WorldWideScience

Sample records for paediatric care models

  1. Hospital-in-the-Home — essential to an integrated model of paediatric care

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hensey, CC

    2017-01-01

    The National Clinical Programme for Paediatrics and Neonatology is proposing a model of care that will determine the future delivery of children’s health services in Ireland1. The focus is on the provision of an integrated service with improved co-ordination between primary, secondary, and tertiary level facilities. A parallel goal is improvements in chronic care and medical care in the home. An expanded role for ambulatory care and hospital at home schemes with a reduced reliance on inpatient care is proposed in line with international best practice. Achieving these goals requires a paradigm shift in delivery of children’s health care, and reconfiguration of current services to deliver multidisciplinary care in hospital and at home. The recently approved planning application for the new children’s hospital provides an opportunity and heralds a change in the structure of paediatric services in Ireland. It will act as the nexus of paediatric care throughout Ireland; supporting paediatric services nationally through outreach programmes, and ensuring children are treated as close to home as possible. A Hospital-in-the-Home (HITH) program would help meet these objectives; and could provide home based acute paediatric care, leading to economic benefits, and the delivery of quality family-centred care.

  2. [Application of an OPT model in a paediatric nursing clinical case in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifà Ros, Rosa; Pérez Pérez, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the assessment and nursing diagnostic hypothesis generation on a 10 years old child with a parietal contusion who attended the health care centre with his mother. The health centre is located in a rural area in Catalonia, and a paediatric nurse was placed in charge of the child. In the assessment and the subsequent information analysis, the nurse identified an unhealthy situation for the correct development of the child. The situation required the mother's intervention and a change in her habits and behaviours. For the approach of the case study, the OPT model (Outcome Present-state Testing) by Pesut and Herdman was used. The assessment was made by using Marjory Gordon's Functional Health Patterns assessment, and the NANDA-I nursing diagnoses taxonomy, NOC Outcomes taxonomy and NIC Interventions taxonomy was used for the diagnoses and planning. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Paediatric patient navigation models of care in Canada: An environmental scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Alison; Doucet, Shelley; Azar, Rima

    2018-05-01

    (1) To provide other organizations with useful information when implementing paediatric navigation programs and (2) to inform the implementation of a navigation care centre in New Brunswick for children with complex health conditions. This environmental scan consisted of a literature review of published and grey literature for paediatric patient navigation programs across Canada. Additional programs were found following discussions with program coordinators and navigators. Interviews were conducted with key staff from each program and included questions related to patient condition; target population and location; method delivery; navigator background; and navigator roles. Data analysis included analysis of interviews and identification of common themes across the different programs. We interviewed staff from 19 paediatric navigation programs across Canada. Programs varied across a number of different themes, including: condition and disease type, program location (e.g., hospital or clinic), navigator background (e.g., registered nurse or peer/lay navigator) and method of delivery (e.g., phone or face-to-face). Overall, navigator roles are similar across all programs, including advocacy, education, support and assistance in accessing resources from both within and outside the health care system. This scan offers a road map of Canadian paediatric navigation programs. Knowledge learned from this scan will inform stakeholders who are either involved in the delivery of paediatric patient navigation programs or planning to implement such a program. Specifically, our scan informed the development of a navigation centre for children with complex health conditions in New Brunswick.

  4. Paediatric acute care: Highlights from the Paediatric Acute Care-Advanced Paediatric Life Support Conference, Gold Coast, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Stephen Ss; Rao, Arjun; Acworth, Jason

    2018-04-25

    The Paediatric Acute Care Conference is an annual conference organised by APLS Australia to advance paediatric acute care topics for clinicians in pre-hospital medicine, EDs, acute paediatrics, intensive care and anaesthesia. The Conference 2017 was held at Surfers Paradise, Queensland. We provide a summary of some of the presentations. © 2018 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  5. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options. (orig.)

  6. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options. (orig.)

  7. The social paediatrics initiative: a RICHER model of primary health care for at risk children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sabrina T; Lynam, M Judith; Khan, Koushambhi B; Scott, Lorine; Loock, Christine

    2012-10-04

    The Responsive Interdisciplinary Child-Community Health Education and Research (RICHER) initiative is an intersectoral and interdisciplinary community outreach primary health care (PHC) model. It is being undertaken in partnership with community based organizations in order to address identified gaps in the continuum of health services delivery for 'at risk' children and their families. As part of a larger study, this paper reports on whether the RICHER initiative is associated with increased: 1) access to health care for children and families with multiple forms of disadvantage and 2) patient-reported empowerment. This study provides the first examination of a model of delivering PHC, using a Social Paediatrics approach. This was a mixed-methods study, using quantitative and qualitative approaches; it was undertaken in partnership with the community, both organizations and individual providers. Descriptive statistics, including logistic regression of patient survey data (n=86) and thematic analyses of patient interview data (n=7) were analyzed to examine the association between patient experiences with the RICHER initiative and parent-reported empowerment. Respondents found communication with the provider clear, that the provider explained any test results in a way they could understand, and that the provider was compassionate and respectful. Analysis of the survey and in-depth interview data provide evidence that interpersonal communication, particularly the provider's interpersonal style (e.g., being treated as an equal), was very important. Even after controlling for parents' education and ethnicity, the provider's interpersonal style remained positively associated with parent-reported empowerment (p<0.01). This model of PHC delivery is unique in its purposeful and required partnerships between health care providers and community members. This study provides beginning evidence that RICHER can better meet the health and health care needs of people, especially

  8. Implementation of a Diabetes Educator Care Model to Reduce Paediatric Admission for Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Asma; Yousef, Hana; Abdelrahman, Layla; Tomy, Mary; Suliman, Shaker; Attia, Salima; Al Suwaidi, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication that can be life-threatening. Management of DKA needs admission in a specialized center and imposes major constraints on hospital resources. Aim. We plan to study the impact of adapting a diabetes-educator care model on reducing the frequency of hospital admission of children and adolescents presenting with DKA. Method. We have proposed a model of care led by diabetes educators for children and adolescents with diabetes. The team consisted of highly trained nurses. The model effectiveness is measured by comparing the rate of hospital admission for DKA over 4-year period to the baseline year prior to implementing the model. Results. There were 158 admissions for DKA over a 5-year period. Number of patients followed up in the outpatient diabetes clinics increased from 37 to 331 patients at the start and the end of the study years. Admission rate showed a downward trend over the five-year period. Percentage of admission for DKA is reduced from 210% to 1.8% (P 0.001). Conclusion. Diabetes educator care model is an effective and a sustainable measure to reduce hospital admission for DKA in children and adolescents.

  9. The social paediatrics initiative: a RICHER model of primary health care for at risk children and their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Sabrina T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Responsive Interdisciplinary Child-Community Health Education and Research (RICHER initiative is an intersectoral and interdisciplinary community outreach primary health care (PHC model. It is being undertaken in partnership with community based organizations in order to address identified gaps in the continuum of health services delivery for ‘at risk’ children and their families. As part of a larger study, this paper reports on whether the RICHER initiative is associated with increased: 1 access to health care for children and families with multiple forms of disadvantage and 2 patient-reported empowerment. This study provides the first examination of a model of delivering PHC, using a Social Paediatrics approach. Methods This was a mixed-methods study, using quantitative and qualitative approaches; it was undertaken in partnership with the community, both organizations and individual providers. Descriptive statistics, including logistic regression of patient survey data (n=86 and thematic analyses of patient interview data (n=7 were analyzed to examine the association between patient experiences with the RICHER initiative and parent-reported empowerment. Results Respondents found communication with the provider clear, that the provider explained any test results in a way they could understand, and that the provider was compassionate and respectful. Analysis of the survey and in-depth interview data provide evidence that interpersonal communication, particularly the provider’s interpersonal style (e.g., being treated as an equal, was very important. Even after controlling for parents’ education and ethnicity, the provider’s interpersonal style remained positively associated with parent-reported empowerment (p Conclusions This model of PHC delivery is unique in its purposeful and required partnerships between health care providers and community members. This study provides beginning evidence that RICHER can

  10. A comparison of paediatric dentists' and general dental practitioners' care patterns in paediatric dental care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorer-Jensma, M.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the care patterns of paediatric dentists and general dentists in the dental treatment of children in the Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A case control study was completed based on the financial records of one of the largest Dutch health insurance

  11. Paediatric stoma care nursing in the UK and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Marie

    Improving quality of care and developing and maintaining high standards of care are issues that are high on the NHS, nursing, and paediatric care agendas. Stoma formation will have an impact on the wellbeing and lifestyle of the person and their family, whatever the person's age. The specialty of stoma care nursing in the UK and Ireland is well established. However, the sub-specialty of paediatric stoma care nursing is much smaller in its 'membership' and its client group. There are differences in the needs of, and the associated care of, paediatric stoma patients even within this overall patient group. Paediatric stoma care nurses are in an ideal position to increase awareness about the specialty and improve standards of nursing care for neonates, children, adolescents and their families. However, until the establishment of the Paediatric Stoma Nurse Group (PSNG) in 2005, this 'position' had not being utilized. This article discusses the ongoing work of the PSNG to devise standards of paediatric stoma care nursing, best practice guidelines, relevant patient/parental information and establish itself as a valuable, proactive and independent forum for all healthcare professionals involved in the care of children with stomas.

  12. [Models of care and classification of "Children with special health care needs-CSHCN": Recommendations from the CSHCN Committee, Chilean Paediatric Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Cano, Juan Carlos; Lizama Calvo, Macarena; Rodríguez Zamora, Natalie; Ávalos Anguita, María Eugenia; Galanti De La Paz, Mónica; Barja Yañez, Salesa; Becerra Flores, Carlos; Sanhueza Sepúlveda, Carolina; Cabezas Tamayo, Ana María; Orellana Welch, Jorge; Zillmann Geerdts, Gisela; Antilef, Rosa María; Cox Melane, Alfonso; Valle Maluenda, Marcelo; Vargas Catalán, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    "Children with special health care needs" (CSHCN) is an emerging and heterogeneous group of paediatric patients, with a wide variety of medical conditions and with different uses of health care services. There is consensus on how to classify and assess these patients according to their needs, but not for their specific diagnosis. Needs are classified into 6 areas: a) specialised medical care; b) use or need of prescription medication; c) special nutrition; d) dependence on technology; e) rehabilitation therapy for functional limitation; and f) special education services. From the evaluation of each area, a classification for CSHCN is proposed according to low, medium, or high complexity health needs, to guide and distribute their care at an appropriate level of the health care system. Low complexity CSHCN should be incorporated into Primary Care services, to improve benefits for patients and families at this level. It is critical to train health care professionals in taking care of CSHCN, promoting a coordinated, dynamic and communicated work between different levels of the health care system. Compliance with these guidelines will achieve a high quality and integrated care for this vulnerable group of children. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. A concept analysis of holistic nursing care in paediatric nursing

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Tjale; J. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Holistic nursing care is widely advocated and is espoused in the philosophy of the South African Nursing Council. This concept is unclear, variously interpreted and poorly understood in paediatric nursing. This study was undertaken to examine the meaning of holistic nursing care and to develop a framework for holistic nursing care, which can be utilised in nurse education settings and in clinical nursing practice in the context of paediatric nursing. A qualitative, interpretive, explorative a...

  14. Paediatric Palliative Care and Intellectual Disability--A Unique Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Jacqueline K.; Herbert, Anthony Robert; Heussler, Helen S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Paediatric palliative care is a nuanced area of practice with additional complexities in the context of intellectual disability. There is currently minimal research to guide clinicians working in this challenging area of care. Method: This study describes the complex care of children with life-limiting conditions and intellectual…

  15. Global perspective on training and staffing for paediatric cardiac critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronicki, Ronald A; Pollak, Uri; Argent, Andrew C; Kumar, R Krishna; Balestrini, Maria; Cogo, Paola; Cury Borim, Bruna; De Costa, Kumi; Beca, John; Shimizu, Naoki; Dominguez, Troy E

    2017-12-01

    This manuscript provides a global perspective on physician and nursing education and training in paediatric cardiac critical care, including available resources and delivery of care models with representatives from several regions of the world including Africa, Israel, Asia, Australasia, Europe, South America, and the United States of America.

  16. The role of anaesthetists in paediatric intensive care units

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    to various surgical and critical care disciplines, the usefulness of a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) rotation was investigated. A brief overview of the experiences of anaesthetic registrars at a. South African teaching hospital rotating through a PICU is pre- sented, as well as the potential advantages for both trainees and.

  17. Paediatric palliative care providers' experiences in rural KwaZulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based palliative care (including paediatric palliative care) is available to patients in rural ... reported that one of the most distressing tasks a nurse has to carry out is telling any .... die, as a miracle (such as a cure) is presented as a possibility.

  18. The value of case management in paediatric palliative care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, L.M.

    2017-01-01

    In the Netherlands around 4000 – 6700 children with life-limiting diseases could benefit from paediatric palliative care (PPC). However, adequate PPC is often absent due to the lack of continuity and coordination of care and limited expertise among healthcare professionals (HCP). Consequently, many

  19. Noddings's caring ethics theory applied in a paediatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Anita; Nilstun, Tore

    2009-04-01

    Since the 1990s, numerous studies on the relationship between parents and their children have been reported on in the literature and implemented as a philosophy of care in most paediatric units. The purpose of this article is to understand the process of nurses' care for children in a paediatric setting by using Noddings's caring ethics theory. Noddings's theory is in part described from a theoretical perspective outlining the basic idea of the theory followed by a critique of her work. Important conceptions in her theory are natural caring (reception, relation, engrossment, motivational displacement, reciprocity) and ethical caring (physical self, ethical self, and ethical ideal). As a nurse one holds a duty of care to patients and, in exercising this duty, the nurse must be able to develop a relationship with the patient including giving the patient total authenticity in a 'feeling with' the patient. Noddings's theory is analysed and described in three examples from the paediatrics. In the first example, the nurse cared for the patient in natural caring while in the second situation, the nurse strived for the ethical caring of the patient. In the third example, the nurse rejected the impulse to care and deliberately turned her back to ethics and abandoned her ethical caring. According to the Noddings's theory, caring for the patient enables the nurse to obtain ethical insights from the specific type of nursing care which forms an important contribution to an overall increase of an ethical consciousness in the nurse.

  20. Participation in paediatric perioperative care: 'what it means for parents'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Carina; Svedberg, Petra; Nygren, Jens M; Carlsson, Ing-Marie

    2017-12-01

    To explore what it means for parents to participate in their children's paediatric perioperative care. Allowing parents to participate in paediatric perioperative care can make a major difference for children in terms of their well-being, a decreased need for painkillers, fewer sleeping disorders and a more positive experience for both parties. The nurse anaesthetist should have a holistic view and develop a shared vision for the child, the parents and for themselves to perform successful paediatric perioperative care. Descriptive qualitative study. The study was conducted in 2014. Data were collected in 20 narrative interviews with 15 mothers and five fathers who had experience of participating in their child's paediatric perioperative day surgery. The analysis was carried out with qualitative content analysis to describe the variations, differences and similarities in the experiences. The analysis revealed a main category that describes that parental participation in the context of paediatric perioperative care in day surgery meant 'having strength to participate despite an increased vulnerability'. Three generic categories with additional subcategories explained what was essential for the parents to be able to preserve this strength and participate in their child's care despite their increased vulnerability. The generic categories were named, 'gaining information about what will happen', 'being seen as a resource' and 'gaining access to the environment'. Efforts should be made to improve parents' roles and opportunities to participate in paediatric perioperative care. Nurse anaesthetists have a crucial role in enabling parents' participation and need knowledge to develop strategies and nursing interventions that meet parents' needs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Parental perceptions of clown care in paediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortamet, Guillaume; Merckx, Audrey; Roumeliotis, Nadia; Simonds, Caroline; Renolleau, Sylvain; Hubert, Philippe

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to report family satisfaction with regards to the presence of clowns in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). This is a single-centre survey-based study, conducted over 4 months in a 12-bed third level PICU in a university hospital. All parents present at the bedside of their child during clowning were considered as potential participants. Eligible parents were approached by one of the two intensivists as investigators and asked to complete a survey within the 48 h following the clowns' intervention. Thirty-three parents consented to complete the survey. Median age of children was 14 months (15 days to 16 years) and median Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) score was 1 (0-22). Twenty-four (72.7%) were considered as clinically stable while the clowns intervened. Twenty-eight parents (84.8%) and 27 (81.8%) considered that clowns had a positive effect on themselves and on their child, respectively. Clown care was considered as necessary in 19 cases (57.6%), optional in 13 (39.4%) and unnecessary in 1 (3.0%). The degree of parental satisfaction was not significantly associated with the child's clinical stability. We suggested that medical clowning in the PICU is well accepted by parents, regardless of severity of their child's condition. This study supports the adoption of medical clowning in PICUs as a patient- and family-centred care practice. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. [The prevention of pressure sores in paediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thueux, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    In paediatric intensive care, children develop pressure sores as a result of various mechanical and clinical factors. The prevention and assessment of the risk of pressure sores constitute a key concern for the nursing teams which establish prevention strategies adapted to the young patients.

  3. Use of antibiotics in paediatric long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, M T; Johnson, C L; Cohen, B; Jackson, O; Jones, L K; Saiman, L; Larson, E L; Neu, N

    2018-06-01

    Adult long-term care (LTC) facilities have high rates of antibiotic use, raising concerns about antimicrobial resistance. Few studies have examined antibiotic use in paediatric LTC facilities. To describe antibiotic use in three paediatric LTC facilities and to describe the factors associated with use. A retrospective cohort study was conducted from September 2012 to December 2015 in three paediatric LTC facilities. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), antimicrobial use and diagnostic testing. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors for antibiotic use. The association between susceptibility testing results and appropriate antibiotic coverage was determined using Chi-squared test. Fifty-eight percent (413/717) of residents had at least one HAI, and 79% (325/413) of these residents were treated with at least one antibiotic course, totalling 2.75 antibiotic courses per 1000 resident-days. Length of enrolment greater than one year, having a neurological disorder, having a tracheostomy, and being hospitalized at least once during the study period were significantly associated with receiving antibiotics when controlling for facility (all P facilities is widespread. There is further need to assess antibiotic use in paediatric LTC facilities. Evaluation of the adverse outcomes associated with inappropriate antibiotic use, including the prevalence of resistant organisms in paediatric LTC facilities, is critical. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Parental satisfaction with paediatric care, triage and waiting times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Nicholas; Breen, Daniel T; Taylor, James; Paul, Eldho; Grosvenor, Robert; Heggie, Katrina; Mahar, Patrick D

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims to determine parental and guardian's perceptions of paediatric emergency care and satisfaction with care, waiting times and triage category in a community ED. A structured questionnaire was provided to parents or guardians of paediatric patients presenting to emergency. The survey evaluated parent perceptions of waiting time, environment/facilities, professionalism and communication skills of staff and overall satisfaction of care. One hundred and thirty-three completed questionnaires were received from parents of paediatric patients. Responses were overall positive with respect to the multiple domains assessed. Parents generally considered waiting times to be appropriate and consistent with triage categories. Overall satisfaction was not significantly different for varying treatment or waiting times. Patients triaged as semi-urgent were of the opinion that waiting times were less appropriate than urgent, less-urgent or non-urgent patients. On the basis of the present study, patient perceptions and overall satisfaction of care does not appear to be primarily influenced by time spent waiting or receiving treatment. Attempts made at the triage process to ensure that semi-urgent patients have reasonable expectations of waiting times might provide an opportunity to improve these patients' expectations and perceptions. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  5. Paediatric cardiac intensive care unit: current setting and organization in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisse, Alain; Le Bel, Stéphane; Mas, Bertrand; Macrae, Duncan

    2010-10-01

    Over recent decades, specialized paediatric cardiac intensive care has emerged as a central component in the management of critically ill, neonatal, paediatric and adult patients with congenital and acquired heart disease. The majority of high-volume centres (dealing with over 300 surgical cases per year) have dedicated paediatric cardiac intensive care units, with the smallest programmes more likely to care for paediatric cardiac patients in mixed paediatric or adult intensive care units. Specialized nursing staff are also a crucial presence at the patient's bedside for quality of care. A paediatric cardiac intensive care programme should have patients (preoperative and postoperative) grouped together geographically, and should provide proximity to the operating theatre, catheterization laboratory and radiology department, as well as to the regular ward. Age-appropriate medical equipment must be provided. An optimal strategy for running a paediatric cardiac intensive care programme should include: multidisciplinary collaboration and involvement with paediatric cardiology, anaesthesia, cardiac surgery and many other subspecialties; a risk-stratification strategy for quantifying perioperative risk; a personalized patient approach; and anticipatory care. Finally, progressive withdrawal from heavy paediatric cardiac intensive care management should be institutionalized. Although the countries of the European Union do not share any common legislation on the structure and organization of paediatric intensive care or paediatric cardiac intensive care, any paediatric cardiac surgery programme in France that is agreed by the French Health Ministry must perform at least '150 major procedures per year in children' and must provide a 'specialized paediatric intensive care unit'. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Paediatric palliative care and intellectual disability-A unique context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Jacqueline K; Herbert, Anthony Robert; Heussler, Helen S

    2017-11-01

    Paediatric palliative care is a nuanced area of practice with additional complexities in the context of intellectual disability. There is currently minimal research to guide clinicians working in this challenging area of care. This study describes the complex care of children with life-limiting conditions and intellectual disability by means of a literature synthesis and commentary with "best-practice" guide. As few articles concerning children with intellectual disability and palliative care needs were identified by formal systematic review, our expert consensus group has drawn from the paediatric palliative, oncology and adult intellectual disability literature to highlight common clinical challenges encountered in the day-to-day care of children with intellectual disability and life-limiting conditions. A longitudinal child- and family-centred approach is key to ensuring best-practice care for families of children with life-limiting conditions and intellectual disability. As highlighted by the great absence of literature addressing this important patient population, further research in this area is urgently required. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Parental experiences with a paediatric palliative care team: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Lisa M.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Yn; Bosman, Diederik K.; Colenbrander, Derk A.; Jagt, Charissa T.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; van Delden, Johannes Jm; Kars, Marijke C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Parents of children with a life-limiting disease have to rely on themselves at home while adequate paediatric palliative care is lacking. In several countries, paediatric palliative care teams are introduced to ensure continuity and quality of care and to support the child and the

  8. Family-Centred Care in Paediatric and Neonatal Nursing- A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.K. Irlam

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A literature review of family-centred care in paediatric and neonatal nursing was undertaken as part of a research project. This research intended to ascertain the knowledge and attitudes of paediatric and neonatal qualified nurses and nurse educators towards family-centred care as it pertains to infants and children in hospitals in the Gauteng Province. A definition of family-centred care is difficult to formulate mainly due to the lack of consensus about its meaning. Additionally, the diverse societal contexts within which family-centred care is applied further complicate its definition. Internationally in developed countries, family-centred care is viewed as care, which is parent-led in consultation with the nurse practitioner. A family-centred care model for the South African context needs to be developed with the focus on parent participation, a precursor of family-centred care. This article traces the early developments in parental care for hospitalised children with specific reference to the USA, the UK and South Africa. Precursor concepts in family-centred care are described followed by a cursory overview of the reality of family-centred care, its cultural dimensions and matters of family strengths and choices in family-centred care.

  9. [Admission, discharge and triage guidelines for paediatric intensive care units in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Oliva, Pedro; Cambra-Lasaosa, Francisco José; Quintana-Díaz, Manuel; Rey-Galán, Corsino; Sánchez-Díaz, Juan Ignacio; Martín-Delgado, María Cruz; de Carlos-Vicente, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Rastrollo, Ramón; Holanda-Peña, María Soledad; Pilar-Orive, Francisco Javier; Ocete-Hita, Esther; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; Serrano-González, Ana; Blanch, Luis

    2018-05-01

    A paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is a separate physical facility or unit specifically designed for the treatment of paediatric patients who, because of the severity of illness or other life-threatening conditions, require comprehensive and continuous inten-sive care by a medical team with special skills in paediatric intensive care medicine. Timely and personal intervention in intensive care reduces mortality, reduces length of stay, and decreases cost of care. With the aim of defending the right of the child to receive the highest attainable standard of health and the facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation, as well as ensuring the quality of care and the safety of critically ill paediatric patients, the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (AEP), Spanish Society of Paediatric Intensive Care (SECIP) and Spanish Society of Critical Care (SEMICYUC) have approved the guidelines for the admission, discharge and triage for Spanish PICUs. By using these guidelines, the performance of Spanish paediatric intensive care units can be optimised and paediatric patients can receive the appropriate level of care for their clinical condition. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Admission, discharge and triage guidelines for paediatric intensive care units in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Oliva, Pedro; Cambra-Lasaosa, Francisco José; Quintana-Díaz, Manuel; Rey-Galán, Corsino; Sánchez-Díaz, Juan Ignacio; Martín-Delgado, María Cruz; de Carlos-Vicente, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Rastrollo, Ramón; Holanda-Peña, María Soledad; Pilar-Orive, Francisco Javier; Ocete-Hita, Esther; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; Serrano-González, Ana; Blanch, Luis

    2018-05-01

    A paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is a separate physical facility or unit specifically designed for the treatment of paediatric patients who, because of the severity of illness or other life-threatening conditions, require comprehensive and continuous inten-sive care by a medical team with special skills in paediatric intensive care medicine. Timely and personal intervention in intensive care reduces mortality, reduces length of stay, and decreases cost of care. With the aim of defending the right of the child to receive the highest attainable standard of health and the facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation, as well as ensuring the quality of care and the safety of critically ill paediatric patients, the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (AEP), Spanish Society of Paediatric Intensive Care (SECIP) and Spanish Society of Critical Care (SEMICYUC) have approved the guidelines for the admission, discharge and triage for Spanish PICUs. By using these guidelines, the performance of Spanish paediatric intensive care units can be optimised and paediatric patients can receive the appropriate level of care for their clinical condition. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  11. The experience of transition in adolescents and young adults transferring from paediatric to adult care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fegran, Liv; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Aagaard, Hanne

    Introduction: Despite research and implementation of transition models in the last decades, transfer from paediatric to adult care still poses great challenges. Predominantly studies on health care transition have been based on the perspective of experts or health care professionals. Aim...... of familiar surroundings and relationships combined with insecurity and a feeling of being unprepared for what was ahead. Four sub-themes illustrating these experiences were identified: facing changes of significant relationships, moving from familiar to unknown ward cultures, timing of transfer and achieving...... as competent collaborators in their own transfer is crucial, and may protect them from additional health problems in a vulnerable phase of their life....

  12. Approaches to integrating paediatric diabetes care and structured education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, H. R.; Wadham, C.; Rayman, G.

    2007-01-01

    .11% in non-attenders (P = 0.04). Conclusion: This family-centred education programme has been integrated into paediatric diabetes care with potential benefits on parental involvement and glycaemic control, but further study is warranted before routine application into clinical care.......Aims: The Families, Adolescents and Children's Teamwork Study (FACTS) is a family-centred structured education programme for children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. It aims to integrate group-based diabetes education into routine care, enhance parental responsibility for self management...... and improve glycaemic control. Methods: A randomized wait-list control group study allocated participants to either the immediate (four educational sessions during year 1) or delayed intervention (four educational sessions during year 2). In both groups, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was measured 3-monthly...

  13. Fifteen minute consultation: Practical pain management in paediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Emily Jane; Brombley, Karen; Boyce, Katherine

    2017-10-01

    Pain and distress in the paediatric palliative care population can be very difficult to manage. Clinical scenarios range from the acute management of cancer-related pain at the end of life to the ongoing long-term support of children with complex multimodal pain related to progressive neurological conditions. Understanding the child's underlying condition, possible causes of pain and their preferred mode of communication are important to the delivery of holistic care. Modification of environmental factors, basic care consideration and non-pharmacological measures have a large role to play, alongside conventional analgesics. Medication may also need to be delivered by novel routes such as transdermal patches, continuous subcutaneous infusion of multiple drugs or transmucosal breakthrough analgesic doses. Two cases are used to illustrate approaches to these clinical problems. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of a paediatric palliative care team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Lisa M; Kars, Marijke C; Schepers, Sasja A; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y N; Grootenhuis, Martha A; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the last decade, paediatric palliative care teams (PPCTs) have been introduced to support children with life-limiting diseases and their families and to ensure continuity, coordination and quality of paediatric palliative care (PPC). However, implementing a PPCT into an organisation

  15. Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of a paediatric palliative care team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Lisa M.; Kars, Marijke C.; Schepers, Sasja A.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; van Delden, Johannes J. M.

    2018-01-01

    Over the last decade, paediatric palliative care teams (PPCTs) have been introduced to support children with life-limiting diseases and their families and to ensure continuity, coordination and quality of paediatric palliative care (PPC). However, implementing a PPCT into an organisation is a

  16. Parental experiences with a paediatric palliative care team: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberne, Lisa M; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Yn; Bosman, Diederik K; Colenbrander, Derk A; Jagt, Charissa T; Grootenhuis, Martha A; van Delden, Johannes Jm; Kars, Marijke C

    2017-12-01

    Parents of children with a life-limiting disease have to rely on themselves at home while adequate paediatric palliative care is lacking. In several countries, paediatric palliative care teams are introduced to ensure continuity and quality of care and to support the child and the family. Yet, little is known about how parents experience such multidisciplinary teams. To obtain insight into the support provided by a new paediatric palliative care team from the parents' perspective. An interpretative qualitative interview study using thematic analysis was performed. A total of 47 single or repeated interviews were undertaken with 42 parents of 24 children supported by a multidisciplinary paediatric palliative care team located at a university children's hospital. The children suffered from malignant or non-malignant diseases. In advance, parents had limited expectations of the paediatric palliative care team. Some had difficulty accepting the need for palliative care for their child. Once parents experienced what the team achieved for their child and family, they valued the team's involvement. Valuable elements were as follows: (1) process-related aspects such as continuity, coordination of care, and providing one reliable point of contact; (2) practical support; and (3) the team members' sensitive and reliable attitude. As a point of improvement, parents suggested more concrete clarification upfront of the content of the team's support. Parents feel supported by the paediatric palliative care team. The three elements valued by parents probably form the structure that underlies quality of paediatric palliative care. New teams should cover these three valuable elements.

  17. Urinary catheter related nosocomial infections in paediatric intensive care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullu M

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The present prospective study was carried out in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Mumbai. The objective was to determine the incidence, risk factors, mortality and organisms responsible for urinary catheter related infections (UCRI. Colonization and/or bacteriuria was labelled as urinary catheter related infection (UCRI. Forty-four patients with 51 urinary catheters were studied. Incidence of UCRI was 47.06%. Age, female sex and immunocompromised status did not increase the risk of UCRI. Duration of catheter in-situ and duration of stay in the PICU were associated with higher risk of UCRI. The mortality was not increased by UCRI. Commonest organism isolated in UCRI was E. coli, which had maximum susceptibility to nitrofurantoin and amikacin.

  18. A family systems nursing intervention model for paediatric health crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Patricia Short; Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia; Sherman, Suzan

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses the development of a family systems nursing intervention for clinical use in health crisis. Although studies in paediatric critical care provide evidence that family stress is an important clinical phenomenon, studies have demonstrated that few nurses have the requisite family intervention skills to provide family members with adequate support during crisis. In addition, few intervention studies that focus on provider-family relationships with the goal of reducing stress have been reported. This article contributes to the literature by redressing this lack. Data sources.  The literature search supporting this project spanned from 1980 to 2009 and included searches from classic nursing theory, family theory and relevant nursing research specific to the design of the intervention reported. The goal of the intervention is to provide a theoretical and practical foundation for explicit action that enhances relationships with caregivers thereby supporting the integrity of the family and enhancing their coping abilities. The intervention, based on the Family Systems Model and the family's understandings of the situation, defines specific goals and desired outcomes to guide strategic actions. Discussion of the conceptual foundation, procedural development and an example of the protocol is provided. Implications for nursing.  The intervention is designed for nurses with limited knowledge in family theory to aid them to better help families dealing with stress. The proposed intervention can be used to increase nurses' skills in family centred nursing care. Although designed for use in paediatric critical care, it can, with modifications, be used in other nursing specialty areas. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. [Psychosocial aspects associated with excessive attendance in primary care paediatric clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Martín, Raquel; Sánchez Bayle, Marciano; Teruel de Francisco, Carmen

    2018-04-20

    Hyper-attendance is a significant problem in paediatric Primary Care clinics. The aim of our study was to analyse the level of attendance in these clinics and its relationship with certain psychosocial aspects of the families attending them. Observational descriptive study was conducted using questionnaires collected during a period of 6months, as well as recording the frequency of attendance in the previous 6months. A total of 346 questionnaires of children between 6months and 13years of age belonging to 2 urban Primary Care clinics in Madrid were completed. The raw data was analysed, and comparisons between groups and multivariate analysis were performed. The mean number of consultations in the last 6months, of the total included in the study, was 3.06 in the Primary Care centre, and 0.77 in the emergency services. It was considered over-frequent for those who had attended the Primary Care health centre 6 or more times in this period (>p90), of which there were 33 children (9.53%). In the multivariate analysis, the variables related to being frequent users of Primary Care clinics were: the presence of high level of anxiety in the parents (OR=5.50; 95%CI: 2.49-12.17, P<.0001), and the age of the children (OR=0.73; 95%CI: 0.58-0.91, P=.005). The model presented an area under the curve of 0.761 (95%CI: 0.678-0.945, P<.0001). The frequency of visits in paediatric Primary Care clinics is directly related to the high level of anxiety of the parents, and inversely to the age of the children. It would be advisable to detect and, if possible, intervene in cases of high parental anxiety in order to try to reduce the over-frequency in the paediatric primary health care. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  20. Towards culturally competent paediatric oncology care. A qualitative study from the perspective of care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suurmond, J; Lieveld, A; van de Wetering, M; Schouten-van Meeteren, A Y N

    2017-11-01

    In order to gain more insight on the influence of ethnic diversity in paediatric cancer care, the perspectives of care providers were explored. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 12 paediatric oncologists and 13 nurses of two different paediatric oncology wards and were analysed using a framework method. We found that care providers described the contact with Turkish and Moroccan parents as more difficult. They offered two reasons for this: (1) language barriers between care provider and parents hindered the exchange of information; (2) cultural barriers between care provider and parents about sharing the diagnosis and palliative perspective hindered communication. Care providers reported different solutions to deal with these barriers, such as using an interpreter and improving their cultural knowledge about their patients. They, however, were not using interpreters sufficiently and were unaware of the importance of eliciting parents' perspectives. Communication techniques to overcome dilemmas between parents and care providers were not used and care providers were unaware of stereotypes and prejudice. Care providers should be offered insight in cultural barriers they are unaware of. Training in cultural competence might be a possibility to overcome manifest barriers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cross-cultural care encounters in paediatric care: minority ethnic parents' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Azar Gashasb; Jirwe, Maria; Kabir, Zarina Nahar

    2017-03-01

    Because of worldwide migration, the healthcare staff in general as well as in paedi"atric care specifically is challenged increasingly by people from various ethnic backgrounds. The challenge is related to providing culturally competent care and effectively communicating with people from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds who have different health beliefs, practices, values and languages. This also applies to the Swedish society and to Swedish paediatric care. The purpose of this study was to describe the expectations and experiences of cross-cultural care encounters among minority ethnic parents in Swedish paediatric care. A qualitative design was used in the study. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews between October 2011 and March 2012. The sample consisted of 12 parents of minority ethnic backgrounds who had their child in a ward at a children's hospital in the Stockholm County Council. The interviews were analysed using manifest content analysis. The Regional Ethical Review Committee approved the study (Ref: Nr: 2011/927-31/5). The analysis of the interviews led to three categories: fundamentals in nursing, cultural sensitivity and understanding, and influencing conditions. Generic knowledge and skills of nurses outweighed the need for the nurses to have culture-specific knowledge of their patients or relatives in cross-cultural care encounters. Language skills and the availability of bilingual nurses in a multi-ethnic society can facilitate communication and increase parents' satisfaction in cross-cultural care encounters. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  2. Paediatric Palliative Care in Resource-Poor Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Downing

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a great need for paediatric palliative care (PPC services globally, but access to services is lacking in many parts of the world, particularly in resource-poor settings. Globally it is estimated that 21.6 million children need access to palliative care, with 8.2 needing specialist services. PC has been identified as important within the global health agenda e.g., within universal health coverage, and a recent Lancet commission report recognised the need for PPC. However, a variety of challenges have been identified to PPC development globally such as: access to treatment, access to medications such as oral morphine, opiophobia, a lack of trained health and social care professionals, a lack of PPC policies and a lack of awareness about PPC. These challenges can be overcome utilising a variety of strategies including advocacy and public awareness, education, access to medications, implementation and research. Examples will be discussed impacting on the provision of PPC in resource-poor settings. High-quality PPC service provision can be provided with resource-poor settings, and there is an urgent need to scale up affordable, accessible, and quality PPC services globally to ensure that all children needing palliative care can access it.

  3. Firm handling; the information exchange interaction by parents in paediatric care – An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Berterö

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Information exchange is fundamental in the paediatric care encounter. Health care professionals need further background knowledge to encounter the parents/guardians from their perspective in their minors’ paediatric care. The parents’/guardians’ ability to manage the situation is dependent on their receiving optimal information, which is why it is important to study how information is exchanged.Aim: The aim of this study was to identify, describe and conceptualize how parents/guardians resolved their main concern ininformation exchange with health care professionals in paediatric care situations involving their minors.Methodology: Glaser’s grounded theory method was used and all data were analysed using constant comparative analysis. The observational study took place at three paediatric outpatient units at a university hospital and 24 parents/guardians participated. Data sources were field notes from 37 observations of paediatric care situations and five adherent excerpts from the minors’ medical records. Grounded theory is a method of conceptualising behaviour, which is why an observational study of parents’/guardians’ information exchange and social interaction in the context of nursing care is relevant as research design.Results: Firm handling was revealed as the way the parents/guardians resolved their main concerns when they were exchanging information about their minors’ paediatric care. Firm handling is built on five inter-related categories: representative advocating, collaborating, aim sharing, supportive resourcing and minor bypassing.Conclusions: This knowledge suggests possible ways for health care professionals to design paediatric care that supports, facilitates, strengthens and improves the parents’/guardians’ firm handling. The key issue is to find ways to support parents/guardians and minors so they can participate in health care encounters according to their preferences. Firm handling gives an

  4. 'Best interests' in paediatric intensive care: an empirical ethics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchley, Giles; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Deans, Zuzana; Fraser, James; Huxtable, Richard

    2017-10-01

    In English paediatric practice, English law requires that parents and clinicians agree the 'best interests' of children and, if this is not possible, that the courts decide. Court intervention is rare and the concept of best interests is ambiguous. We report qualitative research exploring how the best interests standard operates in practice, particularly with decisions related to planned non-treatment. We discuss results in the light of accounts of best interests in the medical ethics literature. We conducted 39 qualitative interviews, exploring decision making in the paediatric intensive care unit, with doctors, nurses, clinical ethics committee members and parents whose children had a range of health outcomes. Interviews were audio-recorded and analysed thematically. Parents and clinicians indicated differences in their approaches to deciding the child's best interests. These were reconciled when parents responded positively to clinicians' efforts to help parents agree with the clinicians' view of the child's best interests. Notably, protracted disagreements about a child's best interests in non-treatment decisions were resolved when parents' views were affected by witnessing their child's physical deterioration. Negotiation was the norm and clinicians believed avoiding the courts was desirable. Sensitivity to the long-term interests of parents of children with life-limiting conditions is defensible but must be exercised proportionately. Current approaches emphasise negotiation but offer few alternatives when decisions are at an impasse. In such situations, the instrumental role played by a child's deterioration and avoidance of the courts risks giving insufficient weight to the child's interests. New approaches to decision making are needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Caring for paediatric patient as to broaden radiography spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atiti, J.S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The paediatric patient is a special group of patients in the hospital set up. thus their special needs contribute to about 75% of quality imaging services offered. Age, Psychological aspects, parents participation, departmental atmosphere and environmental make them special. this presentation aims at installing into Imaging Technologies a sense of Responsibility for purpose of improving the resultant quality of Imaging services offered to paediatrics

  6. Medication communication between nurses and doctors for paediatric acute care: An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrott, Narelle; Kinney, Sharon; Newall, Fiona; Williams, Allison; Cranswick, Noel; Wong, Ian; Manias, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    To examine how communication between nurses and doctors occurred for managing medications in inpatient paediatric settings. Communication between health professionals influences medication incidents' occurrence and safe care. An ethnographic study was undertaken. Semi-structured interviews, observations and focus groups were conducted in three clinical areas of an Australian tertiary paediatric hospital. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using the Medication Communication Model. The actual communication act revealed health professionals' commitment to effective medication management and the influence of professional identities on medication communication. Nurses and doctors were dedicated to providing safe, effective medication therapy for children, within their scope of practice and perceived role responsibilities. Most nurses and junior doctors used tentative language in their communication while senior doctors tended to use direct language. Irrespective of language style, nurses actively engaged with doctors to promote patients' needs. Yet, the medical hierarchical structure, staffing and attendant expectations influenced communication for medication management, causing frustration among nurses and doctors. Doctors' lack of verbal communication of documented changes to medication orders particularly troubled nurses. Nurses persisted in their efforts to acquire appropriate orders for safe medication administration to paediatric patients. Collaborative practice between nurses and doctors involved complex, symbiotic relationships. Their dedication to providing safe medication therapy to paediatric patients facilitated effective medication management. At times, shortcomings in interdisciplinary communication impacted on potential and actual medication incidents. Understanding of the complexities affecting medication communication between nurses and doctors helps to ensure interprofessional respect for each other's roles and inherent demands

  7. The BRACELET Study: surveys of mortality in UK neonatal and paediatric intensive care trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platt Martin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subject of death and bereavement in the context of randomised controlled trials in neonatal or paediatric intensive care is under-researched. The objectives of this phase of the Bereavement and RAndomised ControlLEd Trials (BRACELET Study were to determine trial activity in UK neonatal and paediatric intensive care (2002-06; numbers of deaths before hospital discharge; and variation in mortality across intensive care units and trials and to determine whether bereavement support policies were available within trials. These are essential prerequisites to considering the implications of future policies and practice subsequent to bereavement following a child's enrolment in a trial. Methods The units survey involved neonatal units providing level 2 or 3 care, and paediatric units providing level II care or above; the trials survey involved trials where allocation was randomized and interventions were delivered to intensive care patients, or to parents but designed to affect patient outcomes. Results Information was available from 191/220 (87% neonatal units (149 level 2 or 3 care; and 28/32 (88% paediatric units. 90/177 (51% eligible responding units participated in one or more trial (76 neonatal, 14 paediatric and 54 neonatal units and 6 paediatric units witnessed at least one death. 50 trials were identified (36 neonatal, 14 paediatric. 3,137 babies were enrolled in neonatal trials, 210 children in paediatric trials. Deaths ranged 0-278 (median [IQR interquartile range] 2 [1, 14.5] per neonatal trial, 0-4 (median [IQR] 1 [0, 2.5] per paediatric trial. 534 (16% participants died post-enrolment: 522 (17% in neonatal trials, 12 (6% in paediatric trials. Trial participants ranged 1-236 (median [IQR] 21.5 [8, 39.8] per neonatal unit, 1-53 (median [IQR] 11.5 [2.3, 33.8] per paediatric unit. Deaths ranged 0-37 (median [IQR] 3.5 [0.3, 8.8] per neonatal unit, 0-7 (median [IQR] 0.5 [0, 1.8] per paediatric unit. Three trials had a

  8. Advance Care Planning in palliative care: a qualitative investigation into the perspective of Paediatric Intensive Care Unit staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sarah; Dale, Jeremy

    2015-04-01

    The majority of children and young people who die in the United Kingdom have pre-existing life-limiting illness. Currently, most such deaths occur in hospital, most frequently within the intensive care environment. To explore the experiences of senior medical and nursing staff regarding the challenges associated with Advance Care Planning in relation to children and young people with life-limiting illnesses in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit environment and opportunities for improvement. Qualitative one-to-one, semi-structured interviews were conducted with Paediatric Intensive Care Unit consultants and senior nurses, to gain rich, contextual data. Thematic content analysis was carried out. UK tertiary referral centre Paediatric Intensive Care Unit. Eight Paediatric Intensive Care Unit consultants and six senior nurses participated. Four main themes emerged: recognition of an illness as 'life-limiting'; Advance Care Planning as a multi-disciplinary, structured process; the value of Advance Care Planning and adverse consequences of inadequate Advance Care Planning. Potential benefits of Advance Care Planning include providing the opportunity to make decisions regarding end-of-life care in a timely fashion and in partnership with patients, where possible, and their families. Barriers to the process include the recognition of the life-limiting nature of an illness and gaining consensus of medical opinion. Organisational improvements towards earlier recognition of life-limiting illness and subsequent Advance Care Planning were recommended, including education and training, as well as the need for wider societal debate. Advance Care Planning for children and young people with life-limiting conditions has the potential to improve care for patients and their families, providing the opportunity to make decisions based on clear information at an appropriate time, and avoid potentially harmful intensive clinical interventions at the end of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Care dependency of hospitalized children: testing the Care Dependency Scale for Paediatrics in a cross-cultural comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tork, Hanan; Dassen, Theo; Lohrmann, Christa

    2009-02-01

    This paper is a report of a study to examine the psychometric properties of the Care Dependency Scale for Paediatrics in Germany and Egypt and to compare the care dependency of school-age children in both countries. Cross-cultural differences in care dependency of older adults have been documented in the literature, but little is known about the differences and similarities with regard to children's care dependency in different cultures. A convenience sample of 258 school-aged children from Germany and Egypt participated in the study in 2005. The reliability of the Care Dependency Scale for Paediatrics was assessed in terms of internal consistency and interrater reliability. Factor analysis (principal component analysis) was employed to verify the construct validity. A Visual Analogue Scale was used to investigate the criterion-related validity. Good internal consistency was detected both for the Arabic and German versions. Factor analysis revealed one factor for both versions. A Pearson's correlation between the Care Dependency Scale for Paediatrics and Visual Analogue Scale was statistically significant for both versions indicating criterion-related validity. Statistically significant differences between the participants were detected regarding the mean sum score on the Care Dependency Scale for Paediatrics. The Care Dependency Scale for Paediatrics is a reliable and valid tool for assessing the care dependency of children and is recommended for assessing the care dependency of children from different ethnic origins. Differences in care dependency between German and Egyptian children were detected, which might be due to cultural differences.

  10. [A scale for the assessment of the risk of pressure sores in paediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Pressure sores are a frequent complication in paediatric intensive care. A multi-disciplinary nursing team has drawn up an assessment scale for the risk of pressure sores and has put in place guidelines for caring for children in intensive care. Prevention actions are thereby adapted to each young patient.

  11. Australian Paediatric Rheumatology Group standards of care for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Jane; Murray, Kevin; Boros, Christina; Chaitow, Jeffrey; Allen, Roger C; Akikusa, Jonathan; Adib, Navid; Piper, Susan E; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2014-09-01

    This standards document outlines accepted standards of management for children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Australia. This document acknowledges that the chronic inflammatory arthritis conditions (JIA) in childhood are different diseases from inflammatory arthritis in adults and that specific expertise is required in the care of children with arthritis. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. [Transition - how adolescents with cystic fibrosis their parents experience the change from paediatric to adult care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Christine; Regamey, Nicolas; Spichiger, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common autosomal-recessive hereditary disease among white Europeans. The average survival of CF patients has increased to above 40 years and transition from paediatric to adult care has therefore become a significant issue. With this study, experiences of adolescents with CF and their parents with the transition from the paediatric to the adult care were explored. At a Swiss university CF centre, six adolescents and their mothers were recruited. Twelve narrative interviews were conducted on how the phase of transition was experienced. The transcribed interviews were analysed according to the method of hermeneutic phenomenology. Positive and negative experiences with long term routine care in the paediatric service, general themes of adolescence and the quality of the relationship with paediatric doctors influenced the families' experience during transition significantly. For mothers, insensitive information on the CF diagnosis might have influenced the transition experience. The adolescents welcomed an individualized and age appropriate care. Continuity in care, the announcement of, and involvement in the planning of the transfer were of great importance. The families particularly appreciated the timed adaptations of the transfer to individual needs. Flexibility and a strong collaboration between paediatric and adult CF teams are most relevant in the care of families.

  13. Influence of awareness and availability of medical alternatives on parents seeking paediatric emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellbrant, Julia A; Åkeson, S Jonas; Karlsland Åkeson, Pia M

    2018-06-01

    Direct seeking of care at paediatric emergency departments may result from an inadequate awareness or a short supply of medical alternatives. We therefore evaluated the care-seeking patterns, availability of medical options and initial medical assessments - with overall reference to socioeconomic status - of parents at an urban paediatric emergency department in a Scandinavian country providing free paediatric healthcare. The parents of children assessed by paediatric emergency department physicians at a Swedish university hospital over a 25-day winter period completed a questionnaire on recent medical contacts and their reasons for attendance. Additional information was obtained from ledgers, patient records and population demographics. In total, 657 of 713 eligible patients (92%) were included. Seventy-nine per cent of their parents either failed to or managed to establish medical contact before the emergency department visit, whereas 21% sought care with no attempt at recent medical contact. Visits with a failed telephone or primary care contact (18%) were more common outside office hours ( p=0.014) and were scored as less urgent ( p=0.014). A perceived emergency was the main reason for no attempt at medical contact before the visit. Direct emergency department care-seeking was more common from the city district with the lowest socioeconomic status ( p=0.027). Although most parents in this Swedish study tried to seek medical advice before attending a paediatric emergency department, perceived emergency, a short supply of telephone health line or primary care facilities and lower socioeconomic status contributed to direct care-seeking by almost 40% of parents. Pre-hospital awareness and the availability of medical alternatives with an emphasis on major differences in socioeconomic status should therefore be considered to further optimize care-seeking in paediatric emergency departments.

  14. Children with life-limiting conditions in paediatric intensive care units: a national cohort, data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Lorna K; Parslow, Roger

    2017-07-13

    To determine how many children are admitted to paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with life-limiting conditions (LLCs) and their outcomes. National cohort, data-linkage study. PICUs in England. Children admitted to a UK PICU (1 January 2004 and 31 March 2015) were identified in the Paediatric Intensive Care Audit Network dataset. Linkage to hospital episodes statistics enabled identification of children with a LLC using an International Classification of Diseases (ICD10) code list. Random-effects logistic regression was undertaken to assess risk of death in PICU. Flexible parametric survival modelling was used to assess survival in the year after discharge. Overall, 57.6% (n=89 127) of PICU admissions and 72.90% (n=4821) of deaths in PICU were for an individual with a LLC.The crude mortality rate in PICU was 5.4% for those with a LLC and 2.7% of those without a LLC. In the fully adjusted model, children with a LLC were 75% more likely than those without a LLC to die in PICU (OR 1.75 (95% CI 1.64 to 1.87)).Although overall survival to 1 year postdischarge was 96%, children with a LLC were 2.5 times more likely to die in that year than children without a LLC (OR 2.59 (95% CI 2.47 to 2.71)). Children with a LLC accounted for a large proportion of the PICU population. There is an opportunity to integrate specialist paediatric palliative care services with paediatric critical care to enable choice around place of care for these children and families. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Balancing research interests and patient interests: A qualitative study into the intertwinement of care and research in paediatric oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekking, Sara; van der Graaf, R; Kars, Marijke C.; Beishuizen, A.; de Vries, Martine; van Delden, J. (Hans) J.M.

    BACKGROUND: Traditionally, in ethical guidelines and in research ethics literature, care and research are clearly separated based on their different objectives. In contrast, in paediatric oncology, research and care are closely combined. Currently, it is unknown how relevant actors in paediatric

  16. PO02 - Clinical profile of children admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit due to acute clinical deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Sixtus; Aagaard, Hanne; Olesen, Hanne Vebert

    2016-01-01

    Theme: Intensive care Background: There has been an increased number of critically ill patients admitted to paediatric departments. Only a few studies have described the various causes of unplanned admission to paediatric intensive care units (PICU) due to clinical deterioration. However...... and exploring life-threatening situations leading to unexpected transfers to PICU in hospitalised children. The study includes all paediatric departments in the Central Denmark Region. PERSPECTIVE: This study will provide knowledge to assist the research efforts to identify and improve the management...... of critical ill children in paediatric wards....

  17. Perceptions of mothers and hospital staff of paediatric care in 13 public hospitals in northern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mwangi, Rose; Chandler, Clare; Nasuwa, Fortunata

    2008-01-01

    User and provider perceptions of quality of care are likely to affect both use and provision of services. However, little is known about how health workers and mothers perceive the delivery of care in hospital paediatric wards in Africa. Paediatric staff and mothers of paediatric inpatients were...... interviewed to explore their opinions and experience of the admission process and conditions on the ward. Overcrowding, unsanitary conditions and lack of food were major concerns for mothers on the ward, who were deterred from seeking treatment earlier due to fears that hospital admission posed a significant...... risk of exposure to infection. While most staff were seen as being sympathetic and supportive to mothers, a minority were reported to be judgemental and authoritarian. Health workers identified lack of trained staff, overwork and low pay as major concerns. Staff shortages, lack of effective training...

  18. [Knowledge of health care ethics in paediatric residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández González, A; Rodríguez Núñez, A; Cambra Lasaosa, F J; Quintero Otero, S; Ramil Fraga, C; García Palacios, M V; Hernández Rastrollo, R; Ruiz Extremera, M A

    2014-02-01

    Bioethics has been recently incorporated in to the educational programs of both medical students and medical residents as part of their curriculum. However, its training based on clinical practice is not well structured. To evaluate the knowledge of bioethics in Spanish paediatric residents, and to analyse how this relates to the medical education during graduate and post-graduate training. A questionnaire with 20 multiple choice questions was designed to evaluate the knowledge in basic ethics with potential implications in clinical practice. We evaluated the education received during graduate and post-graduate training, and the main ethical conflicts faced. A total of 210 completed questionnaires were received from medical residents in paediatrics from 20 different Spanish hospitals, of whom 47 of these were first year residents (R1), 49 were second year residents (R2), 57 were third year residents (R3), and the remaining 57 were final year residents (R4). The mean number of correct answers was 16.8 out of 20. No differences were found between residents in different years of training, nor were there any differences between the group that had received specific training in bioethics versus those who had not. Residents were more likely to give wrong answers related with informed consent, the law on the freedom of the patient, principles of quality of life, the case analysis system, and the dimension of distributive justice. Limitation of therapeutic efforts was identified as the main ethical problem faced in clinical practice by Spanish residents in paediatrics. Most of the knowledge of bioethics is acquired during graduate training, and improved very little throughout the period of medical residence. Our results suggest that efforts are required in organising and structuring the education in bioethics during the training of residents in paediatrics. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Chiropractic care for paediatric and adolescent Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonello Rod

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychostimulants are first line of therapy for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD. The evidence suggests that up to 30% of those prescribed stimulant medications do not show clinically significant outcomes. In addition, many children and adolescents experience side-effects from these medications. As a result, parents are seeking alternate interventions for their children. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for behavioural disorders such as AD/HD are increasing with as many as 68% of parents having sought help from alternative practitioners, including chiropractors. Objective The review seeks to answer the question of whether chiropractic care can reduce symptoms of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD. Methods Electronic databases (Cochrane CENTRAL register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Scopus, ISI Web of Science, Index to Chiropractic Literature were searched from inception until July 2009 for English language studies for chiropractic care and AD/HD. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select studies. All randomised controlled trials were evaluated using the Jadad score and a checklist developed from the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials guidelines. Results The search yielded 58 citations of which 22 were intervention studies. Of these, only three studies were identified for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD cohorts. The methodological quality was poor and none of the studies qualified using inclusion criteria. Conclusions To date there is insufficient evidence to evaluate the efficacy of chiropractic care for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD. The claim that chiropractic care improves paediatric and adolescent AD/HD, is only supported by low levels of scientific evidence. In the interest of paediatric and adolescent health, if chiropractic care for AD/HD is to continue, more rigorous

  20. Parental presence or absence during paediatric burn wound care procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egberts, Marthe R; de Jong, Alette E E; Hofland, Helma W C; Geenen, Rinie; Van Loey, Nancy E E

    2017-12-18

    Differing views on benefits and disadvantages of parental presence during their child's wound care after burn injury leave the topic surrounded by controversies. This study aimed to describe and explain parents' experiences of their presence or absence during wound care. Shortly after the burn event, 22 semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents of children (0-16 years old) that underwent hospitalization in one of the three Dutch burn centers. Eighteen of these parents also participated in follow-up interviews three to six months after discharge. Interviews were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Analyses resulted in themes that were integrated into a model, summarizing key aspects of parental presence during wound care. These aspects include parental cognitions and emotions (e.g., shared distress during wound care), parental abilities and needs (e.g., controlling own emotions, being responsive, and gaining overall control) and the role of burn care professionals. Findings emphasize the distressing nature of wound care procedures. Despite the distress, parents expressed their preference to be present. The abilities to control their own emotions and to be responsive to the child's needs were considered beneficial for both the child and the parent. Importantly, being present increased a sense of control in parents that helped them to cope with the situation. For parents not present, the professional was the intermediary to provide information about the healing process that helped parents to deal with the situation. In sum, the proposed model provides avenues for professionals to assess parents' abilities and needs on a daily basis and to adequately support the child and parent during wound care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Paediatric palliative care : recommendations for treatment of symptoms in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knops, Rutger R G; Kremer, Leontien C M; Verhagen, A A Eduard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children dying of a life threatening disease suffer a great deal at the end of life. Symptom control is often unsatisfactory, partly because many caregivers are simply not familiar with paediatric palliative care. To ensure that a child with a life-threatening condition receives high

  2. Paediatric palliative care: recommendations for treatment of symptoms in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knops, Rutger R. G.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.; Verhagen, A. A. Eduard; Beek, L.; Fock, J. M.; Hartvelt-Faber, G.; Mensink, M. O.; Michiels, E. C. M.; Schouten-van Meeteren, A. Y. N.; Uitdehaag, M. J.; Venmans, L. M. A. J.; Verhagen, A. A. E.; de Weerd, W.

