrine function was measured by the faecal elastase-1 test and insufficiency was classified as moderately impaired or severely impaired. Pancreatic necrosis was determined by contrast-enhanced CT scan, and its extent was categorised according to Balthazar's classification. The severity of pancreatic endocrine insufficiency was categorised according to insulin dependence. Attacks were classified as mild (n = 16) or severe (n = 7) according to the Atlanta criteria. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency was significantly more frequent in patients recovering from severe attacks than mild (n = 6, 86% vs. n = 2, 13%; p = 0.002), and in those who developed pancreatic necrosis or pseudocyst than those who did not (6 of 7 patients vs. 2 of 16 patients, and 5 of 5 patients vs. 3 of 18 patients respectively; p = 0.002). The development of exocrine insufficiency correlated strongly with the extent of pancreatic necrosis (r = -0.754, p pancreatic endocrine insufficiency (n = 4, r = -0.453, p = 0.03). Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a common occurrence in patients recovering from severe acute pancreatitis, and its severity correlates with the extent of pancreatic necrosis and the severity of concomitant pancreatic endocrine insufficiency. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP

  16. Metastatic Insulinoma Following Resection of Nonsecreting Pancreatic Islet Cell Tumor

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    Anoopa A. Koshy MD

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old woman presented to our clinic for recurrent hypoglycemia after undergoing resection of an incidentally discovered nonfunctional pancreatic endocrine tumor 6 years ago. She underwent a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, after which she developed diabetes and was placed on an insulin pump. Pathology showed a pancreatic endocrine neoplasm with negative islet hormone immunostains. Two years later, computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed multiple liver lesions. Biopsy of a liver lesion showed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm, consistent with pancreatic origin. Six years later, she presented to clinic with 1.5 years of recurrent hypoglycemia. Laboratory results showed elevated proinsulin, insulin levels, and c-peptide levels during a hypoglycemic episode. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen redemonstrated multiple liver lesions. Repeated transarterial catheter chemoembolization and microwave thermal ablation controlled hypoglycemia. The unusual features of interest of this case include the transformation of nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumor to a metastatic insulinoma and the occurrence of atrial flutter after octreotide for treatment.

  17. Enucleation of pancreatic solid pseudopapillary neoplasm: Short-term and long-term outcomes from a 7-year large single-center experience.

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    Wang, Xing; Chen, Yong-Hua; Tan, Chun-Lu; Zhang, Hao; Xiong, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yu; Ke, Neng-Wen; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2018-05-01

    Enucleation is increasingly used for pancreatic solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) to preserve function of the pancreas. The data was limited due to rarity of this low-grade neoplasm. We sought to describe the indications, operative technique, short and long-term outcomes after enucleation with largest series of enucleated SPNs. Data collected retrospectively from 110 patients with SPN who underwent pancreatectomy between 2009 and 2016 in our institution were reviewed. Thirty-one patients underwent enucleation were identified for analysis, and compared with the 70 patients underwent conventional pancreatic resection. Of the 31 patients, 27 (87.1%) were women, and the mean age was 29.8 years (range, 11-49 years). Enucleated SPNs were mostly located in the head/uncinate process of the pancreas (38.7%). Overall morbidity was 25.8%, mainly due to POPF (19.4%), and severe morbidity was only 6.5% with no death. Compared with conventional pancreatic resection, enucleation had a shorter duration of surgery (P insufficiency (P = 0.033) and comparable morbidity (P = 1), with no increased risk of tumor recurrence (P = 1). The rate of endocrine insufficiency after enucleation seemed lower (Nil vs. 4.5%, P = 0.55). Enucleation of SPN of the pancreas appears to be feasible and safe for preserving exocrine and endocrine function of the gland. Enucleation with negative surgical margin seems adequate with no increased risk of tumor recurrence. Enucleation could be seriously considered as an alternative to conventional resection for this frequently young population. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Unicentric Castleman’s Disease Masquerading Pancreatic Neoplasm

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    Saurabh Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease is a rare nonclonal proliferative disorder of the lymph nodes with an unknown etiology. Common locations of Castleman’s disease are mediastinum, neck, axilla, and abdomen. Castleman’s disease of a peripancreatic location masquerading as pancreatic neoplasm is an even rarer entity. On search of published data, we came across about 17 cases published on peripancreatic Castleman’s disease until now. Here we are reporting a case of retropancreatic Castleman's disease masquerading as retroperitoneal neoplasm in a 46-year-old male patient.

  19. Dynamic MRI of pancreatic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Nobuyoshi; Takayasu, Ken-ichi; Muramatu, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    The usefulness of dynamic MRI study using contrast media is studied on pancreatic tumors. This method was useful in detecting small lesion of pancreatic tumor, however, T1-weighted SE method was more useful in detecting swelling lesions or diagnosing degree of tumors. Although endocrine tumors are depicted by contrast media, careful attention is needed since there are some hypovascular cases. T2-weighted image is commonly performed to detect the morphology of cystic content and the correlation between the pancreas and bile duct in cystic tumors, however, dynamic study was more useful in proving vascularity of serous cystadenoma and differentiating malignant or benign mucous cystic tumors by depicting intracystic torous components. In performing MR imaging on pancreatic diseases, it is necessary to select appropriate imaging procedure, and dynamic study should be included and used in a rational manner. (S.Y.)

  20. Production of pancreatic hormone-expressing endocrine cells from human embryonic stem cells.

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    D'Amour, Kevin A; Bang, Anne G; Eliazer, Susan; Kelly, Olivia G; Agulnick, Alan D; Smart, Nora G; Moorman, Mark A; Kroon, Evert; Carpenter, Melissa K; Baetge, Emmanuel E

    2006-11-01

    Of paramount importance for the development of cell therapies to treat diabetes is the production of sufficient numbers of pancreatic endocrine cells that function similarly to primary islets. We have developed a differentiation process that converts human embryonic stem (hES) cells to endocrine cells capable of synthesizing the pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin. This process mimics in vivo pancreatic organogenesis by directing cells through stages resembling definitive endoderm, gut-tube endoderm, pancreatic endoderm and endocrine precursor--en route to cells that express endocrine hormones. The hES cell-derived insulin-expressing cells have an insulin content approaching that of adult islets. Similar to fetal beta-cells, they release C-peptide in response to multiple secretory stimuli, but only minimally to glucose. Production of these hES cell-derived endocrine cells may represent a critical step in the development of a renewable source of cells for diabetes cell therapy.

  1. Examining the effects of hyperglycemia on pancreatic endocrine function in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas P J; Knudsen, Sine H; Karstoft, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the impact of hyperglycemia on pancreatic endocrine function promotes our understanding of the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia-related disease.......Investigating the impact of hyperglycemia on pancreatic endocrine function promotes our understanding of the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia-related disease....

  2. Molecular Diagnostics in the Neoplasms of the Pancreas, Liver, Gallbladder, and Extrahepatic Biliary Tract: 2018 Update.

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    Zhang, Lei; Bluth, Martin H; Bhalla, Amarpreet

    2018-06-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms, including ductal adenocarcinoma, solid pseudopapillary neoplasm, pancreatic endocrine neoplasms, acinar cell carcinoma, and pancreatoblastoma, are associated with different genetic abnormalities. Hepatic adenomas with beta-catenin exon 3 mutation are associated with a high risk of malignancy. Hepatic adenoma with arginosuccinate synthetase 1 expression or sonic hedgehog mutations are associated with a risk of bleeding. Hepatocellular carcinoma and choangiocarcinoma display heterogeneity at both morphologic and molecular levels Cholangiocellular carcinoma is most commonly associated with IDH 1/2 mutations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains

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    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections.

  4. Zinc status in chronic pancreatitis and its relationship with exocrine and endocrine insufficiency.

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    Girish, Banavara Narasimhamurthy; Rajesh, Gopalakrishna; Vaidyanathan, Kannan; Balakrishnan, Vallath

    2009-11-05

    A major role of the pancreas in zinc homeostasis has been suggested. To assess erythrocyte zinc status in chronic pancreatitis and to correlate it with pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. One hundred and one patients with chronic pancreatitis (34 alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, 67 tropical chronic pancreatitis) were prospectively studied. Disease characteristics and imaging features were recorded. Erythrocyte zinc was estimated by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Exocrine insufficiency was assessed using polyclonal antibody ELISA for pancreatic stool elastase1. Endocrine insufficiency was assessed by serum glucose levels and insulin requirement. Erythrocyte zinc was significantly lower in chronic pancreatitis patients than in the controls (26.5+/-9.5 microg/g Hb vs. 38.0+/-6.6 microg/g Hb; Ppancreatitis than in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (25.0+/-10.4 microg/g Hb vs. 29.6+/-6.5 microg/g Hb, P=0.001). In chronic pancreatitis patients who had exocrine insufficiency, erythrocyte zinc positively correlated with stool elastase1 (r=0.587, Ppancreatitis patients, and that zinc deficiency correlates with exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Further studies may clarify the possible benefits of zinc supplementation in chronic pancreatitis.

  5. Nuclear medicine procedures to diagnose endocrine pancreatic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bares, R.; Besenfelder, H.; Eschmann, S.M.; Pfannenberg, C.

    2003-01-01

    The typical clinical features of endocrine pancreatic tumours are either symptoms caused by excessive hormone production or progressive tumour growth. In several prospective studies it has been shown that somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is the most accurate imaging technique currently available to detect endocrine pancreatic tumours. Therefore it should be used whenever curative surgical treatment appears to be feasible. Furthermore it should be applied if a radionuclide treatment of inoperable tumours is considered. In this situation scintigraphy with 123 I-mIBG might be useful, too. Future developments include the use of PET with labelled somatostatin analogues or DOPA derivatives as well as image fusion techniques to optimize preoperative tumour localization. (orig.) [de

  6. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function and salivary gland function in autoimmune pancreatitis before and after steroid therapy.

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    Kamisawa, Terumi; Egawa, Naoto; Inokuma, Shigeko; Tsuruta, Kouji; Okamoto, Atsutake; Kamata, Noriko; Nakamura, Teruo; Matsukawa, Masakatsu

    2003-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct clinical entity in which an autoimmune mechanism may be involved in pathogenesis. To investigate salivary gland function in addition to pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function in patients with AIP, and to determine changes occurring after steroid therapy. Fasting serum glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance tests or glycosylated hemoglobin values were examined in 19 patients with AIP. N-benzoyl-L-tyrosyl-p-aminobenzoic acid excretion test, sialochemistry and parotid gland scintigraphy were performed in 8 patients. Eight patients had evidence of DM. Steroid therapy subsequently improved insulin secretion and glycemic control in 3 of 5 patients treated. Pancreatic exocrine function was reduced in 88% of patients. Impaired pancreatic exocrine function improved after steroid therapy in 3 of 6 patients treated. The 3 patients also showed treatment-related improvement in endocrine function. Concentration of beta2-microglobulin in saliva was significantly raised in patients with AIP compared with controls (P gland dysfunction improved after steroid therapy in all 5 patients treated. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine and salivary gland function were frequently impaired in patients with AIP, and steroid therapy was occasionally effective for these dysfunctions.

  7. Thirty-day outcomes underestimate endocrine and exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic resection.

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    Lim, Pei-Wen; Dinh, Kate H; Sullivan, Mary; Wassef, Wahid Y; Zivny, Jaroslav; Whalen, Giles F; LaFemina, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Long-term incidence of endocrine and exocrine insufficiency after pancreatectomy is poorly described. We analyze the long-term risks of pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatectomy. Subjects who underwent pancreatectomy from 2002 to 2012 were identified from a prospective database (n = 227). Subjects who underwent total pancreatectomy or pancreatitis surgery were excluded. New post-operative endocrine and exocrine insufficiency was defined as the need for new pharmacologic intervention within 1000 days from resection. 28 (16%) of 178 subjects without pre-existing endocrine insufficiency developed post-operative endocrine insufficiency: 7 (25%) did so within 30 days, 8 (29%) between 30 and 90 days, and 13 (46%) after 90 days. 94 (43%) of 214 subjects without pre-operative exocrine insufficiency developed exocrine insufficiency: 20 (21%) did so within 30 days, 29 (31%) between 30 and 90 days, and 45 (48%) after 90 days. Adjuvant radiation was associated with new endocrine insufficiency. On multivariate regression, pancreaticoduodenectomy and chemotherapy were associated with a greater risk of exocrine insufficiency. Reporting 30-day functional outcomes for pancreatic resection is insufficient, as nearly 45% of subjects who develop disease do so after 90 days. Reporting of at least 90-day outcomes may more reliably assess risk for post-operative endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. Copyright © 2016 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in 21 patients suffering from autoimmune pancreatitis before and after steroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frulloni, Luca; Scattolini, Chiara; Katsotourchi, Anna Maria; Amodio, Antonio; Gabbrielli, Armando; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Benini, Luigi; Vantini, Italo

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) responds rapidly and dramatically to steroid therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate pancreatic exocrine and endocrine function in patients suffering from AIP both before and after steroid therapy. Fecal elastase 1 and diabetes were evaluated before steroid therapy and within 1 month of its suspension in 21 patients (13 males and 8 females, mean age 43 +/- 16.5 years) diagnosed as having AIP between 2006 and 2008. At clinical onset, fecal elastase 1 was 107 +/- 126 microg/g stool. Thirteen patients (62%) showed severe pancreatic insufficiency (insufficiency (100-200 microg/g stool), while 4 (19%) had normal pancreatic function (>200 microg/g stool). Before steroids, diabetes was diagnosed in 5 patients (24%), all of whom had very low levels of fecal elastase 1 (endocrine pancreatic insufficiency at clinical onset. These insufficiencies improve after steroid therapy. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Islet Cells Serve as Cells of Origin of Pancreatic Gastrin-Positive Endocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Jaafar, Rami; Ripoche, Doriane; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Chen, Yuan-Jia; Rehfeld, Jens F; Lepinasse, Florian; Hervieu, Valérie; Pattou, François; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bertolino, Philippe; Zhang, Chang Xian

    2015-10-01

    The cells of origin of pancreatic gastrinomas remain an enigma, since no gastrin-expressing cells are found in the normal adult pancreas. It was proposed that the cellular origin of pancreatic gastrinomas may come from either the pancreatic cells themselves or gastrin-expressing cells which have migrated from the duodenum. In the current study, we further characterized previously described transient pancreatic gastrin-expressing cells using cell lineage tracing in a pan-pancreatic progenitor and a pancreatic endocrine progenitor model. We provide evidence showing that pancreatic gastrin-expressing cells, found from embryonic day 12.5 until postnatal day 7, are derived from pancreatic Ptf1a(+) and neurogenin 3-expressing (Ngn3(+)) progenitors. Importantly, the majority of them coexpress glucagon, with 4% coexpressing insulin, indicating that they are a temporary subpopulation of both alpha and beta cells. Interestingly, Men1 disruption in both Ngn3 progenitors and beta and alpha cells resulted in the development of pancreatic gastrin-expressing tumors, suggesting that the latter developed from islet cells. Finally, we detected gastrin expression using three human cohorts with pancreatic endocrine tumors (pNETs) that have not been diagnosed as gastrinomas (in 9/34 pNETs from 6/14 patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, in 5/35 sporadic nonfunctioning pNETs, and in 2/20 sporadic insulinomas), consistent with observations made in mouse models. Our work provides insight into the histogenesis of pancreatic gastrin-expressing tumors. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Prospective Evaluation of Germline Alterations in Patients With Exocrine Pancreatic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Maeve A; Wong, Winston; Jordan, Emmet J; Lee, Jonathan W; Kemel, Yelena; Vijai, Joseph; Mandelker, Diana; Zehir, Ahmet; Capanu, Marinela; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Arnold, Angela G; Yu, Kenneth H; Varghese, Anna M; Kelsen, David P; Brenner, Robin; Kaufmann, Erica; Ravichandran, Vignesh; Mukherjee, Semanti; Berger, Michael F; Hyman, David M; Klimstra, David S; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Tjan, Catherine; Covington, Christina; Maynard, Hannah; Allen, Peter J; Askan, Gokce; Leach, Steven D; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Robson, Mark E; Offit, Kenneth; Stadler, Zsofia K; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2018-02-28

    Identification of pathogenic germline alterations (PGAs) has important clinical and therapeutic implications in pancreas cancer. We performed comprehensive germline testing (GT) in an unselected prospective cohort of patients with exocrine pancreatic neoplasms with genotype and phenotype association to facilitate identification of prognostic and/or predictive biomarkers and examine potential therapeutic implications. Six hundred fifteen unselected patients with exocrine pancreatic neoplasms were prospectively consented for somatic tumor and matched sample profiling for 410-468 genes. GT for PGAs in 76 genes associated with cancer susceptibility was performed in an "identified" manner in 356 (57.9%) patients and in an "anonymized" manner in 259 (42.1%) patients, using an institutional review board-approved protocol. Detailed clinical and pathological features, response to platinum, and overall survival (OS) were collected for the identified cohort. OS was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curves. PGAs were present in 122 (19.8%) of 615 patients involving 24 different genes, including BRCA1/2, ATM, PALB2, and multiple additional genes associated with the DNA damage response pathway. Of 122 patients with germline alterations, 41.8% did not meet current guidelines for GT. The difference in median OS was not statistically significant between patients with and without PGA (50.8 months, 95% confidence interval = 34.5 to not reached, two-sided P = .94). Loss of heterozygosity was found in 60.0% of BRCA1/2. PGAs frequently occur in pancreas exocrine neoplasms and involve multiple genes beyond those previously associated with hereditary pancreatic cancer. These PGAs are therapeutically actionable in about 5% to 10% of patients. These data support routinely offering GT in all pancreatic ductal adenocarcimona patients with a broad panel of known hereditary cancer predisposition genes.

  11. A Single Centre Analysis of Clinical Characteristics and Treatment of Endocrine Pancreatic Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Adil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Endocrine Pancreatic Tumours (PENs are rare and can be nonfunctioning or functioning. They carry a good prognosis overall though high grade lesions show a relatively shorter survival. The aim of the current study is to describe a single centre analysis of the clinical characteristics and surgical treatment of PENs. Patients and Methods. This is a cohort analysis of 40 patients of PENs who underwent surgery at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India, from 1995 to 2013. Patient particulars, clinical features, surgical interventions, postoperative outcome, and followup were done and reviewed. The study group was divided based on grade (G1, G2, and G3 and functionality (nonfunctioning versus functioning for comparison. Results. PENs comprised 6.3% of all pancreatic neoplasms (40 of 634. Twenty-eight patients (70% had nonfunctioning tumours. Eighteen PENs (45% were carcinomas (G3, all of which were nonfunctioning. 14 (78% of these were located in the pancreatic head and uncinate process (P=0.09. The high grade (G3 lesions were significantly larger in size than the lower grade (G1 + G2 tumours (7.0 ± 3.5 cms versus 3.1 ± 1.6 cms, P=0.007. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed in 18 (45%, distal pancreatectomy in 10 (25%, and local resection in 8 (20% and nonresective procedures were performed in 4 patients (10%. Fourteen patients (35% had postoperative complications. All G3 grade tumours which were resected had positive lymph nodes (100% and 10 had angioinvasion (71%. Eight neoplasms (20% were cystic, all being grade G3 carcinomas, while the rest were solid. The overall disease related mortality attributable to PEN was 14.3% (4 of 28 and for malignant PENs was 33.3% (4 of 12 after a mean follow-up period of 49.6 months (range: 2–137 months. Conclusion. Majority of PENs are nonfunctioning. They are more likely malignant if they are nonfunctioning and large in size, show cystic appearance, and are situated in the pancreatic head

  12. Positron emission tomography (PET) and pancreatic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montravers, F.; Kerrou, K.; Grahek, D.; Gutman, F.; Beco, V. de; Talbot, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    Neoplasms of the pancreas may originate front both exocrine and endocrine cells but in 90% of the cases, they correspond to ductal adenocarcinomas. For adenocarcinomas, the major indication of FDG-PET corresponds to the pre-operative staging because unexpected distant metastases can be detected by FDG-PET in about 20 to 40% of the cases, which results in avoidance of unnecessary surgical procedures. FDG PET is also useful in evaluation of the treatment effect, monitoring after the operation and detection of recurrent pancreatic cancers. For the characterisation of the pancreatic tumour, the performance of FDG-PET is sometimes limited due to poor cellularity, hyperglycemia or inflammatory processes. especially for large tumours and is indicated only in cases of doubtful results of CT or MRI. For endocrine pancreatic tumours, FDG-PET is useful only in case of poorly-differentiated and aggressive tumours. F-DOPA PET can he useful, complementary to pentetreotide scintigraphy, in well-differentiated endocrine tumours. (authors)

  13. Role of adipocytokines and its correlation with endocrine pancreatic function in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsiorowska, Anita; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Kaczka, Aleksandra; Borkowska, Anna; Czupryniak, Leszek; Małecka-Panas, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Some authors suggest that adipocytokines contribute to the induction of pancreatic carcinogenesis as well as the development of endocrine insufficiency. We evaluate the circulating concentrations of leptin, resistin and visfatin in patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer (PC) and relationship between serum adipocytokines level and clinicopathological features of PC. Moreover the usefulness of those adipocytokines as possible biomarkers of endocrine pancreatic function in PC has been assessed. The pilot study group consisted of 45 individuals (mean age 65.6 ± 11.5 years, BMI 21.8 ± 3.4 kg/m(2)) with newly diagnosed PC (within last 1-3 months) and 13 healthy individuals with age, gender and BMI matched to the study group. Among PC patients 18 (40%) had recently diagnosed diabetes. Fasting plasma leptin, resistin, visfatin concentrations were determined with ELISA (R&D Systems, Phoenix Pharmaceuticals) and insulin by RIA (DakoCytomation). Patients with PC as compared to controls had significantly lower plasma leptin (40.6 ± 21.3 vs 63.2 ± 16.3 pg/mL; p pancreatic cancer are characterized with lower level of leptin. This pilot study showed significantly higher resistin concentrations in patients with PC in comparison to healthy controls, which may be helpful in PC early diagnosis. Changes in leptin and resistin level in PC are not likely related to endocrine disorders. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror

    2015-01-01

    in neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic...... endocrine cells, which are molecularly close to neurons. We show that Rest is widely expressed in pancreas progenitors and that it is down-regulated in differentiated endocrine cells. Sustained expression of REST in Pdx1(+) progenitors impairs the differentiation of endocrine-committed Neurog3...

  15. Contribution of the ultrasonography for pancreatic endocrine tumors diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vezozzo, D.C.P.; Cerri, G.G.; Siqueira, S.S.C.; Cauledori, I.; Alves, V.A.F.; Magalhaes, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a review of 12 cases of endocrine pancreatic tumors. All patients were submitted to preoperative sonography and five of these to intra-operative sonography as well. Correlation with pathological findings was obtained in all patients. Correct localization of the lesions was obtained in seven of 12 patients by pre- and intra-operative sonography studies. False-positive results were observed in two patients and a technically inadequate sonographic examination with false-negative results were seen in the remaining three cases. Intra-operative sonography contributed in 100% of cases in order to localize at least one of the lesions detected pathologically, thus been very usefull to surgical management. Intra-operative sonography should be used as a routine procedure in the evaluation of endocrine pancreatic tumors. (author)

  16. Enucleation and limited pancreatic resection provide long-term cure for insulinoma in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Detlef K; Albers, Max; Knoop, Richard; Kann, Peter H; Fendrich, Volker; Waldmann, Jens

    2013-01-01

    To assess the characteristics and long-term outcome after surgery in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)-associated insulinoma. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of MEN1 patients with organic hyperinsulinism at a tertiary referral center. Thirteen (17%) of 74 patients with MEN1 had organic hyperinsulinism. The median age at diagnosis was 27 (range 9-48) years. In 7 patients insulinoma was the first manifestation of the syndrome. All patients had at least one pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (pNEN) upon imaging, including CT, MRI or endoscopic ultrasonography. Seven patients had solitary lesions upon imaging, 4 patients had one dominant tumor with coexisting multiple small pNENs, and 2 patients had multiple lesions without dominance. Eight patients had limited resections (1 segmental resection, 7 enucleations), 4 subtotal distal pancreatectomies, and 1 patient a partial duodenopancreatectomy. There was no postoperative mortality. Six patients experienced complications, including pancreatic fistula in 5 patients. Pathological examination revealed median three (range 1-14) macro-pNENs sized between 6 and 40 mm, and a total of 14 potentially benign insulinomas were detected in the 13 patients. After median follow-up of 156 months, only 1 patient developed recurrent hyperinsulinism after initial enucleation. Twelve patients developed new pNENs in the pancreatic remnant and 4 patients underwent reoperations (3 for metastatic ZES, 1 for recurrent hyperinsulinism). One of 5 patients with an initial extended pancreatic resection developed insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Enucleation and limited resection provide long-term cure for MEN1 insulinoma in patients with solitary or dominant tumors. Subtotal distal pancreatectomy should thus be preserved for patients with multiple pNENs without dominance given the risk of exocrine and endocrine pancreas insufficiency in the mostly young patients. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Hematologic and pancreatic endocrine abnormalities after ionisingirradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.

    1986-01-01

    Besides the use of ionizing irradiation in the treatment of malignant tumours of the abdominal cavity, irradiation has also been documented to suppress the classical organ allograft rejection response in man and experimental models. Recently, fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and subtotal bone-marrow irradiation has been proved successfull in suppressing rejection of liver and kidney allografts in primates resulting in permanent tolerance. This study evaluates the detrimental side-effects of fractionated irradiation on peripheral blood, bone-marrow, pancreatic morphology and function in our primate model. Twenty primates received fractionated irradiation in doses of 800 (8 Gy) and 1000 (10 Gy) rads respectively administered at 100 rad (1 Gy) biweekly over a 4 to 5 week period. During the last weeks of irradiation 300 millilitres (ml) of donor specific blood was transfused in 50 ml aliquotes to combat the myelosuppressive effects of irradiation. Within 1 week of irradiation marked bonemarrow suppression was characterized by pancytopaenia and hypoplasia Pancreatic endocrine disturbances include hypoin-sulinaemia associated with mild glucose intolerance and reduced K-values. Significant pathological changes of the pancreas included nuclear and cytocavitary network changes affecting both endocrine and exocrine pancreatic elements. Although irradiation has proved to be a powerful immunosuppressive modality, significant haematological and organ damage occurred despite fractionation over a 4 to 5 week period

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation, for pancreatic cystic neoplasms and neuroendocrine tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Madhava; Habib, Nagy; Senturk, Hakan; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Reddy, Nageshwar; Cicinnati, Vito R; Kaba, Iyad; Beckebaum, Susanne; Drymousis, Panagiotis; Kahaleh, Michel; Brugge, William

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To outline the feasibility, safety, adverse events and early results of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in pancreatic neoplasms using a novel probe. METHODS: This is a multi-center, pilot safety feasibility study. The intervention described was radiofrequency ablation (RF) which was applied with an innovative monopolar RF probe (1.2 mm Habib EUS-RFA catheter) placed through a 19 or 22 gauge fine needle aspiration (FNA) needle once FNA was performed in patients with a tumor in the head of the pancreas. The Habib™ EUS-RFA is a 1 Fr wire (0.33 mm, 0.013”) with a working length of 190 cm, which can be inserted through the biopsy channel of an echoendoscope. RF power is applied to the electrode at the end of the wire to coagulate tissue in the liver and pancreas. RESULTS: Eight patients [median age of 65 (range 27-82) years; 7 female and 1 male] were recruited in a prospective multicenter trial. Six had a pancreatic cystic neoplasm (four a mucinous cyst, one had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and one a microcystic adenoma) and two had a neuroendocrine tumors (NET) in the head of pancreas. The mean size of the cystic neoplasm and NET were 36.5 mm (SD ± 17.9 mm) and 27.5 mm (SD ± 17.7 mm) respectively. The EUS-RFA was successfully completed in all cases. Among the 6 patients with a cystic neoplasm, post procedure imaging in 3-6 mo showed complete resolution of the cysts in 2 cases, whilst in three more there was a 48.4% reduction [mean pre RF 38.8 mm (SD ± 21.7 mm) vs mean post RF 20 mm (SD ± 17.1 mm)] in size. In regards to the NET patients, there was a change in vascularity and central necrosis after EUS-RFA. No major complications were observed within 48 h of the procedure. Two patients had mild abdominal pain that resolved within 3 d. CONCLUSION: EUS-RFA of pancreatic neoplasms with a novel monopolar RF probe was well tolerated in all cases. Our preliminary data suggest that the procedure is straightforward and safe. The

  19. Endocrine carcinoma of the pancreatic tail exhibiting gastric variceal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yuan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonfunctional endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas is uncommon. Without excess hormone secretion, it is clinically silent until the enlarging or metastatic tumor causes compressive symptoms. Epigastric pain, dyspepsia, jaundice, and abdominal mass are the usual symptoms, whereas upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is rare. Here, we describe the case of a 24-year-old man with the chief complaint of hematemesis. Upper GI panendoscopy revealed isolated gastric varices at the fundus and upper body. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a tumor mass at the pancreatic tail causing a splenic vein obstruction, engorged vessels near the fundus of the stomach, and splenomegaly. After distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, the bleeding did not recur. The final pathologic diagnosis was endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. Gastric variceal bleeding is a possible manifestation of nonfunctional endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas if the splenic vein is affected by a tumor. In non-cirrhotic patients with isolated gastric variceal bleeding, the differential diagnosis should include pancreatic disorders.

  20. Expansion of Adult Human Pancreatic Tissue Yields Organoids Harboring Progenitor Cells with Endocrine Differentiation Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy J.M. Loomans

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Generating an unlimited source of human insulin-producing cells is a prerequisite to advance β cell replacement therapy for diabetes. Here, we describe a 3D culture system that supports the expansion of adult human pancreatic tissue and the generation of a cell subpopulation with progenitor characteristics. These cells display high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDHhi, express pancreatic progenitors markers (PDX1, PTF1A, CPA1, and MYC, and can form new organoids in contrast to ALDHlo cells. Interestingly, gene expression profiling revealed that ALDHhi cells are closer to human fetal pancreatic tissue compared with adult pancreatic tissue. Endocrine lineage markers were detected upon in vitro differentiation. Engrafted organoids differentiated toward insulin-positive (INS+ cells, and circulating human C-peptide was detected upon glucose challenge 1 month after transplantation. Engrafted ALDHhi cells formed INS+ cells. We conclude that adult human pancreatic tissue has potential for expansion into 3D structures harboring progenitor cells with endocrine differentiation potential. : In the context of β cell replacement therapy for diabetes, de Koning and colleagues describe a 3D culture platform that supports ex vivo expansion of human pancreatic tissue as organoids. These organoids harbor a subpopulation of ALDHhi cells that display proliferative capacity and can differentiate to an endocrine fate. Keywords: pancreas, organoid, human, ALDH, endocrine differentiation, beta cells, insulin, progenitor, fetal, diabetes

  1. Quality of life and functional outcome after resection of pancreatic cystic neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Gaag, Niels A; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Sprangers, Mirjam A; Busch, Olivier R C; Bruno, Marco J; de Castro, Steve M; van Gulik, Thomas M; Gouma, Dirk J

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the long-term quality of life (QOL) after the resection of a primary pancreatic cyst and to determine predictors of outcome. Secondary outcomes were pancreatic function and survival. One hundred eight consecutive patients, who underwent resection between 1992 and 2007 and had nearly 60 months follow-up, were reviewed. Questionnaires and function tests were collected during scheduled outpatient clinic visits. At follow-up, 20 patients had died. Five-year overall survival was 94% for benign and 62% for malignant neoplasia. Of 88 living patients, 65 (74%) returned questionnaires. Generic physical and mental QOL scores were equal or better compared with healthy references. None of the disease-specific symptom scales were above mean 50, implicating none to mild complaints. Independent predictors for good generic QOL were young age (P endocrine insufficiency (P Endocrine insufficiency prevalence was 40%, and 59% for exocrine insufficiency. After cyst resection, long-term QOL is equal to healthy references, pancreatic insufficiency is prevalent but does not impair QOL, and survival relates positive compared with solid pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The excellent long-term outcome justifies proceeding with surgery once a medical indication for resection has been established.

  2. Clinical application of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT in diagnosing and monitoring of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junyan; Li, Yi; Xu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jiangang; Zhang, Yingjian; Yu, Xianjun; Huang, Dan

    2018-06-20

    Our aim of this research was to determine the value of SPECT/CT with 99m Tc-HYNIC-TOC for evaluation of the pancreatic masses which were suspected as neuroendocrine neoplasms and follow-up of patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. We retrospectively analyzed 184 patients who performed 99m Tc-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT. All the patients were divided into two groups: one for assessment of diagnostic efficiency for pancreatic suspected masses (n = 140) and another for monitoring recurrence after surgery (n = 44). The image findings acquired at 2 h postinjection were compared to final diagnoses from pathological results and clinical follow-up. Then, the correlation between ratios of tumor-to-background (TBR) and tumor grade was analyzed. In group 1, 95/140 (67.9%) patients were confirmed as neuroendocrine neoplasms including 85 neuroendocrine tumors and 10 neuroendocrine carcinomas. Patient-based analysis showed that the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of diagnosing neuroendocrine neoplasms with SPECT/CT were 81.1, 84.4 and 82.1%. There was significant difference of TBRs among G1, G2 and G3 (F = 3.175, P = 0.048). In group 2, 22/44 (50.0%) patients occurred metastasis mainly in liver. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of monitoring recurrence were 87.0, 100 and 93.2%. 99m Tc-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT is a reliable method of diagnosing and monitoring of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, especially neuroendocrine tumors.

  3. Frequent Detection of Pancreatic Lesions in Asymptomatic High-Risk Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Marcia Irene; Hruban, Ralph H.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Kamel, Ihab R.; Schulick, Richard; Zhang, Zhe; Topazian, Mark; Takahashi, Naoki; Fletcher, Joel; Petersen, Gloria; Klein, Alison P.; Axilbund, Jennifer; Griffin, Constance; Syngal, Sapna; Saltzman, John R.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Lee, Jeffrey; Tamm, Eric; Vikram, Raghunandan; Bhosale, Priya; Margolis, Daniel; Farrell, James; Goggins, Michael

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The risk of pancreatic cancer is increased in patients with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer or a predisposing germline mutation. Screening can detect curable, non-invasive pancreatic neoplasms, but the optimal imaging approach is not known. We determined the baseline prevalence and characteristics of pancreatic abnormalities using 3 imaging tests to screen asymptomatic, high-risk individuals (HRI). METHODS We screened 225 asymptomatic adult HRI at 5 academic US medical centers once, using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). We compared results in a blinded, independent fashion. RESULTS Ninety-two of 216 HRI (42%) were found to have at least 1 pancreatic mass (84 cystic, 3 solid) or a dilated pancreatic duct (n=5) by any of the imaging modalities. Fifty-one of the 84 HRI with a cyst (60.7%) had multiple lesions, typically small (mean 0.55 cm, range 2–39 mm), in multiple locations. The prevalence of pancreatic lesions increased with age; they were detected in 14% of subjects <50 years old, 34% of subjects 50–59 years old, and 53% of subjects 60–69 years old (P<.0001). CT, MRI, and EUS detected a pancreatic abnormality in 11%, 33.3%, and 42.6% of the HRI, respectively. Among these abnormalities, proven or suspected neoplasms were identified in 85 HRI (82 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms [IPMN] and 3 pancreatic endocrine tumors). Three of 5 HRI who underwent pancreatic resection had high-grade dysplasia in <3 cm IPMNs and in multiple intraepithelial neoplasias. CONCLUSIONS Screening of asymptomatic HRI frequently detects small pancreatic cysts, including curable, non-invasive high-grade neoplasms. EUS and MRI detect pancreatic lesions better than CT. PMID:22245846

  4. Pancreatic fibrosis correlates with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T C K; van 't Hof, G; Kazemier, G; Hop, W C; Pek, C; van Toorenenbergen, A W; van Dekken, H; van Eijck, C H J

    2008-01-01

    Obstruction of the pancreatic duct can lead to pancreatic fibrosis. We investigated the correlation between the extent of pancreatic fibrosis and the postoperative exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. Fifty-five patients who were treated for pancreatic and periampullary carcinoma and 19 patients with chronic pancreatitis were evaluated. Exocrine pancreatic function was evaluated by fecal elastase-1 test, while endocrine pancreatic function was assessed by plasma glucose level. The extent of fibrosis, duct dilation and endocrine tissue loss was examined histopathologically. A strong correlation was found between pancreatic fibrosis and elastase-1 level less than 100 microg/g (p pancreatic insufficiency. A strong correlation was found between pancreatic fibrosis and endocrine tissue loss (p pancreatic fibrosis nor endocrine tissue loss were correlated with the development of postoperative diabetes mellitus. Duct dilation alone was neither correlated with exocrine nor with endocrine function loss. The majority of patients develop severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy. The extent of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is strongly correlated with preoperative fibrosis. The loss of endocrine tissue does not correlate with postoperative diabetes mellitus. Preoperative dilation of the pancreatic duct per se does not predict exocrine or endocrine pancreatic insufficiency postoperatively. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Malignant Nonfunctioning Neuroendocrine Neoplasm of the Pancreas in a 10-Year-Old Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Marwan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Malignant neoplasms of the pancreas are extremely rare in children and only represent a small percentage of pediatric cancer-related deaths. The paucity of cases reported in the literature, in addition to the lack of understanding of biologic behavior, has led to a lack of consensus concerning optimal management strategy. Presentation differs compared to adult counterparts and generally prognosis is improved even when lymph node metastases occur. Here we review the literature and report the case of a 10-year-old autistic female with a malignant nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine neoplasm of the head of the pancreas successfully extirpated via pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  6. Preoperative localization of endocrine pancreatic tumours by intra-arterial dynamic computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstroem, H.; Magnusson, A.; Grama, D.; Eriksson, B.; Oeberg, K.; Loerelius, L.E.; Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala; Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala

    1990-01-01

    Eleven patients with biochemically confirmed endocrine pancreatic tumours were examined with intra-arterial (i.a.) dynamic computed tomography (CT) and angiography preoperatively. Seven of the patients suffered from the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1) syndrome. All patients were operated upon and surgical palpation and ultrasound were the peroperative localization methods. Of the 33 tumours which were found at histopathologic analysis of the resected specimens in the 11 patients, 7 tumours in 7 patients were correctly localized by both i.a. dynamic CT and angiography. Six patients with MEN-1 syndrome had multiple tumours and this group of patients together had 28 tumours, of which 5 (18%) were localized preoperatively by both CT and angiography. I.a. dynamic CT, with the technique used by us, does not seem to improve the localization of endocrine pancreatic tumours, especially in the rare group of MEN-1 patients, as compared with angiography. (orig.)

  7. Molecular genetics of pancreatic neoplasms and their morphologic correlates: an update on recent advances and potential diagnostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Michelle D; Saka, Burcu; Balci, Serdar; Goldblum, Andrew S; Adsay, N Volkan

    2014-02-01

    To summarize the most clinically and biologically relevant advances in molecular/genetic characteristics of various pancreatic neoplasms, with morphologic correlation. Whole-exome sequencing of numerous benign and malignant pancreatic tumors, along with the plethora of highly sensitive molecular studies now available for analyzing these tumors, provide mounting evidence to support the long-held belief that cancer is essentially a genetic disease. These genetic discoveries have not only helped to confirm the age-old, morphology-based classifications of pancreatic neoplasia but have shed new light on their mechanisms. Many of these molecular discoveries are currently being used in preoperative diagnosis. Mutations in KRAS, P16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4 are commonly seen in ductal neoplasia but not in nonductal tumors; ductal adenocarcinomas with SMAD4/DPC4 loss are associated with widespread metastasis and poor prognosis. GNAS and RNF43 mutations have been discovered in most intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasms, providing critical molecular fingerprints for their diagnosis. Mutation in DAXX/ATRX is only seen in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, making it a useful potential marker in distinguishing these tumors from mimics. When combined with morphologic observations, molecular studies will increase our understanding of the pathogenesis and morphomolecular signatures associated with specific neoplasms and provide new horizons for precision medicine and targeted therapies.

  8. Distribution of Pancreatic Polypeptide-secreting Endocrine Cells in Nondiabetic and Diabetic Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwińska-Mossoń, Mariola; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate the effects of cigarette smoking and ongoing inflammation in chronic pancreatitis on the functioning of pancreatic polypeptide (PP)-secreting cells and to determine the relationship between the occurrence of an increased number of PP cells in the pancreas, the change in their location, and the intensity of their inflammatory changes in the course of pancreatitis and diabetes. Samples of tissues from healthy persons and from patients were verified histopathologically, and then PP was localized by immunohistochemical staining using the monoclonal anti-human PP antibody. The histopathologic evaluation of the hormone expression intensity in tissue sections was carried out using the semiquantitative method and was calculated with digital image analysis. The present study showed a very strong PP expression in the pancreatic tissue (especially in the head of the pancreas) derived from smoking patients with diabetes. The increase in the percentage of cells in the PP islets, between the acinar cells in smoking patients with diabetes and a statistically significant increase in the expression of PP, indicates a pancreatic endocrine dysfunction and suggests that cigarette smoking has a negative impact on the organ's efficiency. Because of its properties, the PP appears to be a useful marker of the endocrine insufficiency of the pancreas and a specific prognostic parameter of developing diabetes due to chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Technical Feasibility and Oncological Legitimacy of Enucleation of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Located at the Pancreatic Head or Uncinate Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Yuji; Toshima, Takeo; Motomura, Takashi; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Joko, Kouji; Oshiro, Yumi; Takahashi, Ikuo; Nishizaki, Takashi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Surgical indications and strategies for branch duct (BD)-intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) at the pancreatic head (PH) are controversial issues. We investigated the technical feasibility and oncological legitimacy of enucleation for IPMN of the PH. The clinicopathological parameters of 11 patients with IPMN who underwent conventional pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, n=7) or enucleation (n=4) during the same period were evaluated. The mean operative time (442 vs. 280 min, p<0.05) and blood loss (864 vs. 93 ml, p<0.05) were significantly better in the enucleation group. The final pathological diagnosis (low-/intermediate-/high-grade dysplasia) in the PD and enucleation groups was 4/2/1 and 3/1/0, respectively. The incidence of grade B pancreatic fistula and Clavien III complications was 14% vs. 0% and 43% vs. 25%, respectively. No recurrent pancreatitis or exocrine or endocrine dysfunction was noted in the enucleation group; however, de novo or exacerbated diabetes mellitus developed in three patients in the PD group. All patients were alive and no disease recurrence was noted at a mean follow-up of 1,059 days. Enucleation of BD-IPMN at the PH is a technically feasible and oncologically acceptable procedure which should be justified in patients with IPMNs with a low risk of malignancy. Copyright© 2017 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Negotiating the complexities of exocrine and endocrine dysfunction in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Sinead N

    2017-11-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterised by irreversible morphological change and typically causing pain and/or permanent loss of function. This progressive, irreversible disease results in destruction of healthy pancreatic tissue and the development of fibrous scar tissue. Gradual loss of exocrine and endocrine function follows, along with clinical manifestations such as steatorrhoea, abdominal pain and diabetes. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis has been described as a problem area and, until recently, there was little research on the topic. It is often asserted that >90 % of the pancreas must be damaged before exocrine insufficiency occurs; however, an exploration of the original studies from the 1970s found that the data do not support this assertion. The management of steatorrhoea with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is the mainstay of nutritional management, and early identification and treatment is a key. The presence of steatorrhoea, coupled with poor dietary intake (due to intractable abdominal pain, gastrointestinal side effects and often alcoholism) renders the chronic pancreatitis patients at considerable risk for undernutrition, muscle depletion and fat-soluble vitamin deficiency. Premature osteoporosis/osteopenia afflicts two-thirds of patients as a consequence of poor dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D, low physical activity, low sunlight exposure, heavy smoking, as well as chronic low-grade inflammation. Bone metabolism studies show increased bone formation as well as bone resorption in chronic pancreatitis, indicating that bone turnover is abnormally high. Loss of the pancreatic islet cells occurs later in the disease process as the endocrine cells are diffusely distributed throughout the pancreatic parenchyma. Patients may develop type 3c (pancreatogenic) diabetes, which is complicated by concurrent decreased glucagon secretion, and hence an increased risk of hypoglycaemia. Diabetes control is

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis type-1 associated with intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Eva C; Salcedo, Maria T; Cuatrecasas, Míriam; De León, Hannah; Merino, Xavier; Navarro, Salvador; Ginès, Angels; Abu-Suboh, Monder; Balsells, Joaquim; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Molero, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis lesions usually embrace both intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients at genetically-determined high risk of PDAC often harbor IPMN and/or chronic pancreatitis, suggesting IPMN, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC may share pathogenetic mechanisms. Chronic autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) may also herald PDAC. Concurrent IPMN and AIP have been reported in few patients. Here we describe two patients with IPMN who developed type-1 AIP fulfilling the Honolulu and Boston diagnostic criteria. AIP diffusively affected the whole pancreas, as well as peripancreatic lymph nodes and the gallbladder. Previous pancreatic resection of focal IPMN did not show features of AIP. One of the patients carried a CFTR class-I mutation. Of notice, serum IgG4 levels gradually decreased to normal values after IPMN excision. Common risk factors to IPMN and AIP may facilitate its coincidental generation. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cystic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (cPNETs: a systematic review and meta-analysis of case series

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    Luis Hurtado-Pardo

    Full Text Available Cystic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors represent 13% of all neuroendocrine tumors. The aim of this study is to analyze the phenotype and biologic behavior of resected cystic neuroendocrine tumors. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted until September 2016 using a search in Medline, Scopus, and EMBASE with the terms "cystic pancreatic endocrine neoplasm", "cystic islets tumors" and "cystic islets neoplasms". From the 795 citations recovered 80 studies reporting on 431 patients were selected. 87.1% (n = 387 were sporadic tumors and 10.3% (n = 40 corresponded to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Were diagnosed incidentally 44.6% (n = 135. Cytology was found to have a sensitivity of 78.5%. Were non-functional tumors 85% (n = 338, and among the functional tumors, insulinoma was the most frequent. According to the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society staging, 87.8% were limited to the pancreas (I-IIb, and 12.2% were advanced (III-IV. Disease-free survival at 5 years in stages (I-IIIa and (IIIb-IV was 91.5% and 54.2%, respectively; and was significantly lower (p = 0.0001 in functional tumors. In patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia there was a higher incidence of functional (62.5% and multifocal (28.1% tumors. Disease-free survival at 5 and 10 years was 60%. Cystic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors exhibit phenotypical characteristics which are different to those of solid neuroendocrine tumors.

  13. Positron emission tomography (PET) and pancreatic tumours; Tomographie par emission de positons (TEP) et tumeurs pancreatiques

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    Montravers, F.; Kerrou, K.; Grahek, D.; Gutman, F.; Beco, V. de; Talbot, J.N. [Hopital Tenon, Service de Medecine, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-15

    Neoplasms of the pancreas may originate front both exocrine and endocrine cells but in 90% of the cases, they correspond to ductal adenocarcinomas. For adenocarcinomas, the major indication of FDG-PET corresponds to the pre-operative staging because unexpected distant metastases can be detected by FDG-PET in about 20 to 40% of the cases, which results in avoidance of unnecessary surgical procedures. FDG PET is also useful in evaluation of the treatment effect, monitoring after the operation and detection of recurrent pancreatic cancers. For the characterisation of the pancreatic tumour, the performance of FDG-PET is sometimes limited due to poor cellularity, hyperglycemia or inflammatory processes. especially for large tumours and is indicated only in cases of doubtful results of CT or MRI. For endocrine pancreatic tumours, FDG-PET is useful only in case of poorly-differentiated and aggressive tumours. F-DOPA PET can he useful, complementary to pentetreotide scintigraphy, in well-differentiated endocrine tumours. (authors)

  14. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor - incidental finding during a follow-up CT for primary ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, D.; Balev, B.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) are primary, usually we 11-differentiated pancreatic tumors. Their origin is not fully understood, but they are thought to develop from the pluripotent cells in the exocrine part of the pancreas. PNET are a heterogeneous group with different malignant potential. In some of the patients with sporadical forms of PNET there is association with other malignancies such as ovarian cancer, breast cancer, bladder and prostate cancers. We present a case of 50-year-old woman, with incidentally found pancreatic neoplasm, during a follow-up CT for ovarian cancer. Laparotomy and pancreatic biopsy are performed. Histological diagnosis confirms a well- differentiated endocrine tumor of the pancreas. (authors)

  15. Relationship between the exocrine and endocrine pancreas after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Stephanie L M; Kennedy, James I C; Murphy, Rinki; Phillips, Anthony R J; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2014-12-07

    To determine the prevalence and time course of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals with newly diagnosed prediabetes or diabetes mellitus after acute pancreatitis. Relevant literature cited in three major biomedical journal databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Scopus) was reviewed independently by two authors. There were no language constraints but the search was limited to human studies. Studies included were cohort studies of adult patients who were discharged after an attack of acute pancreatitis. Patients were excluded if they were under 18 years of age or had a previous diagnosis of prediabetes or diabetes mellitus, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or chronic pancreatitis. The main outcome measure was the prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients who were diagnosed with prediabetes and diabetes mellitus after an attack of acute pancreatitis. Subgroup analysis was conducted for patients who were diagnosed with prediabetes only and those who were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus only. Subgroup analysis looking at the time course of concomitant pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency was also conducted. Pooled prevalence and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated for all outcome measures and P-values pancreatitis was 43% (95%CI: 30%-56%). The pooled prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals after acute pancreatitis was 29% (95%CI: 19%-39%). The prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals with newly diagnosed prediabetes or diabetes was 40% (95%CI: 25%-55%). The prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency among individuals with prediabetes alone and diabetes mellitus alone was 41% (95%CI: 12%-75%) and 39% (95%CI: 28%-51%), respectively. Further analysis showed that the prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals with prediabetes or diabetes decreases over time after an attack of acute pancreatitis

  16. GLUT4 in the endocrine pancreas--indicating an impact in pancreatic islet cell physiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähr, I; Bazwinsky-Wutschke, I; Wolgast, S; Hofmann, K; Streck, S; Mühlbauer, E; Wedekind, D; Peschke, E

    2012-06-01

    The glucose transporter GLUT4 is well known to facilitate the transport of blood glucose into insulin-sensitive muscle and adipose tissue. In this study, molecular, immunohistochemical, and Western blot investigations revealed evidence that GLUT4 is also located in the mouse, rat, and human endocrine pancreas. In addition, high glucose decreased and insulin elevated the GLUT4 expression in pancreatic α-cells. In contrast, high glucose increased GLUT4 expression, whereas insulin led to a reduced expression level of the glucose transporter in pancreatic β-cells. In vivo experiments showed that in pancreatic tissue of type 2 diabetic rats as well as type 2 diabetic patients, the GLUT4 expression is significantly increased compared to the nondiabetic control group. Furthermore, type 1 diabetic rats exhibited reduced GLUT4 transcript levels in pancreatic tissue, whereas insulin treatment of type 1 diabetic animals enhanced the GLUT4 expression back to control levels. These data provide evidence for the existence of GLUT4 in the endocrine pancreas and indicate a physiological relevance of this glucose transporter as well as characteristic changes in diabetic disease. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Attenuation of endocrine-exocrine pancreatic communication in type 2 diabetes: pancreatic extracellular matrix ultrastructural abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Melvin R; Patel, Kamlesh; Habibi, Javad; Gupta, Deepa; Tekwani, Seema S; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R

    2008-01-01

    Ultrastructural observations reveal a continuous interstitial matrix connection between the endocrine and exocrine pancreas, which is lost due to fibrosis in rodent models and humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Widening of the islet-exocrine interface appears to result in loss of desmosomes and adherens junctions between islet and acinar cells and is associated with hypercellularity consisting of pericytes and inflammatory cells in T2DM pancreatic tissue. Organized fibrillar collagen was closely associated with pericytes, which are known to differentiate into myofibroblasts-pancreatic stellate cells. Of importance, some pericyte cellular processes traverse both the connecting islet-exocrine interface and the endoacinar interstitium of the exocrine pancreas. Loss of cellular paracrine communication and extracellular matrix remodeling fibrosis in young animal models and humans may result in a dysfunctional insulino-acinar-ductal-incretin gut hormone axis, resulting in pancreatic insufficiency and glucagon-like peptide deficiency, which are known to exist in prediabetes and overt T2DM in humans.

  18. The impact of pancreaticoduodenectomy on endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function: A prospective cohort study based on pre- and postoperative function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeyen, Geert; Jansen, Miet; Hartman, Vera; Chapelle, Thiery; Bracke, Bart; Ysebaert, Dirk; De Block, Christophe

    Studies reporting on function after pancreatic surgery are frequently based on diabetes history, fasting glycemia or random glycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the evolution of pancreatic function in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy based on proper pre- and postoperative function tests. It was hypothesised that pancreatic function deteriorates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Between 2013 and 2016, 78 patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for oncologic indications had a prospective evaluation of their endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function. Endocrine function was evaluated with the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and the 1 mg intravenous glucagon test. Exocrine function was evaluated with a 13C-labelled mixed-triglyceride breath test. Tests were performed pre- and postoperatively. In 90.5% (19/21) of patients with preoperatively known diabetes, no change in endocrine function was observed. In contrast, endocrine function improved in 68.1% (15/22) of patients with newly diagnosed diabetes. 40% (14/35) of patients with a preoperative normal OGTT or prediabetes experienced deterioration in function. In multivariate analysis, improvement of newly diagnosed diabetes was correlated with preoperative bilirubin levels (p = 0.045), while progression towards diabetes was correlated with preoperative C-peptidogenic index T 30 (p = 0.037). A total of 20.5% (16/78) of patients had pancreatic exocrine insufficiency preoperatively. Another 51.3% (40/78) of patients deteriorated on exocrine level. In total, 64.1% (50/78) of patients required pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy postoperatively. Although deterioration of endocrine function was expected after pancreatic resection, improvement is frequently observed in patients with newly diagnosed diabetes. Exocrine function deteriorates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Successful Control of Liver Metastases From Pancreatic Solid-Pseudopapillary Neoplasm (SPN) Using Hepatic Arterial Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Violari, Elena G., E-mail: eviolari@live.com; Brody, Lynn A.; Covey, Anne M.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Getrajdman, George I.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Service (United States); Reidy, Diane L. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, Gastrointestinal Oncology Service (United States); Jarnagin, William R. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, Hepatopancreatobiliary Service (United States); Brown, Karen T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Service (United States)

    2015-04-15

    No systemic agents that are known to be effective for the treatment of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) are available. We report the prolonged and sustained control of metastatic pancreatic SPN to the liver using hepatic arterial embolization (HAE), where a total of 13 HAE sessions were performed over a 6-year period.

  20. Predictive factors of endocrine and exocrine insufficiency after resection of a benign tumour of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neophytou, Hélène; Wangermez, Marc; Gand, Elise; Carretier, Michel; Danion, Jérôme; Richer, Jean-Pierre

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the risk factors of endocrine and exocrine insufficiency occurring few years after pancreatic resections in a consecutive series of patients who underwent pancreatoduodenectomy (PD), left pancreatectomy (LP) or enucleation for benign neoplasms at a referral centre. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was defined by the onset of steatorrhea associated with weight loss, and endocrine insufficiency was determinate by fasting plasma glucose. Association between pancreatic insufficiency and clinical, pathological, and perioperative features was studied using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. A prospective cohort of 92 patients underwent PD (48%), LP (44%) or enucleation (8%) for benign tumours, from 2005 to 2016 in the University Hospital in Poitiers (France). The median follow-up was 68.6±42.4months. During the following, 54 patients developed exocrine insufficiency whereas 32 patients presented endocrine insufficiency. In the Cox model, a BMI>28kg/m 2 , being a man and presenting a metabolic syndrome were significantly associated with a higher risk to develop postoperative diabetes. The risks factors for the occurrence of PEI were preoperative chronic pancreatitis, a BMIpancreatic head, biological markers of chronic obstruction and fibrotic pancreas. Undergoing LP or enucleation were protective factors of PEI. Histological categories such as neuroendocrine tumours and cystadenomas were also associated with a decreased incidence of PEI. Men with metabolic syndrome and obesity should be closely followed-up for diabetes, and patients with obstructive tumours, pancreatic fibrosis or chronic pancreatitis require a vigilant follow up on their pancreatic exocrine function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. FGF-2b and h-PL Transform Duct and Non-Endocrine Human Pancreatic Cells into Endocrine Insulin Secreting Cells by Modulating Differentiating Genes

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    Giulia Donadel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a multifactorial disease orphan of a cure. Regenerative medicine has been proposed as novel strategy for DM therapy. Human fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2b controls β-cell clusters via autocrine action, and human placental lactogen (hPL-A increases functional β-cells. We hypothesized whether FGF-2b/hPL-A treatment induces β-cell differentiation from ductal/non-endocrine precursor(s by modulating specific genes expression. Methods: Human pancreatic ductal-cells (PANC-1 and non-endocrine pancreatic cells were treated with FGF-2b plus hPL-A at 500 ng/mL. Cytofluorimetry and Immunofluorescence have been performed to detect expression of endocrine, ductal and acinar markers. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and annexin-V quantified cells proliferation and apoptosis. Insulin secretion was assessed by RIA kit, and electron microscopy analyzed islet-like clusters. Results: Increase in PANC-1 duct cells de-differentiation into islet-like aggregates was observed after FGF-2b/hPL-A treatment showing ultrastructure typical of islets-aggregates. These clusters, after stimulation with FGF-2b/hPL-A, had significant (p < 0.05 increase in insulin, C-peptide, pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, somatostatin, glucagon, and glucose transporter 2 (Glut-2, compared with control cells. Markers of PANC-1 (Cytokeratin-19, MUC-1, CA19-9 were decreased (p < 0.05. These aggregates after treatment with FGF-2b/hPL-A significantly reduced levels of apoptosis. Conclusions: FGF-2b and hPL-A are promising candidates for regenerative therapy in DM by inducing de-differentiation of stem cells modulating pivotal endocrine genes.

  2. Non-neoplastic cystic and cystic-like lesions of the pancreas: may mimic pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Brian K P; Tan, Yu-Meng; Chung, Yaw-Fui A; Chow, Pierce K H; Ong, Hock-Soo; Lim, Dennis T H; Wong, Wai-Keong; Ooi, London L P J

    2006-05-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas consist of a broad range of pathological entities. With the exception of the pancreatic pseudocyst, these are usually caused by pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Non-neoplastic pancreatic cystic and cystic-like lesions are extremely rare. In the present article, the surgical experience with these unusual entities over a 14-year period is reported. Between 1991 and 2004, all patients who underwent surgical exploration for a cystic lesion of the pancreas were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with a pancreatic pseudocyst were excluded. There were 106 patients of whom 8 (7.5%) had a final pathological diagnosis consistent with a non-neoplastic pancreatic cystic or cystic-like lesion, including 3 patients with a benign epithelial cyst, 2 with a pancreatic abscess (one tuberculous and one foreign body), 2 with mucous retention cysts and 1 with a mucinous non-neoplastic cyst. These eight patients are the focus of this study. There were six female and two male patients with a median age of 61.5 years (range, 41-71 years). All the patients were of Asian origin including seven Chinese and one Indian. Four of the patients were asymptomatic and their pancreatic cysts were discovered incidentally on radiological imaging for other indications. All the patients underwent preoperative radiological investigations, including ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, which showed a cystic lesion of the pancreas. Three patients, all of whom were symptomatic, were diagnosed preoperatively with a malignant cystic neoplasm on the basis of radiological imaging. Two patients were eventually found to have a pancreatic abscess, one tuberculous and the other, secondary to foreign body perforation. The third patient was found on final histology to have chronic pancreatitis with retention cysts. The remaining five patients had a preoperative diagnosis of an indeterminate cyst; on pathological examination, they were found to have a benign

  3. Cystic lesion of pancreas - Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

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    Rajiv Baijal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN of the pancreas is an intraductal mucin-producing epithelial neoplasm that arises from the main and/or branched pancreatic duct. It usually presents as cystic lesion of pancreas. There are well known differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesion. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms are detected at an increasing frequency due to an increased use of abdominal imaging. The diagnosis and treatment of intraductal papillary mucinous tumors (IPMN of the pancreas has evolved over the past decade. IPMN represents a spectrum of disease, ranging from benign to malignant lesions, making the early detection and characterization of these lesions important. Definitive management is surgical resection for appropriate candidates, as benign lesions harbor malignant potential. IPMN has a prognosis, which is different from adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. We report a case of a 58-year-old male with intraductal papillary neoplasm involving main duct and side branches presenting to us with clinical symptoms of chronic pancreatitis with obstructive jaundice and cholangitis treated surgically.