    2015-01-01

    Children dying of a life threatening disease suffer a great deal at the end of life. Symptom control is often unsatisfactory, partly because many caregivers are simply not familiar with paediatric palliative care. To ensure that a child with a life-threatening condition receives high quality

  3. Balancing research interests and patient interests: a qualitative study into the intertwinement of care and research in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekking, Sara A S; van der Graaf, Rieke; Kars, Marijke C; Beishuizen, Auke; de Vries, Martine C; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2015-05-01

    Traditionally, in ethical guidelines and in research ethics literature, care and research are clearly separated based on their different objectives. In contrast, in paediatric oncology, research and care are closely combined. Currently, it is unknown how relevant actors in paediatric oncology perceive this combination of research and care. We conducted a qualitative study into the experiences of those involved in Dutch paediatric oncology with the intertwinement of research and care and the dual role of paediatric oncologists as researchers and treating physicians. A qualitative study approach, using two focus groups and 19 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with paediatric oncologists, research coordinators, parents of children with cancer, and adolescents with cancer. Four themes characterize how actors experience the intertwinement of research and care in paediatric oncology. First, research is considered of major importance, and paediatric oncology professionals convey this message to patients and their parents. Second, there is ambiguity about categorization of studies into cancer therapy as either research or treatment. Third, role conflicts appear within the work of the paediatric oncologists. Finally, the various benefits of combining treatment with research are emphasized. Research is regarded as a fundamental and indispensable characteristic of paediatric oncology practice. Paediatric oncology professionals, parents, and patients have a very positive outlook on combining research and care, but they may not be sufficiently critical with respect to potential conflicts. Increased reflection on how to optimally combine research and care could serve as an important protection of the interests of children with cancer and their parents. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Paediatric nurses' perceptions and practices of family-centred care in Saudi hospitals: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdulaziz, Hawa; Moss, Cheryle; Copnell, Beverley

    2017-04-01

    Family-centred care is widely accepted as the underlying philosophy of paediatric nursing. Studies of family-centred care have mainly been conducted in western countries and little is known of its practice in other contexts. No studies have been undertaken in the Middle East. To explore family-centred care in the Saudi context from the perspectives of paediatric nurses. A mixed methodology was utilised with an explanatory sequential design. In the quantitative phase a convenience sample of 234 nurses from six hospitals in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia completed the Family Centred Care Questionnaire. The qualitative phase took place in one hospital and involved 140h of non-participant observation of paediatric nurses' practice. A convenience sample of 14 nurses was involved. Additionally, 10 face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with key staff members. A purposeful sample of 10 nurses was involved. The findings from both phases were integrated in the final analysis. The survey results indicated that participants identified most elements of family-centred care as necessary for its practice. They were less likely to incorporate them into their practice (pworked with the elements as a set of core tasks. In the current study, there were similarities between what has been found in the Saudi context and findings from other studies using the same tool in western contexts. There is general agreement regarding the differences between theory and practice. Nurses do believe and acknowledge the importance of family-centred care; however, they struggle with practising this model in their everyday work. In the current study, many factors contributed to this issue, including language barriers, communication issues, cultural issues and hospital policies. Western concepts of family-centred care appear to be accepted by paediatric nurses in Saudi Arabia. However, full adoption of family-centred care in keeping with western values is likely not to be appropriate or successful

  5. Sudden death in paediatrics as a traumatic experience for critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Lígia; Gonçalves, Sandra; Pinto, Cândida

    2018-01-01

    Research shows that nurses working in critical care units and in particular, paediatric units, are at risk of developing symptoms of secondary traumatic stress (STS). However, little attention has been given to this phenomenon when associated with situations of sudden death in paediatrics. This study aimed to examine the impact of sudden death in paediatrics on nurses working in paediatrics critical care units and to explore nurses' experiences of this event. This study used a mixed-methods design. The Impact of Event Scale - Revised was used for investigating the presence of STS symptoms. In addition, an interview was conducted with six nurses. Fifty-seven percent of nurses responded to the surveys and six nurses were interviewed. The results showed that the sudden death of children and adolescents is an event that elicits symptoms of STS in nurses. The quantitative assessment, revealed that 19·4% presented total scores indicating high impact. The participants interviewed described experiences of subjective distress, such as intrusive thoughts, avoidance and hyperarousal. Other factors were also reported as influencing the experience of the sudden death of a child/adolescent, namely, the child's age, the cause of death and the family's reaction to the loss. According to the participants, the emotional impact was also determined by parenthood, previous training and professional experience. Sudden death in paediatric critical care units is one of the most difficult situations in nursing practice and elicits STS symptoms, which may severely impact the physical and psychological health of nurses and ultimately affect the quality of the provided care. This study emphasizes the need for promoting better conditions for professional practice, namely, with regard to emotional support, as well as training programmes for skills development in the area of management of traumatic situations and of communication with clients. © 2017 British Association of Critical Care

  6. Informed consent in paediatric critical care research--a South African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Brenda M; Argent, Andrew C; Kling, Sharon

    2015-09-09

    Medical care of critically ill and injured infants and children globally should be based on best research evidence to ensure safe, efficacious treatment. In South Africa and other low and middle-income countries, research is needed to optimise care and ensure rational, equitable allocation of scare paediatric critical care resources. Ethical oversight is essential for safe, appropriate research conduct. Informed consent by the parent or legal guardian is usually required for child research participation, but obtaining consent may be challenging in paediatric critical care research. Local regulations may also impede important research if overly restrictive. By narratively synthesising and contextualising the results of a comprehensive literature review, this paper describes ethical principles and regulations; potential barriers to obtaining prospective informed consent; and consent options in the context of paediatric critical care research in South Africa. Voluntary prospective informed consent from a parent or legal guardian is a statutory requirement for child research participation in South Africa. However, parents of critically ill or injured children might be incapable of or unwilling to provide the level of consent required to uphold the ethical principle of autonomy. In emergency care research it may not be practical to obtain consent when urgent action is required. Therapeutic misconceptions and sociocultural and language issues are also barriers to obtaining valid consent. Alternative consent options for paediatric critical care research include a waiver or deferred consent for minimal risk and/or emergency research, whilst prospective informed consent is appropriate for randomised trials of novel therapies or devices. We propose that parents or legal guardians of critically ill or injured children should only be approached to consent for their child's participation in clinical research when it is ethically justifiable and in the best interests of both

  7. Paediatric Obesity Research in Early Childhood and the Primary Care Setting: The TARGet Kids! Research Network

    OpenAIRE

    Morinis, Julia; Maguire, Jonathon; Khovratovich, Marina; McCrindle, Brian W.; Parkin, Patricia C.; Birken, Catherine S.

    2012-01-01

    Primary paediatric health care is the foundation for preventative child health. In light of the recent obesity epidemic, paediatricians find themselves at the frontline of identification and management of childhood obesity. However, it is well recognized that evidence based approaches to obesity prevention and subsequent translation of this evidence into practice are critically needed. This paper explores the role of primary care in obesity prevention and introduces a novel application and de...

  8. [From paediatric urological care to adult urology. Assessment of a transition consultation for adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, L; Mouttalib, S; Moscovici, J; Soulie, M; Rischmann, P; Game, X; Galinier, P; Bouali, O

    2017-10-01

    To provide an adequate lifelong urological care in the complex period of adolescence, a transition consultation conducted by a paediatric surgeon and an urologist was developed in our institution. As a real rite of passage, it allows the follow-up and the adapted care of urological conditions, sometimes complex, and permits the transition between childhood and the world of grown-ups. We reported our experience at the Children Hospital of our institution (paediatric surgery and urology departments). During a 6 months period (January-July 2015), forty-five young adults with a mean age of 17.8±3.6 years were seen in transition consultation. Eight patients had neurogenic voiding disorders (4 spina bifida, 1 multiple sclerosis, 1 mitochondrial encephalopathy, 1 metachromic leucodystrophy, 1 paraplegia), 9 patients had idiopathic voiding disorders, 1 patient had a non obstructive malformative uropathy; and 30 patients had surgery during infancy and childhood: hypospadias in 17 young men and malformative uropathy in 13 patients. This consultation occurred within 4.6±4.5 years after the last consultation with paediatric surgeon. For 6 patients, the transition consultation was the first for the urological problem. After this consultation, 8 patients stayed in paediatric surgery and 37 patients were referred to adult urologist. Among those 8 patients: 2 patients had cognitive and psychiatric disorders; 4 patients refused to be transferred to adult unit; 2 patients wanted to come back at transition consultation. Among the 37 patients transferred in adult urological care: 6 patients had urological surgery, and one patient was referred to a sexology consultation. The remaining 30 patients have initiated long-term monitoring. All reconvened patients came back at the follow-up visit (at least 12 months follow-up). A 16-year-old patient (spina bifida with polymalformative syndrome) developed a depressive syndrome at the end of the consultation, in the motive of an awareness of

  9. An outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex in the paediatric unit of a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Mali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc has emerged as a serious nosocomial pathogen worldwide especially in patients with indwelling catheters and cystic fibrosis. Bcc is a common contaminant of pharmaceutical products. We describe an outbreak of Bcc bacteraemia amongst children admitted in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU and paediatric ward at a tertiary care hospital, Mumbai, in Western India. Materials and Methods: Blood culture samples from paediatric patients yielded growth of non-fermenting, oxidase positive, motile, Gram negative bacilli (NFGNB (76/909 over a period of 8 months. Based on conventional biochemical tests and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, these isolates were provisionally identified as Bcc. The increased, repeated and continued isolation of Bcc alerted the possibility of an outbreak confined to PICU and paediatric ward. Active surveillance was undertaken to trace the source and contain the outbreak. Isolates were subjected to recA polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Expanded multilocus sequence typing (EMLST. Results: Surveillance revealed the presence of Bcc on the upper surface of rubber stopper of sealed multidose amikacin vials. Isolates from blood culture and rubber stoppers were confirmed as Bcc by recA PCR. EMLST revealed that these isolates shared an identical novel sequence type 824 proving clonality. Timely interventions instituted led to control of the outbreak. Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of identification and molecular characterization of Bcc to establish its role in infection and outbreak.

  10. An outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex in the paediatric unit of a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Swapna; Dash, Lona; Gautam, Vikas; Shastri, Jayanthi; Kumar, Sunil

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) has emerged as a serious nosocomial pathogen worldwide especially in patients with indwelling catheters and cystic fibrosis. Bcc is a common contaminant of pharmaceutical products. We describe an outbreak of Bcc bacteraemia amongst children admitted in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and paediatric ward at a tertiary care hospital, Mumbai, in Western India. Blood culture samples from paediatric patients yielded growth of non-fermenting, oxidase positive, motile, Gram negative bacilli (NFGNB) (76/909) over a period of 8 months. Based on conventional biochemical tests and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, these isolates were provisionally identified as Bcc. The increased, repeated and continued isolation of Bcc alerted the possibility of an outbreak confined to PICU and paediatric ward. Active surveillance was undertaken to trace the source and contain the outbreak. Isolates were subjected to recA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Expanded multilocus sequence typing (EMLST). Surveillance revealed the presence of Bcc on the upper surface of rubber stopper of sealed multidose amikacin vials. Isolates from blood culture and rubber stoppers were confirmed as Bcc by recA PCR. EMLST revealed that these isolates shared an identical novel sequence type 824 proving clonality. Timely interventions instituted led to control of the outbreak. This study highlights the importance of identification and molecular characterization of Bcc to establish its role in infection and outbreak.

  11. Burnout and posttraumatic stress in paediatric critical care personnel: Prediction from resilience and coping styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rey, Rocío; Palacios, Alba; Alonso-Tapia, Jesús; Pérez, Elena; Álvarez, Elena; Coca, Ana; Mencía, Santiago; Marcos, Ana; Mayordomo-Colunga, Juan; Fernández, Francisco; Gómez, Fernando; Cruz, Jaime; Ordóñez, Olga; Llorente, Ana

    2018-03-28

    Our aims were (1) to explore the prevalence of burnout syndrome (BOS) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of Spanish staff working in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and compare these rates with a sample of general paediatric staff and (2) to explore how resilience, coping strategies, and professional and demographic variables influence BOS and PTSD. This is a multicentre, cross-sectional study. Data were collected in the PICU and in other paediatric wards of nine hospitals. Participants consisted of 298 PICU staff members (57 physicians, 177 nurses, and 64 nursing assistants) and 189 professionals working in non-critical paediatric units (53 physicians, 104 nurses, and 32 nursing assistants). They completed the Brief Resilience Scale, the Coping Strategies Questionnaire for healthcare providers, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and the Trauma Screening Questionnaire. Fifty-six percent of PICU working staff reported burnout in at least one dimension (36.20% scored over the cut-off for emotional exhaustion, 27.20% for depersonalisation, and 20.10% for low personal accomplishment), and 20.1% reported PTSD. There were no differences in burnout and PTSD scores between PICU and non-PICU staff members, either among physicians, nurses, or nursing assistants. Higher burnout and PTSD rates emerged after the death of a child and/or conflicts with patients/families or colleagues. Around 30% of the variance in BOS and PTSD is predicted by a frequent usage of the emotion-focused coping style and an infrequent usage of the problem-focused coping style. Interventions to prevent and treat distress among paediatric staff members are needed and should be focused on: (i) promoting active emotional processing of traumatic events and encouraging positive thinking; (ii) developing a sense of detached concern; (iii) improving the ability to solve interpersonal conflicts, and (iv) providing adequate training in end-of-life care. Copyright © 2018 Australian

  12. Development and implementation of a multi-centre information system for paediatric and infant critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybloom, Bruce; Champion, Zahra

    2003-12-01

    With no UK collective information system, a need existed to establish an integrated information system for public and private sector hospitals providing paediatric and infant critical care services. A lack of information in the past made it difficult for those procuring, providing and monitoring services to make informed, evidence-based decisions using reliable integrated data. To develop and implement a collective multi-purpose information system for paediatric and infant critical care that was easily adaptable to any UK infant or paediatric critical care setting. Information outputs had to fulfil policy requirements and meet the needs of stakeholders. Two minimum datasets, corresponding data definitions, survey forms and a user database were developed through a process of consultation by utilising an information partnership. Design, content, development and implementation issues were identified, discussed and resolved through a co-ordinated collaborative process. Data collection was implemented in all London and Brighton National Health Service (NHS) general and cardio-thoracic paediatric intensive care (PIC) units, several private PIC units and one NHS tertiary referral neonatal unit (NNU) 24 months from project start. The development of universal integrated information systems for defined settings of care is achievable within reasonable timeframes; however, successful development and implementation requires working within an information partnership to maximise co-ordination, co-operation and collaboration. Those collecting and using data must be identified and involved in all aspects of development from project start. Financial and manpower resources must be well planned. Datasets should be as small as possible in order to make the collection of complete and valid data realistically achievable. When considering service-based information needs, considerable thought should be given to a multi-purpose; multi-use approach based on the most refined minimum dataset

  13. Social media in paediatric heart disease: professional use and opportunities to improve cardiac care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Lee, Joyce M; Pasquali, Sara K

    2015-12-01

    Social media is any type of communication utilising electronic technology that follows two guiding principles: free publishing or sharing of content and ideas and group collaboration and inter-connectedness. Over the last 10 years, social media technology has made tremendous inroads into all facets of communication. Modalities such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter are no longer viewed as new communication technologies. Owing to their tremendous usage, they are now common ways to conduct a dialogue with individuals and groups. Greater than 91% of teenagers and 89% of young adults routinely use social media. Further, 24% of teenagers reported being online "almost constantly". These forms of communication are readily used by individuals cared for in the field of paediatric cardiology; thus, they should carry significant interest for cardiology care providers; however, social media's influence on medicine extends beyond use by patients. It directly affects all medical providers, both users and non-users. Further, social media has the ability to improve care for patients with paediatric heart disease. This article details social media's current influence on paediatric cardiology, including considerations for professional use of social media and potential opportunities to improve cardiac care.

  14. Psychological factors impacting transition from paediatric to adult care by childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granek, Leeat; Nathan, Paul C; Rosenberg-Yunger, Zahava R S; D'Agostino, Norma; Amin, Leila; Barr, Ronald D; Greenberg, Mark L; Hodgson, David; Boydell, Katherine; Klassen, Anne F

    2012-09-01

    Childhood cancer survivors require life-long care focused on the specific late effects that may arise from their cancer and its treatment. In many centers, survivors are required to transition from follow-up care in a paediatric cancer center, to care provided in an adult care setting. The purpose of this study was to identify the psychological factors involved in this transition to adult care long-term follow-up clinics. Qualitative interviews were conducted with ten paediatric survivors still in paediatric care, as well as 28 adult survivors of whom 11 had transitioned successfully to adult care (attended three long-term follow-up (LTFU) appointments consecutively); ten who failed to transition (attended at least one LTFU appointment as an adult, but were inconsistent with subsequent attendance); and seven who had never transitioned (did not attend any LTFU care as an adult). Line-by-line coding was used to establish categories and themes. Constant comparison was used to examine relationships within and across codes and categories. Two overall categories and four subthemes were identified: (1) Identification with being a cancer survivor included the subthemes of 'cancer identity' and 'cancer a thing of the past' and; (2) Emotional components included the subthemes of 'fear and anxiety' and 'gratitude and gaining perspective'. The analysis revealed that the same factor could act as either a motivator or a hindrance to successful transition in different survivors (e.g., fear of recurrence of cancer might be a barrier or a facilitator depending on the survivor's life experience). Psychological factors are an important consideration when preparing cancer survivors for transition to adult long-term follow-up care. Identifying and addressing the individual psychological needs of childhood cancer survivors may improve the likelihood of their successful transition to adult care.

  15. Challenges of safe medication practice in paediatric care--a nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Kristina; Nordin, Karin; Pöder, Ulrika; Edwards, I Ralph

    2013-05-01

    To explore nurses' experiences of handling medications in paediatric clinical practice, with a focus on factors that hinder and facilitate safe medication practices. Twenty nurses (registered nurses) from four paediatric wards at two hospitals in Sweden were interviewed in focus groups. The interviews were analysed using content analysis. Six themes emerged from the analysed interviews: the complexity specific for nurses working on paediatric wards is a hindrance to safe medication practices; nurses' concerns about medication errors cause a considerable psychological burden; the individual nurse works hard for safe medication practices and values support from other nurse colleagues; circumstances out of the ordinary are perceived as critical challenges for maintaining patient safety; nurses value clear instructions, guidelines and routines, but these are often missing, variable or changeable; management, other medical professionals, the pharmacy, the pharmaceutical industry and informatics support need to respond to the requirements of the nurses' working situations to improve safe medication practices. Weaknesses were apparent in the long chain of the medication-delivery process. A joint effort by different professions involved in that delivery process, and a nationwide collaboration between hospitals is recommended to increase safe medication practices in paediatric care. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. HIV transmission during paediatric health care in sub- Saharan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health care systems in sub-Saharan Africa are challenged not only to improve care for the increasing number of HIV-infected children, but also to prevent transmission of HIV to other children and health care workers through contaminated medical procedures and needlestick accidents. HIV-infected children aged to 1 year ...

  17. Staff Experiences of Media Representations of Paediatric Palliative Care: Implications for Wellbeing and Career Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Neal, Anna

    2015-01-01

    study examined representations of paediatric palliative care (PPC) available in the UK media. Furthermore, the study explored PPC nurses’ experiences of these representations, with consideration of the impact of these on wellbeing and career longevity.\\ud With research from the fields of media and cultural studies and medical sociology informing its theoretical basis, the study demonstrated how popularly held constructions of healthcare services and staff are influenced by media representatio...

  18. Providing music therapy to the unconscious child in the paediatric intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Kennelly, Jeanette; Edwards, Jane

    1997-01-01

    peer-reviewed This paper describes techniques used in the provision of music therapy to two children in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit during the phase of admission when they were unconscious. The presentation of known songs and adaptations of known songs elicited a range of responses in these children. Further study of the role and effects of music with this patient group is required following positive outcomes for these children receiving music therapy while unconscious ...

  19. Paediatric home care in Tower Hamlets: a working partnership with parents.

    OpenAIRE

    Tatman, M A; Woodroffe, C; Kelly, P J; Harris, R J

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To describe the first two years of a paediatric home care service. DESIGN--Observational cross sectional study, 1989-91. SETTING--One inner London health district. PATIENTS--611 children referred to the service; 50 children selected from those referred during the first year, whose parents were interviewed and whose general practitioners were invited to complete a questionnaire. MAIN MEASURES--Description and costs of service; views of parents and general practitioners of selected ...

  20. Paediatric obesity research in early childhood and the primary care setting: the TARGet Kids! research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinis, Julia; Maguire, Jonathon; Khovratovich, Marina; McCrindle, Brian W; Parkin, Patricia C; Birken, Catherine S

    2012-04-01

    Primary paediatric health care is the foundation for preventative child health. In light of the recent obesity epidemic, paediatricians find themselves at the frontline of identification and management of childhood obesity. However, it is well recognized that evidence based approaches to obesity prevention and subsequent translation of this evidence into practice are critically needed. This paper explores the role of primary care in obesity prevention and introduces a novel application and development of a primary care research network in Canada--TARGet Kids!--to develop and translate an evidence-base on effective screening and prevention of childhood obesity.

  1. Paediatric Obesity Research in Early Childhood and the Primary Care Setting: The TARGet Kids! Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S. Birken

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary paediatric health care is the foundation for preventative child health. In light of the recent obesity epidemic, paediatricians find themselves at the frontline of identification and management of childhood obesity. However, it is well recognized that evidence based approaches to obesity prevention and subsequent translation of this evidence into practice are critically needed. This paper explores the role of primary care in obesity prevention and introduces a novel application and development of a primary care research network in Canada—TARGet Kids!—to develop and translate an evidence-base on effective screening and prevention of childhood obesity.

  2. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. A telemedicine network to support paediatric care in small hospitals in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Carsten; Niemi, Mauri

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed our experience with the Tanzanian Telemedicine Network in supporting paediatric care at 40 small, rural hospitals in the country. The network began operating in 2008. Store and forward telemedicine was provided via the open source software iPath. The 33 volunteer consultants were based in several countries, although most of them had practical experience in Tanzania. During the first three years of network operation there were 533 referrals. There were 159 paediatric cases (median age five years). Three paediatric specialists provided most consultations (64%), but other specialists provided recommendations when required. The response time was usually less than two days (median 6 h; inter-quartile range 2-24 h). A precise recommendation was not always provided, but since all consultants had an intimate knowledge of the state of health services in Tanzania, their advice was usually well adapted to the local circumstances of the hospitals. Referral to a higher level of care was recommended in 26 cases (16%). A simple web-based telemedicine system combined with email alerts is feasible in remote locations in Tanzania, even where fast Internet connections are not available. Copyright © 2012 by the Royal Society of Medicine Press Ltd

  4. Re-envisioning paediatric nurse training in a re-engineered health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minette Coetzee

    2014-10-01

    Method: In response to the Committee on Morbidity and Mortality in Children recommendation, a colloquium was convened as a national forum for schools of nursing, departments of health, health care facilities, clinicians and regulatory bodies to advance children’s nursing in South Africa. Objectives: The goals of the colloquium were to thoroughly investigate the situation in South Africa’s paediatric nurse training, plot ways to strengthen and expand postgraduate paediatric programmes to meet priority child health needs, and to build relationships between the various schools and stakeholders. Results: Outcomes included the clarification and strengthening of a ‘stakeholder grid’ in nurse training, recognition of the need for more active teaching and learning strategies in curricula linked to national child health priorities, as well as the need to develop and support clinical nursing practice in facilities.

  5. Keeping kids in care: virological failure in a paediatric antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective file audit determined the cumulative virological failure rate, that is, the sum of all ... Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 12 staff members and a random sample of 21 caregivers and 4 children attending care.

  6. The NASA Task Load Index as a measure of overall workload among neonatal, paediatric and adult intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs-Cooley, Heather L; Mara, Constance A; Carle, Adam C; Gurses, Ayse P

    2018-02-12

    The NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) is a subjective workload assessment scale developed for use in aviation and increasingly applied to healthcare. The scale purports to measure overall workload as a single variable calculated by summing responses to six items. Since no data address the validity of this scoring approach in health care, we evaluated the single factor structure of the NASA-TLX as a measure of overall workload among intenisive care nurses. Confirmatory factor analysis of data from two studies of nurse workload in neonatal, paediatric, and adult intensive care units. Study 1 data were obtained from 136 nurses in one neonatal intensive care unit. Study 2 data were collected from 300 nurses in 17 adult, paediatric and neonatal units. Nurses rated their workload using the NASA-TLX's paper version. A single factor model testing whether all six items measured a single overall workload variable fit least well (RMSEA = 0.14; CFI = 0.91; TLI = 0.85). A second model that specified two items as outcomes of overall workload had acceptable fit (RMSEA = 0.08; CFI = 0.97; TLI = 0.95) while a third model of four items fit best (RMSEA = 0.06; CFI > 0.99; TLI = 0.99). A summed score from four of six NASA-TLX items appears to most reliably measure a single overall workload variable among intensive care nurses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Need for timely paediatric HIV treatment within primary health care in rural South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham S Cooke

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In areas where adult HIV prevalence has reached hyperendemic levels, many infants remain at risk of acquiring HIV infection. Timely access to care and treatment for HIV-infected infants and young children remains an important challenge. We explore the extent to which public sector roll-out has met the estimated need for paediatric treatment in a rural South African setting.Local facility and population-based data were used to compare the number of HIV infected children accessing HAART before 2008, with estimates of those in need of treatment from a deterministic modeling approach. The impact of programmatic improvements on estimated numbers of children in need of treatment was assessed in sensitivity analyses.In the primary health care programme of HIV treatment 346 children <16 years of age initiated HAART by 2008; 245(70.8% were aged 10 years or younger, and only 2(<1% under one year of age. Deterministic modeling predicted 2,561 HIV infected children aged 10 or younger to be alive within the area, of whom at least 521(20.3% would have required immediate treatment. Were extended PMTCT uptake to reach 100% coverage, the annual number of infected infants could be reduced by 49.2%.Despite progress in delivering decentralized HIV services to a rural sub-district in South Africa, substantial unmet need for treatment remains. In a local setting, very few children were initiated on treatment under 1 year of age and steps have now been taken to successfully improve early diagnosis and referral of infected infants.

  8. An urban survey of paediatric environmental health concerns: Perceptions of parents, guardians and health care professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buka, Irena; Rogers, W Todd; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro R; Hoffman, Harold; Pearce, Marni; Li, Yuen Yee

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To conduct a survey in Edmonton, Alberta, to gather information regarding concerns about the influence of environmental factors on children’s health and to use the information to set an agenda for the resources of the Paediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit at Misericordia Hospital (Edmonton, Alberta). METHODS Two questionnaires with 28 closed-ended questions were developed to examine parents’, guardians’ and health care professionals’ concerns. They comprised items about six environmental factors (air, water and food quality; household supplies; radiation; and waste disposal). Health care professionals were also asked four questions about their knowledge of and their needs in Paediatric Environmental Health. Parents and guardians attending the public health centres and nurses working therein received questionnaires. Physicians were surveyed by e-mail. RESULTS After verification, the questionnaire data from 400 parents or guardians and 152 health care professionals were used for analyses. Results from contingency table, Hotelling’s T2 and effect size analyses revealed similarities in the levels of concern in both groups, and the results were combined. The greatest concern of both groups was with environmental tobacco smoke, followed by pesticides in water. Concerns about six additional environmental elements were also expressed. The health care professionals showed a high level of concern about the need for resources, specific training and public education regarding paediatric environmental health. CONCLUSION A significant level of concern was consistently found between the two groups studied, regardless of professional training. The highest level of concern was with a well-documented topic (ie, environmental tobacco smoke). Less concern associated with decreased documentation calls for increasing the knowledge of society, including health care professionals, to address the adverse effects of environmental factors on children. PMID

  9. Primary health care in a paediatric setting — the background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. Power

    1979-09-01

    Full Text Available At a recent conference, a definition was drawn up that is most appropriate to the South African situation: “ Primary health care is essential health care made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community by means acceptable to them, through their full participation, and at a cost that the community and country can afford. It forms an integral part both of the country’s health system of which it is the nucleus, and of the overall social and economic development of the community.”

  10. Paediatric palliative home care by general paediatricians: a multimethod study on perceived barriers and incentives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischbach Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-specialist palliative care, as it is delivered by general practitioners, is a basic component of a comprehensive palliative care infrastructure for adult patients with progressive and far advanced disease. Currently palliative care for children and adolescents is recognized as a distinct entity of care, requiring networks of service providers across different settings, including paediatricians working in general practice. In Germany, the medical home care for children and adolescents is to a large extent delivered by general paediatricians working in their own practice. However, these are rarely confronted with children suffering from life-limiting diseases. The aim of this study was therefore to examine potential barriers, incentives, and the professional self-image of general paediatricians with regard to paediatric palliative care. Methods Based on qualitative expert interviews, a questionnaire was designed and a survey among general paediatricians in their own practice (n = 293 was undertaken. The survey has been developed and performed in close cooperation with the regional professional association of paediatricians. Results The results showed a high disposition on part of the paediatricians to engage in palliative care, and the majority of respondents regarded palliative care as part of their profile. Main barriers for the implementation were time restrictions (40.7% and financial burden (31.6%, sole responsibility without team support (31.1%, as well as formal requirements such as forms and prescriptions (26.6%. Major facilitations were support by local specialist services such as home care nursing service (83.0%, access to a specialist paediatric palliative care consultation team (82.4%, as well as an option of exchange with colleagues (60.1%. Conclusions Altogether, the high commitment to this survey reflects the relevance of the issue for paediatricians working in general practice. Education in basic palliative

  11. Ethnic Swedish parents' experiences of minority ethnic nurses' cultural competence in Swedish paediatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Azar G; Kabir, Zarina Nahar; Jirwe, Maria

    2014-06-01

    Sweden has a population of a little more than 9.4 million. The rapid growth of immigration in Sweden has resulted in an increased number of minority ethnic patients and minority ethnic nurses in the Swedish healthcare system. This also applies to paediatric care. The purpose of this study was to explore how parents with ethnic Swedish backgrounds experience minority ethnic nurses' cultural competence and the care the nurses provide in a Swedish paediatric care context. This exploratory qualitative study is of 14 parents with an ethnic Swedish background whose child was in a ward at a children's hospital in Stockholm County Council. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews to identify parents' perceptions and experiences of minority ethnic nurses' cultural competence. The interviews were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The analyses of the interviews led to four main categories: influence of nurses' ethnicity; significance of cross-cultural communication; cross-cultural skills; and the importance of nursing education. Nurses' ethnicity did not have much impact on parents' satisfaction with their child's care. The parents attached importance to nurses' language skills and to their adaptation and awareness of Swedish culture. They also attached weight to nurses' professional knowledge and personal attributes. The role of nursing education to increase nurses' cultural awareness was highlighted too. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. The value of routine chest radiographs in a paediatric intensive care unit: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, J.W.; Ploetz, F.B.; Schuerman, F.A.B.A.; Vught, H. van; Kramer, P.P.G.; Beek, E.J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Background. In many paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) chest X-ray films (CXRs) are required as part of the daily examination or after completion of invasive procedures. Objective. First, to evaluate if the American College of Radiology (ACR) guidelines for adult patients are appropriate for paediatric pa- tients. Second, to assess the diagnostic efficacy of the CXRs. Materials and methods. One-hundred-seventy-four CXRs acquired in 74 patients, either routinely or after invasive procedures, were analysed. The indication of the obtained CXRs, or the absence of indication in patients in whom no CXRs was taken, was compared with ACR guidelines. The position of medical devices was evaluated. Changes in cardiopulmonary status were noted. Results. Sixty-seven percent of the CXRs were in accordance with the ACR guidelines, and in 74 % of pa- tients in whom no CXRs were taken this was also in accordance with these guidelines. Sixteen percent of the endotracheal tubes, 23 % of central venous lines and 15 % of nasogastric tubes were malpositioned. Changes in cardiopulmonary status, after the initial film, were noted in 63 %. Conclusions. The indications for the majority of CXRs in our PICU appeared to be in accordance with ACR guidelines. The high percentage of malpositioned tubes and lines and the number of cardiopulmonary changes on CXRs in a PICU underline the value of these films. Adjustments of the ACR guidelines for particular groups of paediatric patients may limit the number of CXRs taken and may further increase diagnostic efficacy. (orig.)

  13. PAEDIATRIC POSTERIOR FOSSA TUMORS: A CLIN ICO - PATHOLOGICAL STUDY I N A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Sekhar Kennedy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tumors of the Central Nervous S ystem , are the second commonest childhood tumors and are the most common solid paediatric tumors comprising 40% - 50% of all tumors . 1 2 Posterior fossa brain tumors are one of the most devastating forms of human illnesses wh ich are more common in children. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : To study the incidence, clinicopathological features and management of paediatric posterior fossa tumors. MATERIALS AND METHOD S : This is a prospective study done in the Department of Neurosurgery, Ranga raya Medical College, Government General Hospital, Kakinada from 2012 to 2015. It is a Tertiary Care Hospital. A total of 25 paediatric patients ranging from infants to 15 years were included in the study. DISCUSSION AND CONCL USION: Posterior fossa tumors are the commonest solid brain tumors of children with a rate of 2.4 per lakh of children at risk per year. The predominant symptoms are headache and vomiting followed by cerebellar symptoms (gait disturbances. Posterior fossa tumors are predominantly seen in children with peak incidence in first decade. Commonest presenting symptoms are due to raised intracranial pressure with headache and vomiting followed by cerebellar symptoms. Meticulous microsurgical techniques are to be followed in removing these tum ors. The incidence of recurrence is very less after gross total excision. Prognosis is good in patients with total excision

  14. Refractory septic shock in children: a European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Luc; Ray, Samiran; Wilson, Clare; Remy, Solenn; Benissa, Mohamed Rida; Jansen, Nicolaas J G; Javouhey, Etienne; Peters, Mark J; Kneyber, Martin; De Luca, Daniele; Nadel, Simon; Schlapbach, Luregn Jan; Maclaren, Graeme; Tissieres, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Although overall paediatric septic shock mortality is decreasing, refractory septic shock (RSS) is still associated with high mortality. A definition for RSS is urgently needed to facilitate earlier identification and treatment. We aim to establish a European society of paediatric and neonatal intensive care (ESPNIC) experts' definition of paediatric RSS. We conducted a two-round Delphi study followed by an observational multicentre retrospective study. One hundred and fourteen paediatric intensivists answered a clinical case-based, two-round Delphi survey, identifying clinical items consistent with RSS. Multivariate analysis of these items in a development single-centre cohort (70 patients, 30 % mortality) facilitated development of RSS definitions based on either a bedside or computed severity score. Both scores were subsequently tested in a validation cohort (six centres, 424 patients, 11.6 % mortality). From the Delphi process, the draft definition included evidence of myocardial dysfunction and high blood lactate levels despite high vasopressor treatment. When assessed in the development population, each item was independently associated with the need for extracorporeal life support (ECLS) or death. Resultant bedside and computed septic shock scores had high discriminative power against the need for ECLS or death, with areas under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.920 (95 % CI 0.89-0.94), and 0.956 (95 % CI 0.93-0.97), respectively. RSS defined by a bedside score equal to or higher than 2 and a computed score equal to or higher than 3.5 was associated with a significant increase in mortality. This ESPNIC definition of RSS accurately identifies children with the most severe form of septic shock.

  15. Work stress, occupational burnout and depression levels: a clinical study of paediatric intensive care unit nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Ching; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Cheng, Su-Fen; Wu, Li-Min; Ou-Yang, Mei-Chen

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between work stress and depression; and investigate the mediating effect of occupational burnout among nurses in paediatric intensive care units. The relationships among work stress, occupational burnout and depression level have been explored, neither regarding occupational burnout as the mediating role that causes work stress to induce depression nor considering the paediatric intensive care unit context. A cross-sectional correlational design was conducted. One hundred and forty-four female paediatric intensive care unit nurses from seven teaching hospitals in southern Taiwan were recruited as the participants. Data were collected by structured questionnaires including individual demographics, the Nurse Stress Checklist, the Occupational Burnout Inventory and the Taiwan Depression Questionnaire. The results indicated that after controlling for individual demographic variables, the correlations of work stress with occupational burnout, as well as work stress and occupational burnout with depression level were all positive. Furthermore, occupational burnout may exert a partial mediating effect on the relationship between work stress and depression level. This study provides information about work stress, occupational burnout and depression level, and their correlations, as well as the mediating role of occupational burnout among paediatric intensive care unit nurses. It suggests government departments and hospital administrators when formulating interventions to prevent work stress and occupational burnout. These interventions can subsequently prevent episodes of depression in paediatric intensive care unit nurses, thereby providing patients with a safe and high-quality nursing environment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A literature review of comfort in the paediatric critical care patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Alcaraz, Alejandro; Falcó-Pegueroles, Anna; Jordan, Iolanda

    2018-03-08

    To investigate the meaning of comfort and to contextualise it within the framework of paediatric critical care. The concept of comfort is closely linked to care in all health contexts. However, in specific settings such as the paediatric critical care unit, it takes on particular importance. A literature review was conducted. A literature search was performed of articles in English and Spanish in international health science databases, from 1992-March 2017, applying the quality standards established by the PRISMA methodology and the Joanna Briggs Institute. A total of 1,203 publications were identified in the databases. Finally, 59 articles which met the inclusion criteria were entered in this literature review. Almost all were descriptive studies written in English and published in Europe. The concept of comfort was defined as the immediate condition of being strengthened through having the three types of needs (relief, ease and transcendence) addressed in the four contexts of experience (physical, psychospiritual, social and environmental). Only two valid and reliable tools for assessing comfort were found: the Comfort Scale and the Comfort Behavior Scale. Comfort is subjective and difficult to assess. It has four facets: physical, emotional, social and environmental. High levels of noise and light are the inputs that cause the most discomfort. Comfort is a holistic, universal concept and an important component of quality nursing care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Development of a core set of quality indicators for paediatric primary care practices in Europe, COSI-PPC-EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Dominik A; Huss, Gottfried; Auras, Silke; Caceres, Juan Ruiz-Canela; Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Geraedts, Max

    2018-06-01

    Paediatric ambulatory healthcare systems in Europe are, because of historical reasons, diverse and show strikingly different outcomes. All across Europe, the benchmarking of structures, processes and outcomes could reveal opportunities for improving Paediatric Primary Care (PPC). The aim of this study was to develop a set of Quality Indicators (QIs) to assess and monitor PPC in Europe. In a three-step process, we used the available external evidence and European expert consensus in a modified RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method (RAM) to develop an indicator set. (1) A broad literature and online research of published QI and guidelines yielded an inventory of 1516 QI. (2) A collaborative panel of paediatric senior experts from the European Academy of Paediatrics (EAP) and the European Confederation of Primary Care Paediatricians (ECPCP) from 15 European countries participated in a first consensus process to reduce the initial indicator inventory by eliminating not PPC-focused indicators and duplicates. (3) In a second consensus process, the panel rated the QI regarding validity and feasibility. The final QI set "COSI-PPC-EU" consists of 42 indicators in five categories of PPC: (A) health promotion/prevention/screening (13 QI), (B) acute care (9 QI), (C) chronic care (8 QI), (D) practice management (3 QI) and (E) patient safety (9 QI). COSI-PPC-EU represents a consented set of a limited number of valid quality indicators for the application in paediatric primary care in different healthcare systems throughout Europe. What is Known: • Paediatric ambulatory healthcare systems in Europe are diverse and show strikingly different outcomes. • There are known gaps in quality performance measures of paediatric primary care in Europe. Pre-existing sets of quality indicators are predominantly limited to national populations, specific diseases and hospital care. What is New: • A set of 42 quality indicators for primary paediatric care in Europe was developed in a multi

  18. Family-centred care: a qualitative study of Chinese and South Asian immigrant parents' experiences of care in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, L; Dix, D; Gulati, S; Sung, L; Klaassen, R J; Shaw, N T; Klassen, A F

    2013-03-01

    Over the past two decades, there is increasing emphasis being placed upon providing family-centred care (FCC) in paediatric oncology settings. However, there is a lack of knowledge of FCC in paediatric oncology from the perspectives of immigrant parents. The purpose of this paper is to describe Chinese and South Asian immigrant parents' experiences of FCC in paediatric oncology settings in Canada. This study adopted a constructivist grounded theory approach. Fifty first generation Chinese and South Asian parents of children with cancer who were at least 6 months post-diagnosis were recruited from six Canadian paediatric oncology centres. Interviews were conducted in English, Cantonese, Mandarin, Urdu, Punjabi or Hindi, and transcribed into English. Analysis involved line-by-line, focused and theoretical coding, and the use of the constant comparison method. Findings indicated that overall parents were highly satisfied with the care and services they received, and their experiences were reflective of the key elements of FCC. However, there were some areas of concern identified by participants: parents not perceiving themselves as a member of the medical team; inconsistency in the quality and co-ordination of services among healthcare providers; disrespectful and mechanical manner of a few healthcare providers; and parents' discomfort with healthcare providers communicating sensitive health-related information directly with their child. In order to successfully provide family-centred services to immigrant parents of children with cancer, better communication of the elements of FCC between healthcare staff and families is needed to negotiate a clear role for the parents as partners of the healthcare team. Moreover, a better understanding of how family relationships are structured in immigrant families will assist healthcare providers to balance the best interests of the child with that of the family as a unit. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Initial evaluation of children admitted on the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Arce Delgado

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The initial evaluation of the child, when admitted on the Paediatric Intensive Unit, is a essential tool and key piece as a starting point on the development of a specific Care Plan for each child. Therefore, it is necessary the existence of a protocol, according to a rigorous methodology, so that cares will have quality and thus, it will be avoided that each nursing professional will act in a different way, according to his intuition, beliefs or improvisation capacity.The initial evaluation of the child will allow us not only to coordinate the interventions, but also to give continuity to the cares.The initial evaluation of the child document is a nursing register that is part of the clinical register of the paediatric patient. Nursing registers turn to be the best approximation of what nowadays is our job’s practice, and they are, therefore, necessary for us to be judged by a professional perspective and to make it possible to classify the services we carry out to the society.

  20. Electronic medical file exchange between on-duty care providers and the attending paediatrician: a Belgian paediatric pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneyer, M; Hachimi-Idrissi, S; Michel, L; Nyssen, M; De Moor, G; Vandenplas, Y

    2012-01-01

    The authors propose the introduction of a pilot project: "paediatric core file exchange in emergencies" (PCF-EXEM) which enables the exchange of medical data between the attending paediatrician (AP), holder of the medical record, and on-duty medical units (i.e. general practitioners, paediatricians, surgeons, emergency physicians,...). This project is based on two pillars: a protected server (PCF-server) containing paediatric core files (PCF), with important clinical data that should be available for the physician in order to quickly get a clear insight into the relevant clinical medical history of the child, and secondly, the possibility to provide feedback to the attending physician about the findings recorded during the on-call duty. The permanent availability of health data on the PCF-server and the possibility to provide feedback represent together the PCF-EXEM-project. This project meets the demand of the care providers to have relevant medical information permanently available in order to guarantee high quality care in emergency situations. The frail balance between the right to informative privacy and professional confidentiality on the one hand and the right to quality health care on the other hand has been taken into account. The technical and practical feasibility of this project is described. The objectives and vision of the PCF-EXEM project are conform to Belgian legislation concerning the processing of medical data and are in line with the still under consideration European projects which are focusing on interoperability and the development of a common access control to databanks containing health data for care providers. PCF-EXEM could therefore be a model for other EU countries as well.

  1. Healthcare professionals' perceptions of the ethical climate in paediatric cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdson, Cecilia; Sandeberg, Margareta Af; Lützén, Kim; Blomgren, Klas; Pergert, Pernilla

    2016-12-01

    How well ethical concerns are handled in healthcare is influenced by the ethical climate of the workplace, which in this study is described as workplace factors that contribute to healthcare professionals' ability to identify and deal with ethical issues in order to provide the patient with ethically good care. The overall aim of the study was to describe perceptions of the paediatric hospital ethical climate among healthcare professionals who treat/care for children with cancer. Data were collected using the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey developed by Olsson as a separate section in a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse perceptions of the ethical climate. Participants and research context: Physicians, nurses and nurse-aides (n = 89) from three paediatric units participated in this study: haematology/oncology, chronic diseases and neurology. Ethical considerations: The study was approved by the regional ethical review board. Different perceptions of the ethical climate were rated as positive or negative/neutral. Nurses' ratings were less positive than physicians on all items. One-third of the participants perceived that they were able to practice ethically good care as they believed it should be practised. Differences in professional roles, involving more or less power and influence, might explain why physicians and nurses rated items differently. A positive perception of the possibility to practice ethically good care seems to be related to inter-professional trust and listening to guardians/parents. A negative/neutral perception of the possibility to practice ethically good care appears to be influenced by experiences of ethical conflicts as well as a lack of ethical support, for example, time for reflection and discussion. The two-thirds of participants who had a negative/neutral perception of the possibility to practice ethically good care are at risk of developing moral stress. Clinical ethics support needs to be implemented in care

  2. PAEDIATRIC OCULAR INJURIES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vinayagamurthy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Childhood blindness constitutes a burden on the economy of the country and produces psychosocial and emotional disturbance to the child and family at large. Similar to the visual impairment produced by vitamin deficiency state in children, ocular injuries form another group which if identified early and treated promptly can reduce irreversible damage. Eye injuries are responsible for the large scale ocular morbidity worldwide. At extremes of age, the incidence of eye injuries are common because of the negligence in their care. The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence, various mechanisms, agents of injury and environmental influence causing eye injuries in children brought to Ophthalmic Outpatient Department of Chengalpattu Medical College in Kanchipuram District, Tamilnadu. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective review of medical records of 230 children who attended Ophthalmic Outpatient in Chengalpattu Medical College Hospital between 01.09.2015 to 30.09.2016. Records of children of both genders between the age group of (0 to 12 years who attended the Ophthalmic Outpatient Department with history of ocular injury coming from both rural and urban areas of the district. Their data was collected and analysed and tabulated based on demography, mechanism and place of injury. RESULTS School going age groups (5-12 years, 84% sustained injuries more commonly. Children from rural areas sustained 54.7% injuries. Blunt trauma accounted for 65% injuries. 52.6% injuries occurred at home. 41.7% were due to stick and wood. Children were admitted to hospital for a mean of 4 days, range (1-25 days, 96% >6/12 v/a, 3% children had v/a (6/18-6/60, 1% blind 6/60 vision. Bilateral blindness was not reported. 1% visual impairment registered. CONCLUSION This study showed that rural children suffered more ocular injuries;commonest were injuries due to sticks followed by cracker injuries. Home-based injuries were more common. Visual prognosis was

  3. Organ and tissue donation in a regional paediatric intensive care unit: evaluation of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carone, Laura; Alurkar, Shrirang; Kigozi, Phoebe; Vyas, Harish

    2018-05-01

    Approximately 2% of those on the organ transplant list in the UK are children. Early identification of donors and referral to organ donation teams (ODT) has proven to increase both the success rate of gaining consent and the number of organs actually retrieved. To evaluate the practice relating to organ donation for children receiving end-of-life care on a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) measured against the National Guidelines. All children 0-18 who received their end-of-life care and died on the PICU. A retrospective cohort study of organ donation patterns including referral, approach, consent and donation. This involved a review of case notes on PICU between the years 2009 and 2014. One hundred five deaths were identified and 100 notes were examined and data analysed to ascertain if religion, age and length of stay on PICU impacted on practice. Eighty-six children met the early identification criteria for potential donors, 40 (46.5%) children were referred to the ODT and 33 (38.3%) families were approached regarding donation. Twenty-one (24.4%) families consented to donation. Seventeen donations took place with a total of 41 sets of organs/tissues retrieved. Despite the majority of children meeting early identification for potential donors, many were not being referred. All children on end-of-life care should be referred for potential organ donation. Organ donation needs to be seen as a priority for hospitals as a part of routine end-of-life care to help increase referral rates and give families the opportunity to donate. Many paediatric deaths are not referred for consideration of organ donation, despite guidelines stating that this process should be standard of care. Further optimization of referral rates may aid in increasing the number of organs available for donation. What is Known: • Shortage of organs continues to be a national problem. • NICE guidelines state that all patients who are on end-of-life care should have the option of organ donation

  4. Towards integrated paediatric services in the Netherlands : A survey of views and policies on collaboration in the care for children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, B. J. G.; Reinders-Messelink, H. A.; de Blécourt, A. C. E.; Olijve, W. G.; Haga, N.; Groothoff, J. W.; Nakken, H.; Postema, K.

    Aim Worldwide, family- centred and co- ordinated care are seen as the two most desirable and effective methods of paediatric care delivery. This study outlines current views on how team collaboration comprising professionals in paediatric rehabilitation and special education and the parents of

  5. Review of supplemental oxygen and respiratory support for paediatric emergency care in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hansmann

    Full Text Available Introduction: In African countries, respiratory infections and severe sepsis are common causes of respiratory failure and mortality in children under five years of age. Mortality and morbidity in these children could be reduced with adequate respiratory support in the emergency care setting. The purpose of this review is to describe management priorities in the emergency care of critically ill children presenting with respiratory problems. Basic and advanced respiratory support measures are described for implementation according to available resources, work load and skill-levels. Methods: We did a focused search of respiratory support for critically ill children in resource-limited settings over the past ten years, using the search tools PubMed and Google Scholar, the latest WHO guidelines, international ‘Advanced Paediatric Life Support’ guidelines and paediatric critical care textbooks. Results: The implementation of triage and rapid recognition of respiratory distress and hypoxia with pulse oximetry is important to correctly identify critically ill children with increased risk of mortality in all health facilities in resource constrained settings. Basic, effective airway management and respiratory support are essential elements of emergency care. Correct provision of supplemental oxygen is safe and its application alone can significantly improve the outcome of critically ill children. Non-invasive ventilatory support is cost-effective and feasible, with the potential to improve emergency care packages for children with respiratory failure and other organ dysfunctions. Non-invasive ventilation is particularly important in severely under-resourced regions unable to provide intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation support. Malnutrition and HIV-infection are important co-morbid conditions, associated with increased mortality in children with respiratory dysfunction. Discussion: A multi-disciplinary approach is required to optimise

  6. Development of a paediatric population-based model of the pharmacokinetics of rivaroxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Stefan; Becker, Corina; Burghaus, Rolf; Coboeken, Katrin; Edginton, Andrea; Lippert, Jörg; Siegmund, Hans-Ulrich; Thelen, Kirstin; Mück, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism has been increasingly recognised as a clinical problem in the paediatric population. Guideline recommendations for antithrombotic therapy in paediatric patients are based mainly on extrapolation from adult clinical trial data, owing to the limited number of clinical trials in paediatric populations. The oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban has been approved in adult patients for several thromboembolic disorders, and its well-defined pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and efficacy and safety profiles in adults warrant further investigation of this agent in the paediatric population. The objective of this study was to develop and qualify a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for rivaroxaban doses of 10 and 20 mg in adults and to scale this model to the paediatric population (0-18 years) to inform the dosing regimen for a clinical study of rivaroxaban in paediatric patients. Experimental data sets from phase I studies supported the development and qualification of an adult PBPK model. This adult PBPK model was then scaled to the paediatric population by including anthropometric and physiological information, age-dependent clearance and age-dependent protein binding. The pharmacokinetic properties of rivaroxaban in virtual populations of children were simulated for two body weight-related dosing regimens equivalent to 10 and 20 mg once daily in adults. The quality of the model was judged by means of a visual predictive check. Subsequently, paediatric simulations of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), maximum (peak) plasma drug concentration (C max) and concentration in plasma after 24 h (C 24h) were compared with the adult reference simulations. Simulations for AUC, C max and C 24h throughout the investigated age range largely overlapped with values obtained for the corresponding dose in the adult reference simulation for both body weight-related dosing regimens. However

  7. Patient participation, a prerequisite for care: A grounded theory study of healthcare professionals' perceptions of what participation means in a paediatric care context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Ing-Marie; Nygren, Jens M; Svedberg, Petra

    2018-01-01

    To explore healthcare professionals' perceptions of what patient participation means in a paediatric care context . A qualitative explorative design with grounded theory. Fifteen healthcare professionals who worked in paediatric care settings were either interviewed or asked open-ended questions in a survey, during December 2015-May 2016. Grounded theory was used as a method. The study results provide a theoretical conceptualization of what patient participation meant for healthcare professionals in paediatric care and how participation was enabled. The core category "participation a prerequisite for care" emerged as the main finding explaining the concept as ethical, practical and integrated in the care givers way of working. However, the concept was implicit in the organization. Four additional categories illustrated the healthcare professionals' different strategies used to enhance patient participation; "meeting each child where the child is," "building a relationship with the child," "showing respect for each individual child" and "making the most of the moment."

  8. Architectures for paediatric palliative care: how to improve quality of life and environmental well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Marco; Francalanza, Paolo Carlo; Galloni, Giulio; Pagella, Bianca; Capolongo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the environment on wellness, not only for patients themselves but for all care-givers as well, refers to the humanisation principles of spaces of care. Commencing with an analysis of existing paediatric hospices, the paper examines design suggestions for prosthetic environments, considered as a fundamental component in the healing process. A prosthetic environment can be created only through a specific knowledge of the real needs of users. Therefore, some scholars have conducted research work for defining the best practices for healing environments, supported by an assessment and comparison of case studies. The methodology is based on two phases: the first is based on interviews with experts in hospice design and management and the second, through the application of a questionnaire to several users. Discussion and Results. The output of the work is the achievement of a logical, sequential and participatory broad-spectrum process in the design of health facilities in order to cause a sustainable awareness in paediatric hospices. Starting from the research work, it is necessary to define a scientific method for implementing knowledge on health, psychological, perceptual and behavioural needs to contribute towards proper planning for meeting the real requirements of users.

  9. Feelings of women accompanying children hospitalized in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiana Mendes Bertoncello Fontes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Analise feelings of women accompanying children in a paediatric intensive care unit Materials and Methods: Data were collected from August to October 2015 by the authors from individual interviews recorded with 15 women. The instrument was structured with the identification of qualitative variables, described in absolute and relative frequencies, and a guiding question. The "corpus" of each interview was electronically transcribed, floating readings were held and statements were categorized and analysed according Analise Content.  Results: 14 (93% are biological mothers; average age 30 years; 11 (73% have completed primary education; six (46% have an occupation or a profession. The four themes were inferred: ambivalence of feelings and coping were related to how individuals express and deal with the hospitalized patient’s situation; empathy with the health team and the structural condition of the critical environment can also generate feelings. Nursing diagnoses were formulated from the reported feelings. Conclusion: It was observed that the feelings identified could be originated by the health-illness hospitalization process as well as the structural components of the critical environment. Keywords: Paediatric Intensive Care Units; Women; Feelings.

  10. What impact did a Paediatric Early Warning system have on emergency admissions to the paediatric intensive care unit? An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefton, G; McGrath, C; Tume, L; Lane, S; Lisboa, P J G; Carrol, E D

    2015-04-01

    The ideology underpinning Paediatric Early Warning systems (PEWs) is that earlier recognition of deteriorating in-patients would improve clinical outcomes. To explore how the introduction of PEWs at a tertiary children's hospital affects emergency admissions to the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and the impact on service delivery. To compare 'in-house' emergency admissions to PICU with 'external' admissions transferred from District General Hospitals (without PEWs). A before-and-after observational study August 2005-July 2006 (pre), August 2006-July 2007 (post) implementation of PEWs at the tertiary children's hospital. The median Paediatric Index of Mortality (PIM2) reduced; 0.44 vs 0.60 (pemergency admissions to PICU. A 39% reduction in emergency admission total beds days reduced cancellation of major elective surgical cases and refusal of external PICU referrals. Following introduction of PEWs at a tertiary children's hospital PIM2 was reduced, patients required less PICU interventions and had a shorter length of stay. PICU service delivery improved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Paediatric rheumatology practice in the UK benchmarked against the British Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology/Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance Standards of Care for juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavirayani, Akhila; Foster, Helen E

    2013-12-01

    To describe current clinical practice against the BSPAR/ARMA Standards of Care (SOCs) for children and young people (CYP) with incident JIA. Ten UK paediatric rheumatology centres (including all current centres nationally accredited for paediatric rheumatology higher specialist training) participated in a retrospective case notes review using a pretested pro forma based on the SOC. Data collected per centre included clinical service configuration and the initial clinical care for a minimum of 30 consecutive new patients seen within the previous 2 years and followed up for at least 6 months. A total of 428 CYP with JIA (median age 11 years, range 1-21 years) were included, with complete data available for 73% (311/428). Against the key SOCs, 41% (175/428) were assessed ≤10 weeks from symptom onset, 60% (186/311) ≤4 weeks from referral, 26% (81/311) had eye screening at ≤6 weeks, 83% (282/341) had joint injections at ≤6 weeks, 59% (184/311) were assessed by a nurse specialist at ≤4 weeks and 45% (141/311) were assessed by a physiotherapist at ≤8 weeks. A median of 6% of patients per centre participated in clinical trials. All centres had access to eye screening and prescribed biologic therapies. All had access to a nurse specialist and physiotherapist. Most had access to an occupational therapist (8/10), psychologist (8/10), joint injection lists (general anaesthesia/inhaled analgesia) (9/10) and designated transitional care clinics (7/10). This first description of UK clinical practice in paediatric rheumatology benchmarked against the BSPAR/ARMA SOCs demonstrates variable clinical service delivery. Considerable delay in access to specialist care is evident and this needs to be addressed in order to improve clinical outcomes.

  12. Parents' experience of a follow-up meeting after a child's death in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Helle L; Thomsen, Anja K; Laerkner, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: 'To identify parents' experience of a follow up meeting and to explore whether the conversation was adequate to meet the needs of parents for a follow-up after their child's death in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). DESIGN AND SETTING: Qualitative method utilising semi...

  13. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children after paediatric intensive care treatment compared to children who survived a major fire disaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, M.B.; Knoester, H.; Bos, AP; Last, B.F.; Grootenhuis, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The goals were to determine the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children after paediatric intensive care treatment, to identify risk factors for PTSD, and to compare this data with data from a major fire disaster in the Netherlands. Methods: Children completed the

  14. Moral distress within neonatal and paediatric intensive care units: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Trisha; Janvier, Annie; Gillam, Lynn; Davis, Peter G

    2016-08-01

    To review the literature on moral distress experienced by nursing and medical professionals within neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Pubmed, EBSCO (Academic Search Complete, CINAHL and Medline) and Scopus were searched using the terms neonat*, infant*, pediatric*, prematur* or preterm AND (moral distress OR moral responsibility OR moral dilemma OR conscience OR ethical confrontation) AND intensive care. 13 studies on moral distress published between January 1985 and March 2015 met our inclusion criteria. Fewer than half of those studies (6) were multidisciplinary, with a predominance of nursing staff responses across all studies. The most common themes identified were overly 'burdensome' and disproportionate use of technology perceived not to be in a patient's best interest, and powerlessness to act. Concepts of moral distress are expressed differently within nursing and medical literature. In nursing literature, nurses are often portrayed as victims, with physicians seen as the perpetrators instigating 'aggressive care'. Within medical literature moral distress is described in terms of dilemmas or ethical confrontations. Moral distress affects the care of patients in the NICU and PICU. Empirical data on multidisciplinary populations remain sparse, with inconsistent definitions and predominantly small sample sizes limiting generalisability of studies. Longitudinal data reflecting the views of all stakeholders, including parents, are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. The value of WhatsApp communication in paediatric burn care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, R; Rogers, A D; Numanoglu, A; Rode, H

    2018-06-01

    Telemedicine is increasingly applied in developed settings to facilitate transfer of information to and from burn surgeons across vast geographic areas. WhatsApp is a widely available and extremely user-friendly encrypted smartphone application that does not require the expensive physical and personnel infrastructure that characterizes many of these telemedicine systems. The aim of this study was to review the use of WhatsApp to facilitate paediatric burn injury consultations to a regional burn centre in a developing country, where burn care continues to be thwarted by administrative apathy, poor resource allocation and lack of attention to medical and nursing education at all levels. A retrospective review was undertaken of all consultations using WhatsApp over an 18-month period, received by the burn centre's two senior medical practitioners. The specific origin and nature of the telemedicine requests for advice, transfer or follow-up were collected, as were data relating to the demographics of the patients, the aetiology, mechanism and extent of the burn injury. The impact of the system of communication in terms of reductions in admissions and clinic visits was assessed, and a cost analysis was undertaken. Feedback was also obtained from those health practitioners regularly using the service. 838 communications occurred during the study period, which included 1562 distinct clinical queries. 486 interactions (58%) originated from within the hospital, the majority of which were initiated by surgeons in training or burn nurse practitioners. 352 (42%) consultations were from outside the hospital. Queries related to the full spectrum of burn care, including emergency management and stabilization, triage and transfer, the need for escharotomy, fluid resuscitation, wound care, the timing and nature of surgical intervention, as well as follow-up and rehabilitation. While no significant changes in the number of surgical interventions or admissions were observed when

  16. [Families of the economic crisis in paediatric Primary Care clinics: descriptive observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Martín, R; Sánchez Bayle, M; Gancedo García, C; Teruel de Francisco, M C; Coullaut López, A

    2016-04-01

    To study the impact of the economic crisis on the families of the children who attend Primary Health Care and its relationship with their socioeconomic status. Observational descriptive study was conducted by analysing the results of 453 questionnaires, given to the parents of children between 1 and 7 years old who attended 4 paediatric clinics in Madrid. The raw data was analysed, and comparisons between groups and multivariate analysis were performed. In the multivariate analysis, the variables related to the non-acquisition of prescribed medication are: lower income level OR=0.118, p<.0001 and lower educational level OR=0.464, p<.001; the variables related to the reduction of food expenditure are: lower income level OR=0.100, p<.0001 and a higher number of family members OR=1.308, p=.045; the variables related to anti-pneumococcal vaccination without public funding are: higher income level OR=2.170, p=.0001, higher educational level OR=1.835, p=.013, and not being an immigrant OR=0.532, p=.037. The presence of health problems from the beginning of the economic crisis is related to unemployment OR=4.079, p=.032, lower educational level R=0.678, p=.042, and income level OR=0.342, p<.0001. In all cases, the models achieved a statistical significance of p<.0001. The economic crisis has greater impact on the group with the lowest income level in all analysed variables. The lower educational level and higher number of family members has an impact on the reduction in food expenditure. The fact of being an immigrant has an impact on not receiving the anti-pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccination. Unemployment leads to an increase in health problems in the family. To sum up, the economic crisis has increased inequalities according to socioeconomic status. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Designing quality of care--contributions from parents: Parents' experiences of care processes in paediatric care and their contribution to improvements of the care process in collaboration with healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Susanne; Gremyr, Ida; Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this article was to explore whether current quality dimensions for health care services are sufficient to capture how parents perceive and contribute to quality of health care. New quality improvement initiatives that actively involve patients must be examined with a critical view on established quality dimensions to ensure that these measures support patient involvement. This paper used a qualitative and descriptive design. This paper is based on interviews with parents participating in two experience-based co-design projects in a Swedish hospital that included qualitative content analysis of data from 12 parent interviews in paediatric care. Health care professionals often overemphasize their own significance for value creation in care processes and underappreciate parents' ability to influence and contribute to better quality. However, quality is not based solely on how professionals accomplish their task, but is co-created by health care professionals and parents. Consequently, assessment of quality outcomes also must include parents' ability and context. This paper questions current models of quality dimensions in health care, and suggests additional sub-dimensions, such as family quality and involvement quality. This paper underscores the importance of involving parents in health care improvements with health care professionals to capture as many dimensions of quality as possible. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Drugs for the paediatric heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Head, Paediatric Cardiology Service of the Western Cape, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, ... His interests also include the care of complex patients ... The pharmacy only has enalapril available – can you substitute this drug for the ...

  19. A review of paediatric anaesthetic-related mortality, serious adverse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: mortality, outcomes, paediatric anaesthesia, perioperative, risks. Introduction ... informed decisions on patient care.2,17,18 ... use of a case mix and institutional audit with a small sample size.2,27,28, ..... Anesthesia safety: model or myth? .... Thomas J. Paediatric anaesthesia: a risky business?: guest editorial. S.

  20. Knowledge and training in paediatric medical traumatic stress and trauma-informed care among emergency medical professionals in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoysted, Claire; Babl, Franz E; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Landolt, Markus A; Jobson, Laura; Van Der Westhuizen, Claire; Curtis, Sarah; Kharbanda, Anupam B; Lyttle, Mark D; Parri, Niccolò; Stanley, Rachel; Alisic, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Background : Provision of psychosocial care, in particular trauma-informed care, in the immediate aftermath of paediatric injury is a recommended strategy to minimize the risk of paediatric medical traumatic stress. Objective : To examine the knowledge of paediatric medical traumatic stress and perspectives on providing trauma-informed care among emergency staff working in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Method : Training status, knowledge of paediatric medical traumatic stress, attitudes towards incorporating psychosocial care and barriers experienced were assessed using an online self-report questionnaire. Respondents included 320 emergency staff from 58 LMICs. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, t -tests and multiple regression. Results : Participating emergency staff working in LMICs had a low level of knowledge of paediatric medical traumatic stress. Ninety-one percent of respondents had not received any training or education in paediatric medical traumatic stress, or trauma-informed care for injured children, while 94% of respondents indicated they wanted training in this area. Conclusions : There appears to be a need for training and education of emergency staff in LMICs regarding paediatric medical traumatic stress and trauma-informed care, in particular among staff working in comparatively lower income countries.

  1. Inviting parents to take part in paediatric palliative care research: A mixed-methods examination of selection bias

    OpenAIRE

    Crocker, Joanna C; Beecham, Emma; Kelly, Paula; Dinsdale, Andrew P; Hemsley, June; Jones, Louise; Bluebond-Langner, Myra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recruitment to paediatric palliative care research is challenging, with high rates of non-invitation of eligible families by clinicians. The impact on sample characteristics is unknown. Aim: To investigate, using mixed methods, non-invitation of eligible families and ensuing selection bias in an interview study about parents? experiences of advance care planning (ACP). Design: We examined differences between eligible families invited and not invited to participate by clinicians us...

  2. [Changes in the demand for paediatric neurology care in a spanish tertiary care hospital over a 20-year period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge Galindo, L; López-Pisón, J; Samper Villagrasa, P; Peña Segura, J L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the profile of the demand for paediatric neurology care in a Spanish tertiary hospital over the past 20 years. We studied epidemiological data, reasons for consultation, diagnoses and complementary tests from all patients examined by our Paediatric Neurology Unit in its 20 years of service (from May 1990 to March 2010). We also reviewed data from patients whose first visit took place within the last five years (2005-2010) and compared them to data obtained from a prior study carried out in this Unit from 1990 to 1995. To compare the first 5 years (group 1) with the last 5 years (group 2), we calculated confidence intervals, P<.05, for the frequency distribution (%) in each category. Main reasons for consultation and principal diagnoses for the 12726 patients evaluated in the 20-year period, as well as results from group 1 (2046 patients) and group 2 (4488 patients) corresponding to first and the last 5 years of activity respectively, are presented with their confidence intervals in a series of tables. Variations in the reasons for consultation, diagnoses and complementary tests over time reflect changes determined by medical, scientific and social progress, and organisational changes specific to each hospital. This explains the difficulty of comparing different patient series studied consecutively, which are even more pronounced between different hospitals. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Paediatric palliative home care in areas of Germany with low population density and long distances: a questionnaire survey with general paediatricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kremeike Kerstin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2007, the patient’s right to specialised palliative home care became law in Germany. However, childhood palliative care in territorial states with low patient numbers and long distances requires adapted models to ensure an area-wide maintenance. Actually, general paediatricians are the basic care providers for children and adolescents. They also provide home care. The aim of this study was to improve the knowledge about general paediatrician’s involvement in and contribution to palliative care in children. Findings To evaluate the current status of palliative home care provided by general paediatricians and their cooperation with other paediatric palliative care providers, a questionnaire survey was disseminated to general paediatricians in Lower Saxony, a German federal state with nearly eight million inhabitants and a predominantly rural infrastructure. Data analysis was descriptive. One hundred forty one of 157 included general paediatricians completed the questionnaire (response rate: 89.8%. A total of 792 children and adolescents suffering from life-limiting conditions were cared for by these general paediatricians in 2008. Severe cerebral palsy was the most prevalent diagnosis. Eighty-nine per cent of the general paediatricians stated that they had professional experience with paediatric palliative care. Collaboration of general paediatricians and other palliative care providers was stated as not well developed. The support by a specialised team including 24-hour on-call duty and the intensification of educational programs were emphasised. Conclusions The current regional infrastructure of palliative home care in Lower Saxony can benefit from the establishment of a coordinated network of palliative home care providers.

  4. Transitioning young adults from paediatric to adult care and the HIV care continuum in Atlanta, Georgia, USA: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussen, Sophia A; Chakraborty, Rana; Knezevic, Andrea; Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Huang, Eugene; Stephenson, Rob; Del Rio, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    The transition from paediatric to adult HIV care is a particularly high-risk time for disengagement among young adults; however, empirical data are lacking. We reviewed medical records of 72 youth seen in both the paediatric and the adult clinics of the Grady Infectious Disease Program in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, from 2004 to 2014. We abstracted clinical data on linkage, retention and virologic suppression from the last two years in the paediatric clinic through the first two years in the adult clinic. Of patients with at least one visit scheduled in adult clinic, 97% were eventually seen by an adult provider (median time between last paediatric and first adult clinic visit = 10 months, interquartile range 2-18 months). Half of the patients were enrolled in paediatric care immediately prior to transition, while the other half experienced a gap in paediatric care and re-enrolled in the clinic as adults. A total of 89% of patients were retained (at least two visits at least three months apart) in the first year and 56% in the second year after transition. Patients who were seen in adult clinic within three months of their last paediatric visit were more likely to be virologically suppressed after transition than those who took longer (Relative risk (RR): 1.76; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-2.9; p  = 0.03). Patients with virologic suppression (HIV-1 RNA below the level of detection of the assay) at the last paediatric visit were also more likely to be suppressed at the most recent adult visit (RR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.34-3.9; p  = 0.002). Retention rates once in adult care, though high initially, declined significantly by the second year after transition. Pre-transition viral suppression and shorter linkage time between paediatric and adult clinic were associated with better outcomes post-transition. Optimizing transition will require intensive transition support for patients who are not virologically controlled, as well as support for youth beyond the first year

  5. Paediatrics: messages from Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Midulla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to describe paediatric highlights from the 2014 European Respiratory Society (ERS International Congress in Munich, Germany. Abstracts from the seven groups of the ERS Paediatric Assembly (Respiratory Physiology and Sleep, Asthma and Allergy, Cystic Fibrosis, Respiratory Infection and Immunology, Neonatology and Paediatric Intensive Care, Respiratory Epidemiology, and Bronchology are presented in the context of the current literature.

  6. Children's environmental health: an under-recognised area in paediatric health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sly Peter D

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The knowledge that the environment in which we live, grow and play, can have negative or positive impacts on our health and development is not new. However the recognition that adverse environments can significantly and specifically affect the growth and development of a child from early intrauterine life through to adolescence, as well as impact their health later in adulthood, is relatively recent and has not fully reached health care providers involved in paediatric care. Over the past 15 years, world declarations and statements on children's rights, sustainable development, chemical safety and most recently climate change, have succeeded in cultivating a global focus on children's health and their right to a healthy environment. Many international calls for research in the area, have also been able to identify patterns of environmental diseases in children, assess children's exposures to many environmental toxicants, identify developmental periods of vulnerability, and quantify the cost benefits to public health systems and beyond, of addressing environmentally related diseases in children. Transferring this information to front-line health care providers and increasing their awareness about the global burden of disease attributed to the environment and children's especial vulnerability to environmental threats is the salient aim of this commentary.

  7. Children's environmental health: an under-recognised area in paediatric health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavidia, Tania G; Pronczuk de Garbino, Jenny; Sly, Peter D

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge that the environment in which we live, grow and play, can have negative or positive impacts on our health and development is not new. However the recognition that adverse environments can significantly and specifically affect the growth and development of a child from early intrauterine life through to adolescence, as well as impact their health later in adulthood, is relatively recent and has not fully reached health care providers involved in paediatric care. Over the past 15 years, world declarations and statements on children's rights, sustainable development, chemical safety and most recently climate change, have succeeded in cultivating a global focus on children's health and their right to a healthy environment. Many international calls for research in the area, have also been able to identify patterns of environmental diseases in children, assess children's exposures to many environmental toxicants, identify developmental periods of vulnerability, and quantify the cost benefits to public health systems and beyond, of addressing environmentally related diseases in children. Transferring this information to front-line health care providers and increasing their awareness about the global burden of disease attributed to the environment and children's especial vulnerability to environmental threats is the salient aim of this commentary. PMID:19196484

  8. Factor analysis of the Children's Behaviour Questionnaire in a Nigerian paediatric primary care population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O O Omigbodun

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This paper examines the factor structure of the Yoruba translation of the Children’s Behaviour Questionnaire for Completion by Parents (CBQ administered in a Nigerian paediatric primary care population. Design. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Subjects. Four hundred and seventy-eight children aged 7 - 14 years who attended a primary care clinic in Ibadan, Nigeria, over a 3-month period. Methods. Parents’ ratings of the children were obtained using the Yoruba translation of the CBQ. The factor structure of this instrument was examined using principal component analysis with varimax rotation. Only factors with eigenvalues of greater than 1 were examined further. Results. The first seven dimensions were readily conceptu- alised. These factors are conduct problem, hyperactivity, emotional problem, irritability, problems with elimination, a somatic complaint and a school problem dimension. Conclusion. These factors are similar to what has been observed in other studies involving populations of children with psychopathology, with the exception of the somatic com- plaint and school problem dimension. The emergence of these two factors, which are quite different from what has been observed in other studies, may demonstrate differences that reflect the influence of language, culture and the peculiarities of a primary care setting. On the other hand the similarity of most of the factors to those found in previous studies con- firms the broad similarities in the behaviour of children across different cultures.

  9. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Jitender; Satpathy, Sidhartha; Sharma, D K; Lodha, Rakesh; Kapil, Arti; Wadhwa, Nitya; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) increase the length of stay in the hospital and consequently costs as reported from studies done in developed countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of HAIs on length of stay and costs of health care in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of a tertiary care hospital in north India. This prospective study was done in the seven bedded PICU of a large multi-specialty tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. A total of 20 children with HAI (cases) and 35 children without HAI (controls), admitted to the PICU during the study period (January 2012 to June 2012), were matched for gender, age, and average severity of illness score. Each patient's length of stay was obtained prospectively. Costs of healthcare were estimated according to traditional and time driven activity based costing methods approach. The median extra length of PICU stay for children with HAI (cases), compared with children with no HAI (controls), was seven days (IQR 3-16). The mean total costs of patients with and without HAI were ' 2,04,787 (US$ 3,413) and ' 56,587 (US$ 943), respectively and the mean difference in the total cost between cases and controls was ' 1,48,200 (95% CI 55,716 to 2,40,685, pcosts for PICU patients, especially costs due to prolongation of hospital stay, and suggests the need to develop effective strategies for prevention of HAI to reduce costs of health care.

  10. Refractory septic shock in children: a European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morin, Luc; Ray, Samiran; Wilson, Clare; Remy, Solenn; Benissa, Mohamed Rida; Jansen, Nicolaas J. G.; Javouhey, Etienne; Peters, Mark J.; Kneyber, Martin; De Luca, Daniele; Nadel, Simon; Schlapbach, Luregn Jan; Maclaren, Graeme; Tissieres, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although overall paediatric septic shock mortality is decreasing, refractory septic shock (RSS) is still associated with high mortality. A definition for RSS is urgently needed to facilitate earlier identification and treatment. We aim to establish a European society of paediatric and

  11. Refractory septic shock in children : a European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morin, Luc; Ray, Samiran; Wilson, Clare; Remy, Solenn; Benissa, Mohamed Rida; Jansen, Nicolaas J. G.; Javouhey, Etienne; Peters, Mark J.; Kneyber, Martin; De Luca, Daniele; Nadel, Simon; Schlapbach, Luregn Jan; Maclaren, Graeme; Tissieres, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Although overall paediatric septic shock mortality is decreasing, refractory septic shock (RSS) is still associated with high mortality. A definition for RSS is urgently needed to facilitate earlier identification and treatment. We aim to establish a European society of paediatric and neonatal

  12. Paediatric end-of-life care needs in Switzerland: current practices, and perspectives from parents and professionals. A study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstraesser, Eva; Zimmermann, Karin; Eskola, Katri; Luck, Patricia; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie; Cignacco, Eva

    2015-08-01

    To present a protocol for a multi-phase study about the current practice of end-of-life care in paediatric settings in Switzerland. In Switzerland, paediatric palliative care is usually provided by teams, who may not necessarily have specific training. There is a lack of systematic data about specific aspects of care at the end of a child's life, such as symptom management, involvement of parents in decision-making and family-centred care and experiences and needs of parents, and perspectives of healthcare professionals. This retrospective nationwide multicentre study, Paediatric End-of-LIfe CAre Needs in Switzerland (PELICAN), combines quantitative and qualitative methods of enquiry. The PELICAN study consists of three observational parts, PELICAN I describes practices of end-of-life care (defined as the last 4 weeks of life) in the hospital and home care setting of children (0-18 years) who died in the years 2011-2012 due to a cardiac, neurological or oncological disease, or who died in the neonatal period. PELICAN II assesses the experiences and needs of parents during the end-of-life phase of their child. PELICAN III focuses on healthcare professionals and explores their perspectives concerning the provision of end-of-life care. This first study across Switzerland will provide comprehensive insight into the current end-of-life care in children with distinct diagnoses and the perspectives of affected parents and health professionals. The results may facilitate the development and implementation of programmes for end-of-life care in children across Switzerland, building on real experiences and needs. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01983852. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Health-care-associated infections in neonates, children, and adolescents: an analysis of paediatric data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control point-prevalence survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, Walter; Hopkins, Susan; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Holmes, Alison; Sharland, Mike; Suetens, Carl

    2017-04-01

    In 2011-12, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) held the first Europe-wide point-prevalence survey of health-care-associated infections in acute care hospitals. We analysed paediatric data from this survey, aiming to calculate the prevalence and type of health-care-associated infections in children and adolescents in Europe and to determine risk factors for infection in this population. Point-prevalence surveys took place from May, 2011, to November, 2012, in 1149 hospitals in EU Member States, Iceland, Norway, and Croatia. Patients present on the ward at 0800 h on the day of the survey and who were not discharged at the time of the survey were included. Data were collected by locally trained health-care workers according to patient-based or unit-based protocols. We extracted data from the ECDC database for all paediatric patients (age 0-18 years). We report adjusted prevalence for health-care-associated infections by clustering at the hospital and country level. We also calculated risk factors for development of health-care-associated infections with use of a generalised linear mixed-effects model. We analysed data for 17 273 children and adolescents from 29 countries. 770 health-care-associated infections were reported in 726 children and adolescents, corresponding to a prevalence of 4·2% (95% CI 3·7-4·8). Bloodstream infections were the most common type of infection (343 [45%] infections), followed by lower respiratory tract infections (171 [22%]), gastrointestinal infections (64 [8%]), eye, ear, nose, and throat infections (55 [7%]), urinary tract infections (37 [5%]), and surgical-site infections (34 [4%]). The prevalence of infections was highest in paediatric intensive care units (15·5%, 95% CI 11·6-20·3) and neonatal intensive care units (10·7%, 9·0-12·7). Independent risk factors for infection were age younger than 12 months, fatal disease (via ultimately and rapidly fatal McCabe scores), prolonged length of stay, and

  14. COMPARISON OF AIRWAY RESPONSES, HAEMODYNAMICS AND RECOVERY USING SEVOFLURANE AND DESFLURANE VIA LARYNGEAL MASK AIRWAY IN DAY CARE PAEDIATRIC SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Satyanarayana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The general observation that children achieve better convalescence in the home environment supports the need for adoption of day care surgeries in them. Advantages of paediatric outpatient anaesthesia include- minimises parental separation, uninterrupted feeding schedule/sleeping patterns, less risk of nosocomial infections, reduced cost of hospitalisation, convenience and improved patient satisfaction. The aim of the study is to compare the airway responses, haemodynamic parameters and recovery using sevoflurane and desflurane via laryngeal mask airway in day care paediatric surgeries. MATERIALS AND METHODS 60 paediatric patients of both gender between the age group of 6 and 14 years with ASA grade 1 and 2 undergoing elective day care surgeries under general anaesthesia with LMA are divided into two groups. (Group S sevoflurane group received sevoflurane 2% to 3% and (group D desflurane group received desflurane 6% to 8% for maintenance of anaesthesia after induction with IV propofol 2 mg/kg. Airway responses, haemodynamics and recovery parameters are recorded. RESULTS Recovery parameters spontaneous eye opening, response to verbal commands, Aldrete score at 5 and 10 mins. showed statistically significant difference between two groups. Recovery is faster in desflurane group compared to sevoflurane group. The airway responses and adverse events were found to be more in desflurane group, but statistically not significant. CONCLUSION Recovery from anaesthesia was faster in patients maintained with desflurane (6% to 8% compared with sevoflurane (2% to 3%.

  15. Using drawings to understand the child's experience of child-centred care on admission to a paediatric high dependency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Mandie; Whitehead, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Family- and child-centred care are philosophies of care used within paediatrics where the family and/or the child are central to healthcare delivery. This study explored the lived experience of hospitalized school-aged children admitted to a paediatric high dependency unit in New Zealand to gain insight into child-centred care from a child's perspective. An interpretive thematic approach was used where the child was asked to draw a picture of 'a person in the hospital' that was further explored through interviews. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim with an inductive thematic analysis completed, drawing on the child-centred care framework. Twenty-six school-aged children participated. The pictures included drawings of family, staff, children and themselves. The themes generated from the interviews were relationships with themselves, family and staff and psychosocial, emotional and physical support. Children described themselves as co-creators of their own healthcare experience, consistent with child-centred care, while drawing on the principles of family-centred care. Further exploration of the concepts of 'participation versus protection' and 'child as becoming versus child as being' will contribute to translation and integration of child-centred care and family-centred care principles into practice, theory, research and policy.

  16. A paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training project in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Javier; Matamoros, Martha M; López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo, Angel P; Ordóñez, Flora; Moral, Ramón; Mencía, Santiago

    2010-04-01

    It is possible that the exportation of North American and European models has hindered the creation of a structured cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training programme in developing countries. The objective of this paper is to describe the design and present the results of a European paediatric and neonatal CPR training programme adapted to Honduras. A paediatric CPR training project was set up in Honduras with the instructional and scientific support of the Spanish Group for Paediatric and Neonatal CPR. The programme was divided into four phases: CPR training and preparation of instructors; training for instructors; supervised teaching; and independent teaching. During the first phase, 24 Honduran doctors from paediatric intensive care, paediatric emergency and anaesthesiology departments attended the paediatric CPR course and 16 of them the course for preparation as instructors. The Honduran Paediatric and Neonatal CPR Group was formed. In the second phase, workshops were given by Honduran instructors and four of them attended a CPR course in Spain as trainee instructors. In the third phase, a CPR course was given in Honduras by the Honduran instructors, supervised by the Spanish team. In the final phase of independent teaching, eight courses were given, providing 177 students with training in CPR. The training of independent paediatric CPR groups with the collaboration and scientific assessment of an expert group could be a suitable model on which to base paediatric CPR training in Latin American developing countries. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Survived so what? Identifying priorities for research with children and families post-paediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Joseph C; Hemingway, Pippa; Redsell, Sarah A

    2018-03-01

    The involvement of patients and the public in the development, implementation and evaluation of health care services and research is recognized to have tangible benefits in relation to effectiveness and credibility. However, despite >96% of children and young people surviving critical illness or injury, there is a paucity of published reports demonstrating their contribution to informing the priorities for aftercare services and outcomes research. We aimed to identify the service and research priorities for Paediatric Intensive Care Unit survivors with children and young people, their families and other stakeholders. We conducted a face-to-face, multiple-stakeholder consultation event, held in the Midlands (UK), to provide opportunities for experiences, views and priorities to be elicited. Data were gathered using write/draw and tell and focus group approaches. An inductive content analytical approach was used to categorize and conceptualize feedback. A total of 26 individuals attended the consultation exercise, including children and young people who were critical care survivors; their siblings; parents and carers; health professionals; academics; commissioners; and service managers. Consultation findings indicated that future services, interventions and research must be holistic and family-centred. Children and young people advisors reported priorities that focused on longer-term outcomes, whereas adult advisors identified priorities that mapped against the pathways of care. Specific priorities included developing and testing interventions that address unmet communication and information needs. Furthermore, initiatives to optimize the lives and longer-term functional and psycho-social outcomes of Paediatric Intensive Care Unit survivors were identified. This consultation exercise provides further evidence of the value of meaningful patient and public involvement in identifying the priorities for research and services for Paediatric Intensive Care Unit survivors

  18. [Vitamin D deficiency in children admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos B, Raúl; Rodríguez-Nuñez, Iván; Peña Zavala, Rubén; Soto Germani, Gonzalo

    Vitamin D is essential for bone health, as well as for cardiovascular and immune function. In critically ill adults vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is common, and is associated with sepsis and higher critical illness severity. To establish the prevalence of VDD and its association with clinically relevant outcomes in children admitted to a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) in Concepcion, Chile. Prospective observational cohort study in 90 consecutive children admitted to the PICU in a university general hospital. Blood was collected on admission to PICU and analysed for 25-OH-D levels. Severity of illness and vasopressor use were assessed using PRISM, PELOD, and vasoactive-inotropic score (VIS) score. VDD was defined as a serum 25-OH-D level40ml/kg in the first 24h of admission (RR 1.5; 95%CI: 1.1-2.1, P<.05). In this study, VDD at PICU admission was prevalent in critically ill children and was associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Further studies are needed to assess the potential benefit of optimizing vitamin D status in the PICU. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Using play therapy in paediatric palliative care: listening to the story and caring for the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breemen, Camara

    2009-10-01

    To be truly comprehensive, palliative care for children must address more than pain control and symptom management. Holistic care also encompasses attention to the child's relationships, hopes, fears and wishes. Parents and caregivers of dying children are generally the primary decision-makers in the child's care and can find the transition from active, to palliative care, particularly difficult. Nurses who understand the parents' perspective can better support them. Children reveal their hopes and fears through play. By being attuned to symbols and themes in play, nurses can better interpret the dying child's journey. Nurses can facilitate communication and connection between parents and child and thereby promote healing during the dying process.

  20. Safety in paediatric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.; Filice, I.; Murray, D.; Thomas, K.

    2006-01-01

    Those of us working in a dedicated paediatric environment are aware of the important safety issues with regard to paediatrics. Our goal when working with paediatric patients, the goal is to obtain the best quality images while keeping patients safe and their distress to a minimum. This article will discuss some of the issues regarding paediatric safety in a diagnostic imaging department, including radiation doses and the risk to paediatric patients, reducing medication errors, safe sedation practice and environmental safety. Also discussed are some conditions requiring special consideration to maintain patient safety such as epiglottitis and suspected child abuse. Promotion of a patient/family-centered care system will create an environment of trust where parents or guardians will know that their children are being well cared for in a safe, effective environment. (author)

  1. Lack of a standardised UK care pathway resulting in national variations in management and outcomes of paediatric small area scalds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevatt, Alexander E J; Kirkham, Emily N; Allix, Bradley; Greenwood, Rosemary; Coy, Karen; Hollén, Linda I; Young, Amber E R

    2016-09-01

    There is a paucity of evidence guiding management of small area partial thickness paediatric scalds. This has prevented the development of national management guidelines for these injuries. This research aimed to investigate whether a lack of evidence for national guidelines has resulted in variations in both management and outcomes of paediatric small area scalds across England and Wales (E&W). A national survey of initial management of paediatric scalds ≤5% Total Body Surface Area (%TBSA) was sent to 14 burns services in E&W. Skin graft rates of anonymised burns services over seven years were collected from the international Burns Injury Database (iBID). Average skin grafting rates across services were compared. Length of stay and proportion of patients receiving general anaesthesia for dressing application at each service were also compared. All 14 burns services responded to the survey. Only 50% of services had a protocol in place for the management of small area burns. All protocols varied in how partial thickness paediatrics scalds ≤5% TBSA should be managed. There was no consensus as to which scalds should be treated using biosynthetic dressings. Data from iBID for 11,917 patients showed that the average reported skin grafting rate across all burns services was 2.3% (95% CI 2.1, 2.6) but varied from 0.3% to 7.1% (P<0.001). Service provider remained associated with likelihood of skin grafting when variations in the %TBSA case mix seen by each service were controlled for (χ(2)=87.3, P<0.001). The use of general anaesthetics across services varied between 0.6 and 35.5% (P<0.001). The median length of stay across services varied from 1 to 3 days (P<0.001). A lack of evidence guiding management of small-area paediatric scalds has resulted in variation in management of these injuries across E&W. There is also significant variation in outcomes for these injuries. Further research is indicated to determine if care pathways and outcomes are linked. An evidence

  2. burden and cost of inpatient care for hiv-positive paediatric patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    paediatric inpatient facilities in the teaching hospitals of the. Cape metropole and ... lifetime hospitalisation cost per infected child was calculated to be RI9 712. ... Prevention Protocol, Provincial Administration of the Western. Cape, 1999) and ...

  3. Paediatric gastroenterology evaluation of overweight and obese children referred from primary care for suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwimmer, J B; Newton, K P; Awai, H I; Choi, L J; Garcia, M A; Ellis, L L; Vanderwall, K; Fontanesi, J

    2013-01-01

    Background Screening overweight and obese children for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is recommended by paediatric and endocrinology societies. However, gastroenterology societies have called for more data before making a formal recommendation. Aim To determine whether the detection of suspected NAFLD in overweight and obese children through screening in primary care and referral to paediatric gastroenterology resulted in a correct diagnosis of NAFLD. Methods Information generated in the clinical evaluation of 347 children identified with suspected NAFLD through screening in primary care and referral to paediatric gastroenterology was captured prospectively. Diagnostic outcomes were reported. The diagnostic performance of two times the upper limit of normal (ULN) for alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was assessed. Results Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was diagnosed in 55% of children identified by screening and referral. Liver disease other than NAFLD was present in 18% of those referred. Autoimmune hepatitis was the most common alternative diagnosis. Children with NAFLD had significantly (P gastroenterology has the potential to identify clinically relevant liver pathology. Consensus is needed on how to value the risk and rewards of screening and referral, to identify children with liver disease in the most appropriate manner. PMID:24117728

  4. Examining the Needs of Paediatric Nurses Caring for Children and Young People Presenting with Self-Harm/Suicidal Behaviour on General Paediatric Wards: Findings from a Small-Scale Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Gemma; Foster, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the process and findings from a small-scale qualitative research study. The study intended to develop an evidence-based care plan/pathway for children and young people in paediatric inpatient settings presenting with self-harm/suicidal behaviour. The article includes a critical review of unanticipated challenges of…

  5. Decision making in extreme situations involving children : withholding or withdrawal of life supporting treatment in paediatric care. Statement of the ethics working group of the Confederation of the European Specialists of Paediatrics (CESP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurz, R

    Paediatricians increasingly find themselves in situations in which decisions must be made regarding withholding or withdrawing life-supporting treatment in the care of a paediatric patient. There comes a point when the artificial prolongation of life only contributes to extending the act of dying

  6. Paediatric interventional radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... Non-operative management is the standard of care in children with blunt solid ... treatment of choice in children with extensive deep venous ... thrombosis. An IVC .... children, a paediatric nurse comfortable with administering.

  7. Improved results in paediatric diabetes care using a quality registry in an improvement collaborative: a case study in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Peterson

    Full Text Available Several studies show that good metabolic control is important for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. In Sweden, there are large differences in mean haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c in different hospitals and difficulties implementing national guidelines in everyday practice. This study shows how the participation in an improvement collaborative could facilitate improvements in the quality of care by paediatric diabetes teams. The Swedish paediatric diabetes quality registry, SWEDIABKIDS was used as a tool and resource for feedback and outcome measures.Twelve teams at paediatric diabetes centres, caring for 30% (2302/7660 of patients in Sweden, participated in an 18-month quality improvement program. Each team defined treatment targets, areas needing improvement, and action plans. The main outcome was the centre patients' mean HbA1c levels, but other clinical variables and change concepts were also studied. Data from the previous six months were compared with the first six months after starting the program, and the long-term follow up after another eleven months.All centres reduced mean HbA1c during the second and third periods compared with the first. The mean reduction for all was 3·7 mmol/mol (p<0.001, compared with non-participating centres who improved their mean HbA1c with 1·7 mmol/mol during the same period. Many of the participating centres reduced the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia and/or ketoacidosis, and five centres reached their goal of ensuring that all patients had some sort of physical activity at least once weekly. Change concepts were, for example, improved guidelines, appointment planning, informing the patients, improving teamwork and active use of the registry, and health promotion activities.By involving paediatric diabetes teams in a quality improvement collaborative together with access to a quality register, the quality of paediatric diabetes care can improve, thereby contributing to a reduced risk of late

  8. CREATING AND AUDITING A NEW ELECTRONIC CONTINUOUS INFUSION PRESCRIPTION CHART FOR A PAEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE UNIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Emily; Sadasivam, Kalaimaran; Christiansen, Nanna

    2016-09-01

    Prescription errors, including continuous infusion prescriptions are one major source of concern in the paediatric population. Evidence suggests that use of an electronic or web-based calculator could minimise these errors. In our paediatric critical care unit (PCCU) we have created an electronic continuous infusion prescription chart to target errors in this area and conducted an audit to assess its effect on error reduction. To create an electronic continuous infusion prescription chart and audit its effect on prescription errors. Similar electronic continuous infusion prescription charts were evaluated. A Choice of electronic formats were considered and excel was chosen for its simplicity and flexibility. The choice of medications to be included, dilution method, and dosage range was agreed between PCCU consultant, pharmacy and nursing staff. Formulas for calculating each medication infusion was created and validated for different age and weight ranges by at least 2 PCCU trained pharmacists, accounting for capping at certain age and weight bands as appropriate for the medication. These were programmed into the spreadsheet for automatic calculation using inputted age and weight for the selected medications. Continuous infusion prescriptions were audited 6 months before and after implementation in April 2015 of this electronic chart. Parameters audited include medication dose, infusion rate, concentration, route, legibility, and missing or incorrect patient details. A trial period of 4 weeks preceded implementation. The electronic continuous infusion prescription form was created and used on PCCU. Hand written prescriptions had higher error rate (30.7%) as compared to electronic charts (0.7%) with a p-value <0.002. No errors were found in electronic prescriptions in regards to dose, volume and rate calculation. The use of an electronic continuous infusion prescription chart has been successfully set up and used on PCCU. Its use has significantly reduced continuous

  9. Transition of gastroenterological patients from paediatric to adult care: A position statement by the Italian Societies of Gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Maieron, Roberto; Martelossi, Stefano; Guariso, Graziella; Buscarini, Elisabetta; Conte, Dario; di Giulio, Emilio; Staiano, Annamaria; Barp, Jacopo; Bassotti, Gabrio; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Buri, Luigi; Carrara, Maurizio; Ghidini, Benedetta; Giannini, Olivia; Knafelz, Daniela; Miele, Erasmo; Peralta, Sergio; Riccio, Elisabetta; Tomba, Carolina; Zilli, Maurizio; Guadagnini, Tiziana

    2015-09-01

    In 2013, four Italian Gastroenterological Societies (the Italian Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the Italian Society of Hospital Gastroenterologists and Endoscopists, the Italian Society of Endoscopy, and the Italian Society of Gastroenterology) formed a joint panel of experts with the aim of preparing an official statement on transition medicine in Gastroenterology. The transition of adolescents from paediatric to adult care is a crucial moment in managing chronic diseases such as celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease and liver transplantation. Improved medical treatment and availability of new drugs and surgical techniques have improved the prognosis of many paediatric disorders, prolonging survival, thus making the transition to adulthood possible and necessary. An inappropriate transition or the incomplete transmission of data from the paediatrician to the adult Gastroenterologist can dramatically decrease compliance to treatment and prognosis of a young patient, particularly in the case of severe disorders. For these reasons, the Italian gastroenterological societies decided to develop an official shared transition protocol. The resulting document discusses the factors influencing the transition process and highlights the main points to accomplish to optimize compliance and prognosis of gastroenterological patients during the difficult transition from childhood to adolescence and adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The changing nature of relationships between parents and healthcare providers when a child dies in the paediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ashleigh E; Hall, Helen; Copnell, Beverley

    2018-01-01

    To explore bereaved parents' interactions with healthcare providers when a child dies in a paediatric intensive care unit. Although most children admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit will survive, 2-5% will die during their stay. The parents of these children interact and form relationships with numerous healthcare staff during their child's illness and death. Although previous studies have explored the parental experience of child death in intensive care generally, the nature of their relationships with healthcare providers during this time remains unknown. This study used a constructivist grounded theory approach. Data were collected via semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews with 26 bereaved parents from four paediatric intensive care units over 18 months in 2015-2016. Constant comparative analysis and theoretical memos were used to analyse the data. The theory "Transitional togetherness" demonstrates the changing nature of the parent-healthcare provider relationship across three key phases of the parents' journey. Phase one, "Welcoming expertise," focuses on the child's medical needs, with the healthcare provider dominant in the relationship. Phase two, "Becoming a team," centres around the parents' need to recreate a parental role and work collaboratively with healthcare providers. Finally, "Gradually disengaging" describes the parents' desire for the relationship to continue after the child's death as a source of support until no longer needed. Findings from this study offer valuable insights into the changing nature of the parent-healthcare provider relationship and highlight the key foci of the relationship at each stage of the parental journey. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. An evaluation of a paediatric radiation oncology teaching programme incorporating a SCORPIO teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Verity; Klein, Linda; Bentvelzen, Adam; Garlan, Karen; Jeffery, Heather

    2011-04-01

    Many radiation oncology registrars have no exposure to paediatrics during their training. To address this, the Paediatric Special Interest Group of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists has convened a biennial teaching course since 1997. The 2009 course incorporated the use of a Structured, Clinical, Objective-Referenced, Problem-orientated, Integrated and Organized (SCORPIO) teaching model for small group tutorials. This study evaluates whether the paediatric radiation oncology curriculum can be adapted to the SCORPIO teaching model and to evaluate the revised course from the registrars' perspective. Teaching and learning resources included a pre-course reading list, a lecture series programme and a SCORPIO workshop. Three evaluation instruments were developed: an overall Course Evaluation Survey for all participants, a SCORPIO Workshop Survey for registrars and a Teacher's SCORPIO Workshop Survey. Forty-five radiation oncology registrars, 14 radiation therapists and five paediatric oncology registrars attended. Seventy-three per cent (47/64) of all participants completed the Course Evaluation Survey and 95% (38/40) of registrars completed the SCORPIO Workshop Survey. All teachers completed the Teacher's SCORPIO Survey (10/10). The overall educational experience was rated as good or excellent by 93% (43/47) of respondents. Ratings of satisfaction with lecture sessions were predominantly good or excellent. Registrars gave the SCORPIO workshop high ratings on each of 10 aspects of quality, with 82% allocating an excellent rating overall for the SCORPIO activity. Both registrars and teachers recommended more time for the SCORPIO stations. The 2009 course met the educational needs of the radiation oncology registrars and the SCORPIO workshop was a highly valued educational component. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2011 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  12. Inadequate vitamin D levels are associated with culture positive sepsis and poor outcomes in paediatric intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuneme, Chike; Carroll, Aoife; Doherty, Dermot; Bruell, Heike; Segurado, Ricardo; Kilbane, Mark; Murphy, Nuala; McKenna, Malachi J; Molloy, Eleanor J

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess vitamin D status, and its determinants, in paediatric patients with suspected sepsis who were admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). We also investigated the association between vitamin D status and clinical outcomes. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) and clinical determinants were prospectively assessed in children with suspected sepsis (<12 years old) admitted to the PICU. The relationship between 25OHD and clinical outcomes was evaluated. Vitamin D status was also assessed in control children of a similar age. We enrolled 120 children with suspected sepsis admitted to the PICU and 30 paediatric controls. 25OHD was <50 nmol/L in 59% of the children admitted to the PICU and 25OHD was lower than in the controls (47 ± 29 vs 66 ± 26 nmol/L, p < 0.001). After adjusting for potential confounders, 25OHD was strongly associated with culture positive sepsis (p < 0.001), the paediatric index of mortality (p = 0.026) and the duration of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.008). There was a negative correlation between 25OHD and C-reactive protein (CRP): each 0.1% decrease in 25OHD increased CRP (p = 0.04). Children admitted to the PICU with suspected sepsis had lower 25OHD than controls and inadequate 25OHD status was associated with confirmed sepsis and poor outcomes. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A qualitative interpretive study exploring parents' perception of the parental role in the paediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Kaitlin E; Rennick, Janet E; Baillargeon, Sophie

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore parents' perception of the parental role in a tertiary care Canadian university affiliated hospital's paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). A descriptive interpretive design was used with a purposive heterogeneous sample to reflect the range of children and parents normally admitted to the PICU. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven parents. Interview data were collected and analysed using the constant comparative method. Three main themes emerged: (1) being present and participating in the child's care; (2) forming a partnership of trust with the PICU health care team; and (3) being informed of the child's progress and treatment plan as the person who "knows" the child best. Enhanced understanding of the parental role in the PICU from the perspective of parents can help guide the development of strategies to more effectively support parents and promote parenting during this extremely stressful time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Suspicion of respiratory tract infection with multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: epidemiology and risk factors from a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renk, Hanna; Stoll, Lenja; Neunhoeffer, Felix; Hölzl, Florian; Kumpf, Matthias; Hofbeck, Michael; Hartl, Dominik

    2017-02-21

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) infections are a serious concern for children admitted to the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Tracheal colonization with MDR Enterobacteriaceae predisposes to respiratory infection, but underlying risk factors are poorly understood. This study aims to determine the incidence of children with suspected infection during mechanical ventilation and analyses risk factors for the finding of MDR Enterobacteriaceae in tracheal aspirates. A retrospective single-centre analysis of Enterobacteriaceae isolates from the lower respiratory tract of ventilated PICU patients from 2005 to 2014 was performed. Resistance status was determined and clinical records were reviewed for potential risk factors. A classification and regression tree (CRT) to predict risk factors for infection with MDR Enterobacteriaceae was employed. The model was validated by simple and multivariable logistic regression. One hundred sixty-seven Enterobacteriaceae isolates in 123 children were identified. The most frequent isolates were Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp. and E.coli. Among these, 116 (69%) isolates were susceptible and 51 (31%) were MDR. In the CRT analysis, antibiotic exposure for ≥ 7 days and presence of gastrointestinal comorbidity were the most relevant predictors for an MDR isolate. Antibiotic exposure for ≥ 7 days was confirmed as a significant risk factor for infection with MDR Enterobacteriaceae by a multivariable logistic regression model. This study shows that critically-ill children with tracheal Enterobacteriaceae infection are at risk of carrying MDR isolates. Prior use of antibiotics for ≥ 7 days significantly increased the risk of finding MDR organisms in ventilated PICU patients with suspected infection. Our results imply that early identification of patients at risk, rapid microbiological diagnostics and tailored antibiotic therapy are essential to improve management of critically ill children infected with

  15. Making co-enrolment feasible for randomised controlled trials in paediatric intensive care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Harron

    Full Text Available Enrolling children into several trials could increase recruitment and lead to quicker delivery of optimal care in paediatric intensive care units (PICU. We evaluated decisions taken by clinicians and parents in PICU on co-enrolment for two large pragmatic trials: the CATCH trial (CATheters in CHildren comparing impregnated with standard central venous catheters (CVCs for reducing bloodstream infection in PICU and the CHIP trial comparing tight versus standard control of hyperglycaemia.We recorded the period of trial overlap for all PICUs taking part in both CATCH and CHiP and reasons why clinicians decided to co-enrol children or not into both studies. We examined parental decisions on co-enrolment by measuring recruitment rates and reasons for declining consent.Five PICUs recruited for CATCH and CHiP during the same period (an additional four opened CATCH after having closed CHiP. Of these five, three declined co-enrolment (one of which delayed recruiting elective patients for CATCH whilst CHiP was running, due to concerns about jeopardising CHiP recruitment, asking too much of parents, overwhelming amounts of information to explain to parents for two trials and a policy against co-enrolment. Two units co-enrolled in order to maximise recruitment to both trials. At the first unit, 35 parents were approached for both trials. 17/35 consented to both; 13/35 consented to one trial only; 5/35 declined both. Consent rates during co-enrolment were 29/35 (82% and 18/35 (51% for CATCH and CHiP respectively compared with 78% and 51% respectively for those approached for a single trial within this PICU. The second unit did not record data on approaches or refusals, but successfully co-enrolled one child.Co-enrolment did not appear to jeopardise recruitment or overwhelm parents. Strategies for seeking consent for multiple trials need to be developed and should include how to combine information for parents and patients.

  16. “[I would like] a place to be alone, other than the toilet” – Children’s perspectives on paediatric hospital care in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkers, I.; Dedding, C.; Bunders-Aelen, J.G.F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although it is widely recognized that children are willing, capable and legally entitled to be active participants in their health care, parents are generally invited to evaluate paediatric hospital care and services rather than children themselves. This is problematic because parents

  17. Training potential in minimally invasive surgery in a tertiary care, paediatric urology centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroeder, R. P. J.; Chrzan, R. J.; Klijn, A. J.; Kuijper, C. F.; Dik, P.; de Jong, T. P. V. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is being utilized more frequently as a surgical technique in general surgery and in paediatric urology. It is associated with a steep learning curve. Currently, the centre does not offer a MIS training programme. It is hypothesized that the number of MIS

  18. Training potential in minimally invasive surgery in a tertiary care, paediatric urology centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroeder, R. P. J.; Chrzan, R. J.; Klijn, A. J.; Kuijper, C. F.; Dik, P.; de Jong, T. P. V. M.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is being utilized more frequently as a surgical technique in general surgery and in paediatric urology. It is associated with a steep learning curve. Currently, the centre does not offer a MIS training programme. It is hypothesized that the number of MIS procedures

  19. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in a tertiary care paediatric intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, M.H.; Maqbool, S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency, causative organisms and susceptibility pattern of nosocomial bloodstream infections in children. All children admitted to the unit during the study period were daily evaluated for features suggestive of nosocomial infection. In addition to other investigations, blood cultures were done in all suspected cases for the confirmation of nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI). Nosocomial infection was defined according to the criteria set by Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. Demographic, microbiological and other variables were carefully studied to analyze frequency, incidence rate, spectrum of isolates and susceptibility pattern. Children with and without nosocomial BSI were compared with regard to age, duration of stay in hospital, need and duration of ventilation and the outcome. Of the total 406 admissions, 134 children were suspected to have nosocomial infection on at least 214 occasions (episodes). Blood cultures yielded growth of pathological organisms in 62 of these episodes, giving the frequency of nosocomial BSI as 15.2 per 100 admissions (62/406 episodes). Children with nosocomial bloodstream infection were found to have younger mean age (2.1 vs. 4.1 years), longer average duration of stay (13.1 vs. 6.6 days), more frequent need for ventilation (64% vs. 34%) and longer duration of ventilation (9.7 vs. 4.8 days). Majority of isolates (77%) were gram-negative bacteria; Klebsiella being the most common isolate (n= 23). Aztreonam, Ceftiazidime, Ceforuxime and Ciprofloxacin showed high resistance pattern (33-50%). Isolates showed good sensitivity to Vancomycin (100%), Imipenem (80%), Meropenem (100%) and Co-amoxiclav (88%). The frequency of nosocomial BSI in the observed setting was quite high, having marked impact on the duration of stay and outcome. Emergence of resistant pathogens is alarming. (author)

  20. Future career intentions of higher specialist trainees in general Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Grainne; Breatnach, Colm; Harty, Sinead; Gavin, Patrick; O'Donnell, Colm; O'Grady, Michael J

    2018-03-27

    A survey of paediatric higher specialist trainees was carried out in 2002 assessing career intentions and perception of training. Fourteen years later, with increased numbers of trainees and a national model of care and a tertiary paediatric hospital on the horizon, we re-evaluated the career intentions of the current trainee workforce. To assess the career intentions of the current paediatric higher specialist trainees. A 28-item questionnaire was developed based on a previously validated instrument and distributed online using the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland trainee database. We distributed the questionnaire to 118 eligible trainees and received responses from 92 (78%). Seventy-nine (86%) respondents desire a consultant post in Ireland. Seventy-five (82%) indicated that their preferred consultant post location was in a tertiary paediatric centre. Sixty-two trainees (67%) intend to become subspecialists with 25 (27%) planning a career in general paediatrics. This contrasts with the 2002 survey when 76% wished to work in urban centres and 61% of trainees planned a career in general paediatrics. There appears to be a mismatch between the career goals of the future paediatric consultant workforce and the requirements for staffing paediatric units nationally. This has the potential to complicate the proposed expansion of general paediatricians in regional centres and result in a significant proportion of current trainees failing to secure a post in their desired location.

  1. A developmental cascade perspective of paediatric obesity: a conceptual model and scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin D; Egan, Kaitlyn N; Montaño, Zorash; Dawson-McClure, Spring; Jake-Schoffman, Danielle E; Larson, Madeline; St George, Sara M

    2018-04-05

    Considering the immense challenge of preventing obesity, the time has come to reconceptualise the way we study the obesity development in childhood. The developmental cascade model offers a longitudinal framework to elucidate the way cumulative consequences and spreading effects of risk and protective factors, across and within biopsychosocial spheres and phases of development, can propel individuals towards obesity. In this article, we use a theory-driven model-building approach and a scoping review that included 310 published studies to propose a developmental cascade model of paediatric obesity. The proposed model provides a basis for testing hypothesised cascades with multiple intervening variables and complex longitudinal processes. Moreover, the model informs future research by resolving seemingly contradictory findings on pathways to obesity previously thought to be distinct (low self-esteem, consuming sugary foods, and poor sleep cause obesity) that are actually processes working together over time (low self-esteem causes consumption of sugary foods which disrupts sleep quality and contributes to obesity). The findings of such inquiries can aid in identifying the timing and specific targets of preventive interventions across and within developmental phases. The implications of such a cascade model of paediatric obesity for health psychology and developmental and prevention sciences are discussed.

  2. Impact of the mother-nurse partnership programme on mother and infant outcomes in paediatric cardiac intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Ju-Yeon; Kim, Hee Soon

    2018-04-04

    To identify the effects of a mother-nurse partnership programme based on the core components of information sharing, negotiation and participation in care. Specifically, we examined the programme's effects on parental satisfaction, parental self-efficacy, perceived partnership and anxiety, as well as infants' time to reach full oral feeding and length of postoperative hospital stay, following cardiac surgery on infants at a paediatric intensive care unit with a restrictive visiting policy. Quasi-experimental study. An analysis of covariance was used to investigate between-group differences while ensuring homogeneity. A paediatric cardiac ICU. Parental satisfaction, parental self-efficacy, perceived partnership and anxiety. Data from 37 and 36 mothers in the control and experimental groups respectively, were analysed. Compared with controls, experimental group mothers reported significantly higher parental satisfaction (F = 39.29, p partnership (F = 62.30, p < .001) and lower anxiety (F = 12.93, p < .001), upon transfer to the ward. Infant outcomes did not differ between the groups. This programme appears to facilitate collaboration between nurses and mothers and positively influences mothers' emotional and cognitive outcomes following infants' cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Ponseti Treatment in the Management of Clubfoot Deformity – A Continuing Role for Paediatric Orthopaedic Services in Secondary Care Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docker, Charles EJ; Lewthwaite, Simon; Kiely, Nigel T

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Ponseti technique is a well-proven way of managing paediatric clubfoot deformity. We describe a management set-up which spreads the care between secondary and tertiary care with no loss of quality. PATIENTS AND METHODS In our audit of the first 2 years of Ponseti casting in the treatment of idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV, clubfoot) deformity, we identified 77 feet having been treated in 50 patients. Forty-nine feet were treated primarily in Oswestry, a tertiary referral centre for paediatric orthopaedic conditions, and 13 feet were treated in conjunction with the physiotherapy department at one of the region's district general hospitals (Leighton Hospital, Crewe, Cheshire). RESULTS Similar good results and low requirement for surgical interventions other than Achilles tenotomy, which forms part of the Ponseti regimen, were found in both cohorts. CONCLUSIONS This ‘hub-and-spoke’ approach would appear to be efficient in terms of resource utilisation. Additional benefits atients and their carers include ease of access to services and reduced financial and transport burdens. PMID:17688726

  4. Ponseti treatment in the management of clubfoot deformity - a continuing role for paediatric orthopaedic services in secondary care centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docker, Charles E J; Lewthwaite, Simon; Kiely, Nigel T

    2007-07-01

    The Ponseti technique is a well-proven way of managing paediatric clubfoot deformity. We describe a management set-up which spreads the care between secondary and tertiary care with no loss of quality. In our audit of the first 2 years of Ponseti casting in the treatment of idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV, clubfoot) deformity, we identified 77 feet having been treated in 50 patients. Forty-nine feet were treated primarily in Oswestry, a tertiary referral centre for paediatric orthopaedic conditions, and 13 feet were treated in conjunction with the physiotherapy department at one of the region's district general hospitals (Leighton Hospital, Crewe, Cheshire). Similar good results and low requirement for surgical interventions other than Achilles tenotomy, which forms part of the Ponseti regimen, were found in both cohorts. This 'hub-and-spoke' approach would appear to be efficient in terms of resource utilisation. Additional benefits for patients and their carers include ease of access to services and reduced financial and transport burdens.

  5. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in children after paediatric intensive care treatment compared to children who survived a major fire disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Last Bob F

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goals were to determine the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in children after paediatric intensive care treatment, to identify risk factors for PTSD, and to compare this data with data from a major fire disaster in the Netherlands. Methods Children completed the Dutch Children's Responses to Trauma Inventory at three and nine months after discharge from the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU. Comparison data were available from 355 children survivors who completed the same questionnaire 10 months after a major fire disaster. Results Thirty-six children aged eight to 17 years completed questionnaires at three month follow-up, nine month follow-up, or both. More than one third (34.5% of the children had subclinical PTSD, while 13.8% were likely to meet criteria for PTSD. Maternal PTSD was the strongest predictor for child PTSD. There were no significant differences in (subclinical PTSD symptoms either over time or compared to symptoms of survivors from the fire disaster. Conclusion This study shows that a considerable number of children have persistent PTSD after PICU treatment. Prevention of PTSD is important to minimize the profound adverse effects that PTSD can have on children's well-being and future development.

  6. Insufficient Humidification of Respiratory Gases in Patients Who Are Undergoing Therapeutic Hypothermia at a Paediatric and Adult Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yukari; Iwata, Sachiko; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Tsuda, Kennosuke; Tanaka, Shoichiro; Hara, Naoko; Shindou, Ryota; Harada, Eimei; Kijima, Ryouji; Yamaga, Osamu; Ohkuma, Hitoe; Ushijima, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Teruo; Yamashita, Yushiro; Iwata, Osuke

    2017-01-01

    For cooled newborn infants, humidifier settings for normothermic condition provide excessive gas humidity because absolute humidity at saturation is temperature-dependent. To assess humidification of respiratory gases in patients who underwent moderate therapeutic hypothermia at a paediatric/adult intensive care unit, 6 patients were studied over 9 times. Three humidifier settings, 37-default (chamber-outlet, 37°C; Y-piece, 40°C), 33.5-theoretical (chamber-outlet, 33.5°C; Y-piece, 36.5°C), and 33.5-adjusted (optimised setting to achieve saturated vapour at 33.5°C using feedback from a thermohygrometer), were tested. Y-piece gas temperature/humidity and the incidence of high (>40.6 mg/L) and low (humidification were highlighted in patients cooled at a paediatric/adult intensive care unit. Y-piece gas conditions can be controlled to the theoretically optimal level by adjusting the setting guided by Y-piece gas temperature/humidity.

  7. Challenges of intra-institutional transfer of care from paediatric to adult congenital cardiology: the need for retention as well as transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohun, Claudine M; Woods, Patricia; Winter, Christiane; Mitchell, Julie; McLarry, Joel; Weiss, Joseph; Broberg, Craig S

    2016-02-01

    Transferring patients with CHD from paediatric to adult care has been challenging, especially across institutions. Within a single institution, some issues such as provider interaction, information exchange, or administrative directives should not play a significant role, and should favour successful transfer. We studied patients who were eligible for transfer to the adult congenital heart disease service within our institution in order to identify factors associated with successful transfer to adult care providers versus failure to transfer. Patients above18 years of age with CHD who were seen by paediatric cardiologists before January, 2008 were identified through a patient-care database. Records were reviewed to determine follow-up between 2008 and 2011 and to determine whether the patient was seen in the adult congenital cardiology clinic, paediatric cardiology clinic, or had no follow-up, and statistical comparisons were made between groups. After reviewing 916 records, 229 patients were considered eligible for transition to adult congenital cardiology. Of these, 77 (34%) were transferred successfully to adult congenital cardiology, 47 (21%) continued to be seen by paediatric cardiologists, and 105 (46%) were lost to follow-up. Those who transferred successfully differed with regard to complexity of diagnosis, insurance, and whether a formal referral was made by a paediatric care provider. Only a small fraction of the patients who were lost to follow-up could be contacted. Within a single institution, with shared information systems, administrations, and care providers, successful transfer from paediatric to adult congenital cardiology was still poor. Efforts for successful retention are just as vital as those for transfer.

  8. An evaluation of a paediatric radiation oncology teaching programme incorporating a SCORPIO teaching model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahern, Verity

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Many radiation oncology registrars have no exposure to paedi atrics during their training, To address this, the Paediatric Special Interest Group of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists has convened a biennial teaching course since 1997. The 2009 course incorpo rated the use of a Structured, Clinical, Objective-Referenced, Problem orientated, Integrated and Organized (SCORPIO) teaching model for small group tutorials. This study evaluates whether the paediatric radiation oncol ogy curriculum can be adapted to the SCORPIO teaching model and to evaluate the revised course from the registrars' perspective. Methods: Teaching and learning resources included a pre-course reading list, a lecture series programme and a SCORPIO workshop. Three evaluation instruments were developed: an overall Course Evaluation Survey for all participants, a SCORPIO Workshop Survey for registrars and a Teacher's SCORPIO Workshop Survey. Results: Forty-five radiation oncology registrars, 14 radiation therapists and five paediatric oncology registrars attended. Seventy-three per cent (47/64) of all participants completed the Course Evaluation Survey and 95% (38/40) of registrars completed the SCORPIO Workshop Survey. All teachers com pleted the Teacher's SCORPIO Survey (10/10). The overall educational expe rience was rated as good or excellent by 93% (43/47) of respondents. Ratings of satisfaction with lecture sessions were predominantly good or excellent. Registrars gave the SCORPIO workshop high ratings on each of 10 aspects of quality, with 82% allocating an excellent rating overall for the SCORPIO activity. Both registrars and teachers recommended more time for the SCORPIO stations. Conclusions: The 2009 course met the educational needs of the radiation oncology registrars and the SCORPIO workshop was a highly valued educa tional component.