  4. Abnormal serum pancreatic enzymes, but not pancreatitis, are associated with an increased risk of malignancy in patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Alexandra M; Parikh, Janak A; Al-Haddad, Mohammad A; DeWitt, John M; Ceppa, Eugene P; House, Michael G; Nakeeb, Attila; Schmidt, C Max

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatitis is associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). This association is in part due to inflammation from pancreatic ductal obstruction. Although the correlation between pancreatitis and the malignant potential of IPMN is unclear, the 2012 International Consensus Guidelines (ICG) consider pancreatitis a "worrisome feature." We hypothesized that serum pancreatic enzymes, markers of inflammation, are a better predictor of malignancy than pancreatitis in patients with IPMN. Between 1992 and 2012, 364 patients underwent resection for IPMN at a single university hospital. In the past decade, serum amylase and lipase were collected prospectively as an inflammatory marker in 203 patients with IPMN at initial surveillance and "cyst clinic" visits. The latest serum pancreatic enzyme values within 3 months preoperatively were studied. Pancreatitis was defined according to the 2012 revision of the Atlanta Consensus. Of the 203 eligible patients, there were 76 with pancreatitis. Pancreatitis was not associated with an increased rate of malignancy (P = .51) or invasiveness (P = .08). Serum pancreatic enzymes categorically outside of normal range (high or low) were also not associated with malignancy or invasiveness. In contrast, as a continuous variable, the higher the serum pancreatic enzymes were, the greater the rate of invasive IPMN. Of the 127 remaining patients without pancreatitis, serum pancreatic enzymes outside of normal range (low and high) were each associated with a greater rate of malignancy (P enzyme levels above normal range (high) were associated with a greater rate of invasiveness (P = .02). In patients with IPMN without a history of pancreatitis, serum pancreatic enzymes outside of the normal range are associated with a greater risk of malignancy. In patients with a history of pancreatitis, there is a positive correlation between the levels of serum pancreatic enzymes and the presence of invasive IPMN. These data suggest

  5. Echovirus 6 Infects Human Exocrine and Endocrine Pancreatic Cells and Induces Pro-Inflammatory Innate Immune Response

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    Luis Sarmiento

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human enteroviruses (HEV, especially coxsackievirus serotype B (CVB and echovirus (E, have been associated with diseases of both the exocrine and endocrine pancreas, but so far evidence on HEV infection in human pancreas has been reported only in islets and ductal cells. This study aimed to investigate the capability of echovirus strains to infect human exocrine and endocrine pancreatic cells. Infection of explanted human islets and exocrine cells with seven field strains of E6 caused cytopathic effect, virus titer increase and production of HEV protein VP1 in both cell types. Virus particles were found in islets and acinar cells infected with E6. No cytopathic effect or infectious progeny production was observed in exocrine cells exposed to the beta cell-tropic strains of E16 and E30. Endocrine cells responded to E6, E16 and E30 by upregulating the transcription of interferon-induced with helicase C domain 1 (IF1H1, 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1, interferon-β (IFN-β, chemokine (C–X–C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10 and chemokine (C–C motif ligand 5 (CCL5. Echovirus 6, but not E16 or E30, led to increased transcription of these genes in exocrine cells. These data demonstrate for the first time that human exocrine cells represent a target for E6 infection and suggest that certain HEV serotypes can replicate in human pancreatic exocrine cells, while the pancreatic endocrine cells are permissive to a wider range of HEV.

  6. Risk factors of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatic resection: A multi-center prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maignan, A; Ouaïssi, M; Turrini, O; Regenet, N; Loundou, A; Louis, G; Moutardier, V; Dahan, L; Pirrò, N; Sastre, B; Delpero, J-R; Sielezneff, I

    2018-01-26

    Management of functional consequences after pancreatic resection has become a new therapeutic challenge. The goal of our study is to evaluate the risk factors for exocrine (ExoPI) and endocrine (EndoPI) pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatic surgery and to establish a predictive model for their onset. Between January 1, 2014 and June 19, 2015, 91 consecutive patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) or left pancreatectomy (LP) (72% and 28%, respectively) were followed prospectively. ExoPI was defined as fecal elastase content126mg/dL or aggravation of preexisting diabetes. The volume of residual pancreas was measured according to the same principles as liver volumetry. The ExoPI and EndoPI rates at 6 months were 75.9% and 30.8%, respectively. The rate of ExoPI after PD was statistically significantly higher than after LP (98% vs. 21%; Ppancreatic volume less than 39.5% was predictive of ExoPI. ExoPI occurs quasi-systematically after PD irrespective of the reconstruction scheme. The rate of EndoPI did not differ between PD and LP. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Unusual cystic pancreatic neoplasms -image-pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilendarov, A.; Simova, E.; Petrova, A.; Traikova, N.; Deenichin, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim is to present the variety of signs and symptoms from the diagnostic imaging methods of atypical neoplasms of the pancreas, presented as a type of cystic lesions. This often leads to unnecessary surgery or inappropriate tracking. In 115 patients (85 men and 30 women) with cystic lesions of the pancreas ultrasonic (US),computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed and verified through histological and macroscopic pathology preparations. The ultrasound machines equipped with linear and convex transducers, MDCT and MRI imaging systems were used. In 14 of 115 patients atypical neoplasms of the pancreas were diagnosed: two cases with macroscopic serous cystic neoplasms, two nonmucinous cystic neoplasms, two hemorrhagic mucinous neoplasms, two ductal adenocarcinomas with cystic changes, one islet cell cystic tumor, two lymphoepithetial cysts, one lymphangioma, one solid papillary epithelial neoplasm and one mucinous adenocarcinoma. The authors take into consideration and overlapping of clinical symptoms and laboratory tests. Although much of the imaging features and morphological characteristics of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are well known, should be known about the atypical unusual images in so-called 'typical' cystic neoplasms, cystic images in solid neoplasms and various atypical tumors with cystic lesions. (authors)

  8. Giessen international workshop on interactions of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic diseases. Castle of Rauischholzhausen of the Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, Germany. March 18-19, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andren-Sandberg, Ake; Hardt, Philip D

    2005-07-08

    The 'Giessen International Workshop on Interactions of Exocrine and Endocrine Pancreatic Diseases' was held on March 18-19, 2005 at the Castle of Rauischolzhausen, Giessen University, Germany. About 50 international clinicians and researchers attended the workshop. It was structured into three sessions: A: Pancreatic Autoimmunity - Interaction Between Exocrine and Endocrine Tissue; B: Diabetes Mellitus - Possible Implications of Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency; C: Chronic Pancreatitis - Update on Prevalence, Understanding and Pathophysiological Concepts. Several new aspects of pancreatic diseases were discussed, including new classifications of pancreatitis, new insights into prevalence, pathophysiology and new therapeutical considerations. The meeting resulted in more cooperation and a number of new concepts for clinical study which will provide data for future developments.

  9. Aberrant over-expression of TRPM7 ion channels in pancreatic cancer: required for cancer cell invasion and implicated in tumor growth and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson S. Yee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies in zebrafish development have led to identification of the novel roles of the transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 7 (TRPM7 ion channels in human pancreatic cancer. However, the biological significance of TRPM7 channels in pancreatic neoplasms was mostly unexplored. In this study, we determined the expression levels of TRPM7 in pancreatic tissue microarrays and correlated these measurements in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with the clinicopathological features. We also investigated the role of TRPM7 channels in pancreatic cancer cell invasion using the MatrigelTM-coated transwell assay. In normal pancreas, TRPM7 is expressed at a discernable level in the ductal cells and centroacinar cells and at a relatively high level in the islet endocrine cells. In chronic pancreatitis, pre-malignant tissues, and malignant neoplasms, there is variable expression of TRPM7. In the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens examined, TRPM7 is expressed at either moderate-level or high-level. Anti-TRPM7 immunoreactivity in pancreatic adenocarcinoma significantly correlates with the size and stages of tumors. In human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells in which TRPM7 is highly expressed, short hairpin RNA-mediated suppression of TRPM7 impairs cell invasion. The results demonstrate that TRPM7 channels are over-expressed in a proportion of the pre-malignant lesions and malignant tumors of the pancreas, and they are necessary for invasion by pancreatic cancer cells. We propose that TRPM7 channels play important roles in development and progression of pancreatic neoplasm, and they may be explored as clinical biomarkers and targets for its prevention and treatment.

  10. Spectral CT imaging in differential diagnosis of pancreatic serous oligocystic adenoma and mucinous cystic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Xiaozhu; Chen Kemin; Wu Zhiyuan; Tao Ran; Guo Yan; Zhang Jing; Li Jianying; Shen Yun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT spectral imaging features of pancreatic serous oligocystic adenoma and mucinous cystic neoplasms and to assess the value of spectral CT in differentiating between pancreatic serous oligocystic adenoma and mucinous cystic neoplasms. Methods: From Feb. 2010 to Dec. 2010, 27 patients with cystic neoplasms of the pancreas (group one with 15 serous oligocystic adenomas and group two with 12 mucinous cystic neoplasms) underwent dual-phase CT spectral imaging followed by surgery. Quantitative values (age, tumor size, CT value change as function of photon energy, effective-Z, iodine-water concentration, and calcium-water concentration) were compared with independent samples t test and Mann-Whitney test and non-quantitative parameters (gender, symptom, and tumor location) were compared with Chi-square test (Fisher exact). The parameters with significant differences between two groups were analyzed further and the performance of multiple parameters for joint differential diagnosis was evaluated with discriminant analysis. Results: Compared to patients with mucinous cystic neoplasms, patients with serous oligocystic adenoma had younger age, lower frequency of being symptomatic and smaller tumor size. The CT values on 40 keV to 60 keV (with 10 keV increment) in late arterial phase [(36±13) HU vs. (62±23) HU, (26±8) HU vs. (40±15) HU, and (19±6) HU vs. (27±10) HU respectively] and 40 keV to 50 keV (with 10 keV increment) in portal venous phase [(43±14) HU vs. (61±25) HU and (30±10) HU vs. (40±16) HU respectively], effective-Z (late arterial phase 7.80± 0.16 vs. 8.05±0.21, and portal venous phase 7.87±0.15 vs 8.02±0.22), concentration of calcium (water) [late arterial phase (5±3) g/L vs. (11±4) g/L, t=-3.836, P=0.001 and portal venous phase (7±3) g/L vs. (10±5) g/L, t=-2.071, P=0.049] and iodine (water) [late arterial phase (0.38±0.24) g/L vs. (0.78±0.32) g/L, t=-3.755, P=0.001 and portal venous phase (0.48± 0.24) g/L vs. (0

  11. Endocrine tumor of the digestive tract - clinical case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szwedziak, K.; Olejniczak, W.; Brichkovkiy, V.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Endocrine tumors of the digestive tract (ETDT) are neoplasms which stem from the APUD (amine precursors uptake and decarboxylation) cells. There are neuroendocrine pancreatic and gastroenteral carcinoid tumors which stand for 2% of digestive tract tumors, 0,5% of all human malignant neoplasms. All of them have secretion granulations in the cytoplasm. That is why a number of immune histochemic techniques is used in search for biogenic amines and hormones such as gastrin, CCK, GIP, VIP, motilin, glucagon, GRP, PP, GHRH and the others. In the majority of cases neuroendocrine tumors of the rectum are described as dysfunctional, which means that specific clinical symptoms are not connected with their hormonal overproduction. Material and methods: We describe a case of fifty seven years old male patient admitted to the Department of General and Transplant Surgery for the diagnosis and treatment of the rectal tumor. Per rectum examination revealed hard tumor. The pathologic examination of the biopsy taken from the lesion and CT scanning confirmed the presence of endocrine tumor of the digestive tract. Results: Anterior resection of the rectum was performed, the postoperative course was uneventful. At present patient is subjected to complementary treatment with the use of somatostatin analogue of the prolonged action. Conclusion: The endocrine tumors of the rectum are extremely rare, they occur in this localization in 0,26-0,52 out of 100.000 all rectal tumors. Diagnosis is usually made upon the microscopic examination and the immune histochemic reactions. (author)

  12. Interdisciplinary Management of Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are increasingly recognized due to the frequent use of abdominal imaging. It is reported that up to 20% of abdominal cross-sectional scans identify incidental asymptomatic pancreatic cysts. Proper characterization of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is important not only to recognize premalignant lesions that will require surgical resection, but also to allow nonoperative management of many cystic lesions that will not require resection with its inherent morbidity. Though reliable biomarkers are lacking, a wide spectrum of diagnostic modalities are available to evaluate pancreatic cystic neoplasms, including radiologic, endoscopic, laboratory, and pathologic analysis. An interdisciplinary approach to management of these lesions which incorporates recent, specialty-specific advances in the medical literature is herein suggested.

  13. Middle-preserving pancreatectomy for advanced transverse colon cancer invading the duodenun and non-functioning endocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Hiroshi; Kato, Takaharu; Kamiyama, Hidenori; Toyama, Nobuyuki; Konishi, Fumio

    2011-02-01

    A 73-year-old female was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of advanced transverse colon cancer with severe anemia and body weight loss. Preoperative evaluations, including colonoscopy, gastroduodenoscopy, and computed tomography, revealed not only a transverse colon cancer massively invading the duodenum, but also a non-functioning endocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail. We performed middle-preserving pancreatectomy (MPP) with right hemicolectomy for these tumors with a curative intent. After the resection, about 6 cm of the body of the pancreas was preserved, and signs of diabetes mellitus have not appeared. The postoperative course was complicated by a grade B pancreatic fistula, but this was successfully treated with conservative management. After a 33-day hospital stay, the patient returned to daily life without signs of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Although the long-term follow-up of the patient is indispensable, in this case, MPP might be able to lead to the curative resection of transverse colon cancer massively invading the duodenum and non-functioning endocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail with preservation of pancreatic function.

  14. Successful pregnancy after mucinous cystic neoplasm with invasive carcinoma of the pancreas in a patient with polycystic ovarian syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloman, Conisha; Carlan, S J; Sundharkrishnan, Lohini; Guzman, Angela; Madruga, Mario

    2017-07-11

    The incidence of invasive cancer within a mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas varies between 6 and 36%. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a disorder characterized by hyperandrogenism and anovulatory infertility. One surgical treatment that can restore endocrine balance and ovulation in polycystic ovarian syndrome is partial ovarian destruction. Successful pregnancies following preconception pancreaticoduodenectomies (Whipple procedures) and chemoradiation to treat pancreatic neoplasms have been reported rarely but none were diagnosed with pre-cancer polycystic ovarian syndrome-associated infertility. Gemcitabine is an antimetabolite drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer that can have profound detrimental effects on oogenesis and ovarian function. Whether the ovarian destructive property of gemcitabine could act as a method to restore ovulation potential in polycystic ovarian syndrome is unknown. A 40-year-old white American woman with a history of pancreatic cancer treatment with a Whipple procedure and chemoradiation with gemcitabine had a successful pregnancy after years of pre-cancerous anovulatory infertility and polycystic ovarian syndrome. She received no fertility agents and delivered full term via a spontaneous vaginal delivery with no pregnancy complications. Gemcitabine treatment for pancreatic cancer may result in resumption of ovulation in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome and these women should be counseled accordingly.

  15. Single photon emission computed tomography procedure improves accuracy of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in endocrine gastro-entero-pancreatic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebtahi, R.; Genin, R.; Rouzet, F.; Bleicner-Perez, S.; Lievre, A.; Scigliano, S.; Vialle, C.; Le Guludec, D.; Cadiot, G.; Sobhani, I.; Mignon, M.

    2005-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors scintigraphy (SRS) is a sensitive method for the detection of endocrine gastro-entero-pancreatic tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of anterior and posterior planar associated to single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) compared to anterior and posterior planar associated to additional lateral and oblique views in the detection of abdominal endocrine tumors. One hundred and sixty four patients with endocrine gastro-entero-pancreatic tumors were included in this study. Scintigraphic images were performed after injection of 189 ± 23 MBq of 111 In-Pentetreotide. Abdominal planar images were performed 4 h and 24 hours after injection. Abdominal SPECT was performed at 24 hours. The combination of anterior and posterior abdominal planar images with SPECT using iterative reconstruction detected significantly more tumoral sites compared to multiple planar images (298 versus 280 for the liver, p = 0.01 and 90 versus 88 for coeliac area). In particular liver lesions were better delineated on tomographic slices. The combination of 111 In-Pentetreotide SPECT with anterior and posterior planar images is more sensitive than multiple planar images to detect abdominal endocrine tumors. (author)

  16. Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy After Pancreatic Resection for Invasive Carcinoma Associated With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, Michael J.; Hsu, Charles C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Winter, Jordan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guler, Mehmet; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. One-third are associated with invasive carcinoma. We examined the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for this cohort. Methods and Materials: Patients who had undergone pancreatic resection at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1999 and 2004 were reviewed. Of these patients, 83 with a resected pancreatic mass were found to have an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma, 70 of whom met inclusion criteria for the present analysis. Results: The median age at surgery was 68 years. The median tumor size was 3.3 cm, and invasive carcinoma was present at the margin in 16% of the patients. Of the 70 patients, 50% had metastases to the lymph nodes and 64% had Stage II disease. The median survival was 28.0 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57% and 45%, respectively. Of the 70 patients, 40 had undergone adjuvant CRT. Those receiving CRT were more likely to have lymph node metastases, perineural invasion, and Stage II-III disease. The 2-year survival rate after surgery with vs. without CRT was 55.8% vs. 59.3%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with lymph node metastases or positive surgical margins benefited significantly from CRT (p = .047 and p = .042, respectively). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant CRT was associated with improved survival, with a relative risk of 0.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.95; p = .044) after adjusting for major confounders. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT conferred a 57% decrease in the relative risk of mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with an associated invasive component after adjusting for major confounders. Patients with lymph node metastases or positive margins appeared to particularly benefit from CRT after definitive surgery.

  17. Pancreatic fibrosis correlates with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Tran; G. van 't Hof; G. Kazemier (Geert); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); C.J. Pek (Chulja); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); H. van Dekken (Herman); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Obstruction of the pancreatic duct can lead to pancreatic fibrosis. We investigated the correlation between the extent of pancreatic fibrosis and the postoperative exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. Methods: Fifty-five patients who were treated for pancreatic and

  18. Pancreatic endocrine tumours: an out-matching field of cooperation with nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadiot, G.; Marmuse, J.P.; Mignon, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is taken as an example of the diagnostic and therapeutic strategy in gastro-entero-pancreatic endocrine tumours, given the standard characteristics of this procedure, whatever the nature of the primitive tumour. Management of ZES includes: anatomical localization of gastrinoma and of possible metastases, in 60 % of cases this step conditioning therapeutic indications and chances of cure; search of a type 1-multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN A), in 25 % of cases; therapeutic indications: ablative surgery with curative intent in case of gastrinoma and of resectable liver metastases, palliative treatment otherwise: anti-secretory drugs, somatostatin analogues, chemotherapy and interferon α; long-term follow-up of patients with resected tumour. At each step, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with indium 111-pentetreotide does play a pivotal role. (author)

  19. Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic neoplasms: A retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jia-Fei; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Jin, Wei-Wei; Huang, Chao-Jie; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Ren-Chao; Harsha, Ajoodhea; Mou, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe the clinical characteristics, technical procedures, and outcomes of patients undergoing laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy (LSPDP) for benign and malignant pancreatic neoplasms. METHODS: The clinical data of 38 patients who underwent LSPDP in the Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital between January 2003 and August 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Surgical techniques for LSPDP included preservation of the splenic artery and vein (Kimura’s technique) and ligation of the splenic pedicle with preservation of the short gastric vessels (Warshaw’s technique). RESULTS: There were no conversions to open surgery in the 38 patients. Splenic vessels were conserved during spleen-preserving pancreatectomy, except in two patients who underwent resection of the splenic vessels and preservation only of the short gastric vessels. The mean operation time was 123.2 ± 52.4 min, the mean intraoperative blood loss was 78.2 ± 39.5 mL, and the mean postoperative hospital stay was 7.6 ± 2.9 d. The overall rate of postoperative complications was 18.4% (7/38), and the rate of clinical pancreatic fistula was 13.2% (5/38). All postoperative complications were treated conservatively. The postoperative pathological diagnoses were 22 cases of benign pancreatic disease and 16 cases of borderline or low-grade malignant lesions. During a median follow-up of 38 mo (range: 5-133 mo), no recurrence was observed. CONCLUSION: LSPDP is a safe, feasible and effective procedure for the treatment of benign and low-grade malignant tumors of the distal pancreas. PMID:25320534

  20. Expansion and conversion of human pancreatic ductal cells into insulin-secreting endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghyeob; Sugiyama, Takuya; Liu, Yinghua; Wang, Jing; Gu, Xueying; Lei, Ji; Markmann, James F; Miyazaki, Satsuki; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Szot, Gregory L; Bottino, Rita; Kim, Seung K

    2013-11-19

    Pancreatic islet β-cell insufficiency underlies pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus; thus, functional β-cell replacement from renewable sources is the focus of intensive worldwide effort. However, in vitro production of progeny that secrete insulin in response to physiological cues from primary human cells has proven elusive. Here we describe fractionation, expansion and conversion of primary adult human pancreatic ductal cells into progeny resembling native β-cells. FACS-sorted adult human ductal cells clonally expanded as spheres in culture, while retaining ductal characteristics. Expression of the cardinal islet developmental regulators Neurog3, MafA, Pdx1 and Pax6 converted exocrine duct cells into endocrine progeny with hallmark β-cell properties, including the ability to synthesize, process and store insulin, and secrete it in response to glucose or other depolarizing stimuli. These studies provide evidence that genetic reprogramming of expandable human pancreatic cells with defined factors may serve as a general strategy for islet replacement in diabetes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00940.001.

  1. Ultrasound compared with computed tomography and pancreatic arteriography in the detection of endocrine tumours of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paeivaensalo, M.; Maekaeraeinen, H.; Siniluoto, T.; Staahlberg, M.; Jalovaara, P.; Oulu Univ. Central Hospital

    1989-01-01

    We have evaluated ultrasound, computed tomography and arteriographic findings in 15 patients with 17 endocrine pancreatic tumours having a mean diameter of 2.3 cm (range 1-7 cm). All patients underwent computed tomography, and all but one ultrasound and arteriography. Ultrasound was the initial investigation in 11 patients, and identified 10 of the 16 tumours present in 14 patients. Two tumours were found at ultrasound reexamination after having been identified by other radiological methods. Computed tomography revealed 8 out of 17 tumours, while arteriography identified 8 out of 16 tumours. Computed tomography was the initial investigation in 4 patients,and identified one tumour. In only 4 patients were tumours not detected by any of the imaging methods. The sensitivities of ultrasound, computed tomography and arteriography in the detection of pancreatic tumours were 62.5% (95% confidence interval 50.4-74.6%), 47.1% (95% confidence interval 35.0-59.2%), and 50.0% (95% confidence interval 37.5-62.5%), respectively. Ultrasound was thus more accurate than computed tomography or arteriography in detecting endocrine pancreatic tumours, and should be the initial radiological investigation. (orig.)

  2. Relationship of visfatin level to pancreatic endocrine hormone level, HOMA-IR index, and HOMA β-cell index in overweight women who performed hydraulic resistance exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Chang Ho; Swearingin, Brenda; Jeon, Yong Kyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the correlation of visfatin level to pancreatic endocrine hormone level, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, and HOMA β-cell index in hydraulic resistance exercise. Furthermore, it investigated the relationship between visfatin level and other variables affected by exercise in overweight women. [Subjects and Methods] The exercise group trained for 12 weeks, 70 minutes/day, 5 days/week. Visfatin level, pancreatic endocrine h...

  3. Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare pancreatic tumour predominantly affecting young women. We present two cases in young female patients. Both tumours were surgically removed as abdominal masses, one from the pancreatic tail and the other posterior to the stomach with an unclear organ of origin. On gross ...

  4. Clinicopathological features of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm and influencing factors for its malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOU Liyan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinicopathological features of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN and influencing factors for benign and malignant MCN. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 43 patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic MCN who were treated from January 2013 to December 2015, and according to the results of pathological diagnosis, the patients were divided into benign group (mucinous cystadenoma and pancreatic MCN with low/middle-grade dysplasia and malignant group (MCN with high-grade dysplasia and MCN with invasive carcinoma. The clinicopathological features and radiological features were summarized, and the risk factors for malignant transformation of pancreatic MCN were analyzed. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between groups, the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups, and a multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors. ResultsThere were 14 male and 29 female patients aged 22-81 years (median 58.53 years. Of all patients, 30 (69.8% had clinical symptoms. The maximum tumor diameter was 4.8 cm (range 1.2-16 cm. Of all patients, 18 (41.9% had MCN in the head of the pancreas, 3 (7.0% had MCN in the neck of the pancreas, 20 (46.5% had MCN in the body and tail of the pancreas, and 2 (4.6% had multiple MCNs. There were significant differences between the two groups in age, tumor nature, tumor location, texture, tumor markers, heterogeneous enhancement of the cyst wall, heterogeneous enhancement of solid components, and cyst wall thickness >0.2 cm. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age and increased tumor markers were independent predictive factors for malignant pancreatic MCN (P <0.05. ConclusionAge, tumor nature, tumor location, texture, increased tumor markers, heterogeneous enhancement of the cyst wall, heterogeneous enhancement

  5. Low accuracy of tumor markers for diagnosing pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Joanne M.; Pieterman, Carolina R. C.; Weijmans, Maaike; Hermus, Ad R.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; de Herder, Wouter W.; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N. A.; Drent, Madeleine L.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Havekes, Bas; Vriens, Menno R.; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The assessment of tumor markers for diagnosing pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) patients is advised in the current guidelines but has never been validated for this purpose. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the

  6. Low Accuracy of Tumor Markers for Diagnosing Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Joanne M.; Pieterman, Carolina R. C.; Weijmans, Maaike; Hermus, Ad R.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; de Herder, Wouter W.; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N. A.; Drent, Madeleine L.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Havekes, Bas; Vriens, Menno R.; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The assessment of tumor markers for diagnosing pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) patients is advised in the current guidelines but has never been validated for this purpose. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the

  7. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Taylor M; Villafane-Ferriol, Nicole; Shah, Kevin P; Shah, Rohan M; Tran Cao, Hop S; Massarweh, Nader N; Silberfein, Eric J; Choi, Eugene A; Hsu, Cary; McElhany, Amy L; Barakat, Omar; Fisher, William; Van Buren, George

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL). The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995-2016) addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1) patients with albumin 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2) patients with albumin endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of appropriate treatment to improve the patient's quality of life.

  8. Diagnostic and radiological management of cystic pancreatic lesions: Important features for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerke, B.; Domagk, D.; Heindel, W.; Wessling, J.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic pancreatic neoplasms are often an incidental finding, the frequency of which is increasing. The understanding of such lesions has increased in recent years, but the numerous types of lesions involved can hinder differential diagnosis. They include, in particular, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN), serous cystic neoplasms (SCN), and mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN). Knowledge of their histological and radiological structure, as well as distribution in terms of localization, age, and sex, helps to differentiate such tumours from common pancreatic pseudocysts. Several types of cystic pancreatic neoplasms can undergo malignant transformation and, therefore, require differentiated radiological management. This review aims to develop a broader understanding of the pathological and radiological characteristics of cystic pancreatic neoplasms, and provide a guideline for everyday practice based on current concepts in the radiological management of the given lesions.

  9. A Single Centre Analysis of Clinical Characteristics and Treatment of Endocrine Pancreatic Tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Adil, M. T.; Nagaraja, R.; Varma, V.; Mehta, N.; Kumaran, V.; Nundy, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Endocrine Pancreatic Tumours (PENs) are rare and can be nonfunctioning or functioning. They carry a good prognosis overall though high grade lesions show a relatively shorter survival. The aim of the current study is to describe a single centre analysis of the clinical characteristics and surgical treatment of PENs. Patients and Methods. This is a cohort analysis of 40 patients of PENs who underwent surgery at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India, from 1995 to 2013. Patient pa...

  10. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  11. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed

  12. Pancreatic insufficiency after different resections for benign tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconi, M; Mantovani, W; Crippa, S; Mascetta, G; Salvia, R; Pederzoli, P

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic resections for benign diseases may lead to long-term endocrine/exocrine impairment. The aim of this study was to compare postoperative and long-term results after different pancreatic resections for benign disease. Between 1990 and 1999, 62 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), 36 atypical resection (AR) and 64 left pancreatectomy (LP) for benign tumours. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function was evaluated by 72-h faecal chymotrypsin and oral glucose tolerance test. The incidence of pancreatic fistula was significantly higher after AR than after LP (11 of 36 versus seven of 64; P = 0.028). The long-term incidence of endocrine pancreatic insufficiency was significantly lower after AR than after PD (P insufficiency was more common after PD (P endocrine and exocrine insufficiency was higher for PD and LP than for AR (32, 27 and 3 per cent respectively at 1 year; 58, 29 and 3 per cent at 5 years; P pancreatic resections are associated with different risks of developing long-term pancreatic insufficiency. AR represents the best option in terms of long-term endocrine and exocrine function, although it is associated with more postoperative complications. Copyright (c) 2007 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd.

  13. Clinical application of duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Songqiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the indications and therapeutic effect of duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 17 patients who underwent DPPHR in Fujian Provincial Hospital from January 2013 to February 2017. Among these patients, 6 had chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic duct stones, 2 had chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst, 3 had solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreatic head, 3 had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, 2 had serous cystadenoma of the pancreatic head, and 1 had mucinous cystadenoma of the pancreatic head. Results The time of operation was 200-360 minutes (mean 304.0±45.3 minutes, and the intraoperative blood loss was 50-500 ml (mean 267.5±116.1 ml. No patient died in the perioperative period. After surgery, 5 experienced biochemical leak, 2 experienced grade B pancreatic fistula, no patient experienced grade C pancreatic fistula, and 1 experienced gastroplegia; all these patients were cured and discharged after conservative treatment. The length of postoperative hospital stay was 17-78 days (mean 30.8±14.3 days. The 17 patients were followed up for 2 months to 4 years after surgery, and no patient experienced tumor recurrence, new-onset diabetes, dyspepsia, or common bile duct stenosis after surgery. Conclusion Besides ensuring the complete resection of tumor, DPPHR can reduce the incidence rate of surgical trauma and complications and shorten the time of operation and the length of hospital stay. Compared with pancreaticoduodenectomy, DPPHR can better preserve the endocrine and exocrine functions of the pancreas and improve patients′ postoperative quality of life.

  14. Skin peptide tyrosine-tyrosine, a member of the pancreatic polypeptide family: isolation, structure, synthesis, and endocrine activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, A; Chartrel, N; Vaudry, H; Nicolas, P

    1994-10-25

    Pancreatic polypeptide, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), and neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY), three members of a family of structurally related peptides, are mainly expressed in the endocrine pancreas, in endocrine cells of the gut, and in the brain, respectively. In the present study, we have isolated a peptide of the pancreatic polypeptide family from the skin of the South American arboreal frog Phyllomedusa bicolor. The primary structure of the peptide was established as Tyr-Pro-Pro-Lys-Pro-Glu-Ser-Pro-Gly-Glu10-Asp-Ala-Ser-Pro-Glu-Glu- Met-Asn- Lys-Tyr20-Leu-Thr-Ala-Leu-Arg-His-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Leu30-Val-Thr- Arg-Gln-Arg-Tyr-NH2 . This unusual peptide, named skin peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (SPYY), exhibits 94% similarity with PYY from the frog Rana ridibunda. A synthetic replicate of SPYY inhibits melanotropin release from perifused frog neurointermediate lobes in very much the same way as NPY. These results demonstrate the occurrence of a PYY-like peptide in frog skin. Our data also suggest the existence of a pituitary-skin regulatory loop in amphibians.

  15. Pancreas Transplantation With Portal-Enteric Drainage for Patients With Endocrine and Exocrine Insufficiency From Extensive Pancreatic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbas, Andrew S; Al-Adra, David P; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Dib, Martin J; Selzner, Markus; Sapisochin, Gonzalo; Cattral, Mark S; McGilvray, Ian D

    2017-09-01

    Although the primary indication for pancreas transplantation is type I diabetes, a small number of patients requires pancreas transplantation to manage combined endocrine and exocrine insufficiency that develops after extensive native pancreatic resection. The objective of this case report was to describe the operative and clinical course in 3 such patients and present an alternative technical approach.

  16. Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stram, Michelle; Liu, Shu; Singhi, Aatur D

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating condition often associated with severe abdominal pain and exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. The underlying cause is multifactorial and involves complex interaction of environmental, genetic, and/or other risk factors. The pathology is dependent on the underlying pathogenesis of the disease. This review describes the clinical, gross, and microscopic findings of the main subtypes of chronic pancreatitis: alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, obstructive chronic pancreatitis, paraduodenal ("groove") pancreatitis, pancreatic divisum, autoimmune pancreatitis, and genetic factors associated with chronic pancreatitis. As pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma may be confused with chronic pancreatitis, the main distinguishing features between these 2 diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A rare case of thyroid metastasis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Michael E

    2012-02-01

    CONTEXT: Thyroid metastasis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma is extremely rare, with only two previous cases in the literature. We report a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma metastasising to the thyroid. We review the incidence, diagnosis, and management of this rare occurrence. CASE REPORT: A 38-year-old man with a synchronous 6-month history of thyroid swelling, presented with epigastric pain and signs of obstructive jaundice. He was investigated by abdominal computerised tomography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm was made. His thyroid neoplasm was investigated at another tertiary centre and thought to be a papillary neoplasm. He underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy and recovered well post-operatively. Eight weeks later he had a total thyroidectomy. Histology confirmed that the thyroid mass was both morphologically and immunophenotypically similar to the pancreatic neoplasm. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrates the importance of a full investigation when a patient with suspected neoplastic history presents with a thyroid nodule. We outline the crucial role that immunohistochemistry plays in detecting and classifying primary and secondary thyroid neoplasms. The detection of a solitary thyroid metastasis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma may indicate a poor prognosis, and it is debatable whether resection of the primary should be undertaken when it presents with a solitary metastasis.

  18. The Insulin Regulatory Network in Adult Hippocampus and Pancreatic Endocrine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanao Machida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a very strong correlation between the insulin-mediated regulatory system of the central nervous system and the pancreatic endocrine system. There are many examples of the same transcriptional factors being expressed in both regions in their embryonic development stages. Hormonal signals from the pancreatic islets influence the regulation of energy homeostasis by the brain, and the brain in turn influences the secretions of the islets. Diabetes induces neuronal death in different regions of the brain especially hippocampus, causes alterations on the neuronal circuits and therefore impairs learning and memory, for which the hippocampus is responsible. The hippocampus is a region of the brain where steady neurogenesis continues throughout life. Adult neurogenesis from undifferentiated neural stem cells is greatly decreased in diabetic patients, and as a result their learning and memory functions decline. Might it be possible to reactivate stem cells whose functions have deteriorated and that are present in the tissues in which the lesions occur in diabetes, a lifestyle disease, which plagues modern humans and develops as a result of the behavior of insulin-related factor? In this paper we summarize research in regard to these matters based on examples in recent years.

  19. In vitro reprogramming of rat bmMSCs into pancreatic endocrine-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Tu; Jiang, Fang-Xu; Shi, Ping; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Lin, Xue-Wen; San, Zhong-Yan; Pang, Xi-Ning

    2017-02-01

    Islet transplantation provides curative treatments to patients with type 1 diabetes, but donor shortage restricts the broad use of this therapy. Thus, generation of alternative transplantable cell sources is intensively investigated worldwide. We previously showed that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs) can be reprogrammed to pancreatic-like cells through simultaneously forced suppression of Rest/Nrsf (repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuronal restrictive silencing factor) and Shh (sonic hedgehog) and activation of Pdx1 (pancreas and duodenal transcription factor 1). We here aimed to reprogram bmMSCs further along the developmental pathway towards the islet lineages by improving our previous strategy and by overexpression of Ngn3 (neurogenin 3) and NeuroD1 (neurogenic differentiation 1), critical regulators of the development of endocrine pancreas. We showed that compared to the previous protocol, the overexpression of only Pdx1 and Ngn3 reprogrammed bmMSCs into cells with more characteristics of islet endocrine lineages verified with bioinformatic analyses of our RNA-Seq datasets. These analyses indicated 2325 differentially expressed genes including those involved in the pancreas and islet development. We validated with qRT-PCR analysis selective genes identified from the RNA-Seq datasets. Thus, we reprogrammed bmMSCs into islet endocrine-like cells and advanced the endeavor to generate surrogate functional insulin-secreting cells.

  20. Pancreas Transplantation With Portal-Enteric Drainage for Patients With Endocrine and Exocrine Insufficiency From Extensive Pancreatic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Barbas, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Although the primary indication for pancreas transplantation is type I diabetes, a small number of patients requires pancreas transplantation to manage combined endocrine and exocrine insufficiency that develops after extensive native pancreatic resection. The objective of this case report was to describe the operative and clinical course in 3 such patients and present an alternative technical approach.

  1. An unusual mixed tumor of the pancreas: sonographic and MDCT features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortelé, Koenraad J; Peters, Hope E; Odze, Robert D; Glickman, Jonathan N; Jajoo, Kunal; Banks, Peter A

    2009-03-09

    Mixed tumors of the pancreas are exceedingly rare. We herein report on a 54-year-old female who presented with an enlarging cystic lesion in the head of the pancreas. Right upper quadrant ultrasound and multidetector-row CT scan showed a well-defined unilocular cystic tumor located in the head of the pancreas and surrounded, in part, by a hypervascular solid mass. Although mixed exocrine/endocrine pancreatic tumors have been described previously, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a pancreatic mixed intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm/endocrine tumor with illustration of its ultrasound and CT features. Moreover, the importance of preoperative analysis of imaging features in the assessment of pancreatic neoplasms is discussed.

  2. Endoscopic Ultrasound Fine-Needle Aspiration Characteristics of Primary Adenocarcinoma versus Other Malignant Neoplasms of The Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Gagovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS with fine-needle aspiration (FNA is often used to assist in the evaluation of pancreatic lesions and may help to diagnose benign versus malignant neoplasms. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding comparative EUS characteristics of various malignant pancreatic neoplasms (primary and metastatic.

  3. Pancreatic endocrine tumor with neoplastic venous thrombus and bilobar liver metastasis. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, L; Turrini, O; Sarran, A; Delpero, J-R

    2010-02-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic 56-year-old woman with a metastatic pancreatic endocrine tumor, fortuitously discovered by abdominal imaging. A CT-scan showed a large mass in the pancreatic tail invading the spleen and stomach; in addition, there was neoplastic thrombus within the spleno-mesentericoportal venous confluence and bilobar liver metastases. Surgical resection was performed in two stages. The first procedure was an extended left pancreatectomy with venous thrombectomy and "clearance" of the left hepatic lobe. During the interval, embolization of the right portal vein was carried out. Right hepatectomy and radiofrequency destruction of residual metastases was then performed. On the basis of completeness of the resection and the histopathological data, the patient did not undergo any adjuvant therapy, in accordance with French guidelines. At 1 year of follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence. (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical strategies for treatment of malignant pancreatic tumors: extended, standard or local surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Dietmar

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor related pancreatic surgery has progressed significantly during recent years. Pancreatoduodenectomy (PD with lymphadenectomy, including vascular resection, still presents the optimal surgical procedure for carcinomas in the head of pancreas. For patients with small or low-grade malignant neoplasms, as well as small pancreatic metastases located in the mid-portion of pancreas, central pancreatectomy (CP is emerging as a safe and effective option with a low risk of developing de-novo exocrine and/or endocrine insufficiency. Total pancreatectomy (TP is not as risky as it was years ago and can nowadays safely be performed, but its indication is limited to locally extended tumors that cannot be removed by PD or distal pancreatectomy (DP with tumor free surgical margins. Consequently, TP has not been adopted as a routine procedure by most surgeons. On the other hand, an aggressive attitude is required in case of advanced distal pancreatic tumors, provided that safe and experienced surgery is available. Due to the development of modern instruments, laparoscopic operations became more and more successful, even in malignant pancreatic diseases. This review summarizes the recent literature on the abovementioned topics.

  5. The Effect of Cigarette Smoking during Pregnancy on Endocrine Pancreatic Function and Fetal Growth: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Lockhart

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionCigarette smoking in pregnancy is a common cause of fetal growth restriction. We aimed to investigate endocrine pancreatic function of mother–infant dyads in relation to cigarette smoking, as a possible mechanism for the poor fetal growth.MethodsProspective study of smoking mothers (10 cigarettes or more per day, self-reported to the midwife and non-smoker control mothers during their first pregnancy. Insulin, glucose, C-peptide, HbA1C, fructosamine, prolactin, serotonin, and cortisol were measured in maternal blood at 24–26 weeks and in umbilical cord blood at birth. Cotinine was also measured in cord blood.ResultsOf 37 smokers and 36 non-smokers recruited, cord blood was obtainable from 38 babies (19 in each group. In utero cigarette exposure was associated with lower birthweight (3,035 ± 490 versus 3,405 ± 598 g, p = 0.005, with linear modeling of the smoking cohort showing a 41 g reduction for every increase of one cigarette smoked per day (95% CI −71 to −11 g, p = 0.010. There were no differences between groups in indices of maternal or perinatal endocrine pancreatic dysfunction. Heavier smoking independently correlated with higher maternal fasting levels of glucose (p = 0.044 and C-peptide (p = 0.011. We did not observe any significant associations between the daily number of cigarettes and any of the cord blood parameters. We also looked for differences between cohorts based on infant gender. Serotonin levels were higher in smoking mothers with male fetuses (p = 0.01 to p = 0.004.ConclusionEndocrine pancreatic dysfunction does not appear to be a major contributing factor to nicotine-associated fetal growth restriction. The higher serotonin levels in smoking mothers carrying male infants is of uncertain significance but could be a manifestation of gender differences in susceptibility to the long-term effects of cigarette smoking.

  6. Better preservation of endocrine function after central versus distal pancreatectomy for mid-gland lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNorcia, Joseph; Ahmed, Leaque; Lee, Minna K; Reavey, Patrick L; Yakaitis, Elizabeth A; Lee, James A; Schrope, Beth A; Chabot, John A; Allendorf, John D

    2010-12-01

    Traditional resections for benign and low-grade malignant neoplasms of the mid pancreas result in loss of normal parenchyma that can cause pancreatic endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. Central pancreatectomy (CP) is a parenchyma-sparing option for such lesions. This study evaluates a single institution's experience with CP and compares outcomes with distal pancreatectomy (DP). We retrospectively collected data on CP patients from 1997 through 2009 and evaluated outcomes. In a subset of 50 patients, we performed a matched-pairs analysis to directly compare the short- and long-term outcomes of CP and DP. Seventy-three patients underwent CP with a median operating room time of 254 minutes. Overall morbidity was 41.1% with pancreatic fistula in 20.5%. Mortality was 0%. There were no differences in fistula, morbidity, and mortality rates between the CP and DP groups. The CP group had resected for smaller lesions. CP patients had a lower rate of new-onset and worsening diabetes than DP patients (14% vs 46%; P = .003). Of new-onset and worsening diabetics, only 1 CP patient required insulin compared with 14 DP patients (P = .002). CP is safe and effective for select neoplasms of the mid pancreas. Patients undergoing CP have markedly decreased insulin requirements compared with DP patients. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginesta, Mireia M; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-09-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71-80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms.

  8. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Basic Biology, Current Treatment Strategies and Prospects for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Ohmoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs are rare tumors accounting for only 1%–2% of all pancreatic tumors. pNENs are pathologically heterogeneous and are categorized into three groups (neuroendocrine tumor: NET G1, NET G2; and neuroendocrine carcinoma: NEC on the basis of the Ki-67 proliferation index and the mitotic count according to the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO classification of gastroenteropancreatic NENs. NEC in this classification includes both histologically well-differentiated and poorly differentiated subtypes, and modification of the WHO 2010 classification is under discussion based on genetic and clinical data. Genomic analysis has revealed NETs G1/G2 have genetic alterations in chromatin remodeling genes such as MEN1, DAXX and ATRX, whereas NECs have an inactivation of TP53 and RB1, and these data suggest that different treatment approaches would be required for NET G1/G2 and NEC. While there are promising molecular targeted drugs, such as everolimus or sunitinib, for advanced NET G1/G2, treatment stratification based on appropriate predictive and prognostic biomarkers is becoming an important issue. The clinical outcome of NEC is still dismal, and a more detailed understanding of the genetic background together with preclinical studies to develop new agents, including those already under investigation for small cell lung cancer (SCLC, will be needed to improve the prognosis.

  9. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection

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    Taylor M. Gilliland

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL. The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995–2016 addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC. We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1 patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2 patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3 enteral nutrition (EN should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN postoperatively; and, (4 a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of

  10. Long-term follow-up of nutritional status, pancreatic function, and morphological changes of the pancreatic remnant after pancreatic tumor resection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugito, Kiminobu; Furuya, Takeshi; Kaneda, Hide; Masuko, Takayuki; Ohashi, Kensuke; Inoue, Mikiya; Ikeda, Taro; Koshinaga, Tsugumichi; Tomita, Ryouichi; Maebayashi, Toshiya

    2012-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine nutritional status, pancreatic function, and morphological changes of the pancreatic remnant after pancreatic tumor resection in children. The nutritional status was evaluated by the patterns of growth. Pancreatic function was evaluated by using a questionnaire, the Bristol stool form chart, the serum levels of fasting blood glucose, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Morphological changes of the pancreatic remnant were evaluated by computed tomography, magnetic resonance image, or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. The present study consisted of 6 patients with pancreatic tumor (5 solid pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas and 1 pancreatoblastoma) who underwent the following operations: tumor enucleation (3), distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (1), and pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD [2]). The serum levels of HbA1c have been gradually elevated in 2 patients with PPPD. A significant decrease in pancreatic parenchymal thickness and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct were observed in 2 patients with PPPD. Endocrine pancreatic insufficiency after PPPD may be explainable by obstructive pancreatitis after operation. Taking together the results of pancreatic endocrine function and morphological changes of pancreatic remnant after PPPD, tumor enucleation should be considered as surgical approach in children with pancreas head tumor whenever possible.

  11. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Hijioka, Susumu; Masui, Toshihiko; Kasajima, Atsuko; Nakamoto, Yuji; Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Komoto, Izumi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Lee, Lingaku; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert Thomas; Imamura, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Several new developments have occurred in the field of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (PNEN) recently in Japan. First, the utility of chromogranin A (CgA), useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of the treatment response of neuroendocrine neoplasm (NEN), has been demonstrated in Japan. For PNEN diagnosis and treatment, grading and correct histological diagnosis according to the WHO 2010 classification is important. Regarding the histological diagnosis, the advent of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has enabled correct pathological diagnosis and suitable treatment for the affected tissue. Furthermore, EUS-FNA has also facilitates the assessment of the presence or absence of gene mutations. In addition, patients who have a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) showing a Ki-67 index of higher than 20 % according to the WHO 2010 classification, have also been identified, and their responses to treatment were found to be different from those of patients with poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC). Therefore, the concept of NET G3 was proposed. Additionally, somatostatin receptor type 2 is expressed in several cases of NET, and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy ( 111 In-octreoscan) has also been approved in Japan. This advancement will undoubtedly contribute to the localization diagnosis, the identification of remote metastasis, and assessments of the treatment responses of PNEN. Finally, regarding the treatment strategy for PNEN, the management of liver metastasis is important. The advent of novel molecular-targeted agents has dramatically improved the prognosis of advanced PNEN. Multimodality therapy that accounts for the tumor stage, degree of tumor differentiation, tumor volume, and speed of tumor growth is required.

  12. Endocrine and metabolic disorders associated with human immune deficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unachukwu, C N; Uchenna, D I; Young, E E

    2009-01-01

    Many reports have described endocrine and metabolic disorders in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article reviewed various reports in the literature in order to increase the awareness and thus the need for early intervention when necessary. Data were obtained from MEDLINE, Google search and otherjournals on 'HIV, Endocrinopathies/Metabolic Disorders' from 1985 till 2007. Studies related to HIV associated endocrinopathies and metabolic disorders in the last two decades were reviewed. Information on epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of the target organ endocrinopathies and metabolic disorders in HIV/AIDS were extracted from relevant literature. Endocrine and metabolic disturbances occur in the course of HIV infection. Pathogenesis includes direct infection of endocrine glands by HIV or opportunistic organisms, infiltration by neoplasms and side effects of drugs. Adrenal insufficiency is the commonest HIV endocrinopathy with cytomegalovirus adrenalitis occurring in 40-88% of cases. Thyroid dysfunction may occur as euthyroid sick syndrome or sub-clinical hypothyroidism. Hypogonadotrophic dysfunction accounts for 75% of HIV-associated hypogonadism, with prolonged amenorrhoea being three times more likely in the women. Pancreatic dysfunction may result in hypoglycaemia or diabetes mellitus (DM). Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) especially protease inhibitors has been noted to result in insulin resistance and lipodystrophy. Virtually every endocrine organ is involved in the course of HIV infection. Detailed endocrinological and metabolic evaluation and appropriate treatment is necessary in the optimal management of patients with HIV infection in our environment.

  13. Chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jorg; Whitcomb, David C; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Esposito, Irene; Lerch, Markus M; Gress, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rebours, Vinciane; Akisik, Fatih; Muñoz, J Enrique Domínguez; Neoptolemos, John P

    2017-09-07

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a pathological fibro-inflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathological responses to parenchymal injury or stress. Potential causes can include toxic factors (such as alcohol or smoking), metabolic abnormalities, idiopathic mechanisms, genetics, autoimmune responses and obstructive mechanisms. The pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis is fairly complex and includes acinar cell injury, acinar stress responses, duct dysfunction, persistent or altered inflammation, and/or neuro-immune crosstalk, but these mechanisms are not completely understood. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the pancreas that results in progressive loss of the endocrine and exocrine compartment owing to atrophy and/or replacement with fibrotic tissue. Functional consequences include recurrent or constant abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus (endocrine insufficiency) and maldigestion (exocrine insufficiency). Diagnosing early-stage chronic pancreatitis is challenging as changes are subtle, ill-defined and overlap those of other disorders. Later stages are characterized by variable fibrosis and calcification of the pancreatic parenchyma; dilatation, distortion and stricturing of the pancreatic ducts; pseudocysts; intrapancreatic bile duct stricturing; narrowing of the duodenum; and superior mesenteric, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment options comprise medical, radiological, endoscopic and surgical interventions, but evidence-based approaches are limited. This Primer highlights the major progress that has been made in understanding the pathophysiology, presentation, prevalence and management of chronic pancreatitis and its complications.

  14. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, H.J.; Lois, J.F.; Gomes, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    A case of multiple endocrine neoplasia (Men) consisting of an unusual combination of an insulin-producing islet cell tumour and an adrenal adenoma is reported. CT clearly demonstrated the adrenal mass whereas the pancreatic lesion remained questionable. Conversely angiography located the pancreatic tumour but the adrenal findings were subtle. (orig.)

  15. Percutaneous transhepatic stent placement in the management of portal venous stenosis after curative surgery for pancreatic and biliary neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Rae; Ko, Gi-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Yoon, Hyun-Ki

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stent placement in the management of portal venous stenosis after curative surgery for pancreatic and biliary neoplasms. From September 1995 to April 2007, percutaneous transhepatic portal venous stent placement was attempted in 19 patients with postoperative portal venous stenosis. Portal venous stenosis was a complication of surgery in 11 patients and caused by tumor recurrence in eight patients. The clinical manifestations were ascites, hematochezia, melena, esophageal varices, and abnormal liver function. Stents were placed in the stenotic or occluded lesions after percutaneous transhepatic portography. Technical and clinical success, stent patency, and complications were evaluated. Stent placement was successful in 18 patients (technical success rate, 95%). Clinical manifestations improved in 16 patients (clinical success rate, 84%). The mean patency period among the 18 patients with technical success was 21.3 ± 23.2 months. The mean patency period of the benign stenosis group (30.1 ± 25.6 months) was longer than that of the tumor recurrence group (7.3 ± 7.7 months), and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.038). There were two cases of a minor complication (transient fever) and three cases of major complications (septicemia, liver abscess, and acute portal venous thrombosis). Percutaneous transhepatic stent placement can be safe and effective in relieving portal venous stenosis after curative surgery for pancreatic and biliary neoplasms. Patients with benign stenosis had more favorable results than did those with tumor recurrence.

  16. [Delayed complications after pancreatic surgery: Pancreatic insufficiency, malabsorption syndrome, pancreoprivic diabetes mellitus and pseudocysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, U; Siveke, J; Friess, H; Kleeff, J

    2015-06-01

    Benign and malignant pathologies of the pancreas can result in a relevant chronic disease burden. This is aggravated by morbidities resulting from surgical resections as well as from progression of the underlying condition. The aim was to summarize the current evidence regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, as well as of pancreatic pseudocysts. A selective literature search was performed and a summary of the currently available data on the surgical sequelae after pancreatic resection is given. Reduction of healthy pancreatic parenchyma down to 10-15 % leads to exocrine insufficiency with malabsorption and gastrointestinal complaints. Orally substituted pancreatic enzymes are the therapy of choice. Loss of pancreatic islets and/or islet function leads to endocrine insufficiency and pancreoprivic diabetes mellitus. Inflammatory, traumatic and iatrogenic injuries of the pancreas can lead to pancreatic pseudocysts, which require endoscopic, interventional or surgical drainage if symptomatic. Finally, pancreatic surgery harbors the long-term risk of gastrointestinal anastomotic ulcers, bile duct stenosis, portal vein thrombosis and chronic pain syndrome. As the evidence is limited, an interdisciplinary and individually tailored approach for delayed pancreatic morbidity is recommended.

  17. Phenotype variability of infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease IMNEPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picker-Minh, Sylvie; Mignot, Cyril; Doummar, Diane; Hashem, Mais; Faqeih, Eissa; Josset, Patrice; Dubern, Béatrice; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Kraemer, Nadine; Kaindl, Angela M

    2016-04-29

    Infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease (IMNEPD) has been recently linked to biallelic mutation of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase 2 gene PTRH2. Two index patients with IMNEPD in the original report had multiple neurological symptoms such as postnatal microcephaly, intellectual disability, developmental delay, sensorineural deafness, cerebellar atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. In addition, distal muscle weakness and abnormalities of thyroid, pancreas, and liver were found. Here, we report five further IMNEPD patients with a different homozygous PTRH2 mutation, broaden the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and differentiate common symptoms and interindividual variability in IMNEPD associated with a unique mutation. We thereby hope to better define IMNEPD and promote recognition and diagnosis of this novel disease entity.

  18. Solid pancreatic pseudopapillary tumor managed laparoscopically: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cuccurullo

    Full Text Available Background: Solid pancreatic pseudopapillary tumors are a rare neoplasms, about 1–3% of all pancreatic neoplasms. This cancer mainly affects women between the third and fourth decade of life.They are not well known; the molecular origins represent a low degree of malignancy, in which the complete resection is curative. We report our experience with a case report of SPT in a young man. Presentation of case: Thirty-six years old male patient with a mass about 10 cm in the pancreatic tail and splenic ilum. After following CT and MR, the patient was subjected to surgery. Histophatological result was solid tumor pseudopapillary of pancreas with no pathological lymph nodes. Discussion and conclusion: Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm shows histological characteristic solid and pseudopapillary proliferation. Immunohistochemistry detects, among the causes of tumor development, a correlation between the Beta-catenin mutations, alteration of the E-cadherin. In the most cases, therapy is surgical treatment with laparoscopic. Keywords: Pancreatic pseudopapillary neoplasm, Pancreatic tumor, Laparoscopic surgery

  19. Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas : radiologic pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Ki Whang; Cho, Nam Hoon

    1996-01-01

    To report variable radiologic manifestastions and to accomplish detailed radiologic-pathologic correlation of solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas. In 23 patients with surgically confirmed solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm, retrospective examination of operative records, gross and micropathologic findings, and radiologic findings including US(n=17), CT(n=23), ERCP(n=9), MRI(n=3) were carried out. On the basis of pathologic findings, detailed analysis of radiologic findings of solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm was then performed. Most pancreatic solid and papillary epithelial neoplasms(n=17) were seen as a mass with heterogeneous internal density consisting of cystic change, hemorrhagic necrosis, and tumor tissue, although the mass con also be seen to be homogeneous(n=6). On gross specimens, a capsule which showed enhancement on the delayed phase of the enhanced CT scan was demonstrated in 22 cases. In was seen as an echogenic rim on the ultrasound images and a low signal rim on the MR images. Calcification of the mass was seen in ten cases, nine of which showed peripheral calcification along the tumor capsule ; five cases showed calcifications within the mass. On pathologic examination, ten cases had a single or multiple cystic appearance ; in seven of these cases, this appeared on CT scan. In addition to usual mixed internal density caused by hemorrhagic necrosis of the tumor, enhanced capsule and internal multicystic appearance on CT scan were other characteristics of pancreatic solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm. These could be useful findings in the radiologic approach and in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses

  20. Recurrent pancreatitis in pregnancy after preconception Whipple for pseudopapillary pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dray, Danielle; Dahlke, Joshua D; Rouse, Dwight J

    2014-08-01

    Solid pseudopapillary pancreatic tumor is a rare tumor affecting young women. Case reports have presented pregnancy outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) in pregnancy for this neoplasm. We report a case of a woman who underwent a preconception Whipple procedure for a solid pseudopapillary pancreatic tumor who experienced recurrent pancreatitis confined to pregnancy. A 28-year-old gravida 2 para 1 woman with a history of a Whipple procedure for a solid pseudopapillary pancreatic tumor 2 years prior had three episodes of severe pancreatitis in pregnancy. She was managed conservatively with each episode. She delivered at term and did not have a recurrence in the 8 months since her delivery. Recurrent pancreatitis in pregnancy after a preconception Whipple procedure can be managed conservatively without surgical intervention.

  1. Primary cystic pancreatic neoplasms and tumor-like conditions. MR cholangiopancreatographic evaluation of lesions and Wirsung's duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Adriana; Spina, Juan C. h; Rogondino, Jose; Chacon, Carolina; Gutierrez, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the contribution of single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) in the diagnosis of cystic lesions in the pancreas, and their relation to Wirsung's duct. Material and methods: In 66 patients (33 women and 33 men; mean age: 66 years) cystic pancreatic lesions were retrospectively analyzed. The SSFSE technique was used, including an evaluation of Wirsung's duct. Conventional pancreatic sequences were added. The following lesion features were assessed: location, number, size, relation to Wirsung's duct, nature of the cystic image and signal intensity of the neoplasm or tumor-like condition. Surgical and anatomopathological correlation was obtained in 31/66 cases (47%). Results: The cystic lesions were divided in 2 groups: A) cystic lesions related to Wirsung's duct, 30 patients: all lesions measured less than 30 mm in size. Seven patients underwent surgical treatment; in 22 cases surgery was not indicated. One patient refused surgery. A mucinous papilliferous intraductal tumor was diagnosed in 3 cases, ampullar carcinoma in 1 case, pancreatic carcinoma, 1 case, autoimmune pancreatitis, 1 case, and cystic duct dilatation due to benign fibrous stenosis, 1 case. B) Cystic lesions not related to Wirsung's duct (36 patients): 7 serous cystadenomas, 7 adenocarcinomas with a cystic component, 1 mucinous cystadenoma, 1 duodenal diverticulum, 7 pseudocysts and 1 neuroendocrine tumor. In 12 patients surgery was not carried out due to clinical contraindication or patient's refusal. Conclusion: SSFSE allowed a clear differentiation between cystic lesions related (Group A) and non-related (Group B) to Wirsung's duct. The diagnosis could not be achieved by usual MRI sequences. However, benign and malignant lesions were observed in both groups. In all cases SSFSE afforded useful data either for surgical treatment or clinical follow-up. (author)

  2. Pancreatic HIF2α Stabilization Leads to Chronic Pancreatitis and Predisposes to Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather K. Schofield

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: We show that pancreatic HIF2α stabilization disrupts pancreatic homeostasis, leading to chronic pancreatitis, and, in the context of oncogenic Kras, MCN formation. These findings provide new mouse models of both chronic pancreatitis and MCN, as well as illustrate the importance of hypoxia signaling in the pancreas.

  3. Early morphological and functional changes in pancreas following necrosectomy for acute severe necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavare, Charudatta; Prabhu, Ramkrishna; Supe, Avinash

    2004-01-01

    Morphological and functional changes in the pancreas after surgical pancreatic necrosectomy have not been studied extensively. To study morphological changes in the pancreas, and exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function following pancreatic necrosectomy. Eighteen adult patients surviving at least one month after pancreatic necrosectomy for acute necrotizing pancreatitis were followed up. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography was done every six months. Stool fat was estimated at 3-month intervals, and need for and response to enzyme supplements were recorded. Blood sugar was measured every fortnight; in patients with hyperglycemia, need for oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin was recorded. Additional pancreatic imaging was done in some cases. Six weeks after surgery, nine of 18 patients had exocrine insufficiency. Thirteen patients developed endocrine insufficiency, including 5 who also had exocrine insufficiency. At the end of the study, 13 patients had endocrine insufficiency and 2 had exocrine insufficiency. Pancreatic size was subnormal in all patients at the end of six months. Pancreatography in three cases did not reveal any ductal abnormality. Necrotizing pancreatitis affects pancreatic exocrine or endocrine function in more than half the patients.

  4. Oncological applications of 18F-FDG PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin

    2000-01-01

    Considering normal distribution of 18 F-FDG in human body, 18 F-FDG imaging using PET can be applied to brain tumors, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, melanoma, lung cancer and head and neck cancer. The author briefly focuses on application of 18 F-FDG PET imaging to breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, musculoskeletal neoplasms, endocrine neoplasms, genitourinary neoplasms, esophageal and gastric carcinomas

  5. Duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection for benign cystic neoplastic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Hans G; Schwarz, Michael; Poch, Bertram

    2012-11-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are diagnosed frequently due to early use of abdominal imaging techniques. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, mucinous cystic neoplasm, and serous pseudopapillary neoplasia are considered pre-cancerous lesions because of frequent transformation to cancer. Complete surgical resection of the benign lesion is a pancreatic cancer preventive treatment. The application for a limited surgical resection for the benign lesions is increasingly used to reduce the surgical trauma with a short- and long-term benefit compared to major surgical procedures. Duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection introduced for inflammatory tumors in the pancreatic head transfers to the patient with a benign cystic lesion located in the pancreatic head, the advantages of a minimalized surgical treatment. Based on the experience of 17 patients treated for cystic neoplastic lesions with duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection, the surgical technique of total pancreatic head resection for adenoma, borderline tumors, and carcinoma in situ of cystic neoplasm is presented. A segmental resection of the peripapillary duodenum is recommended in case of suspected tissue ischemia of the peripapillary duodenum. In 305 patients, collected from the literature by PubMed search, in about 40% of the patients a segmental resection of the duodenum and 60% a duodenum and common bile duct-preserving total pancreatic head resection has been performed. Hospital mortality of the 17 patients was 0%. In 305 patients collected, the hospital mortality was 0.65%, 13.2% experienced a delay of gastric emptying and a pancreatic fistula in 18.2%. Recurrence of the disease was 1.5%. Thirty-two of 175 patients had carcinoma in situ. Duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection for benign cystic neoplastic lesions is a safe surgical procedure with low post-operative morbidity and mortality.