  9. Influence of covariate distribution on the predictive performance of pharmacokinetic models in paediatric research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piana, Chiara; Danhof, Meindert; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Aims The accuracy of model-based predictions often reported in paediatric research has not been thoroughly characterized. The aim of this exercise is therefore to evaluate the role of covariate distributions when a pharmacokinetic model is used for simulation purposes. Methods Plasma concentrations of a hypothetical drug were simulated in a paediatric population using a pharmacokinetic model in which body weight was correlated with clearance and volume of distribution. Two subgroups of children were then selected from the overall population according to a typical study design, in which pre-specified body weight ranges (10–15 kg and 30–40 kg) were used as inclusion criteria. The simulated data sets were then analyzed using non-linear mixed effects modelling. Model performance was assessed by comparing the accuracy of AUC predictions obtained for each subgroup, based on the model derived from the overall population and by extrapolation of the model parameters across subgroups. Results Our findings show that systemic exposure as well as pharmacokinetic parameters cannot be accurately predicted from the pharmacokinetic model obtained from a population with a different covariate range from the one explored during model building. Predictions were accurate only when a model was used for prediction in a subgroup of the initial population. Conclusions In contrast to current practice, the use of pharmacokinetic modelling in children should be limited to interpolations within the range of values observed during model building. Furthermore, the covariate point estimate must be kept in the model even when predictions refer to a subset different from the original population. PMID:24433411

  10. [Design and validation of a training model on paediatric and neonatal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Duarte, F J; Díaz-Güemes, I; Sánchez-Hurtado, M A; Cano Novillo, I; Berchi García, F J; García Vázquez, A; Sánchez-Margallo, F M

    2012-07-01

    We present our experience in the design and development of a training program in paediatric and neonatal laparoscopic surgery, and the determination of face validity by the attendants. Data included in the present study was obtained from five consecutive editions of our Neonatal and Paediatric Laparoscopic Surgery Course. Our training model, with a total duration of 21 hours, begins with acquisition of knowledge in ergonomics and instrument concepts, after which the attendants develop basic laparoscopic dexterity through the performance of hands-on physical simulator tasks. During the second and third days of the course, surgeons undertook various surgical techniques hands-on animal model. At the end of the training program, a subjective evaluation questionnaire was handed out to the attendants, in which different didactic and organizational aspects were considered. We obtained a highly positive score on all questions concerning the different topics and techniques included in the training program (> or = 9 points over 10). 78,5% of the 54 attendants was in accordance with the course total duration, whilst 21,5% considered that it should be of longer duration. Regarding abilities' self assessment, 79,1% considered themselves capacitated to perform trained procedures on live patients. The presented training model has obtained a very positive valuation score, leading to an increase in the attendants' self confidence in the application of learned techniques to their clinical practice.

  11. Inviting parents to take part in paediatric palliative care research: a mixed-methods examination of selection bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Joanna C; Beecham, Emma; Kelly, Paula; Dinsdale, Andrew P; Hemsley, June; Jones, Louise; Bluebond-Langner, Myra

    2015-03-01

    Recruitment to paediatric palliative care research is challenging, with high rates of non-invitation of eligible families by clinicians. The impact on sample characteristics is unknown. To investigate, using mixed methods, non-invitation of eligible families and ensuing selection bias in an interview study about parents' experiences of advance care planning (ACP). We examined differences between eligible families invited and not invited to participate by clinicians using (1) field notes of discussions with clinicians during the invitation phase and (2) anonymised information from the service's clinical database. Families were eligible for the ACP study if their child was receiving care from a UK-based tertiary palliative care service (Group A; N = 519) or had died 6-10 months previously having received care from the service (Group B; N = 73). Rates of non-invitation to the ACP study were high. A total of 28 (5.4%) Group A families and 21 (28.8%) Group B families (p research findings. Non-invitation and selection bias should be considered, assessed and reported in palliative care studies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Team collaboration in Dutch paediatric rehabilitation. Cooperation between parents, rehabilitation professionals and special education professionals in the care for children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, Bianca Gertruda Johanna

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the collaborative processes in Dutch paediatric teams engaged in the care for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The three main stakeholder groups in these teams are the parents and the professionals in child rehabilitation and special education. Although the need for close

  13. The CLOSED trial; CLOnidine compared with midazolam for SEDation of paediatric patients in the intensive care unit : Study protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Neubert (Antje); M.A. Baarslag (Manuel A.); M. van Dijk (Monique); J.M. van Rosmalen (Joost); J.F. Standing (Joseph); Y. Sheng (Yucheng); W. Rascher; D. Roberts (Deborah); J. Winslade (Jackie); L. Rawcliffe (Louise); S.M. Hanning (Sara M.); T. Metsvaht (Tuuli); V. Giannuzzi (Viviana); P. Larsson (Peter); P. Pokorna (Pavla); A. Simonetti (Alessandra); D. Tibboel (Dick)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Introduction__ Sedation is an essential part of paediatric critical care. Midazolam, often in combination with opioids, is the current gold standard drug. However, as it is a far-from-ideal agent, clonidine is increasingly being used in children. This drug is prescribed off-label

  14. Paediatric in-patient care in a conflict-torn region of Somalia: are hospital outcomes of acceptable quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, R.; Hinderaker, S. G.; Khogali, M.; Manzi, M.; van Griensven, J.; Ayada, L.; Jemmy, J. P.; Maalim, A.; Amin, H.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: A district hospital in conflict-torn Somalia. Objective: To report on in-patient paediatric morbidity, case fatality and exit outcomes as indicators of quality of care. Design: Cross-sectional study. Results: Of 6211 children, lower respiratory tract infections (48%) and severe acute malnutrition (16%) were the leading reasons for admission. The highest case-fatality rate was for meningitis (20%). Adverse outcomes occurred in 378 (6%) children, including 205 (3.3%) deaths; 173 (2.8%) absconded. Conclusion: Hospital exit outcomes are good even in conflict-torn Somalia, and should boost efforts to ensure that such populations are not left out in the quest to achieve universal health coverage. PMID:26393014

  15. Insufficient Humidification of Respiratory Gases in Patients Who Are Undergoing Therapeutic Hypothermia at a Paediatric and Adult Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Tanaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For cooled newborn infants, humidifier settings for normothermic condition provide excessive gas humidity because absolute humidity at saturation is temperature-dependent. To assess humidification of respiratory gases in patients who underwent moderate therapeutic hypothermia at a paediatric/adult intensive care unit, 6 patients were studied over 9 times. Three humidifier settings, 37-default (chamber-outlet, 37°C; Y-piece, 40°C, 33.5-theoretical (chamber-outlet, 33.5°C; Y-piece, 36.5°C, and 33.5-adjusted (optimised setting to achieve saturated vapour at 33.5°C using feedback from a thermohygrometer, were tested. Y-piece gas temperature/humidity and the incidence of high (>40.6 mg/L and low (<32.9 mg/L humidity relative to the target level (36.6 mg/L were assessed. Y-piece gas humidity was 32.0 (26.8–37.3, 22.7 (16.9–28.6, and 36.9 (35.5–38.3 mg/L {mean (95% confidence interval} for 37-default setting, 33.5-theoretical setting, and 33.5-adjusted setting, respectively. High humidity was observed in 1 patient with 37-default setting, whereas low humidity was seen in 5 patients with 37-default setting and 8 patients with 33.5-theoretical setting. With 33.5-adjusted setting, inadequate Y-piece humidity was not observed. Potential risks of the default humidifier setting for insufficient respiratory gas humidification were highlighted in patients cooled at a paediatric/adult intensive care unit. Y-piece gas conditions can be controlled to the theoretically optimal level by adjusting the setting guided by Y-piece gas temperature/humidity.

  16. Insufficient Humidification of Respiratory Gases in Patients Who Are Undergoing Therapeutic Hypothermia at a Paediatric and Adult Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yukari; Iwata, Sachiko; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Tsuda, Kennosuke; Tanaka, Shoichiro; Hara, Naoko; Shindou, Ryota; Harada, Eimei; Kijima, Ryouji; Yamaga, Osamu; Ohkuma, Hitoe; Ushijima, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Teruo; Yamashita, Yushiro

    2017-01-01

    For cooled newborn infants, humidifier settings for normothermic condition provide excessive gas humidity because absolute humidity at saturation is temperature-dependent. To assess humidification of respiratory gases in patients who underwent moderate therapeutic hypothermia at a paediatric/adult intensive care unit, 6 patients were studied over 9 times. Three humidifier settings, 37-default (chamber-outlet, 37°C; Y-piece, 40°C), 33.5-theoretical (chamber-outlet, 33.5°C; Y-piece, 36.5°C), and 33.5-adjusted (optimised setting to achieve saturated vapour at 33.5°C using feedback from a thermohygrometer), were tested. Y-piece gas temperature/humidity and the incidence of high (>40.6 mg/L) and low (<32.9 mg/L) humidity relative to the target level (36.6 mg/L) were assessed. Y-piece gas humidity was 32.0 (26.8–37.3), 22.7 (16.9–28.6), and 36.9 (35.5–38.3) mg/L {mean (95% confidence interval)} for 37-default setting, 33.5-theoretical setting, and 33.5-adjusted setting, respectively. High humidity was observed in 1 patient with 37-default setting, whereas low humidity was seen in 5 patients with 37-default setting and 8 patients with 33.5-theoretical setting. With 33.5-adjusted setting, inadequate Y-piece humidity was not observed. Potential risks of the default humidifier setting for insufficient respiratory gas humidification were highlighted in patients cooled at a paediatric/adult intensive care unit. Y-piece gas conditions can be controlled to the theoretically optimal level by adjusting the setting guided by Y-piece gas temperature/humidity. PMID:28512388

  17. The Epital Care Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phanareth, Klaus; Vingtoft, Søren; Christensen, Anders Skovbo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is worldwide recognition that the future provision of health care requires a reorganization of provision of care, with increased empowerment and engagement of patients, along with skilled health professionals delivering services that are coordinated across sectors...... and organizations that provide health care. Technology may be a way to enable the creation of a coherent, cocreative, person-centered method to provide health care for individuals with one or more long-term conditions (LTCs). It remains to be determined how a new care model can be introduced that supports...... the intentions of the World Health Organization (WHO) to have integrated people-centered care. OBJECTIVE: To design, pilot, and test feasibility of a model of health care for people with LTCs based on a cocreative, iterative, and stepwise process in a way that recognizes the need for person-centered care...

  18. Living the values - respect, integrity, care and imagination: Investing in co-design to pave the way for consumers to be project partners in paediatric health service innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, Perrin William; Dunlop, Emma

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: In 2016, Children’s Health Queensland (CHQ) launched its new organisational values; respect, integrity, care and imagination, as well as pursuing a more integrated approach to service delivery.  Delivering paediatric healthcare across the continuum in a state as diverse as Queensland presents many inherent challenges.  Through a successful Integrated Care Innovation Fund grant for CHQ to deliver telementoring to general practitioners in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, ...

  19. Provision of general paediatric surgical services in a regional hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, O

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, specialist paediatric surgery is carried out in paediatric hospitals in Dublin. General surgeons\\/consultants in other surgical specialities provide paediatric surgical care in regional centres. There has been a failure to train general surgeons with paediatric skills to replace these surgeons upon retirement. AIM: To assess paediatric surgical workload in one regional centre to focus the debate regarding the future provision of general paediatric surgery in Ireland. METHODS: Hospital in-patient enquiry (HIPE) system was used to identify total number of paediatric surgical admissions and procedures. Cases assessed requiring hospital transfer. RESULTS: Of 17,478 surgical patients treated, 2,584 (14.8%) were under 14 years. A total of 2,154 procedures were performed. CONCLUSION: Regional centres without dedicated paediatric surgeons deliver care to large numbers of paediatric patients. The demand for care highlights the need for formal paediatric services\\/appropriate surgical training for general surgical trainees.

  20. [Cerebrovascular accidents in paediatric care. Our experience gained over an 18-year period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz del Olmo-Izuzquiza, Ignacio; de Arriba-Muñoz, Antonio; López-Pisón, Javier; García-Iñiguez, Juan Pablo; Romero-Gil, Ruth; Monge-Galindo, Lorena; Pérez-Delgado, Raquel; Peña-Segura, José Luis

    This study reviews our experience over the last 18 years with paediatric patients diagnosed with non-haemorrhagic cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) after the perinatal period. Data were collected for the period between May 1990 and May 2008 (n = 10 270 children) and special attention was given to cases with no previous pathology. We found 41 cases that were diagnosed with post-natal non-haemorrhagic CVA, of which 13 did not present any known pathology at the onset of the symptoms. Nine patients were diagnosed as having ischaemic CVA (ICVA), three cases had thrombosis of the venous sinuses and there was one case of haemorrhagic infarction (HI). No causation was found in five cases, three of which were heterozygotic for the C677T mutation of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. ICVA was caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, aneurysm of the auricular septum and patent foramen ovale, homocystinuria and chickenpox. A recent ear infection and diminished levels of protein C were noted in two cases of venous thrombosis. Five patients with ICVA and the case of HI were treated with oral antiaggregants, anticoagulants were administered in two of the thromboses, and the remaining cases did not receive any treatment. Seven patients (four ICVA, two thromboses and the HI) did not present any kind of sequelae, four ICVA presented different degrees of hemiparesis and two died (one ICVA and one thrombosis). The scarcity of studies and therapeutic clinical trials in the paediatric age makes it difficult to lay down clear guidelines of conduct, especially from the therapeutic point of view. The different specialists involved must collaborate with each other.

  1. VISUAL OUTCOME OF TRAUMATIC PAEDIATRIC CATARACT AT A TERTIARY EYE CARE CENTRE IN WEST BENGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smiti Rani Srivastava

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Traumatic cataract is common presentation of penetrating and blunt ocular trauma in children. Ocular trauma is the leading cause of unilateral blindness all over the world. The incidence of ocular trauma varies in different parts of the world. From India, the reported incidence is 20.53%. Traumatic cataract causes significant blindness in paediatric populations particularly in developing countries. The aim of the study is to evaluate the final visual outcome of the patients with traumatic cataract. MATERIALS AND METHODS We conducted a prospective study of 100 children from 4 to 16 years of age presenting in Outpatient Department of Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Kolkata, with traumatic cataract between April 2015 to March 2017. Detailed history, systemic and local examinations and relevant investigations done followed by medical and surgical intervention and patients were followed up till six months and final visual acuity recorded. RESULTS There was a male predilection with a male-to-female ratio 2.85:1.56 (56% patients sustained penetrating trauma, while 44 (44% were inflicted with blunt injury. Commonest causative agent was trauma with organic foreign bodies in 20 eyes (20% followed by stones in 14 eyes (14%. Anterior segment was more involved than posterior segment. Final best corrected visual acuity after six months was better than or equal to 6/18 in 64 eyes (64%. The major early postoperative complications include anterior uveitis in 26 (26% and corneal oedema in 8 (8% patients, while late postoperative complication was posterior capsular uveitis in 36% patients. CONCLUSION Paediatric traumatic cataract can cause ocular morbidity. Timely and proper medical and surgical intervention can result in good visual outcome. The parents, caretakers and teachers have an important role to play in prevention by recognising hazardous situation and taking preventing measures.

  2. Systematic review of international evidence on the effectiveness and costs of paediatric home care for children and young people who are ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, G; Spiers, G; Gridley, K; Atkin, K; Birks, Y; Lowson, K; Light, K

    2013-01-01

    Promoting 'care closer to home' for ill children is a policy and practice objective internationally. Progress towards this goal is hampered by a perceived lack of evidence on effectiveness and costs. The aim of the work reported here was to establish the strength of current international evidence on the effectiveness and costs of paediatric home care by updating and extending an earlier systematic review. A systematic review following Centre for Reviews and Dissemination guidelines involved updating electronic searches, and extending them to cover paediatric home care for short-term acute conditions. Twenty-one databases were searched from 1990 to April 2007. Hand searching was also carried out. Pairs of team members, guided by an algorithm, selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs), other comparative studies and studies including health economics data. A third reviewer resolved any disagreements. The quality of RCTs was assessed, but a 'best-evidence' approach was taken overall. Data were extracted into specifically designed spreadsheets and a second team member checked all data. Narrative synthesis was used throughout. This paper reports findings from RCTs and studies with health economics data. In total, 16 570 publications were identified after de-duplication. Eleven new RCTs (reported in 17 papers) and 20 papers with health economics data were included and reviewed. Evidence on costs and effectiveness of paediatric home care has not grown substantially since the previous review, but this updated review adds weight to the conclusion that it can deliver equivalent clinical outcomes for children and not impose a greater burden on families. Indeed, in some cases, there is evidence of reduced burden and costs for families compared with hospital care. There is also growing evidence, albeit based on weaker evidence, that paediatric home care may reduce costs for health services, particularly for children with complex and long-term needs. © 2012 Blackwell

  3. CYP3A5 genotyping may reduce the cost of care and guide dosing in paediatric renal transplant recipients treated with tacrolimus: A report of two paediatric renal transplant cases

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    Stephen M. Roper

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic tacrolimus blood levels are often difficult to achieve immediately after transplant. Pharmacogenetic testing is an option to predict the metabolism of tacrolimus; however the clinical benefits of this approach have not been extensively studied. We describe two paediatric renal transplant recipients who were initially treated with a standard dosing equation for tacrolimus, but required increased frequency of therapeutic drug monitoring and multiple dose adjustments leading to increased cost of hospitalization. A novel perspective is that pharmacogenetic testing is appropriate to reduce length of hospitalization and the total cost of care.

  4. Welcoming expertise: Bereaved parents' perceptions of the parent-healthcare provider relationship when a critically ill child is admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ashleigh E; Copnell, Beverley; Hall, Helen

    2017-11-15

    Entering the paediatric intensive care unit with a critically ill child is a stressful experience for parents. In addition to fearing for their child's well-being, parents must navigate both a challenging environment and numerous new relationships with healthcare staff. How parents form relationships with staff and how they perceive both their own and the healthcare providers' roles in this early stage of their paediatric intensive care journey is currently unknown. This paper explores bereaved parents' perceptions of their role and their relationships with healthcare providers when their child is admitted to the intensive care unit, as part of a larger study exploring their experiences when their child dies in intensive care. A constructivist grounded theory approach was utilised to recruit 26 bereaved parents from 4 Australian intensive care units. Parents participated in audio-recorded, semi-structured interviews lasting 90-150min. All data were analysed using the constant comparative analysis processes, supported by theoretical memos. Upon admission, parents viewed healthcare providers as experts, both of their child's medical care and of the hospital system. This expertise was welcomed, with the parent-healthcare provider relationship developing around the child's need for medical care. Parents engaged in 2 key behaviours in their relationships with staff: prioritising survival, and learning 'the system'. Within each of these behaviours are several subcategories, including 'Stepping back', 'Accepting restrictions' and 'Deferring to medical advice'. The relationships between parents and staff shift and change across the child's admission and subsequent death in the paediatric intensive care unit. However, upon admission, this relationship centres around the child's potential survival and their need for medical care, and the parent's recognition of the healthcare staff as experts of both the child's care and the hospital system. Copyright © 2017 Australian

  5. Improving paediatric and neonatal care in rural district hospitals in the highlands of Papua New Guinea: a quality improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa'avu, Martin; Duke, Trevor; Matai, Sens

    2014-05-01

    In developing countries such as Papua New Guinea (PNG), district hospitals play a vital role in clinical care, training health-care workers, implementing immunization and other public health programmes and providing necessary data on disease burdens and outcomes. Pneumonia and neonatal conditions are a major cause of child admission and death in hospitals throughout PNG. Oxygen therapy is an essential component of the management of pneumonia and neonatal conditions, but facilities for oxygen and care of the sick newborn are often inadequate, especially in district hospitals. Improving this area may be a vehicle for improving overall quality of care. A qualitative study of five rural district hospitals in the highlands provinces of Papua New Guinea was undertaken. A structured survey instrument was used by a paediatrician and a biomedical technician to assess the quality of paediatric care, the case-mix and outcomes, resources for delivery of good-quality care for children with pneumonia and neonatal illnesses, existing oxygen systems and equipment, drugs and consumables, infection-control facilities and the reliability of the electricity supply to each hospital. A floor plan was drawn up for the installation of the oxygen concentrators and a plan for improving care of sick neonates, and a process of addressing other priorities was begun. In remote parts of PNG, many district hospitals are run by under-resourced non-government organizations. Most hospitals had general wards in which both adults and children were managed together. Paediatric case-loads ranged between 232 and 840 patients per year with overall case-fatality rates (CFR) of 3-6% and up to 15% among sick neonates. Pneumonia accounts for 28-37% of admissions with a CFR of up to 8%. There were no supervisory visits by paediatricians, and little or no continuing professional development of staff. Essential drugs were mostly available, but basic equipment for the care of sick neonates was often absent or

  6. Listening to paediatric primary care nurses: a qualitative study of the potential for interprofessional oral health practice in six federally qualified health centres in Massachusetts and Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Judith; Gebel, Christina; Vargas, Clemencia; Geltman, Paul; Walter, Ashley; Garcia, Raul; Tinanoff, Norman

    2017-03-29

    To explore the opportunities for interprofessional collaboration (IPC) to improve paediatric oral health in federally qualified health centres (FQHCs), to identify challenges to IPC-led integration of oral health prevention into the well-child visit and to suggest strategies to overcome barriers. Nurse managers (NMs), nurse practitioners (NPs), paediatric clinical staff and administrators in six FQHCs in two states were interviewed using a semistructured format. Grounded theory research. Topics included feasibility of integration, perceived barriers and strategies for incorporating oral health into paediatric primary care. Qualitative data were coded and analysed using NVivo 10 to generate themes iteratively. Nurses in diverse roles recognised the importance of oral health prevention but were unaware of professional guidelines for incorporating oral health into paediatric encounters. They valued collaborative care, specifically internal communication, joint initiatives and training and partnering with dental schools or community dental practices. Barriers to IPC included inadequate training, few opportunities for cross-communication and absence of charting templates in electronic health records. NMs, NPs and paediatric nursing staff all value IPC to improve patients' oral health, yet are constrained by lack of oral health training and supportive charting and referral systems. With supports, they are willing to take on responsibility for introducing oral health preventive measures into the well-child visit, but will require IPC approaches to training and systems changes. IPC teams in the health centre setting can work together, if policy and administrative supports are in place, to provide oral health assessments, education, fluoride varnish application and dental referrals, decrease the prevalence of early childhood caries and increase access to a dental home for low-income children. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  7. Transition from tube feeding to oral feeding: experience in a tertiary care paediatric cardiology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine, Anne Marie; Finn, Daragh Gerard; Allen, Noeleen; McMahon, Colin J

    2018-05-02

    Home enteral tube feeding (HETF) is imperative for many infants and children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Tube weaning (TW) facilitates the progression from tube feeding to oral diet. There is limited literature on TW practices, protocols and success for children with CHD that have been tube fed. The objective of this study is to assess the process of weaning HETF in a tertiary referral centre for paediatric CHD. Specifically, we aimed to assess the duration of HETF, duration of TW and the interventions involved. We retrospectively reviewed the medical and dietetic records of all infants and children that were successfully weaned off HETF over a 12-month period from January 2015 to December 2015. There were 30 children included in the study, 9 boys and 21 girls. The diagnoses included 15 septal defects, 8 univentricular diagnosis and other diagnoses in 7 children. The median age at initiation of enteral tube feeding was 45 days (range 2-169). The median duration to wean from enteral tube feeding was 52 days (range 2-359). Number of dietetic consults required for successful TW varied among patients, median 5 (range 2-23). The number of days required for successful TW was associated with age and duration on HETF. Dietetic interventions included discontinuation of nutrient dense feeds, altering feed schedule and reduction of feed volume. Weaning HETF is possible in the outpatient setting. Early and frequent dietetic intervention is recommended to ensure prompt discontinuation of HETF when appropriate.

  8. Paediatric medulloblastoma: patterns of care and radiotherapy quality assurance in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahern, V.; Koh, E-S.; Gebski, V.; Sathiyaseelan, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this study was to document how children in Australia with medulloblastoma are being treated and to evaluate the quality of radiotherapy (RT) delivered. The Radiotherapy Database of the Australian and New Zealand Children's Haematology and Oncology Group was used to identify 46 children with medulloblastoma younger than the age of 15 years treated with radical intent by craniospinal irradiation between 1997 and 1999 inclusively. Twenty-six patients had completely resected disease without evidence of disease spread. Of these, 16 patients received a craniospinal RT dose of <25 Gy in addition to chemotherapy. RT treatment immobilization methods varied, as did planning methods. RT dose to critical structures was recorded on treatment plans for only 15% of patients. The average systematic error in shield placement at the posterior orbit was 5.2 mm, and two-thirds of patients were 'overshielded' at this site. Adequate coverage of the distal end of the thecal sac was achieved in fewer than 50% of on-treatment verification films for 21 of 45 patients. With a reduction in RT dose to the craniospinal axis for paediatric medulloblastoma, greater attention is needed for patient immobilization, documentation of RT dose to critical structures and the placement and reproducibility of shielding

  9. Evaluation and optimisation of current milrinone prescribing for the treatment and prevention of low cardiac output syndrome in paediatric patients after open heart surgery using a physiology-based pharmacokinetic drug-disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    Milrinone is the drug of choice for the treatment and prevention of low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) in paediatric patients after open heart surgery across Europe. Discrepancies, however, among prescribing guidance, clinical studies and practice pattern require clarification to ensure safe and effective prescribing. However, the clearance prediction equations derived from classical pharmacokinetic modelling provide limited support as they have recently failed a clinical practice evaluation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate current milrinone dosing using physiology-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling and simulation to complement the existing pharmacokinetic knowledge and propose optimised dosing regimens as a basis for improving the standard of care for paediatric patients. A PBPK drug-disease model using a population approach was developed in three steps from healthy young adults to adult patients and paediatric patients with and without LCOS after open heart surgery. Pre- and postoperative organ function values from adult and paediatric patients were collected from literature and integrated into a disease model as factorial changes from the reference values in healthy adults aged 20-40 years. The disease model was combined with the PBPK drug model and evaluated against existing pharmacokinetic data. Model robustness was assessed by parametric sensitivity analysis. In the next step, virtual patient populations were created, each with 1,000 subjects reflecting the average adult and paediatric patient characteristics with regard to age, sex, bodyweight and height. They were integrated into the PBPK drug-disease model to evaluate the effectiveness of current milrinone dosing in achieving the therapeutic target range of 100-300 ng/mL milrinone in plasma. Optimised dosing regimens were subsequently developed. The pharmacokinetics of milrinone in healthy young adults as well as adult and paediatric patients were accurately described with an

  10. Assessment of nutritional status of children attending paediatric outpatient department at a tertiary care hospital

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    Shreyash J Gandhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The nutrition status is always neglected issue of public health. The high prevalence of malnutrition in NFHS data gives alarm to work for the children who are assets of our country in future. Objectives To study the nutritional status of children attending pediatric OPD by anthropometric measurements and to know the health status of these children and their relation with nutritional status. Methods The nutritional profile of children of age group 0-5 years attending Paediatric OPD at New Civil Hospital (NCH, Surat was studied. Stratification to get equal representation of both gender by enrolling 50 boys and 50girls of each age group 0-6 months, 6-12 months, 1-2 years, 2-3 years, 3-4 years and 4-5 years was done. Total 600 children of age group of 0-5 years were enrolled. Results As per WHO growth standards, 17.5%, 46% and 39.33% children had wasting, stunting and underweight respectively. Total malnutrition cases were 386 with a prevalence of 64.3 %. Age group wise prevalence of under nutrition was highest in 37-48 months age group (69.2 %. As per assessment of nutritional status of children aged 6-60 months using MUAC, 45.8 % children have mild to moderate malnutrition whereas 1.8 % has severe malnutrition. Conclusion Malnutrition is more in boys compared to girls. Malnutrition was more prevalent in 12-60 months age group children and was found statistically significant. Reduction of malnutrition in 0-5 age group can be ensured by availability of supplementary feed.

  11. Development of a screening measure of stress for parents of children hospitalised in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rey, Rocío; Alonso-Tapia, Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Having a child admitted to intensive care is a highly stressful experience for parents; however there is a lack of screening instruments of parental stress in that context, which would be useful for both, research and clinical purposes. (1) To validate a brief measure of parental stress based on the Parental Stressor Scale: Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PSS:PICU), (2) to study which environmental factors of the PICU are more stressful in a sample of Spanish parents, and (3) to study which variables are related to higher levels of stress among this group. 196 Spanish parents completed the Abbreviated PSS: PICU (A-PSS:PICU) and a general stress scale (the Perceived Stress Scale) upon their child's discharge to test the convergent validity of the tool. Three months later, they were assessed anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and posttraumatic stress with the Davidson Trauma Scale in order to test the predictive validity of the A-PSS:PICU. Two factors emerged from Confirmatory Factor Analyses, (1) stress due to child's condition and (2) stress related to PICU's staff. The A-PSS:PICU showed adequate reliability and convergent and predictive validity. The most stressful aspects were the behaviours and emotional responses of their child and the loss of their parental role. Age, gender, child's condition, length of admission, spiritual beliefs, and mechanical ventilation were associated to parental stress scores. The A-PSS:PICU is a reliable and valid measure. Parental stress should be screened during a child's PICU admission to identify parents at risk of post-discharge distress. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nurse versus physician led-care for the management of paediatric asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Küthe, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis discusses the role of a specialized nurse practitioner in the follow up of children with asthma in comparison with traditional care by a general practitioner or a paediatrician. In addition, we evaluated the suitability of an existing questionnaire to assess quality of care and we

  13. Exploring perspectives on restraint during medical procedures in paediatric care: a qualitative interview study with nurses and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Edel Jannecke; Pedersen, Reidar; Moen, Anne; Bjørk, Ida Torunn

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' and physicians' perspectives on and reasoning about the use of restraint during medical procedures on newly admitted preschoolers in somatic hospital care. We analysed qualitative data from individual interviews with a video recall session at the end with seven physicians and eight nurses. They had earlier participated in video recorded peripheral vein cannulations on preschool children. The data were collected between May 2012 and May 2013 at a paediatric hospital unit in Norway. The analysis resulted in three main themes: (1) disparate views on the concept of restraint and restraint use (2), ways to limit the use of physical restraint and its negative consequences, and (3) experience with the role of parents and their influence on restraint. Perspectives from both healthcare professions were represented in all the main themes and had many similarities. The results of this study may facilitate more informed and reflective discussions of restraint and contribute to higher awareness of restraint in clinical practice. Lack of guidance and scientific attention to restraint combined with conflicting interests and values among healthcare providers may result in insecurity, individual dogmatism, and a lack of shared discussions, language, and terminology.

  14. The use of paediatric artemisinin combinations in sub-Saharan Africa: a snapshot questionnaire survey of health care personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnandji Selidji T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paediatric drug formulations for artemisinin combination therapy (P-ACT have been developed over the past few years and have been shown to improve the therapeutic management of young children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. This process was however not equally paralleled by a timely adoption of P-ACT in national and international treatment recommendations. National malaria programmes in sub-Saharan Africa have not yet widely embraced this new therapeutic tool. To which extent P-ACT is used in the field in sub-Saharan Africa is not known to date. Methods This snapshot questionnaire survey aimed to provide an overview on the current routine practices for the availability and use of P-ACT as anti-malarial treatment for young children in sub-Saharan Africa. Health care personnel in seven countries in West-, Central, and East-Africa were invited to answer a structured questionnaire assessing use and availability of P-ACT. Results A total of 71 respondents including doctors, nurses and pharmacy personnel responsible for the anti-malarial treatment of young children were interviewed. P-ACT was used by 83% (95% confidence interval: 73-90%; n = 59 as first-line treatment for young children. Use of 15 different P-ACT products was reported among which only two have received WHO prequalification status and approval by a stringent registration authority. Use of a specific P-ACT product was not linked to consumer prices or availability of supporting clinical trial data, but may depend more on the marketing capacity of the manufacturer. Major differences in frequency and dosing of anti-malarial regimens with identical anti-malarial compounds and the marketing of loose combinations were recorded. Conclusion Paediatric ACT is widely used for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in young children. However, the majority of P-ACT formulations in use do not meet highest international quality standards evoking concerns for patients

  15. Severe influenza cases in paediatric intensive care units in Germany during the pre-pandemic seasons 2005 to 2008

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    Liese Johannes G

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data on complications in children with seasonal influenza virus infection are limited. We initiated a nation-wide three-year surveillance of children who were admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU with severe seasonal influenza. Methods From October 2005 to July 2008, active surveillance was performed using an established reporting system for rare diseases (ESPED including all paediatric hospitals in Germany. Cases to be reported were hospitalized children Results Twenty severe influenza-associated cases were reported from 14 PICUs during three pre-pandemic influenza seasons (2005-2008. The median age of the patients (12 males/8 females was 7.5 years (range 0.1-15 years. None had received vaccination against influenza. In 14 (70% patients, the infection had been caused by influenza A and in five (25% by influenza B; in one child (5% the influenza type was not reported. Patients spent a median of 19 (IQR 12-38 days in the hospital and a median of 11 days (IQR 6-18 days in the PICU; 10 (50% needed mechanical ventilation. Most frequent diagnoses were influenza-associated pneumonia (60%, bronchitis/bronchiolitis (30%, encephalitis/encephalopathy (25%, secondary bacterial pneumonia (25%, and ARDS (25%. Eleven (55% children had chronic underlying medical conditions, including 8 (40% with chronic pulmonary diseases. Two influenza A- associated deaths were reported: i an 8-year old boy with pneumococcal encephalopathy following influenza infection died from cerebral edema, ii a 14-year-old boy with asthma bronchiale, cardiac malformation and Addison's disease died from cardiac and respiratory failure. For nine (45% patients, possibly permanent sequelae were reported (3 neurological, 3 pulmonary, 3 other sequelae. Conclusions Influenza-associated pneumonia and secondary bacterial infections are relevant complications of seasonal influenza in Germany. The incidence of severe influenza cases in PICUs was relatively low

  16. WHO and national lists of essential medicines in Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean: are they adequate to promote paediatric endocrinology and diabetes care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Amanda; Acosta-Gualandri, Alejandra; Guevara-Aguirre, Jaime; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric endocrinology and diabetes is a paediatric specialty with less common conditions and higher cost medicines. Access to medicines for our specialty in low and middle income countries remains limited. We analysed the content of the WHO (children and adults) and of all available national Model Lists of Essential Medicines (EMLs) for Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America from a paediatric endocrinology and diabetes standpoint. A master list of medicines deemed necessary in paediatric endocrinology and diabetes was established and compared with the WHO and national EMLs, taking into account the gross national income. The WHO EMLs, which are largely recognised as an international benchmark and drive the content of the national EMLs, included many but not all medicines present on our master list. Interestingly, several national EMLs from richer countries included medicines that were not present in the WHO EMLs. Our analysis suggests that these medicines could be considered by the WHO for inclusion in their EMLs, which may promote the adoption of more medicines by individual countries. We also propose several changes to the WHO and national EMLs that could facilitate access to medicines in our specialty: age cut-off for a child using physical maturity rather than a set age limit; greater standardisation of the formatting of the national EMLs for easier comparison and collaborations between countries; greater emphasis on age-specificity and population-specificity for some medicines; and formatting of the EMLs in a disease-focused manner rather than as individual medicines. PMID:28588968

  17. Supportive care utilization and treatment toxicity in children with Down syndrome and acute lymphoid leukaemia at free-standing paediatric hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Elizabeth G; Li, Yimei; Fisher, Brian T; Rheingold, Susan R; Fitzgerald, Julie; Seif, Alix E; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Bagatell, Rochelle; Aplenc, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Although inferior outcomes of children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL) are established, national supportive care patterns for these patients are unknown. A validated retrospective cohort of paediatric patients diagnosed with ALL from 1999 to 2011 was assembled from the US Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database to examine organ toxicity, sepsis, and resource utilization in children with and without DS. Among 10699 ALL patients, 298 had DS-ALL (2·8%). In a multivariate model, DS was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular (odds ratio [OR] 2·0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·6-2·7), respiratory (OR 2·1, 95% CI: 1·6-2·9), neurologic (OR 3·4, 95% CI 1·9-6·2), and hepatic (OR 1·4, 95% CI 1·0-1·9) dysfunction and sepsis (OR 1·8, 95% CI: 1·4-2·4). Children with DS-ALL used significantly more respiratory support, insulin, and anti-infectives, including broad-spectrum Gram-positive agents, quinolones, and azoles. They used significantly fewer analgesics and antiemetics compared to non-DS-ALL children. Ultimately, this study confirms the increased risk of infectious and end-organ toxicity in children with DS-ALL and quantifies important differences in resource utilization between children with DS and non-DS ALL. These findings highlight the importance of investigating the impact of these care variations and developing specific supportive care guidelines for this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The wrong and wounding road: Paediatric polytrauma admitted to a level 1 trauma intensive care unit over a 5-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Natasha; Muckart, David J J

    2015-09-19

    Injury in childhood is a major cause of potentially preventable morbidity and mortality. In order to implement effective preventive strategies, epidemiological data on mechanisms of injury and outcome are essential. To assess the causation, severity of injury, morbidity and mortality of paediatric trauma admitted to a level 1 trauma intensive care unit (TICU). Children were defined as being 25 in 98 patients (54.1%), 16-25 in 51 (28.2%), 9-15 in 9 (4.9%) and 25. Of the 26 patients who died, 88.4% had a head injury, 46.2% an extremity injury, 38.5% an external injury, 34.6% abdominal or chest injuries, 19.2% neck injury and 11.5% facial injury. Motor vehicle-related injuries, especially PMVCs, dominate severe paediatric trauma and there is an urgent need for more road traffic education and stringent measures to decrease the incidence and associated morbidity and mortality.

  19. Challenges contributing to disrupted transition from paediatric to adult diabetes care in young adults with Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatak, E. A.; Sequeira, P. A.; Whittemore, R.; Vigen, C. P.; Peters, A. L.; Weigensberg, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To examine challenges contributing to disruptions in care during the transition from paediatric to adult care among young adults with Type 1 diabetes who are primarily in ethnic minority groups and have low socio-economic status. Methods Participants (n = 20) were newly enrolled patients in a transition clinic for young adults with Type 1 diabetes with a history of loss to medical follow-up. Participants completed qualitative semi-structured interviews detailing their transition experiences in addition to demographic, HbA1c and psychosocial measures. Descriptive statistics were completed for quantitative data, and narrative thematic analysis of interviews was used to identify common themes. A mixed-method analysis was used to identify the associations between stressors identified in interviews and clinical and psychosocial variables. Results Three categories of challenges contributing to loss to follow-up were identified: psychosocial challenges, health provider and health system challenges and developmental challenges. Participants experienced a high degree of stressful life circumstances which were associated with higher HbA1c (r = 0.60, P = 0.005), longer duration of loss to follow-up (r = 0.51, P = 0.02), greater emergency department utilization (r = 0.45, P = 0.05), and lower life satisfaction (r = −0.62, P = 0.003). Conclusions A confluence of challenges, including stressful life circumstances, healthcare system barriers and the developmental trajectory of young adulthood, contributes to a high risk of loss to follow-up and poor health in this population of young adults with Type 1 diabetes. An integrated approach to transition addressing medical and psychosocial needs may facilitate improved follow-up and health outcomes in clinical settings. PMID:24798586

  20. Anaesthesia for Ambulatory Paediatric Surgery: Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Ambulatory surgical care accounts for over 70% of elective procedures in Northern America. Ambulatory paediatric surgical practice is not widespread in Nigeria. This report examined clinical indicators for quality care in paediatric ambulatory surgery using common outcomes after day case procedures as ...

  1. Practicing medicine without borders: tele-consultations and tele-mentoring for improving paediatric care in a conflict setting in Somalia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, R; Bienvenue, B; Ayada, L; Manzi, M; Maalim, A; Engy, E; Jemmy, J P; Ibrahim Said, A; Hassan, A; Abdulrahaman, F; Abdulrahman, O; Bseiso, J; Amin, H; Michalski, D; Oberreit, J; Draguez, B; Stokes, C; Reid, T; Harries, A D

    2012-09-01

    In a district hospital in conflict-torn Somalia, we assessed (i) the impact of introducing telemedicine on the quality of paediatric care, and (ii) the added value as perceived by local clinicians. A 'real-time' audio-visual exchange of information on paediatric cases (Audiosoft Technologies, Quebec, Canada) took place between clinicians in Somalia and a paediatrician in Nairobi. The study involved a retrospective analysis of programme data, and a perception study among the local clinicians. Of 3920 paediatric admissions, 346 (9%) were referred for telemedicine. In 222 (64%) children, a significant change was made to initial case management, while in 88 (25%), a life-threatening condition was detected that had been initially missed. There was a progressive improvement in the capacity of clinicians to manage complicated cases as demonstrated by a significant linear decrease in changes to initial case management for meningitis and convulsions (92-29%, P = 0.001), lower respiratory tract infection (75-45%, P = 0.02) and complicated malnutrition (86-40%, P = 0.002). Adverse outcomes (deaths and lost to follow-up) fell from 7.6% in 2010 (without telemedicine) to 5.4% in 2011 with telemedicine (30% reduction, odds ratio 0.70, 95% CI: 0.57-0.88, P = -0.001). The number needed to be treated through telemedicine to prevent one adverse outcome was 45. All seven clinicians involved with telemedicine rated it to be of high added value. The introduction of telemedicine significantly improved quality of paediatric care in a remote conflict setting and was of high added value to distant clinicians. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The State of Paediatric Eye Care in Nigeria: A Situational Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    children in resource poor countries is one of the ... infant mortality rate (currently 100 deaths /1000. 3, 4 live births . A child .... reason for the gross inadequacy in the delivery of safe eye care in the .... distribution of public information materials.

  3. Modelling the costs and consequences of treating paediatric faecal impaction in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Julian F; Clegg, John P

    2006-01-01

    To compare the costs and consequences of using oral macrogol 3350 plus electrolytes (macrogol 3350; Movicol) compared to enemas/suppositories, manual evacuation and naso-gastric administration of macrogol (NGA-PEG) lavage solution in treating paediatric faecal impaction in Australia. A decision model was constructed using published clinical outcomes, utilities and clinician-derived resource utilisation estimates. The model was used to determine the expected Commonwealth and parent costs associated with each treatment over the period of disimpaction and 12 weeks post-disimpaction, in Australian dollars at 2003/2004 prices. 92% of oral macrogol 3350-treated patients are expected to be disimpacted within 6 days following initial treatment, compared with 79% of patients treated with enemas and suppositories who are expected to be disimpacted within 8 days. All patients are expected to be disimpacted within 5 days following a manual evacuation and within 2 days following NGA-PEG. The level of health gain at 12 weeks post-disimpaction irrespective of treatment for disimpaction and subsequent maintenance is expected to be the same; the expected quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) being 0.20 (95% CI: 0.17; 0.23). Starting treatment with oral macrogol 3350 in an outpatient setting is expected to lead to a Commonwealth cost of $758, compared to $1838 with NGA-PEG, $2125 with enemas and suppositories, $3931 with oral macrogol 3350 in an inpatient setting and $4478 with manual evacuation. Resource use associated with maintenance following initial disimpaction is expected to be broadly similar, irrespective of initial laxative. Hence, the expected Commonwealth cost is primarily affected by the treatment used to initially disimpact a patient. Expected parents' costs are expected to be comparable irrespective of treatment ranging from $89 to $112 per patient. Within the limitations of our model, using oral macrogol 3350 in an outpatient setting for treating faecally impacted

  4. Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF to describe children referred to special care or paediatric dental services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Faulks

    Full Text Available Children in dentistry are traditionally described in terms of medical diagnosis and prevalence of oral disease. This approach gives little information regarding a child's capacity to maintain oral health or regarding the social determinants of oral health. The biopsychosocial approach, embodied in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Child and Youth version (ICF-CY (WHO, provides a wider picture of a child's real-life experience, but practical tools for the application of this model are lacking. This article describes the preliminary empirical study necessary for development of such a tool - an ICF-CY Core Set for Oral Health. An ICF-CY questionnaire was used to identify the medical, functional, social and environmental context of 218 children and adolescents referred to special care or paediatric dental services in France, Sweden, Argentina and Ireland (mean age 8 years ± 3.6 yrs. International Classification of Disease (ICD-10 diagnoses included disorders of the nervous system (26.1%, Down syndrome (22.0%, mental retardation (17.0%, autistic disorders (16.1%, and dental anxiety alone (11.0%. The most frequently impaired items in the ICF Body functions domain were 'Intellectual functions', 'High-level cognitive functions', and 'Attention functions'. In the Activities and Participation domain, participation restriction was frequently reported for 25 items including 'Handling stress', 'Caring for body parts', 'Looking after one's health' and 'Speaking'. In the Environment domain, facilitating items included 'Support of friends', 'Attitude of friends' and 'Support of immediate family'. One item was reported as an environmental barrier - 'Societal attitudes'. The ICF-CY can be used to highlight common profiles of functioning, activities, participation and environment shared by children in relation to oral health, despite widely differing medical, social and geographical contexts. The results of this empirical

  5. Echocardiographic evaluation of simple versus complex congenital heart disease in a tertiary care Paediatrics Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Uttam Kumar Sarkar; Anish Chatterjee; Suprit Basu; Atanu Pan; Sumit Periwal

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objectives:Congenital heart diseases are treatable either by catheter based intervention or open heart surgery according to their quality. In our study we aim to analyze congenital heart disease echocardiographically into simple versus complex heart disease at a tertiary care centre with a public health planning and policy making perspective.Materials & Methods:This hospital based study was done on 1010 patients, both from in-patient and out-patient, who were clinically s...

  6. Pharmacoeconomic Analysis of Drugs Used in the Treatment of Pneumonia in Paediatric Population in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India-A Cost-of-Illness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Lekha; Kaur, Sharonjeet; Khosla, Pratibha; Kumari, Sweta; Rani, Alka

    2017-12-11

    The cost of antibiotic therapy for the treatment of pneumonia in the inpatient paediatric population can have a major impact on the healthcare expenditure. We planned to assess the direct and indirect costs of diagnosis and medical treatment of paediatric patients with community acquired pneumonia who are hospitalized in a tertiary care hospital in India. 125 children with a diagnosis of pneumonia who were admitted to the inpatient department of a paediatric hospital receiving antibiotic treatment were observed. Data on clinical presentation and resources consumed were collected and the costs of pneumonia treatment were calculated. Descriptive statistics (mean ± standard deviation (SD)) were used to evaluate data regarding demographics, drugs prescribed and cost (direct and indirect cost). Multivariate regression analysis was used to find out predictors of direct and indirect cost. Among all pneumonia admissions, mild-to-moderate pneumonia constitutes 76.8%, and 23.2% children were admitted with severe pneumonia; 105 children out of 125 (84%) were suffering from associated disorders along with pneumonia. The majority of antibiotics prescribed belonged to beta lactams (52%) followed by aminoglycosides (19%), macrolides (13%) and peptides (11%). Parenteral routes of administration were used in a majority of patients as compared to oral. The average cost per patient in management of pneumonia was 12245 ± 593 INR ($187.34 ± 9.07).

  7. Pharmacoeconomic Analysis of Drugs Used in the Treatment of Pneumonia in Paediatric Population in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India—A Cost-of-Illness Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekha Saha

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: The cost of antibiotic therapy for the treatment of pneumonia in the inpatient paediatric population can have a major impact on the healthcare expenditure. We planned to assess the direct and indirect costs of diagnosis and medical treatment of paediatric patients with community acquired pneumonia who are hospitalized in a tertiary care hospital in India. Methods: 125 children with a diagnosis of pneumonia who were admitted to the inpatient department of a paediatric hospital receiving antibiotic treatment were observed. Data on clinical presentation and resources consumed were collected and the costs of pneumonia treatment were calculated. Descriptive statistics (mean ± standard deviation (SD were used to evaluate data regarding demographics, drugs prescribed and cost (direct and indirect cost. Multivariate regression analysis was used to find out predictors of direct and indirect cost. Results: Among all pneumonia admissions, mild-to-moderate pneumonia constitutes 76.8%, and 23.2% children were admitted with severe pneumonia; 105 children out of 125 (84% were suffering from associated disorders along with pneumonia. The majority of antibiotics prescribed belonged to beta lactams (52% followed by aminoglycosides (19%, macrolides (13% and peptides (11%. Parenteral routes of administration were used in a majority of patients as compared to oral. The average cost per patient in management of pneumonia was 12245 ± 593 INR ($187.34 ± 9.07.

  8. Convulsive status epilepticus in a quaternary hospital paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in South Africa: An 8 year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Yavini; Balakrishna, Yusentha; Mubaiwa, Lawrence

    2017-10-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to describe the clinical profile, aetiology, neuroimaging and EEG findings as well as outcome of children with CSE in Sub-Saharan Africa. This was a retrospective analysis of electronic records of children with CSE admitted to the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) over an 8-year period from January 2007 to December 2014. Seventy six patients were admitted to the PICU with CSE and 55(72%) had refractory status epilepticus. The median age at presentation was 15 months (IQR 6-37 months). The main aetiologies were meningoencephalitis and gastroenteritis in 33(43%) and 19(25%) patients respectively. The most frequently used antiepileptic drugs for CSE in PICU consisted of infusions of midazolam (96%) and thiopentone (22%). Neuroimaging findings were abnormal in 53(75%) patients with hypoxic changes in 17 patients. On multivariable regression, the predictors of poor outcome included the use of more than 3 antiepileptic drugs in PICU(RR-1.41(1.12-1.78), p=0.003), duration of mechanical ventilation for more than 3days (RR 1.98(1.22-3.20), p=0.005) and abnormal neuroimaging findings (RR 3.21(1.53-6.72), p=0.002). The mortality rate was 24%(n=18). Persistent seizures or a new neurological deficit occurred in 58%(n=44). The main cause of mortality was CSE related diffuse cortical and brainstem injury. Predominant neurological sequelae were cerebral palsy and persistent epilepsy. The high burden of infection related CSE is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates in contrast to the rates in developed countries. This highlights the need for early recognition and treatment of underlying conditions. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predominance of community-associated sequence type 59 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qifa; Wu, Junhua; Ruan, Peisen

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the distribution of molecular types of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) according to their community-associated (CA) and hospital-associated (HA) source of acquisition, and thus assess the degree to which CA-MRSA has been introduced into the PICU. We implemented an MRSA surveillance in a PICU during 2013-2016 and investigated the genetic diversity of the isolates retrospectively using three genetic typing methods, as well as antibiograms and virulence factor profiles.Results/Key findings. From 2684 specimens, we identified 60 MRSA isolates, 43 of which were ST59 CA-MRSA. These 43 ST59 MRSA isolates could be further subtyped into 2 clusters and 7 sporadic isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and 3 spa types, which demonstrated the genetic diversity in ST59 MRSA. Phenotypic diversity was also demonstrated among these ST59 MRSA isolates, with 12 virulence factor profiles and 4 antibiograms being identified. Epidemiological information showed that 43 ST59 MRSA isolates were both community-associated (15 isolates) and hospital-associated (28 isolates) and caused colonization and various types of infections in different age groups of children. Our results show that a predominant ST59 CA-MRSA has been introduced into the PICU to a significant extent. This has caused the ST59 HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA in the PICU to be indistinguishable. Our results also demonstrate that when we are interpreting situations where the causative agents of infections focus on very limited pathogenic clones, combined typing methods and epidemiological information are needed to investigate isolates' genetic and phenotypic diversity to distinguish an outbreak from endemic cases.

  10. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in increased mortality in developing nations.6,7 However, it has been shown ... Background: The time from birth to the first paediatric surgical consultation of neonates with gastroschisis is a predictor ... of Helsinki and its later amendments. Informed consent was obtained from the parents of the infants included in the study.

  11. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitender Sodhi

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: This study highlights the effect of HAI on costs for PICU patients, especially costs due to prolongation of hospital stay, and suggests the need to develop effective strategies for prevention of HAI to reduce costs of health care.

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLES HIV transmission during paediatric health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prevalence in paediatric health care settings in Africa, risks for horizontal ... 29 West Governer Road, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. David Gisselquist, PhD ..... tolerance policy for HIV transmission through health care. February 2004, Vol.

  13. Echocardiographic evaluation of simple versus complex congenital heart disease in a tertiary care Paediatrics Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Kumar Sarkar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives:Congenital heart diseases are treatable either by catheter based intervention or open heart surgery according to their quality. In our study we aim to analyze congenital heart disease echocardiographically into simple versus complex heart disease at a tertiary care centre with a public health planning and policy making perspective.Materials & Methods:This hospital based study was done on 1010 patients, both from in-patient and out-patient, who were clinically suspected to have heart disease from January 2015 to September 2016 at Dr.B.C.Roy P.G.I.P.S. Kolkata and echocardiographically categorized.Results:A VSD was the commonest acyanotic heart disease (17. 08%.Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF was commonest complex cyanotic heart disease (10.64%, VSD +ASD was the commonest combined lesion (8.12%. Simple heart lesions (63.1% were commoner than complex (36.9% congenital heart diseases.Conclusion:Health policy makers should give due care to manage Congenital Heart Disease either catheter based or surgically keeping in mind about 63.1% of the lesions are simple cardiac lesions and 36.9% lesions are complex cardiac lesion where complex surgery is required. 

  14. An intervention to improve paediatric and newborn care in Kenyan district hospitals: Understanding the context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opondo Charles

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is increasingly appreciated that the interpretation of health systems research studies is greatly facilitated by detailed descriptions of study context and the process of intervention. We have undertaken an 18-month hospital-based intervention study in Kenya aiming to improve care for admitted children and newborn infants. Here we describe the baseline characteristics of the eight hospitals as environments receiving the intervention, as well as the general and local health system context and its evolution over the 18 months. Methods Hospital characteristics were assessed using previously developed tools assessing the broad structure, process, and outcome of health service provision for children and newborns. Major health system or policy developments over the period of the intervention at a national level were documented prospectively by monitoring government policy announcements, the media, and through informal contacts with policy makers. At the hospital level, a structured, open questionnaire was used in face-to-face meetings with senior hospital staff every six months to identify major local developments that might influence implementation. These data provide an essential background for those seeking to understand the generalisability of reports describing the intervention's effects, and whether the intervention plausibly resulted in these effects. Results Hospitals had only modest capacity, in terms of infrastructure, equipment, supplies, and human resources available to provide high-quality care at baseline. For example, hospitals were lacking between 30 to 56% of items considered necessary for the provision of care to the seriously ill child or newborn. An increase in spending on hospital renovations, attempts to introduce performance contracts for health workers, and post-election violence were recorded as examples of national level factors that might influence implementation success generally. Examples of factors

  15. An intervention to improve paediatric and newborn care in Kenyan district hospitals: understanding the context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Mike; Ntoburi, Stephen; Wagai, John; Mbindyo, Patrick; Opiyo, Newton; Ayieko, Philip; Opondo, Charles; Migiro, Santau; Wamae, Annah; Irimu, Grace

    2009-07-23

    It is increasingly appreciated that the interpretation of health systems research studies is greatly facilitated by detailed descriptions of study context and the process of intervention. We have undertaken an 18-month hospital-based intervention study in Kenya aiming to improve care for admitted children and newborn infants. Here we describe the baseline characteristics of the eight hospitals as environments receiving the intervention, as well as the general and local health system context and its evolution over the 18 months. Hospital characteristics were assessed using previously developed tools assessing the broad structure, process, and outcome of health service provision for children and newborns. Major health system or policy developments over the period of the intervention at a national level were documented prospectively by monitoring government policy announcements, the media, and through informal contacts with policy makers. At the hospital level, a structured, open questionnaire was used in face-to-face meetings with senior hospital staff every six months to identify major local developments that might influence implementation. These data provide an essential background for those seeking to understand the generalisability of reports describing the intervention's effects, and whether the intervention plausibly resulted in these effects. Hospitals had only modest capacity, in terms of infrastructure, equipment, supplies, and human resources available to provide high-quality care at baseline. For example, hospitals were lacking between 30 to 56% of items considered necessary for the provision of care to the seriously ill child or newborn. An increase in spending on hospital renovations, attempts to introduce performance contracts for health workers, and post-election violence were recorded as examples of national level factors that might influence implementation success generally. Examples of factors that might influence success locally included frequent

  16. Paediatric tracheostomy and ventilation home care with challenging socio-economic circumstances in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendijk, Ilse; Booth, Jane; van Dijk, Monique; Argent, Andrew; Zampoli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Children discharged home with a tracheostomy need a safe home environment and access to health care. We described the indications, clinical characteristics, socio-economic circumstances and outcomes of children enroled in a tracheostomy home care programme in South Africa. We performed a retrospective chart review of children receiving a tracheostomy and enroled in the Breatheasy programme at the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town. Medical and background characteristics were recorded. Influences of socio-economic variables and underlying medical conditions on length of hospital stay, unplanned readmissions and mortality in the first year after discharge were evaluated. In the period 2008-2012, 157 patients were discharged home with a tracheostomy. Median hospital stay after tracheostomy insertion was significantly longer when parents had incomplete schooling compared to completed secondary school or higher education; 30 days (IQR 21-53) versus 23 days (IQR 16-33), respectively. Unplanned readmissions in the first year were documented for 72 patients (45.9%). The risk for unplanned readmission was 2.6 times higher in families with substance abuse the risk of respiratory infections was two-fold in case of household cigarette smoke exposure (OR 2.3.) Tracheostomy-related mortality was low (1.2%). An underlying medical condition was the only independent significant risk factor for mortality (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.8-14.3). This study demonstrates that despite difficult socio-economic circumstances, home ventilation of children with a tracheostomy is safe, provided caregivers are adequately trained and supported. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Control of hyperglycaemia in paediatric intensive care (CHiP: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy Deborah

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that tight blood glucose (BG control improves outcomes in critically ill adults. Children show similar hyperglycaemic responses to surgery or critical illness. However it is not known whether tight control will benefit children given maturational differences and different disease spectrum. Methods/Design The study is an randomised open trial with two parallel groups to assess whether, for children undergoing intensive care in the UK aged ≤ 16 years who are ventilated, have an arterial line in-situ and are receiving vasoactive support following injury, major surgery or in association with critical illness in whom it is anticipated such treatment will be required to continue for at least 12 hours, tight control will increase the numbers of days alive and free of mechanical ventilation at 30 days, and lead to improvement in a range of complications associated with intensive care treatment and be cost effective. Children in the tight control group will receive insulin by intravenous infusion titrated to maintain BG between 4 and 7.0 mmol/l. Children in the control group will be treated according to a standard current approach to BG management. Children will be followed up to determine vital status and healthcare resources usage between discharge and 12 months post-randomisation. Information regarding overall health status, global neurological outcome, attention and behavioural status will be sought from a subgroup with traumatic brain injury (TBI. A difference of 2 days in the number of ventilator-free days within the first 30 days post-randomisation is considered clinically important. Conservatively assuming a standard deviation of a week across both trial arms, a type I error of 1% (2-sided test, and allowing for non-compliance, a total sample size of 1000 patients would have 90% power to detect this difference. To detect effect differences between cardiac and non-cardiac patients, a target sample

  18. Assessing process of paediatric care in a resource-limited setting: a cross-sectional audit of district hospitals in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategeka, Celestin; Shoveller, Jeannie; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Lynd, Larry D

    2018-05-01

    Routine assessment of quality of care helps identify deficiencies which need to be improved. While gaps in the emergency care of children have been documented across sub-Saharan Africa, data from Rwanda are lacking. To assess the care of sick infants and children admitted to Rwandan district hospitals and the extent to which it follows currently recommended clinical practice guidelines in Rwanda. Data were gathered during a retrospective cross-sectional audit of eight district hospitals across Rwanda in 2012/2013. Medical records were randomly selected from each hospital and were reviewed to assess the process of care, focusing on the leading causes of under-5 mortality, including neonatal conditions, pneumonia, malaria and dehydration/diarrhoea. Altogether, 522 medical records were reviewed. Overall completion of a structured neonatal admission record was above 85% (range 78.6-90.0%) and its use was associated with better documentation of key neonatal signs (median score 6/8 and 2/8 when used and not used, respectively). Deficiencies in the processes of care were identified across hospitals and there were rural/urban disparities for some indicators. For example, neonates admitted to urban district hospitals were more likely to receive treatment consistent with currently recommended guidelines [e.g. gentamicin (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.03-6.43) and fluids (OR 2.69, 95% CI 1.2-6.2)] than those in rural hospitals. Likewise, children with pneumonia admitted to urban hospitals were more likely to receive the correct dosage of gentamicin (OR 4.47, 95% CI 1.21-25.1) and to have their treatment monitored (OR 3.75, 95% CI 1.57-8.3) than in rural hospitals. Furthermore, children diagnosed with malaria and admitted to urban hospitals were more likely to have their treatment (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.15-6.41) monitored than those in rural hospitals. Substantial gaps were identified in the process of neonatal and paediatric care across district hospitals in Rwanda. There is a need to (i

  19. Antibiotic susceptibility of isolates from paediatric intensive care units in Zagreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedenić, Branka; Prahin, Esmina; Vranić-Ladavac, Mirna; Atalić, Vlasta; Sviben, Mario; Frančula-Zaninović, Sonja; Plečko, Vanda; Kalenić, Smilja

    2014-02-01

    Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection (MYSTIC) Program is a longitudinal global surveillance study to monitor in vitro data on microbial susceptibility in centers that prescribe meropenem. Results of the six years period (2002-2007) for the antimicrobial efficacy of meropenem compared to other broad-spectrum agents against Gram-negative and Gram-positive isolates collected at pediatric intensive care units of the University Hospital Center Zagreb in Croatia were reported. A total of 110 Gram-negative and 43 Gram-positive pathogens from pediatric specimens were tested. The minimum-inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by broth microdilution method according to CLSI. There was no resistance to either imipenem or meropenem observed for Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis. High resistance rates of K. pneumoniae to ceftazidime and gentamicin (50%) are a raising concern. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most resistant Gram-negative species with two (12%) of the strains resistant to meropenem, three (18%) to imipenem, 10 (47%) to gentamicin and six (35%) to piperacillin/tazobactam and ciprofloxacin. According to our results meropenem remains an appropriate antibiotic for the treatment of severe infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria in pediatric population. The results indicate that meropenem has excellent potency and spectrum of activity despite being prescribed for a long time for the treatment of seriously ill patients, and still appears to be a reliable option for the initial empirical therapy of serious nosocomial infections in children. However, later studies have shown the emergence of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria after 2008.

  20. The Internet and the paediatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, M; Inumpudi, A; Mitra, D K

    1998-12-01

    The Internet, which has truly united the world, is an extensive network of inter-linked computers storing immense bytes of information that can be accessed by anyone, transcending all barriers. The paediatric surgery Internet consists of exponentially growing material that deals with information specifically for paediatric surgeons and patients of the paediatric age group. We reviewed the methods available to take advantage of this network to enable busy paediatric surgeons to accrue the benefits easily and efficiently rather than be lost in the information ocean by surfing individually. By getting connected to the Internet, the paediatric surgeon gains enormous information that can be useful for patient care. The Internet has revolutionised scientific publications by virtue of its fast and accurate transmission of manuscripts. Paediatric surgeons can send manuscripts by this channel and also access journals, obviating the inherent lag period of communication by post.

  1. Literature review : Use of family history for primary paediatric care as the next step towards use of genomics in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Syurina, Elena V.; Hens, Kristien; Feron, Frans J M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Many childhood-onset diseases and developmental disorders have a strong genetic basis. However, up till now, the knowledge of this genetic component within multifactorial diseases is not frequently used in paediatric practice. A good family history collection can facilitate the link

  2. Review of simulation in paediatrics: The evolution of a revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul eOjha

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent changes in medical education have highlighted the importance of experiential learning. Simulation is one model that has gained significant attention in the last decade and has been widely adopted as a training and assessment tool in medical education. Paediatric simulation has been utilized to teach various skills including resuscitation and trauma management, procedural skills and team training. It is also a valuable tool for health care educators, as it allows learners to achieve competence without putting patients at risk. Recent literature demonstrates increased retention of knowledge and skills after simulation based training. Further research is required to improve current simulation curriculums, develop validated assessment tools and to demonstrate improved clinical outcomes after simulation based training. We conducted an online search of original and review articles related to simulation and paediatric medical education and provide an overview of the role and utility of simulation in paediatrics.

  3. Understanding the private worlds of physicians, nurses, and parents: a study of life-sustaining treatment decisions in Italian paediatric critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Franco A; Benedetti, Monica; Bonaldi, Amabile; Bravi, Elena; Trabucco, Gaetano; Biban, Paolo

    2011-12-01

    This study's aim was to describe: (a) How life-sustaining treatment (LST) decisions are made for critically ill children in Italy; and (b) How these decisional processes are experienced by physicians, nurses and parents. Focus groups with 16 physicians and 26 nurses, and individual interviews with 9 parents were conducted. Findings uncovered the 'private worlds' of paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) physicians, nurses and parents; they all suffer tremendously and privately. Physicians struggle with the weight of responsibility and solitude in making LST decisions. Nurses struggle with feelings of exclusion from decisions regarding patients and families that they care for. Physicians and nurses are distressed by legal barriers to LST withdrawal. Parents struggle with their dependence on physicians and nurses to provide care for their child and strive to understand what is happening to their child. Features of helpful and unhelpful communication with parents are highlighted, which should be considered in educational and practice changes.

  4. Exploring the rewards and challenges of paediatric palliative care work - a qualitative study of a multi-disciplinary children's hospice care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Johanna; Aldridge, Jan

    2017-12-16

    Children's hospices are a key provider of palliative care for children and young people with life-limiting and life-threatening conditions. However, despite recent policy attention to the provision of paediatric palliative care, little is known about the role of children's hospice staff and the factors that may impact on their wellbeing at work. This study explored the rewards and challenges of working in a children's hospice with an aim to identify staff support and development needs. We conducted an exploratory, qualitative study involving thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with 34 staff and three focus groups with 17 staff working in a multi-disciplinary care team in a UK children's hospice. Participants identified rewards and challenges related to the direct work of caring for children and their families; team dynamics and organisational structures; and individual resilience and job motivation. Participants described the work as emotionally intensive and multi-faceted; 'getting it right' for children was identified as a strong motivator and reward, but also a potential stressor as staff strived to maintain high standards of personalised and emotional care. Other factors were identified as both a reward and stressor, including team functioning, the allocation of work, meeting parent expectations, and the hospice environment. Many participants identified training needs for different aspects of the role to help them feel more confident and competent. Participants also expressed concerns about work-related stress, both for themselves and for colleagues, but felt unable to discuss this at work. Informal support from colleagues and group clinical reflection were identified as primary resources to reflect on and learn from work and for emotional support. However, opportunities for this were limited. Providing regular, structured, and dedicated clinical reflection provides a mechanism through which children's hospice staff can come together for support and

  5. Health-related quality-of-life outcome measures in paediatric palliative care: A systematic review of psychometric properties and feasibility of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Lucy H; Wiseman, Theresa; Lucas, Grace; Sangha, Amrit; Murtagh, Fliss EM

    2016-01-01

    Background: The number of children worldwide requiring palliative care services is increasing due to advances in medical care and technology. The use of outcome measures is important to improve the quality and effectiveness of care. Aim: To systematically identify health-related quality-of-life outcome measures that could be used in paediatric palliative care and examine their feasibility of use and psychometric properties. Design: A systematic literature review and analysis of psychometric properties. Data sources: PsychInfo, Medline and EMBASE were searched from 1 January 1990 to 10 December 2014. Hand searches of the reference list of included studies and relevant reviews were also performed. Results: From 3460 articles, 125 papers were selected for full-text assessment. A total of 41 articles met the eligibility criteria and examined the psychometric properties of 22 health-related quality-of-life measures. Evidence was limited as at least half of the information on psychometric properties per instrument was missing. Measurement error was not analysed in any of the included articles and responsiveness was only analysed in one study. The methodological quality of included studies varied greatly. Conclusion: There is currently no ‘ideal’ outcome assessment measure for use in paediatric palliative care. The domains of generic health-related quality-of-life measures are not relevant to all children receiving palliative care and some domains within disease-specific measures are only relevant for that specific population. Potential solutions include adapting an existing measure or developing more individualized patient-centred outcome and experience measures. Either way, it is important to continue work on outcome measurement in this field. PMID:27247087

  6. Litigation in paediatrics

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphu, JFA

    2011-03-01

    on the issue. This is understandable. Most individuals are healthy during their childhood and have less need of and less interaction with medical services when compared with adults. However, Paediatric litigation does happen and furthermore it is likely to increase in parallel with other specialties. Carroll and Buddenbaum1 have described the pattern of Paediatric litigation in the US. The annual incidence of malpractice claims has been quoted to be as high as 6.6 claims per 100 Paediatricians per year. Almost 30% of Paediatricians have been sued with many being sued on more than one occasion. Of these cases 36% were settled out of court, 33% were dropped by the plaintiff with the remainder going before the judiciary. The authors point out that in the US medical malpractice is a hotly debated issue. Litigation has a questionable impact on health care quality, cost, and access to services. The AMA believes that rising premiums are resulting in the curtailment of medical care particularly in states with high medico-legal rates. The Physician Insurers Association of America (PIAA) is a trade organisation which insures 60% of all private practicing physicians and surgeons has been a useful source of data. In the 20 year period 1985-2005 among a total of 214,226 claims there were 6363 (2.9%) Paediatric claims which ranked it 10th among the 28 specialties covered. The claims arose in equal numbers from the hospital and Paediatrician’s office settings. Common reasons for Paediatric litigation were errors in diagnosis (32%), incorrect performance of a medical or surgical procedure (13%), failure to monitor or manage a case effectively (10%) and medication error (5%). The top five medico-legal conditions were meningitis, routine infant or child checks, newborn respiratory problems, appendicitis and brain-damaged infants as a co-defendant with Obstetrics. Good quality information about litigation is important because the discussion among doctors is frequently confused by

  7. Paediatric advance care planning survey: a cross-sectional examination of congruence and discordance between adolescents with HIV/AIDS and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Maureen E; Dallas, Ronald H; Garvie, Patricia A; Wilkins, Megan L; Garcia, Ana; Cheng, Yao Iris; Wang, Jichuan

    2017-09-21

    To identify patient-reported paediatric advance care planning (pACP) needs of adolescents living with HIV and to examine the congruence with their family's perception of their needs. A cross-sectional survey among six paediatric hospital-based outpatient HIV specialty clinics. Participants included 48 adolescent/family dyads (n=96 participants) within a larger study facilitating pACP. The main outcome measure was the Lyon Advance Care Planning Survey - Adolescent and Surrogate Versions-Revised. Adolescents' mean age was 18 years (range ≥14-congruence in pACP needs within adolescent/family dyads. There was substantial congruence in that being free from pain (PABAK=0.83), and understanding your treatment choices (PABAK=0.92) were very important or important. There was discordance about being off machines that extend life (PABAK=0.08) and when is the best time to bring up EOL decisions (PABAK=0.32). Areas of discordance were associated with life-sustaining choices and when to have the EOL conversation. Targeted, adolescent/family-centred, evidence-based pACP interventions are needed to improve family understanding of youth's EOL wishes. NCT01289444; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. The CLOSED trial; CLOnidine compared with midazolam for SEDation of paediatric patients in the intensive care unit: study protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Antje; Baarslag, Manuel Alberto; Dijk, Monique van; Rosmalen, Joost van; Standing, Joseph F; Sheng, Yucheng; Rascher, Wolfgang; Roberts, Deborah; Winslade, Jackie; Rawcliffe, Louise; Hanning, Sara M; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Larsson, Peter; Pokorná, Pavla; Simonetti, Alessandra; Tibboel, Dick

    2017-06-21

    Sedation is an essential part of paediatric critical care. Midazolam, often in combination with opioids, is the current gold standard drug. However, as it is a far-from-ideal agent, clonidine is increasingly being used in children. This drug is prescribed off-label for this indication, as many drugs in paediatrics are. Therefore, the CLOSED trial aims to provide data on the pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of clonidine for the sedation of mechanically ventilated patients in order to obtain a paediatric-use marketing authorisation. The CLOSED study is a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, active-controlled non-inferiority trial with a 1:1 randomisation between clonidine and midazolam. Both treatment groups are stratified according to age in three groups with the same size: <28 days (n=100), 28 days to <2 years (n=100) and 2-18 years (n=100). The primary end point is defined as the occurrence of sedation failure within the study period. Secondary end points include a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship, pharmacogenetics, occurrence of delirium and withdrawal syndrome, opioid consumption and neurodevelopment in the neonatal age group. Logistic regression will be used for the primary end point, appropriate statistics will be used for the secondary end points. Written informed consent will be obtained from the parents/caregivers. Verbal or deferred consent will be used in the sites where national legislation allows. The study has institutional review board approval at recruiting sites. The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and shared with the worldwide medical community. EudraCT: 2014-003582-24; Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02509273; pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Emerging trends of bloodstream infection: A six-year study at a paediatric tertiary care hospital in kabul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, T.M.; Rasool, E.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the frequency of pathogens causing bloodstream infections and evaluate their trends and antibiogram patterns among in-patients in a paediatric tertiary care centre. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: French Medical Institute for Mothers and Children (FMIC), Kabul, Afghanistan in two phases, from January 2010 to December 2015. Methodology: Results of blood cultures from suspected cases of sepsis admitted in the FMIC, from January 2010 to December 2012 (Period-1), and from January 2013 to December 2015 (Period-2) were completed. Standard microbiological methods were followed for blood culture and antibiotic sensitivity testing. Results: Out of total 1,040 cases of culture proven sepsis, 528 (50.77%) Gram-negative bacilli (GNB), 474 (45.58%) Gram-positive cocci (GPC), and 38 (3.65%) Candida species were isolated during the entire study period. Out of 528 GNB isolates, 373 (70.64%) belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae and 155 (29.36%) were non-fermenters. Among Enterobacteriaceae, 168 (31.82%) were Klebsiella species (K. pneumoniae=124, K. oxytoca=44), 70 (13.26%) were Enterobacter species (E. cloacae=52, E. aerogenes=18), 65 (12.31%) were E. coli, 37 (7.01%) were Serratia marcescens and 31 (5.87%) were others. Out of 155 non-fermenters, 88 (16.67%) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 39 (7.39%) were Burkholderia cepacia and 18 (3.41%) were Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. There was a drop in the frequency of Enterobacteriaceae from 85% in Period-1 to 58.68% in Period-2. There was an increase in the frequency of nonuniformities from 15% to 41.32%, particularly 18 new cases of sepsis caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia during Period-2. Among GPC, there was an overall rise of 16.14% in the prevalence of Staphylococcus epidermidis during Period-2 and a drop of 9.64% in the frequency of Staphylococcus aureus during Period-2. The majority of Gram-negative isolates were multidrug-resistant to commonly used antibiotics. However, most of the

  10. Sustainable Benefits of a Community Hospital-Based Paediatric Asthma Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzik, Brian A; Chen, Chee P; Hansen, Miriam J; Montgomery, Paula L

    2017-01-01

    In 2011, we reported that our paediatric asthma clinic (PAC) appeared to significantly reduce the burden of paediatric asthma in our community. Supported by these results, the PAC underwent a gradual threefold expansion while maintaining the same model of care. We now report on the outcome of that expansion and demonstrate that our PAC continues to significantly reduce the burden of paediatric asthma in our community. As previously, newly enrolled PAC patients continue to show a 12-month reduction in asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits and admissions exceeding 60% and 80%, respectively. This consistent short-term benefit, coupled with clinic expansion, has contributed to a significant improvement in our rate of paediatric asthma-related ED visits or hospitalizations when compared to other Ontario hospitals.

  11. Shared learning for chronic conditions: a methodology for developing the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) care pathways for children with allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, John O; Lloyd, Kate

    2011-11-01

    The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) Science and Research Department was commissioned by the Department of Health to develop national care pathways for children with allergies. The pathways focus on defining the competences to deliver the highest standard of care for such children. By defining competences rather than criteria for onward referral, the authors have sought to create flexibility in delivery of care which will be responsive to regional variations in knowledge, skills and service. All pathways were developed by multidisciplinary working groups, based on a comprehensive review of evidence. The pathways were reviewed by a broad group of stakeholders and approved by the Allergy Care Pathways Project Board and the RCPCH Clinical Standards Committee. The results for all pathways are presented in two sections: a pathway algorithm and the competences. The entry points for each pathway are defined at the point where symptoms first occur and the ideal management is described from self-care through complete diagnosis to monitoring of progress. From the evidence review the working groups were able to make research recommendations. The authors present eight national care pathways for allergic conditions based on evidence review, expert consensus and stakeholder input. They provide a guide for training and development of services to facilitate improvements in delivery as close to the patient's home as possible. The authors recommend that these pathways are implemented locally by a multidisciplinary team with a focus on creating networks between primary, secondary and tertiary care to improve services for children with allergic conditions.

  12. Paediatric Interventional Uroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnacle, Alex M.; Wilkinson, A. Graham; Roebuck, Derek J.

    2011-01-01

    Paediatric interventional uroradiology lies at the intersection of the disciplines of paediatric interventional radiology and paediatric endourology. Interdisciplinary collaboration has led to the development of new techniques and refinement of procedures adopted from adult practice. This article reviews the major procedures used in paediatric interventional uroradiology, with emphasis on nephrostomy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, balloon-burst pyeloplasty, and antegrade ureteric stenting.

  13. Making sense of resilience: a review from the field of paediatric psycho-oncology and a proposal of a model for its study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmina Castellano-Tejedor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is intended to review the concept of resilience from the scope of paediatric psycho-oncology. The origin, its different definitions and its suitability of application in the field of serious physical illness - such as cancer - will be analyzed. Furthermore, the differences between resilience and other concepts commonly associated or confused with it, such as post-traumatic growth or benefit finding, will be discussed. Finally, a proposal for a comprehensive model of resilience in paediatric cancer will be put forward.

  14. Predicting Cortisol Exposure from Paediatric Hydrocortisone Formulation Using a Semi-Mechanistic Pharmacokinetic Model Established in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Johanna; Parra-Guillen, Zinnia P; Hartung, Niklas; Huisinga, Wilhelm; Ross, Richard J; Whitaker, Martin J; Kloft, Charlotte

    2018-04-01

    Optimisation of hydrocortisone replacement therapy in children is challenging as there is currently no licensed formulation and dose in Europe for children under 6 years of age. In addition, hydrocortisone has non-linear pharmacokinetics caused by saturable plasma protein binding. A paediatric hydrocortisone formulation, Infacort ® oral hydrocortisone granules with taste masking, has therefore been developed. The objective of this study was to establish a population pharmacokinetic model based on studies in healthy adult volunteers to predict hydrocortisone exposure in paediatric patients with adrenal insufficiency. Cortisol and binding protein concentrations were evaluated in the absence and presence of dexamethasone in healthy volunteers (n = 30). Dexamethasone was used to suppress endogenous cortisol concentrations prior to and after single doses of 0.5, 2, 5 and 10 mg of Infacort ® or 20 mg of Infacort ® /hydrocortisone tablet/hydrocortisone intravenously. A plasma protein binding model was established using unbound and total cortisol concentrations, and sequentially integrated into the pharmacokinetic model. Both specific (non-linear) and non-specific (linear) protein binding were included in the cortisol binding model. A two-compartment disposition model with saturable absorption and constant endogenous cortisol baseline (Baseline cort ,15.5 nmol/L) described the data accurately. The predicted cortisol exposure for a given dose varied considerably within a small body weight range in individuals weighing cortisol exposure indicated the importance of defining an accurate hydrocortisone dose to mimic physiological concentrations for neonates and infants weighing <20 kg. EudraCT number: 2013-000260-28, 2013-000259-42.

  15. Differences in case-mix can influence the comparison of standardised mortality ratios even with optimal risk adjustment: an analysis of data from paediatric intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manktelow, Bradley N; Evans, T Alun; Draper, Elizabeth S

    2014-09-01

    The publication of clinical outcomes for consultant surgeons in 10 specialties within the NHS has, along with national clinical audits, highlighted the importance of measuring and reporting outcomes with the aim of monitoring quality of care. Such information is vital to be able to identify good and poor practice and to inform patient choice. The need to adequately adjust outcomes for differences in case-mix has long been recognised as being necessary to provide 'like-for-like' comparisons between providers. However, directly comparing values of the standardised mortality ratio (SMR) between different healthcare providers can be misleading even when the risk-adjustment perfectly quantifies the risk of a poor outcome in the reference population. An example is shown from paediatric intensive care. Using observed case-mix differences for 33 paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in the UK and Ireland for 2009-2011, SMRs were calculated under four different scenarios where, in each scenario, all of the PICUs were performing identically for each patient type. Each scenario represented a clinically plausible difference in outcome from the reference population. Despite the fact that the outcome for any patient was the same no matter which PICU they were to be admitted to, differences between the units were seen when compared using the SMR: scenario 1, 1.07-1.21; scenario 2, 1.00-1.14; scenario 3, 1.04-1.13; scenario 4, 1.00-1.09. Even if two healthcare providers are performing equally for each type of patient, if their patient populations differ in case-mix their SMRs will not necessarily take the same value. Clinical teams and commissioners must always keep in mind this weakness of the SMR when making decisions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation Guidelines 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Gene Yong Kwang; Chan, Irene Lai Yeen; Ng, Agnes Suah Bwee; Chew, Su Yah; Mok, Yee Hui; Chan, Yoke Hwee; Ong, Jacqueline Soo May; Ganapathy, Sashikumar; Ng, Kee Chong

    2017-07-01

    We present the revised 2016 Singapore paediatric resuscitation guidelines. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation's Pediatric Taskforce Consensus Statements on Science and Treatment Recommendations, as well as the updated resuscitation guidelines from the American Heart Association and European Resuscitation Council released in October 2015, were debated and discussed by the workgroup. The final recommendations for the Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation Guidelines 2016 were derived after carefully reviewing the current available evidence in the literature and balancing it with local clinical practice. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  17. A prospective three-step intervention study to prevent medication errors in drug handling in paediatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Dorothee; Bertsche, Astrid; Meyrath, David; Koepf, Ellen D; Traiser, Carolin; Seebald, Katja; Schmitt, Claus P; Hoffmann, Georg F; Haefeli, Walter E; Bertsche, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    To prevent medication errors in drug handling in a paediatric ward. One in five preventable adverse drug events in hospitalised children is caused by medication errors. Errors in drug prescription have been studied frequently, but data regarding drug handling, including drug preparation and administration, are scarce. A three-step intervention study including monitoring procedure was used to detect and prevent medication errors in drug handling. After approval by the ethics committee, pharmacists monitored drug handling by nurses on an 18-bed paediatric ward in a university hospital prior to and following each intervention step. They also conducted a questionnaire survey aimed at identifying knowledge deficits. Each intervention step targeted different causes of errors. The handout mainly addressed knowledge deficits, the training course addressed errors caused by rule violations and slips, and the reference book addressed knowledge-, memory- and rule-based errors. The number of patients who were subjected to at least one medication error in drug handling decreased from 38/43 (88%) to 25/51 (49%) following the third intervention, and the overall frequency of errors decreased from 527 errors in 581 processes (91%) to 116/441 (26%). The issue of the handout reduced medication errors caused by knowledge deficits regarding, for instance, the correct 'volume of solvent for IV drugs' from 49-25%. Paediatric drug handling is prone to errors. A three-step intervention effectively decreased the high frequency of medication errors by addressing the diversity of their causes. Worldwide, nurses are in charge of drug handling, which constitutes an error-prone but often-neglected step in drug therapy. Detection and prevention of errors in daily routine is necessary for a safe and effective drug therapy. Our three-step intervention reduced errors and is suitable to be tested in other wards and settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Managing simple food allergy in community settings: A pilot study investigating a new model of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Margaret; De Bono, Natalie; Allen, Katrina; Tang, Mimi; Hiscock, Harriet

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of food allergy in Australia has increased, paralleled by an increase in waiting time to access tertiary paediatric allergy care. We aimed to test whether a new model of care, based on serum specific IgE testing, was feasible and acceptable to Australian families. A prospective pilot intervention study was conducted in community paediatric practices within 20-40 km of The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. Children ≤7 years with likely food allergy referred to the Department of Allergy and Immunology at RCH were included; children with anaphylaxis, drug allergy or complex food allergy (>three food groups) were excluded. Community general paediatricians, recruited through the Australian Paediatric Research Network, were trained via webinars on the management of four common food allergy-related scenarios. Paediatrician and child and family parameters were assessed at baseline and 3 months, including safety. 34/45 (76%) eligible families and 10/12 (83%) paediatricians participated. Paediatricians managed 27/34 (80%) of children independently, with 7/34 (20%) requiring referral to an allergist for more complex food allergy. Paediatricians reported improved knowledge and competency in managing food allergy: (mean (standard deviation) scores pre = 35 (5.3) and post = 43.3 (3.9) training). The majority of children received appropriate management; there were no anaphylaxis episodes. There was no significant change in child quality of life or parent mental health. Management of simple food allergy by community paediatricians appears feasible and acceptable to paediatricians and families alike. Future research will evaluate this approach in an adequately powered and controlled trial. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  19. Formulating a poorly water soluble drug into an oral solution suitable for paediatric patients; lorazepam as a model drug

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Van Der Vossen (Anna C.); I. Van Der Velde (Iris); O. Smeets (Oscar); Postma, D.J.; Eckhardt, M.; A. Vermes (Andras); B.C.P. Koch (Birgit C. P.); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); L.M. Hanff (Lidwien)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction Many drugs are unavailable in suitable oral paediatric dosage forms, and pharmacists often have to compound drugs to provide paediatric patients with an acceptable formulation in the right dose. Liquid formulations offer the advantage of dosing flexibility and ease of

  20. What do we think we are doing? How might a clinical information network be promoting implementation of recommended paediatric care practices in Kenyan hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Mike; Ayieko, Philip; Nyamai, Rachel; Were, Fred; Githanga, David; Irimu, Grace

    2017-02-02

    The creation of a clinical network was proposed as a means to promote implementation of a set of recommended clinical practices targeting inpatient paediatric care in Kenya. The rationale for selecting a network as a strategy has been previously described. Here, we aim to describe network activities actually conducted over its first 2.5 years, deconstruct its implementation into specific components and provide our 'insider' interpretation of how the network is functioning as an intervention. We articulate key activities that together have constituted network processes over 2.5 years and then utilise a recently published typology of implementation components to give greater granularity to this description from the perspective of those delivering the intervention. Using the Behaviour Change Wheel we then suggest how the network may operate to achieve change and offer examples of change before making an effort to synthesise our understanding in the form of a realist context-mechanism-outcome configuration. We suggest our network is likely to comprise 22 from a total of 73 identifiable intervention components, of which 12 and 10 we consider major and minor components, respectively. At the policy level, we employed clinical guidelines, marketing and communication strategies with intervention characteristics operating through incentivisation, persuasion, education, enablement, modelling and environmental restructuring. These might influence behaviours by enhancing psychological capability, creating social opportunity and increasing motivation largely through a reflective pathway. We previously proposed a clinical network as a solution to challenges implementing recommended practices in Kenyan hospitals based on our understanding of theory and context. Here, we report how we have enacted what was proposed and use a recent typology to deconstruct the intervention into its elements and articulate how we think the network may produce change. We offer a more generalised

  1. Accuracy of near-patient vs. inbuilt spirometry for monitoring tidal volumes in an in-vitro paediatric lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenroth, S; Thomas, J; Cannizzaro, V; Weiss, M; Schmidt, A R

    2018-03-01

    Spirometric monitoring provides precise measurement and delivery of tidal volumes within a narrow range, which is essential for lung-protective strategies that aim to reduce morbidity and mortality in mechanically-ventilated patients. Conventional anaesthesia ventilators include inbuilt spirometry to monitor inspiratory and expiratory tidal volumes. The GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilator allows additional near-patient spirometry via a sensor interposed between the proximal end of the tracheal tube and the respiratory tubing. Near-patient and inbuilt spirometry of two different GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilators were compared in an in-vitro study. Assessments were made of accuracy and variability in inspiratory and expiratory tidal volume measurements during ventilation of six simulated paediatric lung models using the ASL 5000 test lung. A total of 9240 breaths were recorded and analysed. Differences between inspiratory tidal volumes measured with near-patient and inbuilt spirometry were most significant in the newborn setting (p tidal volume measurements with near-patient spirometry were consistently more accurate than with inbuilt spirometry for all lung models (p tidal volumes decreased with increasing tidal volumes, and was smaller with near-patient than with inbuilt spirometry. The variability in measured tidal volumes was higher during expiration, especially with inbuilt spirometry. In conclusion, the present in-vitro study shows that measurements with near-patient spirometry are more accurate and less variable than with inbuilt spirometry. Differences between measurement methods were most significant in the smallest patients. We therefore recommend near-patient spirometry, especially for neonatal and paediatric patients. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  2. The "basic" approach: a single-centre experience with a cost-reducing model for paediatric cardiac extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padalino, Massimo A; Tessari, Chiara; Guariento, Alvise; Frigo, Anna C; Vida, Vladimiro L; Marcolongo, Andrea; Zanella, Fabio; Harvey, Michael J; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Stellin, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a lifesaving but expensive therapy in terms of financial, technical and human resources. We report our experience with a 'basic' ECMO support model, consisting of ECMO initiated and managed without the constant presence of a bedside specialist, to assess safety, clinical outcomes and financial impact on our health system. We did a retrospective single-centre study of paediatric cardiac ECMO between January 2001 and March 2014. Outcomes included postimplant complications and survival at weaning and at discharge. We used activity based costing to compare the costs of current basic ECMO with those of a 'full optional' dedicated ECMO team (hypothesis 1); ECMO with a bedside nurse and perfusionist (hypothesis 2), and ECMO with a bedside perfusionist (hypothesis 3). Basic cardiac ECMO was required for 121 patients (median age 75 days, median weight 4.4 kg). A total of 107 patients (88%) had congenital heart disease; 37 had univentricular physiology. The median duration of ECMO was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR], 4-15 days). Overall survival at weaning and at 30 days in the neonatal and paediatric age groups was 58.6% and 30.6%, respectively; these results were not significantly different from Extracorporeal Life Support Organization data. Cost analysis revealed a saving of €30 366, €22 144 and €13 837 for each patient on basic ECMO for hypotheses 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Despite reduced human, technical and economical resources, a basic ECMO model without a bedside specialist was associated with satisfactory survival and lower costs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. The paediatric Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (pCAM-ICU: Translation and cognitive debriefing for the German-speaking area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens de Grahl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To date there are only a few studies published, dealing with delirium in critically ill patients. The problem with these studies is that prevalence rates of delirium could only be estimated because of the lack of validated delirium assessment tools for the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU. The paediatric Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (pCAM-ICU was specifically developed and validated for the detection of delirium in PICU patients. The purpose of this study was the translation of the English pCAM-ICU into German according to international validated guidelines. Methods: The translation process was performed according to the principles of good practice for the translation and cultural adaptation process for patient reported outcomes measures: From three independently created German forward-translation versions one preliminary German version was developed, which was then retranslated to English by a certified, state-approved translator. The back-translated version was submitted to the original author for evaluation. The German translation was evaluated by clinicians and specialists anonymously (German grades in regards to language and content of the translation. Results: The results of the cognitive debriefing revealed good to very good results. After that the translation process was successfully completed and the final version of the German pCAM-ICU was adopted by the expert committee. Conclusion: The German version of the pCAM-ICU is a result of a translation process in accordance with internationally acknowledged guidelines. Particularly, with respect to the excellent results of the cognitive debriefing, we could finalise the translation and cultural adaptation process for the German pCAM-ICU.

  4. ‘Something normal in a very, very abnormal environment’ – Nursing work to honour the life of dying infants and children in neonatal and paediatric intensive care in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Bloomer, MJ; Endacott, R; Copnell, B; O’Connor, M

    2016-01-01

    publisher: Elsevier articletitle: ‘Something normal in a very, very abnormal environment’ – Nursing work to honour the life of dying infants and children in neonatal and paediatric intensive care in Australia journaltitle: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing articlelink: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2015.09.001 content_type: article copyright: Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The global burden of paediatric heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musa, Ndidiamaka L; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Zheleva, Bistra

    2017-01-01

    An estimated 15 million children die or are crippled annually by treatable or preventable heart disease in low- and middle-income countries. Global efforts to reduce under-5 mortality have focused on reducing death from communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries with little...... to no attention focusing on paediatric CHD and acquired heart disease. Lack of awareness of CHD and acquired heart disease, access to care, poor healthcare infrastructure, competing health priorities, and a critical shortage of specialists are important reasons why paediatric heart disease has not been addressed...... in low resourced settings. Non-governmental organisations have taken the lead to address these challenges. This review describes the global burden of paediatric heart disease and strategies to improve the quality of care for paediatric heart disease. These strategies would improve outcomes for children...

  6. Models of care and delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2014-01-01

    with community clinics for injecting drug-dependent persons is also being implemented. Shared care models require oversight to ensure that primary responsibility is defined for the persons overall health situation, for screening of co-morbidities, defining indication to treat comorbidities, prescription of non......Marked regional differences in HIV-related clinical outcomes exist across Europe. Models of outpatient HIV care, including HIV testing, linkage and retention for positive persons, also differ across the continent, including examples of sub-optimal care. Even in settings with reasonably good...... outcomes, existing models are scrutinized for simplification and/or reduced cost. Outpatient HIV care models across Europe may be centralized to specialized clinics only, primarily handled by general practitioners (GP), or a mixture of the two, depending on the setting. Key factors explaining...

  7. Costs of health care across primary care models in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Maude; Wodchis, Walter P; Barnsley, Jan; Laporte, Audrey

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between newly introduced primary care models in Ontario, Canada, and patients' primary care and total health care costs. A specific focus is on the payment mechanisms for primary care physicians, i.e. fee-for-service (FFS), enhanced-FFS, and blended capitation, and whether providers practiced as part of a multidisciplinary team. Utilization data for a one year period was measured using administrative databases for a 10% sample selected at random from the Ontario adult population. Primary care and total health care costs were calculated at the individual level and included costs from physician services, hospital visits and admissions, long term care, drugs, home care, lab tests, and visits to non-medical health care providers. Generalized linear model regressions were conducted to assess the differences in costs between primary care models. Patients not enrolled with a primary care physicians were younger, more likely to be males and of lower socio-economic status. Patients in blended capitation models were healthier and wealthier than FFS and enhanced-FFS patients. Primary care and total health care costs were significantly different across Ontario primary care models. Using the traditional FFS as the reference, we found that patients in the enhanced-FFS models had the lowest total health care costs, and also the lowest primary care costs. Patients in the blended capitation models had higher primary care costs but lower total health care costs. Patients that were in multidisciplinary teams (FHT), where physicians are also paid on a blended capitation basis, had higher total health care costs than non-FHT patients but still lower than the FFS reference group. Primary care and total health care costs increased with patients' age, morbidity, and lower income quintile across all primary care payment types. The new primary care models were associated with lower total health care costs for patients compared to the

  8. Temperamental reactivity and negative emotionality in uncooperative children referred to specialized paediatric dentistry compared to children in ordinary dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnrup, Kristina; Broberg, Anders G; Berggren, Ulf; Bodin, Lennart

    2007-11-01

    Current treatment of children with dental behaviour management problems (DBMP) is based on the presupposition that their difficulties are caused by dental fear, but is this always the case? The aim of this study was to study temperamental reactivity, negative emotionality, and other personal characteristics in relation to DBMP in 8- to 12-year-old children. Forty-six children referred because of DBMP (study group) and 110 children in ordinary dental care (reference group) participated. The EASI tempramental survey assessed temperamental reactivity and negative emotionality, the Child Behaviour Questionnaire internalizing and externalizing behaviour problems, and the Children's Fear Survey Schedule general and dental fears. Cluster analyses and tree-based modelling were used for data analysis. Among the five clusters identified, one could be characterized as 'balanced temperament'. Thirty-five per cent of the reference group compared to only 7% of the study group belonged to this cluster. Negative emotionality was the most important sorting variable. Children referred because of DBMP differed from children in ordinary dental care, not only in dental fear level, but also in personal characteristics. Few of the referred children were characterized by a balanced temperament profile. It is important to consider the dual impact of emotion dysregulation and emotional reactivity in the development of DBMP.

  9. Developing implementation strategies for firearm safety promotion in paediatric primary care for suicide prevention in two large US health systems: a study protocol for a mixed-methods implementation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Courtney Benjamin; Jager-Hyman, Shari; Marcus, Steven C; Ahmedani, Brian K; Zeber, John E; Fein, Joel A; Brown, Gregory K; Lieberman, Adina; Beidas, Rinad S

    2017-06-24

    The promotion of safe firearm practices, or firearms means restriction, is a promising but infrequently used suicide prevention strategy in the USA. Safety Check is an evidence-based practice for improving parental firearm safety behaviour in paediatric primary care. However, providers rarely discuss firearm safety during visits, suggesting the need to better understand barriers and facilitators to promoting this approach. This study, Adolescent Suicide Prevention In Routine clinical Encounters, aims to engender a better understanding of how to implement the three firearm components of Safety Check as a suicide prevention strategy in paediatric primary care. The National Institute of Mental Health-funded Mental Health Research Network (MHRN), a consortium of 13 healthcare systems across the USA, affords a unique opportunity to better understand how to implement a firearm safety intervention in paediatric primary care from a system-level perspective. We will collaboratively develop implementation strategies in partnership with MHRN stakeholders. First, we will survey leadership of 82 primary care practices (ie, practices serving children, adolescents and young adults) within two MHRN systems to understand acceptability and use of the three firearm components of Safety Check (ie, screening, brief counselling around firearm safety and provision of firearm locks). Then, in collaboration with MHRN stakeholders, we will use intervention mapping and the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to systematically develop and evaluate a multilevel menu of implementation strategies for promoting firearm safety as a suicide prevention strategy in paediatric primary care. Study procedures have been approved by the University of Pennsylvania. Henry Ford Health System and Baylor Scott & White institutional review boards (IRBs) have ceded IRB review to the University of Pennsylvania IRB. Results will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals. © Article

  10. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  11. Information structure and organisation in change of shift reports: An observational study of nursing hand-offs in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Hunt, Tara; Parush, Avi; Ellis, Jacqueline; Thomas, Margot; Rashotte, Judy

    2015-06-01

    Patient hand-offs involve the exchange of critical information. Ineffective hand-offs can result in reduced patient safety by leading to wrong treatment, delayed diagnoses or other outcomes that can negatively affect the healthcare system. The objectives of this study were to uncover the structure of the information conveyed during patient hand-offs and look for principles characterising the organisation of the information. With an observational study approach, data was gathered during the morning and evening nursing change of shift hand-offs in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit. Content analysis identified a common meta-structure used for information transfer that contained categories with varying degrees of information integration and the repetition of high consequence information. Differences were found in the organisation of the hand-off structures, and these varied as a function of nursing experience. The findings are discussed in terms of the potential benefits of computerised tools which utilise standardised structure for information transfer and the implications for future education and critical care skill acquisition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. PREVENTIVE PAEDIATRICS — NEW CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baranov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article takes up priority directions of preventive paediatrics concerning health formation of rising generation, organization of health care for children, decrease of morbidity, disability and mortality rate. The authors mention the importance of vaccination in control of the most common infections, base the necessity of complex rehabilitation health care system organization for disable children and need of wide spreading of developed and used in practical Russian health care types and methods of prophylaxis of rare (orphan diseases. The ways of prophylaxis, maintenance, strengthening and recovery of children’s health are suggested in this article.

  13. Influenza in hospitalized children in Ireland in the pandemic period and the 2010/2011 season: risk factors for paediatric intensive-care-unit admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rebolledo, J

    2013-11-11

    SUMMARY Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality in children. This study\\'s objectives were to describe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during the pandemic, to compare it with circulating influenza in 2010\\/2011, and to identify risk factors for severe influenza defined as requiring admission to a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Children hospitalized with influenza during the pandemic were older, and more likely to have received antiviral therapy than children hospitalized during the 2010\\/2011 season. In 2010\\/2011, only one child admitted to a PICU with underlying medical conditions had been vaccinated. The risk of severe illness in the pandemic was higher in females and those with underlying conditions. In 2010\\/2011, infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 compared to other influenza viruses was a significant risk factor for severe disease. An incremental relationship was found between the number of underlying conditions and PICU admission. These findings highlight the importance of improving low vaccination uptake and increasing the use of antivirals in vulnerable children.

  14. Primary ciliary dyskinesia in the paediatric population: range and severity of radiological findings in a cohort of patients receiving tertiary care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, K. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Padley, S.P.G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.padley@ic.ac.uk; Goldstraw, E.J.; Kidd, S.J. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hogg, C.; Biggart, E.; Bush, A. [Department of Paediatric Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    Aim: To investigate the clinical range and severity of radiological findings in a cohort of patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) receiving tertiary care. Materials and methods: The case notes and clinical test results of 89 children attending the paediatric respiratory disease clinic at our institution were retrospectively analysed. Demographic details including age at diagnosis and common presenting signs and symptoms were studied. Results of chest radiographs, microscopy, and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for quantification of lung damage were analysed. Results: In a cohort of 89 children with PCD, a presentation chest radiograph was available in 62% of patients (n = 55), with all but one demonstrating changes of bronchial wall thickening. HRCT of the lungs, available in 26 patients, were scored using the system described by Brody et al. analysing five specific features of lung disease, including bronchiectasis, mucus plugging, peribronchial thickening, parenchymal changes of consolidation, and ground-glass density, and focal air-trapping in each lobe. Peribronchial thickening was observed using HRCT in 25 patients, while 20 patients had bronchiectasis. Severity scores were highest for the middle and the lingular lobes. Conclusion: The radiographic findings of the largest reported cohort of patients with PCD are presented, with associated clinical findings. Dextrocardia remains the commonest finding on chest radiography. HRCT demonstrates peribronchial thickening and bronchiectasis, which is most marked in the lower zones. Radiological scoring techniques developed for assessment of cystic fibrosis can also be applied for the assessment of disease severity in this patient population.

  15. VISUAL OUTCOME OF OCULAR INJURY IN PAEDIATRIC POPULATION PRESENTING AT TERTIARY EYE CARE CENTRE IN WEST BENGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Das

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Ocular trauma is an important worldwide cause of visual morbidity. It includes a spectrum of simple ocular surface foreign bodies, minute corneal abrasions to devastating perforating injuries causing blindness. Children are particularly susceptible to ocular trauma. Identification of the cause of injuries among children may help in determining the most effective measures to prevent visual loss. The purpose of this study is to analyse visual status at the time of presentation and to find the time gap between the occurrence of trauma and presentation, intervention and visual outcome in paediatric ocular trauma at Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Kolkata, West Bengal. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 100 children (age 0-14 yrs. who attended outpatient department and emergency of Regional Institute of Ophthalmology and got admitted were included in the study. Detailed history regarding mode of injury, type of injury, time of injury and time elapsed to attend the hospital from the onset of injury noted. Recording of visual acuity and detailed clinical examination done. Appropriate medical and surgical treatment given as per the standard protocol after assessing the type of injury. Visual outcome assessed by doing follow up at presentation at 1 month and 6 month after injury. RESULTS Our study showed that 37% of the children who presented to us had visual acuity between 2/60 and Perception of light (PL positive. 7% had vision between 6/6 and 6/12. PL was denied in 5% patients. Majority (44% of the children who suffered ocular trauma presented to our hospital between 25-48 hrs. of injury. 88 out 100 patients who were hospitalised were operated within the first 24 hours. At one month after injury, 28% had visual acuity between 6/60 and 3/60 and six months after injury, 25% had visual acuity between 6/18 and 6/36. CONCLUSION Close supervision at home, school and playground, public awareness and education regarding the hazardous nature of

  16. Role of a behavioural therapy involving psychodrama for the treatment of sleep disorders in paediatric primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnara, Jean; Lemoine, Patrick

    2017-07-28

    Sleep disorders are common in young children. Our objective was to describe a psychodrama using puppets and to assess the interest of this approach for the treatment of sleep disorders in ambulatory paediatric patients. This retrospective, observational, monocentre study was carried between 1st January 2014 and 31st December 2015. Children aged 12 months to 6 years with a sleep disorder confirmed according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-2 were recruited. The parents were questioned separately about their child's sleep rhythm and the family's quality of life (QoL). The child sitting on their parent's knee and, using puppets to represent the family members, the paediatrician reproduced the scenario that took place at home and demonstrated what should be changed. The parents were contacted by telephone 1-2 weeks after the therapy to determine whether the child's sleep patterns had improved. The primary endpoint was resolution of the sleep disorder. Thirty-eight children (mean age 27.2 ± 14.0 months; mean duration of sleep disorder 12.7 ± 9.5 months) were assessed. The most common sleep disorders were difficulties in falling asleep at evening bed-time (76.3%) and night-time wakening (76.3%). The main triggering factors were the birth of a sibling (30.8%) or an illness (30.8%). In the majority (52.2%) of families who were convinced that the psychodrama would work, an immediate and complete resolution of the sleep disorder was obtained within 3 days of the consultation. QoL improved in the majority of families after the consultation (QoL was average in 68.4% of families before the consultation vs. good in 84.2% after the consultation). Psychodrama was effective at bringing about an immediate and complete resolution of sleep disorders in children. This confirms the findings of other reports that show that behavioural therapy is effective in this context. This method could be adapted effectively by individual practitioners, enabling children to

  17. [Spanish Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Spanish Society of Paediatric Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Spanish Association of Paediatric Primary Care, and the Spanish Society of Extra-hospital Paediatrics and Primary Health Care consensus document on antibiotic treatment in penicillin or amoxicillin allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero-Artigao, Fernando; Michavila, Antonio; Suárez-Rodriguez, Ángeles; Hernandez, Anselmo; Martínez-Campos, Leticia; Calvo, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    The suspected allergy to beta-lactam antibiotics, especially penicillin and amoxicillin, is the most frequent reason for consultation in Child Allergy Units. In this consensus document, the clinical and diagnostic criteria of allergic reactions are described, as well as alternative antibiotic treatment for the most common infections diagnosed in paediatrics for patients with known or suspected allergy. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Regular in-situ simulation training of paediatric Medical Emergency Team leads to sustained improvements in hospital response to deteriorating patients, improved outcomes in intensive care and financial savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilen, Ulf; Fraser, Laura; Jones, Patricia; Leonard, Paul; Simpson, Dave

    2017-06-01

    The introduction of a paediatric Medical Emergency Team (pMET) was accompanied by weekly in-situ simulation team training. Key ward staff participated in team training, focusing on recognition of the deteriorating child, teamwork and early involvement of senior staff. Following an earlier study [1], this investigation aimed to evaluate the long-term impact of ongoing regular team training on hospital response to deteriorating ward patients, patient outcome and financial implications. Prospective cohort study of all deteriorating in-patients in a tertiary paediatric hospital requiring admission to paediatric intensive care (PICU) the year before, 1year after and 3 years after the introduction of pMET and team training. Deteriorating patients were recognised more promptly (before/1year after/3years after pMET; median time 4/1.5/0.5h, pIntroduction of pMET coincided with significantly reduced hospital mortality (p<0.001). These results indicate that lessons learnt by ward staff during team training led to sustained improvements in the hospital response to critically deteriorating in-patients, significantly improved patient outcomes and substantial savings. Integration of regular in-situ simulation training of medical emergency teams, including key ward staff, in routine clinical care has potential application in all acute specialties. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Pattern of Paediatric Trauma in North Western Nigeria | Mungadi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-economic emancipation, intra-city traffic considerations, abrogation of child labour and provision of adequate water supply should reduce these accidents. Trauma prevention and care programme in developing countries should always address paediatric injuries. KEY Words: Paediatric, Trauma, North Western, ...

  20. Weight-band dosing tables: simplifying paediatric art | Nuttall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the obstacles to scaling up paediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage in resource-limited settings is the relative complexity of paediatric dosing. There is a need to simplify ART in order to facilitate treatment initiation and ongoing management of infants and children by health care providers, as well as to support ...

  1. Improving glycaemic control and life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A randomised, controlled intervention study using the Guided Self-Determination-Young method in triads of adolescents, parents and health care providers integrated into routine paediatric outpatient clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Gitte; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2011-01-01

    visits will reduce haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations and improve adolescents' life skills compared with a control group. METHODS: Using a mixed methods design comprising a randomised controlled trial and a nested qualitative evaluation, we will recruit 68 adolescents age 13 - 18 years with type 1......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Adolescents with type 1 diabetes face demanding challenges due to conflicting priorities between psychosocial needs and diabetes management. This conflict often results in poor glycaemic control and discord between adolescents and parents. Adolescent-parent conflicts are thus...... are lacking. The Guided Self-Determination method is proven effective in adult care and has been adapted to adolescents and parents (Guided Self-Determination-Young (GSD-Y)) for use in paediatric diabetes outpatient clinics. Our objective is to test whether GSD-Y used in routine paediatric outpatient clinic...

  2. High Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy can be used safely in the general paediatric ward using Paediatric Early Warning Scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsing, IE; Tinnevelt, Marcel; Jansen, Nicolaas J.G.; Koomen, E

    2015-01-01

    High Flow Nasal Cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) is nowadays widely used at paediatric intensive care units (PICU) to provide a safe and comfortable (warm and humidified) oxygen delivery in children with respiratory distress. At general paediatric wards HFNC is hardly used because intensive observation

  3. Developing Integrated Care: Towards a development model for integrated care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.N. Minkman (Mirella)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe thesis adresses the phenomenon of integrated care. The implementation of integrated care for patients with a stroke or dementia is studied. Because a generic quality management model for integrated care is lacking, the study works towards building a development model for integrated

  4. A comparison of newborn stylized and tomographic models for dose assessment in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staton, R J; Pazik, F D; Nipper, J C; Williams, J L; Bolch, W E

    2003-01-01

    Establishment of organ doses from diagnostic and interventional examinations is a key component to quantifying the radiation risks from medical exposures and for formulating corresponding dose-reduction strategies. Radiation transport models of human anatomy provide a convenient method for simulating radiological examinations. At present, two classes of models exist: stylized mathematical models and tomographic voxel models. In the present study, organ dose comparisons are made for projection radiographs of both a stylized and a tomographic model of the newborn patient. Sixteen separate radiographs were simulated for each model at x-ray technique factors typical of newborn examinations: chest, abdomen, thorax and head views in the AP, PA, left LAT and right LAT projection orientation. For AP and PA radiographs of the torso (chest, abdomen and thorax views), the effective dose assessed for the tomographic model exceeds that for the stylized model with per cent differences ranging from 19% (AP abdominal view) to 43% AP chest view. In contrast, the effective dose for the stylized model exceeds that for the tomographic model for all eight lateral views including those of the head, with per cent differences ranging from 9% (LLAT chest view) to 51% (RLAT thorax view). While organ positioning differences do exist between the models, a major factor contributing to differences in effective dose is the models' exterior trunk shape. In the tomographic model, a more elliptical shape is seen thus providing for less tissue shielding for internal organs in the AP and PA directions, with corresponding increased tissue shielding in the lateral directions. This observation is opposite of that seen in comparisons of stylized and tomographic models of the adult

  5. The proposal of Paediatric Virology and its perspectives: An interview with Professor of Paediatrics Maria Theodoridou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-10-01

    Professor Maria Theodoridou, Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics at the University of Athens, is one of the few paediatricians in Greece, who have experienced almost all the infectious diseases of the second half of the 20th century and their severe consequences, prior to the widespread adoption of immunisations. A milestone during her career was the establishment of a specialised National Reference Unit for the care of paediatric patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the 'Aghia Sophia' Children's Hospital in Athens, Greece. According to Professor Theodoridou, training on the prevention, management and treatment of neonatal and paediatric viral infections represents a new educational challenge for both community as well as hospital-based paediatric health professionals. The debate of the potential strategically principal role of Paediatric Virology subspecialists in the primary, secondary and tertiary clinical practice is definitely necessary and needs further discussion and evaluation, she adds. She describes the difficulties that Greece, a country under a long-standing financial crisis, faces for the hospital-based management of paediatric viral infections and refers to the future advances, which are expected in the field of diagnosis and treatment of viral infections in neonates and children. In the context of the 3rd Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which will be held in Athens on October 7th, 2017, Professor Theodoridou will focus on the immigration crisis and vaccination policy.

  6. Creation of voxel-based models for paediatric dosimetry from automatic segmentation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, O.; Li, R.; Ourselin, S.; Caon, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The first computational models representing human anatomy were mathematical phantoms, but still far from accurate representations of human body. These models have been used with radiation transport codes (Monte Carlo) to estimate organ doses from radiological procedures. Although new medical imaging techniques have recently allowed the construction of voxel-based models based on the real anatomy, few children models from individual CT or MRI data have been reported [1,3]. For pediatric dosimetry purposes, a large range of voxel models by ages is required since scaling the anatomy from existing models is not sufficiently accurate. The small number of models available arises from the small number of CT or MRI data sets of children available and the long amount of time required to segment the data sets. The existing models have been constructed by manual segmentation slice by slice and using simple thresholding techniques. In medical image segmentation, considerable difficulties appear when applying classical techniques like thresholding or simple edge detection. Until now, any evidence of more accurate or near-automatic methods used in construction of child voxel models exists. We aim to construct a range of pediatric voxel models, integrating automatic or semi-automatic 3D segmentation techniques. In this paper we present the first stage of this work using pediatric CT data.

  7. The PAediatric Risk Assessment (PARA) Mobile App to Reduce Postdischarge Child Mortality: Design, Usability, and Feasibility for Health Care Workers in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Lauren Lacey; Dunsmuir, Dustin; Kumbakumba, Elias; Ansermino, John Mark; Larson, Charles P; Lester, Richard; Barigye, Celestine; Ndamira, Andrew; Kabakyenga, Jerome; Wiens, Matthew O

    2016-02-15

    Postdischarge death in children is increasingly being recognized as a major contributor to overall child mortality. The PAediatric Risk Assessment (PARA) app is an mHealth tool developed to aid health care workers in resource-limited settings such as Sub-Saharan Africa to identify pediatric patients at high risk of both in-hospital and postdischarge mortality. The intended users of the PARA app are health care workers (ie, nurses, doctors, and clinical officers) with varying levels of education and technological exposure, making testing of this clinical tool critical to successful implementation. Our aim was to summarize the usability evaluation of the PARA app among target users, which consists of assessing the ease of use, functionality, and navigation of the interfaces and then iteratively improving the design of this clinical tool. Health care workers (N=30) were recruited to participate at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital and Holy Innocents Children's Hospital in Mbarara, Southwestern Uganda. This usability study was conducted in two phases to allow for iterative improvement and testing of the interfaces. The PARA app was evaluated using quantitative and qualitative measures, which were compared between Phases 1 and 2 of the study. Participants were given two patient scenarios that listed hypothetical information (ie, demographic, social, and clinical data) to be entered into the app and to determine the patient's risk of in-hospital and postdischarge mortality. Time-to-completion and user errors were recorded for each participant while using the app. A modified computer system usability questionnaire was utilized at the end of each session to elicit user satisfaction with the PARA app and obtain suggestions for future improvements. The average time to complete the PARA app decreased by 30% from Phase 1 to Phase 2, following user feedback and modifications. Participants spent the longest amount of time on the oxygen saturation interface, but modifications

  8. Ethical issues in the application of medical technology to paediatric intensive care: two views of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, J S

    1996-04-01

    Recent advances in medical technology have led to a marked improvement in the chances of survival of sick or preterm infants, thereby stimulating renewed ethical debate on the status of the newborn. Two contradictory attitudes to the medical care of preterm or congenitally malformed newborn infants can be discerned in our pluralistic society. The two attitudes have their historical roots in the classical Graeco-Roman and Judaeo-Christian ethical traditions respectively. The former views newborn infants as of potential value only whereas the latter emphasises the intrinsic worth and dignity of the individual made in God's image. Recent secular philosophical reflection has provided a rationale for infanticide of the sick or abnormal newborn. A Christian approach to the care of the newborn prohibits intentional killing yet may encompass the withdrawal of treatment that is inappropriate or unduly burdensome. Medical care should be based upon respect for the value of the individual, protection of the defenceless from abuse or exploitation, and wise stewardship of limited health-care resources.

  9. Paediatric radiopharmaceutical administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassmann, Michael; Treves, S Ted; Borgwardt, Lise

    2014-01-01

    In 2008 the EANM published their paediatric dosage card. In 2011 the North American consensus guidelines recommended a set of administered activities for paediatric nuclear medicine. During the EANM congress in 2012 a working group of the EANM and the SNMMI met to study the possibility of harmoni...

  10. Generalisability and Cost-Impact of Antibiotic-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters for Reducing Risk of Bloodstream Infection in Paediatric Intensive Care Units in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harron, Katie; Mok, Quen; Hughes, Dyfrig; Muller-Pebody, Berit; Parslow, Roger; Ramnarayan, Padmanabhan; Gilbert, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    We determined the generalisability and cost-impact of adopting antibiotic-impregnated CVCs in all paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in England, based on results from a large randomised controlled trial (the CATCH trial; ISRCTN34884569). BSI rates using standard CVCs were estimated through linkage of national PICU audit data (PICANet) with laboratory surveillance data. We estimated the number of BSI averted if PICUs switched from standard to antibiotic-impregnated CVCs by applying the CATCH trial rate-ratio (0.40; 95% CI 0.17,0.97) to the BSI rate using standard CVCs. The value of healthcare resources made available by averting one BSI as estimated from the trial economic analysis was £10,975; 95% CI -£2,801,£24,751. The BSI rate using standard CVCs was 4.58 (95% CI 4.42,4.74) per 1000 CVC-days in 2012. Applying the rate-ratio gave 232 BSI averted using antibiotic CVCs. The additional cost of purchasing antibiotic-impregnated compared with standard CVCs was £36 for each child, corresponding to additional costs of £317,916 for an estimated 8831 CVCs required in PICUs in 2012. Based on 2012 BSI rates, management of BSI in PICUs cost £2.5 million annually (95% uncertainty interval: -£160,986, £5,603,005). The additional cost of antibiotic CVCs would be less than the value of resources associated with managing BSI in PICUs with standard BSI rates >1.2 per 1000 CVC-days. The cost of introducing antibiotic-impregnated CVCs is less than the cost associated with managing BSIs occurring with standard CVCs. The long-term benefits of preventing BSI could mean that antibiotic CVCs are cost-effective even in PICUs with extremely low BSI rates.