  6. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-26

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  7. Identification of Achaete-scute complex-like 1 (ASCL1) target genes and evaluation of DKK1 and TPH1 expression in pancreatic endocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Térèse A; Westin, Gunnar; Skogseid, Britt

    2009-01-01

    ASCL1 role in pancreatic endocrine tumourigenesis has not been established. Recently it was suggested that ASCL1 negatively controls expression of the Wnt signalling antagonist DKK1. Notch signalling regulates expression of TPH1, the rate limiting enzyme in the biosyntesis of serotonin. Understanding the development and proliferation of pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) is essential for the development of new therapies. ASCL1 target genes in the pancreatic endocrine tumour cell line BON1 were identified by RNA interference and microarray expression analysis. Protein expressions of selected target genes in PETs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. 158 annotated ASCL1 target genes were identified in BON1 cells, among them DKK1 and TPH1 that were negatively regulated by ASCL1. An inverse relation of ASCL1 to DKK1 protein expression was observed for 15 out of 22 tumours (68%). Nine tumours displayed low ASCL1/high DKK1 and six tumours high ASCL1/low DKK1 expression. Remaining PETs showed high ASCL1/high DKK1 (n = 4) or low ASCL1/low DKK1 (n = 3) expression. Nine of twelve analysed PETs (75%) showed TPH1 expression with no relation to ASCL1. A number of genes with potential importance for PET tumourigenesis have been identified. ASCL1 negatively regulated the Wnt signalling antagonist DKK1, and TPH1 expression in BON1 cells. In concordance with these findings DKK1 showed an inverse relation to ASCL1 expression in a subset of PETs, which may affect growth control by the Wnt signalling pathway

  8. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation for chronic pancreatitis. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, R.L.; Braasch, J.W.; O' Bryan, E.M.; Watkins, E. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    A patient who underwent 95% pancreatectomy with autotransplantation of the body and tail of the gland to the femoral area for chronic pancreatitis is presented. The pain resolved, and the patient's blood glucose level remained within normal limits. High levels of insulin were found in the iliac vein on the transplanted side. Patency of the graft was demonstrated by technetium scan and arteriography and followed by a color-coded Doppler imaging system. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation offers a method of relieving pain with preservation of endocrine function in selected patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Glucose Homeostasis, Pancreatic Endocrine Function, and Outcomes in Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenovsky, Vojtech; Benes, Jan; Franekova, Janka; Kovar, Jan; Borlaug, Barry A; Segetova, Marketa; Tura, Andrea; Pelikanova, Tereza

    2017-08-07

    The mechanisms and relevance of impaired glucose homeostasis in advanced heart failure (HF) are poorly understood. The study goals were to examine glucose regulation, pancreatic endocrine function, and metabolic factors related to prognosis in patients with nondiabetic advanced HF. In total, 140 advanced HF patients without known diabetes mellitus and 21 sex-, age-, and body mass index-matched controls underwent body composition assessment, oral glucose tolerance testing, and measurement of glucose-regulating hormones to model pancreatic β-cell secretory response. Compared with controls, HF patients had similar fasting glucose and insulin levels but higher levels after oral glucose tolerance testing. Insulin secretion was not impaired, but with increasing HF severity, there was a reduction in glucose, insulin, and insulin/glucagon ratio-a signature of starvation. The insulin/C-peptide ratio was decreased in HF, indicating enhanced insulin clearance, and this was correlated with lower cardiac output, hepatic insufficiency, right ventricular dysfunction, and body wasting. After a median of 449 days, 41% of patients experienced an adverse event (death, urgent transplant, or assist device). Increased glucagon and, paradoxically, low fasting plasma glucose displayed the strongest relations to outcome ( P =0.01). Patients in the lowest quartile of fasting plasma glucose (3.8-5.1 mmol·L -1 , 68-101 mg·dL -1 ) had 3-times higher event risk than in the top quartile (6.0-7.9 mmol·L -1 , 108-142 mg·dL -1 ; relative risk: 3.05 [95% confidence interval, 1.46-6.77]; P =0.002). Low fasting plasma glucose and increased glucagon are robust metabolic predictors of adverse events in advanced HF. Pancreatic insulin secretion is preserved in advanced HF, but levels decrease with increasing HF severity due to enhanced insulin clearance that is coupled with right heart failure and cardiac cachexia. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc

  10. Pancreatic Carcinoma With Hepatic Metastasis And Early Signs Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the lethal neoplasms. Involvement of pancreatic body and tail are uncommon compared to that of the head and neck. Sinistral portal hypertension is a rare complication of pancreatic tumor which results from obstruction of portal vein tributaries. Imaging may be the only clue to diagnosis.

  11. Plurihormonal Cosecretion by a Case of Adrenocortical Oncocytic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Corrales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms (oncocytomas are extremely rare; only approximately 159 cases have been described so far. The majority are nonfunctional and benign. We describe an unusual case of a functional oncocytoma secreting an excess of glucocorticoids (cortisol and androgens (androstenedione and DHEAS, a pattern of plurihormonal cosecretion previously not reported in men, presenting with endocrine manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome. The neoplasm was considered to be of uncertain malignant potential (borderline according to the Lin-Weiss-Bisceglia criteria.

  12. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  13. Diagnosis and management of endocrine gland neoplasmas. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Functional and nonfunctional neoplasms of the endocrine glands constitute some of the more challenging diagnostic and therapeutic problems in veterinary cancer medicine. This discussion will focus on the clinical signs and syndromes associated with neoplasms of the thyroid, adrenal, and parathyroid glands, and pancreas in companion animals and will concentrate on the mechanisms producing the clinical signs, diagnosis, staging, therapy and prognosis.

  14. Pancreaticoduodenectomy versus duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhenjiang; Xiang, Guangming; Tan, Chunlu; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Baowang; Gong, Jun; Mai, Gang; Liu, Xubao

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis (CP). The 123 patients with CP who underwent pancreatic head resection between January 2004 and June 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. The preoperative variables, operative data, postoperative complications, and follow-up information were examined. There were no significant differences in clinical and morphological characteristics, pain relief, and jaundice status between the PD and DPPHR groups. The duration of operation was shorter (251.8 [SD, 43.1] vs 324.5 [SD, 41.4] minutes, P endocrine insufficiency was higher in PD group as compared with DPPHR group. Both procedures are equally effective in pain relief, but DPPHR is superior to PD in operative data, postoperative morbidity, improving quality of life, and preservation of exocrine and endocrine function.

  15. Long-term assessments after pancreaticoduodenectomy with pancreatic duct invagination anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Ippei; Sakai, Tetsuya; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Ueda, Takashi; Kuroda, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this cohort was to evaluate the long-term patency of the anastomosis and the remnant pancreatic functions. Fifty-six consecutive patients undergoing a pancreaticoduodenectomy with pancreatic duct invagination anastomosis were enrolled in this study. During the follow-up, changes in the remnant pancreatic duct size, pancreatic exocrine and endocrine functions, and nutritional status were monitored. No seriously activated pancreatic fistula, no hemorrhagic complications, no reoperations, and no in-hospital deaths were observed after surgery. A dilatation of remnant pancreatic duct was detected a total of 37 times (51%) during annual computed tomography (CT) evaluations. Pancreatic dysfunctions were observed in a considerable number of patients (exocrine 4/12, 9/14, and 8/16, endocrine 9/35, 8/27, and 4/16 at 1, 2, and 3 postoperative years, respectively). Functional declines in the remnant pancreas, duct dilatation, and a decrease in the body mass index were observed from the first year. However, these data did not progressively deteriorate thereafter, at least during the first 3 postoperative years. This study demonstrated a significant correlation between the duct dilatation and endocrine dysfunction. Our pancreatic duct invagination anastomosis resulted in somewhat limited long-term outcomes, although it did prevent serious complications in the short-term. (author)

  16. Solitary pancreatic metastasis from breast cancer: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Apodaca-Rueda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT: Pancreatic metastases from primary malignant tumors at other sites are rare, constituting about 2% of the neoplasms that affect the pancreas. Pancreatic metastasis from breast cancer is extremely rare and difficult to diagnose, because its clinical and radiological presentation is similar to that of a primary pancreatic tumor. CASE REPORT: A 64-year-old female developed a lesion in the pancreatic tail 24 months after neoadjuvant therapy, surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy for right-side breast cancer (ductal carcinoma. She underwent distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and left adrenalectomy, and presented an uneventful outcome. The immunohistochemical analysis on the surgical specimen suggested that the lesion originated from the breast. CONCLUSION: In cases of pancreatic lesions detected in patients with a previous history of breast neoplasm, the possibility of pancreatic metastasis should be carefully considered.

  17. Role of nutrients and mTOR signaling in the regulation of pancreatic progenitors development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda Elghazi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Poor fetal nutrition increases the risk of type 2 diabetes in the offspring at least in part by reduced embryonic β-cell growth and impaired function. However, it is not entirely clear how fetal nutrients and growth factors impact β-cells during development to alter glucose homeostasis and metabolism later in life. The current experiments aimed to test the impact of fetal nutrients and growth factors on endocrine development and how these signals acting on mTOR signaling regulate β-cell mass and glucose homeostasis. Method: Pancreatic rudiments in culture were used to study the role of glucose, growth factors, and amino acids on β-cell development. The number and proliferation of pancreatic and endocrine progenitor were assessed in the presence or absence of rapamycin. The impact of mTOR signaling in vivo on pancreas development and glucose homeostasis was assessed in models deficient for mTOR or Raptor in Pdx1 expressing pancreatic progenitors. Results: We found that amino acid concentrations, and leucine in particular, enhance the number of pancreatic and endocrine progenitors and are essential for growth factor induced proliferation. Rapamycin, an mTORC1 complex inhibitor, reduced the number and proliferation of pancreatic and endocrine progenitors. Mice lacking mTOR in pancreatic progenitors exhibited hyperglycemia in neonates, hypoinsulinemia and pancreatic agenesis/hypoplasia with pancreas rudiments containing ductal structures lacking differentiated acinar and endocrine cells. In addition, loss of mTORC1 by deletion of raptor in pancreatic progenitors reduced pancreas size with reduced number of β-cells. Conclusion: Together, these results suggest that amino acids concentrations and in particular leucine modulates growth responses of pancreatic and endocrine progenitors and that mTOR signaling is critical for these responses. Inactivation of mTOR and raptor in pancreatic progenitors suggested that alterations in some of

  18. [Pancreatic anastomosis in operative treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, E; Izbicki, J R; Bockhorn, M

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an irreversible, inflammatory process, which is characterized by progressive fibrosis of the pancreas and leads to abdominal pain, endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. Surgical therapy is indicated by the absence of pain relief and local complications. The target of the surgical approach is to relieve the pancreatic and bile ducts and resection of the fibrotic and calcified parenchyma. Drainage procedures, such as the Partington-Rochelle method, are used in patients with isolated congestion of the pancreatic duct without further organ complications, such as inflammatory processes of the pancreatic head; however, patients with CP often have an inflammatory swelling of the pancreatic head. In this case classical pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) or organ-sparing duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) with its various techniques (e.g. Beger, Frey, Bern and V‑shape) can be applied. Due to similar long-term results PD should be carried out in cases of suspicion or detection of malignancies and DPPHR for treatment of CP.

  19. [Pancreatic infringement exocrine and endocrine in cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, L; Abély, M

    2016-12-01

    The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency affects more than 80% of cystic fibrosis (CF) infants. Pancreatic insufficiency is diagnosed by low levels of fecal elastase. An optimal caloric intake, a pancreatic enzyme treatment are the keys to maintain a good nutritional status. The fat soluble vitamins supplementation will be associated with pancreatic enzymes treatment and will be adapted to plasma levels. Iron and oligo-element deficiency such as zinc is common. The pancreatic enzymes function is not optimal in the proximal bowel: the intraluminal intestinal pH is low because of the absence of bicarbonate release by the pancreas. The use of proton pump inhibitors may improve the functionality of pancreatic enzymes treatment. New therapies such as ivacaftor in patients with a G551D mutation allows a weight gain in particular by restoring intestinal pH similar to controls. Lengthening of the life expectancy of patients with CF is accompanied by the emergence new aspects of the disease, especially diabetes, favored by pancreatic cystic fibrosis resulting in an anatomical destruction of pancreatic islets. Currently, diabetes affects a third of the patients after 20 years, and half after 30 years. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a major factor of morbidity-mortality in all stages of the disease and is characterized by a preclinical phase of glucose intolerance particularly long reaching up to 10 years. Its pathophysiology combines a lack of insulin secretion, an insulin resistance secondary to chronic infection, and a decrease in the production of the GIP and GLP-1. The insulin secretion depending on the channel chlorine (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator [CFTR]) activity at the membrane surface of insulin cell is reduced prior to the occurrence of pancreatic histological lesions. At the stage of diabetes, obtaining a normoglycemia by insulin treatment began very early allows to slow the decline of lung function and nutritional status. Given the silent

  20. Imaging findings of neuroendocrine neoplasm in biliary duct with liver metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Hwa; Chung, Dong Jin; Hahn, Sung Tae; Lee, Jae Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    A 64-year-old man was transferred to our hospital because of indigestion and jaundice. The initial abdominal CT and MRI revealed a 2.0 cm enhancing mass in the proximal common bile duct (CBD) with several enlarged lymph nodes. The mass was presumed to be a cholangiocarcinoma, and a CBD segmental resection and choledochojejunostomy was performed. However, the final diagnosis was that of a mixed endocrine-exocrine carcinoma, a high-grade neuroendocrine neoplasm. Seven months after the operation, a follow-up abdominal CT study revealed multiple small arterial enhancing nodules in both hepatic lobes. A sono-guided liver biopsy confirmed these as metastastic mixed endocrine-exocrine carcinoma. This case is unique in that the imaging study regarding the neuroendocrine neoplasm of biliary duct has not been previously reported.

  1. Pancreatic cancer accompanied by a moderate-sized pseudocyst with extrapancreatic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkura, Yu; Sasaki, Kazunari; Matsuda, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Masaji; Fujii, Takeshi; Watanabe, Goro

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer accompanied by a moderate-sized pseudocyst with extrapancreatic growth is extremely rare. Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer on preoperative imaging is difficult when the pancreatic parenchyma is compressed by a pseudocyst and becomes unclear. Despite advances in imaging techniques, accurate preoperative diagnosis of cystic lesions of the pancreas remains difficult. In this case, it was challenging to diagnose pancreatic cancer preoperatively as we could not accurately assess the pancreatic parenchyma, which had been compressed by a moderate-sized cystic lesion with extrapancreatic growth. A 63-year-old woman underwent investigations for epigastric abdominal pain. She had no history of pancreatitis. Although we suspected pancreatic ductal carcinoma with a pancreatic cyst, there was no mass lesion or low-density area suggestive of pancreatic cancer. We did not immediately suspect pancreatic cancer, as development of a moderate-sized cyst with extrapancreatic growth is extremely rare and known tumor markers were not elevated. Therefore, we initially suspected that a massive benign cyst (mucinous cyst neoplasm, serous cyst neoplasm, or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm) resulted in stenosis of the main pancreatic duct. We were unable to reach a definitive diagnosis prior to the operation. We had planned a pancreaticoduodenectomy to reach a definitive diagnosis. However, we could not remove the tumor because of significant invasion of the surrounding tissue (portal vein, superior mesenteric vein, etc.). The fluid content of the cyst was serous, and aspiration cytology from the pancreatic cyst was Class III (no malignancy), but the surrounding white connective tissue samples were positive for pancreatic adenocarcinoma on pathological examination during surgery. We repeated imaging (CT, MRI, endoscopic ultrasound, etc.) postoperatively, but there were neither mass lesions nor a low-density area suggestive of pancreatic cancer. In retrospect, we think

  2. Biological similarities and differences between pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Wataru; Semba, Shuho; Sakurai, Fumiaki; Hirai, Ichiro; Ma, Jinfeng; Fuse, Akira; Maeda, Kunihiko; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2005-01-01

    Ever since the classification of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) was published, studies on the precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer have been advancing along a new directions, using standardized terminology. There are few studies that have examined the biological differences between PanIN and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) in detail. PanIN and IPMN, which are similar in morphology, were compared using various indicators, with the aim of identifying the similarities and differences between the two. A total of 46 PanINs and 37 ducts with IPMN were identified in 19 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma and 18 patients with IPMN. These PanINs and IPMNs were examined immunohistologically with respect to the expression patterns of HER2/neu, DPC4/Smad4, Akt/PKB, p53, cyclin A, Ki67, MUC1, and MUC2. Significant differences in the expression of MUC1 and MUC2 were observed between IPMNadenoma and PanIN-2 and between CIS and PanIN-3 (MUC1: p = 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively; MUC2: p = 0.002 and p Smad4, and Akt/PKB, along with progression in the process of multistage carcinogenesis. Although the expression levels of these factors reflected the grade of atypism, they did not reflect any differences in the grade of biological malignancy between IPMN and PanIN. On the other hand, MUC1 and MUC2 may serve as indicators of the direction of differentiation, i.e., either progression to IDAC or IPMN. Positivity for MUC1 was believed to suggest differentiation into IDAC, and positivity for MUC2 appeared to be indicative of differentiation into IPMN. Such indication of the direction of differentiation seemed to appear in PanIN1-2, even before abnormalities of HER2/neu, Akt/PKB, DPC4/Smad4, p53, and cyclin A expression began to be detected.

  3. Plasma protein profiling of patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas as potential precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilies, Maria; Sappa, Praveen Kumar; Iuga, Cristina Adela; Loghin, Felicia; Gesell Salazar, Manuela; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Beyer, Georg; Lerch, Markus M; Völker, Uwe; Mayerle, Julia; Hammer, Elke

    2018-02-01

    Efforts for the early diagnosis of the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have recently been driven to one of the precursor lesions, namely intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas (IPMN). Only a few studies have focused on IPMN molecular biology and its overall progression to cancer. Therefore, IPMN lacks comprehensive characterization which makes its clinical management controversial. In this study, we characterized plasma proteins in the presence of IPMNs in comparison to healthy controls, chronic pancreatitis, and PDAC by a proteomics approach using data-independent acquisition based mass spectrometry. We describe several protein sets that could aid IPMN diagnosis, but also differentiation of IPMN from healthy controls, as well as from benign and malignant diseases. Among all, high levels of carbonic anhydrases and hemoglobins were characteristic for the IPMN group. By employing ELISA based quantification we validated our results for human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase inhibitor 1 (TIMP-1). We consider IPMN management directed towards an early potential cancer development a crucial opportunity before PDAC initiation and thus its early detection and cure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hormone profiling, WHO 2010 grading, and AJCC/UICC staging in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Emilie; Cheng, Sonia; Mete, Ozgur; Serra, Stefano; Araujo, Paula B; Temple, Sara; Cleary, Sean; Gallinger, Steven; Greig, Paul D; McGilvray, Ian; Wei, Alice; Asa, Sylvia L; Ezzat, Shereen

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are the second most common pancreatic neoplasms, exhibiting a complex spectrum of clinical behaviors. To examine the clinico-pathological characteristics associated with long-term prognosis we reviewed 119 patients with pNETs treated in a tertiary referral center using the WHO 2010 grading and the American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer (AJCC/UICC) staging systems, with a median follow-up of 38 months. Tumor size, immunohistochemistry (IHC) profiling and patient characteristics-determining stage were analyzed. Primary clinical outcomes were disease progression or death. The mean age at presentation was 52 years; 55% were female patients, 11% were associated with MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia 1) or VHL (Von Hippel–Lindau); mean tumor diameter was 3.3 cm (standard deviation, SD) (2.92). The clinical presentation was incidental in 39% with endocrine hypersecretion syndromes in only 24% of cases. Nevertheless, endocrine hormone tissue immunoreactivity was identified in 67 (56.3%) cases. According to WHO 2010 grading, 50 (42%), 38 (31.9%), and 3 (2.5%) of tumors were low grade (G1), intermediate grade (G2), and high grade (G3), respectively. Disease progression occurred more frequently in higher WHO grades (G1: 6%, G2: 10.5%, G3: 67%, P = 0.026) and in more advanced AJCC stages (I: 2%, IV: 63%, P = 0.033). Shorter progression free survival (PFS) was noted in higher grades (G3 vs. G2; 21 vs. 144 months; P = 0.015) and in more advanced AJCC stages (stage I: 218 months, IV: 24 months, P < 0.001). Liver involvement (20 vs. 173 months, P < 0.001) or histologically positive lymph nodes (33 vs. 208 months, P < 0.001) were independently associated with shorter PFS. Conversely, tissue endocrine hormone immunoreactivity, independent of circulating levels was significantly associated with less aggressive disease. Age, gender, number of primary tumors, and heredity were not significantly associated with

  5. Bombesin-stimulated serum immunoreactive trypsin in the different diagnosis between endocrine and exocrine tumors of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonora, G.; De Giorgio, R.; Toni, R.; Fanti, M.P.; Cariani, G.; Vezzadini, P.

    1987-01-01

    Bombesin administration was recently found to induce a marked increase in circulating immunoreactive trypsin (IRT), whose magnitude seems to reflect the functional capacity of pancreatic acinar cell mass. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of bombesin infusion on serum IRT concentration in patients with endocrine or exocrine tumors of the pancreas. Fifteen patients with pancreatic endocrine tumor, 17 patients with pancreatic exocrine carcinoma and 15 healty subjects were investigated. Serum IRT was measured by radioimmunoassay before and for 120 minutes after the start of bombesin infusion (9 ng/kg/min over 30 min). The integrated serum IRT response to bombesin administration in patients with endocrine tumor of the pancreas did not differ significantly from controls, but were significantly higher than in patients with exocrine carcinoma. In the latter the integrated IRT responses to bombesin infusion in patients with endocrine tumor can probably be explained by small tumor size and/or little invasion of the glandular parenchyma, resulting in an undetectable impairment of exocrine pancreatic function. The very low IRT responses in patients with exocrine carcinoma could reflect the presence of severe pancreatic damage. The results suggest that this newly proposed bombesin test may be useful in the preoperative differential diagnosis between endocrine and exocrine tumors of the pancreas

  6. PET and endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.; Belhocine, T.; Hustinx, R.; Foidart-Willems, J.

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the main indications of PET examination, and specifically of 18 FDG, in the assessment of endocrine tumors: of the thyroid, of the parathyroid, of the adrenal and of the pituitary glands. Neuroendocrine tumors, gastro-entero-pancreatic or carcinoid tumors are also under the scope. Usually, the most differentiated tumors show only poor uptake of the FDG as they have a weak metabolic and proliferative activity. In the assessment of endocrine tumors, FDG-PET should be used only after most specific nuclear examinations been performed. (author)

  7. Effects of acute exercise on pancreatic endocrine function in subjects with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Sine H; Karstoft, Kristian; Winding, Kamilla

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of exercise on pancreatic endocrine responses to metabolic stimuli in type 2 diabetic (T2D) subjects and examined the influence of the diabetic status. Fourteen subjects underwent a hyperglycaemic clamp with GLP-1 infusion and arginine injection, the morning after a one.......05-P arginine (P = 0.08). The same trends were seen for low HbA1c subjects. Furthermore, exercise increased GLP-1- and arginine-stimulated insulin secretion (P diabetic......-hour walk or no exercise. Subjects were stratified by high and low quantiles of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c as well as current use/non-use of anti-diabetic medication. In the entire cohort, exercise did not alter insulin secretion, while glucagon levels were increased in all clamp phases (P 

  8. The Utilization of Imaging Features in the Management of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Palmucci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs represent a group of cystic pancreatic neoplasms with large range of clinical behaviours, ranging from low-grade dysplasia or borderline lesions to invasive carcinomas. They can be grouped into lesions originating from the main pancreatic duct, main duct IPMNs (MD-IPMNs, and lesions which arise from secondary branches of parenchyma, denominated branch-duct IPMNs (BD-IPMNs. Management of these cystic lesions is essentially based on clinical and radiological features. The latter have been very well described in the last fifteen years, with many studies published in literature showing the main radiological features of IPMNs. Currently, the goal of imaging modalities is to identify “high-risk stigmata” or “worrisome feature” in the evaluation of pancreatic cysts. Marked dilatation of the main duct (>1 cm, large size (3–5 cm, and intramural nodules have been associated with increased risk of degeneration. BD-IPMNs could be observed as microcystic or macrocystic in appearance, with or without communication with main duct. Their imaging features are frequently overlapped with cystic neoplasms. The risk of progression for secondary IPMNs is lower, and subsequently an imaging based follow-up is very often proposed for these lesions.

  9. Early versus late surgical drainage for obstructive pancreatitis in an experimental model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamme, B.; Boermeester, M. A.; Straatsburg, I. H.; van Buijtenen, J. M.; Boerma, D.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; Gouma, D. J.; van Gulik, T. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by intractable abdominal pain, and pancreatic exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. This study investigated whether early surgical drainage of pancreatic duct obstruction leads to improved recovery of pancreatic function compared with late

  10. Central pancreatectomy for benign pancreatic pathology/trauma: is it a reasonable pancreas-preserving conservative surgical strategy alternative to standard major pancreatic resection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Maria A; Rajendran, Shanmugasundaram; Balachandar, Tirupporur G; Kannan, Devy G; Jeswanth, Satyanesan; Ravichandran, Palaniappan; Surendran, Rajagopal

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the technical feasibility, safety and outcome of central pancreatectomy (CP) with pancreaticogastrostomy or pancreaticojejunostomy in appropriately selected patients with benign central pancreatic pathology/trauma. Benign lesions/trauma of the pancreatic neck and proximal body pose an interesting surgical challenge. CP is an operation that allows resection of benign tumours located in the pancreatic isthmus that are not suitable for enucleation. Between January 2000 and December 2005, eight central pancreatectomies were carried out. There were six women and two men with a mean age of 35.7 years. The cephalic pancreatic stump is oversewn and the distal stump is anastomosed end-to-end with a Roux-en-Y jejunal loop in two and with the stomach in six patients. The indications for CP were: non-functional islet cell tumours in two patients, traumatic pancreatic neck transection in two and one each for insulinoma, solid pseudopapillary tumour, splenic artery pseudoaneurysm and pseudocyst. Pancreatic exocrine function was evaluated by a questionnaire method. Endocrine function was evaluated by blood glucose level. Morbidity rate was 37.5% with no operative mortality. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 10.5 days. Neither of the patients developed pancreatic fistula nor required reoperations or interventional radiological procedures. At a mean follow up of 26.4 months, no patient had evidence of endocrine or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, all the patients were alive and well without clinical and imaging evidence of disease recurrence. When technically feasible, CP is a safe, pancreas-preserving pancreatectomy for non-enucleable benign pancreatic pathology/trauma confined to pancreatic isthmus that allows for cure of the disease without loss of substantial amount of normal pancreatic parenchyma with preservation of exocrine/endocrine function and without interruption of enteric continuity.

  11. Somatostatin receptors in gastroentero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. de Herder (Wouter); L.J. Hofland (Leo); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractFive somatostatin receptor (sst) subtype genes, sst(1), sst(2), sst(3), sst(4) and sst(5), have been cloned and characterised. The five sst subtypes all bind natural somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 with high affinity. Endocrine pancreatic and endocrine digestive

  12. Incidence and management of pancreatic leakage after pancreatoduodenectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Castro, S. M. M.; Busch, O. R. C.; van Gulik, T. M.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Optimal management of severe pancreatic leakage after pancreatoduodenectomy can reduce morbidity and mortality. Completion pancreatectomy may be adequate but leads to endocrine insufficiency. This study evaluated an alternative management strategy for pancreatic leakage. Methods: Outcome

  13. Management of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas: a comparison with standard pancreatic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Castro, S. M. M.; Singhal, D.; Aronson, D. C.; Busch, O. R. C.; van Gulik, T. M.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) of the pancreas are increasingly diagnosed, but the exact surgical management in terms of extent of the resection is not well defined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients operated on in our hospital between January 1993 and March 2005 formed the study

  14. Predictors of malignancy in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas: analysis of 310 pancreatic resection patients at multiple high-volume centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yamaue, Hiroki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamao, Kenji; Hirono, Seiko; Osanai, Manabu; Hijioka, Susumu; Hosoda, Waki; Nakamura, Yasushi; Shinohara, Toshiya; Yanagisawa, Akio

    2013-07-01

    The present study was a retrospective investigation of predictors of malignancy in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas. The subjects were 310 patients who underwent pancreatic resection at 3 high-volume centers. Preoperative laboratory and imaging findings were analyzed in logistic regression analyses. Endoscopic ultrasonography measurements were essential for the size of mural nodules, and a central review was conducted for pathological diagnosis. Pathological diagnosis was benign IPMN in 150 cases and malignant in 160 (noninvasive carcinoma, n = 100; invasive, n = 60). In multivariate analysis, size of mural nodules, diameter of main pancreatic duct, and cyst size of branch pancreatic duct were independent predictors of malignancy, and areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for these 3 factors were 0.798, 0.643, and 0.601, respectively. With 7 mm taken as the cutoff value for the size of mural nodules, the diagnosis of malignant IPMN had sensitivity of 74.3% and specificity of 72.7%. Carcinoma without nodules was present in 15 patients (15/160 [9.4%]). The size of mural nodules measured with endoscopic ultrasonography showed high predictive ability. However, about 10% of carcinoma patients did not have nodules, and the handling of the diagnosis in such cases is a problem for the future.

  15. Co-existence of chronic non-communicable diseases and common neoplasms among 2,462 endocrine adult inpatients – a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Szychta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Objective[/b]. To analyze the coexistence of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs and common neoplasms among endocrine adult inpatients. [b]Materials and method. [/b]The retrospective analysis was performed using clinical data of 2,462 adult patients (2,003 women and 459 men, hospitalized in the reference endocrine department. Diagnoses of 18 types of benign tumours and 16 types of malignant tumours, together with the most common 25 NCDs and demographic parameters, were all collected from the medical records. The most frequently found 6 types of benign tumours (of thyroid, pituitary, uterus, breast, adrenal and prostate and 4 types of malignant tumours (of thyroid, breast, prostate and uterus were taken for further statistical analyses. [b]Results[/b]. Age predicted the existence of accumulated as well as individual types of benign and malignant tumours, whereas BMI predicted the occurrence of accumulated and some individual types of benign tumours. Accumulated as well as individual types of benign and malignant tumours coexisted more frequently with several NCDs, such as diabetes, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, Graves’ disease, coronary artery disease, state after cholecystectomy, thus being disorders usually resulting from excessive exposure to harmful environmental factors. The most distinct coexistence was found between breast cancer and metabolic syndrome, between breast cancer and Graves’ disease, between cancer of the uterus and type 2 diabetes, between cancer of the uterus and metabolic syndrome, and between cancer of the uterus and dyslipidemia. [b]Conclusion.[/b] The results obtained indicate a significant relationship between the most common NCDs and several cancers in endocrine adult patients, which suggests that the prevention of the former may reduce the frequency of the latter.

  16. Pancreatic Sarcoma Mimicking Pseudocyst After Pancreatitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chi Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old female presented with abdominal pain for 3 days without trauma history. The pain was located over the epigastric area with radiation to the back. A pancreatic pseudocyst was impressed initially according to clinical symptoms, laboratory data, and image studies. However, rapid progression of the lesions was noted later after discharge. Following image studies showed circumscribed tumors in the head, body, and tail regions of the pancreas. Surgery with the Whipple operation was performed during the second admission. The post operation course was uneventful. Pathologic results showed sarcoma of the pancreas. Primary pancreatic sarcomas are extremely rare lesions accounting for < 0.1% of all pancreatic malignancies. Pancreatic sarcomas tend to be aggressive and have a poor prognosis. In addition, < 5% of pancreatic tumors are cystic. The rarest cystic neoplasm is also the primary pancreatic sarcoma, with only a few cases having been documented. However, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions.

  17. Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Peter; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Johns, Amber L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Miller, David K; Christ, Angelika N; Bruxner, Tim J C; Quinn, Michael C; Nourse, Craig; Murtaugh, L Charles; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Fink, Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Chin, Venessa; Anderson, Matthew J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wilson, Peter J; Cloonan, Nicole; Kassahn, Karin S; Taylor, Darrin; Quek, Kelly; Robertson, Alan; Pantano, Lorena; Mincarelli, Laura; Sanchez, Luis N; Evers, Lisa; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Humphris, Jeremy; Chou, Angela; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Moran-Jones, Kim; Jamieson, Nigel B; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Grützmann, Robert; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Rusev, Borislav; Capelli, Paola; Salvia, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Petersen, Gloria M; Munzy, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Karim, Saadia A; Eshleman, James R; Hruban, Ralph H; Pilarsky, Christian; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Gill, Anthony J; Gibbs, Richard A; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2016-03-03

    Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.

  18. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  19. Gene expression patterns in pancreatic tumors, cells and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anson W Lowe

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancers of the pancreas originate from both the endocrine and exocrine elements of the organ, and represent a major cause of cancer-related death. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of gene expression for pancreatic tumors, the normal pancreas, and nonneoplastic pancreatic disease.DNA microarrays were used to assess the gene expression for surgically derived pancreatic adenocarcinomas, islet cell tumors, and mesenchymal tumors. The addition of normal pancreata, isolated islets, isolated pancreatic ducts, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines enhanced subsequent analysis by increasing the diversity in gene expression profiles obtained. Exocrine, endocrine, and mesenchymal tumors displayed unique gene expression profiles. Similarities in gene expression support the pancreatic duct as the origin of adenocarcinomas. In addition, genes highly expressed in other cancers and associated with specific signal transduction pathways were also found in pancreatic tumors.The scope of the present work was enhanced by the inclusion of publicly available datasets that encompass a wide spectrum of human tissues and enabled the identification of candidate genes that may serve diagnostic and therapeutic goals.

  20. Comparison between 68Ga-DOTA-NOC and 18F-DOPA PET for the detection of gastro-entero-pancreatic and lung neuro-endocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, Valentina; Tomassetti, Paola; Castellucci, Paolo; Campana, Davide; Montini, Giancarlo; Rubello, Domenico; Nanni, Cristina; Rizzello, Anna; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    18 F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) value for the assessment of neuro-endocrine tumours (NET) is limited. Preliminary studies indicate that 18 F-DOPA and 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC are more accurate for disease assessment and 68 Ga-DOTA peptides provide additional data on receptor status that are crucial for targeted radionuclide therapy. At present, there are no comparative studies investigating their role in NET. The aim of this study was to compare 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC and 18 F-DOPA for the evaluation of gastro-entero-pancreatic and lung neuro-endocrine tumours. Thirteen patients with biopsy-proven NET (gastro-entero-pancreatic or pulmonary) were prospectively enrolled and scheduled for 18 F-DOPA and 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET. PET results obtained with both tracers were compared with each other, with other conventional diagnostic procedures (CT, ultrasound) and with follow-up (clinical, imaging). The most common primary tumour site was the pancreas (8/13) followed by the ileum (2/13), the lung (2/13) and the duodenum (1/13). The carcinoma was well differentiated in 10/13 and poorly differentiated in 3/13 cases. 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET was positive, showing at least one lesion, in 13/13 cases while 18 F-DOPA PET was positive in 9/13. On a lesions basis, 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC identified more lesions than 18 F-DOPA (71 vs 45), especially at liver, lung and lymph node level. 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC correctly identified the primary site in six of eight non-operated cases (in five cases, the primary was surgically removed before PET), while 18 F-DOPA identified the primary only in two of eight cases. Although the patients studied are few and heterogeneous, our data show that 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC is accurate for the detection of gastro-entero-pancreatic and lung neuro-endocrine tumours in either the primary or metastatic site and that it offers several advantages over 18 F-DOPA. (orig.)

  1. Comparison between 68Ga-DOTA-NOC and 18F-DOPA PET for the detection of gastro-entero-pancreatic and lung neuro-endocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Valentina; Tomassetti, Paola; Castellucci, Paolo; Campana, Davide; Montini, Giancarlo; Rubello, Domenico; Nanni, Cristina; Rizzello, Anna; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano

    2008-08-01

    (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) value for the assessment of neuro-endocrine tumours (NET) is limited. Preliminary studies indicate that (18)F-DOPA and (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC are more accurate for disease assessment and (68)Ga-DOTA peptides provide additional data on receptor status that are crucial for targeted radionuclide therapy. At present, there are no comparative studies investigating their role in NET. The aim of this study was to compare (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC and (18)F-DOPA for the evaluation of gastro-entero-pancreatic and lung neuro-endocrine tumours. Thirteen patients with biopsy-proven NET (gastro-entero-pancreatic or pulmonary) were prospectively enrolled and scheduled for (18)F-DOPA and (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC PET. PET results obtained with both tracers were compared with each other, with other conventional diagnostic procedures (CT, ultrasound) and with follow-up (clinical, imaging). The most common primary tumour site was the pancreas (8/13) followed by the ileum (2/13), the lung (2/13) and the duodenum (1/13). The carcinoma was well differentiated in 10/13 and poorly differentiated in 3/13 cases. (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC PET was positive, showing at least one lesion, in 13/13 cases while (18)F-DOPA PET was positive in 9/13. On a lesions basis, (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC identified more lesions than (18)F-DOPA (71 vs 45), especially at liver, lung and lymph node level. (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC correctly identified the primary site in six of eight non-operated cases (in five cases, the primary was surgically removed before PET), while (18)F-DOPA identified the primary only in two of eight cases. Although the patients studied are few and heterogeneous, our data show that (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC is accurate for the detection of gastro-entero-pancreatic and lung neuro-endocrine tumours in either the primary or metastatic site and that it offers several advantages over (18)F-DOPA.

  2. Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slice Culture Facilitates Long-Term Studies of Exocrine and Endocrine Cell Physiology in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Marciniak, Anja; Selck, Claudia; Friedrich, Betty; Speier, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Studies on pancreatic cell physiology rely on the investigation of exocrine and endocrine cells in vitro. Particularly, in the case of the exocrine tissue these studies have suffered from a reduced functional viability of acinar cells in culture. As a result not only investigations on dispersed acinar cells and isolated acini were limited in their potential, but also prolonged studies on pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells in an intact pancreatic tissue environment were unfeasible. To ove...

  3. The modified Puestow procedure for chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombleholme, T M; deLorimier, A A; Way, L W; Adzick, N S; Longaker, M T; Harrison, M R

    1990-07-01

    Chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children is an unusual condition that often goes undiagnosed and untreated for years. In light of recent reports in adults that endocrine and exocrine function may be preserved by early pancreaticojejunostomy, we reviewed our experience with this procedure (one Duval, 10 Puestows) in 10 children between 1969 and 1989. The underlying etiology was familial pancreatitis in four patients, one case of unknown etiology, congenital ductal anomalies in four (one pancreas divisum, one annular pancreas, one choledochal cyst, and one ductal stenosis), and posttraumatic in one. All 10 had intractable recurrent abdominal pain. Preoperatively, only three patients evidenced exocrine insufficiency and none had endocrine insufficiency. There was complete resolution of pain in eight patients and improvement in two during a mean observation period of 4 years (range, 7 months to 19.75 years). Exocrine insufficiency resolved in two patients but has persisted in the third patient now on Viokase. Endocrine insufficiency has developed during follow-up in one patient. Pancreaticojejunostomy provides excellent relief of recurrent pain in chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is indicated when the diagnosis of chronic relapsing pancreatitis is suspected to define the ductal anatomy. Pancreaticojejunostomy may prevent the progression of exocrine and endocrine insufficiency if performed early in the course of the disease.

  4. Pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology in candidates for surgical resection of branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas: should the International Consensus Guidelines be revised?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Jin Kan; Suyama, Masafumi; Kubokawa, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Sumio; Maehara, Tadayuki

    2009-03-01

    The International Consensus Guidelines are helpful for the management of branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), because they allow us to exclude malignancy. However, it is not possible to predict malignancy with certainty, and further preoperative differentiation between benign and malignant IPMNs is required to avoid the false-positive results. To examine the usefulness of pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology by using an originally designed double-lumen catheter for discriminating benign and malignant IPMNs of the branch-duct type in candidates for surgical resection based on the International Consensus Guidelines. Pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology was investigated in 24 patients with branch-duct IPMNs who underwent surgical resection based on the International Consensus Guidelines, namely, they either had intramural nodules or the ectatic branch duct was >30 mm in diameter. Single-center retrospective study. Academic medical center. The sensitivity and specificity of pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology for discriminating benign from malignant IPMNs. More than 30 mL of pancreatic-duct-lavage fluid was obtained from each patient, and there were no patients with noninformative results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the cytologic diagnosis were 78%, 93%, 88%, and 88%, respectively. Single-center and small number of patients. Pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology can improve differentiation between benign and malignant IPMNs of the branch-duct type in candidates for surgical resection based on the International Consensus Guidelines.

  5. Surgical management of neoplasms of the ampulla of Vater: Local resection or pancreatoduodenectomy and prognostic factors for survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Castro, S. M. M.; van Heek, N. T.; Kuhlmann, K. F. D.; Busch, O. R. C.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; van Gulik, T. M.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    yBackground. Neoplasms of the ampulla of Vater have a better 5-year survival than pancreatic and bile duct neoplasms after resection. This study was Performed to analyze the outcome after local resection and pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) and to identify predictive factors for survival. Methods. We used

  6. Morphological study of pancreatic duct in red jungle fowl

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-10-18

    Oct 18, 2010 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9(42), pp. 7209-7215 ... pancreatic tissues, while the endocrine units were observed frequently in the third and splenic lobes. A ... histological and histochemical features of the pancreatic.

  7. [Culture of pancreatic progenitor cells in hanging drop and on floating filter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Feng-xia; Chen, Fang; Chi, Ying; Yang, Shao-guang; Lu, Shi-hong; Han, Zhong-chao

    2013-06-01

    To construct a method to culture pancreatic progenitor cells in hanging drop and on floating filter,and to examine if pancreatic progenitor cells can differentiate into mature endocrine cells with this method. Murine embryos at day 12.5 were isolated and digested into single cells,which were then cultured in hanging drop for 24h and formed spheres.Spheres were cultured on the filter for 6 days,which floated in the dish containing medium.During culture,the expressions of pancreas duodenum homeobox-1(PDX-1)and neurogenin3(Ngn3)were determined.The expressions of endocrine and exocrine markers,insulin,glucagon,and carboxypeptidase(CPA)were determined on day 7 by immunohistochemistry.Insulin secretion of spheres stimulated by glucose was detected by ELISA.The changes of pancreatic marker expressions during culture were monitored by real-time polymerase chain reaction(PCR). One day after the culture,there were still a large amount of PDX-1 positive cells in pancreatic spheres,and these cells proliferated.On day 3,high expression of Ngn3 was detected,and the Ngn3-positive cells did not proliferate.On day 7,The expressions of endocrine and exocrine markers in the differentiated pancreatic progenitor cells were detected,which were consistent with that in vivo.Insulin was secreted by spheres upon the stimulation of glucose. In hanging drop and on floating filter,pancreatic progenitor cells can differentiate into mature endocrine cells.

  8. Physiology of the endocrine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelking, L R

    1997-11-01

    The endocrine pancreas is composed of nests of cells called the islets of Langerhans, which comprise only about 20% of pancreatic cell mass and secrete insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide. Insulin is anabolic, increasing storage of glucose, fatty acids and amino acids, while glucagon namely stimulates hepatic glycogenolysis, gluconeogenesis, and ketogenesis. Somatostatin acts as a paracrine agent to inhibit both insulin and glucagon release, and, therefore, to modulate their output. This article explores factors controlling release of these hormones, as well as the way in which they affect fuel metabolism in the whole animal.

  9. Mouse pancreas tissue slice culture facilitates long-term studies of exocrine and endocrine cell physiology in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Anja; Selck, Claudia; Friedrich, Betty; Speier, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Studies on pancreatic cell physiology rely on the investigation of exocrine and endocrine cells in vitro. Particularly, in the case of the exocrine tissue these studies have suffered from a reduced functional viability of acinar cells in culture. As a result not only investigations on dispersed acinar cells and isolated acini were limited in their potential, but also prolonged studies on pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells in an intact pancreatic tissue environment were unfeasible. To overcome these limitations, we aimed to establish a pancreas tissue slice culture platform to allow long-term studies on exocrine and endocrine cells in the intact pancreatic environment. Mouse pancreas tissue slice morphology was assessed to determine optimal long-term culture settings for intact pancreatic tissue. Utilizing optimized culture conditions, cell specificity and function of exocrine acinar cells and endocrine beta cells were characterized over a culture period of 7 days. We found pancreas tissue slices cultured under optimized conditions to have intact tissue specific morphology for the entire culture period. Amylase positive intact acini were present at all time points of culture and acinar cells displayed a typical strong cell polarity. Amylase release from pancreas tissue slices decreased during culture, but maintained the characteristic bell-shaped dose-response curve to increasing caerulein concentrations and a ca. 4-fold maximal over basal release. Additionally, endocrine beta cell viability and function was well preserved until the end of the observation period. Our results show that the tissue slice culture platform provides unprecedented maintenance of pancreatic tissue specific morphology and function over a culture period for at least 4 days and in part even up to 1 week. This analytical advancement now allows mid -to long-term studies on the cell biology of pancreatic disorder pathogenesis and therapy in an intact surrounding in situ.

  10. Mouse pancreas tissue slice culture facilitates long-term studies of exocrine and endocrine cell physiology in situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Marciniak

    Full Text Available Studies on pancreatic cell physiology rely on the investigation of exocrine and endocrine cells in vitro. Particularly, in the case of the exocrine tissue these studies have suffered from a reduced functional viability of acinar cells in culture. As a result not only investigations on dispersed acinar cells and isolated acini were limited in their potential, but also prolonged studies on pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells in an intact pancreatic tissue environment were unfeasible. To overcome these limitations, we aimed to establish a pancreas tissue slice culture platform to allow long-term studies on exocrine and endocrine cells in the intact pancreatic environment. Mouse pancreas tissue slice morphology was assessed to determine optimal long-term culture settings for intact pancreatic tissue. Utilizing optimized culture conditions, cell specificity and function of exocrine acinar cells and endocrine beta cells were characterized over a culture period of 7 days. We found pancreas tissue slices cultured under optimized conditions to have intact tissue specific morphology for the entire culture period. Amylase positive intact acini were present at all time points of culture and acinar cells displayed a typical strong cell polarity. Amylase release from pancreas tissue slices decreased during culture, but maintained the characteristic bell-shaped dose-response curve to increasing caerulein concentrations and a ca. 4-fold maximal over basal release. Additionally, endocrine beta cell viability and function was well preserved until the end of the observation period. Our results show that the tissue slice culture platform provides unprecedented maintenance of pancreatic tissue specific morphology and function over a culture period for at least 4 days and in part even up to 1 week. This analytical advancement now allows mid -to long-term studies on the cell biology of pancreatic disorder pathogenesis and therapy in an intact surrounding in situ.

  11. Reconstructing human pancreatic differentiation by mapping specific cell populations during development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramond, Cyrille; Glaser, Nicolas; Berthault, Claire

    2017-01-01

    . Endocrine maturation progresses by up-regulating SUSD2 and lowering ECAD levels. Finally, in vitro differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells mimics key in vivo events. Our work paves the way to extend our understanding of the origin of mature human pancreatic......Information remains scarce on human development compared to animal models. Here, we reconstructed human fetal pancreatic differentiation using cell surface markers. We demonstrate that at 7weeks of development, the glycoprotein 2 (GP2) marks a multipotent cell population that will differentiate...... cell types and how such lineage decisions are regulated....

  12. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-08-07

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management.

  13. Long-term Outcomes Favor Duodenum-preserving Pancreatic Head Resection over Pylorus-preserving Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Chronic Pancreatitis: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukharamwala, Prashant B; Patel, Krishen D; Teta, Anthony F; Parikh, Shailraj; Ross, Sharona B; Ryan, Carrie E; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2015-09-01

    Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) and duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) are important treatment options for patients with chronic pancreatitis. This meta-analysis was undertaken to compare the long-term outcomes of DPPHR versus PPPD in patients with chronic pancreatitis. A systematic literature search was conducted using Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane, and PubMed databases on all studies published between January 1991 and January 2013 reporting intermediate and long-term outcomes after DPPHR and PPPD for chronic pancreatitis. Long-term outcomes of interest were complete pain relief, quality of life, professional rehabilitation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency. Other outcomes of interest included perioperative morbidity and length of stay (LOS). Ten studies were included comprising of 569 patients. There was no significant difference in complete pain relief (P = 0.24), endocrine insufficiency (P = 0.15), and perioperative morbidity (P = 0.13) between DPPHR and PPPD. However, quality of life (P insufficiency (P = 0.005), and LOS (P = 0.00001) were significantly better for patients undergoing DPPHR compared with PPPD. In conclusion, there is no significant difference in endocrine insufficiency, postoperative pain relief, and perioperative morbidity for patients undergoing DPPHR versus PPPD. Improved intermediate and long-term outcomes including LOS, quality of life, professional rehabilitation, and preservation of exocrine function make DPPHR a more favorable approach than PPPD for patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Lack of Association for Reported Endocrine Pancreatic Cancer Risk Loci in the PANDoRA Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Daniele; Obazee, Ofure; Pastore, Manuela; Panzuto, Francesco; Liço, Valbona; Greenhalf, William; Katzke, Verena; Tavano, Francesca; Costello, Eithne; Corbo, Vincenzo; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Strobel, Oliver; Zambon, Carlo Federico; Neoptolemos, John P; Zerboni, Giulia; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Lombardo, Carlo; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Gioffreda, Domenica; Hackert, Thilo; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Landi, Stefano; Milanetto, Anna Caterina; Landoni, Luca; Lawlor, Rita T; Bambi, Franco; Pirozzi, Felice; Basso, Daniela; Pasquali, Claudio; Capurso, Gabriele; Canzian, Federico

    2017-08-01

    Background: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare neoplasms for which very little is known about either environmental or genetic risk factors. Only a handful of association studies have been performed so far, suggesting a small number of risk loci. Methods: To replicate the best findings, we have selected 16 SNPs suggested in previous studies to be relevant in PNET etiogenesis. We genotyped the selected SNPs (rs16944, rs1052536, rs1059293, rs1136410, rs1143634, rs2069762, rs2236302, rs2387632, rs3212961, rs3734299, rs3803258, rs4962081, rs7234941, rs7243091, rs12957119, and rs1800629) in 344 PNET sporadic cases and 2,721 controls in the context of the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. Results: After correction for multiple testing, we did not observe any statistically significant association between the SNPs and PNET risk. We also used three online bioinformatic tools (HaploReg, RegulomeDB, and GTEx) to predict a possible functional role of the SNPs, but we did not observe any clear indication. Conclusions: None of the selected SNPs were convincingly associated with PNET risk in the PANDoRA consortium. Impact: We can exclude a major role of the selected polymorphisms in PNET etiology, and this highlights the need for replication of epidemiologic findings in independent populations, especially in rare diseases such as PNETs. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1349-51. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Conservative treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhr, J-Matthias; Haas, Stephen L; Lindgren, Fredrik; Enochsson, Lars; Hedström, Aleksandra; Swahn, Fredrik; Segersvärd, Ralf; Arnelo, Urban

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease giving rise to several complications that need to be treated accordingly. Because pancreatic surgery has significant morbidity and mortality, less invasive therapy seems to be an attractive option. This paper reviews current state-of-the-art strategies to treat chronic pancreatitis without surgery and the current guidelines for the medical therapy of chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic therapy of complications of chronic pancreatitis such as pain, main pancreatic duct strictures and stones as well as pseudocysts is technically feasible and safe. The long-term outcome, however, is inferior to definitive surgical procedures such as resection or drainage. On the other hand, the medical therapy of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine insufficiency is well established and evidence based. Endoscopic therapy may be an option to bridge for surgery and in children/young adolescents and those unfit for surgery. Pain in chronic pancreatitis as well as treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency follows established guidelines. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davies, Karen

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  17. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davies, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  18. Perioperative management of endocrine insufficiency after total pancreatectomy for neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maker, Ajay V; Sheikh, Raashid; Bhagia, Vinita

    2017-09-01

    Indications for total pancreatectomy (TP) have increased, including for diffuse main duct intrapapillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas and malignancy; therefore, the need persists for surgeons to develop appropriate endocrine post-operative management strategies. The brittle diabetes after TP differs from type 1/2 diabetes in that patients have absolute deficiency of insulin and functional glucagon. This makes glucose management challenging, complicates recovery, and predisposes to hospital readmissions. This article aims to define the disease, describe the cause for its occurrence, review the anatomy of the endocrine pancreas, and explain how this condition differs from diabetes mellitus in the setting of post-operative management. The morbidity and mortality of post-TP endocrine insufficiency and practical treatment strategies are systematically reviewed from the literature. Finally, an evidence-based treatment algorithm is created for the practicing pancreatic surgeon and their care team of endocrinologists to aid in managing these complex patients. A PubMed, Science Citation Index/Social sciences Citation Index, and Cochrane Evidence-Based Medicine database search was undertaken along with extensive backward search of the references of published articles to identify studies evaluating endocrine morbidity and treatment after TP and to establish an evidence-based treatment strategy. Indications for TP and the etiology of pancreatogenic diabetes are reviewed. After TP, ~80% patients develop hypoglycemic episodes and 40% experience severe hypoglycemia, resulting in 0-8% mortality and 25-45% morbidity. Referral to a nutritionist and endocrinologist for patient education before surgery followed by surgical reevaluation to determine if the patient has the appropriate understanding, support, and resources preoperatively has significantly reduced morbidity and mortality. The use of modern recombinant long-acting insulin analogues, continuous subcutaneous insulin

  19. Assessment of a Revised Management Strategy for Patients With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms Involving the Main Pancreatic Duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Motokazu; Elliott, Irmina A; Nguyen, Andrew H; Kim, Stephen; Muthusamy, V Raman; Watson, Rabindra; Hines, O Joe; Dawson, David W; Reber, Howard A; Donahue, Timothy R

    2017-01-18

    According to the 2012 International Consensus Guidelines, the diagnostic criterion of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) involving the main duct (MD IPMNs) or the main and branch ducts (mixed IPMNs) of the pancreatic system is a main pancreatic duct (MPD) diameter of 5.0 mm or greater on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, surgical resection is recommended for patients with an MPD diameter of 10.0 mm or greater, which is characterized as a high-risk stigma. An MPD diameter of 5.0 to 9.0 mm is not an indication for immediate resection. To determine an appropriate cutoff (ie, one with high sensitivity and negative predictive value) of the MPD diameter on CT or MRI as a prognostic factor for malignant disease and to propose a new management algorithm for patients with MD or mixed IPMNs. This retrospective cohort study included 103 patients who underwent surgical resection for a preoperative diagnosis of MD or mixed IPMN and in whom IPMN was confirmed by surgical pathologic findings at a single institution from July 1, 1996, to December 31, 2015. Malignant disease was defined as high-grade dysplasia or invasive adenocarcinoma on results of surgical pathologic evaluation. An appropriate MPD diameter on preoperative CT or MRI to predict malignant disease was determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The prognostic value of the new management algorithm that incorporated the new MPD diameter cutoff was evaluated. Among the 103 patients undergoing resection for an MD or mixed IPMN (59 men [57.3%]; 44 women [42.7%]; median [range] age, 71 [48-86] years), 64 (62.1%) had malignant disease. Diagnostic accuracy for malignant neoplasms was highest at an MPD diameter cutoff of 7.2 mm (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.59-0.81). An MPD diameter of 7.2 mm or greater was also an independent prognostic factor for malignant neoplasms (odds ratio, 12.76; 95% CI, 2

  20. New developments in diagnosis and non-surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Kazuo; Yoshino, Junji; Miyoshi, Hironao; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is progressive and irreversible, leading to digestive and absorptive disorders by destruction of the exocrine pancreas and to diabetes mellitus by destruction of the endocrine pancreas. When complications such as pancreatolithiasis and pseudocyst occur, elevated pancreatic ductal pressure exacerbates pain and induces other complications, worsening the patient's general condition. Combined treatment with extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy and endoscopic lithotripsy is a useful, minimally invasive, first-line treatment approach that can preserve pancreatic exocrine function. Pancreatic duct stenosis elevates intraductal pressure and favor both pancreatolithiasis and pseudocyst formation, making effective treatment vitally important. Endoscopic treatment of benign pancreatic duct stenosis stenting frequently decreases pain in chronic pancreatitis. Importantly, stenosis of the main pancreatic duct increases risk of stone recurrence after treatment of pancreatolithiasis. Recently, good results were reported in treating pancreatic duct stricture with a fully covered self-expandable metallic stent, which shows promise for preventing stone recurrence after lithotripsy in patients with pancreatic stricture. Chronic pancreatitis has many complications including pancreatic carcinoma, pancreatic atrophy, and loss of exocrine and endocrine function, as well as frequent recurrence of stones after treatment of pancreatolithiasis. As early treatment of chronic pancreatitis is essential, the new concept of early chronic pancreatitis, including characteristics findings in endoscopic ultrasonograms, is presented. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. High Volume Washing of the Abdomen in Increasing Survival After Surgery in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-25

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Ampulla of Vater Adenocarcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma; Duodenal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm, Pancreatobiliary-Type; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

  2. Physiology of fish endocrine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plisetskaya, E M

    1989-06-01

    From the very beginning of physiological studies on the endocine pancreas, fish have been used as experimental subjects. Fish insulin was one of the first vertebrate insulins isolated and one of the first insulins whose primary and then tertiary structures were reported. Before a second pancreatic hormone, glucagon, was characterized, a physiologically active 'impurity', similar to that in mammalian insulin preparations, was found in fish insulins.Fish have become the most widely used model for studies of biosynthesis and processing of the pancreatic hormones. It seems inconceivable, therefore, that until the recent past cod and tuna insulins have been the only purified piscine islet hormones available for physiological experiments. The situation has changed remarkably during the last decade.In this review the contemporary status of physiological studies on the fish pancreas is outlined with an emphasis on the following topics: 1) contents of pancreatic peptides in plasma and in islet tissue; 2) actions of piscine pancreatic hormones in fish; 3) specific metabolic consequences of an acute insufficiency of pancreatic peptides; 4) functional interrelations among pancreatic peptides which differ from those of mammals. The pitfalls, lacunae and the perspectives of contemporary physiological studies on fish endocrine pancreas are outlined.

  3. Imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile D. Balaban

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the pancreatic parenchyma and ductal system, which leads to chronic pain, loss of endocrine and exocrine functions. Clinically, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency becomes apparent only after 90% of the parenchima has been lost. Despite the simple definition, diagnosing chronic pancreatitis remains a challenge, especially for early stage disease. Because pancreatic function tests can be normal until late stages and have significant limitations, there is an incresing interest in the role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. In this article we review the utility and accuracy of different imaging methods in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, focusing on the role of advanced imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound.

  4. Does secretin stimulation add to magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in characterising pancreatic cystic lesions as side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purysko, Andrei S.; Gandhi, Namita S.; Veniero, Joseph C.; Walsh, R.M.; Obuchowski, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the value of secretin during magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) in demonstrating communication between cystic lesions and the pancreatic duct to help determine the diagnosis of side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (SB-IPMN). This is an IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective study of 29 SB-IPMN patients and 13 non-IPMN subjects (control) who underwent secretin-enhanced MRCP (s-MRCP). Two readers blinded to the final diagnosis reviewed three randomised image sets: (1) pre-secretin HASTE, (2) dynamic s-MRCP and (3) post-secretin HASTE. Logistic regression, generalised linear models and ROC analyses were used to compare pre- and post-secretin results. There was no significant difference in median scores for the pre-secretin [reader 1: 1; reader 2: 2 (range -2 to 2)] and post-secretin HASTE [reader 1: 1; reader 2: 1 (range -2 to 2)] in the SB-IPMN group (P = 0.14), while the scores were lower for s-MRCP [reader 1: 0.5 (range -2 to 2); reader 2: 0 (range -1 to 2); P = 0.016]. There was no significant difference in mean maximum diameter of SB-IPMN on pre- and post-secretin HASTE, and s-MRCP (P > 0.05). Secretin stimulation did not add to MRCP in characterising pancreatic cystic lesions as SB-IPMN. (orig.)

  5. Endocrine pancreatic insufficiency secondary to chronic herpesvirus pancreatitis in a cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, David N; Falcon, Michelle; Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K

    2007-06-01

    A cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus) examined because of weight loss, polydipsia, and polyuria was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus based on the presence of glucosuria and marked hyperglycemia. Medical attempts to manage the diabetes mellitus were unsuccessful, and the bird was euthanatized. Histopathologic examination of the pancreas revealed a chronic active pancreatitis with herpesviral inclusions in many of the pancreatic acinar and duct cells. Psittacid herpesvirus-1 (PsHV-1) DNA was amplified from the lesion by polymerase chain reaction. Sequencing of the amplicon showed it to be the genotype 1 variant, which is most commonly associated with Pacheco's disease, an acute rapidly fatal systemic infection. The findings in this case suggest that the PsHV-1 genotype may also cause a localized disease of the pancreas. Infection with this virus should be considered as a differential diagnosis in birds with pancreatitis with or without diabetes mellitus.

  6. Risk of endocrine pancreatic insufficiency in patients receiving adjuvant chemoradiation for resected gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemici, Cengiz; Sargin, Mehmet; Uygur-Bayramicli, Oya; Mayadagli, Alpaslan; Yaprak, Gokhan; Dabak, Resat; Kocak, Mihriban

    2013-05-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy combined with 5-fluorouracil based chemotherapy has become the new standard after curative resection in high risk gastric cancer. Beside many complications due to surgery, the addition of chemotherapy and radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment may lead to both acute and late toxicities. Pancreatic tissue irradiation during this adjuvant treatment because of incidental and unavoidable inclusion of the organ within the radiation field may affect exocrine and endocrine functions of the organ. Fifty-three patients with gastric adenocarcinoma were evaluated for adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after surgery. While 37 out of 53 patients were treated postoperatively due to either serosal or adjacent organ or lymph node involvement, 16 patients without these risk factors were followed up regularly without any additional treatment and they served as the control group. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), hemoglobin A1c (HBA1c), insulin and C-peptide levels were measured in the control and study groups after the surgery and 6 months and 1 year later. At the baseline there was no difference in FBG, HbA1c, C-peptide and insulin levels between the control and the study groups. At the end of the study there was a statistically significant decline in insulin and C-peptide levels in the study group, (7.5 ± 6.0 vs 4.5 ± 4.4 IU/L, p: 0.002 and 2.3 ± 0.9 vs 1.56 ± 0.9 ng/ml, p: 0.001) respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy in gastric cancer leads to a decrease in beta cell function and insulin secretion capacity of the pancreas with possible diabetes risk. Radiation-induced pancreatic injury and late effects of radiation on normal pancreatic tissue are unknown, but pancreas is more sensitive to radiation than known. This organ should be studied extensively in order to determine the tolerance doses and it should be contoured during abdominal radiotherapy planning as an organ at risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk of endocrine pancreatic insufficiency in patients receiving adjuvant chemoradiation for resected gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemici, Cengiz; Sargin, Mehmet; Uygur-Bayramicli, Oya; Mayadagli, Alpaslan; Yaprak, Gokhan; Dabak, Resat; Kocak, Mihriban

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adjuvant radiotherapy combined with 5-fluorouracil based chemotherapy has become the new standard after curative resection in high risk gastric cancer. Beside many complications due to surgery, the addition of chemotherapy and radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment may lead to both acute and late toxicities. Pancreatic tissue irradiation during this adjuvant treatment because of incidental and unavoidable inclusion of the organ within the radiation field may affect exocrine and endocrine functions of the organ. Materials and methods: Fifty-three patients with gastric adenocarcinoma were evaluated for adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after surgery. While 37 out of 53 patients were treated postoperatively due to either serosal or adjacent organ or lymph node involvement, 16 patients without these risk factors were followed up regularly without any additional treatment and they served as the control group. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), hemoglobin A1c (HBA1c), insulin and C-peptide levels were measured in the control and study groups after the surgery and 6 months and 1 year later. Results: At the baseline there was no difference in FBG, HbA1c, C-peptide and insulin levels between the control and the study groups. At the end of the study there was a statistically significant decline in insulin and C-peptide levels in the study group, (7.5 ± 6.0 vs 4.5 ± 4.4 IU/L, p: 0.002 and 2.3 ± 0.9 vs 1.56 ± 0.9 ng/ml, p: 0.001) respectively. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy in gastric cancer leads to a decrease in beta cell function and insulin secretion capacity of the pancreas with possible diabetes risk. Radiation-induced pancreatic injury and late effects of radiation on normal pancreatic tissue are unknown, but pancreas is more sensitive to radiation than known. This organ should be studied extensively in order to determine the tolerance doses and it should be contoured during abdominal radiotherapy planning as an organ at risk

  8. A combination of molecular markers and clinical features improve the classification of pancreatic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Simeon; Wang, Yuxuan; Dal Molin, Marco; Masica, David L; Jiao, Yuchen; Kinde, Isaac; Blackford, Amanda; Raman, Siva P; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Tomita, Tyler; Niknafs, Noushin; Douville, Christopher; Ptak, Janine; Dobbyn, Lisa; Allen, Peter J; Klimstra, David S; Schattner, Mark A; Schmidt, C Max; Yip-Schneider, Michele; Cummings, Oscar W; Brand, Randall E; Zeh, Herbert J; Singhi, Aatur D; Scarpa, Aldo; Salvia, Roberto; Malleo, Giuseppe; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Falconi, Massimo; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun-Whe; Kwon, Wooil; Hong, Seung-Mo; Song, Ki-Byung; Kim, Song Cheol; Swan, Niall; Murphy, Jean; Geoghegan, Justin; Brugge, William; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Schulick, Richard; Edil, Barish H; Adsay, Volkan; Paulino, Jorge; van Hooft, Jeanin; Yachida, Shinichi; Nara, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Yamao, Kenji; Hijioka, Susuma; van der Merwe, Schalk; Goggins, Michael; Canto, Marcia Irene; Ahuja, Nita; Hirose, Kenzo; Makary, Martin; Weiss, Matthew J; Cameron, John; Pittman, Meredith; Eshleman, James R; Diaz, Luis A; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Karchin, Rachel; Hruban, Ralph H; Vogelstein, Bert; Lennon, Anne Marie

    2015-11-01

    The management of pancreatic cysts poses challenges to both patients and their physicians. We investigated whether a combination of molecular markers and clinical information could improve the classification of pancreatic cysts and management of patients. We performed a multi-center, retrospective study of 130 patients with resected pancreatic cystic neoplasms (12 serous cystadenomas, 10 solid pseudopapillary neoplasms, 12 mucinous cystic neoplasms, and 96 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms). Cyst fluid was analyzed to identify subtle mutations in genes known to be mutated in pancreatic cysts (BRAF, CDKN2A, CTNNB1, GNAS, KRAS, NRAS, PIK3CA, RNF43, SMAD4, TP53, and VHL); to identify loss of heterozygozity at CDKN2A, RNF43, SMAD4, TP53, and VHL tumor suppressor loci; and to identify aneuploidy. The analyses were performed using specialized technologies for implementing and interpreting massively parallel sequencing data acquisition. An algorithm was used to select markers that could classify cyst type and grade. The accuracy of the molecular markers was compared with that of clinical markers and a combination of molecular and clinical markers. We identified molecular markers and clinical features that classified cyst type with 90%-100% sensitivity and 92%-98% specificity. The molecular marker panel correctly identified 67 of the 74 patients who did not require surgery and could, therefore, reduce the number of unnecessary operations by 91%. We identified a panel of molecular markers and clinical features that show promise for the accurate classification of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and identification of cysts that require surgery. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CT and MR imaging findings of endocrine tumor of the pancreas according to WHO classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rha, Sung Eun; Jung, Seung Eun; Lee, Kang Hoon; Ku, Young Mi; Byun, Jae Young; Lee, Jae Mun

    2007-01-01

    The pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas originating from totipotential stem cells or differentiated mature endocrine cells within the exocrine gland. Endocrine tumors are usually classified into functioning and non-functioning tumors and presents with a range of benignity or malignancy. In this article, we present the various CT and MR imaging findings of endocrine tumors of pancreas according to recent WHO classification

  10. CCAR1 is required for Ngn3-mediated endocrine differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chung-Kuang; Lai, Yi-Chyi; Lin, Yung-Fu; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chiang, Ming-Ko

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We identify CCAR1 to directly interact with Ngn3. ► CCAR1 is co-localized with Ngn3 in the nucleus. ► CCAR1 cooperates with Ngn3 in activating NeuroD expression. ► CCAR1 is required for Ngn3-mediated PANC-1 transdifferentiation. -- Abstract: Neurogenin3 (Ngn3) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that specifies pancreatic endocrine cell fates during pancreas development. It can also initiate a transdifferentiation program when expressed in pancreatic exocrine and ductal cells. However, how Ngn3 initiates a transcriptional cascade to achieve endocrine differentiation is still poorly understood. Here, we show that cell cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1), which is a transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors, also interacts with Ngn3. The association between Ngn3 and CCAR1 was verified by pull-down assays and co-immunoprecipitation analyses. Using gene reporter assays, we found that CCAR1 is essential for Ngn3 to activate the expression of the reporter genes containing the NeuroD promoter. Moreover, down-regulation of endogenous CCAR1 in the PANC-1 pancreatic ductal cell line inhibits the transdifferentiation program initiated by Ngn3. CCAR1 is, therefore, a novel partner of Ngn3 in mediating endocrine differentiation.

  11. 10-Year-Old Female with Acute Abdominal Pain with Pancreatic Mass

    OpenAIRE

    Charles K. Powers; Molly Posa; Dhanashree Rajderkar; Jaclyn Otero

    2017-01-01

    A previously healthy 10-year-old female presented to a local emergency department following three days of nausea and vomiting diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumor. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms are a rare form of pancreatic cystic neoplasm that typically presents in young females in their 20–30s and are very rare in children. These neoplasms often present as an asymptomatic tumor found on incidental imaging. When symptomatic they most commonly present with abdominal pain and can als...

  12. Characterization of Insulin-Immunoreactive Cells and Endocrine Cells Within the Duct System of the Adult Human Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Yu, Lan; Zou, Xia; Zhao, Hailu

    2016-01-01

    The adult pancreatic duct system accommodates endocrine cells that have the potential to produce insulin. Here we report the characterization and distribution of insulin-immunoreactive cells and endocrine cells within the ductal units of adult human pancreas. Sequential pancreas sections from 12 nondiabetic adults were stained with biomarkers of ductal epithelial cells (cytokeratin 19), acinar cells (amylase), endocrine cells (chromogranin A; neuron-specific enolase), islet hormones (insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide), cell proliferation (Ki-67), and neogenesis (CD29). The number of islet hormone-immunoreactive cells increased from large ducts to the terminal branches. The insulin-producing cells outnumbered endocrine cells reactive for glucagon, somatostatin, or pancreatic polypeptide. The proportions of insulin-immunoreactive count compared with local islets (100% as a baseline) were 1.5% for the main ducts, 7.2% for interlobular ducts, 24.8% for intralobular ducts, 67.9% for intercalated ducts, and 348.9% for centroacinar cells. Both Ki-67- and CD29-labeled cells were predominantly localized in the terminal branches around the islets. The terminal branches also showed cells coexpressing islet hormones and cytokeratin 19. The adult human pancreatic ducts showed islet hormone-producing cells. The insulin-reactive cells predominantly localized in terminal branches where they may retain potential capability for β-cell neogenesis.

  13. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. Personal series and synthetic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gallucci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs are rare pancreatic tumors, accounting for less than 1-2% of all neoplasms of the pancreas. The main characteristic of IPMNs is their favorable prognosis, as these pre-malignant or malignant lesions are usually slow-growing tumors and radical surgery is frequently possible. According to the localization of the lesions, three different tumor types have been identified: the main-duct IPMN, the branch-duct IPMN and the mixed-type IPMN (involving both the main pancreatic duct and the side branches. IMPNs do not present pathognomonic signs or symptoms. The obstruction of the main pancreatic duct system may cause abdominal pain and acute pancreatitis (single or recurrent episodes. The tumor may be incidentally discovered in asymptomatic patients, particularly in those with branch-duct IPMNs. In clinical practice, any non-inflammatory cystic lesion of the pancreas should be considered as possible IPMN. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging with cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography can localize an IPMN and assess its morphology and size. The choice between non-operative and surgical management depends on the risk of malignancy and on the definitive distinction between benign and malignant IPMNs. Main-duct IPMNs have a high risk of malignant degeneration, especially in older patients. The clinical and radiological features, as well as treatment and outcome, of eight patients with IPMN (five with main-duct, two with branch-duct and one with mixed-type observed by the authors over the last ten years are presented.

  15. Somatostatin-receptor imaging in the localization of endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberts, S.W.; Bakker, W.H.; Reubi, J.C.; Krenning, E.P.

    1990-01-01

    A number of different tumors have receptors for somatostatin. We evaluated the efficacy of scanning with 123 I-labeled Tyr3-octreotide, a somatostatin analogue, for tumor localization in 42 patients with carcinoid tumors, pancreatic endocrine tumors, or paragangliomas. We then evaluated the response to octreotide therapy in some of these patients. Primary tumors or metastases, often previously unrecognized, were visualized in 12 of 13 patients with carcinoid tumors and in 7 of 9 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors. The endocrine symptoms of these patients responded well to therapy with octreotide. Among 20 patients with paragangliomas, 8 of whom had more than one tumor, 10 temporal (tympanic or jugular), 9 carotid, and 10 vagal tumors could be visualized. One small tympanic tumor and one small carotid tumor were not seen on the scan. The 123 I-labeled Tyr3-octreotide scanning technique is a rapid and safe procedure for the visualization of some tumors with somatostatin receptors. A positive scan may predict the ability of octreotide therapy to control symptoms of hormonal hypersecretion

  16. A prospective study of endoscopic ultrasonography features, cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen, and fluid cytology for the differentiation of small pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Chai, Ningli; Feng, Jia; Linghu, Enqiang

    2017-08-24

    With improvements in imaging technologies, pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) have been increasingly identified in recent years. However, the imaging modalities used to differentiate the categories of pancreatic cysts remain limited, which may cause confusion when planning treatment. Due to progress in endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) technology, auxiliary diagnosis by the detection of cystic fluid has become a recent trend. From March 2015 to April 2016, 120 patients with PCLs were enrolled in this study. According to the results of EUS, cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) analysis, and cystic fluid cytology, the patients were divided into two groups: a nonmucinous and a mucinous group. Of those, 61 patients who had undergone surgical resection were included in the analysis. The clinical features, biochemical and tumor markers of cyst fluid as well as the cytological test results of the patients were compared with histopathology results. A cyst size of 4.0 cm was used as the boundary value; a cyst ≤4.0 cm was defined as a small PCL. 87 (72.5%) lesions were ≤4.0 cm, and 33 (27.5%) lesions were >4.0 cm. Regarding the analysis of CEA and carbohydrate antigens 19-9 (CA19-9), significant differences were found between the nonmucinous and mucinous groups (P < 0.05) according to nonparametric independent samples tests. The EUS, cystic fluid CEA, and cystic fluid cytology results were compared with the tissue pathology findings using McNemar's test (P < 0.05) and showed a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 84%. A diagnostic combination of EUS, cyst fluid CEA, and cystic fluid cytology could be used to differentiate small pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Cystic fluid cytology analysis is helpful for planning treatment for pancreatic cystic tumors that pose a surgical risk.

  17. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. What do we know of their history?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Starting with Paul Langerhans, who first described pancreatic islets in 1869, this article reviews the various protagonists who, in the last century and a half, have contributed to the discovery of the main hormones originating in the pancreas, the analytical methods for their measurement, the imaging techniques for identifying tumoural location, and the various pancreatic neoplasms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  18. Occult Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Pancreatitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... KEYWORDS: Chronic pancreatitis, metabolic bone disease, osteomalacia, osteopenia ... with malabsorption, and endocrine dysfunction results in diabetes .... of insufficiency and deficiency were not assessed separately due ...

  19. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis: Indications and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Monica M; Visser, Brendan C

    2017-07-01

    There are a number of surgical strategies for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis. The optimal intervention should provide effective pain relief, improve/maintain quality of life, preserve exocrine and endocrine function, and manage local complications. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was once the standard operation for patients with chronic pancreatitis; however, other procedures such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resections and its variants have been introduced with good long-term results. Pancreatic duct drainage via a lateral pancreaticojejunostomy continues to be effective in ameliorating symptoms and expediting return to normal lifestyle in many patients. This review summarizes operative indications and gives an overview of the different surgical strategies in treating chronic pancreatitis.

  20. [Chronic pancreatitis: Retrospective review of 121 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger F, Zoltán; Mancilla A, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a rare disease in Chile, without a clear explanation for this low prevalence. To analyze the characteristics of our patients with pancreatitis. Retrospective analysis of a database of patients with pancreatitis of a clinical hospital. Morphological proof of diagnosis (calcifications/calculi, alterations of ducts, local complication or histology) was obtained for every patient. History of acute pancreatitis was recorded and exocrine-endocrine function was assessed. We retrieved information of 121 patients with pancreatitis (86 males) in a period of 20 years. The number of cases increased markedly every five years. The calculated incidence and prevalence was 0.8/100,000/year and 6/100,000, respectively. Pancreatic calcifications were initially observed in 93 patients and became evident during the follow-up in another six patients. Severe pain or local complications occurred in 27 patients, requiring surgery in 10 or endoscopic treatment in 15. During the years of follow-up, 55 patients were free of symptoms. Exocrine and endocrine insufficiency was demonstrated and treated in 81 and 67 patients, respectively. Alcoholic etiology was evident in 40% of patients. In 29% no etiology was identified. Mapuche origin was exceptional. Late diagnosis of CP is common, since most of our patients presented with advanced stages. Even though CP is increasingly diagnosed in our hospitals, the number of cases is still far fewer when compared to other countries. Underdiagnosis alone cannot explain this difference and genetic factors might be of importance.

  1. Pancreatic MRI for the surveillance of cystic neoplasms: Comparison of a short with a comprehensive imaging protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi-Mucelli, Raffaella Maria; Kartalis, Nikolaos [C1-46 Karolinska University Hospital, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet and Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Rinta-Kiikka, Irina [Tampere University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Medical Imaging Centre of Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere (Finland); Wuensche, Katharina [St. Olavs University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Trondheim (Norway); Laukkarinen, Johanna [Tampere University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere (Finland); Labori, Knut Joergen [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo (Norway); Aanonsen, Kim [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo (Norway); Verbeke, Caroline [Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Stockholm (Sweden); Del Chiaro, Marco [Karolinska University Hospital, Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet and Center for Digestive Diseases, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-01-15

    The study aims were to evaluate: (1) whether a short-protocol (SP) MRI for the surveillance of pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCN) provides equivalent clinical information as a comprehensive-protocol (CP), and (2) the cost reduction from substituting CP with SP for patient surveillance. This retrospective study included 154 consecutive patients (median age: 66, 52 % men) with working-diagnosis of PCN and available contrast-enhanced MRI/MRCP. Three radiologists evaluated independently two imaging sets (SP/CP) per patient. The CP included: T2-weighted (HASTE/MRCP), DWI and T1-weighted (chemical-shift/pre-/post-contrast) images [acquisition time (AT) ∼ 35 min], whereas the SP included: T2-weighted HASTE and T1-weighted pre-contrast images (AT ∼ 8 min). Mean values of largest cyst/main pancreatic duct diameter (D{sub C}/D{sub MPD}) were compared. Agreement regarding presence/absence of cystic/MPD mural nodules (MN{sub C}/MN{sub MPD}), inter-observer agreement and cost differences between SP/CP were calculated. For D{sub C} and D{sub MPD}, mean values with SP/CP were 21.4/21.7 mm and 3.52/3.58 mm, while mean differences SP-CP were 0.3 mm (p = 0.02) and 0.06 mm (p = 0.12), respectively. For presence/absence of MN{sub C} and MN{sub MPD}, SP/CP coincided in 93 % and 98 % of cases, respectively. Inter-observer agreement was strong for SP/CP. SP-cost was 25 % of CP-cost. For the surveillance of PCN, short-protocol MRI provides information equivalent to the more time-consuming and costly comprehensive-protocol. (orig.)

  2. Pancreatic MRI for the surveillance of cystic neoplasms: Comparison of a short with a comprehensive imaging protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzi-Mucelli, Raffaella Maria; Kartalis, Nikolaos; Rinta-Kiikka, Irina; Wuensche, Katharina; Laukkarinen, Johanna; Labori, Knut Joergen; Aanonsen, Kim; Verbeke, Caroline; Del Chiaro, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The study aims were to evaluate: (1) whether a short-protocol (SP) MRI for the surveillance of pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCN) provides equivalent clinical information as a comprehensive-protocol (CP), and (2) the cost reduction from substituting CP with SP for patient surveillance. This retrospective study included 154 consecutive patients (median age: 66, 52 % men) with working-diagnosis of PCN and available contrast-enhanced MRI/MRCP. Three radiologists evaluated independently two imaging sets (SP/CP) per patient. The CP included: T2-weighted (HASTE/MRCP), DWI and T1-weighted (chemical-shift/pre-/post-contrast) images [acquisition time (AT) ∼ 35 min], whereas the SP included: T2-weighted HASTE and T1-weighted pre-contrast images (AT ∼ 8 min). Mean values of largest cyst/main pancreatic duct diameter (D_C/D_M_P_D) were compared. Agreement regarding presence/absence of cystic/MPD mural nodules (MN_C/MN_M_P_D), inter-observer agreement and cost differences between SP/CP were calculated. For D_C and D_M_P_D, mean values with SP/CP were 21.4/21.7 mm and 3.52/3.58 mm, while mean differences SP-CP were 0.3 mm (p = 0.02) and 0.06 mm (p = 0.12), respectively. For presence/absence of MN_C and MN_M_P_D, SP/CP coincided in 93 % and 98 % of cases, respectively. Inter-observer agreement was strong for SP/CP. SP-cost was 25 % of CP-cost. For the surveillance of PCN, short-protocol MRI provides information equivalent to the more time-consuming and costly comprehensive-protocol. (orig.)

  3. Oncocytic Type Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas with Unusually Low Mucin Production Mimicking Intraductal Tubulopapillary Neoplasm: A Report of a Case Diagnosed by a Preoperative Endoscopic Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yukinari; Endo, Takao; Tanaka, Eiichi; Kikuchi, Takefumi; Akino, Kimishige; Mita, Hiroaki; Adachi, Yasuyo; Nakamura, Masahiro; Adachi, Yasushi; Ishii, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Joe; Hirano, Satoshi; Nitta, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Tomoko; Kato, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 78-year-old woman with an intraductal tumor with scant mucin production in a moderately dilated main pancreatic duct that resembled an intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm (ITPN) on imaging. An endoscopic transpapillary forceps biopsy enabled an accurate preoperative diagnosis of the tumor as an oncocytic type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas microscopically showing papillary growth consisting of oncocytic cells with a typical mucin expression profile, although with few intraepithelial lumina containing mucin. This is the first case of an oncocytic type IPMN mimicking an ITPN that was able to be diagnosed preoperatively. PMID:29021473

  4. Current radiotherapeutic approaches to pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is not a radioresistant neoplasm, as was once believed. The data now suggest that in some instances this cancer may be radiocurable. This fact seems to justify the risk of pancreatic biopsy even in the face of unresectable disease, for it is well known that many benign conditions imitate pancreatic cancer. Clinical benefit from radiation for pancreatic cancer treatment is dose related. Careful delineation of tumor margins, precision treatment planning, and precision dose delivery can minimize damage to adjacent normal tissues. Interstitial implantation and intraoperative electron beam therapy are being studied as methods of accurate dose delivery for pancreatic cancer. Fractionation studies and high LET studies are in embryonic stages. Combined modality regimens may have much to offer in terms of improved palliation and survival for patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

  5. Selection and Outcome of Portal Vein Resection in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Akimasa

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Five-year survival of pancreatic cancer after pancreatectomy is very low, and surgical resection is the only option to cure this dismal disease. The standard surgical procedure is pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic head cancer. The morbidity and especially the mortality of PD have been greatly reduced. Portal vein resection in pancreatic cancer surgery is one attempt to increase resectability and radicality, and the procedure has become safe to perform. Clinicohistopathological studies have shown that the most important indication for portal vein resection in patients with pancreatic cancer is the ability to obtain cancer-free surgical margins. Otherwise, portal vein resection is contraindicated

  6. Selection and Outcome of Portal Vein Resection in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Akimasa [Department of Surgery II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2010-11-24

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Five-year survival of pancreatic cancer after pancreatectomy is very low, and surgical resection is the only option to cure this dismal disease. The standard surgical procedure is pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic head cancer. The morbidity and especially the mortality of PD have been greatly reduced. Portal vein resection in pancreatic cancer surgery is one attempt to increase resectability and radicality, and the procedure has become safe to perform. Clinicohistopathological studies have shown that the most important indication for portal vein resection in patients with pancreatic cancer is the ability to obtain cancer-free surgical margins. Otherwise, portal vein resection is contraindicated.

  7. Radiological imaging of endocrine diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneton, J.N.

    1999-01-01

    Imaging studies are playing an increasingly role in the evaluation of endocrine diseases; accordingly, familiarity with the specific indications for the various modalities, and with the characteristic findings, is essential. This multi-author work, which is intended for both radiologists and endocrinologists, considers the role of all the recent imaging techniques, including ultrasound (particular color Doppler), computed tomography, MRI, and scintigraphy. Following an extensive introduction on the pituitary, subsequent chapters discuss in detail the normal anatomy and pathology of the female and male reproductive systems. Remaining chapters provide state-of-the-art data on the thyroid, parathyroids, pancreatic endocrine tumors, adrenal glands, hormonal tumors (carcinoids and MEN), and imaging of the complications of hormone therapy. (orig.)

  8. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound imaging of pancreatic cystic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Onofrio, M., E-mail: mirko.donofrio@univr.it [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Gallotti, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Salvia, R. [Department of Surgery, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Capelli, P. [Department of Pathology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Mucelli, R. Pozzi [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ARFI ultrasound imaging with Virtual Touch tissue quantification in studying pancreatic cystic lesions, compared with phantom fluid models. Materials and methods: Different phantom fluids at different viscosity or density (water, iodinate contrast agent, and oil) were evaluated by two independent operators. From September to December 2008, 23 pancreatic cystic lesions were prospectively studied. All lesions were pathologically confirmed. Results: Non-numerical values on water and numerical values on other phantoms were obtained. Inter-observer evaluation revealed a perfect correlation (rs = 1.00; p < 0.0001) between all measurements achieved by both operators per each balloon and fluid. Among the pancreatic cystic lesions, 14 mucinous cystadenomas, 4 pseudocysts, 3 intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms and 2 serous cystadenomas were studied. The values obtained ranged from XXXX/0-4,85 m/s in mucinous cystadenomas, from XXXX/0-3,11 m/s in pseudocysts, from XXXX/0-4,57 m/s in intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms. In serous cystadenomas all values measured were XXXX/0 m/s. Diagnostic accuracy in benign and non-benign differentiation of pancreatic cystic lesions was 78%. Conclusions: Virtual Touch tissue quantification can be applied in the analysis of fluids and is potentially able to differentiate more complex (mucinous) from simple (serous) content in studying pancreatic cystic lesions.

  9. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound imaging of pancreatic cystic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Onofrio, M.; Gallotti, A.; Salvia, R.; Capelli, P.; Mucelli, R. Pozzi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the ARFI ultrasound imaging with Virtual Touch tissue quantification in studying pancreatic cystic lesions, compared with phantom fluid models. Materials and methods: Different phantom fluids at different viscosity or density (water, iodinate contrast agent, and oil) were evaluated by two independent operators. From September to December 2008, 23 pancreatic cystic lesions were prospectively studied. All lesions were pathologically confirmed. Results: Non-numerical values on water and numerical values on other phantoms were obtained. Inter-observer evaluation revealed a perfect correlation (rs = 1.00; p < 0.0001) between all measurements achieved by both operators per each balloon and fluid. Among the pancreatic cystic lesions, 14 mucinous cystadenomas, 4 pseudocysts, 3 intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms and 2 serous cystadenomas were studied. The values obtained ranged from XXXX/0-4,85 m/s in mucinous cystadenomas, from XXXX/0-3,11 m/s in pseudocysts, from XXXX/0-4,57 m/s in intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms. In serous cystadenomas all values measured were XXXX/0 m/s. Diagnostic accuracy in benign and non-benign differentiation of pancreatic cystic lesions was 78%. Conclusions: Virtual Touch tissue quantification can be applied in the analysis of fluids and is potentially able to differentiate more complex (mucinous) from simple (serous) content in studying pancreatic cystic lesions.

  10. Surgical treatment of pancreas divisum causing chronic pancreatitis: the outcome benefits of duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, W; Rau, B M; Poch, B; Beger, H G

    2005-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) represents a duct anomaly in the pancreatic head ducts, leading frequently leading to recurrent acute pancreatitis (rAP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). Based on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, pancreas divisum can be found in 1% to 6% of patients with pancreatitis. The correlation of this abnormality with pancreatic disease is an issue of continuing controversy. Because of the underlying duct anomalies and major pathomorphological changes in the pancreatic head, duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) offers an option for causal treatment. Thirty-six patients with pancreatitis caused by PD were treated surgically. Thirty patients suffered from CP, 6 from rAP. The mean duration of the disease was 47.5 and 49.8 months, respectively. The age at the time of surgery was 39.2 years in the CP group, and 27.6 years in the rAP group. Median hospitalization since diagnosis was 18.8 weeks for CP patients and 24.6 weeks for rAP patients. Previous procedures performed in these patients included endoscopic papillotomy (30%), duct stenting (14%), and surgical treatment (17%). The median preoperative pain score was 8 on a visual analog scale. According to the classification of pancreas divisum, 10 patients demonstrated a complete PD, 25 had a functionally incomplete PD, and 1 had a dorsal duct type. The pain status as well as the endocrine (oral glucose tolerance test) and exocrine (pancreolauryl test) function were evaluated preoperatively and early and late postoperatively with a median follow-up time of 39.3 months. There was no operative-related mortality. The follow-up was 100%; 4 patients died (1 from suicide, 1 from cardiac arrest, and 2 from cancer of the esophagus). Fifty percent of the patients were completely pain-free, 31% had a significant reduction of pain with a median pain score of 2 (P pancreatitis with a need for hospitalization. DPPHR reduced pain and preserved the endocrine function in the majority of patients

  11. Quality of life and functional outcome after resection of pancreatic cystic neoplasm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gaag, Niels A.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Sprangers, Mirjam A.; Busch, Olivier R. C.; Bruno, Marco J.; de Castro, Steve M.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Gouma, Dirk J.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the long-term quality of life (QOL) after the resection of a primary pancreatic cyst and to determine predictors of outcome. Secondary outcomes were pancreatic function and survival. One hundred eight consecutive patients, who underwent resection between

  12. Prognostic value of CT findings to predict survival outcomes in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single institutional study of 161 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Kyung Won; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ki Byung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha [Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Seung-Mo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT to predict recurrence-free and overall survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). Between January 2004 and December 2012, 161 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative triphasic CT and surgical resection with curative intent for PanNENs were identified. The tumour consistency, margin, presence of calcification, pancreatic duct dilatation, bile duct dilatation, vascular invasion, and hepatic metastases were evaluated. The tumour size, arterial enhancement ratio, and portal enhancement ratio were measured. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the association between CT features and recurrence-free survival and overall survival. By multivariate analysis, tumour size (>3 cm) (hazard ratio, 3.314; p = 0.006), portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 2.718; p = 0.006), and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.374; p = 0.003) were independent significant variables for worse recurrence-free survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 5.951; p = 0.001) and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.122; p = 0.021) were independent significant variables for worse overall survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) and hepatic metastases assessed on CT were common independent prognostic factors for worse recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with PanNENs. (orig.)

  13. Prognostic value of CT findings to predict survival outcomes in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single institutional study of 161 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Kyung Won; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon; Song, Ki Byung; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Hong, Seung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT to predict recurrence-free and overall survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). Between January 2004 and December 2012, 161 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative triphasic CT and surgical resection with curative intent for PanNENs were identified. The tumour consistency, margin, presence of calcification, pancreatic duct dilatation, bile duct dilatation, vascular invasion, and hepatic metastases were evaluated. The tumour size, arterial enhancement ratio, and portal enhancement ratio were measured. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the association between CT features and recurrence-free survival and overall survival. By multivariate analysis, tumour size (>3 cm) (hazard ratio, 3.314; p = 0.006), portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 2.718; p = 0.006), and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.374; p = 0.003) were independent significant variables for worse recurrence-free survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 5.951; p = 0.001) and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.122; p = 0.021) were independent significant variables for worse overall survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) and hepatic metastases assessed on CT were common independent prognostic factors for worse recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with PanNENs. (orig.)

  14. Relationship of visfatin level to pancreatic endocrine hormone level, HOMA-IR index, and HOMA β-cell index in overweight women who performed hydraulic resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Chang Ho; Swearingin, Brenda; Jeon, Yong Kyun

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the correlation of visfatin level to pancreatic endocrine hormone level, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, and HOMA β-cell index in hydraulic resistance exercise. Furthermore, it investigated the relationship between visfatin level and other variables affected by exercise in overweight women. [Subjects and Methods] The exercise group trained for 12 weeks, 70 minutes/day, 5 days/week. Visfatin level, pancreatic endocrine hormone level, HOMA-IR index, and HOMA β-cell index were measured before and after the intervention. Based on the blood insulin and glucose concentrations, HOMA-IR index, the indicator of insulin resistance, and HOMA β-cell index, the indicator of insulin secretion level, were assessed. [Results] Interaction effects on visfatin level, insulin level, HOMA-IR index, and HOMA β-cell index were observed. Interaction effects on glucagon and glucose levels were not observed between the intervention groups. The correlations of visfatin level to insulin, glucagon, and glucose levels, and HOMA-IR and HOMA β-cell indexes were not significant for any of the subjects. [Conclusion] Therefore, the 12-week resistance exercise affected body composition, visfatin level, insulin level, HOMA-IR index, and HOMA β-cell index. Finally, visfatin was not related to insulin, glucagon, and glucose levels, and HOMA-IR and HOMA β-cell indexes.

  15. Regeneration of pancreatic non-β endocrine cells in adult mice following a single diabetes-inducing dose of streptozotocin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqing Zhang

    Full Text Available The non-β endocrine cells in pancreatic islets play an essential counterpart and regulatory role to the insulin-producing β-cells in the regulation of blood-glucose homeostasis. While significant progress has been made towards the understanding of β-cell regeneration in adults, very little is known about the regeneration of the non-β endocrine cells such as glucagon-producing α-cells and somatostatin producing δ-cells. Previous studies have noted the increase of α-cell composition in diabetes patients and in animal models. It is thus our hypothesis that non-β-cells such as α-cells and δ-cells in adults can regenerate, and that the regeneration accelerates in diabetic conditions. To test this hypothesis, we examined islet cell composition in a streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes mouse model in detail. Our data showed the number of α-cells in each islet increased following STZ-mediated β-cell destruction, peaked at Day 6, which was about 3 times that of normal islets. In addition, we found δ-cell numbers doubled by Day 6 following STZ treatment. These data suggest α- and δ-cell regeneration occurred rapidly following a single diabetes-inducing dose of STZ in mice. Using in vivo BrdU labeling techniques, we demonstrated α- and δ-cell regeneration involved cell proliferation. Co-staining of the islets with the proliferating cell marker Ki67 showed α- and δ-cells could replicate, suggesting self-duplication played a role in their regeneration. Furthermore, Pdx1(+/Insulin(- cells were detected following STZ treatment, indicating the involvement of endocrine progenitor cells in the regeneration of these non-β cells. This is further confirmed by the detection of Pdx1(+/glucagon(+ cells and Pdx1(+/somatostatin(+ cells following STZ treatment. Taken together, our study demonstrated adult α- and δ-cells could regenerate, and both self-duplication and regeneration from endocrine precursor cells were involved in their regeneration.

  16. Rare presentation of pancreatic schwannoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tofigh Arash

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Schwannoma is a rare tumor among pancreatic neoplasms. Schwannomas vary in size, and most of them are cystic, mimicking pancreatic cystic lesions. Generally, a definitive diagnosis is made at the time of histological analysis. The mainstay treatment is surgical resection. Case presentation We report an unusual presentation of pancreatic schwannoma with abdominal pain and several episodes of cholangitis in a 54-year-old Caucasian (Iranian man. The condition was not diagnosed pre-operatively and Whipple's procedure was performed. Conclusion Pancreatic schwannoma is an important clinical entity to include in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. Pre-operative diagnosis is difficult but computed tomographic findings may be helpful. The tumor may also have atypical and rare presentations, such as cholangitis and weight loss. For benign tumors, simple enucleation is usually adequate, whereas malignant tumors require standard oncological resection.

  17. CT in pancreatic involvement of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, L.; Schurawitzki, H.; Mallek, R.; Mostbeck, G.

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate characteristic CT features of primary pancreatic involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scans of 10 patients were reviewed retrospectively and compared to 50 patients with histologically proved different neoplasms of the pancreas. Setting the correct diagnosis of NHL would be essential for planning of treatment and prognosis. CT findings of NHL were characteristic but not specific. Nevertheless, the presence of a homogeneous pancreatic mass with a diameter of 7 cm or more, infiltrating surrounding tissue accompanied by retroperitoneal and/or mesenteric lymphadenopathy strongly suggests NHL. CT-guided needle biopsy can help to establish the diagnosis of pancreatic NHL. (orig.)

  18. CT in pancreatic involvement of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, L.; Schurawitzki, H.; Mallek, R.; Mostbeck, G. (Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-03-01

    In an attempt to evaluate characteristic CT features of primary pancreatic involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scans of 10 patients were reviewed retrospectively and compared to 50 patients with histologically proved different neoplasms of the pancreas. Setting the correct diagnosis of NHL would be essential for planning of treatment and prognosis. CT findings of NHL were characteristic but not specific. Nevertheless, the presence of a homogeneous pancreatic mass with a diameter of 7 cm or more, infiltrating surrounding tissue accompanied by retroperitoneal and/or mesenteric lymphadenopathy strongly suggests NHL. CT-guided needle biopsy can help to establish the diagnosis of pancreatic NHL. (orig.).

  19. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

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    Mössner Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2, the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

  20. Contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Lakshmanan, Ramesh Kumar; Sonik, Bhavay; Padmavathy, Rajagopalan; Gunaseelan, Rajamani Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is a rare pancreatic tumor with low malignant potential. It occurs characteristically more often in young women. Radiological and pathological studies have revealed that the tumor is quite different from other pancreatic tumors. Limited information is available in the literature reporting their accumulation of fluorine- 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Here, we report a case of pancreatic SPN imaged with contrast-enhanced FDG PET/CT. A percutaneous fine needle aspiration from the metabolically active lesion revealed SPN, and it was confirmed with histopathological results. Recurrence or metastasis was not found after 7 months of follow-up

  1. Does a family history of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and cyst size influence the follow-up strategy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandai, Koichiro; Uno, Koji; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) family history and PDAC development in patients followed up for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) and to assess the cyst size relevance in determining follow-up strategies. We analyzed 300 patients with branch duct and mixed-type IPMN who were followed up at our facility. Among the patients aged 70 years or older, the frequency of PDAC did not differ significantly between those with 1 first-degree relative with PDAC and those without a family history. Although patients with IPMNs of greater than or equal to 30 mm were followed up for a significantly shorter duration than those patients with IPMNs of less than 30 mm, the frequency of IPMN progression and malignant IPMN was significantly greater in the former. The frequency of IPMN progression and pancreatic cancer did not differ significantly according to IPMN size (family history. Special attention should be paid to IPMN progression and malignant transformation in patients with IPMNs of greater than or equal to 30 mm, but cyst size need not be considered when determining follow-up strategies for patients with IPMNs of less than 30 mm without mural nodules.

  2. Indications and results of pancreatic stump duct occlusion after duodenopancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Sergio; Quero, Giuseppe; Rosa, Fausto; Di Miceli, Dario; Tortorelli, Antonio Pio; Doglietto, Giovanni Battista

    2016-09-01

    Severe post-operative complications after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) are largely due to pancreatic fistula onset. The occlusion of the main pancreatic duct using synthetic glue may prevent these complications. Aim of this study is to describe this technique and to report short- and long-term results as well as the post-operative endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. Two hundred and four patients who underwent PD with occlusion of the main pancreatic duct in a period of 15 years were retrospectively analyzed. Post-operative complications and their management were the main aim of the study with particular focus on pancreatic fistula incidence and its treatment. At 1-year follow-up endocrine and exocrine functions were analyzed. We observed a 54 % pancreatic fistula incidence, most of which (77/204 patients) were a grade A fistula with little change in medical management. Twenty-eight patients developed a grade B fistula while only 2 % of patients (5/204) developed a grade C fistula. Nine patients required re-operation, 5 of whom had a post-operative grade C fistula. Post-operative mortality was 3.4 %. At 1-year follow-up, 31 % of patients developed a post-operative diabetes while exocrine insufficiency was encountered in 88 % of patients. The occlusion of the main pancreatic duct after PD can be considered a relatively safe and easy-to-perform procedure. It should be reserved to selected patients, especially in case of soft pancreatic texture and small pancreatic duct and in elderly patients with comorbidities, in whom pancreatic fistula-related complications could be life threatening.

  3. Chronic pancreatitis: review and update of etiology, risk factors, and management [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Pham

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a syndrome involving inflammation, fibrosis, and loss of acinar and islet cells which can manifest in unrelenting abdominal pain, malnutrition, and exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. The Toxic-Metabolic, Idiopathic, Genetic, Autoimmune, Recurrent and Severe Acute Pancreatitis, Obstructive (TIGAR-O classification system categorizes known causes and factors that contribute to chronic pancreatitis. Although determining disease etiology provides a framework for focused and specific treatments, chronic pancreatitis remains a challenging condition to treat owing to the often refractory, centrally mediated pain and the lack of consensus regarding when endoscopic therapy and surgery are indicated. Further complications incurred include both exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency, pseudocyst formation, bile duct obstruction, and pancreatic cancer. Medical treatment of chronic pancreatitis involves controlling pain, addressing malnutrition via the treatment of vitamin and mineral deficiencies and recognizing the risk of osteoporosis, and administering appropriate pancreatic enzyme supplementation and diabetic agents. Cornerstones in treatment include the recognition of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and administration of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, support to cease smoking and alcohol consumption, consultation with a dietitian, and a systematic follow-up to assure optimal treatment effect.

  4. Duodenum-Preserving Resection of the Pancreatic Head versus Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis with Enlargement of the Pancreatic Head: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of this meta-analysis show that DPPHR should be established as first-line treatment because of lower level of severe early postoperative complications, maintenance of endocrine pancreatic functions, shortening of postoperative hospitalization time, and increase of quality of life compared to pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  5. Bicaudal C1 promotes pancreatic NEUROG3+ endocrine progenitor differentiation and ductal morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemaire, Laurence A; Goulley, Joan; Kim, Yung Hae

    2015-01-01

    that line the ducts during development, and in the ducts after birth, but not in differentiated endocrine or acinar cells. Genetic inactivation of Bicc1 leads to ductal cell over-proliferation and cyst formation. Transcriptome comparison between WT and Bicc1 KO pancreata, before the phenotype onset, reveals......(+) endocrine progenitor production. Its deletion leads to a late but sustained endocrine progenitor decrease, resulting in a 50% reduction of endocrine cells. We show that BICC1 functions downstream of ONECUT1 in the pathway controlling both NEUROG3(+) endocrine cell production and ductal morphogenesis...

  6. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetic patients: prevalence, mechanisms, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piciucchi, Matteo; Capurso, Gabriele; Archibugi, Livia; Delle Fave, Martina Maria; Capasso, Marina; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Pancreas is a doubled-entity organ, with both an exocrine and an endocrine component, reciprocally interacting in a composed system whose function is relevant for digestion, absorption, and homeostasis of nutrients. Thus, it is not surprising that disorders of the exocrine pancreas also affect the endocrine system and vice versa. It is well-known that patients with chronic pancreatitis develop a peculiar form of diabetes (type III), caused by destruction and fibrotic injury of islet cells. However, less is known on the influence of diabetes on pancreatic exocrine function. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) has been reported to be common in diabetics, with a prevalence widely ranging, in different studies, in both type I (25-74%) and type II (28-54%) diabetes. A long disease duration, high insulin requirement, and poor glycemic control seem to be risk factors for PEI occurrence. The impact of pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy on glycemic, insulin, and incretins profiles has not been fully elucidated. The present paper is aimed at reviewing published studies investigating the prevalence of PEI in diabetic patients and factors associated with its occurrence.

  7. Effects of pancreatic intraductal injection of a radioisotope in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devonec, M.; Faure, J.L.; Blanc-Brunat, N.; Dubernard, J.M.; Traeger, J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects on exocrine and endocrine pancreatic functions of local irradiation by the intraductal injection of Rhenium 186 were investigated as an alternative to neoprene for exocrine secretion suppression. The results indicate that Rhenium 186 irradiation suppressed exocrine secretion of the pancreas while conserving the endocrine function. Although some edema and fibrosis were observed, the effects were not excessive

  8. Abdominal tuberculosis with periportal lymph node involvement mimicking pancreatic malignancy in an immunocompetent adolescent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Park, Su-Eun [Pusan National University, Department of Pediatrics, Pusan National University Children' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Woo; Lee, Jun Woo [Pusan National University, Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Abdominal tuberculosis manifesting as isolated lymphadenopathy is rare, particularly in children. Tuberculous involvement of the pancreatic head and peripancreatic area can simulate a neoplasm of the pancreatic head. To our knowledge, obstructive jaundice caused by tuberculous lymphadenopathy has not been reported in children or adolescents. Here we present radiologic findings in a case of tuberculous lymphadenopathy that mimicked malignancy of the pancreatic head and caused obstructive jaundice in an immunocompetent adolescent. (orig.)

  9. Abdominal tuberculosis with periportal lymph node involvement mimicking pancreatic malignancy in an immunocompetent adolescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Park, Su-Eun; Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Woo; Lee, Jun Woo

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal tuberculosis manifesting as isolated lymphadenopathy is rare, particularly in children. Tuberculous involvement of the pancreatic head and peripancreatic area can simulate a neoplasm of the pancreatic head. To our knowledge, obstructive jaundice caused by tuberculous lymphadenopathy has not been reported in children or adolescents. Here we present radiologic findings in a case of tuberculous lymphadenopathy that mimicked malignancy of the pancreatic head and caused obstructive jaundice in an immunocompetent adolescent. (orig.)

  10. [Physiology and disease of the endocrine function of the pancreas (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbe, P

    1980-12-01

    Qualitative and quantitative immunocytochemistry, electronmicroscopy and radio-immuno-assays led to the discovery of 5 pancreatic polypeptide hormones under physiological conditions. The active endocrine cells and the produced hormones are termed A, B, D, D1, and PP cell and glucagon, insulin, somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) respectively. Beside the physiology of secretion and action a survey of pathological conditions in the paediatric age group is given. Insulin is the most important of pancreatic hormones in childhood. Therefore diagnosis and treatment of hyperinsulinism are described in extension.

  11. Indications for surgical resection of benign pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isenmann, R.; Henne-Bruns, D.

    2008-01-01

    Benign pancreatic tumors should undergo surgical resection when they are symptomatic or - in the case of incidental discovery - bear malignant potential. This is the case for the majority of benign pancreatic tumors, especially for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms or mucinous cystic adenomas. In addition, resection is indicated for all tumors where preoperative diagnostic fails to provide an exact classification. Several different operative techniques are available. The treatment of choice depends on the localization of the tumor, its size and on whether there is evidence of malignant transformation. Partial duodenopancreatectomy is the oncological treatment of choice for tumors of the pancreatic head whereas for tumors of the pancreatic tail a left-sided pancreatectomy is appropriate. Middle pancreatectomy or duodenum-preserving resection of the pancreatic head is not a radical oncologic procedure. They should only be performed in cases of tumors without malignant potential. (orig.) [de

  12. COMPARING THE ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY COST IN POST PANCREATECTOMY PATIENTS DUE TO PANCREATIC TUMOR AND CHRONIC PANCREATITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Anna Victoria; Pedroso, Martha Regina; Herman, Paulo; Montagnini, André Luis

    2016-01-01

    Among late postoperative complications of pancreatectomy are the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiencies. The presence of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency imposes, as standard treatment, pancreatic enzyme replacement. Patients with chronic pancreatitis, with intractable pain or any complications with surgical treatment, are likely to present exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or have this condition worsened requiring adequate dose of pancreatic enzymes. The aim of this study is to compare the required dose of pancreatic enzyme and the enzyme replacement cost in post pancreatectomy patients with and without chronic pancreatitis. Observational cross-sectional study. In the first half of 2015 patients treated at the clinic of the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery at Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, who underwent pancreatectomy for at least 6 months and in use of enzyme replacement therapy were included in this series. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of chronic pancreatitis prior to pancreatic surgery. For this study, Ptreatment was R$ 2150.5 ± 729.39; R$ 2118.18 ± 731.02 in patients without pancreatitis and R$ 2217.74 ± 736.30 in patients with pancreatitis. There was no statistically significant difference in the cost of treatment of enzyme replacement post pancreatectomy in patients with or without chronic pancreatitis prior to surgical indication.

  13. Diffusion-weighted imaging in characterization of cystic pancreatic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrasegaran, K., E-mail: ksandras@iupui.edu [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Akisik, F.M.; Patel, A.A.; Rydberg, M. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Cramer, H.M.; Agaram, N.P. [Department of Pathology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Schmidt, C.M. [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Aim: To evaluate whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can characterize or predict the malignant potential of cystic pancreatic lesions. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) database over a 2-year period revealed 136 patients with cystic pancreatic lesions. Patients with DWI studies and histological confirmation of cystic mass were included. In patients with known pancreatitis, lesions with amylase content of >1000 IU/l that resolved on subsequent scans were included as pseudocysts. ADC of cystic lesions was measured by two independent reviewers. These values were then compared to categorize these lesions as benign or malignant using conventional MRI sequences. Results: Seventy lesions were analysed: adenocarcinoma (n = 4), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN; n = 28), mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN; n = 9), serous cystadenoma (n = 16), and pseudocysts (n = 13). There was no difference between ADC values of malignant and non-malignant lesions (p = 0.06), between mucinous and serous tumours (p = 0.12), or between IPMN and MCN (p = 0.42). ADC values for low-grade IPMN were significantly higher than those for high-grade or invasive IPMN (p = 0.03). Conclusion: ADC values may be helpful in deciding the malignant potential of IPMN. However, they are not useful in differentiating malignant from benign lesions or for characterizing cystic pancreatic lesions.

  14. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Huangying

    2016-01-01

    Gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms (g-NENs) are a group of heterogeneous tumors arising from the endocrine cells of stomach. Most g-NENs progresses slowly and have a long disease course; however, some other g-NENs grow rapidly, similar to the progression of gastric adenocarcinoma. g-NENs have complex and diverse clinical manifestations and their prognosis and treatment strategies depend highly on clinical subtype, pathological grade, tumour stage, and other factors. Due to their low prevalence,...

  15. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  16. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: Evidence-Based Report on Diagnostic Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L.; Lee, Linda S.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Miller, Frank H.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Levy, Michael J.; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G.; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Philip P.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Vege, Santhi S.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed and evidence based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; S-survey, T-tomography, E-endoscopy and P-pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a non-invasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Futhermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (T-toxic, I-idiopathic, G-genetic, A- autoimmune, R-recurrent and O-obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria) and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multi-center research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves. PMID:25333398

  17. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: evidence-based report on diagnostic guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L; Lee, Linda S; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S; Miller, Frank H; Mortele, Koenraad J; Levy, Michael J; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Phillip P; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U; Forsmark, Christopher E; Vege, Santhi S

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed, and evidence-based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable, or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; survey, tomography, endoscopy, and pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a noninvasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false-positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Furthermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (toxic, idiopathic, genetic, autoimmune, recurrent, and obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria), and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multicenter research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves.

  18. Pancreatic cyst development: insights from von Hippel-Lindau disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Asselt Sophie J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic cysts are a heterogeneous group of lesions, which can be benign or malignant. Due to improved imaging techniques, physicians are more often confronted with pancreatic cysts. Little is known about the origin of pancreatic cysts in general. Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease is an atypical ciliopathy and inherited tumor syndrome, caused by a mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene encoding the VHL protein (pVHL. VHL patients are prone to develop cysts and neuroendocrine tumors in the pancreas in addition to several other benign and malignant neoplasms. Remarkably, pancreatic cysts occur in approximately 70% of VHL patients, making it the only hereditary tumor syndrome with such a discernible expression of pancreatic cysts. Cellular loss of pVHL due to biallelic mutation can model pancreatic cystogenesis in other organisms, suggesting a causal relationship. Here, we give a comprehensive overview of various pVHL functions, focusing on those that can potentially explain pancreatic cyst development in VHL disease. Based on preclinical studies, cilia loss in ductal cells is probably an important early event in pancreatic cyst development.

  19. Functional and morphological changes in pancreatic remnant after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wen-Liang; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Chen, Tien-Hua; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Tai, Ling-Chen; Wu, Chew-Wun; Lui, Wing-Yiu

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency has been reported to be more common in pancreaticogastrostomy (PG) than in pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ) after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). This study aimed to evaluate the long-term outcome after PD between these 2 groups. We evaluated the long-term functional status of 42 surviving patients diagnosed with periampullary lesions who underwent PJ or PG after PD and followed up for more than 1 year. Among these, 23 patients underwent PJ and 19 patients underwent PG. To compare the 2 groups, we analyzed the (1) pancreatic exocrine insufficiency by questioning the presence or absence of steatorrhea, (2) pancreatic endocrine function by measuring glycohemoglobin A1c, fasting blood glucose, and history of new-onset diabetes, (3) nutritional status by measuring serum total protein, albumin, cholesterol, and triglyceride, (4) gastric emptying time, (5) panendoscopic findings, (6) changes of pancreatic duct diameter by computed tomography, and (7) relaparotomy rate. The mean follow-up time for PG and PJ were 37 +/- 23 and 103 +/- 52 months, respectively (P pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and 11.9% had new-onset diabetes. There was no significant difference between PJ and PG groups. A significantly improved postoperative nutritional state regarding serum total protein and albumin were noticed in both groups. There was no significant difference in terms of gastric emptying time, positive panendoscopic findings, and changes in pancreatic duct diameter. The pancreatic remnant-related relaparotomy rate was higher in the PJ group as compared with the PG group (17.4% vs 0%; P = 0.056). There is no significant difference in pancreatic exocrine or endocrine insufficiency, gastric emptying time, and positive panendoscopic findings between PJ and PG. Pancreaticojejunostomy was associated with a higher pancreatic remnant-related relaparotomy rate; however, because of a shorter follow-up in the PG group, a continuous long-term follow-up is still

  20. 10-Year-Old Female with Acute Abdominal Pain with Pancreatic Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles K. Powers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 10-year-old female presented to a local emergency department following three days of nausea and vomiting diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumor. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms are a rare form of pancreatic cystic neoplasm that typically presents in young females in their 20–30s and are very rare in children. These neoplasms often present as an asymptomatic tumor found on incidental imaging. When symptomatic they most commonly present with abdominal pain and can also cause a palpable abdominal mass, weight loss, gastrointestinal obstruction, and nausea and vomiting. Timely diagnosis of this rare neoplasm is very important because complete resection of the tumor is the definitive treatment and leads to an excellent long-term survival.

  1. Pancreatic Serous Cystadenoma with Compression of the Main Pancreatic Duct: An Unusual Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Truant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Serous cystadenoma is a common benign neoplasm that can be managed without surgery in asymptomatic patients provided that the diagnosis is certain. We describe a patient, whose pancreatic cyst exhibited a radiological appearance distinct from that of typical serous cystadenoma, resulting in diagnostic difficulties. CT and MRI showed a 10 cm-polycystic tumor with upstream dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (MPD, suggestive of intraductal papillary mucinous tumor (IPMT. Ultrasonographic aspect and EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration gave arguments for serous cystadenoma. ERCP showed a communication between cysts and the dilated MPD, compatible with IPMT. The patient underwent left pancreatectomy with splenectomy. Pathological examination concluded in a serous cystadenoma, with only a ductal obstruction causing proximal dilatation.

  2. Predictive factors for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy with pancreaticogastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Hayashidani, Yasuo; Sudo, Takeshi; Ohge, Hiroki; Sueda, Taijiro

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) with pancreaticogastrostomy (PG). A (13)C-labeled mixed triglyceride breath test was performed in 61 patients after PD to assess exocrine pancreatic function. Percent (13)CO(2) cumulative dose at 7 h pancreatic insufficiency. Abdominal computed tomography scans were utilized to assess the dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (MPD dilatation) in the remnant. Thirty-eight of 61 patients (62.3%) were diagnosed with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Univariate analysis identified significant associations between two preoperative factors (preoperative impaired endocrine function and a hard pancreatic texture induced by preexisting obstructive pancreatitis), plus one postoperative factor (MPD dilatation caused by PG stricture) and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (P pancreatic insufficiency after PD may be partly explainable by preexisting obstructive pancreatitis prior to surgery, surgeons desiring to obtain better postoperative exocrine pancreatic function after PD would be well-advised to devote considerable attention to preventing PG stricture.

  3. A case control study of possible additional risk factors for chronic alcoholic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Vengadesh Gopal; Ashley Solomon; Jaahnavi Konidala

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterised by irreversible damage to pancreas leading to endocrine and exocrine insufficiency with considerable morbidity. Etiopathogenesis is multifactorial with interplay between genetics and environmental toxins. Alcoholism is more commonly associated with chronic pancreatitis. But it is not very clear why only certain proportion of the alcoholics develop pancreatitis. So this study was conducted to find the possible additional risk factors inv...

  4. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and serum nutritional markers after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Tepes, Bojan; Makuc, Jana; Rudolf, Sasa; Zaletel, Jelka; Vidmar, Tjasa; Seruga, Maja; Birsa, Bostjan

    2014-12-28

    To investigate impairment and clinical significance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in patients after acute pancreatitis (AP). Patients with AP were invited to participate in the study. Severity of AP was determined by the Atlanta classification and definitions revised in 2012. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed by the concentration of fecal elastase-1. An additional work-up, including laboratory testing of serum nutritional markers for determination of malnutrition, was offered to all patients with low levels of fecal elastase-1 FE. Hemoglobin A1c or oral glucose tolerance tests were also performed in patients without prior diabetes mellitus, and type 3c diabetes mellitus (T3cDM) was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. One hundred patients were included in the study: 75% (75/100) of patients had one attack of AP and 25% (25/100) had two or more attacks. The most common etiology was alcohol. Mild, moderately severe and severe AP were present in 67, 15 and 18% of patients, respectively. The mean time from attack of AP to inclusion in the study was 2.7 years. PEI was diagnosed in 21% (21/100) of patients and T3cDM in 14% (14/100) of patients. In all patients with PEI, at least one serologic nutritional marker was below the lower limit of normal. T3cDM was more frequently present in patients with severe AP (P = 0.031), but was also present in some patients with mild and moderately severe AP. PEI was present in all degrees of severity of AP. There were no statistically significantly differences according to gender, etiology and number of AP attacks. As exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop after AP, routine follow-up of patients is necessary, for which serum nutritional panel measurements can be useful.

  5. Surgical therapy in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, C P; Dennison, A R; Garcea, G

    2012-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas which causes chronic pain, as well as exocrine and endocrine failure in the majority of patients, together producing social and domestic upheaval and a very poor quality of life. At least half of patients will require surgical intervention at some stage in their disease, primarily for the treatment of persistent pain. Available data have now confirmed that surgical intervention may produce superior results to conservative and endoscopic treatment. Comprehensive individual patient assessment is crucial to optimal surgical management, however, in order to determine which morphological disease variant (large duct disease, distal stricture with focal disease, expanded head or small duct/minimal change disease) is present in the individual patient, as a wide and differing range of surgical approaches are possible depending upon the specific abnormality within the gland. This review comprehensively assesses the evidence for these differing approaches to surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis. Surgical drainage procedures should be limited to a small number of patients with a dilated duct and no pancreatic head mass. Similarly, a small population presenting with a focal stricture and tail only disease may be successfully treated by distal pancreatectomy. Long-term results of both of these procedure types are poor, however. More impressive results have been yielded for the surgical treatment of the expanded head, for which a range of surgical options now exist. Evidence from level I studies and a recent meta-analysis suggests that duodenum-preserving resections offer benefits compared to pancreaticoduodenectomy, though the results of the ongoing, multicentre ChroPac trial are awaited to confirm this. Further data are also needed to determine which of the duodenum-preserving procedures provides optimal results. In relation to small duct/minimal change disease total pancreatectomy represents the only

  6. Secretin-stimulated MRI characterization of pancreatic morphology and function in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Adnan; Olesen, Søren Schou; Haldorsen, Ingfrid Salvesen; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by abnormal pancreatic morphology and impaired endocrine and exocrine function. However, little is known about the relationship between pancreatic morphology and function, and also the association with the etiology and clinical manifestations of CP. The aim was to explore pancreatic morphology and function with advanced MRI in patients with CP and healthy controls (HC) METHODS: Eighty-two patients with CP and 22 HC were enrolled in the study. Morphological imaging parameters included pancreatic main duct diameter, gland volume, fat signal fraction and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Functional secretin-stimulated MRI (s-MRI) parameters included pancreatic secretion (bowel fluid volume) and changes in pancreatic ADC value before and after secretin stimulation. Patients were classified according to the modified Cambridge and M-ANNHEIM classification system and fecal elastase was collected. All imaging parameters differentiated CP patients from HC; however, correlations between morphological and functional parameters in CP were weak. Patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic etiology had comparable s-MRI findings. Fecal elastase was positively correlated to pancreatic gland volume (r = 0.68, P = 0.0016) and negatively correlated to Cambridge classification (r = -0.35, P pancreatic gland volume was significantly decreased in the severe stages of CP (P = 0.001). S-MRI provides detailed information about pancreatic morphology and function and represents a promising non-invasive imaging method to characterize pancreatic pathophysiology and may enable monitoring of disease progression in patients with CP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Tumors of the endocrine/neuroendocrine system: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, R A; Nesland, J M

    1994-01-01

    For the sake of discussion, the markedly diversified tumors of the endocrine/neuroendocrine system are classified as those originating in classic epithelial endocrine organs (eg, adrenal cortical adenomas), from the diffuse endocrine cells (eg, jejunal carcinoid tumors), or from clusters of these cells (eg, islet cell tumors); and those arising from neurosecretory neurons (eg, neuroblastoma) or paraganglia (eg, carotid body tumor). Although traditional transmission electron microscopy is useful for identifying neurosecretory or endosecretory granules as such, with few exceptions (eg, insulin-containing granules with a complex paracrystalline core) it is not possible to ascribe a granule type (size, shape, or ultrastructure) to a distinct nosologic entity or secretory product because of their overlapping fine structures in different cell types. Immunoelectron microscopy methods utilizing colloidal gold-labeled secondary antibodies can be used to localize virtually any antigen (peptide or neuroamine) to a specific neurosecretory or endosecretory granule or other cell structure. General endocrine/neuroendocrine cell markers such as neuron-specific enolase, the chromogranins, and synaptophysin are useful in identifying neuroendocrine differentiation in a neoplasm using routine immunohistochemical procedures. The current relevance of the APUD concept of Pearse as well as the biologic importance of endocrine/neuroendocrine secretory products such as bombesin and insulinlike growth factors also are discussed.