  11. Generalisability and Cost-Impact of Antibiotic-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters for Reducing Risk of Bloodstream Infection in Paediatric Intensive Care Units in England.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Harron

    Full Text Available We determined the generalisability and cost-impact of adopting antibiotic-impregnated CVCs in all paediatric intensive care units (PICUs in England, based on results from a large randomised controlled trial (the CATCH trial; ISRCTN34884569.BSI rates using standard CVCs were estimated through linkage of national PICU audit data (PICANet with laboratory surveillance data. We estimated the number of BSI averted if PICUs switched from standard to antibiotic-impregnated CVCs by applying the CATCH trial rate-ratio (0.40; 95% CI 0.17,0.97 to the BSI rate using standard CVCs. The value of healthcare resources made available by averting one BSI as estimated from the trial economic analysis was £10,975; 95% CI -£2,801,£24,751.The BSI rate using standard CVCs was 4.58 (95% CI 4.42,4.74 per 1000 CVC-days in 2012. Applying the rate-ratio gave 232 BSI averted using antibiotic CVCs. The additional cost of purchasing antibiotic-impregnated compared with standard CVCs was £36 for each child, corresponding to additional costs of £317,916 for an estimated 8831 CVCs required in PICUs in 2012. Based on 2012 BSI rates, management of BSI in PICUs cost £2.5 million annually (95% uncertainty interval: -£160,986, £5,603,005. The additional cost of antibiotic CVCs would be less than the value of resources associated with managing BSI in PICUs with standard BSI rates >1.2 per 1000 CVC-days.The cost of introducing antibiotic-impregnated CVCs is less than the cost associated with managing BSIs occurring with standard CVCs. The long-term benefits of preventing BSI could mean that antibiotic CVCs are cost-effective even in PICUs with extremely low BSI rates.

  12. Implementation experience during an eighteen month intervention to improve paediatric and newborn care in Kenyan district hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wamae Annah

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have conducted an intervention study aiming to improve hospital care for children and newborns in Kenya. In judging whether an intervention achieves its aims, an understanding of how it is delivered is essential. Here, we describe how the implementation team delivered the intervention over 18 months and provide some insight into how health workers, the primary targets of the intervention, received it. Methods We used two approaches. First, a description of the intervention is based on an analysis of records of training, supervisory and feedback visits to hospitals, and brief logs of key topics discussed during telephone calls with local hospital facilitators. Record keeping was established at the start of the study for this purpose with analyses conducted at the end of the intervention period. Second, we planned a qualitative study nested within the intervention project and used in-depth interviews and small group discussions to explore health worker and facilitators' perceptions of implementation. After thematic analysis of all interview data, findings were presented, discussed, and revised with the help of hospital facilitators. Results Four hospitals received the full intervention including guidelines, training and two to three monthly support supervision and six monthly performance feedback visits. Supervisor visits, as well as providing an opportunity for interaction with administrators, health workers, and facilitators, were often used for impromptu, limited refresher training or orientation of new staff. The personal links that evolved with senior staff seemed to encourage local commitment to the aims of the intervention. Feedback seemed best provided as open meetings and discussions with administrators and staff. Supervision, although sometimes perceived as fault finding, helped local facilitators become the focal point of much activity including key roles in liaison, local monitoring and feedback, problem solving

  13. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 2. Organ doses from computed tomographic examinations in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zankl, M.; Panzer, W.; Drexler, G.

    1993-11-01

    This report provides a catalogue of organ dose conversion factors resulting from computed tomographic (CT) examinations of children. Two radiation qualities and two exposure geometries were simulated as well as the use of asymmetrical beams. The use of further beam shaping devices was not considered. The organ dose conversion factors are applicable to babies at the age of ca. 2 months and to children between 5 and 7 years but can be used for other ages as well with the appropriate adjustments. For the calculations, the patients were represented by the GSF tomographic anthropomorphic models BABY and CHILD. The radiation transport in the body was simulated using a Monte Carlo method. The doses are presented as conversion factors of mean organ doses per air kerma free in air on the axis of rotation. Mean organ dose conversion factors are given per organ and per scanned body section of 1 cm height. The mean dose to an organ resulting from a particular CT examination can be estimated by summing up the contributions to the organ dose from all relevant sections. To facilitate the selection of the appropriate sections, a table is given which relates the tomographic models' coordinates to certain anatomical landmarks in the human body. (orig.)

  14. Costs of health care across primary care models in Ontario

    OpenAIRE

    Laberge, Maude; Wodchis, Walter P; Barnsley, Jan; Laporte, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between newly introduced primary care models in Ontario, Canada, and patients? primary care and total health care costs. A specific focus is on the payment mechanisms for primary care physicians, i.e. fee-for-service (FFS), enhanced-FFS, and blended capitation, and whether providers practiced as part of a multidisciplinary team. Methods Utilization data for a one year period was measured using administrative databases for a 1...

  15. Going beyond the identification of change facilitators to effectively implement a new model of services: lessons learned from a case example in paediatric rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camden, Chantal; Swaine, Bonnie; Tétreault, Sylvie; Carrière, Monique

    2011-01-01

    To identify facilitators and barriers to service reorganization, how they evolved and interacted to influence change during the implementation of a new service delivery model of paediatric rehabilitation. Over 3 years, different stakeholders responded to SWOT questionnaires (n = 139) and participated in focus groups (n = 19) and telephone interviews (n = 13). A framework based on socio constructivist theories made sense of the data. Facilitators related to the programme's structure (e.g. funding), the actors (e.g. willingness to test the new service model) and the change management process (e.g. participative approach). Some initial facilitators became barriers (e.g. leadership lacked at the end), while other barriers emerged (e.g. lack of tools). Understanding factor interactions requires examining the multiple actors' intentions, actions and consequences and their relations with structural elements. Analysing facilitators and barriers helped better understand the change processes, but this must be followed by concrete actions to successfully implement new paediatric rehabilitation models.

  16. Paediatric Malignancies | Joseph | African Journal of Paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    malignancies. Other common malignancies included sarcomas 10(14.71%), neurofibromatosis 9(13.24%), nephroblastoma 8(11.77%), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia 5(7.35%) and retinoblastoma 4(5.88%). The less common paediatric malignancies were melanoma, invasive lobular breast carcinoma and squamous cell ...

  17. Achieving Value in Primary Care: The Primary Care Value Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollow, William; Cucchiara, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model provides a compelling vision for primary care transformation, but studies of its impact have used insufficiently patient-centered metrics with inconsistent results. We propose a framework for defining patient-centered value and a new model for value-based primary care transformation: the primary care value model (PCVM). We advocate for use of patient-centered value when measuring the impact of primary care transformation, recognition, and performance-based payment; for financial support and research and development to better define primary care value-creating activities and their implementation; and for use of the model to support primary care organizations in transformation. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  18. Prevalence of transfusion-transmitted viral pathogens among health-care workers and risk mitigation programme in a paediatric tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Nayyar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The health-care workers (HCWs are at an occupational risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens, mainly, HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus. HBV is currently the only blood-borne virus for which a vaccine is available. All health-care institutions must encourage the HCWs to undergo screening for blood-borne pathogens.

  19. Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in Health Care Workers. A Pre-Post Intervention Study in an Italian Paediatric Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gilardi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite relevant recommendations and evidences on the efficacy of influenza vaccination in health care workers (HCWs, vaccination coverage rates in Europe and Italy currently do not exceed 25%. Aim of the study is to measure the variations in vaccination coverage rates in an Italian pediatric hospital after a promotion campaign performed in the period October–December 2017. The design is a pre-post intervention study. The intervention is based on a wide communication campaign and an expanded offer of easy vaccination on site. The study was carried out at Bambino Gesù Children’s hospital in Rome, Italy, on the whole population of HCWs. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were performed. Vaccination coverage rate increased in 2017/18 campaign compared with the 2016/17 one (+95 HCWs vaccinated; +4.4%. The highest increases were detected in males (+45.7%, youngest employees (+142.9%, mean age of employment (+175%, other HCWs (+209.1%, Emergency Area (+151.6% and Imaging Diagnostic Department (+200.0%. At multivariate logistic regression, working in some departments and being nurses represents a higher risk of being unvaccinated. Although the vaccination coverage rate remained low, a continuous increase of the coverage rate and development of a different consciousness in HCWs was highlighted. The study significantly identified the target for future campaigns.

  20. Ethical dimensions of paediatric nursing: A rapid evidence assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnasco, Annamaria; Cadorin, Lucia; Barisone, Michela; Bressan, Valentina; Iemmi, Marina; Prandi, Marzia; Timmins, Fiona; Watson, Roger; Sasso, Loredana

    2018-02-01

    Paediatric nurses often face complex situations requiring decisions that sometimes clash with their own values and beliefs, or with the needs of the children they care for and their families. Paediatric nurses often use new technology that changes the way they provide care, but also reduces their direct interaction with the child. This may generate ethical issues, which nurses should be able to address in the full respect of the child. Research question and objectives: The purpose of this review is to describe the main ethical dimensions of paediatric nursing. Our research question was, 'What are the most common ethical dimensions and competences related to paediatric nursing?' A rapid evidence assessment. According to the principles of the rapid evidence assessment, we searched the PubMed, SCOPUS and CINAHL databases for papers published between January 2001 and March 2015. These papers were then independently read by two researchers and analysed according to the inclusion criteria. Ethical considerations: Since this was a rapid evidence assessment, no approval from the ethics committee was required. Ten papers met our inclusion criteria. Ethical issues in paediatric nursing were grouped into three areas: (a) ethical issues in paediatric care, (b) social responsibility and (c) decision-making process. Few studies investigate the ethical dimensions and aspects of paediatric nursing, and they are mainly qualitative studies conducted in critical care settings based on nurses' perceptions and experiences. Paediatric nurses require specific educational interventions to help them resolve ethical issues, contribute to the decision-making process and fulfil their role as advocates of a vulnerable population (i.e. sick children and their families). Further research is needed to investigate how paediatric nurses can improve the involvement of children and their families in decision-making processes related to their care plan.

  1. PREVALENCE OF PAEDIATRIC DERMATOSES IN THE AGE GROUP OF 5-14 YEARS AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTER IN SALEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kanniah Baskara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Skin diseases in pediatric age group are common all over the world. Pediatric dermatoses require separate view from adult dermatoses as there are differences in their clinical presentation and treatment. OBJECTIVE The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of pediatric dermatoses attending our tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 100 consecutive children with dermatoses between 5-14 years of age attending dermatology outpatient department at Vinayaka Missions Kirupananda Variyar medical college, Salem. The study was conducted over a period of 6 months from February 2016 to August 2016. Demographic parameters, detailed history, clinical features and diagnosis were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS In our short term study, we examined 100 pediatric cases with 106 dermatoses. The incidence of infections and infestations (43.39% was more prevalent in our study. The most common non-infectious dermatoses in our study was insect bite reactions (17.9%. Dermatitis and eczema (9.39%, disorders of sweat and sebaceous glands (6.6%, pigmentary disorders (5.66%, disorders of hair and nails (3.77%, genetic disorders (2.88%, immune and allergic disorders (2.8%, psoriasis (2.8%, nutritional disorders (0.9%, Polymorphic light eruption (0.9%, pearly penile papule (0.9%, aphthous ulcer (0.9% and pityriasis rosea (0.9% were the other dermatoses seen in the study.CONCLUSION Fungal infections (tinea versicolor and tinea corporis, scabies and insect bite reactions were the common dermatoses observed in our study. Most of the pediatric patients attending our hospital came from rural areas belonging to low socioeconomic strata. Health education, proper sanitation and improved nutrition will help to reduce the incidence of pediatric dermatoses.

  2. Modelling the Contributions of Malaria, HIV, Malnutrition and Rainfall to the Decline in Paediatric Invasive Non-typhoidal Salmonella Disease in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Nicholas A; Everett, Dean; Faragher, E Brian; Roca-Feltrer, Arantxa; Kang'ombe, Arthur; Denis, Brigitte; Kerac, Marko; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Molyneux, Malcolm; Jahn, Andreas; Gordon, Melita A; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae (NTS) are responsible for a huge burden of bloodstream infection in Sub-Saharan African children. Recent reports of a decline in invasive NTS (iNTS) disease from Kenya and The Gambia have emphasised an association with malaria control. Following a similar decline in iNTS disease in Malawi, we have used 9 years of continuous longitudinal data to model the interrelationships between iNTS disease, malaria, HIV and malnutrition. Trends in monthly numbers of childhood iNTS disease presenting at Queen's Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi from 2002 to 2010 were reviewed in the context of longitudinal monthly data describing malaria slide-positivity among paediatric febrile admissions, paediatric HIV prevalence, nutritional rehabilitation unit admissions and monthly rainfall over the same 9 years, using structural equation models (SEM). Analysis of 3,105 iNTS episodes identified from 49,093 blood cultures, showed an 11.8% annual decline in iNTS (p malnutrition on the prevalence of iNTS disease. When these data were smoothed to eliminate seasonal cyclic changes, these associations remained strong and there were additional significant effects of HIV prevalence. These data suggest that the overall decline in iNTS disease observed in Malawi is attributable to multiple public health interventions leading to reductions in malaria, HIV and acute malnutrition. Understanding the impacts of public health programmes on iNTS disease is essential to plan and evaluate interventions.

  3. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, low educational status, family history of anxiety disorder, financial stress in family and adverse childhood experiences are risk factors for the development of anxiety disorders. If not diagnosed and managed at the earliest, paediatric anxiety disorders can cause life threatening problems in the future. Hence early and scientific management of anxiety disorders is essential. Cognitive behavioural therapy is the effective evidence based treatment for paediatric anxiety disorders.

  4. Paediatric talus fracture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Ann-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Paediatric talus fractures are rare injuries resulting from axial loading of the talus against the anterior tibia with the foot in dorsiflexion. Skeletally immature bone is less brittle, with higher elastic resistance than adult bone, thus the paediatric talus can sustain higher forces before fractures occur. However, displaced paediatric talus fractures and those associated with high-energy trauma have been associated with complications including avascular necrosis, arthrosis, delayed union, neurapraxia and the need for revision surgery. The authors present the rare case of a talar neck fracture in a skeletally immature young girl, initially missed on radiological review. However, clinical suspicion on the part of the emergency physician, repeat examination and further radiographic imaging revealed this rare paediatric injury.

  5. Challenges in paediatric neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Ganjoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvements in technique, knowledge and expertise have brought about rapid advances in the fields of paediatric neurosurgery and anaesthesia, and many procedures limited earlier to adults are now being increasingly attempted in neonates and small children, with good outcomes. This article highlights the challenges faced by the operating team while handling some of the technically complex procedures like awake craniotomy, interventional neuroradiology, minimally invasive neurosurgery, procedures in intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging suites, and neonatal emergencies in the paediatric population.

  6. [Challenges in acute paediatric medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Henriette A

    2016-01-01

    A big drop in the number of severe infections has resulted in less experience in recognising a seriously ill child. The challenge is finding a safe and effective balance between high-quality expertise and quickly accessible care, while avoiding over-diagnosis. There are a number of tools available to aid recognition of a seriously ill child and to avoid delay in diagnostic procedures and treatment: the use of a validated paediatric triage system, validated decision rules and guidelines, listening carefully to the parents ('my child's illness is different this time'), the clinical intuition of the experienced paediatrician and the provision of good 'safety net' advice to parents concerning the alarm signals and when they should contact a care provider. Experienced paediatricians should be at the forefront in the evaluation of the acutely ill child in order to teach their younger colleagues the importance of various alarm signals and the role played by clinical intuition.

  7. Identification of subgroups by risk of graft failure after paediatric renal transplantation: application of survival tree models on the ESPN/ERA-EDTA Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofaro, Danilo; Jager, Kitty J; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Groothoff, Jaap W; Arikoski, Pekka; Hoecker, Britta; Roussey-Kesler, Gwenaelle; Spasojević, Brankica; Verrina, Enrico; Schaefer, Franz; van Stralen, Karlijn J

    2016-02-01

    Identification of patient groups by risk of renal graft loss might be helpful for accurate patient counselling and clinical decision-making. Survival tree models are an alternative statistical approach to identify subgroups, offering cut-off points for covariates and an easy-to-interpret representation. Within the European Society of Pediatric Nephrology/European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ESPN/ERA-EDTA) Registry data we identified paediatric patient groups with specific profiles for 5-year renal graft survival. Two analyses were performed, including (i) parameters known at time of transplantation and (ii) additional clinical measurements obtained early after transplantation. The identified subgroups were added as covariates in two survival models. The prognostic performance of the models was tested and compared with conventional Cox regression analyses. The first analysis included 5275 paediatric renal transplants. The best 5-year graft survival (90.4%) was found among patients who received a renal graft as a pre-emptive transplantation or after short-term dialysis (2.2 years). The Cox model including both pre-transplant factors and tree subgroups had a significantly better predictive performance than conventional Cox regression (P 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and dialysis 20 months). Also in this case combining tree findings and clinical factors improved the predictive performance as compared with conventional Cox model models (P tree model to be an accurate and attractive tool to predict graft failure for patients with specific characteristics. This may aid the evaluation of individual graft prognosis and thereby the design of measures to improve graft survival in the poor prognosis groups. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  8. Paediatric ART outcomes in a decentralised model of care in Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective cohort analysis of 613 children receiving ART between 2004 and 2009 was performed in seven physician-run .... and uploaded to Stata Statistical Software ..... yet only one-third of these children required medication change.

  9. Paediatric conscious sedation: views and experience of specialists in paediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, S M; Hingston, E J; Shah, J; Chadwick, B L

    2009-09-26

    The objectives were three-fold: to investigate the level of conscious sedation training received prior to and during specialist training in paediatric dentistry; to establish the use of conscious sedation during and following specialisation; and to determine the attitudes of specialists in paediatric dentistry to conscious sedation. A self-administered postal questionnaire was sent to all specialists in paediatric dentistry registered with the General Dental Council in January 2008. Non-responders were contacted again after a four-week period. A response rate of 60% was achieved. Of the 122 respondents, 67 (55%) had received sedation training as an undergraduate; 89 (75%) had been trained during specialisation. All respondents performed dental treatment under sedation as a trainee and the majority used nitrous oxide inhalation sedation (NOIS). Over 90% of respondents felt that NOIS should be available to all children, both in appropriate primary care settings and in hospitals. One hundred and twenty-one (99%) respondents thought that all trainees in paediatric dentistry should have sedation training. The most popular form of sedation amongst specialists in paediatric dentistry was NOIS. However, some of the respondents felt that children should have access to other forms of sedation in both the primary care and hospital settings. Additional research on other forms of sedation is required to evaluate their effectiveness and safety.

  10. Paediatric End-of-LIfe CAre Needs in Switzerland (PELICAN) : Current end-of-life care practices and the persepctives of bereaved parents

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Despite continued advancements in medical care and improved survival or life expectancy, childhood deaths due to complex chronic conditions (CCC) or prematurity are inevitable. Deaths during the first year of life constitute approximately 50% of disease-related deaths, the causes of which include perinatal complications, prematurity, or congenital anomalies. Beyond the age of one year, the three most common life-limiting CCCs are neurological/neuromuscular and cardiovascular conditions (inclu...

  11. British Society of Paediatric Dentistry: a policy document on consent and the use of physical intervention in the dental care of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, June; Foster, Martin; Master, Selina; Greening, Sue

    2008-11-01

    This policy document was prepared by J Nunn, M Foster, S Master and S Greening on behalf of the British Society of Paediatric Dentistry (BSPD). Policy documents produced by the BSPD represent a majority view, based on a consideration of currently available evidence. They are produced to provide guidance with the intention that the policy be regularly reviewed and updated to take account of changing views and developments.

  12. Malnutrition in paediatric oncology patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional status of paediatric cancer patients at diagnosis ... Professor and Executive Head, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Hospital, .... can lead to decreased oral intake, weight loss.

  13. Genodermatoses in paediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sunil

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern of genodermatoses in paediatric age group was studied. The relative incidence of genodermatoses in paediatric dermatology out patient department was 0.62%. The commonest genodermatoses observed was ichthyosis.

  14. Virtual Models of Long-Term Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenice, Lillian A.; Griffore, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing homes, assisted living facilities and home-care organizations, use web sites to describe their services to potential consumers. This virtual ethnographic study developed models representing how potential consumers may understand this information using data from web sites of 69 long-term-care providers. The content of long-term-care web…

  15. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Paediatric Surgery aims to promote research, post- graduate training and further education among Paediatric surgeons, Paediatric Surgical Trainees and paramedical personnel in the surgery of newborn infants and children particularly in Africa and other tropical regions of the world.AJPS welcomes ...

  16. African Journal of Paediatric Nephrology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Paediatric Nephrology is the official Journal of the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA). The journal is dedicated to increasing awareness and knowledge of Paediatric nephrology in Africa and beyond. We publish research articles on renal diseases in children, on fluid and electrolyte ...

  17. Paediatric interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric interventional radiology (PIR) is a rapidly-growing subspecialty, which offers a wide range of procedures applicable to almost all areas of hospital paediatrics. There are many important differences between paediatric and adult practice in interventional radiology, including disease processes and treatment goals, anatomical considerations, periprocedural patient management, radiation exposure optimisation and legal aspects. The use of retrievable or absorbable interventional devices such as stents will probably become more widespread in PIR practice. Recent advances in the technology of imaging equipment have been accompanied by an increase in the complexity of the work done by the radiographer. These developments present challenges and opportunities related to training and maintenance of skills, staffing arrangements, and the potential for advanced practice. It is likely that specialisation in PIR will become a more common role for radiographers in the future

  18. Paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training program in Latin-America: the RIBEPCI experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Matamoros, Martha M; Moya, Luis; Almonte, Enma; Coronel, Diana; Urbano, Javier; Carrillo, Ángel; Del Castillo, Jimena; Mencía, Santiago; Moral, Ramón; Ordoñez, Flora; Sánchez, Carlos; Lagos, Lina; Johnson, María; Mendoza, Ovidio; Rodriguez, Sandra

    2017-09-12

    To describe the design and to present the results of a paediatric and neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program adapted to Latin-America. A paediatric CPR coordinated training project was set up in several Latin-American countries with the instructional and scientific support of the Spanish Group for Paediatric and Neonatal CPR. The program was divided into four phases: CPR training and preparation of instructors; training for instructors; supervised teaching; and independent teaching. Instructors from each country participated in the development of the next group in the following country. Paediatric Basic Life Support (BLS), Paediatric Intermediate (ILS) and Paediatric Advanced (ALS) courses were organized in each country adapted to local characteristics. Five Paediatric Resuscitation groups were created sequentially in Honduras (2), Guatemala, Dominican Republican and Mexico. During 5 years, 6 instructors courses (94 students), 64 Paediatric BLS Courses (1409 students), 29 Paediatrics ILS courses (626 students) and 89 Paediatric ALS courses (1804 students) were given. At the end of the program all five groups are autonomous and organize their own instructor courses. Training of autonomous Paediatric CPR groups with the collaboration and scientific assessment of an expert group is a good model program to develop Paediatric CPR training in low- and middle income countries. Participation of groups of different countries in the educational activities is an important method to establish a cooperation network.

  19. Diabetes care: model for the future of primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, L Michael; Tanzi, Maria G

    2010-01-01

    To review relevant trends threatening primary care and the evidence supporting use of nonphysicians in primary and chronic care of patients with diabetes. Current medical and pharmacy literature as selected by authors. The care needed by patients with diabetes does not fit well into our current medical model for primary care, and an adequate supply of physicians is not likely to be available for primary care roles in coming years. Patients with diabetes who are placed on evidence-based regimens, are educated about their disease, are coached in ways that motivate them to lose weight and adopt other therapeutic lifestyle changes, and are adhering to and persisting with therapy will soon have improved clinical parameters. These quickly translate into fewer hospitalizations and emergency department visits. A growing body of literature supports the use of pharmacists and other nonphysicians in meeting the needs of patients with diabetes. Pharmacists should join nurse practitioners, specially trained nurses, and physician assistants as integral members of the health care team in providing care to patients with diabetes and, by logical extension, other chronic conditions. Demand for primary care is likely to outstrip the available supply of generalist physicians in the coming years. In addition to nurse practitioners and physician assistants, pharmacists should be considered for key roles in future interdisciplinary teams that triage and provide direct care to patients, including those with diabetes and other chronic conditions.

  20. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C viral co-infections among children infected with human immunodeficiency virus attending the paediatric HIV care and treatment center at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munubhi Emmanuel K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increased availability of antibiotics and antifungal agents hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV infections are becoming a cause for significant concern in HIV infected children. We determined the seroprevalence and risk factors for HBV and HCV among HIV infected children aged 18 months to 17 years, attending the Paediatric HIV Care and Treatment Center (CTC at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. Methods Investigations included; interviews, physical examination and serology for HBsAg, IgG antibodies to HCV and alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels. HIV serostatus and CD4 counts were obtained from patient records. Results 167 HIV infected children, 88(52.7% males and 79(47.3% females were enrolled. The overall prevalence of hepatitis co-infection was 15%, with the seroprevalence of HBV and HCV being 1.2% and 13.8%, respectively. Hepatitis virus co-infection was not associated with any of the investigated risk factors and there was no association between HBV and HCV. Elevated ALT was associated with hepatitis viral co-infection but not with ART usage or immune status. Conclusion The high seroprevalence (15% of hepatitis co-infection in HIV infected children attending the Paediatrics HIV CTC at the MNH calls for routine screening of hepatitis viral co-infection and modification in the management of HIV infected children.

  1. ‘Reaching Out’: international models for transitional care for teenage and young adult cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Weston

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article will give an overview of ‘Reaching Out’, a project to identify international models of transitional care for adolescent and young adult (AYA cancer patients. Aims: •\tExplore provision of AYA cancer care in a different cultural context •\tIdentify new models of care for supporting transition between paediatric, AYA and adult care, and between acute and primary care •\tIdentify relevant resources and service designs that could be adapted for use in AYA services in the UK Methods: Three-week observational visit in a range of international healthcare settings. Findings: Similarities and differences between Australian and UK healthcare systems were observed. Models of care using a range of resources, including structured health and wellbeing programmes, were identified to support transitional care. Models of collaborative working across organisations were observed. The implementation of innovative programmes to improve efficiency of services and limit unnecessary impact on patient time and finances were identified, including the use of Skype for collaborative consultations between acute and community healthcare providers. Conclusions: Recommendations to benefit AYA patients with an improved range of supportive, holistic services and improved person-centred care include: •\tJoint AYA nursing posts between AYA centres to support transition •\tStructured AYA post-treatment health and wellbeing programme •\tProgramme of creative wellbeing projects to support transition at the end of treatment Scope use of Skype appointments within the AYA service Implications for practice: Observing service provision and healthcare practice in an international setting provides the opportunity to improve cross-cultural competence, which is essential to culturally competent care. Cross-cultural competence supports the improvement of patient care through experiential learning, sharing of ideas and connecting with others. The

  2. Implementation and evaluation of a simulation curriculum for paediatric residency programs including just-in-time in situ mock codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Jonathan; Pierse, Michael; Al-Qahtani, Abdullah; Cheng, Adam

    2012-02-01

    To develop, implement and evaluate a simulation-based acute care curriculum in a paediatric residency program using an integrated and longitudinal approach. Curriculum framework consisting of three modular, year-specific courses and longitudinal just-in-time, in situ mock codes. Paediatric residency program at BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia. The three year-specific courses focused on the critical first 5 min, complex medical management and crisis resource management, respectively. The just-in-time in situ mock codes simulated the acute deterioration of an existing ward patient, prepared the actual multidisciplinary code team, and primed the surrounding crisis support systems. Each curriculum component was evaluated with surveys using a five-point Likert scale. A total of 40 resident surveys were completed after each of the modular courses, and an additional 28 surveys were completed for the overall simulation curriculum. The highest Likert scores were for hands-on skill stations, immersive simulation environment and crisis resource management teaching. Survey results also suggested that just-in-time mock codes were realistic, reinforced learning, and prepared ward teams for patient deterioration. A simulation-based acute care curriculum was successfully integrated into a paediatric residency program. It provides a model for integrating simulation-based learning into other training programs, as well as a model for any hospital that wishes to improve paediatric resuscitation outcomes using just-in-time in situ mock codes.

  3. Fast tracking in paediatric cardiac anaesthesia : an update.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lake Carol

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A care plan in which cardiac surgical patients progress quickly through the perioperative course to hospital discharge is often referred to as a Fast Track. Such care plans have been used extensively in adult cardiac patients but are also applicable to paediatric patients. Although no randomised controlled trials are available to document a reduction in hospital costs and avoidance of iatrogenic complications with paediatric fast tracks, many healthcare administrators encourage their use. Fast Track clinical guidelines usually include same day surgery, use of short- acting anaesthetic drugs, early extubation, effective pain management, and reduced intensive care unit stays. These protocols are certainly appropriate for simple procedures such as repair of atrial or ventricular septal defects or ligation of a patent ductus arteriosus. However, many paediatric cardiac anaesthesiologists consider that all paediatric patients without significant pulmonary or residual cardiac pathology can be managed using expedited postoperative protocols. Essential components in a "fast track" protocol include use of minimally invasive surgical techniques, modified ultrafiltration during cardiopulmonary bypass, transoesophageal echocardiography to evaluate the cardiac repair, and postoperative pain control. Using such techniques, 80-90% of paediatric patients can be extubated in the operating room or within 2-4 hours postoperatively. Despite the opinions of recognised experts, an appropriately sized and powered multicentre, controlled, randomised, prospective study is still needed to conclusively document the efficiency and effectiveness of the Fast Track in paediatric cardiac patients.

  4. Paediatric airway management: basic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Knudsen, R J; Rasmussen, L S

    2009-01-01

    Paediatric airway management is a great challenge, especially for anaesthesiologists working in departments with a low number of paediatric surgical procedures. The paediatric airway is substantially different from the adult airway and obstruction leads to rapid desaturation in infants and small...... children. This paper aims at providing the non-paediatric anaesthesiologist with a set of safe and simple principles for basic paediatric airway management. In contrast to adults, most children with difficult airways are recognised before induction of anaesthesia but problems may arise in all children...

  5. Mayo Clinic Care Network: A Collaborative Health Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, John T; Lowery-Schrandt, Sherri; Hayes, David L; Kotsenas, Amy L

    2018-01-01

    By leveraging its experience and expertise as a consultative clinical partner, the Mayo Clinic developed an innovative, scalable care model to accomplish several strategic goals: (1) create and sustain high-value relationships that benefit patients and providers, (2) foster relationships with like-minded partners to act as a strategy against the development of narrow health care networks, and (3) increase national and international brand awareness of Mayo Clinic. The result was the Mayo Clinic Care Network. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinician's gaze behaviour in simulated paediatric emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughten, Ben; Hart, Caroline; Gallagher, Stephen; Junk, Carol; Coulter, Patricia; Thompson, Andrew; Bourke, Thomas

    2018-03-07

    Differences in the gaze behaviour of experts and novices are described in aviation and surgery. This study sought to describe the gaze behaviour of clinicians from different training backgrounds during a simulated paediatric emergency. Clinicians from four clinical areas undertook a simulated emergency. Participants wore SMI (SensoMotoric Instruments) eye tracking glasses. We measured the fixation count and dwell time on predefined areas of interest and the time taken to key clinical interventions. Paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) consultants performed best and focused longer on the chest and airway. Paediatric consultants and trainees spent longer looking at the defibrillator and algorithm (51 180 ms and 50 551 ms, respectively) than the PICU and paediatric emergency medicine consultants. This study is the first to describe differences in the gaze behaviour between experts and novices in a resuscitation. They mirror those described in aviation and surgery. Further research is needed to evaluate the potential use of eye tracking as an educational tool. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Managing guidelines to support parents with the hospitalisation of their child in a private paediatric unit

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to describe managerial guidelines to support parents with the hospitalisation of their child in a private paediatric unit. The study explored and described: · the nursing care experiences of parents regarding the hospitalisation of their child in a paediatric unit; · managerial guidelines to support parents with their lived experiences of their child’s hospitalisation in a private paediatric unit. To achieve the purpose and the objectives of the research...

  8. Hand decontamination practices in paediatric wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jelly

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine and describe hand decontamination practices of health care professionals in the paediatric wards of an academic hospital in Johannesburg. The purpose was addressed within a survey design and through the use of descriptive and comparative methods. Data were collected through direct observation conducted with the use of a researcher-administered checklist. A sample of sixtysix health professionals was obtained through convenience sampling.

  9. Smartphone applications in paediatric radiology: availability and authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelmerdine, Susan C.; Lynch, Jeremy O.

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread ownership of smartphones, many health care professionals question the degree to which medically related smartphone applications are reliable. To assess the variety of smartphone applications relating to paediatric radiology and the presence of health care professional involvement in their development. As a secondary objective, we explore whether there are gaps within the paediatric radiology app market. The most popular smartphone marketplaces (Apple iTunes App Store, Blackberry Mobile Market, Google Play Android Market, Nokia Ovi, Samsung and Microsoft Windows Marketplace) were searched for terms relating to paediatric radiology. Cost, review ratings, number of downloads, health care involvement and target audience were recorded. Nine paediatric radiology applications were found in the Apple iTunes App Store and nine in the Google Play Android Market. The target audiences for all applications were health care professionals. None were available for patients or their caregivers. All applications were reported to have medical expertise in their development. All paediatric radiology applications were developed with the aid of a health care professional. Due to the small number available online, there is a potential gap in the marketplace for further applications in this field, possibly aimed at patients and their families. (orig.)

  10. Smartphone applications in paediatric radiology: availability and authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelmerdine, Susan C. [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Specialist Registrar in Clinical Radiology, Department of Clinical Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Lynch, Jeremy O. [Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Specialist Registrar in Clinical Radiology, Department of Clinical Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    With the widespread ownership of smartphones, many health care professionals question the degree to which medically related smartphone applications are reliable. To assess the variety of smartphone applications relating to paediatric radiology and the presence of health care professional involvement in their development. As a secondary objective, we explore whether there are gaps within the paediatric radiology app market. The most popular smartphone marketplaces (Apple iTunes App Store, Blackberry Mobile Market, Google Play Android Market, Nokia Ovi, Samsung and Microsoft Windows Marketplace) were searched for terms relating to paediatric radiology. Cost, review ratings, number of downloads, health care involvement and target audience were recorded. Nine paediatric radiology applications were found in the Apple iTunes App Store and nine in the Google Play Android Market. The target audiences for all applications were health care professionals. None were available for patients or their caregivers. All applications were reported to have medical expertise in their development. All paediatric radiology applications were developed with the aid of a health care professional. Due to the small number available online, there is a potential gap in the marketplace for further applications in this field, possibly aimed at patients and their families. (orig.)

  11. Repeatability of derived parameters from histograms following non-Gaussian diffusion modelling of diffusion-weighted imaging in a paediatric oncological cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerome, Neil P.; Miyazaki, Keiko; Collins, David J.; Orton, Matthew R.; D' Arcy, James A.; Leach, Martin O. [Cancer Research UK Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Wallace, Toni; Koh, Dow-Mu [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Moreno, Lucas [The Institute of Cancer Research, Paediatric Drug Development Team, Division of Cancer Therapeutics and Clinical Studies, London (United Kingdom); Hospital Nino Jesus, Madrid (Spain); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Paediatric Drug Development Unit, Children and Young People' s Unit, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Pearson, Andrew D.J.; Marshall, Lynley V.; Carceller, Fernando; Zacharoulis, Stergios [The Institute of Cancer Research, Paediatric Drug Development Team, Division of Cancer Therapeutics and Clinical Studies, London (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Paediatric Drug Development Unit, Children and Young People' s Unit, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    To examine repeatability of parameters derived from non-Gaussian diffusion models in data acquired in children with solid tumours. Paediatric patients (<16 years, n = 17) were scanned twice, 24 h apart, using DWI (6 b-values, 0-1000 mm{sup -2} s) at 1.5 T in a prospective study. Tumour ROIs were drawn (3 slices) and all data fitted using IVIM, stretched exponential, and kurtosis models; percentage coefficients of variation (CV) calculated for each parameter at all ROI histogram centiles, including the medians. The values for ADC, D, DDC{sub α}, α, and DDC{sub K} gave CV < 10 % down to the 5th centile, with sharp CV increases below 5th and above 95th centile. K, f, and D* showed increased CV (>30 %) over the histogram. ADC, D, DDC{sub α}, and DDC{sub K} were strongly correlated (ρ > 0.9), DDC{sub α} and α were not correlated (ρ = 0.083). Perfusion- and kurtosis-related parameters displayed larger, more variable CV across the histogram, indicating observed clinical changes outside of D/DDC in these models should be interpreted with caution. Centiles below 5th for all parameters show high CV and are unreliable as diffusion metrics. The stretched exponential model behaved well for both DDC{sub α} and α, making it a strong candidate for modelling multiple-b-value diffusion imaging data. (orig.)

  12. A paediatric and perinatal HIV/AIDS leadership initiative in Kingston, Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, C D C

    2004-10-01

    In Jamaica 1-2% of pregnant women are HIV-positive; 876 HIV-positive pregnant women will deliver and at least 283 newly infected HIV-infected infants will be born in 2003; HIV/AIDS is the leading cause of death in children aged one to four years. We describe a collaborative "Town and Gown" programme to address the paediatric and perinatal HIV epidemic in Kingston. A team of academic and government healthcare personnel, comprising paediatricians, obstetricians, public health practitioners, nurses, microbiologists, data management and information technology personnel collaborated to address this public health emergency. A five-point plan was implemented This comprised leadership and training of a core group of paediatric/perinatal HIVprofessionals to serve Greater Kingston and St Catherine and be a model for the rest of Jamaica. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS is prevented by counselling and HIV-testing women in the antenatal clinics, giving azidothymidine (AZT) to HIV pregnant women beginning at 28 weeks gestation, throughout labour and to the HIV-exposed infants for the first six weeks of life. A unified parallel programme for identifying the HIV-infected infant and delivering paediatric HIV care at the major paediatric centres was implemented In three years, over 30,000 pregnant women are being tested for HIV; 600 HIV-exposed babies are being identified and about 140 paediatric HIV infections will be prevented The team is building research capacity which emphasizes a strong outcomes-based research agenda and implementation of clinical trials. We are collaborating, locally, regionally and internationally. Collaboratively, the mission of reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS and improving the quality of life for those already living and affected by HIV/AIDS can be achieved.

  13. Modeling Health Care Expenditures and Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Partha; Norton, Edward C

    2018-04-01

    Health care expenditures and use are challenging to model because these dependent variables typically have distributions that are skewed with a large mass at zero. In this article, we describe estimation and interpretation of the effects of a natural experiment using two classes of nonlinear statistical models: one for health care expenditures and the other for counts of health care use. We extend prior analyses to test the effect of the ACA's young adult expansion on three different outcomes: total health care expenditures, office-based visits, and emergency department visits. Modeling the outcomes with a two-part or hurdle model, instead of a single-equation model, reveals that the ACA policy increased the number of office-based visits but decreased emergency department visits and overall spending.

  14. Phase Synchronization in Electroencephalographic Recordings Prognosticates Outcome in Paediatric Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadovic, Vera; Perez Velazquez, Jose Luis; Hutchison, James Saunders

    2014-01-01

    Brain injury from trauma, cardiac arrest or stroke is the most important cause of death and acquired disability in the paediatric population. Due to the lifetime impact of brain injury, there is a need for methods to stratify patient risk and ultimately predict outcome. Early prognosis is fundamental to the implementation of interventions to improve recovery, but no clinical model as yet exists. Healthy physiology is associated with a relative high variability of physiologic signals in organ systems. This was first evaluated in heart rate variability research. Brain variability can be quantified through electroencephalographic (EEG) phase synchrony. We hypothesised that variability in brain signals from EEG recordings would correlate with patient outcome after brain injury. Lower variability in EEG phase synchronization, would be associated with poor patient prognosis. A retrospective study, spanning 10 years (2000–2010) analysed the scalp EEGs of children aged 1 month to 17 years in coma (Glasgow Coma Scale, GCS, <8) admitted to the paediatric critical care unit (PCCU) following brain injury from TBI, cardiac arrest or stroke. Phase synchrony of the EEGs was evaluated using the Hilbert transform and the variability of the phase synchrony calculated. Outcome was evaluated using the 6 point Paediatric Performance Category Score (PCPC) based on chart review at the time of hospital discharge. Outcome was dichotomized to good outcome (PCPC score 1 to 3) and poor outcome (PCPC score 4 to 6). Children who had a poor outcome following brain injury secondary to cardiac arrest, TBI or stroke, had a higher magnitude of synchrony (R index), a lower spatial complexity of the synchrony patterns and a lower temporal variability of the synchrony index values at 15 Hz when compared to those patients with a good outcome. PMID:24752289

  15. The Gold Coast Integrated Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Connor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the development of the Australian Gold Coast Integrated Care Model based on the elements identified in contemporary research literature as essential for successful integration of care between primary care, and acute hospital services. The objectives of the model are to proactively manage high risk patients with complex and chronic conditions in collaboration with General Practitioners to ultimately reduce presentations to the health service emergency department, improve the capacity of specialist outpatients, and decrease planned and unplanned admission rates. Central to the model is a shared care record which is maintained and accessed by staff in the Coordination Centre. We provide a process map outlining the care protocols from initial assessment to care of the patient presenting for emergency care. The model is being evaluated over a pilot three year proof of concept phase to determine economic and process perspectives. If found to be cost-effective, acceptable to patients and professionals and as good as or better than usual care in terms of outcomes, the strategic intent is to scale the programme beyond the local health service.

  16. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Loonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the “Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model”, that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  17. Optimization of paediatric radiation doses with CR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatelli, Giovanna; Mazzocchi, S.; Ciccarone, A.; Fonda, C.; De Otto, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radiation protection of paediatric patients is a primary objective in paediatric radiology due the higher life expectance of the little patients undergoing radiology examinations and due to the higher radiosensitivity of tissues. Aim of this work is the study of the optimization process in paediatric doses needed after the recent installation of a new Computed Radiography System in the Radiology of the Meyer paediatric Hospital, in Florence, Italy. This process involves both the use of new dedicated digitizer (Agfa DX-S) and elaboration software (Agfa NX2.0). The choice of the DX-S systems has been performed in consideration of high resolution (Scanhead technology - DirectriX detector), image sharpness and portability of the cassettes that make DX-S ideal in paediatric applications as neonatal intensive care. The NX software for image processing has been installed with the 'Paediatric' licence that optimizes paediatric images especially for exposures of premature newborns. Paediatric NX automatically selects the paediatric age group, depending on the patient's birth date. Each age group contains enhanced algorithms and settings adapted to age group, for optimized visibility of fine details. All the CR system has been accepted by mean of quality control acceptance tool AGFA AutoQC2, and all the automatic exposure control devices installed on radiographic devices were previously calibrated in accordance to literature with signal to noise vs dose considerations [S. Mazzocchi et al. 'AEC set-up optimization with computed radiography imaging' Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 117, 169-173 2005]. Paediatric patients were then divided into age-weight categories and the Entrance Surface Doses (ESD) were calculated by output x-rays measurements. ESD for thorax examinations were correlated to the image evaluations performed by experienced radiologists following European Guidelines on quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images in paediatrics (EUR 16261, European

  18. The Happy Teen programme: a holistic outpatient clinic-based approach to prepare HIV-infected youth for the transition from paediatric to adult medical care services in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolekha, Rangsima; Boon-Yasidhi, Vitharon; Na-Nakorn, Yossawadee; Manaboriboon, Boonying; Vandepitte, Warunee Punpanich; Martin, Michael; Tarugsa, Jariya; Nuchanard, Wipada; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri; Lapphra, Ketwadee; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Thaineua, Vorapathu; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2017-05-16

    We developed an 18-month Happy Teen 2 (HT2) programme comprised of a one-day workshop, two half-day sessions, and three individual sessions to prepare HIV-infected youth for the transition from paediatric to adult HIV care services. We describe the programme and evaluate the change in youth's knowledge scores. We implemented the HT2 programme among HIV-infected Thai youth aged 14-22 years who were aware of their HIV status and receiving care at two hospitals in Bangkok (Siriraj Hospital, Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health [QSNICH]). Staff interviewed youth using a standardized questionnaire to assess HIV and health-related knowledge at baseline and at 12 and 18 months while they participated in the programme. We examined factors associated with a composite knowledge score ≥95% at month 18 using logistic regression. During March 2014-July 2016, 192 of 245 (78%) eligible youth were interviewed at baseline. Of these, 161 (84%) returned for interviews at 12 and 18 months. Among the 161 youth, the median age was 17 years, 74 (46%) were female, and 99% were receiving antiretroviral treatment. The median composite score was 45% at baseline and increased to 82% at 12 months and 95% at 18 months ( P  95% was associated with education level >high school (aOR: 2.15, 95%CI, 1.03-4.48) and receipt care at QSNICH (aOR: 2.43, 95%CI, 1.18-4.98). Youth whose mother and father had died were less likely to have score ≥95% (aOR: 0.22, 95%CI, 0.07-0.67) than those with living parents. Knowledge useful for a successful transition from paediatric to adult HIV care increased among youth participating in the HT2 programme. Youth follow-up will continue to assess the impact of improved knowledge on outcomes following the transition to adult care services.

  19. BDA special care case mix model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, P; Arnold, C; Brown, R; Foster, L V; Greening, S; Monaghan, N; Zoitopoulos, L

    2010-04-10

    Routine dental care provided in special care dentistry is complicated by patient specific factors which increase the time taken and costs of treatment. The BDA have developed and conducted a field trial of a case mix tool to measure this complexity. For each episode of care the case mix tool assesses the following on a four point scale: 'ability to communicate', 'ability to cooperate', 'medical status', 'oral risk factors', 'access to oral care' and 'legal and ethical barriers to care'. The tool is reported to be easy to use and captures sufficient detail to discriminate between types of service and special care dentistry provided. It offers potential as a simple to use and clinically relevant source of performance management and commissioning data. This paper describes the model, demonstrates how it is currently being used, and considers future developments in its use.

  20. Scotland's GP paediatric scholarship: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVicar, Ronald; Borland, Lyndsey; McHale, Sharon; Goh, Dayeel; Potter, Alex

    2018-05-01

    In a previous publication we described the implementation and early evaluation of general practice paediatric scholarships in Scotland. We suggested that it was too early to be able to determine whether this significant investment will produce a return for Scotland in terms of enhanced roles in providing, leading or developing children's services in primary care or at the primary care/secondary care interface. This paper presents the results of a survey of the impact of the scholarship for the first six cohorts of the scholarship (119 General Practitioners). The response rate was 76%. Of the 90 respondents, almost half (44) have developed roles or areas of special paediatric interest either within or out with the practice, or in three cases both within and out with the practice. A total of 37 (43%) of those that continue to work within general practice reported that they have developed areas of special interest of benefit to the practice. Qualitative analysis of free text questions suggested that scholars had benefited from their experience in terms of increased confidence in dealing with child health problems, developing links with secondary care colleagues, and personal gain with respect to role development. What is already known in this area: Changes in GP Training have been suggested in order to provide a workforce that can meet the needs of infants, children and young people. Studies have shown a positive impact of paediatric trainees and GP trainees learning together. Little attention has however been given to the potential to support trained GPs to develop their expertise in child health. What this work adds: Early evaluation of the Scottish Paediatric Scholarship suggested a high degree of satisfaction. This more robust evaluation suggests that almost half (44/90 respondents) have developed roles or areas of special paediatric interest either within or out with the practice, or in three cases both within and out with the practice. Suggestions for future

  1. Prosthetics in Paediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulićević Zoran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature loss of teeth in children may lead to both functional and esthetic problems. Missing teeth in both anterior and posterior regions may cause malfunctions in mastication and proper pronunciation. If the missing teeth are not replaced, further complications may occur, including adjacent tooth migration, loss of alveolar bone, and irregular occlusion. Considering the sensitive nature of children, loss of teeth may cause the development of insecurities and low self esteem problems. Due to dynamic nature of growth in children and adolescents, prosthetic appliances must not hinder development of orofacial system, and must meet adequate esthetic and functional standards. Dental prosthetic appliances in paediatrics must be planned with respect to the special conditions that led to tooth loss or damage. Multi-disciplinary approach is needed, under constant supervision of paediatric dentist and orthodontist, as well as regular checkups with clinical and radiographical examinations.

  2. Paediatric treadmill friction injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremijenko, Luke; Mott, Jonathan; Wallis, Belinda; Kimble, Roy

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the severity and incidence of children injured by treadmills and to promote the implementation of safety standards. This retrospective review of children with treadmill friction injuries was conducted in a single tertiary-level burns centre in Australia between January 1997 and June 2007. The study revealed 37 children who sustained paediatric treadmill friction injuries. This was a presentation of 1% of all burns. Thirty-three (90%) of the injuries occurred in the last 3.5 years (January 2004 to June 2007). The modal age was 3.2 years. Thirty-three (90%) injuries were either full thickness or deep partial friction burns. Eleven (30%) required split thickness skin grafts. Of those who became entrapped, 100% required skin grafting. This study found that paediatric treadmill friction injuries are severe and increasing in incidence. Australian standards should be developed, implemented and mandated to reduce this preventable and severe injury.

  3. Understanding Business Models in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-05-01

    The increasing focus on the costs of care is forcing health care organizations to critically look at their basic set of processes and activities, to determine what type of value they can deliver. A business model describes the resources, processes, and cost assumptions that an organization makes that will lead to the delivery of a unique value proposition to a customer. As health care organizations are beginning to transform their structure in preparation for a value-based delivery system, understanding business model theory can help in the redesign process.

  4. Simulation modeling for the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the use of simulation software to solve administrative problems faced by health care managers. Spreadsheet add-ins, process simulation software, and discrete event simulation software are available at a range of costs and complexity. All use the Monte Carlo method to realistically integrate probability distributions into models of the health care environment. Problems typically addressed by health care simulation modeling are facility planning, resource allocation, staffing, patient flow and wait time, routing and transportation, supply chain management, and process improvement.

  5. Advanced practice physiotherapy in paediatric orthopaedics: innovation and collaboration to improve service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó Mír, M; O'Sullivan, C

    2018-02-01

    One in eight paediatric primary care presentations is for a musculoskeletal (MSK) disorder. These patients are frequently referred to paediatric orthopaedic surgeons; however, up to 50% of referrals are for normal variants. This results in excessive wait-times and impedes access for urgent surgical cases. Adult MSK medicine has successfully utilised advanced practice physiotherapists (APP) managing non-surgical candidates, with documented benefits both to patients and services. There is a gap in the literature with regard to APP in paediatric orthopaedics. In this review, we investigate demands on paediatric orthopaedic services, examine the literature regarding APP in paediatric orthopaedics and explore the value the role has to offer current outpatient services. Paediatric orthopaedic services are under-resourced with concurrent long wait times. Approximately 50% of referrals are for normal variants, which do not require specialist intervention. Poor musculoskeletal examination skills and low diagnostic confidence amongst primary care physicians have been identified as a cause of inappropriate referrals. APP clinics for normal variants have reported independent management rate and discharge rates of 95% and marked reduction in patient wait times. There is limited evidence to support the APP in paediatric orthopaedics. Further studies are needed investigating diagnostic agreement, patient/stakeholder satisfaction, patient outcomes and economic evaluation. Paediatric orthopaedics is in crisis as to how to effectively manage the overwhelming volume of referrals. Innovative multidisciplinary solutions are required so that the onus is not solely on physicians to provide all services. The APP in paediatric orthopaedics may be part of the solution.

  6. Recommendations for mechanical ventilation of critically ill children from the Paediatric Mechanical Ventilation Consensus Conference (PEMVECC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; de Luca, Daniele; Calderini, Edoardo; Jarreau, Pierre-Henri; Javouhey, Etienne; Lopez-Herce, Jesus; Hammer, Jurg; Macrae, Duncan; Markhorst, Dick G.; Medina, Alberto; Pons-Odena, Marti; Racca, Fabrizio; Wolf, Gerhard; Biban, Paolo; Brierley, Joe; Rimensberger, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Much of the common practice in paediatric mechanical ventilation is based on personal experiences and what paediatric critical care practitioners have adopted from adult and neonatal experience. This presents a barrier to planning and interpretation of clinical trials on the use of specific

  7. Renal imaging in paediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porn, U.; Hahn, K.; Fischer, S.

    2003-01-01

    The most frequent renal diseases in paediatrics include urinary tract infections, hydronephrosis, kidney anomalies and reflux. The main reason for performing DMSA scintigraphy in paediatrics is the detection of cortical abnormalities related to urinary tract infection. Because the amount of tracer retained in the tubular cells is associated with the distribution of functioning renal parenchyma in the kidney, it is possible, to evaluate the split renal function. In comparison to ultrasound and intravenous urography the sensitivity in the detection of acute as well as chronic inflammatory changes is very high, however less specific. An indication for a renography in neonates and children is beside an estimation of the total renal function and the calculation of the split renal function, the assessment of renal drainage in patients with unclear dilatation of the collecting system in ultrasound. The analysis of the time activity curve provides, especially for follow-up studies, a reproducible method to assess the urinary outflow. The diuretic scintigraphy allows the detection of urinary obstruction. Subsequently it is possible to image the micturition phase to detect vesico-ureteric reflux (indirect MCU) after drainage of tracer from the renal pelvis. An reflux in the ureters or the pelvicalyceal system is visible on the scintigraphic images and can be confirmed by time activity curves. A more invasive technique is the direct isotope cystography with bladder catheterization. The present paper should give an overview about the role of nuclear medicine in paediatric urology. (orig.) [de

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols for paediatric neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, Dawn E.; Thompson, Clare; Gunny, Roxanne; Jones, Rod; Cox, Tim; Chong, Wui Khean

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, radiologists are encouraged to have protocols for all imaging studies and to include imaging guidelines in care pathways set up by the referring clinicians. This is particularly advantageous in MRI where magnet time is limited and a radiologist's review of each patient's images often results in additional sequences and longer scanning times without the advantage of improvement in diagnostic ability. The difficulties of imaging small children and the challenges presented to the radiologist as the brain develops are discussed. We present our protocols for imaging the brain and spine of children based on 20 years experience of paediatric neurological MRI. The protocols are adapted to suit children under the age of 2 years, small body parts and paediatric clinical scenarios. (orig.)

  9. ISLAMIC CARING MODEL ON INCREASE PATIENT SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muh. Abdurrouf

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction was important aspect that must be considered by health service providers, patients who were not satisfied will leave the hospital and be a competitor's customers so be able caused a decrease in sales of products/services and in turn could reduce and even loss of profit, therefore, the hospital must provided the best service so that it could increase patient satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to exams the effect of Islamic caring model on increase patient satisfaction.. Method: This study was used pre-experimental design, the respondents were 31 patients in the treatment group assigned Islamic caring and 31 patients with a kontrol group that were not given Islamic caring Inpatient Surgical Sultan Agung Islamic Hospital Semarang by using consecutive sampling techniques, patient satisfaction data collected through questionnaires and analyzed with Mann-Whitney test, as for finding out the Islamic caring for patient satisfaction were analyzed with spearmen's rho test. Result: The results showed that there was a significant influence of Islamic caring for perceived disconfirmation (p=0,000 there was a perceived disconfirmation influence on patient satisfaction significantly (p=0,000, there was a significant influence of Islamic caring for patient satisfaction in the treatment group with a kontrol group (p=0.001. Discussion: Discussion of this study was Islamic caring model effect on the increase perceived disconfirmation and patient satisfaction, Perceived disconfirmation effect on patient satisfaction, patient satisfaction who given Islamic caring was increase, patients given Islamic caring had higher satisfaction levels than patients who not given Islamic caring. Suggestions put forward based on the results of the study of Islamic caring model could be applied in Sultan Agung Islamic Hospital as a model of nursing care, Islamic caring behavior can be learned and improved through training and commitment and

  10. Geography does not limit optimal diabetes care: use of a tertiary centre model of care in an outreach service for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simm, Peter J; Wong, Nicole; Fraser, Lynne; Kearney, John; Fenton, Judy; Jachno, Kim; Cameron, Fergus J

    2014-06-01

    Young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus living in rural and regional Australia have previously been shown to have limited access to specialised diabetes services. The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne has been running diabetes outreach clinics to Western Victoria, Australia, for over 13 years. We aim to evaluate this service by comparing the outcomes of three outreach clinics with our urban diabetes clinic at the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne. We examine our tertiary, multidisciplinary team-based model of care, where visiting specialist medical staff work alongside local allied health teams. The local teams provide interim care between clinics utilising the same protocols and treatment practices as the tertiary centre. Longitudinal data encapsulating the years 2005-2010, as a cohort study with a control group, are reviewed. A total of 69 rural patients were compared with 1387 metropolitan patients. Metabolic control was comparable, with no difference in mean HbA1c (8.3%/67 mmol/mol for both groups). Treatment options varied slightly at diagnosis, while insulin pump usage was comparable between treatment settings (20.3% rural compared with 27.6% urban, P = 0.19). Of note was that the number of visits per year was higher in the rural group (3.3 per year rural compared with 2.7 urban, P < 0.001). We conclude that the outreach service is able to provide a comparable level of care when the urban model is translated to a rural setting. This model may be further able to be extrapolated to other geographic areas and also other chronic health conditions of childhood. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  11. Survey on sedation in paediatric dentistry: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Alcaino, Eduardo A

    2011-09-01

    Paediatric dentists receive training in sedation during their advanced education training, but evidence suggests that this training varies widely. The purpose of this study was to survey members of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry (IAPD) and the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) on their opinion on pharmacological and other behavioural management techniques and their training related to provision of oral health care of paediatric patients in the dental setting. A request was made for access to the IAPD and EAPD membership email addresses. The responses were recorded anonymously and data uploaded into spss (version 9) and analysed using descriptive analysis and chi-square with and without tabulation processes. A total of 311 respondents of 1973 targeted individuals answered the survey. The response rate was 16%. The majority of the respondents came from the continent of Europe, Asia, and the Americas. The most frequent type of sedation was general anaesthesia (52% of the respondents), followed by nitrous oxide (46%) and then oral sedation (44%). At least 91% of the respondents indicated that they were interested in the development of continuing education on the topic of sedation. Paediatric dentists around the world use relatively few behaviour management techniques, including pharmacological management. There is a definite interest in continuing education in the area of sedation. The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Choosing a career in paediatrics: do trainees' views change over the first year of specialty training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Helen M; Lakshminarayana, Indumathy; Wall, David; Bindal, Taruna

    2014-09-01

    To look at why a regional cohort of UK doctors chose a paediatric career and to ascertain views on their career near the end of training year one. A 20-item questionnaire was sent to all new regional paediatric specialty trainees. Three focus groups were held with trainees near the end of year one to elicit key themes. West Midlands Deanery, UK. Twenty-nine new regional paediatric specialty trainees in year one completed the questionnaire. A total of 15 trainees participated in the focus groups near the end of year one training. Reasons for choosing a paediatric career and factors which further influence career choice for trainees during their first specialty training year. Key influencing factors for choosing paediatrics were enjoying working with children and positive undergraduate experience of the specialty. All trainees had paediatrics as their first choice specialty and undertook a paediatric Foundation post. Near the end of year one, doubts were cast on career aspirations due to seeing middle grade colleagues struggling with work-life balance and a growing feeling that family came first. Senior trainees need to be aware that they act as powerful role models for their more junior colleagues and therefore have an influential role on how juniors perceive a paediatric career. Family friendly flexible working patterns in paediatrics are vital to retain junior trainees. All paediatric staff are role models and need to be enthusiastic, keen to teach and to promote a positive working environment.