  8. COMPARING THE ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY COST IN POST PANCREATECTOMY PATIENTS DUE TO PANCREATIC TUMOR AND CHRONIC PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Victoria FRAGOSO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - Among late postoperative complications of pancreatectomy are the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiencies. The presence of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency imposes, as standard treatment, pancreatic enzyme replacement. Patients with chronic pancreatitis, with intractable pain or any complications with surgical treatment, are likely to present exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or have this condition worsened requiring adequate dose of pancreatic enzymes. Objective - The aim of this study is to compare the required dose of pancreatic enzyme and the enzyme replacement cost in post pancreatectomy patients with and without chronic pancreatitis. Methods - Observational cross-sectional study. In the first half of 2015 patients treated at the clinic of the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery at Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, who underwent pancreatectomy for at least 6 months and in use of enzyme replacement therapy were included in this series. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of chronic pancreatitis prior to pancreatic surgery. For this study, P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results - The annual cost of the treatment was R$ 2150.5 ± 729.39; R$ 2118.18 ± 731.02 in patients without pancreatitis and R$ 2217.74 ± 736.30 in patients with pancreatitis. Conclusion - There was no statistically significant difference in the cost of treatment of enzyme replacement post pancreatectomy in patients with or without chronic pancreatitis prior to surgical indication.

  9. Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency in Diabetic Patients: Prevalence, Mechanisms, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Piciucchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreas is a doubled-entity organ, with both an exocrine and an endocrine component, reciprocally interacting in a composed system whose function is relevant for digestion, absorption, and homeostasis of nutrients. Thus, it is not surprising that disorders of the exocrine pancreas also affect the endocrine system and vice versa. It is well-known that patients with chronic pancreatitis develop a peculiar form of diabetes (type III, caused by destruction and fibrotic injury of islet cells. However, less is known on the influence of diabetes on pancreatic exocrine function. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI has been reported to be common in diabetics, with a prevalence widely ranging, in different studies, in both type I (25–74% and type II (28–54% diabetes. A long disease duration, high insulin requirement, and poor glycemic control seem to be risk factors for PEI occurrence. The impact of pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy on glycemic, insulin, and incretins profiles has not been fully elucidated. The present paper is aimed at reviewing published studies investigating the prevalence of PEI in diabetic patients and factors associated with its occurrence.

  10. Islet Cells Serve as Cells of Origin of Pancreatic Gastrin-Positive Endocrine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Jaafar, Rami

    2015-01-01

    The cells of origin of pancreatic gastrinomas remain an enigma, since no gastrin-expressing cells are found in the normal adult pancreas. It was proposed that the cellular origin of pancreatic gastrinomas may come from either the pancreatic cells themselves or gastrin-expressing cells which have ...

  11. Long non-coding RNAs as regulators of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Marko; Lodish, Harvey F; Sun, Lei

    2015-03-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse group of RNAs that are often lineage-specific and that regulate multiple biological functions. Many are nuclear and are essential parts of ribonucleoprotein complexes that modify chromatin segments and establish active or repressive chromatin states; others are cytosolic and regulate the stability of mRNA or act as microRNA sponges. This Review summarizes the current knowledge of lncRNAs as regulators of the endocrine system, with a focus on the identification and mode of action of several endocrine-important lncRNAs. We highlight lncRNAs that have a role in the development and function of pancreatic β cells, white and brown adipose tissue, and other endocrine organs, and discuss the involvement of these molecules in endocrine dysfunction (for example, diabetes mellitus). We also address the associations of lncRNAs with nuclear receptors involved in major hormonal signalling pathways, such as estrogen and androgen receptors, and the relevance of these associations in certain endocrine cancers.

  12. Prospective assessment of the influence of pancreatic cancer resection on exocrine pancreatic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkens, E C M; Cahen, D L; de Wit, J; Looman, C W N; van Eijck, C; Bruno, M J

    2014-01-01

    Exocrine insufficiency frequently develops in patients with pancreatic cancer owing to tumour ingrowth and pancreatic duct obstruction. Surgery might restore this function by removing the primary disease and restoring duct patency, but it may also have the opposite effect, as a result of resection of functional parenchyma and anatomical changes. This study evaluated the course of pancreatic function, before and after pancreatic resection. This prospective cohort study included patients with tumours in the pancreatic region requiring pancreatic resection in a tertiary referral centre between March 2010 and August 2012. Starting before surgery, exocrine function was determined monthly by measuring faecal elastase 1 levels (normal value over 0.200 µg per g faeces). Endocrine function, steatorrhoea-related symptoms and bodyweight were also evaluated before and after surgery. Subjects were followed from diagnosis until 6 months after surgery, or until death. Twenty-nine patients were included, 12 with pancreatic cancer, 14 with ampullary carcinoma and three with bile duct carcinoma (median tumour size 2.6 cm). Twenty-six patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy and three distal pancreatectomy. Thirteen patients had exocrine insufficiency at preoperative diagnosis. After a median follow-up of 6 months, this had increased to 24 patients. Diabetes was present in seven patients at diagnosis, and developed in one additional patient within 1 month after surgery. Most patients with tumours in the pancreatic region requiring pancreatic resection either had exocrine insufficiency at diagnosis or became exocrine-insufficient soon after surgical resection. © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Nutrition treatment of deficiency and malnutrition in chronic pancreatitis: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2010-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis results in exocrine and endocrine dysfunction, affecting normal digestion and absorption of nutrients. In individuals with chronic pancreatitis, nutrition status may be further affected by poor dietary intake, often related to alcoholism. However, some deficiencies may be overlooked, potentially leading to nutrition-related problems with bone health and fatigue. The aim of this article is to describe the deficiencies that occur and to propose an evidence-based algorithm for the nutrition assessment and treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Endocrine system on chip for a diabetes treatment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dao Thi Thuy; van Noort, Danny; Jeong, In-Kyung; Park, Sungsu

    2017-02-21

    The endocrine system is a collection of glands producing hormones which, among others, regulates metabolism, growth and development. One important group of endocrine diseases is diabetes, which is caused by a deficiency or diminished effectiveness of endogenous insulin. By using a microfluidic perfused 3D cell-culture chip, we developed an 'endocrine system on chip' to potentially be able to screen drugs for the treatment of diabetes by measuring insulin release over time. Insulin-secreting β-cells are located in the pancreas, while L-cells, located in the small intestines, stimulate insulin secretion. Thus, we constructed a co-culture of intestinal-pancreatic cells to measure the effect of glucose on the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from the L-cell line (GLUTag) and insulin from the pancreatic β-cell line (INS-1). After three days of culture, both cell lines formed aggregates, exhibited 3D cell morphology, and showed good viability (>95%). We separately measured the dynamic profile of GLP-1 and insulin release at glucose concentrations of 0.5 and 20 mM, as well as the combined effect of GLP-1 on insulin production at these glucose concentrations. In response to glucose stimuli, GLUTag and INS-1 cells produced higher amounts of GLP-1 and insulin, respectively, compared to a static 2D cell culture. INS-1 combined with GLUTag cells exhibited an even higher insulin production in response to glucose stimulation. At higher glucose concentrations, the diabetes model on chip showed faster saturation of the insulin level. Our results suggest that the endocrine system developed in this study is a useful tool for observing dynamical changes in endocrine hormones (GLP-1 and insulin) in a glucose-dependent environment. Moreover, it can potentially be used to screen GLP-1 analogues and natural insulin and GLP-1 stimulants for diabetes treatment.

  15. Benign Tumors of the Pancreas-Radical Surgery Versus Parenchyma-Sparing Local Resection-the Challenge Facing Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Hans G

    2018-03-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy and left-sided pancreatectomy are the surgical treatment standards for tumors of the pancreas. Surgeons, who are requested to treat patients with benign tumors, using standard oncological resections, face the challenge of sacrificing pancreatic and extra-pancreatic tissue. Tumor enucleation, pancreatic middle segment resection and local, duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resections are surgical procedures increasingly used as alternative treatment modalities compared to classical pancreatic resections. Use of local resection procedures for cystic neoplasms and neuro-endocrine tumors of the pancreas (panNETs) is associated with an improvement of procedure-related morbidity, when compared to classical Whipple OP (PD) and left-sided pancreatectomy (LP). The procedure-related advantages are a 90-day mortality below 1% and a low level of POPF B+C rates. Most importantly, the long-term benefits of the use of local surgical procedures are the preservation of the endocrine and exocrine pancreatic functions. PD performed for benign tumors on preoperative normo-glycemic patients is followed by the postoperative development of new onset of diabetes mellitus (NODM) in 4 to 24% of patients, measured by fasting blood glucose and/or oral/intravenous glucose tolerance test, according to the criteria of the international consensus guidelines. Persistence of new diabetes mellitus during the long-term follow-up after PD for benign tumors is observed in 14.5% of cases and after surgery for malignant tumors in 15.5%. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after PD is found in the long-term follow-up for benign tumors in 25% and for malignant tumors in 49%. Following LP, 14-31% of patients experience postoperatively NODM; many of the patients subsequently change to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The decision-making for cystic neoplasms and panNETs of the pancreas should be guided by the low surgical risk and the preservation of pancreatic metabolic

  16. A case report of mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas treated with S-1 chemotherapy: Does it work or induce endocrine differentiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokode, Masataka; Itai, Ryosuke; Yamashita, Yukimasa; Zen, Yoh

    2017-11-01

    Acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) and mixed acinar-endocrine carcinomas (MAECs) of the pancreas are rare, accounting for only 1% of pancreatic tumors. Although both typically present at an advanced stage, chemotherapeutic regimes have not yet been standardized. A 65-year-old man presented with a large mass in the pancreatic tail with multiple liver metastases. He was initially treated with gemcitabine for suspected ductal carcinoma of the pancreas, but no response was observed. S-1, administered as second-line chemotherapy, showed an approximately 38% reduction in the size of the primary tumor and metastatic deposits with therapeutic effects being maintained for 12 months. When the tumor progressed again, he underwent a percutaneous liver biopsy, which led to the diagnosis of MAEC. Combination therapy with cisplatin and etoposide targeting the endocrine component was administered, and this was based on the endocrine component potentially being less sensitive to S-1 than the ACC element. However, therapy was stopped due to the development of neutropenia, and the patient is currently receiving best supportive care. Given the previous studies suggested that S-1 is more effective for ACCs than gemcitabine, MAECs may also respond to S-1 chemotherapy, similar to ACCs. Another potential interpretation is that S-1 was effective when the condition was ACC, and eventually showed decreased effectiveness when the condition shifted to MAEC. Future studies are needed to conclude whether S-1 chemotherapy truly works against MAECs or induces endocrine differentiation in ACCs as a part of the drug-resistance process.

  17. EUS – Fine- Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNAB in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalogeraki Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solid masses of the pancreas represent a variety of benign and malignant neoplasms of the exocrine and endocrine tissues of the pancreas. A tissue diagnosis is often required to direct therapy in the face of uncertain diagnosis or if the patient is not a surgical candidate either due to advanced disease or comorbidities. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS is a relatively new technology that employs endoscopy and high-frequency ultrasound (US. EUS involves imaging of the pancreatic head and the uncinate from the duodenum and imaging of the body and tail from the stomach. It has been shown to be a highly sensitive method for the detection of pancreatic masses. It is superior to extracorporeal US and computed tomographic (CT scans, especially when the pancreatic tumor is smaller than 2-3 cm. Although EUS is highly sensitive in detecting pancreatic solid masses, its ability to differentiate between inflammatory masses and malignant disease is limited. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP brushing, CT-guided biopsies, and transabdominal ultrasound (US have been the standard nonsurgical methods for obtaining a tissue diagnosis of pancreatic lesions, but a substantial false-negative rate has been reported. Transabdominal US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNAB has been used for tissue diagnosis in patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma. It has been shown to be highly specific, with no false-positive diagnoses. With the advent of curvilinear echoendoscopes, transgastric and transduodenal EUS-FNAB of the pancreas have become a reality EUS with FNAB has revolutionized the ability to diagnose and stage cancers of the gastrointestinal tract and assess the pancreas. Gastrointestinal cancers can be looked at with EUS and their depth of penetration into the intestinal wall can be determined. Any suspicious appearing lymph nodes can be biopsied using EUS/FNAB. The pancreas is another organ that is well visualized with EUS. Abnormalities

  18. Diagnosis of pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bautz, W.; Skalej, M.; Kalender, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on CT scanners with continuously rotating measurement systems enable volume scanning of a body section when used with continuous patient transport (spiral CT). Because of its relatively small volume, the complete pancreas can be scanned in a single breathhold. For pancreatic examinations, 1 continuous, 1- second scans with a table feed of 10 mm/sec were obtained on a Siemens SOMATOM Plus. Contrast material (50 mL) was power injected immediately before the start of measurements. CT images were reconstructed from the volume data set at 2-mm intervals. Fifty-six patients with pancreatitis, carcinoma or metastases of the pancreas; endocrine-active tumors; or Echinococcus were examined with both conventional and spiral CT

  19. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  20. Cystic degeneration of neuro endocrine tumor of pancreas and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) or islet cell tumors are rare lesions, the incidence of which is estimated to be less than 1 per 100,000 person-years in the general population . PETs can be divided into functional (exhibit a distinct clinical syndrome due to hormone hypersecretion) and non-functional tumors. The majority ...

  1. Plasticity of adult human pancreatic duct cells by neurogenin3-mediated reprogramming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Swales

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Duct cells isolated from adult human pancreas can be reprogrammed to express islet beta cell genes by adenoviral transduction of the developmental transcription factor neurogenin3 (Ngn3. In this study we aimed to fully characterize the extent of this reprogramming and intended to improve it. METHODS: The extent of the Ngn3-mediated duct-to-endocrine cell reprogramming was measured employing genome wide mRNA profiling. By modulation of the Delta-Notch signaling or addition of pancreatic endocrine transcription factors Myt1, MafA and Pdx1 we intended to improve the reprogramming. RESULTS: Ngn3 stimulates duct cells to express a focused set of genes that are characteristic for islet endocrine cells and/or neural tissues. This neuro-endocrine shift however, is incomplete with less than 10% of full duct-to-endocrine reprogramming achieved. Transduction of exogenous Ngn3 activates endogenous Ngn3 suggesting auto-activation of this gene. Furthermore, pancreatic endocrine reprogramming of human duct cells can be moderately enhanced by inhibition of Delta-Notch signaling as well as by co-expressing the transcription factor Myt1, but not MafA and Pdx1. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The results provide further insight into the plasticity of adult human duct cells and suggest measurable routes to enhance Ngn3-mediated in vitro reprogramming protocols for regenerative beta cell therapy in diabetes.

  2. Road Accident due to a Pancreatic Insulinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Amilcare; Desiderio, Jacopo; Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Trastulli, Stefano; Barberini, Francesco; Corsi, Alessia; Cacurri, Alban; Renzi, Claudio; Anastasio, Fabio; Battista, Francesca; Pucci, Giacomo; Noya, Giuseppe; Schillaci, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Insulinoma is a rare pancreatic endocrine tumor, typically sporadic and solitary. Although the Whipple triad, consisting of hypoglycemia, neuroglycopenic symptoms, and symptoms relief with glucose administration, is often present, the diagnosis may be challenging when symptoms are less typical. We report a case of road accident due to an episode of loss of consciousness in a patient with pancreatic insulinoma. In the previous months, the patient had occasionally reported nonspecific symptoms. During hospitalization, endocrine examinations were compatible with an insulin-producing tumor. Abdominal computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging allowed us to identify and localize the tumor. The patient underwent a robotic distal pancreatectomy with partial omentectomy and splenectomy. Insulin-producing tumors may go undetected for a long period due to nonspecific clinical symptoms, and may cause episodes of loss of consciousness with potentially lethal consequences. Robot-assisted procedures can be performed with the same techniques of the traditional surgery, reducing surgical trauma, intraoperative blood loss, and hospital stays. PMID:25816027

  3. Intraductal mucin-hypersecreting neoplasm of the pancreas : US, CT and ERP findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Yeol

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate US, CT and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) findings of intraductal mucin-hypersecreting neoplasm(IMHN). We categorized an IMHN as belonging to a group of disease that can be clinically detected by the pooling of mucus produced by tumors inside the main duct or branch ducts of the pancreas, thus causing dilatation of these ducts. We retrospectively reviewed the US, CT and ERP findings of five patients(hyperplasia, 4;adenocarcinoma, 1). On US and/or CT, diffuse dilatation of the main pancreatic duct was demonstrated in five patients. In two cystic lesions corresponding to cystic dilatation of branch ducts were noted at the pancreatic head(n=1) and neck(n=1). In one patient, multiple cystic lesions were seen on CT along the entire pancreas, but these were not detected on US. In all patients, dilatation of the main duct and /or its branch ducts was seen on ERP. Filling defects resulting from mucin in the main duct or branch ducts were noted in all cases. Lymphadenopathy was not seen on US or CT, but carcinoma peritonei was found in the adenocarcinoma patient at the time of operation. IMHN usually shows smooth, diffuse dilatation of the main duct, and on US or CT, dilated branch ducts are occasionally noted. ERP findings are the most characteristic and conclusive;dilatation of the main duct and/or branch ducts is noted, with a filling defect corresponding to mucin. If overlooked during diagnosis, an IMHN might be interpreted simply as chronic pancreatitis, and so the recognition of this neoplasm is important

  4. The Current Role of Venous Sampling in the Localization of Endocrine Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Jeshen H. G.; Drake, William; Matson, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    Endocrine venous sampling plays a specific role in the diagnosis of endocrine disorders. In this article, we cover inferior petrosal sinus sampling, selective parathyroid venous sampling, hepatic venous sampling with arterial stimulation, adrenal venous sampling, and ovarian venous sampling. We review their indications and the scientific evidence justifying these indications in the diagnosis and management of Cushing's syndrome, hyperparathyroidism, pancreatic endocrine tumors, Conn's syndrome, primary hyperaldosteronism, pheochromocytomas, and androgen-secreting ovarian tumors. For each sampling technique, we compare its diagnostic accuracy with that of other imaging techniques and, where possible, look at how it impacts patient management. Finally, we incorporate venous sampling into diagnostic algorithms used at our institution

  5. Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm size using CT volumetry, spherical and ellipsoid formulas: validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalian, Hamid; Seyal, Adeel Rahim; Rezai, Pedram; Töre, Hüseyin Gürkan; Miller, Frank H; Bentrem, David J; Yaghmai, Vahid

    2014-01-10

    The accuracy for determining pancreatic cyst volume with commonly used spherical and ellipsoid methods is unknown. The role of CT volumetry in volumetric assessment of pancreatic cysts needs to be explored. To compare volumes of the pancreatic cysts by CT volumetry, spherical and ellipsoid methods and determine their accuracy by correlating with actual volume as determined by EUS-guided aspiration. Setting This is a retrospective analysis performed at a tertiary care center. Patients Seventy-eight pathologically proven pancreatic cysts evaluated with CT and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) were included. Design The volume of fourteen cysts that had been fully aspirated by EUS was compared to CT volumetry and the routinely used methods (ellipsoid and spherical volume). Two independent observers measured all cysts using commercially available software to evaluate inter-observer reproducibility for CT volumetry. The volume of pancreatic cysts as determined by various methods was compared using repeated measures analysis of variance. Bland-Altman plot and intraclass correlation coefficient were used to determine mean difference and correlation between observers and methods. The error was calculated as the percentage of the difference between the CT estimated volumes and the aspirated volume divided by the aspirated one. CT volumetry was comparable to aspirated volume (P=0.396) with very high intraclass correlation (r=0.891, Pvolumetry. There was excellent inter-observer correlation in volumetry of the entire cohort (r=0.997, Pvolumetry is accurate and reproducible. Ellipsoid and spherical volume overestimate the true volume of pancreatic cysts.

  6. A solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas in a man presenting with acute pancreatitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Chikuie

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We report a man with a small SPN of the pancreas presenting with acute pancreatitis and mimicking pancreatic cancer. We should be aware that this rare pancreatic tumor can become a cause of acute pancreatitis.

  7. Endocrine pancreatic development: impact of obesity and diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline F O'Dowd

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic development, multipotent endodermal cells differentiate to form the pancreas. Islet cell clusters arising from the pancreatic bud form the acini tissue and exocrine ducts whilst pancreatic islets form around the edges of the clusters. The successive steps of islet differentiation are controlled by a complex network of transcription factors and signals that influence cell differentiation, growth and lineage. A Westernised lifestyle has led to an increased consumption of a high saturated fat diet, and an increase in maternal obesity. The developing fetus is highly sensitive to the intrauterine environment, therefore any alteration in maternal nutrition during gestation and lactation which affects the in-utero environment during the key developmental phases of the pancreas may change the factors controlling β-cell development and β-cell mass. Whilst the molecular mechanisms behind the adaptive programming of β-cells are still poorly understood it is established that changes arising from maternal obesity and/or over-nutrition may affect the ability to maintain fetal β-cell mass resulting in an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in adulthood.

  8. A novel distinguishing system for the diagnosis of malignant pancreatic cystic neoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xiaoyong, E-mail: shanlixinc@163.com [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Lu, Di, E-mail: lcyxld@126.com [Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Xu, Xiao, E-mail: zdyyxx@163.com [Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Wang, Jianguo, E-mail: 21118059@zju.edu.cn [Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Wu, Jian, E-mail: drwujian@hotmail.com [Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yan, Sheng, E-mail: shengyan@zju.edu.cn [Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zheng, Shu-sen, E-mail: zyzss@zju.edu.cn [Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To explore a simple and reliable non-invasive distinguishing system for the pre-operative evaluation of malignancy in pancreatic cystic neoplasm (PCN). Methods: This study first enrolled an observation cohort of 102 consecutive PCN patients. Demographic information, results of laboratory examinations, and computed tomography (CT) presentations were recorded and analyzed to achieve a distinguishing model/system for malignancy. A group of 21 patients was then included to validate the model/system prospectively. Results: Based on the 11 malignancy-related features identified by univariate analysis, a distinguishing model for malignancy in PCN was established by multivariate analysis: PCN malignant score = 2.967 × elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) (≥6.16 mmol/L) ± 4.496 × asymmetrically thickened wall (or mural nodules ≥ 4 mm) ± 1.679 × septum thickening (≥2 mm) − 5.134. With the optimal cut-off value selected as −2.8 in reference to the Youden index, the proposed system for malignant PCN was established: septum thickening (>2 mm), asymmetrically thickened wall (or mural nodules > 4 mm), or elevated FBG (>6.16 mmol/L, accompanying commonly known malignant signs), the presence of at least one of these 3 features indicated malignancy in PCN. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of this system were 81.4%, 95.8% and 76.9%, respectively. MRI was performed on 32 patients, making correct prediction of malignancy explicitly in only 68.8% (22/32). The subsequent prospective validation study showed that the proposed distinguishing system had a predictive accuracy of 85.7% (18/21). Moreover, a higher model score, or aggregation of the features in the proposed system, indicated a higher grade of malignancy (carcinoma) in PCN. Conclusion: Elevated FBG (>6.16 mmol/L), asymmetrically thickened wall (or mural nodules > 4 mm) and septum thickening (>2 mm) are of great value in differentiating the malignancy in PCN. The developed distinguishing system is

  9. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia in association with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: implications for disease progression and recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biankin, Andrew V; Kench, James G; Biankin, Sandra A; Lee, C-Soon; Morey, Adrienne L; Dijkman, Floriaan P; Coleman, Maxwell J; Sutherland, Robert L; Henshall, Susan M

    2004-09-01

    The development of pancreatic cancer (PC) several years after curative resection for noninvasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and the presence of PC distant from IPMN suggest that PC may develop independently of the IPMN. Here, we identified pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions, the putative precursors of PC, in the ducts of pancreata resected for IPMN and assessed the frequency of molecular aberrations common to PanIN and PC, within these lesions. The protein expression of p53, p21(WAF1/CIP1), cyclin D1, p16(INK4A) and DPC4/Smad4 were examined by immunohistochemistry in 267 PanIN lesions from a cohort of 23 patients with IPMN. Overexpression of p21(WAF1/CIP1) was present in PanIN-1A and -1B lesions and increased in frequency in PanIN-2 and PanIN-3. Overexpression of p53 and cyclin D1, and loss of p16(INK4A) expression were detected in PanIN-2 and PanIN-3 lesions. Loss of DPC4/Smad4 expression occurred only in the PanIN-3 lesions. PanIN lesions that were more dysplastic than the coincident IPMN were identified in 5 of 12 patients, and 2 of these contained a greater number of aberrations in protein expression than the IPMN. PanIN lesions seen in association with IPMN demonstrate molecular and histologic changes identical to PanIN lesions found in association with PC and, in some cases, are more advanced than the associated IPMN. These data suggest that PanIN lesions found in the ducts of a pancreas with IPMN may be relevant to the development of PC either coincident with IPMN or in the remnant pancreas after curative resection of IPMN.

  10. Secondary pancreatic involvement by a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Wasif Saif; Sapna Khubchandani; Marek Walczak

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. More than 50% of patients have some site of extra-nodal involvement at diagnosis,including the gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow.However, a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis is rare. A 57-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and matted lymph nodes in her axilla. She was admitted with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed diffusely enlarged pancreas due to infiltrative neoplasm and peripancreatic lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the axillary mass revealed a large B-cell lymphoma.The patient was classified as stage Ⅳ, based on the Ann Arbor Classification, and as having a high-risk lymphoma,based on the International Prognostic Index. She was started on chemotherapy with CHOP (cyclophosphamide,doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone). Within a week after chemotherapy, the patient's abdominal pain resolved. Follow-up CT scan of the abdomen revealed a marked decrease in the size of the pancreas and peripancreatic lymphadenopathy. A literature search revealed only seven cases of primary involvement of the pancreas in B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis. However, only one case of secondary pancreatic involvement by B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis has been published. Our case appears to be the second report of such a manifestation.Both cases responded well to chemotherapy.

  11. Short and long-term post-operative outcomes of duodenum preserving pancreatic head resection for chronic pancreatitis affecting the head of pancreas: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Zaynab A R; Tsim, Nicole; Pai, Madhava; Bansi, Dev; Westaby, David; Vlavianos, Panagiotis; Jiao, Long R

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the short and long term outcomes of duodenum preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) procedures in the treatment of painful chronic pancreatitis. A systematic literature search was performed to identify all comparative studies evaluating long and short term postoperative outcomes (pain relief, morbidity and mortality, pancreatic exocrine and endocrine function). Five published studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria including 1 randomized controlled trial comparing the Beger and Frey procedure. In total, 323 patients underwent surgical procedures for chronic pancreatitis, including Beger (n = 138) and Frey (n = 99), minimal Frey (n = 32), modified Frey (n = 25) and Berne's modification (n = 29). Two studies comparing the Beger and Frey procedure were entered into a meta-analysis and showed no difference in post-operative pain (RD = -0.06; CI -0.21 to 0.09), mortality (RD = 0.01; CI -0.03 to 0.05), morbidity (RD = 0.12; CI -0.00 to 0.24), exocrine insufficiency (RD = 0.04; CI -0.10 to 0.18) and endocrine insufficiency (RD = -0.14 CI -0.28 to 0.01). All procedures are equally effective for the management of pain for chronic pancreatitis. The choice of procedure should be determined by other factors including the presence of secondary complications of pancreatitis and intra-operative findings. Registration number CRD42015019275. Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, 2009. Copyright © 2015 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. English language version of the S3-consensus guidelines on chronic pancreatitis: Definition, aetiology, diagnostic examinations, medical, endoscopic and surgical management of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, A; Mayerle, J; Beglinger, C; Büchler, M W; Bufler, P; Dathe, K; Fölsch, U R; Friess, H; Izbicki, J; Kahl, S; Klar, E; Keller, J; Knoefel, W T; Layer, P; Loehr, M; Meier, R; Riemann, J F; Rünzi, M; Schmid, R M; Schreyer, A; Tribl, B; Werner, J; Witt, H; Mössner, J; Lerch, M M

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a disease of the pancreas in which recurrent inflammatory episodes result in replacement of pancreatic parenchyma by fibrous connective tissue. This fibrotic reorganization of the pancreas leads to a progressive exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, characteristic complications arise, such as pseudocysts, pancreatic duct obstructions, duodenal obstruction, vascular complications, obstruction of the bile ducts, malnutrition and pain syndrome. Pain presents as the main symptom of patients with chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic carcinoma. Chronic pancreatitis significantly reduces the quality of life and the life expectancy of affected patients. These guidelines were researched and compiled by 74 representatives from 11 learned societies and their intention is to serve evidence-based professional training as well as continuing education. On this basis they shall improve the medical care of affected patients in both the inpatient and outpatient sector. Chronic pancreatitis requires an adequate diagnostic workup and systematic management, given its severity, frequency, chronicity, and negative impact on the quality of life and life expectancy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Unexpected metastasis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the bile duct into thoracic cavity with direct extension: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Tae; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki [Hanyang Univ. Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol [Hanyang Univ. Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is known to arise from intraductal proliferation of mucinous cells with findings of marked dilatation of the biliary or pancreatic duct. There are reports of the metastasis and extension of pancreatic IPMN. However, cases of biliary IPMN with direct metastasis, or metastasis to distant locations, are rare. We present a case of metastasis of biliary IPMN with unexpected direct extension into the thoracic cavity, and we attempt to account for the mechanism of this extension.

  14. Unexpected metastasis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the bile duct into thoracic cavity with direct extension: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eung Tae; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol

    2012-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is known to arise from intraductal proliferation of mucinous cells with findings of marked dilatation of the biliary or pancreatic duct. There are reports of the metastasis and extension of pancreatic IPMN. However, cases of biliary IPMN with direct metastasis, or metastasis to distant locations, are rare. We present a case of metastasis of biliary IPMN with unexpected direct extension into the thoracic cavity, and we attempt to account for the mechanism of this extension

  15. Immunohistochemical detection of vimentin in pancreatic islet β- and α-cells of macrosomic infants of diabetic and nondiabetic mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivova, Yuliya S; Proshchina, Alexandra E; Barabanov, Valeriy M; Barinova, Irina V; Saveliev, Sergey V

    2018-02-01

    Expression of the intermediate filament protein vimentin has been recently observed in the pancreatic islet β- and α-cells of humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It was suggested that the presence of vimentin in endocrine cells may indicate islet tissue renewal, or potentially represent the dedifferentiation of endocrine cells, which could contribute to the onset of type 2 diabetes or islet cell dysfunction. To analyze the expression of vimentin in pancreatic β- and α-cells of macrosomic infants of diabetic and nondiabetic mothers. Pancreatic samples of five macrosomic infants (gestational age 34-40weeks) from three diabetic and two nondiabetic mothers were compared to six control infants (32-40weeks, weight appropriate for gestational age) from normoglycemic mothers. Pancreatic autopsy samples were examined by double immunofluorescent labeling with antibodies against vimentin and either insulin or glucagon. Alterations in the endocrine pancreas were measured using morphometric methods, then data were statistically analyzed. In the pancreatic islets of macrosomic infants from diabetic and nondiabetic mothers, we observed vimentin-positive cells, some of which simultaneously contained insulin or glucagon. We also quantitatively showed that the presence of such cells was associated with hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the islets, and with an increase in β- and α-cell density. We speculate that the appearance of vimentin-positive islet cells may reflect induction of differentiation in response to the increased insulin demand, and vimentin may serve as an early marker of endocrine pancreas disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic pancreatitis: indications to surgery and remote results assessment criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Klimenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Present indications to surgery include intractable pain syndrome, severe dilation of the Wirsung’s duct, strictures and stones in the Wirsung’s duct, pancreatic pseudocysts, duodenal stenosis and obstructive jaundice because of “inflammatory mass” in the pancreatic head. But these absolute indications mean that in the most cases pancreatic exocrine and endocrine functions are already decompensated. Therefore it is important to produce new indications to surgical treatment of the CP in early stages. Also it is necessary to make such remote results assessment criteria that will allow to range among parenchymapreserving and resectional technics according to anatomical and functional parameters. Goal: to adjust indications to surgical treatment of the CP according to leading pathogenetic factors and develop criteria to assess remote results. Patients and methods: 122 CP patients have undergone surgery. There were 103 (84,4% men and – 19 (15,6% women, mean age - 45. Alcohol etiology of the CP was in 79 (64,8% patients, postpancreonecrotic – in 29 (23,8%, biliary – in 6 (4,9%, idiopathic – in 8 (6,6%. Wirsung’s duct diameter of 4 – 8 mm – was in 65 (53,3% patients, 8 – 12 and more – in 57 (46,7%. By Shalimov classification there were “pseudotumorous” – in 39 (31,9%, “calculouse” – in 40 (32,8%, fibrose-cystic – in 17 (13,9%, fibrose-degenerative with adjacent organs involvement and hampering of their function – in 26 (21,4% patients. All patients had pain syndrome and 79 (64,8% – exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. All patients underwent abdominal CT-scan, fecal elastase test, C-peptide, endogenic insulin, glucose, immunehystochemical investigation of biopsy samples taken from body corpus and tale simultaneously etc. Results: We have found that gastroenterologists poorly recognize “surgical” type of CP and restrain patients from being directed to surgical pancreatologists for surgical therapy. We

  17. IMMEDIATE AND DISTANT EFFECTS OF THE PANCREATIC DUCT OCCLUSION BY THE FIBRIN ADHESIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojin Savić

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper represent an experimental study whose aim was to determine immediate consequences of the pancreatic duct occlusion by the fibrin adhesive upon the pancreas parenchyma as well as distant negative effects upon the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic secretion.The experiment was carried out on the dogs divided into two groups of twenty animals, namely, into the experimental group of those animals that were subdued to the pancreas resection with the PJA formation and the anastomosis protection by means of the pancreatic duct occlusion with the fibrin adhesive (Tissucol - Immuno AG and the control group that was, under the same conditions, subdued to the pancreas resection and the PJA with no anastomosis protection. In the post-operative course the animals cere monitored for five months and during that time they were subjected to the clinic, biochemical, pathohistological, histochemical, immunocito-chemical and scanning electronic-microscopic examination.The fibrin cork lyse was noticed since the fifth post-operative day while it was fully completed on the thirteenth post-operative day. The statistical analysis of the biochemical parameters as well as pathohistological and scanning-electronic exami-nations have revealed the signs of easier, sub-clinic forms of edematose pancreatitis with a short-term increase of the amylase level. The examinations after 150 days have shown the preserved morphology and the functional integrity of the exocrine and en-docrine pancreas.The authors conclude that the fibrin adhesive application in preventing the loosening up of the pancreatic jejuna anastomosis represents a simple and efficient procedure with no negative effects upon the exocrine and endocrine function and the pancreas morphology.

  18. Earlier surgery improves outcomes from painful chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Nengwen; Jia, Dan; Huang, Wei; Nunes, Quentin M.; Windsor, John A.; Liu, Xubao; Sutton, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The timing of surgery for painful chronic pancreatitis (CP) may affect outcomes. Clinical course, Izbicki pain scores, and pancreatic function were retrospectively compared and analyzed between patients undergoing either early or late surgery (pancreatic mass +/− ductal dilatation (47% vs 27%, P insufficiency (60% vs 72%, P = .034); there were no other significant differences. The early group had longer hospital stay (14.4 vs 12.2 days, P = .009), but no difference in complications. Significantly greater pain relief followed early surgery (complete 69% vs 47%, partial 22% vs 37%, none 8% vs 16%, P = .01) with lower rates of exocrine (60% vs 80%, P = .005) and endocrine insufficiency (36% vs 53%, P = .033). Our data indicate that early surgery results in higher rates of pain relief and pancreatic sufficiency than late surgery for chronic pancreatitis patients. Frey and Berne procedures showed better results than other surgical procedures. PMID:29742705

  19. Maturation and function of human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic progenitors in macroencapsulation devices following transplant into mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruin, Jennifer E; Rezania, Alireza; Xu, Jean; Narayan, Kavitha; Fox, Jessica K; O'Neil, John J; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2013-09-01

    Islet transplantation is a promising cell therapy for patients with diabetes, but it is currently limited by the reliance upon cadaveric donor tissue. We previously demonstrated that human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitor cells matured under the kidney capsule in a mouse model of diabetes into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells capable of reversing diabetes. However, the formation of cells resembling bone and cartilage was a major limitation of that study. Therefore, we developed an improved differentiation protocol that aimed to prevent the formation of off-target mesoderm tissue following transplantation. We also examined how variation within the complex host environment influenced the development of pancreatic progenitors in vivo. The hESCs were differentiated for 14 days into pancreatic progenitor cells and transplanted either under the kidney capsule or within Theracyte (TheraCyte, Laguna Hills, CA, USA) devices into diabetic mice. Our revised differentiation protocol successfully eliminated the formation of non-endodermal cell populations in 99% of transplanted mice and generated grafts containing >80% endocrine cells. Progenitor cells developed efficiently into pancreatic endocrine tissue within macroencapsulation devices, despite lacking direct contact with the host environment, and reversed diabetes within 3 months. The preparation of cell aggregates pre-transplant was critical for the formation of insulin-producing cells in vivo and endocrine cell development was accelerated within a diabetic host environment compared with healthy mice. Neither insulin nor exendin-4 therapy post-transplant affected the maturation of macroencapsulated cells. Efficient differentiation of hESC-derived pancreatic endocrine cells can occur in a macroencapsulation device, yielding glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells capable of reversing diabetes.

  20. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Can Transform Into Chronic Features Similar to Advanced Chronic Pancreatitis With Functional Insufficiency Following Severe Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Keita; Maruyama, Masahiro; Kameko, Fumiko; Kawasaki, Kenji; Asano, Junpei; Oguchi, Takaya; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ito, Tetsuya; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Arakura, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2016-09-01

    Because several studies for autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) have revealed pancreatic calcification resembling that in chronic pancreatitis (CP), we sought to clarify whether AIP could transform into chronic features similar to advanced CP with severe pancreatic dysfunction. Pancreatic functions of 92 AIP patients, 47 definite CP patients, and 30 healthy controls were assessed by fecal elastase-1 concentration (FEC), fasting immunoreactive insulin (IRI), and homeostatic model assessment (HOMA)-R. The 92 AIP patients included 17 (18%) with severe calcification (SC) and 75 without. The FEC levels in AIP and CP patients were significantly lower than that in controls. Exocrine insufficiency defined as FEC less than 200 μg/g was 39% in AIP without SC, 56% in AIP with SC, and 74% in CP. Fasting IRI and C-peptide reactivity values in CP were significantly lower than those in AIP, with no significant differences between AIP subgroups. The prevalence of endocrine insufficiency according to fasting IRI less than 5.0 μU/mL was 26% in AIP without SC, 31% in AIP with SC, and 59% in CP, respectively. HOMA-R values were significantly higher in all AIP groups than in CP. Autoimmune pancreatitis can transform into a state of pancreatic insufficiency after calcification that is less severe than that in definite CP.

  1. Effect of ionizing radiation on the primate pancreas: an endocrine and morphologic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.

    1987-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the endocrine, biochemical, and haematological derangements as well as pancreatic and histological changes of the bonemarrow in the primate following external fractionated subtotal marrow irradiation without bonemarrow reconstitution. The irradiation was administered in preparation for pancreatic transplantation. Two groups of animals (ten in each group) received 800 rad (8 Gy) and 1000 rad (10 Gy) respectively over 4 to 5 weeks. A maximum of 200 rads (2 Gy) were administered weekly as photons from a 6 MV linear accelerator. During irradiation the animals remained normoglycaemic in the presence of transiently elevated liver enzymes and serum amylase values, which returned to normal on completion of the irradiation. Insulin release was significantly reduced in both groups during irradiation and was associated with minimally decreased K-values in the presence of mild glucose intolerance. Pancreatic light morphologic changes included structural changes of both exocrine and endocrine elements and included necrosis of the islet cells and acinar tissue. Islet histology demonstrated striking cytocavitary network changes of alpha and beta cells, including degranulation, vacuolization, mitochondrial destruction, and an increase in lysosomes. A hypoplastic bonemarrow ranging from moderate to severe was observed in all irradiated recipients. Near total fractionated body irradiation in the primate is therefore associated with elevated liver enzymes, pancytopenia, transient hyperamylasaemia, hypoinsulinaemia, a varying degree of pancreatitis, and bonemarrow hypoplasia

  2. Activation of the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein by glucose leads to increased pancreatic beta cell differentiation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soggia, A; Flosseau, K; Ravassard, P; Szinnai, G; Scharfmann, R; Guillemain, G

    2012-10-01

    Pancreatic cell development is a tightly controlled process. Although information is available regarding the mesodermal signals that control pancreatic development, little is known about the role of environmental factors such as nutrients, including glucose, on pancreatic development. We previously showed that glucose and its metabolism through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP) promote pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation. Here, we analysed the role of the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) in this process. This transcription factor is activated by glucose, and has been recently described as a target of the HBP. We used an in vitro bioassay in which pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells develop from rat embryonic pancreas in a way that mimics in vivo pancreatic development. Using this model, gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments were undertaken. ChREBP was produced in the endocrine lineage during pancreatic development, its abundance increasing with differentiation. When rat embryonic pancreases were cultured in the presence of glucose or xylitol, the production of ChREBP targets was induced. Concomitantly, beta cell differentiation was enhanced. On the other hand, when embryonic pancreases were cultured with inhibitors decreasing ChREBP activity or an adenovirus producing a dominant-negative ChREBP, beta cell differentiation was reduced, indicating that ChREBP activity was necessary for proper beta cell differentiation. Interestingly, adenovirus producing a dominant-negative ChREBP also reduced the positive effect of N-acetylglucosamine, a substrate of the HBP acting on beta cell differentiation. Our work supports the idea that glucose, through the transcription factor ChREBP, controls beta cell differentiation from pancreatic progenitors.

  3. Pancreatic Aquaporin-7: A Novel Target for Anti-diabetic Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Giménez, Leire; Ezquerro, Silvia; da Silva, Inês V; Soveral, Graça; Frühbeck, Gema; Rodríguez, Amaia

    2018-01-01

    Aquaporins comprise a family of 13 members of water channels (AQP0-12) that facilitate a rapid transport of water across cell membranes. In some cases, these pores are also permeated by small solutes, particularly glycerol, urea or nitric oxide, among other solutes. Several aquaporins have been identified in the pancreas, an exocrine and endocrine organ that plays an essential role in the onset of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The exocrine pancreas, which accounts for 90% of the total pancreas, secretes daily large volumes of a near-isotonic fluid containing digestive enzymes into the duodenum. AQP1, AQP5, and AQP8 contribute to fluid secretion especially from ductal cells, whereas AQP12 allows the proper maturation and exocytosis of secretory granules in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas. The endocrine pancreas (10% of the total pancreatic cells) is composed by the islets of Langerhans, which are distributed in α, β, δ, ε, and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cells that secrete glucagon, insulin, somatostatin, ghrelin and PP, respectively. AQP7, an aquaglyceroporin permeated by water and glycerol, is expressed in pancreatic β-cells and murine studies have confirmed its participation in insulin secretion, triacylglycerol synthesis and proliferation of these endocrine cells. In this regard, transgenic AQP7-knockout mice develop adult-onset obesity, hyperinsulinemia, increased intracellular triacylglycerol content and reduced β-cell mass in Langerhans islets. Moreover, we have recently reported that AQP7 upregulation in β-cells after bariatric surgery, an effective weight loss surgical procedure, contributes, in part, to the improvement of pancreatic steatosis and insulin secretion through the increase of intracytoplasmic glycerol in obese rats. Human studies remain scarce and controversial, with some rare cases of loss-of function mutations of the AQP7 gene being associated with the onset of type 2 diabetes. The present Review is focused on the role

  4. Pancreatic aquaporin-7: a novel target for anti-diabetic drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Giménez, Leire; Ezquerro, Silvia; da Silva, Inês V.; Soveral, Graça; Frühbeck, Gema; Rodríguez, Amaia

    2018-04-01

    Aquaporins comprise a family of 13 members of water channels (AQP0-12) that facilitate a rapid transport of water across cell membranes. In some cases, these pores are also permeated by small solutes, particularly glycerol, urea or nitric oxide, among other solutes. Several aquaporins have been identified in the pancreas, an exocrine and endocrine organ that plays an essential role in the onset of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The exocrine pancreas, which accounts for 90% of the total pancreas, secretes daily large volumes of a near-isotonic fluid containing digestive enzymes into the duodenum. AQP1, AQP5 and AQP8 contribute to fluid secretion especially from ductal cells, whereas AQP12 allows the proper maturation and exocytosis of secretory granules in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas. The endocrine pancreas (10% of the total pancreatic cells) is composed by the islets of Langerhans, which are distributed in ,, ,  and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cells that secrete glucagon, insulin, somatostatin, ghrelin and PP, respectively. AQP7, an aquaglyceroporin permeated by water and glycerol, is expressed in pancreatic -cells and murine studies have confirmed its participation in insulin secretion, triacylglycerol synthesis and proliferation of these endocrine cells. In this regard, transgenic AQP7-knockout mice develop adult-onset obesity, hyperinsulinemia, increased intracellular triacylglycerol content and reduced -cell mass in Langerhans islets. Moreover, we have recently reported that AQP7 upregulation in β-cells after bariatric surgery, an effective weight loss surgical procedure, contributes, in part, to the improvement of pancreatic steatosis and insulin secretion by increasing intracellular glycerol in obese rats. Human studies remain scarce and controversial, with some rare cases of loss-of function variants of the AQP7 gene being associated with the onset of type 2 diabetes. The present Review is focused on the role of

  5. Pancreatic Aquaporin-7: A Novel Target for Anti-diabetic Drugs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leire Méndez-Giménez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins comprise a family of 13 members of water channels (AQP0-12 that facilitate a rapid transport of water across cell membranes. In some cases, these pores are also permeated by small solutes, particularly glycerol, urea or nitric oxide, among other solutes. Several aquaporins have been identified in the pancreas, an exocrine and endocrine organ that plays an essential role in the onset of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The exocrine pancreas, which accounts for 90% of the total pancreas, secretes daily large volumes of a near-isotonic fluid containing digestive enzymes into the duodenum. AQP1, AQP5, and AQP8 contribute to fluid secretion especially from ductal cells, whereas AQP12 allows the proper maturation and exocytosis of secretory granules in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas. The endocrine pancreas (10% of the total pancreatic cells is composed by the islets of Langerhans, which are distributed in α, β, δ, ε, and pancreatic polypeptide (PP cells that secrete glucagon, insulin, somatostatin, ghrelin and PP, respectively. AQP7, an aquaglyceroporin permeated by water and glycerol, is expressed in pancreatic β-cells and murine studies have confirmed its participation in insulin secretion, triacylglycerol synthesis and proliferation of these endocrine cells. In this regard, transgenic AQP7-knockout mice develop adult-onset obesity, hyperinsulinemia, increased intracellular triacylglycerol content and reduced β-cell mass in Langerhans islets. Moreover, we have recently reported that AQP7 upregulation in β-cells after bariatric surgery, an effective weight loss surgical procedure, contributes, in part, to the improvement of pancreatic steatosis and insulin secretion through the increase of intracytoplasmic glycerol in obese rats. Human studies remain scarce and controversial, with some rare cases of loss-of function mutations of the AQP7 gene being associated with the onset of type 2 diabetes. The present Review is

  6. Pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis: a comprehensive update and a look into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Roland; Tingstedt, Bobby; Xia, Jinglin

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a relatively frequent condition usually caused by alcoholic abuse but also due to recurrent gallstone disease, metabolic endocrine disorders and haemochromatosis, among others. Specific types such as hereditary and autoimmune pancreatitis should be particularly kept in mind and emphasized, as they require specific treatment and attention. The possibility to identify gene mutations has also increased and this is likely to decrease the overall total number of "idiopathic" chronic pancreatitis cases. Pancreatic stellate cells have been identified as potential key players in the progression of chronic pancreatitis and the development of fibrogenesis, which are activated either during repeated attacks of necro-inflammation or directly by toxic factors. The inhibition or modulation of pancreatic stellate cells could represent a way of potential intervention in patients with chronic pancreatitis in the future.

  7. surgical treatment for chronic pancreatitis: report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibrosis of the pancreas that leads to loss of endocrine and exocrine function of pancreas. The most common symptom is intractable pain. Which adversely effects quality of life, remains the most common indication for surgery in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Case report: Three patients underwent operations for chronic pancreatitis at the Ghaem hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences Mashhad, Iran. Indication for operation in all cases were intractable abdominal pain. In all of the three patients complete relief of symptoms was obtained. There was no morbidity and mortality. In one patient exocrine function of pancreas and malabsorpation resolved after surgery. Conclusions: Although chronic pancreatitis is uncommon, but in persistent abdominal pain surgery should be considered. Surgery for patients with chronic pancreatitis can be performed safely with minimal morbidity and effective in control of pain and malabsorption.  

  8. RIP3 attenuates the pancreatic damage induced by deletion of ATG7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Xie, Li; Xia, Leizhou; Bergmann, Frank; Büchler, Markus W; Kroemer, Guido; Hackert, Thilo; Fortunato, Franco

    2017-07-13

    Invalidation of pancreatic autophagy entails pancreatic atrophy, endocrine and exocrine insufficiency and pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether depletion of Rip3, which is involved in necroptotic signaling, may attenuate the pancreatic atrophy and pancreatitis resulting from autophagy inhibition. Autophagy and necroptosis signaling were evaluated in mice lacking expression of Rip3 in all organs and Atg7 in the pancreas. Acinar cell death, inflammation and fibrosis were evaluated by using of a compendium of immunofluorescence methods and immunoblots. Mice deficient for pancreatic Atg7 developed acute pancreatitis, which progressed to chronic pancreatitis. This phenotype reduces autophagy, increase apoptosis and necroptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, as well as premature death of the animals. Knockout of Rip3 exacerbated the apoptotic death of acinar cells, increased tissue damage, reduced macrophage infiltration and further accelerated the death of the mice with Atg7-deficient pancreas. The pancreatic degeneration induced by autophagy inhibition was exacerbated by Rip3 deletion.

  9. Exocrine Dysfunction Correlates with Endocrinal Impairment of Pancreas in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna Kumar, H R; Gowdappa, H Basavana; Hosmani, Tejashwi; Urs, Tejashri

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic abnormal metabolic condition, which manifests elevated blood sugar level over a prolonged period. The pancreatic endocrine system generally gets affected during diabetes, but often abnormal exocrine functions are also manifested due to its proximity to the endocrine system. Fecal elastase-1 (FE-1) is found to be an ideal biomarker to reflect the exocrine insufficiency of the pancreas. The aim of this study was conducted to assess exocrine dysfunction of the pancreas in patients with type-2 DM (T2DM) by measuring FE levels and to associate the level of hyperglycemia with exocrine pancreatic dysfunction. A prospective, cross-sectional comparative study was conducted on both T2DM patients and healthy nondiabetic volunteers. FE-1 levels were measured using a commercial kit (Human Pancreatic Elastase ELISA BS 86-01 from Bioserv Diagnostics). Data analysis was performed based on the important statistical parameters such as mean, standard deviation, standard error, t -test-independent samples, and Chi-square test/cross tabulation using SPSS for Windows version 20.0. Statistically nonsignificant ( P = 0.5051) relationship between FE-1 deficiency and age was obtained, which implied age as a noncontributing factor toward exocrine pancreatic insufficiency among diabetic patients. Statistically significant correlation ( P = 0.003) between glycated hemoglobin and FE-1 levels was also noted. The association between retinopathy ( P = 0.001) and peripheral pulses ( P = 0.001) with FE-1 levels were found to be statistically significant. This study validates the benefit of FE-1 estimation, as a surrogate marker of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, which remains unmanifest and subclinical.

  10. Safety and Efficacy of AAV Retrograde Pancreatic Ductal Gene Delivery in Normal and Pancreatic Cancer Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirin, Kayla A; Kwon, Jason J; Alioufi, Arafat; Factora, Tricia; Temm, Constance J; Jacobsen, Max; Sandusky, George E; Shontz, Kim; Chicoine, Louis G; Clark, K Reed; Mendell, Joshua T; Korc, Murray; Kota, Janaiah

    2018-03-16

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene delivery shows promise to transduce the pancreas, but safety/efficacy in a neoplastic context is not well established. To identify an ideal AAV serotype, route, and vector dose and assess safety, we have investigated the use of three AAV serotypes (6, 8, and 9) expressing GFP in a self-complementary (sc) AAV vector under an EF1α promoter (scAAV.GFP) following systemic or retrograde pancreatic intraductal delivery. Systemic delivery of scAAV9.GFP transduced the pancreas with high efficiency, but gene expression did not exceed >45% with the highest dose, 5 × 10 12 viral genomes (vg). Intraductal delivery of 1 × 10 11 vg scAAV6.GFP transduced acini, ductal cells, and islet cells with >50%, ∼48%, and >80% efficiency, respectively, and >80% pancreatic transduction was achieved with 5 × 10 11 vg. In a Kras G12D -driven pancreatic cancer mouse model, intraductal delivery of scAAV6.GFP targeted acini, epithelial, and stromal cells and exhibited persistent gene expression 5 months post-delivery. In normal mice, intraductal delivery induced a transient increase in serum amylase/lipase that resolved within a day of infusion with no sustained pancreatic inflammation or fibrosis. Similarly, in PDAC mice, intraductal delivery did not increase pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia progression/fibrosis. Our study demonstrates that scAAV6 targets the pancreas/neoplasm efficiently and safely via retrograde pancreatic intraductal delivery.

  11. Safety and Efficacy of AAV Retrograde Pancreatic Ductal Gene Delivery in Normal and Pancreatic Cancer Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla A. Quirin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV-mediated gene delivery shows promise to transduce the pancreas, but safety/efficacy in a neoplastic context is not well established. To identify an ideal AAV serotype, route, and vector dose and assess safety, we have investigated the use of three AAV serotypes (6, 8, and 9 expressing GFP in a self-complementary (sc AAV vector under an EF1α promoter (scAAV.GFP following systemic or retrograde pancreatic intraductal delivery. Systemic delivery of scAAV9.GFP transduced the pancreas with high efficiency, but gene expression did not exceed >45% with the highest dose, 5 × 1012 viral genomes (vg. Intraductal delivery of 1 × 1011 vg scAAV6.GFP transduced acini, ductal cells, and islet cells with >50%, ∼48%, and >80% efficiency, respectively, and >80% pancreatic transduction was achieved with 5 × 1011 vg. In a KrasG12D-driven pancreatic cancer mouse model, intraductal delivery of scAAV6.GFP targeted acini, epithelial, and stromal cells and exhibited persistent gene expression 5 months post-delivery. In normal mice, intraductal delivery induced a transient increase in serum amylase/lipase that resolved within a day of infusion with no sustained pancreatic inflammation or fibrosis. Similarly, in PDAC mice, intraductal delivery did not increase pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia progression/fibrosis. Our study demonstrates that scAAV6 targets the pancreas/neoplasm efficiently and safely via retrograde pancreatic intraductal delivery.

  12. Evidence-Based Surgical Treatments for Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jörg; Stöß, Christian; Mayerle, Julia; Stecher, Lynne; Maak, Matthias; Simon, Peter; Nitsche, Ulrich; Friess, Helmut

    2016-07-25

    If conservative treatment of chronic pancreatitis is unsuccessful, surgery is an option. The choice of the most suitable surgical method can be difficult, as the indications, advantages, and disadvantages of the available methods have not yet been fully documented with scientific evidence. In April 2015, we carried out a temporally unlimited systematic search for publications on surgery for chronic pancreatitis. The target parameters were morbidity, mortality, pain, endocrine and exocrine insuffi - ciency, weight gain, quality of life, length of hospital stay, and duration of urgery. Differences between surgical methods were studied with network meta-analysis, and duodenum-preserving operations were compared with partial duodenopancreatectomy with standard meta-analysis. Among the 326 articles initially identified, 8 randomized controlled trials on a total of 423 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The trials were markedly heterogeneous in some respects. There was no significant difference among surgical methods with respect to perioperative morbidity, pain, endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, or quality of life. Duodenumpreserving procedures, compared to duodenopancreatectomy, were associated with a long-term weight gain that was 3 kg higher (p chronic pancreatitis is superior to partial duodenopancreatectomy in multiple respects. Only limited recommendations can be given, however, on the basis of present data. The question of the best surgical method for the individual patient, in view of the clinical manifestations, anatomy, and diagnostic criteria, remains open.

  13. Pancreatic morphogenesis and extracellular matrix organization during rat development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaoka, M; Haratake, J; Hashimoto, H

    1993-07-01

    We investigated the rat pancreatic morphology at various developmental stages ranging from 12 days of gestation to the neonatal stage, with special emphasis on alterations in extracellular matrix organization in vivo. The rat pancreatic development in utero could be divided into four representative stages as follows: (1) initial epithelial buds (12 days of gestation), (2) elongated and branching epithelium (13-14 days), (3) tubular structure (15-16 days), and (4) acinar structure (17 days or more). Ultrastructurally, the fetal and neonatal pancreata were almost constantly encompassed by continuous basal lamina, except for the earliest stage, in which minute disruptions of basal lamina were observed. Through the disruption, the direct epithelial-mesenchymal contact was formed between an endocrine cell and an adjacent mesenchymal cell, which implied epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in processes of endocrine cell differentiation. Collagen fibrils were frequently accumulated at the cleft (branchpoint) of the branching epithelium during the second and third stages mentioned above. Immunohistochemically, fibronectin and collagen type-I were localized particularly beside the neck (narrow part) or cleft of the pancreatic epithelium at these stages, although continuous linear localization of these matrices was noted around the initial pancreatic bud. This was in contrast to invariable linear localization of laminin and collagen type-IV at the epithelial/mesenchymal interface throughout the pancreatic development. Diffuse fibrillar localization of fibronectin and collagen type-I in the mesenchyme was pronounced at the later stages and after birth. Collagen type-III was only focally detectable around the pancreatic epithelium from the second stage, and its distinct localization was noted in the interlobular connective tissue after birth. Thus, chronological changes in extracellular matrix organization seemed to be closely related to morphogenetic processes of the rat

  14. Pancreatic cancer screening employing noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging combined with ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki-Suzuki, Seiko; Nagashima, Chieko; Machida, Minoru; Muramatsu, Yukio; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Kuroki, Yoshifumi; Nasu, Katsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted an initial evaluation on the potential of combining noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) to screen for pancreatic cancer. An independent ethics committee approved this study. A total of 2511 patients who underwent US were enrolled. Among them, noncontrast MRI was performed in patients in whom the entire pancreas was difficult to depict or in those with US-suspected pancreatic lesions. In total, using 1.5-T MRI, T1- and T2-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and diffusion-weighted imaging, we acquired a variety of images. The efficacy of US and MRI in screening for pancreatic lesions, including pancreatic cancer, was evaluated. Of 2511 patients, 184 underwent MRI, and the pancreas was demonstrated in all of them. Among the 2511, five pancreatic cancers were detected by MRI combined with US (detection rate 0.20%). Of the five pancreatic cancers, three were detected by US (detection rate 0.12%) and two by MRI. Four of the five pancreatic cancers were resectable. By combining noncontrast MRI with US, pancreatic cancer can be detected with high accuracy. Other pancreatic lesions that require follow-up, including intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, can also be detected. Thus, pancreatic cancer screening with a combination of US and MRI is suggested. (author)

  15. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H.M.; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G.J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and human pancreas tissues. Pancreatic organoids can be rapidly generated from resected tumors and biopsies, survive cryopreservation and exhibit ductal- and disease stage-specific characteristics. Orthotopically transplanted neoplastic organoids recapitulate the full spectrum of tumor development by forming early-grade neoplasms that progress to locally invasive and metastatic carcinomas. Due to their ability to be genetically manipulated, organoids are a platform to probe genetic cooperation. Comprehensive transcriptional and proteomic analyses of murine pancreatic organoids revealed genes and pathways altered during disease progression. The confirmation of many of these protein changes in human tissues demonstrates that organoids are a facile model system to discover characteristics of this deadly malignancy. PMID:25557080

  16. Pancreatic effects of GLP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    -dependent manner. But perhaps equally importantly, GLP-1’s glucose lowering effects are attributable to a strong inhibition of glucagon secretion, and, thereby, a reduction of hepatic glucose output. The effects of GLP-1 on insulin secretion are mediated by binding of the hormone to the receptor (GLP-1r......) on the pancreatic β-cell, which increases intracellular cAMP levels and sets in motion a plethora of events that lead to secretion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of GLP-1 on the α-cell may be indirect, involving paracrine intra-islet regulation by somatostatin and possibly also insulin, although GLP-1 also...... inhibits glucagon secretion in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Besides these acute effects on the endocrine pancreas, GLP-1 also appears to have a positive effect on β-cell mass. In the following we will review GLP-1’s pancreatic effects with particular focus on its effects on pancreatic islets...

  17. Accelerated radiochemotherapy in pancreatic cancer is not necessarily related to a pathologic pancreatic function decline in the early period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst, Eckehard; Seidel, Matthias; Micke, Oliver; Ruebe, Christian; Glashoerster, Marco; Schaefer, Ulrich; Willich, Normann A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the functional effects of ionizing radiation in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer in the early period after accelerated radiochemotherapy (ART). Methods and Materials: To analyze the exocrine component, the amino acid consumption test and fecal elastase 1 were performed in 13 patients immediately before and 4-8 weeks after ART. Pancreatic duct morphology was evaluated before therapy. Weight loss and clinical steatorrhea were recorded. Endocrine parameters were examined according to standardized criteria. Results: The relative change of the amino acid consumption test results and the median elastase concentration was 41.2% and 56.4%, respectively. Five patients still had normal test results after ART and 5 patients developed pathologic values. The median relative weight loss of the total body weight was 7.7% ± 4.5%. No steatorrhea occurred. Of the 5 patients with normal values, 3 had a mean organ dose of 41 Gy. The endocrine function measurements remained unchanged. Conclusion: Although a nominal reduction of exocrine function parameters occurred in most patients, ART was not necessarily related to a pathologic level in the early period. Diabetes was not established. The functional impairment that was existent in the patient population presumably contributed to the weight loss. Pancreatic enzyme preparations may also play a role in maintaining an anabolic state during and after radiochemotherapy

  18. Normal postperative computed tomography findings after avariety of pancreatic surgeries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Won; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Lee, Min Wook; Kim, Ki Whang; Kang, Chang Moo; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Yong Eun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Pancreatic surgery remains the only curative treatment for pancreatic neoplasms, and plays an important role in the management of medically intractable diseases. Since the original Whipple operation in the 20th century, surgical techniques have advanced, resulting in decreased postoperative complications and better clinical outcomes. Normal postoperative imaging findings vary greatly depending on the surgical technique used. Radiologists are required to be familiar with the normal postoperative imaging findings, in order to distinguish from postoperative complications or tumor recurrence. In this study, we briefly review a variety of surgical techniques for the pancreas, and present the normal postoperative computed tomography findings.

  19. Functional pancreatic insufficiency after surgical treatment in the light of the latest international recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Bordin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exocrine  and  endocrine   insufficiencies  are  frequent complications of surgical treatment for pancreatic diseases. The presence  and  extent  of the insufficiency depend on the underlying  disorder, type of surgical procedure, extent of pancreatic resection, and anatomical reconstruction. Increased surgical  activity  determines  the  importance  of the  evidence-based guidelines  for management of patients  after  pancreatic  surgery. The article presents  an  overview of international Evidence-based Guidelines for the Management of Exocrine Pancreatic  Insufficiency after  Pancreatic  Surgery (2016 and United European Gastroenterology evidence-based guidelines  for the  diagnosis  and therapy of chronic pancreatitis (HaPanEU, 2017.

  20. Functional and morphological evolution of remnant pancreas after resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Young; Park, Keun-Myoung; Shin, Woo Young; Choe, Yun-Mee; Hur, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Keon-Young; Ahn, Seung-Ik

    2017-07-01

    Functional and morphological evolution of remnant pancreas after resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma is investigated.The medical records of 45 patients who had undergone radical resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma from March 2010 to September 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. There were 34 patients in the pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) group and 10 patients in the distal pancreatectomy (DP) group. One patient received total pancreatectomy. The endocrine function was measured using the glucose tolerance index (GTI), which was derived by dividing daily maximum serum glucose fluctuation by daily minimum glucose. Remnant pancreas volume (RPV) was estimated by considering pancreas body and tail as a column, and head as an ellipsoid, respectively. The pancreatic atrophic index (PAI) was defined as the ratio of pancreatic duct width to total pancreas width. Representative indices of each patient were compared before and after resection up to 2 years postoperatively.The area under receiver operating characteristic curve of GTI for diagnosing DM was 0.823 (95% confidence interval, 0.699-0.948, P < .001). Overall, GTI increased on postoperative day 1 (POD#1, mean ± standard deviation, 1.79 ± 1.40 vs preoperative, 1.02 ± 1.41; P = .001), and then decreased by day 7 (0.89 ± 1.16 vs POD#1, P < .001). In the PD group, the GTI on POD#14 became lower than preoperative (0.51 ± 0.38 vs 0.96 ± 1.37; P = .03). PAI in the PD group was significantly lower at 1 month postoperatively (0.22 ± 0.12 vs preoperative, 0.38 ± 0.18; P < .001). In the PD group, RPV was significantly lower at 1 month postoperatively (25.3 ± 18.3 cm vs preoperative, 32.4 ± 20.1 cm; P = .02), due to the resolution of pancreatic duct dilatation. RPV of the DP group showed no significant change. GTI was negatively related to RPV preoperatively (r = -0.317, P = .04), but this correlation disappeared postoperatively (r = -0

  1. Diagnosis and treatment in cystic neoplasms of the pancreas: Analysis of 12 cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Karateke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas (CNPaccounts for only 1-5% of all pancreatic neoplasms but inrecent years approximately 30% of all pancreatic resectionsare performed for CNP. In this study we aimed toargue diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of the patientswhom operated in our clinic for CNP.Materials and methods: The demographic characteristics,preoperative findings, surgical procedures, histopathologicaldiagnosis, postoperative complications andlong term follow-up outcomes of the CNP patients operatedin our clinic between 2009 -Jan and 2012-Feb wereevaluated.Results: One patient was male,11 patients were femaleand mean age was 51,5 years (19-73 years.Localizationsof the lesions were in the head of pancreas for 4 patients,in the body for 2 patients and in tail for 6 patients.Mean size of the cysts was 5.1 cm (3-10 cm.Pylorus-reservedpancreaticoduodenectomy for 4 patients, subtotal/distal pancreatectomy + splenectomy for 7 patients andspleen reserved distal pancreatectomy was performedfor 1 patient. Histopathological diagnosis was reportedas serous cystadenoma in 6, mucinous cystadenoma in3, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma in 2 and pseudocystin 1 patient respectively. Postoperative complication ratewas 33%. Mean follow-up time was 18.4 months (2-38months.Conclusions: Management should be based upon oncarefully weighting the malignant potential of a pancreaticcystic lesions and the risk of surgery.Key words: Pancreas, cystic neoplasm, resection

  2. Genetic, epidemiological, and clinical aspects of hereditary pancreatitis: a population-based cohort study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    , respectively, and among tIP patients 9 and 12%, respectively. Pancreatic cancer was diagnosed in 5% of the HP families. CONCLUSIONS: The genotype of the Danish population with HP differs from that of previously described cohorts. The occurrence of exocrine and endocrine insufficiency is higher among patients......-degree relatives of the 18 initially identified HP patients, 38 HP patients in total were identified, and 28 patients had SPINK1-CFTR mutations. Among HP patients, no p.N29I mutations were found and the p.A16V mutation was more frequent than previously reported, 45 and 32% had exocrine and endocrine insufficiency......OBJECTIVES: In a population-based, well-defined group of patients first regarded as having pancreatitis of unknown origin (PUO), we identified, described, and compared the clinical and genetic aspects of patients with hereditary pancreatitis (HP) and with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance...

  3. Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas: A population-based comparison with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

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    G. Paul Wright

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: SPTP is a rare pancreatic neoplasm found more commonly in young women in the tail of the pancreas and is associated with a significantly more favorable prognosis than PDAC. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(3.000: 148-153

  4. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

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    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  5. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors : comparison of MR pancreatography(MRP) and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography(ERP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Ki Suh; Seo, Jung Hoon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae Bok; Chung, Jae Joon; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik

    1999-01-01

    parenchyma. In two cases of serous cystadenoma with lack of communication between the pancreatic duct and cystic neoplasm, MRP depicted the lesion clearly whereas ERP showed no information. MRP is better than ERP at visualizing the of pancreatic duct proximal to obstruction, assessment of tumoral extent, and diagnosis of a cystic neoplasm which does not communicate with the pancreatic duct

  6. [Update on chronic pancreatitis: review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czul, Frank; Coronel, Emmanuel; Donet, Jean A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibro-inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by irreversible fibrosis of the gland with eventual failure of exocrine and endocrine functions and hallmark features of abdominal pain, malabsorption, malnutrition, diabetes mellitus and pancreatic calcifications. In many patients this disease results from a complex mix of environmental (eg, alcohol, cigarettes, and occupational chemicals), genetic factors and a few patients with hereditary or autoimmune disease. The management includes medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches with the need for interaction between various specialties, calling for a concerted multidisciplinary approach. This review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the studies summarizing the epidemiology, etiology, physiopatology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatments of the disease.

  7. Molecular Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Grützmann

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs are rare primary neoplasms of the pancreas and arise sporadically or in the context of genetically determined syndromes. Depending on hormone production and sensing, PNETs clinically manifest due to a hormone-related syndrome (functional PNET or by symptoms related to tumor bulk effects (non-functional PNET. So far, radical surgical excision is the only therapy to cure the disease. Development of tailored non-surgical approaches has been impeded by the lack of experimental laboratory models and there is, therefore, a limited understanding of the complex cellular and molecular biology of this heterogeneous group of neoplasm. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of tumorigenesis of familial and sporadic PNETs on a cellular and molecular level. Open questions in the field of PNET research are discussed with specific emphasis on the relevance of disease management.

  8. Molecular Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehehalt, Florian; Franke, Ellen; Pilarsky, Christian; Grützmann, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare primary neoplasms of the pancreas and arise sporadically or in the context of genetically determined syndromes. Depending on hormone production and sensing, PNETs clinically manifest due to a hormone-related syndrome (functional PNET) or by symptoms related to tumor bulk effects (non-functional PNET). So far, radical surgical excision is the only therapy to cure the disease. Development of tailored non-surgical approaches has been impeded by the lack of experimental laboratory models and there is, therefore, a limited understanding of the complex cellular and molecular biology of this heterogeneous group of neoplasm. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of tumorigenesis of familial and sporadic PNETs on a cellular and molecular level. Open questions in the field of PNET research are discussed with specific emphasis on the relevance of disease management

  9. Discussion of difficult problems of early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Xiaozhong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a common malignant neoplasm of the pancreas with an extremely high mortality. Currently, the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is still not ideal. Attention should be paid to some clinical warning symptoms, such as unexplained abdominal and back pain, jaundice, and unexpected diabetes. Additionally, the combined use of CA19-9, CEA, and other tumor markers, the attention to biochemical indicators, the detection of mutation in KAI1 or p53 gene, and the exploration of the value of miRNA in clinical diagnosis are of great significance. On the other hand, ultrasound, CT, MRCP, ERCP, PET-CT, and other imaging methods, as well as effective collection of cytology specimens, should be performed. Thus, there is hope for the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  10. A rare case with synchronous gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, and uterine leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabadzhieva, Elena; Yonkov, Atanas; Bonev, Sasho; Bulanov, Dimitar; Taneva, Ivanka; Vlahova, Alexandrina; Dikov, Tihomir; Dimitrova, Violeta

    2016-11-15

    Although gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, they comprise less than 1% of all gastrointestinal tumors. Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the gastro-enteropancreatic system are also rare, representing about 2% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Pancreatic localization of NET is extremely uncommon-these tumors are only 1-5% of all pancreatic cancers. We describe an unusual case with triple tumor localization-a gastric tumor, a formation in the pancreas, which involves the retroperitoneal space, and a uterine leiomyoma. The exact diagnosis was confirmed with immunohistochemical study after surgical treatment of the patient. Distal pancreatic resection, splenectomy, partial gastrectomy, omentectomy, and hysterectomy were performed. The histological examination proved an epithelioid type of gastric GIST. Immunostaining showed focal positive expression of c-kit and no mitotic figures per 50 HPF. Histology of the pancreatic and retroperitoneal formation proved a well-differentiated NET with origin from the islets of Langerhans. The immunohistochemical study demonstrated co-expression of chromogranin A and synaptophysin. This is the fourth case published so far of a patient with synchronous pancreatic NET and gastric GIST. The main objective of the study is to present a unique case because we have not found any reports for coexistence of the described three types of neoplasm, as in our patient, and we hope that it will be valuable in the future investigations about the genesis, diagnosis, and treatment of these types of tumors.

  11. Exocrine dysfunction correlates with endocrinal impairment of pancreas in Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H R Prasanna Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic abnormal metabolic condition, which manifests elevated blood sugar level over a prolonged period. The pancreatic endocrine system generally gets affected during diabetes, but often abnormal exocrine functions are also manifested due to its proximity to the endocrine system. Fecal elastase-1 (FE-1 is found to be an ideal biomarker to reflect the exocrine insufficiency of the pancreas. Aim: The aim of this study was conducted to assess exocrine dysfunction of the pancreas in patients with type-2 DM (T2DM by measuring FE levels and to associate the level of hyperglycemia with exocrine pancreatic dysfunction. Methodology: A prospective, cross-sectional comparative study was conducted on both T2DM patients and healthy nondiabetic volunteers. FE-1 levels were measured using a commercial kit (Human Pancreatic Elastase ELISA BS 86-01 from Bioserv Diagnostics. Data analysis was performed based on the important statistical parameters such as mean, standard deviation, standard error, t-test-independent samples, and Chi-square test/cross tabulation using SPSS for Windows version 20.0. Results: Statistically nonsignificant (P = 0.5051 relationship between FE-1 deficiency and age was obtained, which implied age as a noncontributing factor toward exocrine pancreatic insufficiency among diabetic patients. Statistically significant correlation (P = 0.003 between glycated hemoglobin and FE-1 levels was also noted. The association between retinopathy (P = 0.001 and peripheral pulses (P = 0.001 with FE-1 levels were found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: This study validates the benefit of FE-1 estimation, as a surrogate marker of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, which remains unmanifest and subclinical.

  12. {sup 177}Lutetium-DOTATATE peptide radio-receptor therapy for patients with endocrine neoplasm and the individualized semi-automatic dosimetry. A retrospective analysis; {sup 177}Lutetium-DOTATATE-Peptid-Radio-Rezeptor-Therapie bei Patienten mit neuroendokrinen Neoplasien und die individualisierte, semi-automatische-Dosimetrie. Eine retrospektive Analyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeser, Anastassia

    2016-09-28

    The {sup 177}lutetium-DOTATATE peptide radio-receptor therapy is a promising approach for the palliative treatment of patients with inoperable endocrine neoplasm. The individually variable biological dispersion and the tumor uptake including the protection of critical organs require a precise and reliable organ and tumor dosimetry. The HERMES Hybrid dosimetry module has appeared as reliable and user-friendly tool for clinical application. The next step is supposed to by the complete integration of 3D SPECT imaging.

  13. Purinergic receptors in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, I

    2008-09-01

    The pancreas is a complex gland performing both endocrine and exocrine functions. In recent years there has been increasing evidence that both endocrine and exocrine cells possess purinergic receptors, which influence processes such as insulin secretion and epithelial ion transport. Most commonly, these processes have been viewed separately. In beta cells, stimulation of P2Y(1) receptors amplifies secretion of insulin in the presence of glucose. Nucleotides released from secretory granules could also contribute to autocrine/paracrine regulation in pancreatic islets. In addition to P2Y(1) receptors, there is also evidence for other P2 and adenosine receptors in beta cells (P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(6), P2X subtypes and A(1) receptors) and in glucagon-secreting alpha cells (P2X(7), A(2) receptors). In the exocrine pancreas, acini release ATP and ATP-hydrolysing and ATP-generating enzymes. P2 receptors are prominent in pancreatic ducts, and several studies indicate that P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(11), P2X(4) and P2X(7) receptors could regulate secretion, primarily by affecting Cl(-) and K(+) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) signalling. In order to understand the physiology of the whole organ, it is necessary to consider the full complement of purinergic receptors on different cells as well as the structural and functional relation between various cells within the whole organ. In addition to the possible physiological function of purinergic receptors, this review analyses whether the receptors could be potential therapeutic targets for drug design aimed at treatment of pancreatic diseases.

  14. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonelli, Francesco; Giudici, Francesco; Giusti, Francesca; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed the literature about entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1) to clarify their demographic features, localization imaging, practice, and appropriate therapeutical strategies, analyzing the current approach to entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1. Despite the fact that hyperparathyroidism is usually the first manifestation of MEN1, the penetrance of these tumors is similar. They are characterized by multiplicity of lesions, variable expression of the tumors, and propensity for malignant degeneration. Both the histological type and the size of MEN1 neuroendocrine tumors correlate with malignancy. Monitoring of pancreatic peptides and use of imaging exams allow early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment, resulting in prevention of metastatic disease and improvement of long-term survival. Surgery is often the treatment of choice for MEN1-neuroendocrine tumors. The rationale for surgical approach is to curtail malignant progression of the disease, and to cure the associated biochemical syndrome, should it be present

  15. Basal serum pancreatic polypeptide is dependent on age and gender in an adult population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes Damholt, M; Rasmussen, B K; Hilsted, L

    1997-01-01

    This study is the first epidemiologically based study of basal levels of serum pancreatic polypeptide (s-PP). The basal level of serum PP has become a field of interest mainly due to the role of PP as an endocrine tumour marker, and as a marker of pancreatic neuroendocrine function after pancreas...... a monospecific radioimmunoassay. Fasting serum pancreatic polypeptide depended on age and gender. The results demonstrated that fasting pancreatic polypeptide levels increase exponentially with age. Fitted separately for each sex, basal serum pancreatic polypeptide was found to increase by approximately 3% per...... reports on the fasting levels of serum pancreatic polypeptide are most likely due to lack of adjustment for age and gender. Thus, variation due to age and gender should be considered in evaluating fasting levels of serum pancreatic polypeptide. Whether similar considerations are important when evaluating...

  16. Mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas in a male patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Yoshida

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs make up a morphologic family of similar appearing tumors arising in the ovary and various extraovarian organs such as pancreas, hepatobiliary tract and mesentery. MCNs of the pancreas occur almost exclusively in women. Here, we report a rare case of MCN in a male patient. A 39-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the chief complaint of back pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a multilocular cyctic mass 6.3 cm in diameter in the pancreatic tail. In addition, the outer wall and septae with calcification were demonstrated in the cystic lesion. On magnetic resonance imaging , the cystic fluid had low intensity on T1-weighted imaging and high intensity on T2-weighted imaging. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP showed neither communication between the cystic lesion and the main pancreatic duct nor encasement of the main pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasonography revealed neither solid component nor thickness of the septae in the cystic lesion. Consequently, we performed distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy under the diagnosis of cystic neoplasia of the pancreas. Histopathologically, the cystic lesion showed two distinct component: an inner epithelial layer and an outer densely cellular ovarian-type stromal layer. Based on these findings, the cystic lesion was diagnosed as MCN.

  17. Road accident due to a pancreatic insulinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Amilcare; Desiderio, Jacopo; Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Trastulli, Stefano; Barberini, Francesco; Corsi, Alessia; Cacurri, Alban; Renzi, Claudio; Anastasio, Fabio; Battista, Francesca; Pucci, Giacomo; Noya, Giuseppe; Schillaci, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    Insulinoma is a rare pancreatic endocrine tumor, typically sporadic and solitary. Although the Whipple triad, consisting of hypoglycemia, neuroglycopenic symptoms, and symptoms relief with glucose administration, is often present, the diagnosis may be challenging when symptoms are less typical. We report a case of road accident due to an episode of loss of consciousness in a patient with pancreatic insulinoma. In the previous months, the patient had occasionally reported nonspecific symptoms. During hospitalization, endocrine examinations were compatible with an insulin-producing tumor. Abdominal computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging allowed us to identify and localize the tumor. The patient underwent a robotic distal pancreatectomy with partial omentectomy and splenectomy. Insulin-producing tumors may go undetected for a long period due to nonspecific clinical symptoms, and may cause episodes of loss of consciousness with potentially lethal consequences. Robot-assisted procedures can be performed with the same techniques of the traditional surgery, reducing surgical trauma, intraoperative blood loss, and hospital stays.

  18. Mutational spectrum of intraepithelial neoplasia in pancreatic heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Changqing; Gocke, Christopher D; Hruban, Ralph H; Belchis, Deborah A

    2016-02-01

    Heterotopic pancreatic parenchyma recapitulates the normal pancreas in extrapancreatic locations and, on rare occasions, can even give rise to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The genetic signatures of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesions are well characterized. We explored the genetic alterations in precursor lesions (intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms [IPMN], pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia [PanIN]) in patients with pancreatic heterotopias but without concomitant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. This allowed us to determine whether the stereotypical dysplasia--infiltrating carcinoma sequence also occurs in these extrapancreatic foci. Seven cases of heterotopic pancreas with ductal precursor lesions were identified. These included 2 IPMNs with focal high-grade dysplasia and 5 PanINs with low- to moderate-grade dysplasia (PanIN grades 1-2). Neoplastic epithelium was microdissected and genomic DNA was extracted. Sequencing of commonly mutated hotspots (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, BRAF, and GNAS) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesions was performed. Both IPMNs were found to have KRAS codon 12 mutations. The identification of KRAS mutations suggests a genetic pathway shared with IPMN of the pancreas. No mutations were identified in our heterotopic PanINs. One of the possible mechanisms for the development of dysplasia in these lesions is field effect. At the time of these resections, there was no clinical or pathologic evidence of a prior or concomitant pancreatic lesion. However, a clinically undetectable lesion is theoretically possible. Therefore, although a field effect cannot be excluded, there was no evidence for it in this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pancreatic enucleation using the da Vinci robotic surgical system: a report of 26 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yusheng; Peng, Chenghong; Shen, Baiyong; Deng, Xiaxing; Jin, Jiabin; Wu, Zhichong; Zhan, Qian; Li, Hongwei

    2016-12-01

    As a tissue-sparing procedure, pancreatic enucleation has become an alternative for benign or borderline pancreatic tumours; it has been proved to be safe and feasible. To date, a large sample size of robotic pancreatic enucleation has not been reported. This study aimed to discuss the clinical evaluation and postoperative complications after robotic pancreatic enucleation and compare it with open surgery. Patients who underwent robotic or open pancreatic enucleation during December 2010-December 2014 at Shanghai Ruijin Hospital, affiliated with the Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine in China, were included. Clinical data were collected and analysed. Patients were divided into an open group and a robotic group: 26 patients underwent robotic pancreatic enucleation, of whom 13 patients were female. The mean age was 51.7 years, the operation time was 125.7 ± 58.8 min, blood loss was 49.4 ± 33.4 ml and mean tumour size was 18.8 ± 7.9 mm; 17 patients underwent open pancreatic enucleation, of whom 11 were female. The mean age was 54.6 ± 17.2 min, blood loss was 198.5 ± 70.7 ml and mean tumour size was 3.5 ± 1.9 cm. Pathology included insulinomas, intrapancreatic mucinous neoplasmas (IPMNs), pancreatic neuro-endocrine tumours (PNETs), solid pseudopapillary tumours (SPTs) and serous cystadenomas (SCAs). Robotic pancreatic enucleations were associated with less trauma, shorter operation time, less blood loss and faster wound recovery compared with open pancreatic enucleation. Pancreatic fistulas (PFs) were the main complication that occurred in the robotic group; infection also occurred in the open group. All patients recovered after effective drainage and the use of somatostatin. The mean follow-up time was 25 months. No recurrence was discovered, and one patient in the open group suffered endocrine insufficiency. Robotic pancreatic enucleation is a safe and effective surgical procedure for pancreatic benign and borderline tumours. It produces less

  20. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function in children following near-total pancreatectomy for diffuse congenital hyperinsulinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Ved Bhushan; Senniappan, Senthil; Demirbilek, Huseyin; Alam, Syeda; Flanagan, Sarah E; Ellard, Sian; Hussain, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI), the commonest cause of persistent hypoglycaemia, has two main histological subtypes: diffuse and focal. Diffuse CHI, if medically unresponsive, is managed with near-total pancreatectomy. Post-pancreatectomy, in addition to persistent hypoglycaemia, there is a very high risk of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. International referral centre for the management of CHI. Medically unresponsive diffuse CHI patients managed with near-total pancreatectomy between 1994 and 2012. Near-total pancreatectomy. Persistent hypoglycaemia post near-total pancreatectomy, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, clinical and biochemical (faecal elastase 1) pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Of more than 300 patients with CHI managed during this time period, 45 children had medically unresponsive diffuse disease and were managed with near-total pancreatectomy. After near-total pancreatectomy, 60% of children had persistent hypoglycaemia requiring medical interventions. The incidence of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was 96% at 11 years after surgery. Thirty-two patients (72%) had biochemical evidence of severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (Faecal elastase 1insufficiency was observed in 22 (49%) patients. No statistically significant difference in weight and height standard deviation score (SDS) was found between untreated subclinical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency patients and treated clinical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency patients. The outcome of diffuse CHI patients after near-total pancreatectomy is very unsatisfactory. The incidence of persistent hypoglycaemia and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is very high. The presence of clinical rather than biochemical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency should inform decisions about pancreatic enzyme supplementation.

  1. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function in children following near-total pancreatectomy for diffuse congenital hyperinsulinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ved Bhushan Arya

    Full Text Available Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI, the commonest cause of persistent hypoglycaemia, has two main histological subtypes: diffuse and focal. Diffuse CHI, if medically unresponsive, is managed with near-total pancreatectomy. Post-pancreatectomy, in addition to persistent hypoglycaemia, there is a very high risk of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.International referral centre for the management of CHI.Medically unresponsive diffuse CHI patients managed with near-total pancreatectomy between 1994 and 2012.Near-total pancreatectomy.Persistent hypoglycaemia post near-total pancreatectomy, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, clinical and biochemical (faecal elastase 1 pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.Of more than 300 patients with CHI managed during this time period, 45 children had medically unresponsive diffuse disease and were managed with near-total pancreatectomy. After near-total pancreatectomy, 60% of children had persistent hypoglycaemia requiring medical interventions. The incidence of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was 96% at 11 years after surgery. Thirty-two patients (72% had biochemical evidence of severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (Faecal elastase 1<100 µg/g. Clinical exocrine insufficiency was observed in 22 (49% patients. No statistically significant difference in weight and height standard deviation score (SDS was found between untreated subclinical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency patients and treated clinical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency patients.The outcome of diffuse CHI patients after near-total pancreatectomy is very unsatisfactory. The incidence of persistent hypoglycaemia and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is very high. The presence of clinical rather than biochemical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency should inform decisions about pancreatic enzyme supplementation.

  2. [Current alternatives in the surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis--a review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kat'uchová, Jana; Radonak, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterized as an inflammatory process affecting the pancreas that causes progressive destruction of the gland and fibrosis, with subsequent endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. The most common cause of chronic pancreatitis is alcohol use in combination with nicotine. Manifestations are persistent or recurrent painful attacks. The only parameter of successful treatment of chronic pancreatitis is a relieve from long-lasting pain and improvement of the quality of life. Surgical treatment options include drainage operations on the pancreas, pancreatic resection or a combination of both. With optimal surgical treatment performed and good patient's compliance, operations for chronic pancreatitis have low number of post-operative complications and relatively good long-term results. The continued consumption of alcohol and drugs bring about worse outcomes, sometimes even a complete failure of therapy. Chronic pancreatitis also has considerable socio-economic consequences. Due to the persisting pain and frequent hospitalization it can lead to long-term disability and early retirement predominantly in young patients.

  3. Chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis, therapy and follow-up results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessner, J.

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of chronic pancreatitis is increasing in industrialized countries due to the steady increase of alcohol abuse. The pathogenesis of this disease is still incompletely understood. A cure is not possible. The knowledge of the patients history and a thorough clinical investigation together with the availability of a wide array of laboratory tests and imaging procedures enable the physician to characterize the stage of the disease. Exact knowledge of the present pancreatic morphology, potential complications of the disease, and knowledge about the present exocrine and endocrine function capacity are prerequisites for adequate therapeutic decision making. The therapeutic possibilities include termination of alcohol abuse, various options of treatment of pain according to the various pathogenetic possibilities leading to pain, pancreatic digestive enzyme supplementation, treatment of diabetes, and either endoscopic or surgical treatments of complications of the disease. (orig.) [de

  4. No Association of Blood Type O With Neuroendocrine Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nell, Sjoerd; van Leeuwaarde, Rachel S.; Pieterman, Carolina R. C.; de Laat, Joanne M.; Hermus, Ad R.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; de Herder, Wouter W.; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N.; Drent, Madeleine L.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Havekes, Bas; Borel Rinkes, Inne H. M.; Vriens, Menno R.; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2015-01-01

    An association between ABO blood type and the development of cancer, in particular, pancreatic cancer, has been reported in the literature. An association between blood type O and neuroendocrine tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) patients was recently suggested. Therefore, blood

  5. No Association of Blood Type O With Neuroendocrine Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nell, S.; Leeuwaarde, R.S. van; Pieterman, C.R.; Laat, J.M. de; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Dekkers, O.M.; Herder, W.W. de; Horst-Schrivers, A.N. van der; Drent, M.L.; Bisschop, P.H.; Havekes, B.; Rinkes, I.H.; Vriens, M.R.; Valk, G.D.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: An association between ABO blood type and the development of cancer, in particular, pancreatic cancer, has been reported in the literature. An association between blood type O and neuroendocrine tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) patients was recently suggested. Therefore,

  6. No Association of Blood Type O With Neuroendocrine Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nell, Sjoerd; Van Leeuwaarde, Rachel S.; Pieterman, Carolina R. C.; de Laat, Joanne M.; Hermus, Ad R.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; de Herder, Wouter W.; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N.; Drent, Madeleine L.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Havekes, Bas; Rinkes, Inne H. M. Borel; Vriens, Menno R.; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2015-01-01

    Context: An association between ABO blood type and the development of cancer, in particular, pancreatic cancer, has been reported in the literature. An association between blood type O and neuroendocrine tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) patients was recently suggested. Therefore,

  7. Ten years of experience with transgastric necrosectomy for walled-off necrosis in acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busse, Malene Just; Ainsworth, Alan Patrick

    2015-01-01

    : Acute pancreatitis with walled-off necrosis has a high mortality rate. Need for additional therapy following necrosectomy was associated with fatal outcome. Endocrine and exocrine insufficiency was often seen at follow-up. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was approved by the Danish Data....... Ten patients (20%) died during their admission to our department. In total, 18 (45%) patients developed late complications defined as endocrine and/or exocrine malfunction of the pancreas (diabetes (n = 10), exocrine insufficiency (n = 4), both diabetes and exocrine insufficiency (n = 4)). CONCLUSION......INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to report our results with open transgastric necrosectomy for walled-off necrosis in acute pancreatitis over a period of ten years. METHODS: Patients operated at the department from 2003 until 2012 were studied retrospectively. RESULTS: A total of 50 patients...

  8. Comparing American Gastroenterological Association Pancreatic Cyst Management Guidelines with Fukuoka Consensus Guidelines as Predictors of Advanced Neoplasia in Patients with Suspected Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gene K; Goldberg, David S; Thiruvengadam, Nikhil; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Vollmer, Charles M; Ahmad, Nuzhat A

    2016-11-01

    In 2015, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published guidelines to provide recommendations for management of suspected pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs). The aim of this study was to compare efficacy of these with the Fukuoka consensus guidelines in predicting advanced neoplasia (AN) in patients with suspected PCNs. We performed a retrospective study of 239 patients who underwent surgical resection for suspected mucinous PCN at a tertiary care center from 2000 to 2014. Surgical pathology was the gold standard. The AGA and Fukuoka criteria were applied, and their performance in predicting AN, defined as invasive cancer or high-grade dysplasia (HGD), was assessed. Advanced neoplasia was found in 71 of 239 (29.7%) patients (28 invasive cancer, 43 HGD). The Fukuoka "high-risk" (FG-HR) and AGA "high-risk" (AGA-HR) criteria identified patients with AN with sensitivities of 28.2% and 35.2%, specificities of 95.8% and 94.0%, positive predictive values of 74.1% and 71.4%, and negative predictive values of 75.9% and 77.5%, respectively. Overall, there was no significant difference between the guidelines for prediction of AN. There were 7 and 6 cases with invasive cancer, and 23 and 24 cases with HGD missed by the FG-HR and AGA-HR guidelines, respectively. In a retrospective analysis, the AGA guidelines are not superior to the Fukuoka guidelines in identifying AN in suspected PCNs. Both sets of guidelines have fair PPV for detection of AN, which would lead to avoidable resections in patients without AN. Additionally, the high-risk features of both guidelines do not accurately identify all patients with AN. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Using CRISPR/Cas9 to Knock out Amylase in Acinar Cells Decreases Pancreatitis-Induced Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Yasunaga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm that originates from acinar cells. Acinar cells get reprogrammed to become duct cells, resulting in pancreatic cancer. Pancreatitis is an acinar cell inflammation, leading to “impaired autophagy flux”. Pancreatitis promotes acinar-to-ductal transdifferentiation. Expression of amylase gets eliminated during the progression of pancreatic cancer. Amylase is considered as an acinar cell marker; however, its function in cells is not known. Thus, we investigated whether amylase affects the acinar cell autophagy and whether it plays any role in development of pancreatitis. Here, we knocked out ATG12 in a pancreatic cancer cells and acinar cells using CRISPR/Cas9. Autophagy inhibition led to an increase in the expression of duct cell markers and a simultaneous decrease in that of acinar cell markers. It also caused an increase in cell viability and changes in mitochondrial morphology. Next, we knocked out amylase in acinar cells. Amylase deficiency decreased autophagy induced by pancreatitis. Our results suggest that amylase controls pancreatitis-induced autophagy. We found that eliminating amylase expression contributes to pancreatic cancer etiology by decreasing autophagy. Furthermore, our results indicate that amylase plays a role in selective pancreatitis-induced autophagy of pancreatic enzyme vesicles.

  10. Methylation-associated down-regulation of RASSF1A and up-regulation of RASSF1C in pancreatic endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malpeli, Giorgio; Amato, Eliana; Dandrea, Mario; Fumagalli, Caterina; Debattisti, Valentina; Boninsegna, Letizia; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Falconi, Massimo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    RASSF1A gene silencing by DNA methylation has been suggested as a major event in pancreatic endocrine tumor (PET) but RASSF1A expression has never been studied. The RASSF1 locus contains two CpG islands (A and C) and generates seven transcripts (RASSF1A-RASSF1G) by differential promoter usage and alternative splicing. We studied 20 primary PETs, their matched normal pancreas and three PET cell lines for the (i) methylation status of the RASSF1 CpG islands using methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing and (ii) expression of RASSF1 isoforms by quantitative RT-PCR in 13 cases. CpG island A methylation was evaluated by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP); pyrosequencing was applied to quantify the methylation of 51 CpGs also encompassing those explored by MSP and qMSP approaches. MSP detected methylation in 16/20 (80%) PETs and 13/20 (65%) normal pancreas. At qMSP, 11/20 PETs (55%) and 9/20 (45%) normals were methylated in at least 20% of RASSF1A alleles. Pyrosequencing showed variable distribution and levels of methylation within and among samples, with PETs having average methylation higher than normals in 15/20 (75%) cases (P = 0.01). The evaluation of mRNA expression of RASSF1 variants showed that: i) RASSF1A was always expressed in PET and normal tissues, but it was, on average, expressed 6.8 times less in PET (P = 0.003); ii) RASSF1A methylation inversely correlated with its expression; iii) RASSF1 isoforms were rarely found, except for RASSF1B that was always expressed and RASSF1C whose expression was 11.4 times higher in PET than in normal tissue (P = 0.001). A correlation between RASSF1A expression and gene methylation was found in two of the three PET cell lines, which also showed a significant increase in RASSF1A expression upon demethylating treatment. RASSF1A gene methylation in PET is higher than normal pancreas in no more than 75% of cases and as such it cannot be considered a marker for this neoplasm

  11. The clinical implications and biologic relevance of neurofilament expression in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmack, Simon; Lawrence, Ben; Svejda, Bernhard; Alaimo, Daniele; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus; Fischer, Lars; Büchler, Markus W; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin

    2012-05-15

    Although gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) exhibit widely divergent behavior, limited biologic information (apart from Ki-67) is available to characterize malignancy. Therefore, the identification of alternative biomarkers is a key unmet need. Given the role of internexin alpha (INA) in neuronal development, the authors assessed its function in neuroendocrine cell systems and the clinical implications of its expression as a GEP-NEN biomarker. Functional assays were undertaken to investigate the mechanistic role of INA in the pancreatic BON cell line. Expression levels of INA were investigated in 50 pancreatic NENs (43 primaries, 7 metastases), 43 small intestinal NENs (25 primaries, 18 metastases), normal pancreas (n = 10), small intestinal mucosa (n = 16), normal enterochromaffin (EC) cells (n = 9), mouse xenografts (n = 4) and NEN cell lines (n = 6) using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunostaining analyses. In BON cells, decreased levels of INA messenger RNA and protein were associated with the inhibition of both proliferation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. INA was not expressed in normal neuroendocrine cells but was overexpressed (from 2-fold to 42-fold) in NEN cell lines and murine xenografts. In pancreatic NENs, INA was overexpressed compared with pancreatic adenocarcinomas and normal pancreas (27-fold [P = .0001], and 9-fold [P = .02], respectively). INA transcripts were correlated positively with Ki-67 (correlation coefficient [r] = 0.5; P biologic information relevant to delineation of both pancreatic NEN tumor phenotypes and clinical behavior. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  12. Long-term results and quality of life of patients undergoing sequential surgical treatment for severe acute pancreatitis complicated by infected pancreatic necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquepalmi, Lorenza; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Rovera, Francesca; Diurni, Mario; Benevento, Angelo; Dionigi, Renzo

    2006-01-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN) is one of the most severe complications of acute pancreatitis (AP). Sequential surgical debridement represents one of the most effective treatments in terms of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this paper is to describe the quality of life and long-term results (e.g., nutritional, muscular, and pancreatic function) of patients treated by sequential necrosectomy at the Department of Surgery of the University of Insubria (Varese, Italy). Data were collected on patients undergoing sequential surgical debridement as treatment for IPN. The severity of AP was evaluated using the Ranson criteria, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) Score, and the Sepsis Score, as well as the extent of necrosis. The surgical approach was through a midline or subcostal laparotomy, followed by exploration of the peritoneal cavity, wide debridement, and peritoneal lavage. The abdomen was either left open or closed partially with a surgical zipper, with multiple re-laparotomies scheduled until debridement of necrotic tissue was complete. The long-term evaluation focused on late morbidity, performance status, and abdominal wall function. In the majority of patients (68%), mixed flora were isolated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the microorganism identified most commonly (59%), often associated with Candida albicans or C. glabrata. The mean total hospital stay was 71+/-38 days (range 13-146 days), of which 24+/-19 days (range 0-66 days) were in the intensive care unit. Eight patients died, the deaths being caused by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in seven patients and hemorrhage from the splenic artery in one. Normal exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function was observed in 28 patients (88%). At discharge, four patients had steatorrhea, which was temporary. Eight patients (23%) developed pancreatic pseudocysts, and in six, cystogastostomy was performed. Most patients (29/32, 91%) developed a post-operative hernia, but only five

  13. Fetal Adrenal Demedullation Lowers Circulating Norepinephrine and Attenuates Growth Restriction but not Reduction of Endocrine Cell Mass in an Ovine Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Placental insufficiency is associated with fetal hypoglycemia, hypoxemia, and elevated plasma norepinephrine (NE that become increasingly pronounced throughout the third trimester and contribute to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR. This study evaluated the effect of fetal adrenal demedullation (AD on growth and pancreatic endocrine cell mass. Placental insufficiency-induced IUGR was created by exposing pregnant ewes to elevated ambient temperatures during mid-gestation. Treatment groups consisted of control and IUGR fetuses with either surgical sham or AD at 98 days gestational age (dGA; term = 147 dGA, a time-point that precedes IUGR. Samples were collected at 134 dGA. IUGR-sham fetuses were hypoxemic, hypoglycemic, and hypoinsulinemic, and values were similar in IUGR-AD fetuses. Plasma NE concentrations were ~5-fold greater in IUGR-sham compared to control-sham, control-AD, and IUGR-AD fetuses. IUGR-sham and IUGR-AD fetuses weighed less than controls. Compared to IUGR-sham fetuses, IUGR-AD fetuses weighed more and asymmetrical organ growth was absent. Pancreatic β-cell mass and α-cell mass were lower in both IUGR-sham and IUGR-AD fetuses compared to controls, however, pancreatic endocrine cell mass relative to fetal mass was lower in IUGR-AD fetuses. These findings indicate that NE, independently of hypoxemia, hypoglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, influence growth and asymmetry of growth but not pancreatic endocrine cell mass in IUGR fetuses.

  14. Fetal Adrenal Demedullation Lowers Circulating Norepinephrine and Attenuates Growth Restriction but not Reduction of Endocrine Cell Mass in an Ovine Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Melissa A.; Macko, Antoni R.; Steyn, Leah V.; Anderson, Miranda J.; Limesand, Sean W.

    2015-01-01

    Placental insufficiency is associated with fetal hypoglycemia, hypoxemia, and elevated plasma norepinephrine (NE) that become increasingly pronounced throughout the third trimester and contribute to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). This study evaluated the effect of fetal adrenal demedullation (AD) on growth and pancreatic endocrine cell mass. Placental insufficiency-induced IUGR was created by exposing pregnant ewes to elevated ambient temperatures during mid-gestation. Treatment groups consisted of control and IUGR fetuses with either surgical sham or AD at 98 days gestational age (dGA; term = 147 dGA), a time-point that precedes IUGR. Samples were collected at 134 dGA. IUGR-sham fetuses were hypoxemic, hypoglycemic, and hypoinsulinemic, and values were similar in IUGR-AD fetuses. Plasma NE concentrations were ~5-fold greater in IUGR-sham compared to control-sham, control-AD, and IUGR-AD fetuses. IUGR-sham and IUGR-AD fetuses weighed less than controls. Compared to IUGR-sham fetuses, IUGR-AD fetuses weighed more and asymmetrical organ growth was absent. Pancreatic β-cell mass and α-cell mass were lower in both IUGR-sham and IUGR-AD fetuses compared to controls, however, pancreatic endocrine cell mass relative to fetal mass was lower in IUGR-AD fetuses. These findings indicate that NE, independently of hypoxemia, hypoglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, influence growth and asymmetry of growth but not pancreatic endocrine cell mass in IUGR fetuses. PMID:25584967

  15. Neoadjuvant Treatment of Nonfunctioning Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors with [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]Octreotate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Esther I.; van Eijck, Casper H.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Nieveen van Dijkum, Elisabeth J.; Teunissen, Jaap J.; Kam, Boen L.; de Herder, Wouter W.; Feelders, Richard A.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Brabander, Tessa; Krenning, Eric P.; Kwekkeboom, Dik J.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare neoplasms for which surgery has almost the only potential for cure. When surgery is not possible because of tumor size and vascular involvement, neoadjuvant treatment with [(177)Lu-DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate ((177)Lu-octreotate) may be an option. We

  16. Current surgical treatment for chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimoto, Takayuki; Uchida, Eiji; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Yamahatsu, Kazuya; Matsushita, Akira; Katsuno, Akira; Cho, Kazumitsu; Kawamoto, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a painful, yet benign inflammatory process of the pancreas. Surgical management should be individualized because the pain is multifactorial and its mechanisms vary from patient to patient. Two main pathogenetic theories for the mechanisms of pain in CP have been proposed: the neurogenic theory and the theory of increased intraductal/intraparenchymal pressures. The latter theory is strongly supported by the good results of drainage procedures in the surgical management of CP. Other possible contributing factors include pancreatic ischemia; a centrally sensitized pain state; and the development of complications, such as pseudocysts and stenosis of the duodenum or common bile duct. Common indications for surgery include intractable pain, suspicion of neoplasm, and complications that cannot be resolved with radiological or endoscopic treatments. Operative procedures have been historically classified into 4 categories: decompression procedures for diseased and obstructed pancreatic ducts; resection procedures for the proximal, distal, or total pancreas; denervation procedures of the pancreas; and hybrid procedures. Pancreaticoduodenectomy and pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, once the standard operations for patients with CP, have been replaced by hybrid procedures, such as duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection, the Frey procedure, and their variants. These procedures are safe and effective in providing long-term pain relief and in treating CP-related complications. Hybrid procedures should be the operations of choice for patients with CP.

  17. Pancreatitis in dogs and cats: definitions and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, P

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas, is commonly seen in dogs and cats and presents a spectrum of disease severities from acute to chronic and mild to severe. It is usually sterile, but the causes and pathophysiology remain poorly understood. The acute end of the disease spectrum is associated with a high mortality but the potential for complete recovery of organ structure and function if the animal survives. At the other end of the spectrum, chronic pancreatitis in either species can cause refractory pain and reduce quality of life. It may also result in progressive exocrine and endocrine functional impairment. There is confusion in the veterinary literature about definitions of acute and chronic pancreatitis and there are very few studies on the pathophysiology of naturally occurring pancreatitis in dogs and cats. This article reviews histological and clinical definitions and current understanding of the pathophysiology and causes in small animals by comparison with the much more extensive literature in humans, and suggests many areas that need further study in dogs and cats. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  18. Exocrine cell-derived microparticles in response to lipopolysaccharide promote endocrine dysfunction in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Andrei Alexandru; Gleizes, Céline; Alhosin, Mahmoud; Yala, Elhassan; Zobairi, Fatiha; Leclercq, Alexandre; Stoian, Gheorghe; Mitrea, Ioan Liviu; Prévost, Gilles; Toti, Florence; Kessler, Laurence

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes in cystic fibrosis (CF) is a result of exocrine pancreas alteration followed by endocrine dysfunction at a later stage. Microparticles (MPs) are plasma membrane fragments shed from stimulated or damaged cells that act as cellular effectors. Our aim was to identify a new form of interaction between exocrine and endocrine pancreatic cells mediated by exocrine MPs, in the context of recurrent infection in CF. MPs from either human exocrine CFTRΔF508-mutated (CFPAC-1) cells or exocrine normal pancreatic (PANC-1) cells were collected after treatment by LPS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and applied to rat endocrine normal insulin-secreting RIN-m5F cells. MP membrane integration in target cells was established by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry using PKH26 lipid probe. Apoptosis, lysosomal activity, insulin secretion were measured after 18 h. MP-mediated NF-κB activation was measured in HEK-Blue reporter cells by SEAP reporter gene system and in RIN-m5F cells by Western blot. In endocrine normal cells, CFTR inhibition was achieved using Inhibitor-172. Compared to PANC-1, MPs from CFPAC-1 significantly reduced insulin secretion and lysosomal activity in RIN-m5F. MPs induced NF-κB activation by increasing the level of IκB phosphorylation. Moreover, the inhibition of NF-κB activation using specific inhibitors was associated with a restored insulin secretion. Interestingly, CFTR inhibition in normal RIN-m5F cells promoted apoptosis and decreased insulin secretion. During recurrent infections associated with CF, exocrine MPs may contribute to endocrine cell dysfunction via NF-κB pathways. Membrane CFTR dysfunction is associated with decreased insulin secretion. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Data on morphometric analysis of the pancreatic islets from C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Aparecido da Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The endocrine portion of the pancreas, which is characterized by pancreatic islets, has been widely investigated among different species. The BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice are extensively used in experimental research, and the morphometric differences in the pancreatic islets of these animals have not been evaluated so far. Thus, our data have a comparative perspective related to the morphometric analysis of area, diameters, circularity, and density of pancreatic islets from BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. The data presented here are focused to evaluate the differences in morphology of pancreatic islets of two common laboratory mouse strains. Keywords: Pancreatic islets, Morphometry, BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice

  20. Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Pancreatic Metastasis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Alibakhshi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumors of pancreas are usually primary neoplasms and pancreatic metastases are rare findings. We are reporting a case of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the esophagus with pancreatic metastasis. A 59-year old woman was admitted with chief complaint of abdominal pain and mass. She was a known case of esophageal SCC since 4 years before when she had undergone transthoracic esophagectomy and cervical esophago-gastrostomy. In order to evaluate recent abdominal mass, CT scan was done which revealed septated cystic lesion in the body and the tail of the pancreas. Palliative resection of the tumor was performed and its histological study showed SCC compatible with her previously diagnosed esophageal cancer.

  1. Pancreatic endocrine tumors or apudomas Tumores endocrinos o apudomas pancreáticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modesto Varas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET are difficult to diagnose. Their accurate localization using imaging techniques is intended to provide a definite cure. The goal of this retrospective study was to review a PET series from a private institution. Patients and methods: the medical records of 19 patients with PETs were reviewed, including 4 cases of MEN-1, for a period of 17 years (1994-2010. A database was set up with ten parameters: age, sex, symptoms, imaging techniques, size and location in the pancreas, metastasis, surgery, complications, adjuvant therapies, definite diagnosis, and survival or death. Results: a total of 19 cases were analyzed. Mean age at presentation was 51 years (range: 26-67 y (14 males, 5 females, and tumor size was 5 to 80 mm (X: 20 mm. Metastatic disease was present in 37% (7/19. Most underwent the following imaging techniques: ultrasounds, computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Fine needle aspiration punction (FNA was performed for the primary tumor in 4 cases. Non-functioning: 7 cases (37%, insulinoma: 2 cases [1 with possible multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN], Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES from gastrinoma: 5 (3 with MEN-1, glucagonoma: 2 cases, 2 somatostatinomas; carcinoid: 1 case with carcinoide-like syndrome. Most patients were operated upon: 14/19 (73%. Four (4/14: 28% has postoperative complications following pancreatectomy: pancreatitis, pseudocyst, and abdominal collections. Some patients received chemotherapy (4, somatostatin (3 and interferon (2 before or after surgery. Median follow-up was 48 months. Actuarial survival during the study was 73.6% (14/19. Conclusions: age was similar to that described in the literature. Males were predominant. Most cases were non-functioning (37%. Most patients underwent surgery (73% with little morbidity (28% and an actuarial survival of 73.6% at the time of the study.Introducción y objetivo: los tumores endocrinos pancre

  2. Treatment of Pancreatic and Periampullary Cancers at a Community Hospital: Successful Application of Tertiary Care Treatment Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesinger, Robert C.; Davis, Jan W.; Hill, Britani; Johnston, W. Cory; Gray, Carl; Johnson, Harold; Ingersoll, Leslye; Whipple, Gary; Reilly, Mark; Harris, Robert; Hansen, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Background. The treatment of pancreatic cancer and other periampullary neoplasms is complex and challenging. Major high-volume cancer centers can provide excellent multidisciplinary care of these patients but almost two-thirds of pancreatic cancer patients are treated at low volume centers. There is very little published data from low volume community cancer programs in regards to the treatment of periampullary cancer. In this study, a review of comprehensive periampullary cancer care at two low volume hospitals with comparison to national standards is presented. Methods. This is a retrospective review of 70 consecutive patients with periampullary neoplasms who underwent surgery over a 5-year period (2006–2010) at two community hospitals. Results. There were 51 successful resections of 70 explorations (73%) including 34 Whipple procedures. Mortality rate was 2.9%. Comparison of these patients to national standards was made in terms of operative mortality, resectability rate, administration of adjuvant therapy, clinical trial participation and overall survival. The results in these patients were comparable to national standards. Conclusions. With adequate commitment of resources and experienced surgical and oncologic practitioners, community cancer centers can meet national tertiary care standards in terms of pancreatic and periampullary cancer care. PMID:22312532

  3. Combined pancreatic and duodenal transection injury: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungazi, Simbarashe Gift; Mbanje, Chenesa; Chihaka, Onesai; Madziva, Noah

    2017-01-01

    Combined pancreatic-duodenal injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are rare. These injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality, and their emergent management is a challenge. We report a case of combined complete pancreatic (through the neck) and duodenal (first part) transections in a 24-year-old male secondary to blunt abdominal trauma following a motor vehicle crash. The duodenal stumps were closed separately and a gastrojejunostomy performed for intestinal continuity. The transacted head of pancreas main duct was suture ligated and parenchyma was over sewn and buttressed with omentum. The edge of the body and tail pancreatic segment was freshened and an end to side pancreatico-jejunostomy was fashioned. A drain was left in situ. Post operatively the patient developed a pancreatic fistula which resolved with conservative management. After ten months of follow up the patient was well and showed no signs and symptoms of pancreatic insufficiency. Lengthy, complex procedures in pancreatic injuries have been associated with poor outcomes. Distal pancreatectomy or Whipple's procedure for trauma are viable options for complete pancreatic transections. But when there is concern that the residual proximal pancreatic tissue is inadequate to provide endocrine or exocrine function, preservation of the pancreatic tissue distal to the injury becomes an option. Combined pancreatic and duodenal injuries are rare and often fatal. Early identification, resuscitation and surgical intervention is warranted. Because of the large number of possible combinations of injuries to the pancreas and duodenum, no one form of therapy is appropriate for all patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Unusual presentation of a pancreatic insulinoma in helical CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, A.; Arias, M.; Brasa, J. [Unidad de Resonancia Magnetica (Medtec), Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain); Casal, M. [Unidad de Radiologia Intervencionista, Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain); Paramo, C. [Servicio de Endocrinologia, Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain); Fiano, C. [Servicio de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain)

    2001-06-01

    Insulinomas are pancreatic neoplasms that can be radiologically characterized typically because of their tendency to present intense and early contrast enhancement with a wash-out phenomenon. In this sense, we report an unusual case of a hypovascular solid pancreatic insulinoma confirmed with surgery and pathologic analysis, in a patient with normal serum insulin levels. In the two-phase helical CT, the mass behaved as a hypodense lesion with respect to the surrounding pancreatic parenchyma during the arterial phase and as a hypointense lesion during the dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. Pathologic examination demonstrated a hypercellular tumor with poor vascularization of intervening stroma which showed prominent amyloid deposits. (orig.)

  5. Unusual presentation of a pancreatic insulinoma in helical CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, A.; Arias, M.; Brasa, J.; Casal, M.; Paramo, C.; Fiano, C.

    2001-01-01

    Insulinomas are pancreatic neoplasms that can be radiologically characterized typically because of their tendency to present intense and early contrast enhancement with a wash-out phenomenon. In this sense, we report an unusual case of a hypovascular solid pancreatic insulinoma confirmed with surgery and pathologic analysis, in a patient with normal serum insulin levels. In the two-phase helical CT, the mass behaved as a hypodense lesion with respect to the surrounding pancreatic parenchyma during the arterial phase and as a hypointense lesion during the dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. Pathologic examination demonstrated a hypercellular tumor with poor vascularization of intervening stroma which showed prominent amyloid deposits. (orig.)

  6. Morphological analysis and differentiation of benign cystic neoplasms of the pancreas using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieser, Christian; Heine, G.; Stelter, L.; Steffen, I.G.; Rothe, J.H.; Walter, T.C.; Denecke, T. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie; Fischer, C. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum (Germany). Medizinische Klinik m. S. Hepatologie und Gastroenterologie; Bahra, M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum (Germany). Klinik fuer Allgemein, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate morphologic characteristics and establish a standardized diagnostic algorithm to differentiate benign cystic pancreatic tumors (CPTs) in non-pancreatitis patients using multidetector computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: Patients with histopathologically proven CPTs who had undergone MRI and/or CT and subsequent tumor resection in our institution were retrospectively identified. Images were analyzed for morphology and enhancement patterns by three independent blinded observers. Preoperative image findings were correlated with histopathological results. Based on the evaluated morphologic parameters, a standardized diagnostic algorithm was designed to help characterize the lesions. Results: A total of 62 consecutive patients with 64 CPTs were identified from the surgical database (21 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms; 10 mucinous cystic neoplasms; 12 serous microcystic adenomas; 3 serous oligocystic adenomas; 6 solid pseudopapillary tumors; 12 neuroendocrine neoplasms). The overall averaged accuracy for the 3 observers was 89.9 % for CT and 93.1 % for MRI with increasing overall accuracy in relation to the experience of the observer (88.2 %, 91.5 %, and 93.8 %, respectively). Overall, the generalized kappa value was 0.69 (CT, 0.64; MRI, 0.76); p < 0.001. The accuracy of the standardized diagnostic algorithm was 91.1 %. Conclusion: It is possible to characterize benign CPTs with MRI and CT, while MRI appears to be superior to CT. Diagnostic accuracy depends on the observer's experience. The standardized algorithm can aid in the differential diagnosis but still needs to be tested in other patient populations. (orig.)

  7. Chronology of endocrine differentiation and beta-cell neogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatsuka, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic and incurable disease, which results from absolute or relative insulin insufficiency. Therefore, pancreatic beta cells, which are the only type of cell that expresses insulin, is considered to be a potential target for the cure of diabetes. Although the findings regarding beta-cell neogenesis during pancreas development have been exploited to induce insulin-producing cells from non-beta cells, there are still many hurdles towards generating fully functional beta cells that can produce high levels of insulin and respond to physiological signals. To overcome these problems, a solid understanding of pancreas development and beta-cell formation is required, and several mouse models have been developed to reveal the unique features of each endocrine cell type at distinct developmental time points. Here I review our understanding of pancreas development and endocrine differentiation focusing on recent progresses in improving temporal cell labeling in vivo.

  8. Surgery of resectable nonfunctioning neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dralle, Henning; Krohn, Sabine L; Karges, Wolfram; Boehm, Bernhard O; Brauckhoff, Michael; Gimm, Oliver

    2004-12-01

    Nonfunctioning neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors (NFNEPTs) comprise about one-third of pancreatic endocrine tumors. Based on immunohistochemistry, nonfunctioning tumors are difficult to distinguish from functioning ones; therefore the final diagnosis is basically the result of a synopsis of pathology and clinical data. Owing to their incapacity to produce hormone-dependent symptoms, NFNEPTs are detected incidentally or because of uncharacteristic symptoms resulting from local or distant growth. About two-thirds of NFNEPTs are located in the pancreatic head, so jaundice may be a late symptom of this tumor. Modern diagnostic procedures are best applied by a stepwise approach: first endoscopic ultrasonography and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging followed by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy or positron emission tomography (or both). Due to significant false-positive and false-negative findings, for decision-making the latter should be confirmed by a second imaging modality. Regarding indications for surgery and the surgical approach to the pancreas, three pancreatic manifestations of NFNEPTs can be distinguished: (1) solitary benign non-multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (non-MEN-1); (2) multiple benign MEN-1; and (3) malignant NFNEPTs. Reviewing the literature and including our experience with 18 NFNEPTs (8 benign, 10 malignant) reported here, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) Solitary benign non-MEN-1 NFNEPTs can be removed by enucleation or by pancreas-, spleen-, and duodenum-preserving techniques in most cases. The choice of surgical technique depends on the location and site of the tumor and its anatomic relation to the pancreatic duct. (2) With multiple benign MEN-1 NFNEPTs, because of the characteristics of the underlying disease a preferred, more conservative concept (removal of only macrolesions) competes with a more radical procedure (left pancreatic resection with enucleation of head macrolesions). Further studies are necessary to

  9. Staging chronic pancreatitis with exocrine function tests: Are we better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperti, Cosimo; Moletta, Lucia

    2017-10-14

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas evolving in progressive fibrotic disruption of the gland with exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Although imaging features of CP are well known, their correlation with exocrine pancreatic function tests are not obvious, particularly in the early stage of the disease. There are many clinical classification of CP, all suggested for better distinguish and manage different forms based on etiological and clinical factors, and severity of the disease. Recently, a new classification of CP has been suggested: the M-ANNHEIM multiple risk factor classification that includes etiology, stage classification and degree of clinical severity. However, more accurate determination of clinical severity of CP requires a correct determination of exocrine function of the pancreas and fecal fat excretion. Recently, Kamath et al demonstrated that the evaluation of exocrine pancreatic function by acid steatocrit and fecal elastase-1 (EF-1) was helpful, but EF-1 was able to detect exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in more patients, upgrading some patients in higher stage of disease according to M-ANNHEIM classification. So, EF-1 is a more accurate test to determine exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and to stage chronic pancreatitis in the M-ANNHEIM classification. On the contrary, EF-1 determination shows low sensitivity in detecting exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in early stage of the disease.

  10. Are Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm Applicable to Other Malignancies—Assessment of Nodal Distribution in Gynecological Malignancies

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    Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Fulay, Suyash; Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy is used to reduce dose to adjacent critical structures while maintaining adequate target coverage, but it requires precise target localization. We report the 3-dimensional distribution of para-aortic (PA) lymph nodes (LN) in pelvic malignancies. We propose a guideline to accurately define the PA LN by anatomic landmarks and compare our data with published guidelines for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 46 patients with pelvic malignancies and positive PA LNs. Positive LNs were defined based on size and morphology or fluorodeoxyglucose avidity. All PA LNs were characterized into 3 groups based on location: left PA (between aorta and left psoas muscle), aortocaval (between aorta and inferior vena cava), and right paracaval (between inferior vena cava and right psoas muscle). Patients with retrocrural LNs were also analyzed. Results: One hundred thirty-three positive PA LNs were evaluated. The majority of the PA LNs were in the left PA (59%) and aortocaval (35) regions, and only 8% were in the right paracaval region. All patients with positive right paracaval LNs also had involved left PA LNs, with only 1 exception. The highest PA LN involvement was at the level of the renal vessels and was seen in 28% of patients. Of these patients with disease extending to renal vessels, 38% had retrocrural LN involvement. Conclusions: The nodal contouring for the PA region should not be defined by a fixed circumferential margin around the vessels. The left PA and aortocaval spaces should be covered adequately because these are common locations of PA LNs. For microscopic disease superiorly, contouring should extend up to renal vessels rather than a fixed bony landmark. For patients who have nodal involvement at renal vessels, one can consider including retrocrural LNs. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm are not applicable to

  11. Are Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm Applicable to Other Malignancies—Assessment of Nodal Distribution in Gynecological Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Fulay, Suyash; Beriwal, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy is used to reduce dose to adjacent critical structures while maintaining adequate target coverage, but it requires precise target localization. We report the 3-dimensional distribution of para-aortic (PA) lymph nodes (LN) in pelvic malignancies. We propose a guideline to accurately define the PA LN by anatomic landmarks and compare our data with published guidelines for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 46 patients with pelvic malignancies and positive PA LNs. Positive LNs were defined based on size and morphology or fluorodeoxyglucose avidity. All PA LNs were characterized into 3 groups based on location: left PA (between aorta and left psoas muscle), aortocaval (between aorta and inferior vena cava), and right paracaval (between inferior vena cava and right psoas muscle). Patients with retrocrural LNs were also analyzed. Results: One hundred thirty-three positive PA LNs were evaluated. The majority of the PA LNs were in the left PA (59%) and aortocaval (35) regions, and only 8% were in the right paracaval region. All patients with positive right paracaval LNs also had involved left PA LNs, with only 1 exception. The highest PA LN involvement was at the level of the renal vessels and was seen in 28% of patients. Of these patients with disease extending to renal vessels, 38% had retrocrural LN involvement. Conclusions: The nodal contouring for the PA region should not be defined by a fixed circumferential margin around the vessels. The left PA and aortocaval spaces should be covered adequately because these are common locations of PA LNs. For microscopic disease superiorly, contouring should extend up to renal vessels rather than a fixed bony landmark. For patients who have nodal involvement at renal vessels, one can consider including retrocrural LNs. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm are not applicable to

  12. Somatic mutations in PIK3CA and activation of AKT in intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kuboki, Yuko; Hatori, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Shiratori, Keiko; Kawamura, Shunji; Kobayashi, Makio; Shimizu, Michio; Ban, Shinichi; Koyama, Isamu; Higashi, Morihiro; Shin, Nobuhiro; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Morikawa, Takanori; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Unno, Michiaki; Kanno, Atsushi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Orikasa, Hideki; Watanabe, Tomoo; Nishimura, Kazuhiko; Harada, Youji; Furukawa, Toru

    2011-12-01

    Intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm (ITPN) is a recently recognized rare variant of intraductal neoplasms of the pancreas. Molecular aberrations underlying the neoplasm remain unknown. We investigated somatic mutations in PIK3CA, PTEN, AKT1, KRAS, and BRAF. We also investigated aberrant expressions of phosphorylated AKT, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), tumor protein 53 (TP53), SMAD4, and CTNNB1 in 11 cases of ITPNs and compared these data with those of 50 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), another distinct variant of pancreatic intraductal neoplasms. Mutations in PIK3CA were found in 3 of 11 ITPNs but not in IPMNs (P = 0.005; Fisher exact test). In contrast, mutations in KRAS were found in none of the ITPNs but were found in 26 of the 50 IPMNs (P = 0.001; Fisher exact test). PIK3CA mutations were associated with strong expression of phosphorylated AKT (P AKT was apparent in most ITPNs but only in a few IPMNs (P SMAD4, and CTNNB1 were not statistically different between these neoplasms. Mutations in PIK3CA and the expression of phosphorylated AKT were not associated with age, sex, tissue invasion, and patients' prognosis in ITPNs. These results indicate that activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway may play a crucial role in ITPNs but not in IPMNs. In contrast, the mutation in KRAS seems to play a major role in IPMNs but not in ITPNs. The activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway may be a potential target for molecular diagnosis and therapy of ITPNs.