  13. ACO model should encourage efficient care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, John; Krueger, David; Shortell, Stephen M; Milstein, Arnold; Cutler, David M

    2015-09-01

    The independent Office of the Actuary for CMS certified that the Pioneer ACO model has met the stringent criteria for expansion to a larger population. Significant savings have accrued and quality targets have been met, so the program as a whole appears to be working. Ironically, 13 of the initial 32 enrollees have left. We attribute this to the design of the ACO models which inadequately support efficient care delivery. Using Bellin-ThedaCare Healthcare Partners as an example, we will focus on correctible flaws in four core elements of the ACO payment model: finance spending and targets, attribution, and quality performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Health care management modelling: a process perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.M.H.

    1998-01-01

    Modelling-based health care management ought to become just as popular as evidence based medicine. Making managerial decisions based on evidence by modelling efforts is certainly a step forward. Examples can be given of many successful applications in different areas of decision making: disease

  15. Minimal intervention dentistry: part 3. Paediatric dental care--prevention and management protocols using caries risk assessment for infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gomez, F J; Crystal, Y O; Domejean, S; Featherstone, J D B

    2012-11-01

    Recent increases in caries prevalence in young children throughout the world highlight the need for a simple but effective infant oral care programme. This programme needs to include a medical disease prevention management model with an early establishment of a dental home and a treatment approach based on individual patient risk. This article presents an updated approach with practical forms and tools based on the principles of caries management by risk assessment, CAMBRA. This method will aid the general practitioner to develop and maintain a comprehensive protocol adequate for infant and young children oral care visits. Perinatal oral health is vitally important in preventing early childhood caries (ECC) in young children. Providing dental treatment to expectant mothers and their young children in a 'dual parallel track' is an effective innovative strategy and an efficient practice builder. It promotes prevention rather than intervention, and this may be the best way to achieve long-lasting oral health for young patients. General dental practice can adopt easy protocols that will promote early preventive visits and anticipatory guidance/counselling rather than waiting for the need for restorative treatment.

  16. The ratio of ICRP103 to ICRP60 calculated effective doses from CT: Monte Carlo calculations with the ADELAIDE voxel paediatric model and comparisons with published values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The ADELAIDE voxel model of paediatric anatomy was used with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to compare effective dose from computed tomography (CT) calculated with both the ICRP103 and ICRP60 definitions which are different in their tissue weighting factors and in the included tissues. The new tissue weighting factors resulted in a lower effective dose for pelvis CT (than if calculated using ICRP60 tissue weighting factors), by 6.5 % but higher effective doses for all other examinations. ICRP103 calculated effective dose for CT abdomen + pelvis was higher by 4.6 %, for CT abdomen (by 9.5 %), for CT chest + abdomen + pelvis (by 6 %), for CT chest + abdomen (by 9.6 %), for CT chest (by 10.1 %) and for cardiac CT (by 11.5 %). These values, along with published values of effective dose from CT that were calculated for both sets of tissue weighting factors were used to determine single values for the ratio ICRP103:ICRP60 calculated effective doses from CT, for seven CT examinations. The following values for ICRP103:ICRP60 are suggested for use to convert ICRP60 calculated effective dose to ICRP103 calculated effective dose for the following CT examinations: Pelvis CT, 0.75; for abdomen CT, abdomen + pelvis CT, chest + abdomen + pelvis CT, 1.00; for chest + abdomen CT, and for chest CT. 1.15; for cardiac CT 1.25.

  17. Estimation of foot joint kinetics in three and four segment foot models using an existing proportionality scheme: Application in paediatric barefoot walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Kevin; Eerdekens, Maarten; Desmet, Dirk; Matricali, Giovanni Arnoldo; Wuite, Sander; Staes, Filip

    2017-08-16

    Recent studies which estimated foot segment kinetic patterns were found to have inconclusive data on one hand, and did not dissociate the kinetics of the chopart and lisfranc joint. The current study aimed therefore at reproducing independent, recently published three-segment foot kinetic data (Study 1) and in a second stage expand the estimation towards a four-segment model (Study 2). Concerning the reproducibility study, two recently published three segment foot models (Bruening et al., 2014; Saraswat et al., 2014) were reproduced and kinetic parameters were incorporated in order to calculate joint moments and powers of paediatric cohorts during gait. Ground reaction forces were measured with an integrated force/pressure plate measurement set-up and a recently published proportionality scheme was applied to determine subarea total ground reaction forces. Regarding Study 2, moments and powers were estimated with respect to the Instituto Ortopedico Rizzoli four-segment model. The proportionality scheme was expanded in this study and the impact of joint centre location on kinetic data was evaluated. Findings related to Study 1 showed in general good agreement with the kinetic data published by Bruening et al. (2014). Contrarily, the peak ankle, midfoot and hallux powers published by Saraswat et al. (2014) are disputed. Findings of Study 2 revealed that the chopart joint encompasses both power absorption and generation, whereas the Lisfranc joint mainly contributes to power generation. The results highlights the necessity for further studies in the field of foot kinetic models and provides a first estimation of the kinetic behaviour of the Lisfranc joint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [The latest in paediatric resuscitation recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Rodríguez, Antonio; Carrillo, Angel; de Lucas, Nieves; Calvo, Custodio; Civantos, Eva; Suárez, Eva; Pons, Sara; Manrique, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac arrest has a high mortality in children. To improve the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it is essential to disseminate the international recommendations and the training of health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article summarises the 2015 European Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, which are based on a review of the advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and consensus in the science and treatment by the International Council on Resuscitation. The Spanish Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, developed by the Spanish Group of Paediatric and Neonatal Resuscitation, are an adaptation of the European recommendations, and will be used for training health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article highlights the main changes from the previous 2010 recommendations on prevention of cardiac arrest, the diagnosis of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and post-resuscitation care, as well as reviewing the algorithms of treatment of basic life support, obstruction of the airway and advanced life support. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  19. Metastatic paediatric colorectal carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Woods, R

    2012-03-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented to our unit with crampy abdominal pain, change in bowel habit, a subjective impression of weight loss and a single episode of haematochezia. She was found to have a rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma and proceeded to laparoscopic anterior resection, whereupon peritoneal metastases were discovered. She received chemotherapy and is alive and well ten month later with no radiological evidence of disease. Colorectal carcinoma is rare in the paediatric population but is increasing in incidence. Early diagnosis is critical to enable optimal outcomes.

  20. Paediatric nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Costa, H [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiation Medicine Centre

    1978-05-01

    The use of radiopharmaceutical agents for the diagnosis of diseases frequently encountered in the paediatric age group is outlined. The agents suitable for scanning of brain, thyroid, kidney, liver and spleen are mentioned and their efficacy in diagnosis of pathological conditions based on practical experience is reported. Bromide partition test for diagnosis of intracranial tuberculosis and /sup 131/I uptake test for thyroid study are also described. Dose of the agent is smaller than that in the case of adults and depends upon the child's body weight.

  1. Improving glycaemic control and life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A randomised, controlled intervention study using the Guided Self-Determination-Young method in triads of adolescents, parents and health care providers integrated into routine paediatric outpatient clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esbensen Bente

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents with type 1 diabetes face demanding challenges due to conflicting priorities between psychosocial needs and diabetes management. This conflict often results in poor glycaemic control and discord between adolescents and parents. Adolescent-parent conflicts are thus a barrier for health care providers (HCPs to overcome in their attempts to involve both adolescents and parents in improvement of glycaemic control. Evidence-based interventions that involve all three parties (i.e., adolescents, parents and HCPs and are integrated into routine outpatient clinic visits are lacking. The Guided Self-Determination method is proven effective in adult care and has been adapted to adolescents and parents (Guided Self-Determination-Young (GSD-Y for use in paediatric diabetes outpatient clinics. Our objective is to test whether GSD-Y used in routine paediatric outpatient clinic visits will reduce haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c concentrations and improve adolescents' life skills compared with a control group. Methods/Design Using a mixed methods design comprising a randomised controlled trial and a nested qualitative evaluation, we will recruit 68 adolescents age 13 - 18 years with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c > 8.0% and their parents from 2 Danish hospitals and randomise into GSD-Y or control groups. During an 8-12 month period, the GSD-Y group will complete 8 outpatient GSD-Y visits, and the control group will completes an equal number of standard visits. The primary outcome is HbA1c. Secondary outcomes include the following: number of self-monitored blood glucose values and levels of autonomous motivation, involvement and autonomy support from parents, autonomy support from HCPs, perceived competence in managing diabetes, well-being, and diabetes-related problems. Primary and secondary outcomes will be evaluated within and between groups by comparing data from baseline, after completion of the visits, and again after a 6-month follow-up. To

  2. Severe morbidity and mortality in untreated HIV-infected children in a paediatric care programme in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, 2004-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alioum Ahmadou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical evolution of HIV-infected children who have not yet initiated antiretroviral treatment (ART is poorly understood in Africa. We describe severe morbidity and mortality of untreated HIV-infected children. Methods All HIV-infected children enrolled from 2004-2009 in a prospective HIV programme in two health facilities in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, were eligible from their time of inclusion. Risks of severe morbidity (the first clinical event leading to death or hospitalisation and mortality were documented retrospectively and estimated using cumulative incidence functions. Associations with baseline characteristics were assessed by competing risk regression models between outcomes and antiretroviral initiation. Results 405 children were included at a median age of 4.5 years; at baseline, 66.9% were receiving cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, and 27.7% met the 2006 WHO criteria for immunodeficiency by age. The risk of developing a severe morbid event was 14% (95%CI: 10.7 - 17.8 at 18 months; this risk was lower in children previously exposed to any prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT intervention (adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio [sHR]: 0.16, 95% CI: 0.04 - 0.71 versus those without known exposure. Cumulative mortality reached 5.5% (95%CI: 3.5 - 8.1 at 18 months. Mortality was associated with immunodeficiency (sHR: 6.02, 95% CI: 1.28-28.42. Conclusions Having benefited from early access to care minimizes the severe morbidity risk for children who acquire HIV. Despite the receipt of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, the risk of severe morbidity and mortality remains high in untreated HIV-infected children. Such evidence adds arguments to promote earlier access to ART in HIV-infected children in Africa and improve care interventions in a context where treatment is still not available to all.

  3. The paediatric change laboratory: optimising postgraduate learning in the outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Mads; Musaeus, Peter; Nøhr, Susanne Backman

    2016-02-02

    This study aimed to analyse and redesign the outpatient clinic in a paediatric department. The study was a joint collaboration with the doctors of the department (paediatric residents and specialists) using the Change Laboratory intervention method as a means to model and implement change in the outpatient clinic. This study was motivated by a perceived failure to integrate the activities of the outpatient clinic, patient care and training of residents. The ultimate goal of the intervention was to create improved care for patients through resident learning and development. We combined the Change Laboratory intervention with an already established innovative process for residents, 3-h meetings. The Change Laboratory intervention method consists of a well-defined theory (Cultural-historical activity theory) and concrete actions where participants construct a new theoretical model of the activity, which in this case was paediatric doctors' workplace learning modelled in order to improve medical social practice. The notion of expansive learning was used during the intervention in conjunction with thematic analysis of data in order to fuel the process of analysis and intervention. The activity system of the outpatient clinic can meaningfully be analysed in terms of the objects of patient care and training residents. The Change Laboratory sessions resulted in a joint action plan for the outpatient clinic structured around three themes: (1) Before: Preparation, expectations, and introduction; (2) During: Structural context and resources; (3) After: Follow-up and feedback. The participants found the Change Laboratory method to be a successful way of sharing reflections on how to optimise the organisation of work and training with patient care in mind. The Change Laboratory approach outlined in this study succeeded to change practices and to help medical doctors redesigning their work. Participating doctors must be motivated to uncover inherent contradictions in their

  4. Paediatric nuclear medicine imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biassoni, Lorenzo; Easty, Marina

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging explores tissue viability and function by using radiotracers that are taken up at cellular level with different mechanism. This imaging technique can also be used to assess blood flow and transit through tubular organs. Nuclear medicine imaging has been used in paediatrics for decades and this field is continuously evolving. The data presented comes from clinical experience and some milestone papers on the subject. Nuclear medicine imaging is well-established in paediatric nephro-urology in the context of urinary tract infection, ante-natally diagnosed hydronephrosis and other congenital renal anomalies. Also, in paediatric oncology, I-123-meta-iodobenzyl-guanidine has a key role in the management of children with neuroblastic tumours. Bone scintigraphy is still highly valuable to localize the source of symptoms in children and adolescents with bone pain when other imaging techniques have failed. Thyroid scintigraphy in neonates with congenital hypothyroidism is the most accurate imaging technique to confirm the presence of ectopic functioning thyroid tissue. Radionuclide transit studies of the gastro-intestinal tract are potentially useful in suspected gastroparesis or small bowel or colonic dysmotility. However, until now a standardized protocol and a validated normal range have not been agreed, and more work is necessary. Research is ongoing on whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with its great advantage of great anatomical detail and no ionizing radiations, can replace nuclear medicine imaging in some clinical context. On the other hand, access to MRI is often difficult in many district general hospitals and general anaesthesia is frequently required, thus adding to the complexity of the examination. Patients with bone pain and no cause for it demonstrated on MRI can benefit from bone scintigraphy with single photon emission tomography and low-dose computed tomography. This technique can identify areas of mechanical stress at

  5. Implementing Outcome Measures Within an Enhanced Palliative Care Day Care Model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilonzo, Isae

    2015-04-23

    Specialist palliative care day care (SPDC) units provide an array of services to patients and their families and can increase continuity of care between inpatient and homecare settings. A multidisciplinary teamwork approach is emphasized, and different models of day care exist. Depending on the emphasis of care, the models can be social, medical, therapeutic, or mixed. We describe our experience of introducing an enhanced therapeutic specialist day care model and using both patient- and carer-rated tools to monitor patient outcomes.

  6. Characteristics and outcome of long-stay patients in a paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) costs can range from about. USD70 to over ..... outcome (moderate disability, severe disability or death), with almost half the .... is poor infrastructure and inaccessibility to transport in much of the country.

  7. The efficacy of an extended scope physiotherapy clinic in paediatric orthopaedics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Mir, Marie

    2016-04-01

    The demand for paediatric orthopaedic care is growing, and providing the service required is an increasingly challenging task. Physiotherapist-led triage clinics are utilised in adult orthopaedics to enable the provision of care to patients who may not require a surgical consult. The Physiotherapy Orthopaedic Triage Clinic (POTC) was established in Our Lady\\'s Children\\'s Hospital Crumlin in response to increasing demands on the paediatric orthopaedic service. The clinic is run by physiotherapists working in an advanced practice role (APP), and is the first paediatric clinic of its type and scale in the Republic of Ireland.

  8. Paediatric surgical abdominal emergencies in a north central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric surgical abdominal emergencies in a north central Nigerian centre. ... The causes of PSAEs vary worldwide, and the management is challenging, often with unimaginably poor outcome if not carefully handled. The aim of this ... Keywords: abdominal emergencies, acute abdomen, children, morbidity, mortality ...

  9. Morbidity and mortality of neonates admitted in general paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were only six admissions to the general purpose intensive care unit referred from the wards. The independent predictors of mortality were low birth weight, apnoec attacks, hypothermia and dehydration(p<0.05). Conclusion: The mortality rate for neonates admitted to the general paediatric wards is high with almost ...

  10. An Analysis of Disorders seen at the Paediatric Neurology Clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Paediatric neurological disorders constitute a major cause of disability in childhood. Children in the developing countries are disproportionately affected and in addition face the added burden of poverty, inadequate health facilities, stigmatisation and lack of facilities for rehabilitative care. OBJECTIVE: To ...

  11. Post-operative pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus Olympio University Teaching Hospital, Lome. Patients and Methods: A prospective descriptive study was conducted in the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care at Sylvanus Olympio teaching hospital from 1 ...

  12. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery - Vol 11, No 3 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oesophageal foreign body in children: 15 years experience in a tertiary care paediatric centre · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. A Singh, M Bajpai, SS Panda, K Chand, M Jana, A Ali, 238-241 ...

  13. The development of paediatric neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood-Nash, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The development of paediatric neuroradiology is a specific persuasion within neuroradiology and has increased in scope and significance throughout the last ten years. The emergence of computed tomography has altered the indications for types of neuroradiological procedures in infants and children. The sophistication, accuracy, and safety of standard neuroradiological procedures have been increased by the accuracy and safety of computed tomography, particularly in the premature infant. There is a growing need for education and instruction in paediatric neuroradiological techniques and paediatric neuroradiological diseases within the neuroradiological fraternity as a whole. (orig.) [de

  14. Paediatric asthma outpatient care by asthma nurse, paediatrician or general practitioner: randomised controlled trial with two-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuethe, Maarten; Vaessen-Verberne, Anja; Mulder, Paul; Bindels, Patrick; van Aalderen, Wim

    2011-01-01

    For children with stable asthma, to test non-inferiority of care provided by a hospital-based specialised asthma nurse versus a general practitioner (GP) or paediatrician. Randomised controlled trial evaluating standard care by a GP, paediatrician or an asthma nurse, with two-year follow-up. 107

  15. Paediatric asthma outpatient care by asthma nurse, paediatrician or general practitioner: Randomised controlled trial with two-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Kuethe (Maarten ); A.A.P.H. Vaessen-Verberne (Anja); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick); W.M.C. van Aalderen (Willem)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAims: For children with stable asthma, to test non-inferiority of care provided by a hospital-based specialised asthma nurse versus a general practitioner (GP) or paediatrician. Methods: Randomised controlled trial evaluating standard care by a GP, paediatrician or an asthma nurse, with

  16. Caring about caring: developing a model to implement compassionate relationship centred care in an older people care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Belinda; Nolan, Mike

    2013-09-01

    This study actively involved older people, staff and relatives in agreeing a definition of compassionate relationship-centred care and identifying strategies to promote such care in acute hospital settings for older people. It was a major component of a three year programme (the Leadership in Compassionate Care Programme, LCCP) seeking to integrate compassionate care across practice and educational environments. Compassionate caring and promoting dignity are key priorities for policy, practice and research worldwide, being central to the quality of care for patients and families, and job satisfaction for staff. Therapeutic relationships are essential to achieving excellence in care but little is known about how to develop and sustain such relationships in a culture that increasingly focuses on throughput and rapid turnover. The study used appreciative inquiry and a range of methods including participant observation, interviews, story telling and group discussions to actively engage older people, relatives and staff. A process of immersion crystallization was used to analyze data with staff as co-analysts. The study adds considerably to the conceptualization of compassionate, relationship-centred care and provides a model to aid staff deliver such care in practice, based on 'appreciative caring conversations' that enable all parties to gain two forms of 'person and relational knowledge' about 'who people are and what matters to them' and 'how people feel about their experience'. Such knowledge enables staff, patients and carers to 'work together to shape the way things are done'. The study generated a model called the 7 'C's that captures in detail the factors necessary to promote 'appreciative caring conversations'. The study demonstrates that engaging in 'appreciative caring conversations' promotes compassionate, relationship-centred care but that these conversations involve practitioners taking risks. Such 'relational practices' must therefore be valued and

  17. Paediatric oncology in the developing world: an African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, F K

    1987-09-01

    Nutritional deficiency and infectious diseases constitute major paediatric priorities in most developing countries in Africa today. It is suggested that successful implementation of the various cost-effective intervention programmes which address themselves to these priorities will gradually unveil other paediatric problems presently considered of low priority. These will include the malignant diseases of childhood. The very high cost of cancer detection and treatment will demand carefully reasoned and planned approaches in most Third World countries. The implications of this in relation to childhood malignancies in Africa are discussed.

  18. Game Maturity Model for Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jan C; Adriani, Paul; van Houwelingen, Jan Willem; Geerts, A

    2016-04-01

    This article introduces the Game Maturity Model for the healthcare industry as an extension to the general Game Maturity Model and describes the usage by two case studies of applied health games. The Game Maturity Model for healthcare provides a practical and value-adding method to assess existing games and to determine strategic considerations for application of applied health games. Our forecast is that within 5 years the use and development of applied games will have a role in our daily lives and the way we organize health care that will be similar to the role social media has today.

  19. Cuffed endotracheal tubes in paediatrics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cuffed endotracheal tubes (CETTs) in children who are younger than eight years old. Most paediatric ... the smallest functional part of the infant airway, because the ... During the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in ...

  20. Paediatric asthma outpatient care by asthma nurse, paediatrician or general practitioner: Randomised controlled trial with two-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Kuethe, Maarten; Vaessen-Verberne, Anja; Mulder, Paul; Bindels, Patrick; Aalderen, Willem

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAims: For children with stable asthma, to test non-inferiority of care provided by a hospital-based specialised asthma nurse versus a general practitioner (GP) or paediatrician. Methods: Randomised controlled trial evaluating standard care by a GP, paediatrician or an asthma nurse, with two-year follow-up. Results: 107 children were recruited, 45 from general practice and 62 from hospital. After two years, no significant differences between groups were found for airway responsiven...

  1. Patient exposure in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, O.; Diaconescu, C.; Isac, R.

    2002-01-01

    Because of their longer life expectancy, the risk of late manifestations of detrimental radiation effects is greater in children than in adults and, consequently, paediatric radiology gives ground for more concern regarding radiation protection than radiology of adults. The purpose of our study was to assess, in terms of effective dose, the magnitude of paediatric patient exposure during conventional X-ray examinations, selected for their high frequency or their relatively high doses delivered to patient

  2. Voluntary Informed Consent in Paediatric Oncology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekking, Sara A S; Van Der Graaf, Rieke; Van Delden, Johannes J M

    2016-07-01

    In paediatric oncology, research and treatments are often closely combined, which may compromise voluntary informed consent of parents. We identified two key scenarios in which voluntary informed consent for paediatric oncology studies is potentially compromised due to the intertwinement of research and care. The first scenario is inclusion by the treating paediatric oncologist, the second scenario concerns treatments confined to the research context. In this article we examine whether voluntary informed consent of parents for research is compromised in these two scenarios, and if so whether this is also morally problematic. For this, we employ the account of voluntary consent from Nelson and colleagues, who assert that voluntary consent requires substantial freedom from controlling influences. We argue that, in the absence of persuasion or manipulation, inclusion by the treating physician does not compromise voluntariness. However, it may function as a risk factor for controlling influence as it narrows the scope within which parents make decisions. Furthermore, physician appeal to reciprocity is not controlling as it constitutes persuasion. In addition, framing information is a form of informational manipulation and constitutes a controlling influence. In the second scenario, treatments confined to the research context qualify as controlling if the available options are restricted through manipulation of options. Although none of the influences is morally problematic in itself, a combination of influences may create morally problematic instances of involuntary informed consent. Therefore, safeguards should be implemented to establish an optimal environment for parents to provide voluntary informed consent in an integrated research-care context. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Collaboration between paediatric surgery and other medical specialties in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon E Okoro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quality of service and success of patient care and research in most fields of medicine depend on effective collaboration between different specialties. Paediatric surgery is a relatively young specialty in Nigeria and such collaborations are desirable. This survey assesses the nature and extent of collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a questionnaire survey carried out in November 2008 among paediatric surgeons and their trainees practising in Nigeria. Questionnaires were distributed and retrieved either by hand or e-mailing. The responses were then collated and analysed using the SPSS 17.0. Results: Forty-seven respondents were included in the survey. Forty-five (95.7% respondents thought that there was inadequate collaboration and that there was a need for an increased collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties. Anaesthesia, paediatrics and radiology are among the specialties where collaborations were most required but not adequately received. Collaboration had been required from these specialties in areas of patient care, training and research. Reasons for inadequate collaboration included the paucity of avenues for inter-specialty communication and exchange of ideas 33 (70.3%, lack of awareness of the need for collaboration 32 (68.1%, tendency to apportion blames for bad outcome 13 (27.7%, and mutual suspicion 8 (17%. Conclusion: There is presently inadequate collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties in Nigeria. There is a need for more inter-specialty support, communication, and exchange of ideas in order to achieve desirable outcomes.

  4. Multiple sclerosis care: an integrated disease-management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, J

    1998-04-01

    A disease-management model must be integrated, comprehensive, individual patient focused and outcome driven. In addition to high quality care, the successful model must reduce variations in care and costs. MS specialists need to be intimately involved in the long-term care of MS patients, while not neglecting primary care issues. A nurse care manager is the "glue" between the managed care company, health care providers and the patient/family. Disease management focuses on education and prevention, and can be cost effective as well as patient specific. To implement a successful program, managed care companies and health care providers must work together.

  5. Islamic Caring Model on Increase Patient Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Abdurrouf, Muh; Nursalam, Nursalam; Purwaningsih, Purwaningsih

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Patient satisfaction was important aspect that must be considered by health service providers, patients who were not satisfied will leave the hospital and be a competitor's customers so be able caused a decrease in sales of products/services and in turn could reduce and even loss of profit, therefore, the hospital must provided the best service so that it could increase patient satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to exams the effect of Islamic caring model on increase pa...

  6. Transitioning adolescent and young adults with chronic disease and/or disabilities from paediatric to adult care services - an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huaqiong; Roberts, Pamela; Dhaliwal, Satvinder; Della, Phillip

    2016-11-01

    This paper aims to provide an updated comprehensive review of the research-based evidence related to the transitions of care process for adolescents and young adults with chronic illness/disabilities since 2010. Transitioning adolescent and young adults with chronic disease and/or disabilities to adult care services is a complex process, which requires coordination and continuity of health care. The quality of the transition process not only impacts on special health care needs of the patients, but also their psychosocial development. Inconsistent evidence was found regarding the process of transitioning adolescent and young adults. An integrative review was conducted using a five-stage process: problem identification, literature search, data evaluation, data analysis and presentation. A search was carried out using the EBSCOhost, Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and AustHealth, from 2010 to 31 October 2014. The key search terms were (adolescent or young adult) AND (chronic disease or long-term illness/conditions or disability) AND (transition to adult care or continuity of patient care or transfer or transition). A total of 5719 records were initially identified. After applying the inclusion criteria a final 61 studies were included. Six main categories derived from the data synthesis process are Timing of transition; Perceptions of the transition; Preparation for the transition; Patients' outcomes post-transition; Barriers to the transition; and Facilitating factors to the transition. A further 15 subcategories also surfaced. In the last five years, there has been improvement in health outcomes of adolescent and young adults post-transition by applying a structured multidisciplinary transition programme, especially for patients with cystic fibrosis and diabetes. However, overall patients' outcomes after being transited to adult health care services, if recorded, have remained poor both physically and psychosocially. An accurate tracking mechanism needs to be

  7. [Impact on the improvement of paediatric emergency services using a standardised model for the declaration and analysis of incidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà de Muga, M; Serrano Llop, A; Rifé Escudero, E; Jabalera Contreras, M; Luaces Cubells, C

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse changes in the incidents reported after the implementation of a new model, and study its results on patient safety. In 2012 an observational study with prospective collection of incidents reported between 2007 and 2011 was conducted. In May 2012 a model change was made in order to increase the number of reports, analyse their causes, and improve the feedback to the service. Professional safety representatives were assigned to every department, information and diffusion sessions were held, and a new incident reporting system was implemented. With the new model, a new observational study with prospective collection of the reports during one year was initiated, and the results compared between models. In 2011, only 19 incidents were reported in the Emergency Department, and between June 1, 2012 to June 1, 2013, 106 incidents (5.6 times more). The incidents reported were medication incidents (57%), identification (26%), and procedures (7%). The most frequent causes were human (70.7%), lack of training (22.6%), and working conditions (15.1%). Some measures were implemented as a result of these incidents: a surgical checklist, unit doses of salbutamol, tables of weight-standardised doses of drugs for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The new model of reporting incidents has enhanced the reports and has allowed improvements and the implementation of preventive measures, increasing the patient safety in the Emergency Department. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Family bedside orientations: An innovative peer support model to enhance a culture of family-centred care at the Stollery Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodinski, Lindsay M; Mattson McCrady, Heather M; Oswald, Christie M; Lyste, Nicole J M; Forbes, Karen L L

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents family bedside orientations, an innovative bedside peer support model for families of paediatric patients piloted in one unit at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta. The model invites family members of former patients back to the hospital as volunteer peer mentors responsible for meeting one-on-one with current inpatient families to provide a listening presence, discuss patient safety practices and encourage families to participate in their child's care. Using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods, the model was evaluated over 1 year (December 2014 to December 2015). Data sources included peer mentor field notes (from 163 visits) detailing the number of family bedside orientations completed by peer mentors and how they interacted with families, as well as post-visit family (n=35) surveys, Hospital-Child Inpatient Experience Survey data, peer mentor (n=6) questionnaires, focus groups with unit staff (n=10) and interviews with members of the project leadership team (n=5). Our findings indicated that family bedside orientations became an established practice in the pilot unit and positively impacted family care experiences. We attribute these successes to championing and support from unit staff and our multidisciplinary project leadership team. We discuss how our team addressed family privacy and confidentiality while introducing peer mentors in the unit. We also highlight strategies used to integrate peer mentors as part of the staff team and enhance peer support culture in the pilot unit. Practical considerations for implementing this model in other paediatric environments are provided.

  9. Confidence and authority through new knowledge: An evaluation of the national educational programme in paediatric oncology nursing in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergert, Pernilla; Af Sandeberg, Margareta; Andersson, Nina; Márky, Ildikó; Enskär, Karin

    2016-03-01

    There is a lack of nurse specialists in many paediatric hospitals in Sweden. This lack of competence is devastating for childhood cancer care because it is a highly specialised area that demands specialist knowledge. Continuing education of nurses is important to develop nursing practice and also to retain them. The aim of this study was to evaluate a Swedish national educational programme in paediatric oncology nursing. The nurses who participated came from all of the six paediatric oncology centres as well as from general paediatric wards. At the time of the evaluation, three groups of registered nurses (n=66) had completed this 2year, part-time educational programme. A study specific questionnaire, including closed and open-ended questions was sent to the 66 nurses and 54 questionnaires were returned. Answers were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis. The results show that almost all the nurses (93%) stayed in paediatric care after the programme. Furthermore, 31% had a position in management or as a consultant nurse after the programme. The vast majority of the nurses (98%) stated that the programme had made them more secure in their work. The nurses were equipped, through education, for paediatric oncology care which included: knowledge generating new knowledge; confidence and authority; national networks and resources. They felt increased confidence in their roles as paediatric oncology nurses as well as authority in their encounters with families and in discussions with co-workers. New networks and resources were appreciated and used in their daily work in paediatric oncology. The programme was of importance to the career of the individual nurse and also to the quality of care given to families in paediatric oncology. The national educational programme for nurses in Paediatric Oncology Care meets the needs of the highly specialised care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Collaborative deliberation: a model for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Lloyd, Amy; May, Carl; van der Weijden, Trudy; Stiggelbout, Anne; Edwards, Adrian; Frosch, Dominick L; Rapley, Tim; Barr, Paul; Walsh, Thom; Grande, Stuart W; Montori, Victor; Epstein, Ronald

    2014-11-01

    Existing theoretical work in decision making and behavior change has focused on how individuals arrive at decisions or form intentions. Less attention has been given to theorizing the requirements that might be necessary for individuals to work collaboratively to address difficult decisions, consider new alternatives, or change behaviors. The goal of this work was to develop, as a forerunner to a middle range theory, a conceptual model that considers the process of supporting patients to consider alternative health care options, in collaboration with clinicians, and others. Theory building among researchers with experience and expertise in clinician-patient communication, using an iterative cycle of discussions. We developed a model composed of five inter-related propositions that serve as a foundation for clinical communication processes that honor the ethical principles of respecting individual agency, autonomy, and an empathic approach to practice. We named the model 'collaborative deliberation.' The propositions describe: (1) constructive interpersonal engagement, (2) recognition of alternative actions, (3) comparative learning, (4) preference construction and elicitation, and (5) preference integration. We believe the model underpins multiple suggested approaches to clinical practice that take the form of patient centered care, motivational interviewing, goal setting, action planning, and shared decision making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Infrastructure for new models of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peak, Steve

    2015-03-01

    The NHS is costing the taxpayer 2.5 times more than it did 50 years ago. Now accounting for 8.2 per cent of the UK's GDP, this trend is set to continue, but funding is not in place to support it. The Government faces a struggle between what is needed and what is affordable, pointing to a complete re-think of the way care is delivered. So says Steve Peak, business development director for Vanguard Healthcare, As the 2015 General Election brings the issue into sharper focus, he examines how estates managers are responding to the pressures and the practicalities of delivering the infrastructure to support a new model of care.

  12. Shared decision-making in the paediatric field: a literature review and concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Sook; Cho, In Young

    2017-09-13

    The concept of shared decision-making is poorly defined and often used interchangeably with related terms. The aim of this study was to delineate and clarify the concept of shared decision-making in the paediatric field. Rodgers and Knafl's evolutionary concept analysis was used to delineate and clarify the concept. Following a search of the CINAHL, PubMed and MEDLINE databases and online journals between 1995 and 2016, we included a total of 42 articles that referred to shared decision-making in the paediatric field. The attributes included active participation of the three: parents, children and health professionals; collaborative partnership; reaching a compromise; and common goal for child's health. Antecedents were existing several options with different possible outcomes; substantial decisional conflict; recognising child's health situations that decision-making is needed; and willingness to participate in decision-making. Finally, the consequences included decreased decisional conflict; mutual empowerment; improved child health status; and improved quality of paediatric health care. This study provides a theoretical understanding of the concept of shared decision-making in the paediatric field; furthermore, by integrating this concept into paediatric practice, it may help to reduce the gap between theory and practice. The analysis could also provide nursing researchers with insight into paediatric decision-making and establish a foundation to develop future interventions and situation-specific theory for promoting high-quality decision-making in the paediatric field. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  13. Current models of care for disorders of sex development – results from an International survey of specialist centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kyriakou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To explore the current models of practice in centres delivering specialist care for children with disorders of sex development (DSD, an international survey of 124 clinicians, identified through DSDnet and the I-DSD Registry, was performed in the last quarter of 2014. Results A total of 78 (63 % clinicians, in 75 centres, from 38 countries responded to the survey. A formal national network for managing DSD was reported to exist in 12 (32 % countries. The paediatric specialists routinely involved in the initial evaluation of a newborn included: endocrinologist (99 %, surgeon/urologist (95 %, radiologist (93 %, neonatologist (91 %, clinical geneticist (81 % and clinical psychologist (69 %. A team consisting of paediatric specialists in endocrinology, surgery/urology, clinical psychology, and nursing was only possible in 31 (41 % centres. Of the 75 centres, 26 (35 % kept only a local DSD registry and 40 (53 % shared their data in a multicentre DSD registry. Attendance in local, national and international DSD-related educational programs was reported by 69, 78 and 84 % clinicians, respectively. Participation in audits/quality improvement exercises in DSD care was reported by 14 (19 % centres. In addition to complex biochemistry and molecular genetic investigations, 40 clinicians (51 % also had access to next generation sequencing. A genetic test was reported to be more preferable than biochemical tests for diagnosing 5-alpha reductase deficiency and 17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency by 50 and 55 % clinicians, respectively. Conclusion DSD centres report a high level of interaction at an international level, have access to specialist staff and are increasingly relying on molecular genetics for routine diagnostics. The quality of care provided by these centres locally requires further exploration.

  14. European evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of paediatric antiphospholipid syndrome: the SHARE initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Noortje; de Graeff, Nienke; Avcin, Tadej; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Dolezalova, Pavla; Feldman, Brian; Kenet, Gili; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Lahdenne, Pekka; Marks, Stephen D; McCann, Liza; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Ravelli, Angelo; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Wulffraat, Nico M; Ozen, Seza; Brogan, Paul; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Beresford, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is rare in children, and evidence-based guidelines are sparse. Consequently, management is mostly based on observational studies and physician's experience, and treatment regimens differ widely. The Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) initiative was launched to develop diagnostic and management regimens for children and young adults with rheumatic diseases. Here, we developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of paediatric APS. Evidence-based recommendations were developed using the European League Against Rheumatism standard operating procedure. Following a detailed systematic review of the literature, a committee of paediatric rheumatologists and representation of paediatric haematology with expertise in paediatric APS developed recommendations. The literature review yielded 1473 articles, of which 15 were valid and relevant. In total, four recommendations for diagnosis and eight for treatment of paediatric APS (including paediatric Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome) were accepted. Additionally, two recommendations for children born to mothers with APS were accepted. It was agreed that new classification criteria for paediatric APS are necessary, and APS in association with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus should be identified by performing antiphospholipid antibody screening. Treatment recommendations included prevention of thrombotic events, and treatment recommendations for venous and/or arterial thrombotic events. Notably, due to the paucity of studies on paediatric APS, level of evidence and strength of the recommendations is relatively low. The SHARE initiative provides international, evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment for paediatric APS, facilitating improvement and uniformity of care. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use

  15. Paediatric Radiation Oncology. Chapter 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anacak, Y.; Zaghloul, M.; Laskar, S.

    2017-01-01

    Although cancer is a typical disease of ageing adults, it can be seen at any age and cancer diagnosis in a child is not a rare situation. Every day around the world, many teenagers, young children and even infants are diagnosed with cancer. Cancer in children is an important health care problem, not only for the individual patient and medical staff, but also for families, teachers, friends and society as a whole. In every culture, children are considered innocent human beings and the diagnosis of such an ‘evil’ disease in a young child always induces feelings of unfairness and anguish. Most childhood cancers are curable; using the best treatment options, more than 80% of children with cancer may survive to adulthood. However, cure alone is not the ultimate goal for paediatric cancer treatment; late effects of treatment impact the quality of life of patients. Cure from cancer in a child means adding at least 50–60 years to his or her life, which is long enough to develop serious late effects of the treatment and the induction of secondary cancers. Thus, treatment should be tailored to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues to chemotherapy drugs and radiation. Cancer treatment can be a painful process, often involving surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and requiring very long treatment periods, which impair the motor and mental development of the child, and his or her educational activities and relations with society. Childhood cancer survivors sometimes have modest to severe sequelae of the disease itself and the treatment used, which may disrupt their development to a healthy adulthood. These cancer survivors should be fully integrated into society and be allowed to live productive lives even when lifelong rehabilitation is required to keep them active.

  16. Peer mentoring: evaluation of a novel programme in paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Sarah; Sukhani, Seema; Brightwell, Alex; Stoneham, Sara; Long, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Mentoring is important for personal and professional development of doctors. Peer mentoring is a core skill in the UK paediatric postgraduate curriculum. However, there is a paucity of peer mentoring programmes aimed at postgraduate doctors in training (postgraduate trainees), and there are no such schemes within paediatrics described in the literature. We developed a regional peer mentoring programme for postgraduate trainees in paediatrics to assess demand and need for peer mentoring and to explore the benefits for both peer mentees and mentors. Junior postgraduate trainees, randomly selected from volunteers, received peer mentoring from more senior trainees for 1 year. Peer mentors were selected by competitive application and undertook tailored training followed by an experiential learning programme. The programme was evaluated using structured questionnaires. 90% (76/84) of first-year postgraduate trainees in paediatrics applied to participate, demonstrating high demand. 18 peer mentor-mentee pairs were matched. Peer mentors and mentees reported high satisfaction rates, acquisition of new and transferable skills and changed behaviours. All peer mentors intended to use the skills in their workplace and, later, as an educational supervisor. Our programme represents a novel approach to meeting the demonstrated demand and the curriculum requirement for peer mentoring, and enabled peer mentors and mentees to develop a valuable and versatile skill set. To our knowledge, it is the first such programme in paediatrics and provides a feasibility model that may be adapted locally to allow education providers to offer this important experience to postgraduate trainees.

  17. Prebiotics as a modulator of gut microbiota in paediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolucci, A C; Reimer, R A

    2017-08-01

    This review highlights our current understanding of the role of gut microbiota in paediatric obesity and the potential role for dietary manipulation of the gut microbiota with prebiotics in managing paediatric obesity. The aetiology of obesity is multifactorial and is now known to include microbial dysbiosis in the gut. Prebiotics are non-digestible carbohydrates which selectively modulate the number and/or composition of gut microbes. The goal of prebiotic consumption is to restore symbiosis and thereby confer health benefits to the host. There is convincing evidence that prebiotics can reduce adiposity and improve metabolic health in preclinical rodent models. Furthermore, there are several clinical trials in adult humans highlighting metabolic and appetite-regulating benefits of prebiotics. In paediatric obesity, however, there are very limited data regarding the potential role of prebiotics as a dietary intervention for obesity management. As the prevalence of paediatric obesity and obesity-associated comorbidities increases globally, interventions that target the progression of obesity from an early age are essential in slowing the obesity epidemic. This review emphasizes the need for further research assessing the role of prebiotics, particularly as an intervention in effectively managing paediatric obesity. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  18. Indications for admission, treatment and improved outcome of paediatric haematology/oncology patients admitted to a tertiary paediatric ICU.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Overall survival in paediatric cancer has improved significantly over the past 20 years. Treatment strategies have been intensified, and supportive care has made substantial advances. Historically, paediatric oncology patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) have had extremely poor outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study over a 3-year period in a single centre to evaluate the outcomes for this particularly vulnerable group of patients admitted to a paediatric ICU. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients were admitted a total of 66 times to the ICU during the study period. The mortality rate of this group was 23% compared with an overall ICU mortality rate of 5%. 11\\/15 patients who died had an underlying haematological malignancy. Twenty-eight percent of children with organism-identified sepsis died. CONCLUSIONS: While mortality rates for paediatric oncology patients admitted to a ICU have improved, they are still substantial. Those with a haematological malignancy or admitted with sepsis are most at risk.

  19. Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Austine I Omoigberale FWACP (Paed) Professor of Paediatrics, Neonatology & Infectious diseases. Dept of Child Health University of Benin Teaching Hospital Benin City Nigeria isigboge@gmail.com +2348030750641. Dr. Felix Akinbami FWACP (Paed) Professor of Paediatrics & Gastroenterology Dept of Paediatrics

  20. Anaesthesia for paediatric patients: Minimising the risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to paediatric patients need to be offset against the need for optimal utilisation of national ... Risk stratification of paediatric patients for specific procedures in ... support colleagues in smaller district hospitals by means of telephonic advice, the ... techniques that can minimise risk in the paediatric surgical population. S Afr Med ...

  1. Organizational home care models across Europe: A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eenoo, Liza; van der Roest, Henriëtte; Onder, Graziano; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Garms-Homolova, Vjenka; Jonsson, Palmi V; Draisma, Stasja; van Hout, Hein; Declercq, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Decision makers are searching for models to redesign home care and to organize health care in a more sustainable way. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize home care models within and across European countries by means of structural characteristics and care processes at the policy and the organization level. At the policy level, variables that reflected variation in health care policy were included based on a literature review on the home care policy for older persons in six European countries: Belgium, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Italy, and the Netherlands. At the organizational level, data on the structural characteristics and the care processes were collected from 36 home care organizations by means of a survey. Data were collected between 2013 and 2015 during the IBenC project. An observational, cross sectional, quantitative design was used. The analyses consisted of a principal component analysis followed by a hierarchical cluster analysis. Fifteen variables at the organizational level, spread across three components, explained 75.4% of the total variance. The three components made it possible to distribute home care organizations into six care models that differ on the level of patient-centered care delivery, the availability of specialized care professionals, and the level of monitoring care performance. Policy level variables did not contribute to distinguishing between home care models. Six home care models were identified and characterized. These models can be used to describe best practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tertiary paediatric emergency department use in children and young people with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Elaine; Reid, Susan M; Williams, Katrina; Freed, Gary L; Babl, Franz E; Sewell, Jillian R; Rawicki, Barry; Reddihough, Dinah S

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of tertiary paediatric emergency department (ED) use in children and young people with cerebral palsy (CP). A retrospective analysis of ED data routinely collected at the two tertiary paediatric hospitals in Victoria, Australia, cross-matched with the Victorian Cerebral Palsy Register. Data pertaining to the ED presentations of 2183 registered individuals born 1993-2008 were obtained. Between 2008 and 2012, 37% (n = 814) of the CP cohort had 3631 tertiary paediatric ED presentations. Overall, 40% (n = 332) of presenters were residing in inner metropolitan Melbourne; 44% (n = 356) in outer Melbourne; and 13% (n = 108) in regional Victoria. Presenters were more likely than non-presenters to be younger, non-ambulant and have epilepsy. In total, 71% of presentations were triaged as Australasian Triage Scale 1-3 (urgent), and 44% resulted in a hospital admission. Disorders of the respiratory, neurological and gastrointestinal systems, and medical device problems were responsible for 72% of presentations. Many of the tertiary paediatric ED presentations in this group were appropriate based on the high admission rate and the large proportion triaged as urgent. However, there is evidence that some families are bypassing local services and travelling long distances to attend the tertiary paediatric ED, even for less urgent complaints that do not require hospital admission. Alternative pathways of care delivery, and strategies to promote the management of common problems experienced by children and young people with CP in non-paediatric EDs or primary care settings, may go some way towards reducing unnecessary tertiary paediatric ED use in this group. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  3. Paediatric and adult malignant glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Chris; Perryman, Lara; Hargrave, Darren

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas in children differ from their adult counterparts by their distribution of histological grade, site of presentation and rate of malignant transformation. Although rare in the paediatric population, patients with high-grade gliomas have, for the most part, a comparably dismal clinical outcome...... to older patients with morphologically similar lesions. Molecular profiling data have begun to reveal the major genetic alterations underpinning these malignant tumours in children. Indeed, the accumulation of large datasets on adult high-grade glioma has revealed key biological differences between...... the adult and paediatric disease. Furthermore, subclassifications within the childhood age group can be made depending on age at diagnosis and tumour site. However, challenges remain on how to reconcile clinical data from adult patients to tailor novel treatment strategies specifically for paediatric...

  4. Evidence-based models of care for people with epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzsimons, Mary

    2012-02-01

    Advances in medical science and technology, together with improved medical and nursing care, are continuously improving health outcomes in chronic illness, including epilepsy. The consequent increasing diagnostic and therapeutic complexity is placing a burgeoning strain on health care systems. In response, an international move to transform chronic disease management (CDM) aims to optimize the quality and safety of care while containing health care costs. CDM models recommend: integration of care across organizational boundaries that is supported with information and communication technology; patient self-management; and guideline implementation to promote standardized care. Evidence of the effectiveness of CDM models in epilepsy care is presented in this review article.

  5. MIH: epidemiologic clinic study in paediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condò, R; Perugia, C; Maturo, P; Docimo, R

    2012-04-01

    The Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is a qualitative and quantitative defect of the enamel structure of the first permanent molars, which may vary from 1 to 4 with involvement of maxillary and jaw permanent incisors. AIM.: Aim of this study is that to evaluate, among 1500 paediatric patients chosen at random aged between 0 and 14 years, afferent by the Paediatric Dentistry of the Azienda Ospedialiera Policlinico Tor Vergata of Rome from 1996 to 2011, the incidents and the prevalence of the MIH distribution, and furthermore to ascertain the possible relationship with the data described in the literature. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION.: From the sample of 1500 paediatric patients, the number of those affections from MIH has turned out to be pairs to 110 (7.3%) aged between 4 and 15 years, and an average age equal to 9.7. The incidence of the hypoplastic defects is greater in the elements of the permanents series in which the functional class mainly interested is that of the first molars, with a percentage of 39.8%. Regarding the elements of the deciduous series affections from hypoplasia, they turn out to be in all in number of 20 represented in 80% of the cases from the seconds molars while in the remaining 20% of the cases the items involved are the central incisors. About the percentage of elements involved in the MIH: the molars, involved with a frequency of 56%, turn out to be more hit regarding incisors (44%). As reported in the literature, it can be asserted that the MIH can hit in equal measure both the male sex that feminine one. CONCLUSIONS.: MIH represents a condition quite frequent in the paediatric population. In managing this anomaly takes an essential role in the early diagnosis and in the differential one. The study done underlined the importance of a correct application of the therapeutic protocol which, starting from a careful diagnosis and articulating themselves in the execution of preventive treatments and in severe cases restorative and

  6. Effective doses in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, Olga; Diaconescu, Cornelia; Roca, Antoaneta

    2001-01-01

    Because of their longer life expectancy, the risk of late manifestations of detrimental radiation effects is greater in children than in adults and, consequently, paediatric radiology gives ground for more concern regarding radiation protection than radiology of adults. The purpose of our study is to assess in terms of effective doses the magnitude of paediatric patient exposure during conventional X-ray examinations, selected for their high frequency or their relatively high doses to the patient. Effective doses have been derived from measurements of dose-area product (DAP) carried out on over 900 patients undergoing X-ray examinations, in five paediatric units. The conversion coefficients for estimating effective doses are those calculated by the NRPB using Monte-Carlo technique on a series of 5 mathematical phantoms representing 0, 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old children. The annual frequency of X-ray examinations necessary for collective dose calculation are those reported in our last national study on medical exposure, conducted in 1995. The annual effective doses from all medical examinations for the average paediatric patient are as follows: 1.05 mSv for 0 year old, 0.98 mSv for 1 year old, 0.53 mSv for 5 year old, 0.65 mSv for 10 year old and 0.70 mSv for 15 year old. The resulting annual collective effective dose was evaluated at 625 man Sv with the largest contribution of pelvis and hip examinations (34%). The annual collective effective associated with paediatric radiology in Romania represent 5% of the annual value resulting from all diagnostic radiology. Examination of the chest is by far the most frequent procedure for children, accounting for about 60 per cent of all annually performed X-ray conventional examinations. Knowledge of real level of patient dose is an essential component of quality assurance programs in paediatric radiology. (authors)

  7. Technical challenges related to implementation of a formula one real time data acquisition and analysis system in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matam, B Rajeswari; Duncan, Heather

    2018-06-01

    Most existing, expert monitoring systems do not provide the real time continuous analysis of the monitored physiological data that is necessary to detect transient or combined vital sign indicators nor do they provide long term storage of the data for retrospective analyses. In this paper we examine the feasibility of implementing a long term data storage system which has the ability to incorporate real-time data analytics, the system design, report the main technical issues encountered, the solutions implemented and the statistics of the data recorded. McLaren Electronic Systems expertise used to continually monitor and analyse the data from F1 racing cars in real time was utilised to implement a similar real-time data recording platform system adapted with real time analytics to suit the requirements of the intensive care environment. We encountered many technical (hardware and software) implementation challenges. However there were many advantages of the system once it was operational. They include: (1) The ability to store the data for long periods of time enabling access to historical physiological data. (2) The ability to alter the time axis to contract or expand periods of interest. (3) The ability to store and review ECG morphology retrospectively. (4) Detailed post event (cardiac/respiratory arrest or other clinically significant deteriorations in patients) data can be reviewed clinically as opposed to trend data providing valuable clinical insight. Informed mortality and morbidity reviews can be conducted. (5) Storage of waveform data capture to use for algorithm development for adaptive early warning systems. Recording data from bed-side monitors in intensive care/wards is feasible. It is possible to set up real time data recording and long term storage systems. These systems in future can be improved with additional patient specific metrics which predict the status of a patient thus paving the way for real time predictive monitoring.

  8. Fundamental care guided by the Careful Nursing Philosophy and Professional Practice Model©.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Therese Connell; Timmins, Fiona; Burke, Jacqueline

    2018-02-05

    To propose the Careful Nursing Philosophy and Professional Practice Model © as a conceptual and practice solution to current fundamental nursing care erosion and deficits. There is growing awareness of the crucial importance of fundamental care. Efforts are underway to heighten nurses' awareness of values that motivate fundamental care and thereby increase their attention to effective provision of fundamental care. However, there remains a need for nursing frameworks which motivate nurses to bring fundamental care values to life in their practice and strengthen their commitment to provide fundamental care. This descriptive position paper builds on the Careful Nursing Philosophy and Professional Practice Model © (Careful Nursing). Careful Nursing elaborates explicit nursing values and addresses both relational and pragmatic aspects of nursing practice, offering an ideal guide to provision of fundamental nursing care. A comparative alignment approach is used to review the capacity of Careful Nursing to address fundamentals of nursing care. Careful Nursing provides a value-based comprehensive and practical framework which can strengthen clinical nurses' ability to articulate and control their practice and, thereby, more effectively fulfil their responsibility to provide fundamental care and measure its effectiveness. This explicitly value-based nursing philosophy and professional practice model offers nurses a comprehensive, pragmatic and engaging framework designed to strengthen their control over their practice and ability to provide high-quality fundamental nursing care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Recommendations for mechanical ventilation of critically ill children from the Paediatric Mechanical Ventilation Consensus Conference (PEMVECC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneyber, Martin C J; de Luca, Daniele; Calderini, Edoardo; Jarreau, Pierre-Henri; Javouhey, Etienne; Lopez-Herce, Jesus; Hammer, Jürg; Macrae, Duncan; Markhorst, Dick G; Medina, Alberto; Pons-Odena, Marti; Racca, Fabrizio; Wolf, Gerhard; Biban, Paolo; Brierley, Joe; Rimensberger, Peter C

    2017-12-01

    Much of the common practice in paediatric mechanical ventilation is based on personal experiences and what paediatric critical care practitioners have adopted from adult and neonatal experience. This presents a barrier to planning and interpretation of clinical trials on the use of specific and targeted interventions. We aim to establish a European consensus guideline on mechanical ventilation of critically children. The European Society for Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care initiated a consensus conference of international European experts in paediatric mechanical ventilation to provide recommendations using the Research and Development/University of California, Los Angeles, appropriateness method. An electronic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed using a combination of medical subject heading terms and text words related to mechanical ventilation and disease-specific terms. The Paediatric Mechanical Ventilation Consensus Conference (PEMVECC) consisted of a panel of 15 experts who developed and voted on 152 recommendations related to the following topics: (1) general recommendations, (2) monitoring, (3) targets of oxygenation and ventilation, (4) supportive measures, (5) weaning and extubation readiness, (6) normal lungs, (7) obstructive diseases, (8) restrictive diseases, (9) mixed diseases, (10) chronically ventilated patients, (11) cardiac patients and (12) lung hypoplasia syndromes. There were 142 (93.4%) recommendations with "strong agreement". The final iteration of the recommendations had none with equipoise or disagreement. These recommendations should help to harmonise the approach to paediatric mechanical ventilation and can be proposed as a standard-of-care applicable in daily clinical practice and clinical research.

  10. The educational challenge of Paediatric Virology: An interview with Professor of Neonatology Anne Greenough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-10-01

    According to Professor Anne Greenough, Professor of Neonatology and Clinical Respiratory Physiology at the King's College London (London, UK), Paediatric Virology is indeed a rapidly increasing educational challenge. Professor Greenough, who in 1992 wrote her book on congenital, perinatal and neonatal infections, believes that during the past 3 decades, paediatric health professionals are becoming increasingly involved in specialised care and follow-up of paediatric patients with viral diseases, who require advanced medical care and innovative technological services. Moreover, she highlights the expected role of new vaccines and antiviral agents that are currently under investigation, as well as the impact of emerging viral diseases that require novel prevention strategies and therapeutic protocols. However, she notes that the number of Paediatric Virologists in any one country is likely to be small; hence, a separate paediatric subspecialty needs to be considered carefully. In the context of the 3rd Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which will be held in Athens, Greece, on October 7th, 2017, Professor Greenough will give her plenary lecture on the impact of viral infections on the long term outcomes of prematurely born infants.

  11. Efficacy of paediatric anaesthetic trolleys: A call for a basic standard and layout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Sian E; Boleat, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Alison; Sheikh, Asme; Goonasekera, Chulananda

    2015-01-01

    Providing safe anaesthesia to children especially in emergency situations goes hand in hand with instant availability of appropriately sized equipment and monitoring. This is best achieved using a designated paediatric anaesthetic trolley containing essential equipment. Guidance for the contents of such trolleys is neither explicit nor standard. We used a survey and a qualitative enquiry to develop a checklist suitable for standardisation of contents and layout of paediatric anaesthetic trolleys. We conducted an observational study of our current practice and paediatric anaesthetic trolleys in a tertiary care hospital. We also performed a qualitative enquiry from experienced paediatric anaesthetists and operating department practitioners.We developed an empirical checklist to ensure the minimum 'essential' equipment is available on these trolleys and implemented a standard layout to facilitate its use. We identified 11 areas in our hospital where anaesthesia is provided to children, each with a designated paediatric anaesthetic trolley. There were considerable deficiencies of items in all areas with no standard pattern or layout. Different types of trolleys contributed to the confusion. In addition, overstocking of inappropriate items hindered its efficient use. Standardising the contents and layout of the paediatric anaesthetic trolley is an essential pre-requisite for safer paediatric anaesthetic practice.

  12. What Do We Know about Knowledge Brokers in Paediatric Rehabilitation? A Systematic Search and Narrative Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifer Taylor, Jacqueline; Verrier, Molly C; Landry, Michel D

    2014-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the literature related to the use of knowledge brokers within paediatric rehabilitation, and specifically to determine (1) how knowledge brokers are defined and used in paediatric rehabilitation and (2) whether knowledge brokers in paediatric rehabilitation have demonstrably improved the performance of health care providers or organizations. The MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and AMED databases were systematically searched to identify studies relating to knowledge brokers or knowledge brokering within paediatric rehabilitation, with no restriction on the study design or primary aim. Following review of titles and abstracts, those studies identified as potentially relevant were assessed based on the inclusion criteria that they: (1) examined some aspect of knowledge brokers/brokering in paediatric rehabilitation; (2) included sufficient descriptive detail on how knowledge brokers/brokering were used; and(3) were peer-reviewed and published in English. Of 1513 articles retrieved, 4 met the inclusion criteria, 3 of which referenced the same knowledge broker initiative. Two papers used mixed methods, one qualitative methodology, and one case presentation. Because of the different methods used in the included studies, the findings are presented in a narrative summary. This study provides an overview of the limited understanding of knowledge brokers within paediatric rehabilitation. Knowledge broker initiatives introduced within paediatric rehabilitation have been anchored in different theoretical frameworks, and no conclusions can be drawn as to the optimum combination of knowledge brokering activities and methods, nor about optimal duration, for sustained results.