  13. Main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: clinical predictors of malignancy and long-term survival following resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvia, Roberto; Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos; Bassi, Claudio; Thayer, Sarah P; Falconi, Massimo; Mantovani, William; Pederzoli, Paolo; Warshaw, Andrew L

    2004-05-01

    To describe clinical characteristics and outcomes of a large cohort of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas affecting the main pancreatic duct. IPMNs are being diagnosed with increasing frequency. Preoperative determination of malignancy remains problematic, and reported results of long-term survival following resection are conflicting. The combined databases from the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Pancreatic Unit of the University of Verona were analyzed. To avoid confusing overlap with mucinous cystic neoplasms, only patients with tumors of the main pancreatic duct (with or without side branch involvement) were included. A total of 140 tumors consecutively resected between 1990 and 2002 were classified as either benign (adenoma and borderline tumors) or malignant (carcinoma in situ or invasive cancer) to compare their characteristics and survival. Men and women were equally affected (mean age 65 years). Seven patients (12%) had adenomas, 40 (28%) borderline tumors, 25 (18%) carcinoma in situ, and 58 (42%) invasive carcinoma. The median age of patients with benign IPMN was 6.4 years younger than those with malignant tumors (P = 0.04). The principal symptoms were abdominal pain (65%), weight loss (44%), acute pancreatitis (23%), jaundice (17%), and onset or worsening of diabetes (12%); 27% of patients were asymptomatic. Jaundice and diabetes were significantly associated with malignant tumors. Five- and 10-year cancer-specific survival for patients with noninvasive tumors was 100%, and comparable survival of the 58 patients with invasive carcinoma was 60% and 50%. Cancer is found in 60% of patients with main-duct IPMNs. Patients with malignant tumors are 6 years older than their benign counterparts and have a higher likelihood of presenting with jaundice or new onset diabetes. No patients with benign tumors or carcinoma in situ died of their disease following resection, and those with invasive cancer had a markedly better

  14. Long-Term Culture of Self-renewing Pancreatic Progenitors Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Trott

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells have been proposed as an unlimited source of pancreatic β cells for studying and treating diabetes. However, the long, multi-step differentiation protocols used to generate functional β cells inevitably exhibit considerable variability, particularly when applied to pluripotent cells from diverse genetic backgrounds. We have developed culture conditions that support long-term self-renewal of human multipotent pancreatic progenitors, which are developmentally more proximal to the specialized cells of the adult pancreas. These cultured pancreatic progenitor (cPP cells express key pancreatic transcription factors, including PDX1 and SOX9, and exhibit transcriptomes closely related to their in vivo counterparts. Upon exposure to differentiation cues, cPP cells give rise to pancreatic endocrine, acinar, and ductal lineages, indicating multilineage potency. Furthermore, cPP cells generate insulin+ β-like cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that they offer a convenient alternative to pluripotent cells as a source of adult cell types for modeling pancreatic development and diabetes.

  15. Patterns of Pathomorphological Changes in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kovalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar necrosis is the basic microscopic sign of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP. Microcirculation disorder is one of the major factors in the pathogenesis and morphogenesis of ANP besides free radicals and damage of enzymatic origin. This study is dedicated to the description of microscopic changes in the pancreatic stroma in ANP, which leads to destruction of the exocrine pancreas with a putative mechanism of endocrine function preservation. This study has been carried out on histological samples of pancreas from 224 patients with ANP. Histological staining was performed with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E, Masson, Gomori methods, and PAS. Microscopy was performed with magnifications of 40×, 100×, and 400×. Vascular endothelial desquamation, stasis, and sludge are typical changes in microcirculation observed in early stages of ANP. Initially, parietal circular intravascular microthrombosis accompanied by endothelial desquamation as early as stromal swelling occurs with no detectable necrosis. Residual stroma appears between areas of necrosis and intact pancreatic tissue. Mucoid swelling is first seen in the perivascular spaces extending to the parenchyma and changing into fibrinoid imbibition causing further necrosis. Reticulin argyrophilic backbone surrounding the pancreatic acini and small ducts decompose. Pancreatic structures, which may be preserved in necrotic tissue, include nerves, major ducts, and Langerhans islets.

  16. FA1 immunoreactivity in endocrine tumours and during development of the human fetal pancreas; negative correlation with glucagon expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornehave, D; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Teisner, B

    1996-01-01

    Fetal antigen 1 (FA1) is a glycoprotein containing six epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats. It is closely similar to the protein translated from the human delta-like (dlk) cDNA and probably constitutes a proteolytically processed form of dlk. dlk is homologous to the Drosophila homeotic...... proteins delta and notch and to the murine preadipocyte differentiation factor Pref-1. These proteins participate in determining cell fate choices during differentiation. We now report that FA1 immunoreactivity is present in a number of neuroectodermally derived tumours as well as in pancreatic endocrine...... tumours. A negative correlation between FA1 and glucagon immunoreactants in these tumours prompted a reexamination of FA1 immunoreactants during fetal pancreatic development. At the earliest stages of development, FA1 was expressed by most of the non-endocrine parenchymal cells and, with ensuing...

  17. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus: a complication of diabetic neuropathy or a different type of diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Philip D; Ewald, Nils

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a frequently observed phenomenon in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alterations of exocrine pancreatic morphology can also be found frequently in diabetic patients. Several hypotheses try to explain these findings, including lack of insulin as a trophic factor for exocrine tissue, changes in secretion and/or action of other islet hormones, and autoimmunity against common endocrine and exocrine antigens. Another explanation might be that diabetes mellitus could also be a consequence of underlying pancreatic diseases (e.g., chronic pancreatitis). Another pathophysiological concept proposes the functional and morphological alterations as a consequence of diabetic neuropathy. This paper discusses the currently available studies on this subject and tries to provide an overview of the current concepts of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus.

  18. Specific Radiological Imaging Findings in Patients With Hereditary Pancreatitis During a Long Follow-up of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esch, Aura A J; Drenth, Joost P H; Hermans, John J

    2017-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammation of the pancreas. Radiological imaging is used to diagnose HP and to monitor complications. The aim of this study was to describe specific imaging findings in HP. We retrospectively collected data of HP patients with serial imaging and reviewed all radiological imaging studies (transabdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging). We included 15 HP patients, with a mean age of 32.5 years (range, 9-61 years) and mean disease duration of 24.1 years (range, 6-42 years). In total, 152 imaging studies were reviewed. Seventy-three percent of patients had a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD) (width 3.5-18 mm). The MPD varied in size during disease course, with temporary reduction in diameter after drainage procedures. A severe dilated MPD (>10 mm) often coincided with presence of intraductal calcifications (size, 1-12 mm). In 73% of patients, pancreatic parenchyma atrophy occurred, which did not correlate with presence of exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. In HP, the MPD diameter increases with time, mostly without dilated side branches, and is often accompanied by large intraductal calcifications. The size of the MPD is independent of disease state. Atrophy of pancreatic parenchyma is not correlated with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency.

  19. Adrenal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, G.; Dhliwayo, H.; Lomas, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Adenoma, myelolipoma, phaeochromocytoma, metastases, adrenocortical carcinoma, neuroblastoma, and lymphoma account for the majority of adrenal neoplasms that are encountered in clinical practice. A variety of imaging methods are available for evaluating adrenal lesions including ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and nuclear medicine techniques such as meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy and positron-emission tomography (PET). Lipid-sensitive imaging techniques such as unenhanced CT and chemical shift MRI enable detection and characterization of lipid-rich adenomas based on an unenhanced CT attenuation of ≤10 HU and signal loss on opposed-phase compared to in-phase T1-weighted images, respectively. In indeterminate cases, an adrenal CT washout study may differentiate adenomas (both lipid-rich and lipid-poor) from other adrenal neoplasms based on an absolute percentage washout of >60% and/or a relative percentage washout of >40%. This is based on the principle that adenomas show rapid contrast washout while most other adrenal neoplasms including malignant tumours show slow contrast washout instead. 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose–PET ( 18 FDG-PET) imaging may differentiate benign from malignant adrenal neoplasms by demonstrating high tracer uptake in malignant neoplasms based on the increased glucose utilization and metabolic activity found in most of these malignancies. In this review, the multi-modality imaging appearances of adrenal neoplasms are discussed and illustrated. Key imaging findings that facilitate lesion characterization and differentiation are emphasized. Awareness of these imaging findings is essential for improving diagnostic confidence and for reducing misinterpretation errors.

  20. Pancreatic Endocrine and Exocrine Function in Children following Near-Total Pancreatectomy for Diffuse Congenital Hyperinsulinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Ved Bhushan; Senniappan, Senthil; Demirbilek, Huseyin; Alam, Syeda; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Ellard, Sian; Hussain, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Context Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI), the commonest cause of persistent hypoglycaemia, has two main histological subtypes: diffuse and focal. Diffuse CHI, if medically unresponsive, is managed with near-total pancreatectomy. Post-pancreatectomy, in addition to persistent hypoglycaemia, there is a very high risk of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Setting International referral centre for the management of CHI. Patients Medically unresponsive diffuse CHI patients managed with near-total pancreatectomy between 1994 and 2012. Intervention Near-total pancreatectomy. Main Outcome Measures Persistent hypoglycaemia post near-total pancreatectomy, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, clinical and biochemical (faecal elastase 1) pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Results Of more than 300 patients with CHI managed during this time period, 45 children had medically unresponsive diffuse disease and were managed with near-total pancreatectomy. After near-total pancreatectomy, 60% of children had persistent hypoglycaemia requiring medical interventions. The incidence of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was 96% at 11 years after surgery. Thirty-two patients (72%) had biochemical evidence of severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (Faecal elastase 1pancreatectomy is very unsatisfactory. The incidence of persistent hypoglycaemia and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is very high. The presence of clinical rather than biochemical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency should inform decisions about pancreatic enzyme supplementation. PMID:24840042

  1. Mucinous cystic neoplasms and serous cystadenomas arising in the body-tail of the pancreas: MR imaging characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfredi, Riccardo; Ventriglia, Anna; Mehrabi, Sara; Boninsegna, Enrico; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto [University of Verona, Department of Radiology, Verona (Italy); Mantovani, William [Provincial Health Services, Department of Public Health and Prevention, Trento (Italy); Zamboni, Giuseppe [University of Verona, Department of Pathology, Verona (Italy); Salvia, Roberto [University of Verona, Department of Surgery, Verona (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    To identify magnetic resonance (MR)/MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) imaging signs helpful in the differential diagnosis between serous cystadenomas (SCAs) and mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs), arising from the body/tail of the pancreas. This retrospective study had institutional review board approval and informed consent was waived. Fifty-three patients with non-communicating cystic pancreatic neoplasm of the body/tail, undergoing MR/MRCP, were included. Qualitative image analysis assessed the macroscopic pattern, number of cysts, presence of central scar, contrast enhancement of peripheral wall, and mural nodules. Quantitative analysis assessed the maximum diameter of the neoplasm, thickness of the peripheral wall, and calibre of the upstream main pancreatic duct. Histopathology results revealed that 27/53 (51 %) were SCAs, 26/53 (49 %) were MCNs. Microcystic pattern was observed in 88.2 % of SCAs and 11.8 % of MCNs; macrocystic pattern was observed in 90.5 % of MCNs and 9.5 % of SCAs (p < 0.0001). Central scar was detected in 29.6 % of SCAs and no MCNs (p = 0.003). Contrast enhancement of the peripheral wall was evident in 99.5 % of MCNs and 11.5 % of SCAs (p < 0.0001); mural nodules were depicted in 94.1 % of MCNs and 5.9 % of SCAs (p < 0.0001). Median maximum diameter was 54 mm for MCNs, 32 mm for SCAs (p = 0.001); median wall thickness was 4 mm for MCNs, 2 mm for SCAs (p < 0.0001). Macrocystic pattern, enhancement of a peripheral wall and mural nodules are suggestive of MCNs; whereas microcystic pattern, lack of peripheral wall and central scar are suggestive of SCAs. (orig.)

  2. Diagnosing pancreatic cancer: the role of percutaneous biopsy and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Z.; Theis, B.; Russell, R.C.G.; House, C.; Novelli, M.; Lees, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To determine the sensitivity and complications of percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses, and whether typical computed tomography (CT) features of adenocarcinoma can reliably predict this diagnosis. Materials and methods: A 5 year retrospective analysis of percutaneous core biopsies of pancreatic masses and their CT features was undertaken. Data were retrieved from surgical/pathology databases; medical records and CT reports and images. Results: Three hundred and three patients underwent 372 biopsies; 56 of 87 patients had repeat biopsies. Malignancy was diagnosed in 276 patients, with ductal adenocarcinoma in 259 (85%). Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for diagnosing pancreatic neoplasms was 90%; for repeat biopsy it was 87%. Complications occurred in 17 (4.6%) patients, in three of whom the complications were major (1%): one abscess, one duodenal perforation, one large retroperitoneal bleed. CT features typical of ductal adenocarcinoma were: hypovascular pancreatic mass with bile and/or pancreatic duct dilatation. Atypical CT features were: isodense or hypervascular mass, calcification, non-dilated ducts, cystic change, and extensive lymphadenopathy. Defining typical CT features of adenocarcinoma as true-positives, CT had a sensitivity of 68%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 98%, and negative predictive value of 41% for diagnosing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Conclusion: Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for establishing the diagnosis was 90%. CT features typical of pancreatic adenocarcinoma had high specificity and PPV. On some occasions, especially in frail patients with co-morbidity, it might be reasonable to assume a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer if CT features are typical, and biopsy only if CT shows atypical features

  3. Diagnosing pancreatic cancer: the role of percutaneous biopsy and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Z.; Theis, B.; Russell, R.C.G.; House, C.; Novelli, M.; Lees, W.R

    2006-12-15

    Aims: To determine the sensitivity and complications of percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses, and whether typical computed tomography (CT) features of adenocarcinoma can reliably predict this diagnosis. Materials and methods: A 5 year retrospective analysis of percutaneous core biopsies of pancreatic masses and their CT features was undertaken. Data were retrieved from surgical/pathology databases; medical records and CT reports and images. Results: Three hundred and three patients underwent 372 biopsies; 56 of 87 patients had repeat biopsies. Malignancy was diagnosed in 276 patients, with ductal adenocarcinoma in 259 (85%). Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for diagnosing pancreatic neoplasms was 90%; for repeat biopsy it was 87%. Complications occurred in 17 (4.6%) patients, in three of whom the complications were major (1%): one abscess, one duodenal perforation, one large retroperitoneal bleed. CT features typical of ductal adenocarcinoma were: hypovascular pancreatic mass with bile and/or pancreatic duct dilatation. Atypical CT features were: isodense or hypervascular mass, calcification, non-dilated ducts, cystic change, and extensive lymphadenopathy. Defining typical CT features of adenocarcinoma as true-positives, CT had a sensitivity of 68%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 98%, and negative predictive value of 41% for diagnosing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Conclusion: Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for establishing the diagnosis was 90%. CT features typical of pancreatic adenocarcinoma had high specificity and PPV. On some occasions, especially in frail patients with co-morbidity, it might be reasonable to assume a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer if CT features are typical, and biopsy only if CT shows atypical features.

  4. NIK is involved in constitutive activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishina, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Gohda, Jin; Semba, Kentaro; Inoue, Jun-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has one of the poorest prognoses among human neoplasms. Constitutive activation of NF-κB is frequently observed in pancreatic cancer cells and is involved in their malignancy. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of this constitutive NF-κB activation. Here, we show that the alternative pathway is constitutively activated and NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK), a mediator of the alternative pathway, is significantly expressed in pancreatic cancer cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of NIK expression followed by subcellular fractionation revealed that NIK is constitutively involved in the processing of p100 and nuclear transport of p52 and RelB in pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, NIK silencing significantly suppressed proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. These results clearly indicate that NIK is involved in the constitutive activation of the alternative pathway and controls cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, NIK might be a novel target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  5. NIK is involved in constitutive activation of the alternative NF-{kappa}B pathway and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishina, Takashi [Division of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Noritaka [Division of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 513 Wasedatsurumaki-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Gohda, Jin [Division of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Semba, Kentaro [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 513 Wasedatsurumaki-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Inoue, Jun-ichiro, E-mail: jun-i@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2009-10-09

    Pancreatic cancer has one of the poorest prognoses among human neoplasms. Constitutive activation of NF-{kappa}B is frequently observed in pancreatic cancer cells and is involved in their malignancy. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of this constitutive NF-{kappa}B activation. Here, we show that the alternative pathway is constitutively activated and NF-{kappa}B-inducing kinase (NIK), a mediator of the alternative pathway, is significantly expressed in pancreatic cancer cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of NIK expression followed by subcellular fractionation revealed that NIK is constitutively involved in the processing of p100 and nuclear transport of p52 and RelB in pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, NIK silencing significantly suppressed proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. These results clearly indicate that NIK is involved in the constitutive activation of the alternative pathway and controls cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, NIK might be a novel target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Role of Melatonin, Galanin, and RFamide Neuropeptides QRFP26 and QRFP43 in the Neuroendocrine Control of Pancreatic β-Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacopo Gesmundo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Glucose homeostasis is finely regulated by a number of hormones and peptides released mainly from the brain, gastrointestinal tract, and muscle, regulating pancreatic secretion through cellular receptors and their signal transduction cascades. The endocrine function of the pancreas is controlled by islets within the exocrine pancreatic tissue that release hormones like insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide, and ghrelin. Moreover, both exocrine and endocrine pancreatic functions are regulated by a variety of hormonal and neural mechanisms, such as ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, or the inhibitory peptide somatostatin. In this review, we describe the role of neurohormones that have been less characterized compared to others, on the regulation of insulin secretion. In particular, we will focus on melatonin, galanin, and RFamide neuropeptides QRFP26 and QRFP43, which display either insulinotropic or insulinostatic effects. In fact, in addition to other hormones, amino acids, cytokines, and a variety of proteins, brain-derived hormones are now considered as key regulators of glucose homeostasis, representing potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diabetes and obesity.

  7. Two cases of chronic pancreatitis associated with anomalous pancreaticobiliary ductal union and SPINK1 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Sam Rho

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting from repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis that impair exocrine function and eventually produce endocrine insufficiency. Some causes of chronic pancreatitis appear to be associated with alterations in the serine&#8211;protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 , cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 , and cystic fibrosis&#8211;transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR genes, or with structural disorders in the pancreaticobiliary ductal system, such as pancreatic divisum or anomalous pancreaticobiliary ductal union (APBDU. However, it is unusual to observe both genetic alteration and structural anomaly. Here, we report 2 cases with both APBDU and a mutation in the SPINK1 genes, and we discuss the implications of these findings in clinical practice.

  8. The enteroinsular axis and endocrine pancreatic function in chronic alcohol consumers: evidence for early beta-cell hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patto, R J; Russo, E K; Borges, D R; Neves, M M

    1993-09-01

    Chronic alcohol consumers may have, as judged by functional criteria, exocrine as well as endocrine pancreatic dysfunction, the latter represented by a decreased insulin response to an oral glucose load. To investigate whether this decreased insulin response was due to an ethanol-induced beta-cell dysfunction or to an ethanol-induced dysfunction of the enteroinsular axis, we determined glucose, insulin, and C-peptide plasma concentrations following an oral and an intravenous glucose load in 16 healthy volunteer nonalcohol consumers and in 10 chronic alcohol consumers. In each group, total integrated response for glucose did not significantly change whether glucose was given orally or intravenously, indicating isoglycemic glucose loads. The total integrated response values for insulin in the alcoholic group following both glucose loads as well as C-peptide plasma concentrations were significantly lower than in the control group. Moreover, in both groups the insulin TIR values following the oral glucose load were significantly greater than the values obtained following the intravenous glucose load, indicating an incretin effect. These results indicate that the decreased insulin response observed in alcoholics was not caused by a dysfunction of the enteroinsular axis because it also occurred following an intravenous glucose load, but by an ethanol-induced beta-cell dysfunction because C-peptide and insulin were proportionally decreased in this group.

  9. Causes of death and prognostic factors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: a prospective study: comparison of 106 MEN1/Zollinger-Ellison syndrome patients with 1613 literature MEN1 patients with or without pancreatic endocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Uehara, Hirotsugu; Berna, Marc J; Jensen, Robert T

    2013-05-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is classically characterized by the development of functional or nonfunctional hyperplasia or tumors in endocrine tissues (parathyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal). Because effective treatments have been developed for the hormone excess state, which was a major cause of death in these patients in the past, coupled with the recognition that nonendocrine tumors increasingly develop late in the disease course, the natural history of the disease has changed. An understanding of the current causes of death is important to tailor treatment for these patients and to help identify prognostic factors; however, it is generally lacking.To add to our understanding, we conducted a detailed analysis of the causes of death and prognostic factors from a prospective long-term National Institutes of Health (NIH) study of 106 MEN1 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1/ZES patients) and compared our results to those from the pooled literature data of 227 patients with MEN1 with pancreatic endocrine tumors (MEN1/PET patients) reported in case reports or small series, and to 1386 patients reported in large MEN1 literature series. In the NIH series over a mean follow-up of 24.5 years, 24 (23%) patients died (14 MEN1-related and 10 non-MEN1-related deaths). Comparing the causes of death with the results from the 227 patients in the pooled literature series, we found that no patients died of acute complications due to acid hypersecretion, and 8%-14% died of other hormone excess causes, which is similar to the results in 10 large MEN1 literature series published since 1995. In the 2 series (the NIH and pooled literature series), two-thirds of patients died from an MEN1-related cause and one-third from a non-MEN1-related cause, which agrees with the mean values reported in 10 large MEN1 series in the literature, although in the literature the causes of death varied widely. In the NIH and pooled literature

  10. Alternative treatment of symptomatic pancreatic fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltberger, Georg; Schmelzle, Moritz; Tautenhahn, Hans-Michael; Krenzien, Felix; Atanasov, Georgi; Hau, Hans-Michael; Moche, Michael; Jonas, Sven

    2015-06-01

    The management of symptomatic pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy is complex and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We here report continuous irrigation and drainage of the pancreatic remnant to be a feasible and safe alternative to total pancreatectomy. Between 2005 and 2011, patients were analyzed, in which pancreaticojejunal anastomosis was disconnected because of grade C fistula, and catheters for continuous irrigation and drainage were placed close to the pancreatic remnant. Clinical data were monitored and quality of life was evaluated. A total of 13 of 202 patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy required reoperation due to symptomatic pancreatic fistula. Ninety-day mortality of these patients was 15.3%. Median length of stay on the intensive care unit and total length of stay was 18 d (range 3-45) and 46 d (range 33-96), respectively. Patients with early reoperation (<10 d) had significantly decreased length of stay on the intensive care unit and operation time (P < 0.05). Global health status after a median time of 22 mo (range 6-66) was nearly identical, when compared with that of a healthy control group. Mean follow-up was 44.4 mo (±27.2). Four patients (36.6 %) died during the follow-up period; two patients from tumor recurrence, one patient from pneumonia, and one patient for unknown reasons. Treatment of pancreatic fistula by continuous irrigation and drainage of the preserved pancreatic remnant is a simple and feasible alternative to total pancreatectomy. This technique maintains a sufficient endocrine function and is associated with low mortality and reasonable quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Is the Whipple procedure harmful for long-term outcome in treatment of chronic pancreatitis? 15-years follow-up comparing the outcome after pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy and Frey procedure in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Kai; Tomkoetter, Lena; Kutup, Asad; Erbes, Johannes; Vashist, Yogesh; Mann, Oliver; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Izbicki, Jakob R

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to report on 15-year long-term results of a randomized controlled trial comparing extended drainage procedure (Frey) and classical resectional procedure [pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PD)] in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a common inflammatory disease with a prevalence of 10 to 30 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. It is characterized by the progressive conversion of pancreatic parenchyma to fibrous tissue. Different surgical procedures are used in treatment of persistent pain. Sixty-four patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis with inflammatory mass in the pancreatic head were randomly assigned in 2 treatment groups (PD, n = 32) and (Frey, n = 32). The perioperative course of the randomized controlled trial and the 7 years follow-up have been previously published. All participating patients were contacted with a standardized, validated questionnaire (EORTC QLQ C30) to evaluate the long-term survival, quality-of-life pain, and exocrine and endocrine function. In the 15-year long-term follow-up, the pain control was good and comparable between both groups, but the quality of life was better after Frey procedure in regard of the physical status [PD: 100 (0-100) vs PD: 60 (0-100) (P = 0.011)]. No significant differences in terms of the Pain Score were detected between both groups [PD: 7 (0-100) vs Frey 4 (0-100) P = 0.258]. Seven patients after Frey OP and 6 patients after PD were free of pain. Analyzing the postoperative overall survival, a higher long-term mortality was found after PD (53%) than that found after Frey procedure (30%) resulting in a longer mean survival (14.5 ± 0.8 vs 11.3 ± 0.8 years; P = 0.037). No correlation between endocrine or exocrine pancreatic function and pain was found, whereas continuous alcohol consumption was associated with poorer outcome regarding quality of life (P treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

  12. Autologous Pancreatic Islet Transplantation in Human Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffi, Paola; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Nano, Rita; Sordi, Valeria; Melzi, Raffaella; Mercalli, Alessia; Scavini, Marina; Esposito, Antonio; Peccatori, Jacopo; Cantarelli, Elisa; Messina, Carlo; Bernardi, Massimo; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Staudacher, Carlo; Doglioni, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Secchi, Antonio; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The liver is the current site of choice for pancreatic islet transplantation, even though it is far from being ideal. We recently have shown in mice that the bone marrow (BM) may be a valid alternative to the liver, and here we report a pilot study to test feasibility and safety of BM as a site for islet transplantation in humans. Four patients who developed diabetes after total pancreatectomy were candidates for the autologous transplantation of pancreatic islet. Because the patients had contraindications for intraportal infusion, islets were infused in the BM. In all recipients, islets engrafted successfully as shown by measurable posttransplantation C-peptide levels and histopathological evidence of insulin-producing cells or molecular markers of endocrine tissue in BM biopsy samples analyzed during follow-up. Thus far, we have recorded no adverse events related to the infusion procedure or the presence of islets in the BM. Islet function was sustained for the maximum follow-up of 944 days. The encouraging results of this pilot study provide new perspectives in identifying alternative sites for islet infusion in patients with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, this is the first unequivocal example of successful engraftment of endocrine tissue in the BM in humans. PMID:23733196

  13. Computed tomographic findings in pancreatic pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frija, J.; Laval-Jeantet, M.; Larde, D.; Mathieu, D.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is actually the most suitable examination for the study of the pancreas. The evolution during the life of its thickness is studied. For the same age group pancreas sharpens from the head to the body and the tail. Pancreas progressively sharpens during the life. The comparison of the efficacy of the other imaging modalities is studied. The indications of the radiological examinations of the pancreas are evaluated during acute and chronic pancreatitis, pseudocysts, adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and endocrine tumors of the pancreas [fr

  14. Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency in Diabetes Mellitus: A Complication of Diabetic Neuropathy or a Different Type of Diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D. Hardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a frequently observed phenomenon in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alterations of exocrine pancreatic morphology can also be found frequently in diabetic patients. Several hypotheses try to explain these findings, including lack of insulin as a trophic factor for exocrine tissue, changes in secretion and/or action of other islet hormones, and autoimmunity against common endocrine and exocrine antigens. Another explanation might be that diabetes mellitus could also be a consequence of underlying pancreatic diseases (e.g., chronic pancreatitis. Another pathophysiological concept proposes the functional and morphological alterations as a consequence of diabetic neuropathy. This paper discusses the currently available studies on this subject and tries to provide an overview of the current concepts of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus.

  15. Pancreatic Stellate Cells : A Starring Role in Normal and Diseased Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoti eApte

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While the morphology and function of cells of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas have been studied over several centuries, one important cell type in the gland, the pancreatic stellate cell (PSC, had remained undiscovered until as recently as twenty years ago. Even after its first description in 1982, it was to be another 16 years before its biology could begin to be studied, because it was only in 1998 that methods were developed to isolate and culture PSCs from rodent and human pancreas. PSCs are now known to play a critical role in pancreatic fibrosis, a consistent histological feature of two major diseases of the pancreas - chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In health, PSCs maintain normal tissue architecture via regulation of the synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. Recent studies have also implied other additional functions for PSCs as progenitor cells, immune cells or intermediaries in exocrine pancreatic secretion in humans.During pancreatic injury, PSCs transform from their quiescent phase into an activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype that secretes excessive amounts of ECM proteins leading to the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. An ever increasing number of factors that stimulate and/or inhibit PSC activation via paracrine and autocrine pathways are being identified and characterized. It is also now established that PSCs interact closely with pancreatic cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression. Based on these findings, several therapeutic strategies have been examined in experimental models of chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer, in a bid to inhibit/retard PSC activation and thereby alleviate chronic pancreatitis or reduce tumour growth in pancreatic cancer. The challenge that remains is to translate these pre-clinical developments into clinically applicable treatments for patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  16. FEATURES OF ISLET-LIKE CLUSTERS GENERATION IN PANCREATIC DUCTAL CELL MOLOLAYER CULTURING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kirsanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborn rabbit pancreatic cell monolayer was obtained as we described earlier.The cultivated epithelial cells were shown by immunofluorescence to express special ductal marker CK19 and were insulin-and glucagon- negative for 10–15 days. A few fusiforms of nestin-positive cells were found in monolayer. Over 2 weeks in serum-free medium the plaques of epithelial cells became crowded and formed 3-dimentional structures – islet- like clusters. Islet-like clusters contain some insulin- and glucagon-positive cells recognized by immunohysto- chemistry staining. Pancreatic endocrine cell generation in 3-dimentional structures is discussed. 

  17. Redifferentiation of insulin-secreting cells after in vitro expansion of adult human pancreatic islet tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, Andreas; Nolan, Anna L.; Blacken, Robyn A.; Habener, Joel F.

    2005-01-01

    Cellular replacement therapy holds promise for the treatment of diabetes mellitus but donor tissue is severely limited. Therefore, we investigated whether insulin-secreting cells could be differentiated in vitro from a monolayer of cells expanded from human donor pancreatic islets. We describe a three-step culture protocol that allows for the efficient generation of insulin-producing cell clusters from in vitro expanded, hormone-negative cells. These clusters express insulin at levels of up to 34% that of average freshly isolated human islets and secrete C-peptide upon membrane depolarization. They also contain cells expressing the other major islet hormones (glucagon, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide). The source of the newly differentiated endocrine cells could either be indigenous stem/progenitor cells or the proliferation-associated dedifferentiation and subsequent redifferentiation of mature endocrine cells. The in vitro generated cell clusters may be efficacious in providing islet-like tissue for transplantation into diabetic recipients

  18. Pancreatic mesenchyme regulates epithelial organogenesis throughout development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limor Landsman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The developing pancreatic epithelium gives rise to all endocrine and exocrine cells of the mature organ. During organogenesis, the epithelial cells receive essential signals from the overlying mesenchyme. Previous studies, focusing on ex vivo tissue explants or complete knockout mice, have identified an important role for the mesenchyme in regulating the expansion of progenitor cells in the early pancreas epithelium. However, due to the lack of genetic tools directing expression specifically to the mesenchyme, the potential roles of this supporting tissue in vivo, especially in guiding later stages of pancreas organogenesis, have not been elucidated. We employed transgenic tools and fetal surgical techniques to ablate mesenchyme via Cre-mediated mesenchymal expression of Diphtheria Toxin (DT at the onset of pancreas formation, and at later developmental stages via in utero injection of DT into transgenic mice expressing the Diphtheria Toxin receptor (DTR in this tissue. Our results demonstrate that mesenchymal cells regulate pancreatic growth and branching at both early and late developmental stages by supporting proliferation of precursors and differentiated cells, respectively. Interestingly, while cell differentiation was not affected, the expansion of both the endocrine and exocrine compartments was equally impaired. To further elucidate signals required for mesenchymal cell function, we eliminated β-catenin signaling and determined that it is a critical pathway in regulating mesenchyme survival and growth. Our study presents the first in vivo evidence that the embryonic mesenchyme provides critical signals to the epithelium throughout pancreas organogenesis. The findings are novel and relevant as they indicate a critical role for the mesenchyme during late expansion of endocrine and exocrine compartments. In addition, our results provide a molecular mechanism for mesenchymal expansion and survival by identifying β-catenin signaling as an

  19. Short- and long-term outcomes after enucleation of pancreatic tumors: An evidence-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanming; Zhao, Min; Wu, Lupeng; Ye, Feng; Si, Xiaoying

    Enucleation of pancreatic tumors is rarely performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the published evidence for its short- and long-term outcomes. PubMed (MEDLINE) and EMBASE databases were searched from 1990 to March 2016. Studies including at least ten patients who underwent enucleation of pancreatic lesions were included. Data on the outcomes were synthesized and meta-analyzed where appropriate. Twenty-seven studies involving 1316 patients were included in the systematic review. The postoperative mortality was 0.3%, and the postoperative morbidity was 50.3%, mainly represented by pancreatic fistula (38.1%). Endocrine insufficiency, exocrine insufficiency and tumor recurrence was observed in 2.4%, 1.1% and 2.3% of the patients respectively. Compared with typical resection, the operation time, blood loss, length of hospital stay, and the incidence of endocrine and exocrine insufficiency were all significantly reduced after enucleation. The occurrence of pancreatic fistula was significantly higher in enucleation group, but overall morbidity, the reoperation rate and mortality were comparable between the two groups. There was no significant difference in disease recurrence between the two groups. Compared with central pancreatectomy, enucleation had a shorter operation time, lower blood loss, less morbidity, and better pancreatic function. Compared with open enucleation, minimally invasive enucleation had a shorter operation time and a shorter length of hospital stay. Enucleation is an appropriate surgical procedure in selected patients with benign or low-malignant lesions of the pancreas. The benefits of minimally invasive approach need to be validated in further investigations with larger groups of patients. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential diagnosis between intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with an associated invasive carcinoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma on ultrasonography: the utility of echo intensity and contrast enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Masato [Dept. of Radiology, Sapporo Teishinkai Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Hirokawa, Naoki; Usami, Yoko; Someya, Masanori; Sakata, Kohichi [Dept. of Radiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of echo intensity and contrast enhancement in the differential diagnosis between intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with an associated invasive carcinoma (IPMN-IC) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) on ultrasonography. This study included eight and 37 patients who had pathologically confirmed IPMN-IC and PDAC, respectively, and were enrolled for a comparative analysis of the sonographic features of the tumors. In the quantitative echo intensity evaluation, the two groups were compared with respect to the difference between the tumor intensity and the pancreatic intensity (TI-PI) and between the tumor intensity and the vascular intensity (TI-VI). In the quantitative contrast enhancement evaluation, the increase in echo intensity (ΔTI) and increase in echo intensity per unit of time (slope) were compared between the groups. The echo intensity and contrast enhancement were also compared between the two groups in patients with T3-T4 disease. In addition, the correlations of the histological type, tumor size, stromal type, and T factor with echogenicity and contrast enhancement were analyzed. IPMN-IC had significantly greater echo intensity and contrast enhancement than PDAC (TI-PI, P=0.004; TI-VI, P=0.001; ΔTI, P=0.012; slope, P=0.002). In T3-T4 disease, IPMN-IC also showed greater echo intensity and faster enhancement than PDAC. Echo intensity and contrast enhancement were correlated with histological type (TI-PI, P=0.003; TI-VI, P<0.001; ΔTI, P=0.007; slope, P<0.001). IPMN-IC and PDAC can be differentiated by the quantitative evaluation of echo intensity and contrast enhancement.

  1. Radiation induces invasiveness of pancreatic cancer via up-regulation of heparanase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, I.; Bensoussan, E.; Meirovitz, A.; Elkin, M.; Vlodavsky, I.

    2013-01-01

    The full text of the publication follows. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive neoplasms with an extremely low survival rate. Because most pancreatic carcinoma patients miss the opportunity for complete surgical resection at the time of diagnosis, radiotherapy remains a major component of treatment modalities. However, pancreatic cancer often shows resistance to radiation therapy. Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced aggressiveness is emerging as one of the important mechanisms responsible for the limited benefit of radiation therapy in pancreatic cancer, but the identity of downstream effectors responsible for this effect remains poorly investigated. Here we report that IR promotes pancreatic cancer aggressiveness through up-regulation of the heparanase. Heparanase is a predominant mammalian enzyme capable of degrading heparan sulfate (HS), the main polysaccharide component of the basement membrane and other types of extracellular matrix (ECM). Cleavage of HS by heparanase leads to disassembly of ECM, enables cell invasion, releases HS-bound angiogenic and growth factors from the ECM depots, and generates bioactive HS fragments. We found that clinically relevant doses of IR augment invasive ability of pancreatic cells in vitro and in vivo via induction of heparanase. Our results indicate that the effect of IR on heparanase expression is mediated by Egr1 transcription factor. Moreover, specific inhibitor of heparanase enzymatic activity abolished IR-induced invasiveness of pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro, while combined treatment with IR and the heparanase inhibitor, but not IR alone, attenuated ortho-topic pancreatic tumor progression in vivo. The proposed up-regulation of heparanase by IR represents a new molecular pathway through which IR may promote pancreatic tumor aggressiveness, providing explanation for the limited benefit from radiation therapy in pancreatic cancer. Our research is expected to offer a new approach to improve the efficacy of

  2. Pancreatic Metastasis of High-Grade Papillary Serous Ovarian Carcinoma Mimicking Primary Pancreas Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Gunay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reports of epithelial ovarian carcinomas metastatic to the pancreas are very rare. We herein present a metastasis of high grade papillary serous ovarian cancer to mid portion of pancreas. Case. A 42-year-old patient was admitted with a non-specified malignant cystic lesion in midportion of pancreas. She had a history of surgical treatment for papillary serous ovarian adenocarcinoma. A cystic lesion was revealed by an abdominal computerized tomography (CT performed in her follow up . It was considered as primary mid portion of pancreatic cancer and a distal pancreatectomy was performed. The final pathology showed high-grade papillary serous adenocarcinoma morphologically similar to the previously diagnosed ovarian cancer. Discussion. Metastatic pancreatic cancers should be considered in patients who present with a solitary pancreatic mass and had a previous non-pancreatic malignancy. Differential diagnosis of primary pancreatic neoplasm from metastatic malignancy may be very difficult. A biopsy for tissue confirmation is required to differentiate primary and secondary pancreatic tumors. Although, the value of surgical resection is poorly documented, resection may be considered in selected patients. Conclusion. Pancreatic metastasis of ovarian papillary serous adenocarcinoma has to be kept in mind when a patient with pancreatic mass has a history of ovarian malignancy.

  3. Cirugías Conservadoras del Parénquima Pancreático / Converving Parenchyma Pancreatic Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giunippero Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available After a classical pancreatic resection the risk of endocrine and exocrine insufficiency is in the order of : 8-20 % and 20-50 % respectively 1. Conservative surgery of pancreatic parenchyma decrease the risk of insufficiency and represents the clearest benefits of this type of surgery. They are optional techniques that help the surgeon to evaluate the decision which is best for each patient and each type of lesion. Among them we will approach three of them: uncinate process resection, enucleation, median pancreatectomy.

  4. MODERN VIEWS ON ETIOLOGY OF CHRONIC PANCREATITIS AND CORRECTION OF FUNCTIONAL INSUFFICIENCY OF THE PANCREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. А. Kornienko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a multietiological disorder characterized by progressive structural changes of the pancreas and development of its eccrine and endocrine insufficiency. The potential causes of chronic pancreatitis in children include obstruction of the pancreas ducts due to cholelithiasis, chronic cholecystitis with biliary sludge, excretory ducts anomalies; obesity and hyperlipidemia; abdominal traumas and infectious pancreatic diseases. Recently new possible variants of chronic pancreatitis — autoimmune and hereditary — have been diagnosed due to the widening of diagnostic potentials. Fifty children and adolescents with chronic pancreatitis were diagnosed. It was shown, that obstructive chronic pancreatitis was found in 50%, obesity-associated. According to the literature, more than 70% of children with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis have genetic mutations in genes SFTR, PRSS1 and SPINK1, both single and associated. These lead to imbalance of the trypsinogen activation and inactivation in the pancreas tissue. Severe mutations can be an independent cause of chronic pancreatitis, mild ones manifest after the impact of some external factors. Regardless of the cause of the disease, the mandatory component of the treatment is enzyme replacement therapy with the preference to microspherical forms.

  5. Vitamin A, endocrine tissues and hormones: interplay and interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Brossaud

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A (retinol is a micronutrient critical for cell proliferation and differentiation. In adults, vitamin A and metabolites such as retinoic acid (RA play major roles in vision, immune and brain functions and tissue remodelling and metabolism. This review presents the physiological interactions of retinoids and endocrine tissues and hormonal systems. Two endocrine systems have been particularly studied. In the pituitary, retinoids target the corticotrophs with a possible therapeutic use in corticotropinomas. In the thyroid, retinoids interfere with iodine metabolism and vitamin A deficiency aggravates thyroid dysfunction caused by iodine-deficient diets. Retinoids use in thyroid cancer appears less promising than expected. Recent and still controversial studies investigated the relations between retinoids and metabolic syndrome. Indeed, retinoids contribute to pancreatic development and modify fat and glucose metabolism. However, more detailed studies are needed before planning any therapeutic use. Finally, retinoids probably play more minor roles in adrenal and gonads development and function apart from their major effects on spermatogenesis.

  6. A modern review of the operative management of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jonathan C; Abeywardina, Shannon; Farrell, James J; Reber, Howard A; Hines, O Joe

    2010-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating disease resulting in pain, intestinal malabsorption, endocrine dysfunction, and poor quality of life (QoL). Our aim was to analyze surgical outcomes for patients with chronic pancreatitis. Data for patients undergoing operations for chronic pancreatitis between 1990 and 2009 were reviewed. Demographics, operative and perioperative data, and survival were catalogued. QoL was determined (Short Form 36 and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire + PAN-26) and compared with historical controls. The mean age was 51 +/- 2 years, 38 patients were male (53%), the most common indication was pain (71%), the etiology of pancreatitis often was alcohol, and most patients underwent a Whipple procedure (56%). Operative time was 316 +/- 17 minutes and blood loss was 363 +/- 75 mL. There were 34 complications in 30 patients (42%) and one death. QoL surveys were administered for 25 of 55 (45%) surviving patients at a mean follow-up of 72 +/- 16 months. Mean survival was 99 +/- 9 months, whereas 5- and 10-year survival were 86 and 75 per cent. QoL scores were uniformly better than historical controls. Our data demonstrate that operations for chronic pancreatitis can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality. Patients have excellent survival and improved QoL compared with historical controls. Surgery is an effective and durable treatment option for patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation for management of benign solid pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Seo, Dong-Wan; Song, Tae Jun; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2018-05-04

     Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been increasingly employed in experimental and clinical settings for the management of pancreatic lesions. This study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided RFA for benign solid pancreatic tumors.  In a single-center, prospective study, 10 patients with benign solid pancreatic tumors underwent EUS-RFA. After the RFA electrode had been inserted into the pancreatic mass, the radiofrequency generator was activated to deliver 50 W of ablation power.  Among the 10 patients, 16 sessions of EUS-RFA were successfully performed. Diagnoses included nonfunctioning neuroendocrine tumor (n = 7), solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (n = 2), and insulinoma (n = 1); the median largest diameter of the tumors was 20 mm (range 8 - 28 mm). During follow-up (median 13 months), radiologic complete response was achieved in seven patients. Two adverse events (12.4 %; 1 moderate and 1 mild) occurred.  EUS-RFA may be a safe and potentially effective treatment option in selected patients with benign solid pancreatic tumors. Multiple sessions may be required if there is a remnant tumor, and adverse events must be carefully monitored. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Primary Hyperparathyroidism in Patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Piecha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hyperparathyroidism may occur as a part of an inherited syndrome in a combination with pancreatic endocrine tumours and/or pituitary adenoma, which is classified as Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1. This syndrome is caused by a germline mutation in MEN-1 gene encoding a tumour-suppressor protein, menin. Primary hyperparathyroidism is the most frequent clinical presentation of MEN-1, which usually appears in the second decade of life as an asymptomatic hypercalcemia and progresses through the next decades. The most frequent clinical presentation of MEN-1-associated primary hyperparathyroidism is bone demineralisation and recurrent kidney stones rarely followed by chronic kidney disease. The aim of this paper is to present the pathomechanism, screening procedures, diagnosis, and management of primary hyperparathyroidism in the MEN-1 syndrome. It also summarises the recent advances in the pharmacological therapy with a new group of drugs—calcimimetics.

  9. A Notch-dependent molecular circuitry initiates pancreatic endocrine and ductal cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shih, Hung Ping; Kopp, Janel L; Sandhu, Manbir

    2012-01-01

    necessitates subsequent Sox9 downregulation and evasion from Notch activity via cell-autonomous repression of Sox9 by Ngn3. If high Notch levels are maintained, endocrine progenitors retain Sox9 and undergo ductal fate conversion. Taken together, our findings establish a novel role for Notch in initiating both...

  10. Generation of polyhormonal and multipotent pancreatic progenitor lineages from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytnikov, Roman; Nostro, Maria Cristina

    2016-05-15

    Generation of pancreatic β-cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has enormous importance in type 1 diabetes (T1D), as it is fundamental to a treatment strategy based on cellular therapeutics. Being able to generate β-cells, as well as other mature pancreatic cells, from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) will also enable the development of platforms that can be used for disease modeling and drug testing for a variety of pancreas-associated diseases, including cystic fibrosis. For this to occur, it is crucial to develop differentiation strategies that are robust and reproducible across cell lines and laboratories. In this article we describe two serum-free differentiation protocols designed to generate specific pancreatic lineages from hPSCs. Our approach employs a variety of cytokines and small molecules to mimic developmental pathways active during pancreatic organogenesis and allows for the in vitro generation of distinct pancreatic populations. The first protocol is designed to give rise to polyhormonal cells that have the potential to differentiate into glucagon-producing cells. The second protocol is geared to generate multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells, which harbor the potential to generate all pancreatic lineages including: monohormonal endocrine cells, acinar, and ductal cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Obestatin enhances in vitro generation of pancreatic islets through regulation of developmental pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Baragli

    Full Text Available Availability of large amounts of in vitro generated β-cells may support replacement therapy in diabetes. However, methods to obtain β-cells from stem/progenitor cells are limited by inefficient endocrine differentiation. We have recently shown that the ghrelin gene product obestatin displays beneficial effects on pancreatic β-cell survival and function. Obestatin prevents β-cell apoptosis, preserves β-cell mass and stimulates insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo, in both normal and diabetic conditions. In the present study, we investigated whether obestatin may promote in vitro β-cell generation from mouse pancreatic islet-derived precursor cells. Treatment of cultured islets of Langerhans with obestatin (i enriched cells expressing the mesenchymal/neuronal marker nestin, which is associated with pancreatic precursors; (ii increased cell survival and reduced apoptosis during precursor selection; (iii promoted the generation of islet-like cell clusters (ICCs with increased insulin gene expression and C-peptide secretion. Furthermore, obestatin modulated the expression of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs, Notch receptors and neurogenin 3 (Ngn3 during islet-derived precursor cell selection and endocrine differentiation. These results indicate that obestatin improves the generation of functional β-cells/ICCs in vitro, suggesting implications for cell-based replacement therapy in diabetes. Moreover, obestatin may play a role in regulating pathways involved in pancreas development and regeneration.

  12. [Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis, 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Gyula

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a benign inflammatory process, which can cause enlargement of the pancreatic head accompanied by severe pain and weight loss, and often leads to a significant reduction in quality of life (QoL). Basically, the disease is characterised by pain and functional disorders which are initially treated with conservative therapy, but in case of complications (uncontrollable pain or obstruction) surgical treatment is required. This article reviews the relevant literature of CP treatment, in particular randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses were involved with a comparison of different surgical treatment options for the management of CP complications. Recent studies have demonstrated that surgical procedures are superior to endoscopic therapy as regards long-term results of QoL and pain control. There was no significant difference found in postoperative pain relief and overall mortality when duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) of Beger and its modification (duodenum and organ-preserving pancreatic head resection [DOPPHR]) were compared with pancreatoduodenectomy (PD), but hospital stay, weight gain, exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, and QoL were significantly better in the DPPHR and DOPPHR groups. DPPHR and PD seem to be equally effective in terms of postoperative pain relief and overall mortality. However, recent data suggest that DOPPHR is superior in the treatment of CP with regard to several peri- and postoperative outcome parameters and QoL. Therefore, this should be the preferable treatment option for CP complications.

  13. Endothelial Cells Control Pancreatic Cell Fate at Defined Stages through EGFL7 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-I Kao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although endothelial cells have been shown to affect mouse pancreatic development, their precise function in human development remains unclear. Using a coculture system containing human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived progenitors and endothelial cells, we found that endothelial cells play a stage-dependent role in pancreatic development, in which they maintain pancreatic progenitor (PP self-renewal and impair further differentiation into hormone-expressing cells. The mechanistic studies suggest that the endothelial cells act through the secretion of EGFL7. Consistently, endothelial overexpression of EGFL7 in vivo using a transgenic mouse model resulted in an increase of PP proliferation rate and a decrease of differentiation toward endocrine cells. These studies not only identified the role of EGFL7 as the molecular handle involved in the crosstalk between endothelium and pancreatic epithelium, but also provide a paradigm for using hESC stepwise differentiation to dissect the stage-dependent roles of signals controlling organogenesis.

  14. A Suspicious Pancreatic Mass in Chronic Pancreatitis: Pancreatic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. de Clerck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation.

  15. Pancreatic β-cell regeneration: Facultative or dedicated progenitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afelik, Solomon; Rovira, Meritxell

    2017-04-15

    The adult pancreas is only capable of limited regeneration. Unlike highly regenerative tissues such as the skin, intestinal crypts and hematopoietic system, no dedicated adult stem cells or stem cell niche have so far been identified within the adult pancreas. New β cells have been shown to form in the adult pancreas, in response to high physiological demand or experimental β-cell ablation, mostly by replication of existing β cells. The possibility that new β cells are formed from other sources is currently a point of major controversy. Under particular injury conditions, fully differentiated pancreatic duct and acinar cells have been shown to dedifferentiate into a progenitor-like state, however the extent, to which ductal, acinar or other endocrine cells contribute to restoring pancreatic β-cell mass remains to be resolved. In this review we focus on regenerative events in the pancreas with emphasis on the restoration of β-cell mass. We present an overview of regenerative responses noted within the different pancreatic lineages, following injury. We also highlight the intrinsic plasticity of the adult pancreas that allows for inter-conversion of fully differentiated pancreatic lineages through manipulation of few genes or growth factors. Taken together, evidence from a number of studies suggest that differentiated pancreatic lineages could act as facultative progenitor cells, but the extent to which these contribute to β-cell regeneration in vivo is still a matter of contention. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Proposal for a structured computed tomography report in the evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms based on expert opinions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Paulo Gustavo Maciel; Matsumoto, Carlos Alberto; Lobo, Edson José; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: pgmlopes87@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de São Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola de Medicina

    2018-03-15

    Objective: To create a structured computed tomography (CT) report for the systematic evaluation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), based on the opinions of clinicians and surgeons. Materials And Methods: This was a prospective study in which we applied a 21-item questionnaire to experts in pancreatic diseases in order to create a model of a structured abdominal CT report. The questionnaire addressed the location and size of PDACs, as well as their effects on adjacent structures and on the vasculature, together with metastases. We used a Likert scale to determine which of those parameters should be included in the model. Results: A total of 18 experts (12 surgeons and 6 clinicians) from 9 institutions completed the questionnaire. All of the experts agreed that the following (if present) should be described in the CT report on a PDAC: the degree of enhancement; the diameter and location of the lesion; pancreatic duct obstruction; biliary dilatation; pancreatic atrophy; liver metastases; peritoneal nodules; ascites; lymph node enlargement; and invasion of adjacent structures. More than 80% of the experts agreed that the report should also describe the relationship between the PDAC and the surrounding vasculature. Conclusion: We have developed a template for a CT report on patients with PDAC, based on the opinions of experts involved in the treatment of such patients. (author)

  17. Pdx1 and Ngn3 overexpression enhances pancreatic differentiation of mouse ES cell-derived endoderm population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Atsushi; Stull, Robert; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Bonham, Kristina; Gouon-Evans, Valerie; Sho, Masayuki; Iwano, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Keller, Gordon; Snodgrass, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    In order to define the molecular mechanisms regulating the specification and differentiation of pancreatic β-islet cells, we investigated the effect of upregulating Pdx1 and Ngn3 during the differentiation of the β-islet-like cells from murine embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived activin induced-endoderm. Induced overexpression of Pdx1 resulted in a significant upregulation of insulin (Ins1 and Ins2), and other pancreas-related genes. To enhance the developmental progression from the pancreatic bud to the formation of the endocrine lineages, we induced the overexpression express of Ngn3 together with Pdx1. This combination dramatically increased the level and timing of maximal Ins1 mRNA expression to approximately 100% of that found in the βTC6 insulinoma cell line. Insulin protein and C-peptide expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry staining. These inductive effects were restricted to c-kit(+) endoderm enriched EB-derived populations suggesting that Pdx1/Ngn3 functions after the specification of pancreatic endoderm. Although insulin secretion was stimulated by various insulin secretagogues, these cells had only limited glucose response. Microarray analysis was used to evaluate the expression of a broad spectrum of pancreatic endocrine cell-related genes as well as genes associated with glucose responses. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the utility of manipulating Pdx1 and Ngn3 expression in a stage-specific manner as an important new strategy for the efficient generation of functionally immature insulin-producing β-islet cells from ES cells.

  18. Immunohistochemical study on gastrointestinal endocrine cells of four reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu-Gen; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the types, regional distributions and distribution densities as well as morphological features of gastrointestinal (GI) endocrine cells in various parts of the gastrointestinal track (GIT) of four reptiles, Gekko japonicus, Eumeces chinensis, Sphenomorphus indicus and Eumeces elegans. METHODS: Paraffin-embedded sections (5 μm) of seven parts (cardia, fundus, pylorus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, rectum) of GIT dissected from the four reptiles were prepared. GI endocrine cells were revealed by using immunohistochemical techniques of streptavidin-peroxidase (S-P) method. Seven types of antisera against 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT), somatostatin (SS), gastrin (GAS), glucagon (GLU), substance P (SP), insulin and pancreatic polypeptide were identified and then GI endocrine cells were photomicrographed and counted. RESULTS: The GI endocrine system of four reptiles was a complex structure containing many endocrine cell types similar in morphology to those found in higher vertebrates. Five types of GI endocrine cells, namely 5-HT, SS, GAS, SP and GLU immunoreactive (IR) cells were identified in the GIT of G. japonicus, E. chinensis and S. indicus; while in the GIT of E. elegans only the former three types of endocrine cells were observed. No PP- and INS- IR cells were found in all four reptiles. 5-HT-IR cells, which were most commonly found in the pylorus or duodenum, distributed throughout the whole GIT of four reptiles. However, their distribution patterns varied from each other. SS-IR cells, which were mainly found in the stomach especially in the pylorus and/or fundus, were demonstrated in the whole GIT of E. chinensis, only showed restricted distribution in the other three species. GAS-IR cells, with a much restricted distribution, were mainly demonstrated in the pylorus and/or the proximal small intestine of four reptiles. GLU-IR cells exhibited a limited and species-dependent variant distribution in the GIT of four reptiles. SP-IR cells were found

  19. Characterization of pancreatic lesions from MT-tgf alpha, Ela-myc and MT-tgf alpha/Ela-myc single and double transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Dezhong Joshua; Wang, Yong; Wu, Jiusheng; Adsay, Nazmi Volkan; Grignon, David; Khanani, Fayyaz; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2006-07-05

    In order to identify good animal models for investigating therapeutic and preventive strategies for pancreatic cancer, we analyzed pancreatic lesions from several transgenic models and made a series of novel findings. Female MT-tgf alpha mice of the MT100 line developed pancreatic proliferation, acinar-ductal metaplasia, multilocular cystic neoplasms, ductal adenocarcinomas and prominent fibrosis, while the lesions in males were less severe. MT-tgf alpha-ES transgenic lines of both sexes developed slowly progressing lesions that were similar to what was seen in MT100 males. In both MT100 and MT-tgf alpha-ES lines, TGF alpha transgene was expressed mainly in proliferating ductal cells. Ela-myc transgenic mice with a mixed C57BL/6, SJL and FVB genetic background developed pancreatic tumors at 2-7 months of age, and half of the tumors were ductal adenocarcinomas, similar to what was reported originally by Sandgren et al 1. However, in 20% of the mice, the tumors metastasized to the liver. MT100/Ela-myc and MT-tgf alpha-ES/Ela-myc double transgenic mice developed not only acinar carcinomas and mixed carcinomas as previously reported but also various ductal-originated lesions, including multilocular cystic neoplasms and ductal adenocarcinomas. The double transgenic tumors were more malignant and metastasized to the liver at a higher frequency (33%) compared with the Ela-myc tumors. Sequencing of the coding region of p16ink4, k-ras and Rb cDNA in small numbers of pancreatic tumors did not identify mutations. The short latency for tumor development, the variety of tumor morphology and the liver metastases seen in Ela-myc and MT-tgf alpha/Ela-myc mice make these animals good models for investigating new therapeutic and preventive strategies for pancreatic cancer.

  20. Evaluation of clinical value of serum CA19-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Haifeng; Lin Zhiyu; Lu Xiaozhuo; Chen Yini

    2003-01-01

    The article is to study the clinical significance of serum CA19-9 in diagnosing malignant tumor occurred in digestive system and to select cut off values for differentiating diagnosis of a pancreatic neoplasms and pancreatitis. Using chemiluminescence immunoassay, serum CA19-9 level of below subjects were analyzed: control group (n=21); digestive system neoplasm group (n=125, with 7 cases conformed as pancreatic cancer); non-neoplastic disease group (n=387, with 15 cases conformed as pancreatitis secondary to destructive cholangitis). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used for analyzing results and selecting cut off values. When cut off value was 18.4 kU/L, sensibility for conforming a digestive system neoplasm was 60.8%, while its related specificity against control group and non-neoplastic disease group was 95. 2% and 68.2%, respectively. Sensibility for diagnosing pancreatic neoplasm was 85.7%, while its related specificity against control group and non-pancreatic origin tumor group was 95.0% and 63.1%, respectively. When 37 kU/L was chosen as cut off value, specificity for differentiating diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm and pancreatitis secondary to destructive cholangitis rose from 13.3% to 46.7%. Serum CA19-9 could be used as an aid in detecting digestive system neoplastic disease; it is a reliable marker for pancreatic neoplasm. Raising cut off value may help to differentiate pancreatic neoplasm and pancreatitis secondary to destructive cholangitis

  1. [Vitamin D and endocrine diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Natielen Jacques; Garcia, Vivian Cristina; Martini, Ligia Araújo

    2009-07-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency has been worldwide reported in all age groups in recent years. It has been considered a Public Health matter since decreased levels of vitamin D has been related to several chronic diseases, as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity and hypertension. Glucose intolerance and insulin secretion has been observed during vitamin D deficiency, both in animals and humans resulting in T2DM. The supposed mechanism underlying these findings is presence of vitamin D receptor in several tissues and cells, including pancreatic beta-cells, adipocyte and muscle cells. In obese individuals, the impaired vitamin D endocrine system, characterized by high levels of PTH and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) could induce a negative feedback for the hepatic synthesis of 25(OH)D and also contribute to a higher intracellular calcium, which in turn secrete less insulin and deteriorate insulin sensitivity. In hypertension, vitamin D could act on renin-angiotensin system and also in vascular function. Administration of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) could decreases renin gene expression and inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. However, prospective and intervention human studies that clearly demonstrates the benefits of vitamin D status adequacy in the prevention and treatment of endocrine metabolic diseases are lacking. Further research still necessary to assure the maximum benefit of vitamin D in such situations.

  2. Role of respiratory-gated PET/CT for pancreatic tumors: A preliminary result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuya, Takeo; Tateishi, Ukihide; Suzuki, Kazufumi; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Nishiyama, Yuji; Hata, Masaharu; Inoue, Tomio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to ascertain role of respiratory-gated PET/CT for accurate diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Materials and methods: Prior to clinical study, the phantom study was performed to evaluate the impact of respiratory motion on lesion quantification. Twenty-two patients (mean age 65 years) with pancreatic tumors were enrolled. Pathological diagnoses by surgical specimens consisted of pancreatic cancer (n = 15) and benign intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN, n = 7). Whole-body scan of non-respiratory-gated PET/CT was performed at first, and subsequent respiratory-gated PET/CT for one bed position was performed. All PET/CT studies were performed prior to surgery. The SUV max obtained by non-respiratory-gated PET/CT and respiratory-gated PET/CT, and percent difference in SUVmax (%SUVmax) were compared. Results: The profile curve of 5 respiratory bin image was most similar to that of static image. The third bin of 5 respiratory bin image showed highest FWHM (24.0 mm) and FWTM (32.7 mm). The mean SUVmax of pancreatic cancer was similar to that of benign IPMN on non-respiratory-gated PET/CT (p = 0.05), whereas significant difference was found between two groups on respiratory-gated PET/CT (p = 0.016). The mean %SUV of pancreatic cancer was greater than that of benign IPMN (p < 0.0001). Identification of the primary tumor in pancreatic head (n = 13, 59%) was improved by using respiratory-gated PET/CT because of minimal affection of physiological accumulation in duodenum. Conclusion: Respiratory-gated PET/CT is a feasible technique for evaluation of pancreatic tumors and allows more accurate identification of pancreatic tumors compared with non-respiratory-gated PET/CT

  3. Population-Level Incidence and Predictors of Surgically Induced Diabetes and Exocrine Insufficiency after Partial Pancreatic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Irmina A; Epelboym, Irene; Winner, Megan; Allendorf, John D; Haigh, Philip I

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine and exocrine insufficiency after partial pancreatectomy affect quality of life, cardiovascular health, and nutritional status. However, their incidence and predictors are unknown. To identify the incidence and predictors of new-onset diabetes and exocrine insufficiency after partial pancreatectomy. We retrospectively reviewed 1165 cases of partial pancreatectomy, performed from 1998 to 2010, from a large population-based database. Incidence of new onset diabetes and exocrine insufficiency RESULTS: Of 1165 patients undergoing partial pancreatectomy, 41.8% had preexisting diabetes. In the remaining 678 patients, at a median 3.6 months, diabetes developed in 274 (40.4%) and pancreatic insufficiency developed in 235 (34.7%) patients. Independent predictors of new-onset diabetes were higher Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.62 for CCI of 1, p = 0.02; HR = 1.95 for CCI ≥ 2, p pancreatitis (HR = 1.51, p = 0.03). There was no difference in diabetes after Whipple procedure vs distal pancreatic resections, or malignant vs benign pathologic findings. Independent predictors of exocrine insufficiency were female sex (HR = 1.32, p = 0.002) and higher CCI (HR = 1.85 for CCI of 1, p insufficiency (HR = 0.35, p endocrine and exocrine insufficiency were 40% and 35%, respectively. These data are critical for informing patients' and physicians' expectations.

  4. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

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    Cedric Cortijo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity (PCP refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal that tridimensional organization and collective communication of cells are needed in the pancreatic epithelium in order to generate appropriate numbers of endocrine cells.

  5. On the regulatory functions of neuropeptide Y (NPY) with respect to vascular resistance and exocrine and endocrine secretion in the pig pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, J J; Orskov, C; Knuhtsen, S

    1989-01-01

    We compared the effects of electrical stimulation of the splanchnic nerves and infusions of neuropeptide Y, noradrenaline or a combination of the two on pancreatic vascular resistance and exocrine and endocrine secretion. For these studies we used isolated perfused pig pancreas with preserved...... splanchnic nerve supply. The exocrine secretion was stimulated with physiological concentrations of secretin and cholecystokinin octapeptide. Noradrenaline and NPY at 10(-8) M both increased pancreatic perfusion pressure. Their effects were additive and similar in magnitude to that of electrical stimulation...

  6. Successful Partial Pancreatotomy as a Salvage Procedure for Massive Intraoperative Bleeding During Head Coring for Chronic Pancreatitis. Report of a Case

    OpenAIRE

    Savio G Barreto; Harshil Shah; Chirayu Choksi; Nilesh H Doctor

    2007-01-01

    Context Chronic pancreatitis is a continuous inflammatory disease of the pancreas resulting in scarring and fibrosis with consequent decline in exocrine and endocrine function. The inflammatory process leads to the development of a head mass, and strictures and stones in the pancreatic duct which present as pain, or loco regional complications such as duodenal obstruction and biliary obstruction. The gold standard for the treatment of pain and loco regional complications remains surgery, whic...

  7. Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas: new clinical and pathological features in a contemporary series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Run; Jih, Lily; Zhai, Jing; Nissen, Nicholas N; Colquhoun, Steven; Wolin, Edward; Dhall, Deepti

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the novel clinical and pathological features of mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. This was a retrospective review of medical records and surgical pathology specimens of patients with a diagnosis of mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center between 2005 and 2011. Additional immunohistochemistry was performed on the specimens of some patients. Five patients were identified. The median age at presentation was 74 years (range, 59-89 years), and all patients were male. The presenting symptoms were all related to tumor mass effects. The median size of the tumor was 10 cm (range, 3.9-16 cm). Preoperative clinical diagnosis aided by fine-needle aspiration biopsy was incorrect in all 5 cases. Most tumors (3/5) exhibited predominantly endocrine differentiation without hormonal production. Only 10% to 30% of cells were truly amphicrine, whereas most were differentiated into either endocrine or acinar phenotype. The clinical behavior ranged from moderate to aggressive with postoperative survival from 2.5 months to more than 3 years. Four patients received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy with variable responses. Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas appears to be not uncommon in men, may harbor predominantly endocrine component, is often misdiagnosed by cytology, and exhibits variable clinical behavior. Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas should be considered in older patients with sizable pancreatic mass and may warrant aggressive surgical resection and chemotherapy.

  8. Pancreatic islet transplantation

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    Corrêa-Giannella Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of

  9. Is endoscopic therapy the treatment of choice in all patients with chronic pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłońska, Beata

    2013-01-07

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by destruction of the pancreatic parenchyma with subsequent fibrosis that leads to pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Abdominal pain and local complications (bile duct or duodenal stenosis and pancreatic tumor) secondary to CP are indications for therapy. At the beginning, medical therapy is used. More invasive treatment is recommended for patients with pancreatic duct stones (PDS) and pancreatic obstruction in whom standard medical therapy is not sufficient. Recently, Clarke et al assessed the long-term effectiveness of endoscopic therapy (ET) in CP patients. The authors compared ET with medical treatment. They reported that ET was clinically successful in 50% of patients with symptomatic CP. In this commentary, current CP treatment, including indications for ET and surgery in CP patients, is discussed. Recommendations for endoscopic treatment of CP according to the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinical Guidelines are reviewed. Different surgical methods used in the treatment of CP patients are also discussed. ET is the most useful in patients with large PDS, pancreatic duct obstruction and dilation. It should be the first-line option because it is less invasive than surgery. Surgery should be the first-line option in patients in whom ET has failed or in those with a pancreatic mass with suspicion of malignancy. ET is a very effective and less invasive procedure, but it cannot be recommended as the treatment of choice in all CP patients.

  10. Differential diagnosis of pancreatic cancer from other solid tumours arising from the periampullary area on MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Suk Ki [Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Departments of Radiology, Daejin Medical Center, Seognam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Hoon; Joo, Ijin; Jeon, Ju Hyun; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Sook [Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 266 Munhwa-ro, Jung-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To investigate CT features and differential diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared to other solid tumours arising in the periampullary area. One hundred and ninety-five patients with pathologically proven, solid periampullary tumours, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 98), neuroendocrine tumours (n = 52), gastrointestinal stromal tumours (n = 31), and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (n = 14), underwent preoperative CT. Two radiologists reviewed CT features and rated the possibility of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Statistically common findings for pancreatic adenocarcinoma included: patient age >50 years; ill-defined margin; completely solid mass; homogeneous enhancement; hypoenhancement on arterial and venous phases; atrophy; and duct dilatation. Statistically common findings for GIST included: heterogeneous enhancement; hyperenhancement on arterial and venous phases; rim enhancement; and prominent feeding arteries. The hyperenhancement on arterial and venous phases is statistically common in NET, and heterogeneous enhancement, hypoenhancement on the arterial and venous phases are statistically common in SPN. Diagnostic performance of CT for differentiating pancreatic adenocarcinomas from other solid periampullary tumours was 0.962 and 0.977 with excellent interobserver agreement (κ = 0.824). CT is useful not only for differentiating pancreatic adenocarcinoma form other solid tumours but also for differentiating between other solid tumours, including NET, SPN, and GIST, arising in the periampullary area. (orig.)

  11. Comparing 3 guidelines on the management of surgically removed pancreatic cysts with regard to pathological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekkerkerker, Selma J; Besselink, Marc G; Busch, Olivier R; Verheij, Joanne; Engelbrecht, Marc R; Rauws, Erik A; Fockens, Paul; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2017-05-01

    Currently, 3 guidelines are available for the management of pancreatic cysts. These guidelines vary in their indication for resection of high-risk cysts. We retrospectively compared the final pathologic outcome of surgically removed pancreatic cysts with the indications for resection according to 3 different guidelines. Patients who underwent pancreatic resection were extracted from our prospective pancreatic cyst database (2006-present). The final histopathologic diagnosis was compared with the initial indication for surgery stated by the guidelines of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP), European Study Group on Cystic tumors of the Pancreas and American Gastroenterological Association (AGA). We considered surgery in retrospect justified for malignancy, high-grade dysplasia, solid pseudopapillary neoplasms, neuroendocrine tumors or symptom improvement. Furthermore, we evaluated the patients with suspected intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) separately. Overall, 115 patients underwent pancreatic resection. The preoperative diagnosis was correct in 83 of 115 patients (72%) and differentiation between benign and premalignant in 99 of 115 patients (86%). In retrospect, surgery was justified according to the aforementioned criteria in 52 of 115 patients (45%). For patients with suspected IPMN (n = 75) resection was justified in 36 of 67 (54%), 36 of 68 (53%), and 32 of 54 (59%) of patients who would have had surgery based on the IAP, European, or AGA guidelines, respectively. The AGA guideline would have avoided resection in 21 of 75 (28%) patients, versus 8 of 75 (11%) and 7 of 75 (9%) when the IAP or European guideline would have been applied strictly. Nevertheless, 4 of 33 patients (12%) with high-grade dysplasia or malignancy would have been missed with the AGA guidelines, compared with none with the IAP or European guidelines. Although fewer patients undergo unnecessary surgery based on the AGA guidelines, the risk of missing

  12. Insulin dependence and pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy are independent prognostic factors for long-term survival after operation for chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winny, Markus; Paroglou, Vagia; Bektas, Hüseyin; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Reichert, Benedikt; Zachau, Lea; Kleine, Moritz; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Schrem, Harald

    2014-02-01

    This retrospective, single-center, observational study on postoperative long-term results aims to define yet unknown factors for long-term outcome after operation for chronic pancreatitis. We analyzed 147 consecutive patients operated for chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2011. Mean follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1 month to 12.7 years). Complete long-term survival data were provided by the German citizen registration authorities for all patients. A quality-of-life questionnaire was sent to surviving patients after a mean follow-up of 5.7 years. Surgical principles were resection (n = 86; 59%), decompression (n = 29; 20%), and hybrid procedures (n = 32; 21%). No significant influences of different surgical principles and operative procedures on survival, long-term quality of life and pain control could be detected. Overall 30-day mortality was 2.7%, 1-year survival 95.9%, and 3-year survival 90.8%. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that only postoperative insulin dependence at the time of hospital discharge (P = .027; Exp(B) = 2.111; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.089-4.090) and the absence of pancreas enzyme replacement therapy at the time of hospital discharge (P = .039; Exp(B) = 2.102; 95% CI, 1.037-4.262) were significant, independent risk factors for survival with significant hazard ratios for long-term survival. Long-term improvement in quality of life was reported by 55 of 76 long-term survivors (73%). Pancreatic enzyme replacement should be standard treatment after surgery for chronic pancreatitis at the time of hospital discharge, even when no clinical signs of exocrine pancreatic failure exist. This study underlines the potential importance of early operative intervention in chronic pancreatitis before irreversible endocrine dysfunction is present. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas in pediatric patients: A case report and institutional case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin B. Mahida

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN of the pancreas is a rare tumor presenting in adolescent and young adult females. A previously healthy 13 year-old female presented to our institution with abdominal pain and emesis. Imaging revealed a pancreatic cystic mass. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS with fine needle biopsy suggested SPN. Pathologic evaluation following resection revealed immunohistochemical (IHC staining positive for β-catenin and α-1-antitrypsin despite extensive necrosis. We discuss this patient as well as our institutional series of SPN of the pancreas, describing the evaluation, management, and histopathology of this rare tumor.

  14. Management of a Pregnancy with a Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Tanacan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old primigravid patient, at 35 weeks and 2 days of gestation, was referred to Hacettepe University Hospital for pancreatic mass, giant cervical myoma, maternal systemic lupus erythematosus, thrombocytopenia, and onset of preterm labor. At 36 weeks and 1 day of gestation (6 days after admission to the hospital, regular uterine contractions started and cervical dilatation with effacement was observed. Because of breech presentation and giant cervical myoma, a cesarean section was performed on the primigravid patient under general anesthesia. Four months after the birth, subtotal pancreatectomy, partial gastrectomy, duodenectomy, cholecystectomy, and omentectomy (Whipple procedure were performed. The pathologic diagnosis was of a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas; the patient was discharged from hospital after ten days.

  15. Genome-wide analysis of PDX1 target genes in human pancreatic progenitors

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    Xianming Wang

    2018-03-01

    maintains PDX1 expression and initiates a pancreatic TF program. Remarkably, we identified several PDX1 target genes that have not been reported in the literature in human so far, including RFX3, required for ciliogenesis and endocrine differentiation in mouse, and the ligand of the Notch receptor DLL1, which is important for endocrine induction and tip-trunk patterning. The comparison of PDX1 profiles from PPs and adult human islets identified sets of stage-specific target genes, associated with early pancreas development and adult β-cell function, respectively. Furthermore, we found an enrichment of T2DM-associated SNPs in active chromatin regions from iPSC-derived PPs. Two of these SNPs fall into PDX1 occupied sites that are located in the intronic regions of TCF7L2 and HNF1B. Both of these genes are key transcriptional regulators of endocrine induction and mutations in cis-regulatory regions predispose to diabetes. Conclusions: Our data provide stage-specific target genes of PDX1 during in vitro differentiation of stem cells into pancreatic progenitors that could be useful to identify pathways and molecular targets that predispose for diabetes. In addition, we show that T2DM-associated SNPs are enriched in active chromatin regions at the pancreatic progenitor stage, suggesting that the susceptibility to T2DM might originate from imperfect execution of a β-cell developmental program. Keywords: iPSC, T2DM, ChIP-seq, PDX1, SNPs, PP, GWAS

  16. Pdx1 and Ngn3 overexpression enhances pancreatic differentiation of mouse ES cell-derived endoderm population.

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    Atsushi Kubo

    Full Text Available In order to define the molecular mechanisms regulating the specification and differentiation of pancreatic β-islet cells, we investigated the effect of upregulating Pdx1 and Ngn3 during the differentiation of the β-islet-like cells from murine embryonic stem (ES cell-derived activin induced-endoderm. Induced overexpression of Pdx1 resulted in a significant upregulation of insulin (Ins1 and Ins2, and other pancreas-related genes. To enhance the developmental progression from the pancreatic bud to the formation of the endocrine lineages, we induced the overexpression express of Ngn3 together with Pdx1. This combination dramatically increased the level and timing of maximal Ins1 mRNA expression to approximately 100% of that found in the βTC6 insulinoma cell line. Insulin protein and C-peptide expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry staining. These inductive effects were restricted to c-kit(+ endoderm enriched EB-derived populations suggesting that Pdx1/Ngn3 functions after the specification of pancreatic endoderm. Although insulin secretion was stimulated by various insulin secretagogues, these cells had only limited glucose response. Microarray analysis was used to evaluate the expression of a broad spectrum of pancreatic endocrine cell-related genes as well as genes associated with glucose responses. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the utility of manipulating Pdx1 and Ngn3 expression in a stage-specific manner as an important new strategy for the efficient generation of functionally immature insulin-producing β-islet cells from ES cells.

  17. Clinico-roentgenological characteristic of early stomach neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golub, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Peculiarities of clinic and roentgenosemiotics of early stomach neoplasms in patients were analyzed. Roentgenological picture of early stomach neoplasms depends on anatomic growth shape and size of neoplasms, its localization and on manifestation of inflammatory and functional chages accompanying the neoplasm. Application of complex of gastrological examination including roentgenological diagnostic method, gastrofibroscopy and morphological examination of the tissue permits to diagnose early stomach neoplasm in 95,4 % of patients. 8 refs

  18. Immunohistochemical localization of glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide on rat endocrine pancreas: coexistence in rat islet cells

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    YH Huang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We used immunofluorescence double staining method to investigate the cellular localization of glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide (PP in rat pancreatic islets. The results showed that both A-cells (glucagon-secreting cells and PP-cells (PPsecreting cells were located in the periphery of the islets. However, A-cells and PP-cells had a different regional distribution. Most of A-cells were located in the splenic lobe but a few of them were in the duodenal lobe of the pancreas. In contrast, the majority of PP-cells were found in the duodenal lobe and a few of them were in the splenic lobe of the pancreas. Furthermore, we found that 67.74% A-cells had PP immunoreactivity, 70.92% PP-cells contained glucagon immunoreactivity with immunofluorescence double staining. Our data support the concept of a common precursor stem cell for pancreatic hormone-producing cells.

  19. Claudin-4-targeted optical imaging detects pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neesse, Albrecht; Hahnenkamp, Anke; Griesmann, Heidi; Buchholz, Malte; Hahn, Stefan A; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Fendrich, Volker; Ring, Janine; Sipos, Bence; Tuveson, David A; Bremer, Christoph; Gress, Thomas M; Michl, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Novel imaging methods based on specific molecular targets to detect both established neoplasms and their precursor lesions are highly desirable in cancer medicine. Previously, we identified claudin-4, an integral constituent of tight junctions, as highly expressed in various gastrointestinal tumours including pancreatic cancer. Here, we investigate the potential of targeting claudin-4 with a naturally occurring ligand to visualise pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions in vitro and in vivo by near-infrared imaging approaches. A non-toxic C-terminal fragment of the claudin-4 ligand Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) was labelled with a cyanine dye (Cy5.5). Binding of the optical tracer was analysed on claudin-4 positive and negative cells in vitro, and tumour xenografts in vivo. In addition, two genetically engineered mouse models for pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and pancreatic cancer were used for in vivo validation. Optical imaging studies were conducted using 2D planar fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) technology and 3D fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT). In vitro, the peptide-dye conjugate showed high binding affinity to claudin-4 positive CAPAN1 cells, while claudin-4 negative HT1080 cells revealed little or no fluorescence. In vivo, claudin-4 positive tumour xenografts, endogenous pancreatic tumours, hepatic metastases, as well as preinvasive PanIN lesions, were visualised by FRI and FMT up to 48 h after injection showing a significantly higher average of fluorochrome concentration as compared with claudin-4 negative xenografts and normal pancreatic tissue. C-CPE-Cy5.5 combined with novel optical imaging methods enables non-invasive visualisation of claudin-4 positive murine pancreatic tumours and their precursor lesions, representing a promising modality for early diagnostic imaging.

  20. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

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    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  1. Assessment of Toxicological Perturbations and Variants of Pancreatic Islet Development in the Zebrafish Model

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    Karilyn E. Sant

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic islets, largely comprised of insulin-producing beta cells, play a critical role in endocrine signaling and glucose homeostasis. Because they have low levels of antioxidant defenses and a high perfusion rate, the endocrine islets may be a highly susceptible target tissue of chemical exposures. However, this endpoint, as well as the integrity of the surrounding exocrine pancreas, is often overlooked in studies of developmental toxicology. Disruption of development by toxicants can alter cell fate and migration, resulting in structural alterations that are difficult to detect in mammalian embryo systems, but that are easily observed in the zebrafish embryo model (Danio rerio. Using endogenously expressed fluorescent protein markers for developing zebrafish beta cells and exocrine pancreas tissue, we documented differences in islet area and incidence rates of islet morphological variants in zebrafish embryos between 48 and 96 h post fertilization (hpf, raised under control conditions commonly used in embryotoxicity assays. We identified critical windows for chemical exposures during which increased incidences of endocrine pancreas abnormalities were observed following exposure to cyclopamine (2–12 hpf, Mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP (3–48 hpf, and Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS (3–48 hpf. Both islet area and length of the exocrine pancreas were sensitive to oxidative stress from exposure to the oxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide during a highly proliferative critical window (72 hpf. Finally, pancreatic dysmorphogenesis following developmental exposures is discussed with respect to human disease.

  2. Curcumin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Pancreatic Cancer

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    Sabrina Bimonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The best chemotherapeutic agent used to treat pancreatic cancer is the gemcitabine. However, gemcitabine treatment is associated with many side effects. Thus novel strategies involving less toxic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer are necessary. Curcumin is one such agent that inhibits the proliferation and angiogenesis of a wide variety of tumor cells, through the modulation of many cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated whether curcumin plays antitumor effects in MIA PaCa-2 cells. In vitro studies showed that curcumin inhibits the proliferation and enhances apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 cells. To test whether the antitumor activity of curcumin is also observed in vivo, we generated an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer by injection of MIA PaCa-2 cells in nude mice. We placed mice on diet containing curcumin at 0.6% for 6 weeks. In these treated mice tumors were smaller with respect to controls and showed a downregulation of the transcription nuclear factor NF-κB and NF-κB-regulated gene products. Overall, our data indicate that curcumin has a great potential in treatment of human pancreatic cancer through the modulation of NF-κB pathway.

  3. The gastrin-releasing peptide analog bombesin preserves exocrine and endocrine pancreas morphology and function during parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Joseph F.; Neuman, Joshua C.; Brill, Allison L.; Brar, Harpreet K.; Thompson, Mary F.; Cadena, Mark T.; Connors, Kelsey M.; Busch, Rebecca A.; Heneghan, Aaron F.; Cham, Candace M.; Jones, Elaina K.; Kibbe, Carly R.; Davis, Dawn B.; Groblewski, Guy E.; Kudsk, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of digestive organs by enteric peptides is lost during total parental nutrition (PN). Here we examine the role of the enteric peptide bombesin (BBS) in stimulation of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas during PN. BBS protects against exocrine pancreas atrophy and dysfunction caused by PN. BBS also augments circulating insulin levels, suggesting an endocrine pancreas phenotype. While no significant changes in gross endocrine pancreas morphology were observed, pancreatic islets isolated from BBS-treated PN mice showed a significantly enhanced insulin secretion response to the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist exendin-4, correlating with enhanced GLP-1 receptor expression. BBS itself had no effect on islet function, as reflected in low expression of BBS receptors in islet samples. Intestinal BBS receptor expression was enhanced in PN with BBS, and circulating active GLP-1 levels were significantly enhanced in BBS-treated PN mice. We hypothesized that BBS preserved islet function indirectly, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis. We confirmed the ability of BBS to directly stimulate intestinal enteroid cells to express the GLP-1 precursor preproglucagon. In conclusion, BBS preserves the exocrine and endocrine pancreas functions during PN; however, the endocrine stimulation is likely indirect, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis. PMID:26185331

  4. Epigenetic Induction of Definitive and Pancreatic Endoderm Cell Fate in Human Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangarajan Sambathkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming can occur by the introduction of key transcription factors (TFs as well as by epigenetic changes. We demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi Trichostatin A (TSA combined with a chromatin remodeling medium (CRM induced expression of a number of definitive endoderm and early and late pancreatic marker genes. When CRM was omitted, endoderm/pancreatic marker genes were not induced. Furthermore, treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi 5-azacytidine (5AZA CRM did not affect gene expression changes, and when 5AZA was combined with TSA, no further increase in gene expression of endoderm, pancreatic endoderm, and endocrine markers was seen over levels induced with TSA alone. Interestingly, TSA-CRM did not affect expression of pluripotency and hepatocyte genes but induced some mesoderm transcripts. Upon removal of TSA-CRM, the endoderm/pancreatic gene expression profile returned to baseline. Our findings underscore the role epigenetic modification in transdifferentiation of one somatic cell into another. However, full reprogramming of fibroblasts to β-cells will require combination of this approach with TF overexpression and/or culture of the partially reprogrammed cells under β-cell specific conditions.

  5. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-11-14

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful.

  6. Chronic pancreatitis with secondary diabetes mellitus treated by use of insulin in an adult California sea lion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Jenny M; Sidor, Inga F; Steiner, Jörg M; Sarran, Delphine; Dunn, J Lawrence

    2008-06-01

    A 21-year-old neutered male captive California sea lion developed chronic polyuria; polydipsia; polyphagia; accelerated development of existing cataracts; and frequent episodes of gastrointestinal upset including anorexia, signs of abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, and vomiting. Chronic hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria were identified. During episodes of gastrointestinal abnormalities, transient hyperbilirubinemia and increased serum J-glutamyltransferase activities developed. Clinical findings strongly suggested chronic pancreatitis with secondary diabetes mellitus and intermittent cholestasis. Multiple diagnostic tests, including abdominal ultrasonography, serial hematologic and serum biochemical analyses, fecal examinations, urinalyses and bacteriologic culture of urine, measurement of serum fructosamine and insulin concentrations, and evaluation of thyroid and adrenal function, did not reveal any specific parasitic, endocrine, hepatic, or neoplastic etiologies. For 1.5 years, the sea lion received once-daily administration of glargine insulin, gastrointestinal protectants, and a strict high-protein, low-fat diet. Daily monitoring of glucose regulation was achieved by training the sea lion to submit to blood and urine sampling. Glucose regulation ranged from fair to good, and clinical signs of diabetes mellitus lessened. Episodes of gastrointestinal upset still occurred, although the frequency and severity decreased. Ultimately, a severe episode developed, associated with diabetic ketoacidosis and sepsis, and the sea lion died. Severe fibrosing pancreatitis with exocrine and endocrine atrophy and abscesses arising from ectatic pancreatic ducts were found. Peripancreatic fibrosis caused stricture of the common bile duct, resulting in gallbladder distension without cholecystitis. Diabetes mellitus can occur secondary to chronic pancreatitis in California sea lions and insulin therapy should be considered.

  7. Genetic Analysis of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 ( Leads to Misdiagnosis of an Extremely Rare Presentation of Intrasellar Cavernous Hemangioma as MEN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Min Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMultiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 is a rare inherited disorder characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of endocrine tumors in target tissues (mainly the pituitary, endocrine pancreas, and parathyroid glands. MEN1 is caused by mutations in the MEN1 gene, which functions as a tumor suppressor and consists of one untranslated exon and nine exons encoding the menin protein. This condition is usually suspected when we encounter patients diagnosed with tumors in multiple endocrine organs, as mentioned above.MethodsA 65-year-old woman who underwent surgery for a pancreatic tumor (serous cystadenoma 5 years previously was referred to our hospital due to neurologic symptoms of diplopia and left ptosis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 3.4-cm lesion originating from the cavernous sinus wall and extending into the sellar region. It was thought to be a nonfunctioning tumor from the results of the combined pituitary function test. Incidentally, we found that she also had a pancreatic tumor, indicating the necessity of genetic analysis for MEN1.ResultsGenomic analysis using peripheral leukocytes revealed a heterozygous c.1621G>A mutation in the MEN1 gene that was previously reported to be either a pathogenic mutation or a simple polymorphism. We pursued a stereotactic approach to the pituitary lesion, and microscopic findings of the tumor revealed it to be an intrasellar cavernous hemangioma, a rare finding in the sellar region and even rarer in relation to oculomotor palsy. The patient recovered well from surgery, but refused further evaluation for the pancreatic lesion.ConclusionThere is great emphasis placed on genetic testing in the diagnosis of MEN1, but herein we report a case where it did not assist in diagnosis, hence, further discussion on the role of genetic testing in this disease is needed. Also, in cases of pituitary tumor with cranial nerve palsy, despite its low prevalence, intrasellar cavernous hemangioma

  8. Treatment options for hypertriglyceridemia: from risk reduction to pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Lars; Brunzell, John D.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Stalenhoef, Anton

    2013-01-01

    While there has been considerable focus on the role and treatment of LDL cholesterol levels, a definitive role of triglycerides in the management of cardiovascular disease has been uncertain. Notably, with increasing triglyceride levels, there is a parallel increase in cholesterol levels carried by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, which has prompted interest in the use of non-HDL cholesterol levels as a tool guiding interventions. Recent studies have provided evidence for an independent role of triglyceride levels as a cardiovascular risk factor, and recently, an Endocrine Society guideline was published for treatment of hypertriglyceridemia. In contrast to the relative uncertainty regarding triglycerides and cardiovascular disease, a role of very high triglyceride levels as a risk factor for pancreatitis has been well known. The present paper summarizes the underlying evidence for a risk role for triglyceride levels in cardiovascular disease and pancreatitis, current treatment recommendations and areas of future research. PMID:24840268

  9. Some aspects of the endocrine tumours of the digestive tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassolas, G.

    1996-01-01

    Endocrine tumours of digestive tract (GEP) synthesize many hormonal products which are responsible for clinical expression in relation with their nature, amount and biological activity, some of these tumours being non-functioning or silent. Moreover these tumours have some characteristics related to neuroendocrine differentiation, which provide tumour markers in addition to hormonal markers, such as chromogranin. A which is of special interest in non-functioning tumours. Pancreatic tumours are the most frequently recognized tumours in systematic screening procedures performed in MEN 1 patients. They are multi-secreting and multifocal, and they exhibit a loss of heterozygosity in the 11q13 locus. Growth factors such as IGF-1 and PDGF and their specific receptors are expressed in GEP tumours but their role in tumour growth remains to be determined. Somatostatin receptors are present on most endocrine digestive tumours, conditioning the therapeutic effects of somatostatin analogues that reduce hormonal tumoral production and alleviate the related symptoms. In addition, in vivo visualization of somatostatin receptor positive tumours by scintigraphy using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues is of clinical interest. (author)

  10. Enrichment of human embryonic stem cell-derived NKX6.1-expressing pancreatic progenitor cells accelerates the maturation of insulin-secreting cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Alireza; Bruin, Jennifer E; Xu, Jean; Narayan, Kavitha; Fox, Jessica K; O'Neil, John J; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2013-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are considered a potential alternative to cadaveric islets as a source of transplantable cells for treating patients with diabetes. We previously described a differentiation protocol to generate pancreatic progenitor cells from hESCs, composed of mainly pancreatic endoderm (PDX1/NKX6.1-positive), endocrine precursors (NKX2.2/synaptophysin-positive, hormone/NKX6.1-negative), and polyhormonal cells (insulin/glucagon-positive, NKX6.1-negative). However, the relative contributions of NKX6.1-negative versus NKX6.1-positive cell fractions to the maturation of functional β-cells remained unclear. To address this question, we generated two distinct pancreatic progenitor cell populations using modified differentiation protocols. Prior to transplant, both populations contained a high proportion of PDX1-expressing cells (~85%-90%) but were distinguished by their relatively high (~80%) or low (~25%) expression of NKX6.1. NKX6.1-high and NKX6.1-low progenitor populations were transplanted subcutaneously within macroencapsulation devices into diabetic mice. Mice transplanted with NKX6.1-low cells remained hyperglycemic throughout the 5-month post-transplant period whereas diabetes was reversed in NKX6.1-high recipients within 3 months. Fasting human C-peptide levels were similar between groups throughout the study, but only NKX6.1-high grafts displayed robust meal-, glucose- and arginine-responsive insulin secretion as early as 3 months post-transplant. NKX6.1-low recipients displayed elevated fasting glucagon levels. Theracyte devices from both groups contained almost exclusively pancreatic endocrine tissue, but NKX6.1-high grafts contained a greater proportion of insulin-positive and somatostatin-positive cells, whereas NKX6.1-low grafts contained mainly glucagon-expressing cells. Insulin-positive cells in NKX6.1-high, but not NKX6.1-low grafts expressed nuclear MAFA. Collectively, this study demonstrates that a pancreatic endoderm

  11. A prospective assessment of the natural course of the exocrine pancreatic function in patients with a pancreatic head tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkens, Edmée C M; Cahen, Djuna L; de Wit, Jill; Looman, Caspar W N; van Eijck, Casper; Bruno, Marco J

    2014-01-01

    In cancer of the pancreatic head region, exocrine insufficiency is a well-known complication, leading to steatorrhea, weight loss, and malnutrition. Its presence is frequently overlooked, however, because the primary attention is focused on cancer treatment. To date, the risk of developing exocrine insufficiency is unspecified. Therefore, we assessed this function in patients with tumors of the pancreatic head, distal common bile duct, or ampulla of Vater. Between March 2010 and August 2012, we prospectively included patients diagnosed with cancer of the pancreatic head region at our tertiary center. To preclude the effect of a resection, we excluded operated patients. Each month, the exocrine function was determined with a fecal elastase test. Furthermore, endocrine function, steatorrhea-related symptoms, and body weight were evaluated. Patients were followed for 6 months, or until death. Thirty-two patients were included. The tumor was located in the pancreas in 75%, in the bile duct in 16%, and in the ampullary region in 9%, with a median size of 2.5 cm. At diagnosis, the prevalence of exocrine insufficiency was 66%, which increased to 92% after a median follow-up of 2 months (interquartile range, 1 to 4 mo). Most patients with cancer of the pancreatic head region were already exocrine insufficient at diagnosis, and within several months, this function was impaired in almost all cases. Given this high prevalence, physicians should be focused on diagnosing and treating exocrine insufficiency, to optimize the nutritional status and physical condition, especially for those patients undergoing palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.

  12. Prenatal ultrasound findings of fetal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Song, Mi Jin; Min, Jee Yeon; Han, Byoung Hee; Lee, Young Ho; Cho, Byung Jae; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2002-01-01

    A variety of neoplasms can develop in each tetal organ. Most fetal neoplasms can be detected by careful prenatal ultrasonographic examination. Some neoplosms show specific ultrasonographic findings suggesting the differential diagnosis, but others do not. Knowledge of the presence of a neoplasm in the fetus may alter the prenatal management of a pregnancy and the mode of delivery, and facilitates immediate postnatal treatment. During the last five years, we experienced 32 cases of fetal neoplasms in a variety of organs. We describe their typical and ultrasonographic findings with correlating postnatal CT, MRI, and pathologic findings

  13. Activated macrophages create lineage-specific microenvironments for pancreatic acinar- and β-cell regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscimanna, Angela; Coudriet, Gina M; Gittes, George K; Piganelli, Jon D; Esni, Farzad

    2014-11-01

    Although the cells that contribute to pancreatic regeneration have been widely studied, little is known about the mediators of this process. During tissue regeneration, infiltrating macrophages debride the site of injury and coordinate the repair response. We investigated the role of macrophages in pancreatic regeneration in mice. We used a saporin-conjugated antibody against CD11b to reduce the number of macrophages in mice following diphtheria toxin receptor-mediated cell ablation of pancreatic cells, and evaluated the effects on pancreatic regeneration. We analyzed expression patterns of infiltrating macrophages after cell-specific injury or from the pancreas of nonobese diabetic mice. We developed an in vitro culture system to study the ability of macrophages to induce cell-specific regeneration. Depletion of macrophages impaired pancreatic regeneration. Macrophage polarization, as assessed by expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, interleukin 10, and CD206, depended on the type of injury. The signals provided by polarized macrophages promoted lineage-specific generation of acinar or endocrine cells. Macrophage from nonobese diabetic mice failed to provide signals necessary for β-cell generation. Macrophages produce cell type-specific signals required for pancreatic regeneration in mice. Additional study of these processes and signals might lead to new approaches for treating type 1 diabetes or pancreatitis. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of pancreatic polypeptide as a market of transplanted insulin-producing fetal pig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuch, B E; Tabiin, M T; Casamento, F M; Yao, M; Georges, P; Amaratunga, A; Pinto, A N

    2001-01-01

    Transplantation of insulin-producing fetal pancreatic tissue into diabetic recipients has been shown to normalize blood glucose levels after several months. This time period is required for the growth and maturation of the fetal tissue so insulin levels cannot be used as a marker of graft function while the beta-cell is immature. Therefore, we have examined the use of another pancreatic endocrine hormone, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), to monitor graft function. The cell that produces this hormone has been shown to be the first mature endocrine cell in the fetal pancreas. Fetal pig pancreatic tissue, both in the form of 1 mm3 explants and islet-like cell clusters (ICCs), was transplanted into immunodeficient SCID mice and the levels of PP and insulin were measured in plasma and in the graft for up to 12 weeks. PP was detected in the untransplanted explants (0.58 pmol/mg) and ICCs (0.06 pmol/ICC) and the PP to insulin ratio was 2.7% and 5.8%, respectively. PP (but not porcine C-peptide, a marker of insulin secretion) was detectable in the plasma of SCID mice from 4 days to 3 weeks after transplantation, but not thereafter. The highest values were obtained at 4 days to 1 week. In the grafted tissue PP and insulin were present at all time points and the ratio of PP to insulin was 59%, 87%, 75%, 56%, 7%, 8%, and 7% at 4 days, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks, respectively. The decline in PP levels 3 weeks after transplantation was associated with beta-cell development in the graft. PP was also secreted by fetal pig pancreatic explants transplanted into diabetic NOD/SCID mice, with plasma levels measurable in the first week after the tissue was grafted. In immunocompetent BALB/c mice transplanted with the tissue, PP was detectable in plasma for 2 days after transplantation but not at 4 days, when cellular rejection commenced, or thereafter. We conclude that plasma PP levels can be used as a marker of the viability of fetal porcine pancreatic tissue in the first 3 weeks after

  15. Two avirulent, lentogenic strains of Newcastle disease virus are cytotoxic for some human pancreatic tumor lines in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Robert J; Attar, Bashar M; Rafiq, Asad; Delimata, Megan; Tejaswi, Sooraj

    2012-09-10

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. Highly infectious Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains are known to be very cytotoxic for an array of human tumor cell types in vitro and in vivo but the effects of these and avirulent NDV strains on pancreatic neoplasms are little known. Here, the direct cytolytic effects of the avirulent Hitchner-B1 (B1) and Ulster (U) NDV strains on 7 human pancreatic tumor cell lines and 4 normal human cell lines were studied. Cytotoxicity assays used serially diluted NDV to determine minimum cytotoxic plaque forming unit (PFU) doses. For NDV-B1, normal human cells were killed only by relatively high doses (range: 471-3,724 PFU) whereas NDV-U killed these cells at low PFU (range: 0.32-1.60 PFU). Most pancreatic cancer cell types were killed by much lower NDV-B1 doses (range: 0.40-2.60 PFU) while NDV-U killed Capan-1 and SU.86.86 cultures at very low doses (0.00041 PFU and 0.0034 PFU, respectively). On average, 1,555 times more NDV-B1 was needed to kill normal cells than most pancreatic tumor cells and 558 times more NDV-U to kill the two most sensitive pancreatic cancer lines. These innately-targeted lentogenic viruses may have meaningful potential in treating pancreatic cancer.

  16. Multiple Diagnostic Imaging of a Patient with Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of the Pancreas: EUS, CT and FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Ari; Ha, Jungmin; Kwon, Seong Young

    2014-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplam of the pancreas (SPNP) is a rare tumour, making up approximately 1 % to 3 % of pancreatic tumours. About 90 % of SPNPs occur in young women (mean age 35 years). SPNP rarely causes symptoms and is usually detected incidentally. Differentiating SPNP from other pancreatic tumours is very important, because surgical resection may provide favourable outcomes. Metastases or invasion to other organs has been reported in 15% to 20% of patients with SPNP. Histologically, the uniform, bland-appearing, epithelial cells of SPNP are similar to the cells making up other pancreatic endocrine neoplasms. However, SPNP cannot be regarded as a pure pancreatic endocrine neoplasm because of the absence of chromogranin A expression and low expression of other endocrine markers. SPNP has not been associated with specific serum tumour markers. CT and MRI are used for the diagnosis and staging of SPNP. On contrast-enhanced CT, SPNP shows isoattenuation on precontrast CT, weak enhancement during the arterial phase and gradually increased enhancement during the portal venous phase. SPNP can appear as an encapsulated lesion with cystic degeneration, necrosis, haemorrhage or calcification. MRI can characterise internal signal intensities, including a blood component, which is helpful in making a differential diagnosis. Dong et al. analysed CT and MRI findings from eight patients with SPNP and reported that four lesions showed mixed solid and cystic components, and the others appeared almost completely solid. Stoita et al. reported that EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration was a minimally invasive, safe and reliable diagnostic method for SPNP. They reported that all seven lesions examined were hypoechoic, heterogeneous and well circumscribed. Their findings are very similar to the findings in our patient. In addition, it is clear from the EUS images of our patient that EUS provides better images for evaluating SPNP lesions than US of the pancreas (Figs. 1e and f and 2

  17. The Spindle Cell Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell neoplasms are defined as neoplasms that consist of spindle-shaped cells in the histopathology. Spindle cell neoplasms can affect the oral cavity. In the oral cavity, the origin of the spindle cell neoplasms may be traced to epithelial, mesenchymal and odontogenic components. This article aims to review the spindle cell neoplasms of the oral cavity with emphasis on histopathology.

  18. Recent advances in nuclear medicine in endocrine oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luster, Markus; Pfestroff, Andreas; Verburg, Frederik A

    2017-01-01

    The purpose is to review recent advances concerning the role of nuclear medicine in endocrine oncology. For I therapy of thyroid cancer a thyrotropin (TSH) more than 30 mU/l has for many years been deemed a condition sine qua non. However, new data show that patients with lower TSH levels at the time of ablation have the same rate of successful ablation as those with TSH more than 30 mU/l.I-124 combined integrated positron emission tomography and computed X-ray tomography was shown to be highly accurate in predicting findings on posttherapy radioiodine scanning and was shown to have a high prognostic power.In neuroendocrine tumors, long-term complication rates of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy were reported. Furthermore first preclinical and clinical results of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin receptor antagonists were published.In nuclear medicine, prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted radionuclide imaging and therapy is of interest. PSMA was shown to also be expressed in neoplasms of the thyroid, the adrenal glands and neuroendocrine tumors. Further individualization of thyroid cancer patient care by means of I-124-positron emission tomography and computed X-ray tomography-based selection of the therapeutic strategy is possible. I therapy might not require as intensive TSH stimulation as thought previously. For endocrine-related malignancies PSMA targeting deserves further investigation.

  19. Traumatic presentation of a solid pancreatic pseudopapillary neoplasm in a 7 year old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawad Ali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas are rare tumors that present in adolescence after having grown to a large size. We present the case of a young girl who had emesis and abdominal pain after hitting her abdomen on the side of her bathtub. She underwent workup and successful surgical resection in the same admission. In reviewing the literature, these tumors often present with a palpable mass or abdominal pain. They are diagnosed with various imaging modalities and have an excellent prognosis with complete surgical resection. Chemotherapy is reserved for unresectable or metastatic disease. The young age and traumatic presentation make this a notable case.

  20. Dictating genomic destiny: Epigenetic regulation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundara, Justin S; Jamal, Karim; Kurzawinski, Tom

    2018-07-05

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours are a diverse group of neoplasms with an increasingly well-defined genomic basis. Despite this, much of what drives this disease is still unknown and epigenetic influences represent the next tier of gene, and hence disease modifiers that are of unquestionable importance. Moreover, they are of arguably more significance than the genes themselves given their malleable nature and potential to be exploited for not only diagnosis and prognosis, but also therapy. This review summarises what is known regarding the key epigenetic modifiers of disease through the domains of diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Cdk4-E2f1 pathway regulates early pancreas development by targeting Pdx1+ progenitors and Ngn3+ endocrine precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Yoon; Rane, Sushil G.

    2011-01-01

    Cell division and cell differentiation are intricately regulated processes vital to organ development. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are master regulators of the cell cycle that orchestrate the cell division and differentiation programs. Cdk1 is essential to drive cell division and is required for the first embryonic divisions, whereas Cdks 2, 4 and 6 are dispensable for organogenesis but vital for tissue-specific cell development. Here, we illustrate an important role for Cdk4 in regulating early pancreas development. Pancreatic development involves extensive morphogenesis, proliferation and differentiation of the epithelium to give rise to the distinct cell lineages of the adult pancreas. The cell cycle molecules that specify lineage commitment within the early pancreas are unknown. We show that Cdk4 and its downstream transcription factor E2f1 regulate mouse pancreas development prior to and during the secondary transition. Cdk4 deficiency reduces embryonic pancreas size owing to impaired mesenchyme development and fewer Pdx1+ pancreatic progenitor cells. Expression of activated Cdk4R24C kinase leads to increased Nkx2.2+ and Nkx6.1+ cells and a rise in the number and proliferation of Ngn3+ endocrine precursors, resulting in expansion of the β cell lineage. We show that E2f1 binds and activates the Ngn3 promoter to modulate Ngn3 expression levels in the embryonic pancreas in a Cdk4-dependent manner. These results suggest that Cdk4 promotes β cell development by directing E2f1-mediated activation of Ngn3 and increasing the pool of endocrine precursors, and identify Cdk4 as an important regulator of early pancreas development that modulates the proliferation potential of pancreatic progenitors and endocrine precursors. PMID:21490060

  2. Impact of preoperative levels of hemoglobin and albumin on the survival of pancreatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, J; Martín-Pérez, E; Fernández-Contreras, M E; Reguero-Callejas, M E; Gamallo-Amat, C

    2010-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer presents the worst survival rates of all neoplasms. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment, but is associated with high complication rates and outcome is bad even in those resected cases. Therefore, candidates amenable for resection must be carefully selected. Identification of prognostic factors preoperatively may help to improve the treatment of these patients, focusing on individually management based on the expected response. We perform a retrospective study of 59 patients with histological diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma between 1999 and 2003, looking for possible prognostic factors. We analyze 59 patients, 32 males and 27 females with a mean age of 63.8 years. All the patients were operated, performing palliative surgery in 32% and tumoral resection in 68%, including pancreaticoduodenectomies in 51% and distal pancreatectomy in 17%. Median global survival was 14 months (Range 1-110).We observed that preoperative levels of hemoglobin under 12 g/dl (p = 0.0006) and serum albumina under 2.8 g/dl (p = 0.021) are associated with worse survival. Preoperative levels of hemoglobin and serum albumina may be prognostic indicators in pancreatic cancer.

  3. 131Iodine-Tenatumomab Treatment in Tenascin-C Positive Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-11

    Breast Neoplasm; Head and Neck Neoplasm; Skin Neoplasm; Respiratory Tract Neoplasm; Urogenital Neoplasm; Digestive System Neoplasm; Pancreatic Neoplasm; Connective and Soft Tissue Neoplasm; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin

  4. B-Receptor Signaling in Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Carcinomas; Amyloidosis; Anal Cancer; Anemia; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of Bladder; Bone Marrow Transplant Failure; Bone Cancer; Cancer of Brain and Nervous System; Breast Cancer; Carcinoma of the Large Intestine; Endocrine Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Eye Cancer; Gall Bladder Cancer; Gastric (Stomach) Cancer; Gastrooesophageal Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST); Gynecologic Cancers; Head and Neck Cancers; Hepatobiliary Neoplasm; Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Hodgkin Disease; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Mesothelioma; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS); Neuroendocrine Tumors; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Pancreatic Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Skin Cancer; Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Testicular Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  5. Chimeric analysis of EGFP and DsRed2 transgenic mice demonstrates polyclonal maintenance of pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Je-Young; Siswanto, Antoni; Harimoto, Kenichi; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi

    2013-06-01

    The pancreatic islet is an assembly of specific endocrine cells. There are many conflicting reports regarding whether the acinus develops from single or multiple progenitor cells. This study investigated the development and maintenance clonality of the pancreatic acinus and duct using a chimeric analysis with EGFP and DsRed2 transgenic mice. Chimeric mice (G-R mice) were obtained by the aggregation method, using 8-cell stage embryos from EGFP and DsRed2 transgenic mice. The islets from the G-R mice were chimeric and mosaic, consisting of either EGFP- or DsRed2-positive populations, as in previous reports. On the other hand, most acini developed from either EGFP or DsRed2 origin, but some were chimeric. Interestingly, these chimeric acini were clearly separated into two-color regions and were not mosaic. Some large intralobular pancreatic ducts consisting of more than 10 cells were found to be chimeric, but no small ducts made up of less than 9 cells were chimeric. Our histological observations suggest that the pancreatic acinus polyclonally and directionally is maintained by multiple progenitor cells. Pancreatic large ducts also seem to develop polyclonally and might result from the assembly of small ducts that develop from a single origin. These findings provide useful information for further understanding pancreatic maintenance.

  6. Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus in Chronic Pancreatitis: Recommendations from PancreasFest 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickels, Michael R.; Bellin, Melena; Toledo, Frederico G.S.; Robertson, R. Paul; Andersen, Dana K.; Chari, Suresh T.; Brand, Randall; Frulloni, Luca; Anderson, Michelle A.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Description Diabetes and glucose intolerance are common complications of chronic pancreatitis, yet clinical guidance on their detection, classification, and management is lacking. Methods A working group reviewed the medical problems, diagnostic methods, and treatment options for chronic pancreatitis-associated diabetes for a consensus meeting at PancreasFest 2012. Results Guidance Statement 1.1 Diabetes mellitus is common in chronic pancreatitis. While any patient with chronic pancreatitis should be monitored for development of diabetes, those with long-standing duration of disease, prior partial pancreatectomy, and early onset of calcific disease may be at higher risk. Those patients developing diabetes mellitus are likely to have co-existing pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Guidance Statement 1.2 Diabetes occurring secondary to chronic pancreatitis should be recognized as pancreatogenic diabetes (type 3c diabetes). Guidance Statement 2.1 The initial evaluation should include fasting glucose and HbA1c. These tests should be repeated annually. Impairment in either fasting glucose or HbA1c requires further evaluation. Guidance Statement 2.2 Impairment in either fasting glucose or HbA1c should be further evaluated by a standard 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test. Guidance Statement 2.3 An absent pancreatic polypeptide response to mixed-nutrient ingestion is a specific indicator of type 3c diabetes. Guidance Statement 2.4 Assessment of pancreatic endocrine reserve, and importantly that of functional beta-cell mass, should be performed as part of the evaluation and follow-up for total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT). Guidance Statement 3 Patients with pancreatic diabetes shall be treated with specifically tailored medical nutrition and pharmacologic therapies. Conclusions Physicians should evaluate and treat glucose intolerance in patients with pancreatitis. PMID:23890130

  7. Multiple endocrine adenomatosis with Cushing's disease and the amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome responsive to proton beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veseley, D.L.; Fass, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    Multiple endocrine adenomatosis (MEA) or neoplasia is a hereditary disorder consisting of tumors of hyperplasia of several endocrine glands. In MEA-1 the pituitary, parathyroids, and pancreatic islets are most frequently involved, while in MEA-2 the thyroid (medullary carcinoma of the thyroid), parathyroids,and adrenals (pheochromocytomas) are the endocrine glands most likely to be involved. Cushings's syndrome may occur in MEA-1 and has also been found in patients with MEA-2, where the cause of Cushing's syndrome is usually ectopic ACTH production from medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. Recently, there have been reports of amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome in patients with MEA-1, and confirmation that hyperprolactinemia is associated with this syndrom has been found in patients with MEA-1. The present report details a patient who has been followed up for 20 years since she first presented with amenorrhea and galactorrhea. Ten years after first being seen she was noted to have Cushing's syndrom and hyperparathyroidism due to parathyroid hyperplasia. Both the amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome and Cushing's sydrome disappeared with proton beam irradiation to the pituitary

  8. CT findings of intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct: Assessment with multiphase contrast-enhanced examination using multi-detector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, H., E-mail: ogawa.hiroshi@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, S. [Department of Radiology, Japanese Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Nagasaka, T. [Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Suzuki, K. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ota, T. [Department of Radiology, Aichi Medical University Hospital, Nagakute Aichi (Japan); Naganawa, S. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Aim: To evaluate multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB), a neoplasm that is considered to be the biliary counterpart of pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Materials and methods: Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated multiphase contrast-enhanced CT images with 0.5 or 1 mm collimation in 37 consecutive patients with resected IPNB diagnosed by a single pathologist. The CT findings were correlated with the pathological findings concerning invasion of the surrounding organs and vessels. Results: All patients showed bile duct dilatation. An intraductal mass was detected in 36 patients and the following findings were observed: extensive infiltration along the bile duct more than 20 mm (n = 32), compared with normal hepatic parenchyma, isodense or hyperdense during the late arterial phase (n = 31), not hyperdense during the portal-venous and delayed phases (n = 36), and intense enhancement rim at the base of the mass during the portal-venous or delayed phase (n = 27). Parenchymal invasion of the surrounding organs was seen in eight of 16 tumours showing irregular or bulging margins. Vascular invasion was false positive in four of eight tumours. Conclusions: IPNB exhibits relatively characteristic findings with multiphase contrast-enhanced examination using MDCT. A tendency to overestimate invasion of the surrounding organs and vessels was seen.

  9. The application of PET/MRI in pancreatic neoplasms%PET/MRI在胰腺肿瘤中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旭东; 林晓珠

    2018-01-01

    PET/MRI是一种将PET和MRI融合的新型影像诊断技术,其整合了PET提供的人体生理代谢、分子信息和MRI提供的功能及解剖形态信息.相较于CT,MRI具有更高的软组织对比度,可多参数成像,且无辐射.PET/MRI在胰腺癌病灶检测、 术前分期和预后评估方面优于PET/CT.68Ga标记的生长抑素受体显像剂PET/MRI能够提高胰腺神经内分泌肿瘤的检测和诊断能力.新型显像剂的研发和应用能够提高胰腺肿瘤PET/MRI的特异性和精准性.就PET/MRI在胰腺癌的诊断、分期及疗效监测的应用价值及其对胰腺神经内分泌肿瘤的研究进展予以综述.%PET/MRI is a new medical imaging technology that can obtain hybrid images of PET and MRI simultane-ously,which integrates human physiological metabolism and molecular information from PET with functional and anatomical information from MRI.MRI has many advantages compared with computed tomography (CT),such as better soft tissue contrast, multiple parameters and no radiation.Researches showed that PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT in the detection, preoperative staging and prognosis of pancreatic cancers. PET/MRI using Somatostatin(SST) receptor with 68-Gallium (68Ga)-labeled can enhance the detection and diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The application of newly developed contrast media can improve specificity and accuracy of PET/MRI in diagnosing pancreatic tumors.In this paper, the values of PET/MRI in di-agnosis, staging and evaluating therapeutic effect in pancreatic cancer and progress of PET/MRI researches in pancreatic neu-roendocrine tumors were reviewed.

  10. LAPAROSCOPIC PANCREATIC RESECTION. FROM ENUCLEATION TO PANCREATODUODENECTOMY. 11-YEAR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Autran Cesar MACHADO

    Full Text Available Context Our experience with laparoscopic pancreatic resection began in 2001. During initial experience, laparoscopy was reserved for selected cases. With increasing experience more complex laparoscopic procedures such as central pancreatectomy and pancreatoduodenectomies were performed. Objectives The aim of this paper is to review our personal experience with laparoscopic pancreatic resection over 11-year period. Methods All patients who underwent laparoscopic pancreatic resection from 2001 through 2012 were reviewed. Preoperative data included age, gender, and indication for surgery. Intraoperative variables included operative time, bleeding, blood transfusion. Diagnosis, tumor size, margin status were determined from final pathology reports. Results Since 2001, 96 patients underwent laparoscopic pancreatectomy. Median age was 55 years old. 60 patients were female and 36 male. Of these, 88 (91.6% were performed totally laparoscopic; 4 (4.2% needed hand-assistance, 1 robotic assistance. Three patients were converted. Four patients needed blood transfusion. Operative time varied according type of operation. Mortality was nil but morbidity was high, mainly due to pancreatic fistula (28.1%. Sixty-one patients underwent distal pancreatectomy, 18 underwent pancreatic enucleation, 7 pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomies, 5 uncinate process resection, 3 central and 2 total pancreatectomies. Conclusions Laparoscopic resection of the pancreas is a reality. Pancreas sparing techniques, such as enucleation, resection of uncinate process and central pancreatectomy, should be used to avoid exocrine and/or endocrine insufficiency that could be detrimental to the patient's quality of life. Laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy is a safe operation but should be performed in specialized centers by highly skilled laparoscopic surgeons.

  11. The effect of the modified puestow procedure on diabetes in patients with tropical chronic pancreatitis--a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, S S; Nundy, S; Tandon, R K

    2001-01-01

    Surgical decompression of the pancreatic duct in patients with chronic pancreatitis relieves pain in 80-90% of subjects, but its effect on exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function is not clear. We sought to further examine such effects. We performed the modified Puestow procedure (lateral pancreaticojejunostomy) in 53 patients with chronic tropical pancreatitis. Pain evaluation was done subjectively and objectively, and the fasting and postprandial blood glucose, insulin requirements, and 72-h fecal fat levels were estimated before and at 3 months and 5 yr after operation. We compared 46 operated patients who completed 5 yr of follow-up with 40 patients who did not undergo operation. Forty-one patients (89%) had complete pain relief. The mean fasting (209 mg/dl) and postprandial (320 mg/dl) blood glucose and insulin requirements (40 U/day) decreased postoperatively (fasting, 162 mg/dl; postprandial blood glucose, 254mg/dl; insulin requirement, 18.2 U/day; p Puestow procedure not only have relief from pain but also improvement of diabetes.

  12. Endocrine pancreas development at weaning in goat kids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabia Rosi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen three-day old Saanen goat kids were divided into MILK and WEAN groups. MILK kids received goat milk to age 48 days; WEAN kids were initially fed milk but started weaning at 25 days and were completely weaned by 40 days. Total intake per group was recorded daily. On day 25, 40 and 48, body weights were recorded, and plasma samples were taken and analyzed for glucose, free amino-acids and insulin. On day 48, all animals were slaughtered and pancreas samples were analyzed for total DNA and RNA content. Histological sections of pancreas were examined by light microscope and images analyzed by dedicated software. Seven days after the beginning of the weaning program, dry matter intake in the WEAN group began to decrease compared to the MILK one. Nonetheless, body weight did not differ throughout the study period. Weaning significantly decreased plasma levels of glucose, amino-acids and insulin. No difference was observed in pancreatic DNA and RNA content. Histological analysis of pancreas showed that the size of pancreatic islets was not different, but islet number per section was lower in the pancreas of WEAN animals. In conclusion, weaning affects glucose and amino-acid metabolism and influences endocrine pancreas activity and morphology.

  13. Identification of risk factors for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreaticoduodenectomy using a 13C-labeled mixed triglyceride breath test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirono, Seiko; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Tani, Masaji; Kawai, Manabu; Okada, Ken-ichi; Uemura, Kenichiro; Sudo, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Naoya; Kondo, Naru; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2015-02-01

    There are only a few reports concerning long-term exocrine function after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), although the number of long-term survivors has increased. We assessed pancreatic exocrine function after PD in 189 patients to identify risk factors for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. We evaluated patients' exocrine function by using the (13)C-labeled mixed triglyceride breath test, a noninvasive test feasible in outpatient service units. The present study included 99 patients that underwent pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ) at Wakayama Medical University Hospital and 90 patients that underwent pancreaticogastrostomy (PG) at Hiroshima University Hospital, the standard reconstruction techniques during PD at the respective hospitals. We also analyzed long-term morphological changes of remnant pancreas by computed tomography (main pancreatic duct dilation and parenchymal atrophy), nutritional status, and endocrine function. Independent risk factors for exocrine insufficiency after PD include hard pancreas (P = 0.003, odds ratio; 3.157) and PG reconstruction (P = 0.040, odds ratio; 2.321). Breath test results correlated significantly with post-operative morphological changes, nutritional status, and endocrine function. Atrophic changes of the remnant pancreas in the PG group were more severe than those in the PJ group. Furthermore, for patients with a soft pancreas, postoperative body weight changes, prognostic nutritional index, serum total protein levels as well as exocrine test were worse in the PG group, compared with the PJ group. Our results showed that PJ reconstruction might be superior to PG during PD, from the viewpoint of long-term pancreatic exocrine function, although further prospective studies are needed.

  14. Duodenal endocrine cells in adult coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölund, K; Alumets, J; Berg, N O; Håkanson, R; Sundler, F

    1979-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical techniques we studied duodenal biopsies from 18 patients with coeliac disease and 24 patients with normal duodenal morphology. We had access to antisera against the following gastrointestinal peptides: cholecystokinin (CCK), gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), gastrin-17, glucagon-enteroglucagon, motilin, neurotensin, pancreatic peptide (PP), secretin, somatostatin, substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). The somatostatin, GIP, CCK, and glucagon cells were increased in number in coeliac disease. The number of motilin cells was slightly increased, while secretin cells were reduced. Cells storing gastrin-17, substance P, or neurotensin were rare in all patients regardless of diagnosis. No PP immunoreactive cells were found and VIP was localised to neurons only. In biopsies from patients having a mucosa with ridging of villi the number of the various endocrine cell types did not differ from that in the control group. Images Fig. 2 PMID:385455

  15. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful. PMID:24259953

  16. Colon neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura F, K.

    1991-01-01

    The main aspects of colon neoplasms are described, including several factors that predispose the disease, the occurrence, the main biomedical radiography and the evaluation after the surgery. (C.G.C.)

  17. Nanotopography Promotes Pancreatic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.