  13. A sequential model for the structure of health care utilization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, W.J.; Haarmann, A.; Baerheim, A.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional measurement models of health care utilization are not able to represent the complex structure of health care utilization. In this qualitative study, we, therefore, developed a new model to represent the health care utilization structure. In Norway and Germany, we conducted episodic

  14. A Participatory Model of the Paradox of Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, Laura; Rose, Johnie; Hovmand, Peter S.; Cherng, Sarah T.; Riolo, Rick L.; Kraus, Alison; Biswas, Anindita; Burgess, Kelly; Aungst, Heide; Stange, Kurt C.; Brown, Kalanthe; Brooks-Terry, Margaret; Dec, Ellen; Jackson, Brigid; Gilliam, Jules; Kikano, George E.; Reichsman, Ann; Schaadt, Debbie; Hilfer, Jamie; Ticknor, Christine; Tyler, Carl V.; Van der Meulen, Anna; Ways, Heather; Weinberger, Richard F.; Williams, Christine

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The paradox of primary care is the observation that primary care is associated with apparently low levels of evidence-based care for individual diseases, but systems based on primary care have healthier populations, use fewer resources, and have less health inequality. The purpose of this article is to explore, from a complex systems perspective, mechanisms that might account for the effects of primary care beyond disease-specific care. METHODS In an 8-session, participatory group model-building process, patient, caregiver, and primary care clinician community stakeholders worked with academic investigators to develop and refine an agent-based computer simulation model to test hypotheses about mechanisms by which features of primary care could affect health and health equity. RESULTS In the resulting model, patients are at risk for acute illness, acute life-changing illness, chronic illness, and mental illness. Patients have changeable health behaviors and care-seeking tendencies that relate to their living in advantaged or disadvantaged neighborhoods. There are 2 types of care available to patients: primary and specialty. Primary care in the model is less effective than specialty care in treating single diseases, but it has the ability to treat multiple diseases at once. Primary care also can provide disease prevention visits, help patients improve their health behaviors, refer to specialty care, and develop relationships with patients that cause them to lower their threshold for seeking care. In a model run with primary care features turned off, primary care patients have poorer health. In a model run with all primary care features turned on, their conjoint effect leads to better population health for patients who seek primary care, with the primary care effect being particularly pronounced for patients who are disadvantaged and patients with multiple chronic conditions. Primary care leads to more total health care visits that are due to more disease

  15. Models for Primary Eye Care Services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhra Misra

    2015-01-01

    In the current situation, an integrated health care system with primary eye care promoted by government of India is apparently the best answer. This model is both cost effective and practical for the prevention and control of blindness among the underprivileged population. Other models functioning with the newer technology of tele-ophthalmology or mobile clinics also add to the positive outcome in providing primary eye care services. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of various models presently functioning in the country with the idea of providing useful inputs for eye care providers and enabling them to identify and adopt an appropriate model for primary eye care services.

  16. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in the paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiballah, Laila; Tubaishat, Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    A paucity of research related to the problem of pressure ulcers in paediatrics is found, with a variety of reported prevalence rates. To record the prevalence, location and categories of PU in the inpatient paediatric wards, and to identify the characteristics of pressure ulcer patients. A descriptive point prevalence study. All paediatric inpatient wards in two hospitals in Jordan. One of which is a university-affiliated hospital and the other a paediatric public hospital. Isolation, burn and emergency units, outpatients' clinics and psychiatric wards were excluded. One sixty six paediatric patients aged from one day up to 18 years from both hospitals. Patients who met the inclusion criteria were included and examined for the existence of pressure ulcers on one day in each hospital by the primary investigator. The European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel classification system was used to categorise each identified ulcer. The characteristics of ulcers were collected as well. Sixteen ulcers were identified in 11 patients, giving a prevalence rate of 6.6%.When Category I ulcers were excluded, the prevalence rate dropped to 2.4%. All except one of the PU patients were being treated in critical care units (n = 10, 90.9%), and most of the ulcers were category one (n = 7, 63.6%) and caused by devices (n = 7, 63.6). The face was the most frequently reported location of PUs (n = 6, 54.5%), followed by the occiput (n = 2, 18.2%). Most PU patients were male (n = 6, 54.5%), and less than 12 months old (n = 8, 72.7%). PU patients had experienced longer hospital stays than patients free from PU (U = 499.0, p = 0.02). Jordanian paediatric patients do have pressure ulcers, with a prevalence rate congruent with previously reported international rates. Most of the ulcers found were caused by devices used in critical care units. This should encourage nurses to pay extra attention to their paediatric patients when they are connected to medical devices. Copyright

  17. Comprehensive Care For Joint Replacement Model - Provider Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model - provider data. This data set includes provider data for two quality measures tracked during an episode of care:...

  18. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2008-06-07

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC), and de novo AIH after liver transplantation. AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2). There is a female predominance in both. LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have partial IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological, and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies, and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress. There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH, including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and histological findings of interface hepatitis, bridging fibrosis, and collapse. Like classical AIH, it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine. De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection. Whether this condition is a

  19. Quality of life in children three and nine months after discharge from a paediatric intensive care unit: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bos Albert P

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improved survival in children with critical illnesses has led to new disease patterns. As a consequence evaluation of the well being of survivors of Pediatric Intensive Care Units (PICU has become important. Outcome assessment should therefore consist of evaluation of morbidity, functional health and Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL. Awareness of HRQoL consequences and physical sequelae could lead to changes in support during the acute phase and thereafter. The aim of this study was to evaluate HRQoL in PICU survivors. Methods Prospective follow-up study three and nine months after discharge from a 14-bed tertiary PICU. Eighty-one of 142 eligible, previously healthy children were included from December 2002 through October 2005. HRQoL was assessed with the TNO-AZL Preschool Children Quality of Life Questionnaire (TAPQOL-PF for children aged 1 to 6 years of age, the TNO-AZL Children's Quality of Life Questionnaire Parent Form (TACQOL-PF for children aged 6 to 12 years of age, and the TNO-AZL Children's Quality of Life Questionnaire Child Form (TACQOL-CF for children aged 8 to 15 years of age. The studied patients were compared with age appropriate normative data using non-parametric tests and effect sizes. Results Thirty-one and 27 children, and 55 and 50 parents completed questionnaires respectively three and nine months after discharge. In 1–6 year old children parents reported more lung problems (3 and 9 months, worse liveliness (9 months and better appetite and problem behaviour (3 months; in 6–12 year old children parents reported worse motor functioning (3 months; and 12–15 year old adolescents reported worse motor functioning (3 months. Large effect sizes indicating clinical significant differences in HRQoL with healthy control subjects were found on more domains. Conclusion In this small group of PICU survivors differences in HRQoL with the normative population exist three and nine months after discharge

  20. Prolonged unexplained fatigue in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged Unexplained Fatigue in Paediatrics. Fatigue, as the result of mental or physical exertion, will disappear after rest, drinks and food. Fatigue as a symptom of illness will recover with the recovering of the illness. But when fatigue is ongoing for a long time, and not the result of

  1. Paediatric diarrhoea rehydration therapy revisited

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alive. 1539. 2035. Patients and methods. At the end of 1985, one of four paediatric inpatient wards ... handbooks, but thereafter a protocol was evolved in which emphasis was ... In the absence of an adequate short-stay facility, this ward had to ...

  2. Methodologies to assess paediatric adiposity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horan, M

    2014-05-04

    Childhood obesity is associated with increased risk of adult obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. Appropriate techniques for assessment of childhood adiposity are required to identify children at risk. The aim of this review was to examine core clinical measurements and more technical tools to assess paediatric adiposity.

  3. Cost Analysis of a Digital Health Care Model in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Björn

    2017-09-22

    Digital technologies in health care are expected to increase in scope and to affect ever more parts of the health care system. It is important to enhance the knowledge of whether new digital methods and innovations provide value for money compared with traditional models of care. The objective of the study was to evaluate whether a digital health care model for primary care is a less costly alternative compared with traditional in-office primary care in Sweden. Cost data for the two care models were collected and analyzed to obtain a measure in local currency per care contact. The comparison showed that the total economic cost of a digital consultation is 1960 Swedish krona (SEK) (SEK100 = US$11.29; February 2017) compared with SEK3348 for a traditional consultation at a health care clinic. Cost differences arose on both the provider side and on the user side. The digital health care model may be a less costly alternative to the traditional health care model. Depending on the rate of digital substitution, gross economic cost savings of between SEK1 billion and SEK10 billion per year could be realized if more digital consultations were made. Further studies are needed to validate the findings, assess the types of care most suitable for digital care, and also to obtain various quality-adjusted outcome measures.

  4. Understanding case mix across three paediatric services: could integration of primary and secondary general paediatrics alter walk-in emergency attendances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Lloyd; Coote, Nicky; Klaber, Robert; Watson, Mando; Coren, Michael

    2018-05-04

    To understand the case mix of three different paediatric services, reasons for using an acute paediatric service in a region of developing integrated care and where acute attendances could alternatively have been managed. Mixed methods service evaluation, including retrospective review of referrals to general paediatric outpatients (n=534) and a virtual integrated service (email advice line) (n=474), as well as a prospective survey of paediatric ambulatory unit (PAU) attendees (n=95) and review by a paediatric consultant/registrar to decide where these cases could alternatively have been managed. The case mix of outpatient referrals and the email advice line was similar, but the case mix for PAU was more acute.The most common parental reasons for attending PAU were referral by a community health professional (27.2%), not being able to get a general practitioner (GP) appointment when desired (21.7%), wanting to avoid accident and emergency (17.4%) and wanting specialist paediatric input (14.1%). More than half of PAU presentations were deemed most appropriate for community management by a GP or midwife. The proportion of cases suitable for community management varied by the reason for attendance, with it highestl for parents reporting not being able to get a GP appointment (85%), and lowest for those referred by community health professionals (29%). One in two attendances to acute paediatric services could have been managed in the community. Integration of paediatric services could help address parental reasons for attending acute services, as well as facilitating the community management of chronic conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of a child -friendly clinic on retention of HIV-infected children in care: an intervention study · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. OR Ugwu, 175-179 ...

  6. Paediatric Abdominal Surgical Emergencies in a General Surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... organized for general surgeons undertaking paediatric surgical emergencies. More paediatric surgeons should be trained and more paediatric surgical units should established in the country. Key Words: Paediatric Abdominal Surgical Emergencies; Paediatric Surgeons, General Surgeons. Journal of College of Medicine ...

  7. Beyond 'doing': Supporting clinical leadership and nursing practice in aged care through innovative models of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturato, Lorraine; Drew, Liz

    2010-06-01

    Contemporary health care environments are increasingly challenged by issues associated with the recruitment and retention of qualified nursing staff. This challenge is particularly felt by residential aged care providers, with registered nurse (RN) numbers already limited and resident acuity rapidly rising. As a result, aged care service providers are increasingly exploring creative and alternative models of care. This article details exploratory research into a pre-existing, alternative model of care in a medium sized, regional residential aged care facility. Research findings suggest that the model of care is complex and multi-faceted and is an example of an integrated model of care. As a result of the implementation of this model of care a number of shifts have occurred in the practice experiences and clinical culture within this facility. Results suggest that the main benefits of this model are: (1) increased opportunities for RNs to engage in clinical leadership and proactive care management; (2) improved management and communication in relation to work processes and practices; and (3) enhanced recruitment and retention of both RNs and care workers.

  8. Wound care clinical pathway: a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, J E; Cuzzell, J

    1996-08-01

    A clinical pathway is a written sequence of clinical processes or events that guides a patient with a defined problem toward an expected outcome. Clinical pathways are tools to assist with the cost-effective management of clinical outcomes related to specific problems or disease processes. The primary obstacles to developing clinical pathways for wound care are the chronic natures of some wounds and the many variables that can delay healing. The pathway introduced in this article was modeled upon the three phases of tissue repair: inflammatory, proliferative, and maturation. This physiology-based model allows clinicians to identify and monitor outcomes based on observable and measurable clinical parameters. The pathway design, which also includes educational and behavioral outcomes, allows the clinician to individualize the expected timeframe for outcome achievement based on individual patient criteria and expert judgement. Integral to the pathway are the "4P's" which help standardize the clinical processes by wound type: Protocols, Policies, Procedures, and Patient education tools. Four categories into which variances are categorized based on the cause of the deviation from the norm are patient, process/system, practitioner, and planning/discharge. Additional research is warranted to support the value of this clinical pathway in the clinical arena.

  9. Paediatric medical emergency calls to a Danish Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper; Mikkelsen, Søren; Jørgensen, Gitte

    2018-01-01

    with a supporting physician-manned mobile emergency care unit (56.4%). The classification of medical issues and the dispatched pre-hospital units varied with patient age. DISCUSSION: We believe our results might help focus the paediatric training received by emergency medical dispatch staff on commonly encountered......BACKGROUND: Little is known regarding paediatric medical emergency calls to Danish Emergency Medical Dispatch Centres (EMDC). This study aimed to investigate these calls, specifically the medical issues leading to them and the pre-hospital units dispatched to the paediatric emergencies. METHODS: We...... records to establish how the medical issues leading to these calls were classified and which pre-hospital units were dispatched to the paediatric emergencies. We analysed the data using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Of a total of 7052 emergency calls in February 2016, 485 (6.9%) concerned patients ≤ 15...

  10. Morbidity among Israeli paediatric travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, Shira; Schwartz, Eli

    2017-09-01

    International travel, particularly to developing countries, is becoming increasingly common among the Israeli population, including an increase in the number of travelling children. Since children are a distinct travellers' population, data about their post-travel morbidity are needed. A retrospective study which examined all children (0-19 years old) who presented to our centre after international travel from 1999 to 2015. About 314 children were seen. The mean age was 10 years (SD ± 5.8). Most of the patients (80.6%) were tourists, and the rest were expatriates. The main destinations visited were South-Asia (46.5%), Sub-Saharan Africa (33.4%), Latin-America (7%) and Europe (6.4%). Overall, the most common diagnoses were gastrointestinal (GI) (mainly chronic) disorders (30.6%), followed by febrile diseases (26.4%), among which 18.1% of patients were diagnosed with dengue fever and 12% with malaria. Dermatologic conditions accounted for 25.2%. Additional diagnoses were schistosomiasis (6.4%) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (2.2%). A substantial part, 10.8%, had eosinophilia, either symptomatic or asymptomatic. Travellers to Asia, compared to travellers to Africa, presented more commonly with GI illness (OR 2.02, 95% confidence interval 1.13-3.61), and dermatologic conditions (OR 1.94, 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.61). Morbidity was associated with a variety of transmission modes, such as food-borne illnesses (30.9%), bite and sting wounds (10.2%), mosquito-borne infections (8%), freshwater contact (6.7%) and tick-borne infections (2.2%). The main conditions seen in paediatric returning travellers were GI, febrile and dermatologic illnesses, some may be rare in their country of origin. Targeting care for the suspected pathogens based on updated knowledge of epidemiology and thorough travel history is essential. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Paediatric dentistry- novel evolvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha Shah, B.D.S, MClinDent Paediatric Dentistry (UK

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric dentistry provides primary and comprehensive preventive and therapeutic oral health care for infants and children through adolescence, together with special health care needs. This specialty encompasses a variety of skills, disciplines, procedures and techniques that share a common origin with other dental specialties however these have been modified and reformed to the distinctive requirements of infants, children, adolescents and special health care needs. Disciplines comprise of behavior guidance, care of the medically and developmentally compromised and disabled patient, supervision of orofacial growth and development, caries prevention, sedation, pharmacological management, and hospital dentistry including other traditional fields of dentistry. The skills apply to the ever-changing stages of dental, physical, and psychosocial development for treating conditions and diseases distinctive to growing individuals. Hence with the changing scope of practice it is imperative that the clinician stays updated with the current evidence based trends in practice, collaborates with other disciplines and Imparts quality oral health care tailored to the specific needs of every child.

  12. Systems modeling and simulation applications for critical care medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Critical care delivery is a complex, expensive, error prone, medical specialty and remains the focal point of major improvement efforts in healthcare delivery. Various modeling and simulation techniques offer unique opportunities to better understand the interactions between clinical physiology and care delivery. The novel insights gained from the systems perspective can then be used to develop and test new treatment strategies and make critical care delivery more efficient and effective. However, modeling and simulation applications in critical care remain underutilized. This article provides an overview of major computer-based simulation techniques as applied to critical care medicine. We provide three application examples of different simulation techniques, including a) pathophysiological model of acute lung injury, b) process modeling of critical care delivery, and c) an agent-based model to study interaction between pathophysiology and healthcare delivery. Finally, we identify certain challenges to, and opportunities for, future research in the area. PMID:22703718

  13. Systems modeling and simulation applications for critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yue; Chbat, Nicolas W; Gupta, Ashish; Hadzikadic, Mirsad; Gajic, Ognjen

    2012-06-15

    Critical care delivery is a complex, expensive, error prone, medical specialty and remains the focal point of major improvement efforts in healthcare delivery. Various modeling and simulation techniques offer unique opportunities to better understand the interactions between clinical physiology and care delivery. The novel insights gained from the systems perspective can then be used to develop and test new treatment strategies and make critical care delivery more efficient and effective. However, modeling and simulation applications in critical care remain underutilized. This article provides an overview of major computer-based simulation techniques as applied to critical care medicine. We provide three application examples of different simulation techniques, including a) pathophysiological model of acute lung injury, b) process modeling of critical care delivery, and c) an agent-based model to study interaction between pathophysiology and healthcare delivery. Finally, we identify certain challenges to, and opportunities for, future research in the area.

  14. Modeling Market Shares of Competing (e)Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ooteghem, Jan; Tesch, Tom; Verbrugge, Sofie; Ackaert, Ann; Colle, Didier; Pickavet, Mario; Demeester, Piet

    In order to address the increasing costs of providing care to the growing group of elderly, efficiency gains through eCare solutions seem an obvious solution. Unfortunately not many techno-economic business models to evaluate the return of these investments are available. The construction of a business case for care for the elderly as they move through different levels of dependency and the effect of introducing an eCare service, is the intended application of the model. The simulation model presented in this paper allows for modeling evolution of market shares of competing care providers. Four tiers are defined, based on the dependency level of the elderly, for which the market shares are determined. The model takes into account available capacity of the different care providers, in- and outflow distribution between tiers and churn between providers within tiers.

  15. Bed Utilisation in an Irish Regional Paediatric Unit – A Cross-Sectional Study Using the Paediatric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (PAEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coilín ÓhAiseadha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Increasing demand for limited healthcare resources raises questions about appropriate use of inpatient beds. In the first paediatric bed utilisation study at a regional university centre in Ireland, we conducted a cross-sectional study to audit the utilisation of inpatient beds at the Regional Paediatric Unit (RPU in University Hospital Limerick (UHL, Limerick, Ireland and also examined hospital activity data, to make recommendations for optimal use of inpatient resources. Methods We used a questionnaire based on the paediatric appropriateness evaluation protocol (PAEP, modified and validated for use in the United Kingdom, to prospectively gather data regarding reasons for admission and for ongoing care after 2 days, from case records for all inpatients during 11 days in February (winter and 7 days in May–June (summer. We conducted bivariate and multivariate analysis to explore associations between failure to meet PAEP criteria and patient attributes including age, gender, admission outside of office hours, arrival by ambulance, and private health insurance. Inpatient bed occupancy and day ward activity were also scrutinised. Results Mean bed occupancy was 84.1%. In all, 12/355 (3.4%, 95% CI: 1.5%–5.3% of children failed to meet PAEP admission criteria, and 27/189 (14.3%, 95% CI: 9.3%–19.3% who were still inpatients after 2 days failed to meet criteria for ongoing care. 35/355 (9.9%, 95% CI: 6.8%–13.0% of admissions fulfilled only the PAEP criterion for intravenous medications or fluid replacement. A logistic regression model constructed by forward selection identified a significant association between failure to meet PAEP criteria for ongoing care 2 days after admission and admission during office hours (08.00–17.59 (P = .020, and a marginally significant association between this outcome and arrival by ambulance (P = .054. Conclusion At a mean bed occupancy of 84.1%, an Irish RPU can achieve 96.6% appropriate admissions

  16. Parent participation in paediatric rehabilitation treatment centres in the Netherlands : a parents' viewpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebes, R. C.; Wijnroks, L.; Ketelaar, M.; van Schie, P. E. M.; Gorter, J. W.; Vermeer, A.

    Aim The importance of family-centred care and services has been increasingly emphasized in paediatric rehabilitation. One aspect of family-centred care is parent involvement in their child's treatment. The aims of this study were (1) to describe how, and to what extent parents are involved in the

  17. Evaluating a nurse-led model for providing neonatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The paper presents an overview of a multi-dimensional, prospective, comparative 5-year audit of the quality of the neonatal care provided by a maternity unit in the UK delivering 2000 babies a year, where all neonatal care after 1995 was provided by advanced neonatal nurse practitioners, in relation to that provided by a range of other medically staffed comparator units. The audit includes 11 separate comparative studies supervised by a panel of independent external advisors. Data on intrapartum and neonatal mortality is reported. A review of resuscitation at birth, and a two-tier confidential inquiry into sentinel events in six units were carried out. The reliability of the routine predischarge neonatal examination was studied and, in particular, the recognition of congenital heart disease. A review of the quality of postdischarge letters was undertaken alongside an interview survey to elicit parental views on care provision. An audit of all hospital readmissions within 28 days of birth is reported. Other areas of study include management of staff stress, perceived adequacy of the training of nurse practitioners coming into post, and an assessment of unit costs. Intrapartum and neonatal death among women with a singleton pregnancy originally booked for delivery in Ashington fell 39% between 1991-1995 and 1996-2000 (5.12 vs. 3.11 deaths per 1000 births); the decline for the whole region was 27% (4.10 vs. 2.99). By all other indicators the quality of care in the nurse-managed unit was as good as, or better than, that in the medically staffed comparator units. An appropriately trained, stable team with a store of experience can deliver cot-side care of a higher quality than staff rostered to this task for a few months to gain experience, and this is probably more important than their medical or nursing background. Factors limiting the on-site availability of medical staff with paediatric expertise do not need to dictate the future disposition of maternity services.

  18. Selection of paediatric patients for intensive care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    illness, particularly near-drowning, cardiomyopathy, gastro- enteritis and complicated infectious illness (Table Ill). Cardiorespiratory resuscitation prior to ICU admission was associated with increased mortality (7/11 v. 27/106,. P < 0,05, two-tailed Fisher's exact test). There were no deaths in patients with polytrauma without ...

  19. Analgesia and sedation in paediatric intensive care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to future sensory and pain stimuli. By contrast, oversedation delays recovery, promotes tolerance to the drugs and leads to distressing symptoms on withdrawal .... Loss of explicit and implicit memory. • Compliance with the need to lie in a confined space, attached to monitors and invasive lines. • Prevention of distress during ...

  20. Predicting mortality in sick African children: the FEAST Paediatric Emergency Triage (PET) Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Elizabeth C; Walker, A Sarah; Kiguli, Sarah; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Opoka, Robert O; Engoru, Charles; Akech, Samuel O; Nyeko, Richard; Mtove, George; Reyburn, Hugh; Berkley, James A; Mpoya, Ayub; Levin, Michael; Crawley, Jane; Gibb, Diana M; Maitland, Kathryn; Babiker, Abdel G

    2015-07-31

    Mortality in paediatric emergency care units in Africa often occurs within the first 24 h of admission and remains high. Alongside effective triage systems, a practical clinical bedside risk score to identify those at greatest risk could contribute to reducing mortality. Data collected during the Fluid As Expansive Supportive Therapy (FEAST) trial, a multi-centre trial involving 3,170 severely ill African children, were analysed to identify clinical and laboratory prognostic factors for mortality. Multivariable Cox regression was used to build a model in this derivation dataset based on clinical parameters that could be quickly and easily assessed at the bedside. A score developed from the model coefficients was externally validated in two admissions datasets from Kilifi District Hospital, Kenya, and compared to published risk scores using Area Under the Receiver Operating Curve (AUROC) and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests. The Net Reclassification Index (NRI) was used to identify additional laboratory prognostic factors. A risk score using 8 clinical variables (temperature, heart rate, capillary refill time, conscious level, severe pallor, respiratory distress, lung crepitations, and weak pulse volume) was developed. The score ranged from 0-10 and had an AUROC of 0.82 (95 % CI, 0.77-0.87) in the FEAST trial derivation set. In the independent validation datasets, the score had an AUROC of 0.77 (95 % CI, 0.72-0.82) amongst admissions to a paediatric high dependency ward and 0.86 (95 % CI, 0.82-0.89) amongst general paediatric admissions. This discriminative ability was similar to, or better than other risk scores in the validation datasets. NRI identified lactate, blood urea nitrogen, and pH to be important prognostic laboratory variables that could add information to the clinical score. Eight clinical prognostic factors that could be rapidly assessed by healthcare staff for triage were combined to create the FEAST Paediatric Emergency Triage (PET) score and externally

  1. Standards of care and quality indicators for multidisciplinary care models for psoriatic arthritis in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratacós, Jordi; Luelmo, Jesús; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Marco, Teresa Navío; de la Cueva, Pablo; Busquets, Manel Pujol; Font, Mercè García; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Vega, Jose Luis Alvarez; Álvarez, Antonio Javier Chaves; Parera, Ricardo Sánchez; Carrascosa, Jose Carlos Ruiz; Martínez, Fernando José Rodríguez; Sánchez, José Pardo; Olmos, Carlos Feced; Pujol, Conrad; Galindez, Eva; Barrio, Silvia Pérez; Arana, Ana Urruticoechea; Hergueta, Mercedes; Coto, Pablo; Queiro, Rubén

    2018-06-01

    To define and give priority to standards of care and quality indicators of multidisciplinary care for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A systematic literature review on PsA standards of care and quality indicators was performed. An expert panel of rheumatologists and dermatologists who provide multidisciplinary care was established. In a consensus meeting group, the experts discussed and developed the standards of care and quality indicators and graded their priority, agreement and also the feasibility (only for quality indicators) following qualitative methodology and a Delphi process. Afterwards, these results were discussed with 2 focus groups, 1 with patients, another with health managers. A descriptive analysis is presented. We obtained 25 standards of care (9 of structure, 9 of process, 7 of results) and 24 quality indicators (2 of structure, 5 of process, 17 of results). Standards of care include relevant aspects in the multidisciplinary care of PsA patients like an appropriate physical infrastructure and technical equipment, the access to nursing care, labs and imaging techniques, other health professionals and treatments, or the development of care plans. Regarding quality indicators, the definition of multidisciplinary care model objectives and referral criteria, the establishment of responsibilities and coordination among professionals and the active evaluation of patients and data collection were given a high priority. Patients considered all of them as important. This set of standards of care and quality indicators for the multidisciplinary care of patients with PsA should help improve quality of care in these patients.

  2. Semelparous Penna Ageing Model with Parental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehsenfeld, K. M.; Sá Martins, J. S.; de Oliveira, S. Moss; Bernardes, A. T.

    In this paper we study the importance of parental care for the survival of semelparous species, that reproduce only once in life. We perform our simulations for sexual and asexual reproductions and show that catastrophic senescence (death soon after reproduction) is delayed if parental care is considered.

  3. Consultant paediatric outreach clinics--a practical step in integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, N J

    1993-04-01

    Ten years' experience of paediatric outreach clinics is reviewed and evaluated. The advantages and disadvantages of paediatric outreach and its possible place in the new era of contracting and more developed community paediatric services are discussed. It is concluded that paediatric outreach increases parental and professional choice and access to paediatric consultant services, increases service flexibility, reduces unnecessary hospital visits, and enables more rational and relevant clinical decision making. Outreach is particularly relevant in areas of deprivation where paediatric needs are greatest.

  4. What's new in paediatric dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Since the early 80's, the use of laser has been introduced in the daily dental practice and the technological development has also provided over time to optimize its use. Various types of lasers with different wavelengths have been developed for use in a handy, easy and ergonomic manner. In daily paediatric dentistry, laser could be a very useful medical device which can completely replace the traditional high hand-piece and bur to realize a "micro-invasive" dentistry and a "clean" surgery, without bleeding and sutures. According to the international literature and in the light of recent researches, this work could give an overview on assisted laser therapy in paediatric dentistry, highlighting advantages and disadvantages of this new technology and pointing out the high compliance of the young patient.

  5. Hypnosis in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of paediatric respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in paediatric patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary care clinicians' recognition and management of depression: a model of depression care in real-world primary care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Seong-Yi; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Gonzales, Junius J

    2013-11-01

    Depression is prevalent in primary care (PC) practices and poses a considerable public health burden in the United States. Despite nearly four decades of efforts to improve depression care quality in PC practices, a gap remains between desired treatment outcomes and the reality of how depression care is delivered. This article presents a real-world PC practice model of depression care, elucidating the processes and their influencing conditions. Grounded theory methodology was used for the data collection and analysis to develop a depression care model. Data were collected from 70 individual interviews (60 to 70 min each), three focus group interviews (n = 24, 2 h each), two surveys per clinician, and investigators' field notes on practice environments. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed for analysis. Surveys and field notes complemented interview data. Seventy primary care clinicians from 52 PC offices in the Midwest: 28 general internists, 28 family physicians, and 14 nurse practitioners. A depression care model was developed that illustrates how real-world conditions infuse complexity into each step of the depression care process. Depression care in PC settings is mediated through clinicians' interactions with patients, practice, and the local community. A clinician's interactional familiarity ("familiarity capital") was a powerful facilitator for depression care. For the recognition of depression, three previously reported processes and three conditions were confirmed. For the management of depression, 13 processes and 11 conditions were identified. Empowering the patient was a parallel process to the management of depression. The clinician's ability to develop and utilize interactional relationships and resources needed to recognize and treat a person with depression is key to depression care in primary care settings. The interactional context of depression care makes empowering the patient central to depression care delivery.

  7. Outcome evaluation of a new model of critical care orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Linda L; Pfeifer, Pamela; Catalano, Rene; Fortney, Robert; Nelson, Greta; Rabito, Robb; Harap, Rebecca

    2009-05-01

    The shortage of critical care nurses and the service expansion of 2 intensive care units provided a unique opportunity to create a new model of critical care orientation. The goal was to design a program that assessed critical thinking, validated competence, and provided learning pathways that accommodated diverse experience. To determine the effect of a new model of critical care orientation on satisfaction, retention, turnover, vacancy, preparedness to manage patient care assignment, length of orientation, and cost of orientation. A prospective, quasi-experimental design with both quantitative and qualitative methods. The new model improved satisfaction scores, retention rates, and recruitment of critical care nurses. Length of orientation was unchanged. Cost was increased, primarily because a full-time education consultant was added. A new model for nurse orientation that was focused on critical thinking and competence validation improved retention and satisfaction and serves as a template for orientation of nurses throughout the medical center.

  8. Recent advances in paediatric gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Richard; Russell, Richard K; Muhammed, Rafeeq

    2015-09-01

    Over the last few years, many changes have been introduced in the diagnosis and management of paediatric gastrointestinal problems. This review highlights the recent developments in Helicobacter pylori infection, eosinophilic oesophagitis, coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. A focus on paediatric hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Paolo Bassareo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension can begin early in childhood, as occasional increases in blood pressure or abnormal blood pressure responses to physical or emotional stress. High blood pressure in juvenile age is defined as a blood pressure repeatedly above the 95th percentile of specific nomograms. Its worldwide prevalence ranges from 1% to about 10%. The purpose of this paper is to perform an overview about characteristics, diagnosis, risk factors, therapy, and prognosis of paediatric hypertension.

  10. Simulated learning environment experience in nursing students for paediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Maldonado, Yessy; Barría-Pailaquilén, René Mauricio

    The training of health professionals requires the acquisition of clinical skills in a safe and efficient manner, which is facilitated by a simulated learning environment (SLE). It is also an efficient alternative when there are limitations for clinical practice in certain areas. This paper shows the work undertaken in a Chilean university in implementing paediatric practice using SLE. Over eight days, the care experience of a hospitalized infant was studied applying the nursing process. The participation of a paediatrician, resident physician, nursing technician, and simulated user was included in addition to the use of a simulation mannequin and equipment. Simulation of care was integral and covered interaction with the child and family and was developed in groups of six students by a teacher. The different phases of the simulation methodology were developed from a pedagogical point of view. The possibility of implementing paediatric clinical practice in an efficient and safe way was confirmed. The experience in SLE was highly valued by the students, allowing them to develop different skills and abilities required for paediatric nursing through simulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Designing a Care Pathway Model - A Case Study of the Outpatient Total Hip Arthroplasty Care Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterholt, Robin I; Simonse, Lianne Wl; Boess, Stella U; Vehmeijer, Stephan Bw

    2017-03-09

    Although the clinical attributes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) care pathways have been thoroughly researched, a detailed understanding of the equally important organisational attributes is still lacking. The aim of this article is to contribute with a model of the outpatient THA care pathway that depicts how the care team should be organised to enable patient discharge on the day of surgery. The outpatient THA care pathway enables patients to be discharged on the day of surgery, shortening the length of stay and intensifying the provision and organisation of care. We utilise visual care modelling to construct a visual design of the organisation of the care pathway. An embedded case study was conducted of the outpatient THA care pathway at a teaching hospital in the Netherlands. The data were collected using a visual care modelling toolkit in 16 semi-structured interviews. Problems and inefficiencies in the care pathway were identified and addressed in the iterative design process. The results are two visual models of the most critical phases of the outpatient THA care pathway: diagnosis & preparation (1) and mobilisation & discharge (4). The results show the care team composition, critical value exchanges, and sequence that enable patient discharge on the day of surgery. The design addressed existing problems and is an optimisation of the case hospital's pathway. The network of actors consists of the patient (1), radiologist (1), anaesthetist (1), nurse specialist (1), pharmacist (1), orthopaedic surgeon (1,4), physiotherapist (1,4), nurse (4), doctor (4) and patient application (1,4). The critical value exchanges include patient preparation (mental and practical), patient education, aligned care team, efficient sequence of value exchanges, early patient mobilisation, flexible availability of the physiotherapist, functional discharge criteria, joint decision making and availability of the care team.

  12. Formalized exercise program for paediatric and young adult cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Y. Wonders

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Survival rates of childhood cancer patients has steadily increased through the years, making it necessary to develop strategies aimed at long term improvements to quality of life. This paper presents a formalized exercise program for paediatric cancer survivors, based on current risk-based exercise recommendations, with the primary goal of helping families return to a normal life that emphasizes overall wellness and physical activity. Background Children tend to respond better to anti-cancer treatments, including chemotherapy. Research indicates that proper nutrition and regular physical activity will help a paediatric cancer survivor continue to grow and develop properly, however, at present, there is no standard of care with regards to this subject. Aims To create a fun and supportive atmosphere that encourages movement and healthy eating for the participants while increasing participant knowledge regarding proper nutrition and exercise.

  13. Paediatric approaches to child maltreatment are subject to wide organisational variations across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, Gabriel; Jalsenius, Marie; Maguire, Sabine; Sarkadi, Anna; Janson, Staffan

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about the organisation of child maltreatment practice in Europe. We therefore explored medical child protection systems and training across Europe. An online survey was completed by physicians working in child maltreatment, identified through professional organisations in 28 member countries of the European Union, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland in 2012-2013. Respondents were questioned regarding management of suspected child maltreatment, mandatory reporting, professional training, patient referral and physician roles in multidisciplinary investigations. Responses underwent a narrative synthesis and descriptive enumerations. The survey was completed by 88 individuals, unevenly distributed in 22 of 31 countries. Physicians were mandated to report child maltreatment in 16 of 22 countries. All of 88 responding physicians described multidisciplinary involvement in the clinical and forensic management of suspected child maltreatment. Practitioners involved in physical examinations included general physicians, paediatricians, forensic medical examiners, gynaecologists and paediatric surgeons. Paediatricians were required to undergo child protection training according to 30 of 86 respondents in 14 of 22 countries. This survey demonstrates that there were wide variations in the organisation of child maltreatment paediatrics in Europe. The differing legislative frameworks and models of care are pertinent to consider when comparing epidemiology of maltreatment reported from across European countries. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Current practice in paediatric basic life support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heczková Jana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although the incidence of cardiac arrest in children is much lower than in adults, the condition is still considered a major health problem with a very low chance for survival. As in adults, the timely provision of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in children is crucial. Current guidelines for CPR in children were published along with the guidelines for CPR in adults in 2015. As in previous years, they are based on consensus provided by International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR. Guidelines of particular ILCOR member councils may vary and reflect regional characteristic such as different access to health care, education methods or willingness of population to provide emergency assistance. Moreover, the conditions requiring CPR in children are characterized not only by different incidence, but also by aetiology or techniques used for different age groups. Therefore, emphasis is put on simplicity and feasibility as well as on consistency with adult guidelines to improve retention of the paediatric sequences. Nurses may be first rescuers not only in health care facilities. Better understanding of CPR guidelines might help them to improve their ability to detect conditions requiring CRP and also initiate and provide effective emergency care.

  15. Counseling People Living in Poverty: The CARE Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Louisa L.; Generali, Margaret M.; Kress, Victoria E.

    2011-01-01

    Counselors frequently counsel clients who live in poverty. The authors describe the new CARE model that addresses the influence of multiple systems on poor clients' experiences. A social justice, humanistic intervention, the CARE model emphasizes cultivating a positive counseling relationship with poor clients, empathizing with their unique…

  16. Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelhoff, Charlotte; Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla; Mörelius, Evalotte

    2018-02-01

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family-centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers' and fathers' sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents' sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily-life home setting after discharge. Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents' sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents' ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child. This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty-two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood. The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood. Parents' sleep quality in family-centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated. The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents' sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well-being in the family. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The primary care amplification model: taking the best of primary care forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholson Caroline

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care internationally is approaching a new paradigm. The change agenda implicit in this threatens to de-stabilise and challenge established general practice and primary care. Discussion The Primary Care Amplification Model offers a means to harness the change agenda by 'amplifying' the strengths of established general practices around a 'beacon' practice. Conclusion Such 'beacon' practices can provide a mustering point for an expanded scope of practice for primary care, integrated primary/secondary service delivery, interprofessional learning, relevant local clinical research, and a focus on local service innovation, enhancing rather than fragmenting the collective capacity of existing primary care.

  18. A maturity model for care pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schriek, M.; Turetken, O.; Kaymak, U.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last recent decades, increasing the quality of healthcare services while reducing costs has been among the top concerns in the healthcare landscape. Several healthcare institutions have initiated improvement programs and invested considerably in process orientation and management. Care

  19. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM): A Home Care Case-Mix Model for Children Facing Special Health Care Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Charles D

    2015-01-01

    Case-mix classification and payment systems help assure that persons with similar needs receive similar amounts of care resources, which is a major equity concern for consumers, providers, and programs. Although health service programs for adults regularly use case-mix payment systems, programs providing health services to children and youth rarely use such models. This research utilized Medicaid home care expenditures and assessment data on 2,578 children receiving home care in one large state in the USA. Using classification and regression tree analyses, a case-mix model for long-term pediatric home care was developed. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM) grouped children and youth in the study sample into 24 groups, explaining 41% of the variance in annual home care expenditures. The P/ECM creates the possibility of a more equitable, and potentially more effective, allocation of home care resources among children and youth facing serious health care challenges.

  20. A taxonomy of nursing care organization models in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Carl-Ardy; D'Amour, Danielle; Tchouaket, Eric; Rivard, Michèle; Clarke, Sean; Blais, Régis

    2012-08-28

    Over the last decades, converging forces in hospital care, including cost-containment policies, rising healthcare demands and nursing shortages, have driven the search for new operational models of nursing care delivery that maximize the use of available nursing resources while ensuring safe, high-quality care. Little is known, however, about the distinctive features of these emergent nursing care models. This article contributes to filling this gap by presenting a theoretically and empirically grounded taxonomy of nursing care organization models in the context of acute care units in Quebec and comparing their distinctive features. This study was based on a survey of 22 medical units in 11 acute care facilities in Quebec. Data collection methods included questionnaire, interviews, focus groups and administrative data census. The analytical procedures consisted of first generating unit profiles based on qualitative and quantitative data collected at the unit level, then applying hierarchical cluster analysis to the units' profile data. The study identified four models of nursing care organization: two professional models that draw mainly on registered nurses as professionals to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support to nurses' professional practice, and two functional models that draw more significantly on licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and assistive staff (orderlies) to deliver nursing services and are characterized by registered nurses' perceptions that the practice environment is less supportive of their professional work. This study showed that medical units in acute care hospitals exhibit diverse staff mixes, patterns of skill use, work environment design, and support for innovation. The four models reflect not only distinct approaches to dealing with the numerous constraints in the nursing care environment, but also different degrees of approximations to an "ideal" nursing professional practice model described by some leaders in the

  1. A taxonomy of nursing care organization models in hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the last decades, converging forces in hospital care, including cost-containment policies, rising healthcare demands and nursing shortages, have driven the search for new operational models of nursing care delivery that maximize the use of available nursing resources while ensuring safe, high-quality care. Little is known, however, about the distinctive features of these emergent nursing care models. This article contributes to filling this gap by presenting a theoretically and empirically grounded taxonomy of nursing care organization models in the context of acute care units in Quebec and comparing their distinctive features. Methods This study was based on a survey of 22 medical units in 11 acute care facilities in Quebec. Data collection methods included questionnaire, interviews, focus groups and administrative data census. The analytical procedures consisted of first generating unit profiles based on qualitative and quantitative data collected at the unit level, then applying hierarchical cluster analysis to the units’ profile data. Results The study identified four models of nursing care organization: two professional models that draw mainly on registered nurses as professionals to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support to nurses’ professional practice, and two functional models that draw more significantly on licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and assistive staff (orderlies) to deliver nursing services and are characterized by registered nurses’ perceptions that the practice environment is less supportive of their professional work. Conclusions This study showed that medical units in acute care hospitals exhibit diverse staff mixes, patterns of skill use, work environment design, and support for innovation. The four models reflect not only distinct approaches to dealing with the numerous constraints in the nursing care environment, but also different degrees of approximations to an “ideal” nursing professional practice

  2. Job stress and job satisfaction: home care workers in a consumer-directed model of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, Linda; Wallace, Steven P; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne; Muntaner, Carles

    2010-08-01

    To investigate determinants of job satisfaction among home care workers in a consumer-directed model. Analysis of data collected from telephone interviews with 1,614 Los Angeles home care workers on the state payroll in 2003. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the odds of job satisfaction using job stress model domains of demands, control, and support. Abuse from consumers, unpaid overtime hours, and caring for more than one consumer as well as work-health demands predict less satisfaction. Some physical and emotional demands of the dyadic care relationship are unexpectedly associated with greater job satisfaction. Social support and control, indicated by job security and union involvement, have a direct positive effect on job satisfaction. Policies that enhance the relational component of care may improve workers' ability to transform the demands of their job into dignified and satisfying labor. Adequate benefits and sufficient authorized hours of care can minimize the stress of unpaid overtime work, caring for multiple consumers, job insecurity, and the financial constraints to seeking health care. Results have implications for the structure of consumer-directed models of care and efforts to retain long-term care workers.

  3. Sustainability in care through an ethical practice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Linda; Salmela, Susanne; Nyström, Lisbet; Koskinen, Camilla

    2018-03-01

    While sustainability is a key concept in many different domains today, it has not yet been sufficiently emphasized in the healthcare sector. Earlier research shows that ethical values and evidence-based care models create sustainability in care practice. The aim of this study was to gain further understanding of the ethical values central to the realization of sustainability in care and to create an ethical practice model whereby these basic values can be made perceptible and active in care practice. Part of the ongoing "Ethical Sustainable Caring Cultures" research project, a hermeneutical application research design was employed in this study. Dialogues were used, where scientific researchers and co-researchers were given the opportunity to reflect on ethical values in relation to sustainability in care. An ethical practice model with ethos as its core was created from the results of the dialogues. In the model, ethos is encircled by the ethical values central to sustainability: dignity, responsibility, respect, invitation, and vows. The model can be used as a starting point for ethical conversations that support carers' reflections on the ethical issues seen in day-to-day care work and the work community, allowing ethical values to become visible throughout the entire care culture. It is intended as a tool whereby carers can more deeply understand an organization's common basic values and what they entail in regard to sustainability in care.

  4. Urgent Need for Improved Mental Health Care and a More Collaborative Model of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, James; Turner, Mason Spain

    2017-01-01

    Current treatments and the dominant model of mental health care do not adequately address the complex challenges of mental illness, which accounts for roughly one-third of adult disability globally. These circumstances call for radical change in the paradigm and practices of mental health care, including improving standards of clinician training, developing new research methods, and re-envisioning current models of mental health care delivery. Because of its dominant position in the US health care marketplace and its commitment to research and innovation, Kaiser Permanente (KP) is strategically positioned to make important contributions that will shape the future of mental health care nationally and globally. This article reviews challenges facing mental health care and proposes an agenda for developing a collaborative care model in primary care settings that incorporates conventional biomedical therapies and complementary and alternative medicine approaches. By moving beyond treatment delivery via telephone and secure video and providing earlier interventions through primary care clinics, KP is shifting the paradigm of mental health care to a collaborative care model focusing on prevention. Recommendations are to expand current practices to include integrative treatment strategies incorporating evidence-based biomedical and complementary and alternative medicine modalities that can be provided to patients using a collaborative care model. Recommendations also are made for an internal research program aimed at investigating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of promising complementary and alternative medicine and integrative treatments addressing the complex needs of patients with severe psychiatric disorders, many of whom respond poorly to treatments available in KP mental health clinics. PMID:28898197

  5. Multidisciplinary Care Models for Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiro, Rubén; Coto, Pablo; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Navío Marco, Teresa; de la Cueva, Pablo; Pujol Busquets, Manel; García Font, Mercè; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Alvarez Vega, Jose Luis; Chaves Álvarez, Antonio Javier; Sánchez Parera, Ricardo; Ruiz Carrascosa, Jose Carlos; Rodríguez Martínez, Fernando José; Pardo Sánchez, José; Feced Olmos, Carlos; Pujol, Conrad; Galindez, Eva; Pérez Barrio, Silvia; Urruticoechea Arana, Ana; Hergueta, Mercedes; Luelmo, Jesús; Gratacós, Jordi

    To describe (structure, processes) of the multidisciplinary care models in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in Spain, as well as barriers and facilitators of their implementation. A qualitative study was performed following structured interviews with 24 professionals (12 rheumatologists, 12 dermatologists who provide multidisciplinary care for patients with PsA). We collected data related to the hospital, department, population and multidisciplinary care model (type, physical and human resources, professional requirements, objectives, referral criteria, agendas, protocols, responsibilities, decision- making, research and education, clinical sessions, development and planning of the model, advantages and disadvantages of the model, barriers and facilitators in the implementation of the model. The models characteristics are described. We analyzed 12 multidisciplinary care models in PsA, with at least 1-2 years of experience, and 3 subtypes of models, face-to-face, parallel, and preferential circuit. All are adapted to the hospital and professionals characteristics. A proper implementation planning is essential. The involvement and empathy between professionals and an access and well-defined referral criteria are important facilitators in the implementation of a model. The management of agendas and data collection to measure the multidisciplinary care models health outcomes are the main barriers. There are different multidisciplinary care models in PsA that can improve patient outcomes, system efficiency and collaboration between specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. The Shifting Landscape of Health Care: Toward a Model of Health Care Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In a rapidly changing world of health care information access and patients’ rights, there is limited conceptual infrastructure available to understand how people approach and engage in treatment of medical conditions. The construct of health care empowerment is defined as the process and state of being engaged, informed, collaborative, committed, and tolerant of uncertainty regarding health care. I present a model in which health care empowerment is influenced by an interplay of cultural, social, and environmental factors; personal resources; and intrapersonal factors. The model offers a framework to understand patient and provider roles in facilitating health care empowerment and presents opportunities for investigation into the role of health care empowerment in multiple outcomes across populations and settings, including inquiries into the sources and consequences of health disparities. PMID:21164096

  7. Paediatric sunburn: the experience of an Australian paediatric burns unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Latifa; Di Giovine, Paul; Quinn, Linda; Sparnon, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    The number of hospital presentations and admissions for treatment of sunburn remains significant, despite efforts to educate the public regarding sun protection. Current literature chiefly examines public health campaigns and sun protection behaviours and attitudes. There are very few articles that explore paediatric sunburn requiring hospital presentation. This study was therefore undertaken to provide a snapshot of this issue and to identify patterns and causative factors in the development of severe sunburn requiring hospital presentation. Data were collected for retrospective analysis from case records of patients who presented with sunburn and were registered on the Burns Service database at the Women's and Children's Hospital in South Australia. This study includes patients who presented during the period of October 2006 to March 2011. There were 81 cases identified over the period of 2006-2011 from the Burns database that had sufficient information for the purpose of this study. Factors such as outdoor activity and water sports were predictably apparent, with patients being burned on days with extremely high ultraviolet ratings. Key patterns that emerged were location of sunburn and sun protection use, which were gender and age specific. Larger-scale studies are warranted to further delineate the contributing factors and to identify the specific populations of children at risk of sunburn. Future educational programmes can therefore target these subgroups and behaviours for effective prevention of sunburn. Tailored campaigns that address these factors may be of greater impact in reducing hospital presentations and admissions of significant sunburn. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  8. Funding models in palliative care: Lessons from international experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, E Iris; Cassel, J Brian; Bausewein, Claudia; Csikós, Ágnes; Krajnik, Malgorzata; Ryan, Karen; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg; Eychmueller, Steffen; Gudat Keller, Heike; Allan, Simon; Hasselaar, Jeroen; García-Baquero Merino, Teresa; Swetenham, Kate; Piper, Kym; Fürst, Carl Johan; Murtagh, Fliss EM

    2017-01-01

    Background: Funding models influence provision and development of palliative care services. As palliative care integrates into mainstream health care provision, opportunities to develop funding mechanisms arise. However, little has been reported on what funding models exist or how we can learn from them. Aim: To assess national models and methods for financing and reimbursing palliative care. Design: Initial literature scoping yielded limited evidence on the subject as national policy documents are difficult to identify, access and interpret. We undertook expert consultations to appraise national models of palliative care financing in England, Germany, Hungary, Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United States and Wales. These represent different levels of service development and a variety of funding mechanisms. Results: Funding mechanisms reflect country-specific context and local variations in care provision. Patterns emerging include the following: Provider payment is rarely linked to population need and often perpetuates existing inequitable patterns in service provision. Funding is frequently characterised as a mixed system of charitable, public and private payers. The basis on which providers are paid for services rarely reflects individual care input or patient needs. Conclusion: Funding mechanisms need to be well understood and used with caution to ensure best practice and minimise perverse incentives. Before we can conduct cross-national comparisons of costs and impact of palliative care, we need to understand the funding and policy context for palliative care in each country of interest. PMID:28156188

  9. Funding models in palliative care: Lessons from international experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, E Iris; Cassel, J Brian; Bausewein, Claudia; Csikós, Ágnes; Krajnik, Malgorzata; Ryan, Karen; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg; Eychmueller, Steffen; Gudat Keller, Heike; Allan, Simon; Hasselaar, Jeroen; García-Baquero Merino, Teresa; Swetenham, Kate; Piper, Kym; Fürst, Carl Johan; Murtagh, Fliss Em

    2017-04-01

    Funding models influence provision and development of palliative care services. As palliative care integrates into mainstream health care provision, opportunities to develop funding mechanisms arise. However, little has been reported on what funding models exist or how we can learn from them. To assess national models and methods for financing and reimbursing palliative care. Initial literature scoping yielded limited evidence on the subject as national policy documents are difficult to identify, access and interpret. We undertook expert consultations to appraise national models of palliative care financing in England, Germany, Hungary, Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United States and Wales. These represent different levels of service development and a variety of funding mechanisms. Funding mechanisms reflect country-specific context and local variations in care provision. Patterns emerging include the following: Provider payment is rarely linked to population need and often perpetuates existing inequitable patterns in service provision. Funding is frequently characterised as a mixed system of charitable, public and private payers. The basis on which providers are paid for services rarely reflects individual care input or patient needs. Funding mechanisms need to be well understood and used with caution to ensure best practice and minimise perverse incentives. Before we can conduct cross-national comparisons of costs and impact of palliative care, we need to understand the funding and policy context for palliative care in each country of interest.

  10. Leadership models in health care - a case for servant leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastek, Victor F; Hamilton, Neil W; Niles, Emily E

    2014-03-01

    Our current health care system is broken and unsustainable. Patients desire the highest quality care, and it needs to cost less. To regain public trust, the health care system must change and adapt to the current needs of patients. The diverse group of stakeholders in the health care system creates challenges for improving the value of care. Health care providers are in the best position to determine effective ways of improving the value of care. To create change, health care providers must learn how to effectively lead patients, those within health care organizations, and other stakeholders. This article presents servant leadership as the best model for health care organizations because it focuses on the strength of the team, developing trust and serving the needs of patients. As servant leaders, health care providers may be best equipped to make changes in the organization and in the provider-patient relationship to improve the value of care for patients. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Developing a Family-Centered Care Model for Critical Care After Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan; Robinson, Gabrielle; Mink, Richard; Hudson, Kimberly; Dotolo, Danae; Gooding, Tracy; Ramirez, Alma; Zatzick, Douglas; Giordano, Jessica; Crawley, Deborah; Vavilala, Monica S

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the family experience of critical care after pediatric traumatic brain injury in order to develop a model of specific factors associated with family-centered care. Qualitative methods with semi-structured interviews were used. Two level 1 trauma centers. Fifteen mothers of children who had an acute hospital stay after traumatic brain injury within the last 5 years were interviewed about their experience of critical care and discharge planning. Participants who were primarily English, Spanish, or Cantonese speaking were included. None. Content analysis was used to code the transcribed interviews and develop the family-centered care model. Three major themes emerged: 1) thorough, timely, compassionate communication, 2) capacity building for families, providers, and facilities, and 3) coordination of care transitions. Participants reported valuing detailed, frequent communication that set realistic expectations and prepared them for decision making and outcomes. Areas for capacity building included strategies to increase provider cultural humility, parent participation in care, and institutional flexibility. Coordinated care transitions, including continuity of information and maintenance of partnerships with families and care teams, were highlighted. Participants who were not primarily English speaking reported particular difficulty with communication, cultural understanding, and coordinated transitions. This study presents a family-centered traumatic brain injury care model based on family perspectives. In addition to communication and coordination strategies, the model offers methods to address cultural and structural barriers to meeting the needs of non-English-speaking families. Given the stress experienced by families of children with traumatic brain injury, careful consideration of the model themes identified here may assist in improving overall quality of care to families of hospitalized children with traumatic brain injury.

  12. Anaesthetic considerations for paediatric laparoscopy | Lasersohn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children, infants and neonates represent an anaesthetic challenge because of age-specific anatomical and physiological issues. Apart from paediatric-specific anaesthetic considerations, the paediatric anaesthetist must understand the implications of laparoscopic surgery, and prevent and react appropriately to changes ...

  13. Onset symptoms in paediatric multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Magnus Spangsberg; Sellebjerg, Finn; Blinkenberg, Morten

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) carries a relatively higher mortality and morbidity than adult MS. Paediatric MS symptoms and paraclinical findings at the first demyelinating event have never before been characterised in a Danish setting. The aim of this study was to compare...

  14. Appendicitis in paediatric age group: Correlation between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Clinical diagnosis of appendicitis can be challenging, particularly in the paediatric age group. There is an increased risk of perforation in paediatrics; therefore, a need for sensitive and specific diagnostic tool is mandatory. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of preoperative inflammatory markers in ...

  15. Congenital malformations in paediatric and neurosurgical practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital malformations in paediatric and neurosurgical practices: problems and pattern (A preliminary report) ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... over a 5-year period (1998 to 2002) with congenital anomalies to the Paediatric Surgery and Neurosurgery units of the University Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria.

  16. Creating A Sustainable Model of Spine Care in Underserved Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldeman, Scott; Nordin, Margareta; Outerbridge, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    The world lacks sustainable models of care to manage spinal disorders in poor and underserved communities. The purpose of this article is to: (1) review the rationale and importance of developing a sustainable evidence-based model of care at low cost for people with spinal disorders in underserved...... adequate care, World Spine Care (WSC) was established to "improve lives in underserved communities through sustainable, integrated, evidence-based, spinal care." WSC is comprised of volunteers and institutions from 6 continents and several countries, and incorporates a Board of Directors, an executive...... are adapted to and integrated within each community in collaboration with local decision makers, existing health care workers and traditional healers. Cornerstones of WSC's emphasis on long-term sustainability are (1) education of community partners, governments and local health professionals, and (2...

  17. A new risk prediction model for critical care: the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David A; Parry, Gareth J; Carpenter, James R; Short, Alasdair; Rowan, Kathy

    2007-04-01

    To develop a new model to improve risk prediction for admissions to adult critical care units in the UK. Prospective cohort study. The setting was 163 adult, general critical care units in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, December 1995 to August 2003. Patients were 216,626 critical care admissions. None. The performance of different approaches to modeling physiologic measurements was evaluated, and the best methods were selected to produce a new physiology score. This physiology score was combined with other information relating to the critical care admission-age, diagnostic category, source of admission, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation before admission-to develop a risk prediction model. Modeling interactions between diagnostic category and physiology score enabled the inclusion of groups of admissions that are frequently excluded from risk prediction models. The new model showed good discrimination (mean c index 0.870) and fit (mean Shapiro's R 0.665, mean Brier's score 0.132) in 200 repeated validation samples and performed well when compared with recalibrated versions of existing published risk prediction models in the cohort of patients eligible for all models. The hypothesis of perfect fit was rejected for all models, including the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) model, as is to be expected in such a large cohort. The ICNARC model demonstrated better discrimination and overall fit than existing risk prediction models, even following recalibration of these models. We recommend it be used to replace previously published models for risk adjustment in the UK.

  18. Paediatric musculoskeletal matters (pmm)--collaborative development of an online evidence based interactive learning tool and information resource for education in paediatric musculoskeletal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicola; Rapley, Tim; Jandial, Sharmila; English, Christine; Davies, Barbara; Wyllie, Ruth; Foster, Helen E

    2016-01-05

    We describe the collaborative development of an evidence based, free online resource namely 'paediatric musculoskeletal matters' (pmm). This resource was developed with the aim of reaching a wide range of health professionals to increase awareness, knowledge and skills within paediatric musculoskeletal medicine, thereby facilitating early diagnosis and referral to specialist care. Engagement with stakeholder groups (primary care, paediatrics, musculoskeletal specialties and medical students) informed the essential 'core' learning outcomes to derive content of pmm. Representatives from stakeholder groups, social science and web development experts transformed the learning outcomes into a suitable framework. Target audience representatives reviewed the framework and their opinion was gathered using an online survey (n = 74) and focus groups (n = 2). Experts in paediatric musculoskeletal medicine peer reviewed the content and design. User preferences informed design with mobile, tablet and web compatible versions to facilitate access, various media and formats to engage users and the content presented in module format (i.e. Clinical assessment, Investigations and management, Limping child, Joint pain by site, Swollen joint(s) and Resources). We propose that our collaborative and evidence-based approach has ensured that pmm is user-friendly, with readily accessible, suitable content, and will help to improve access to paediatric musculoskeletal medicine education. The content is evidence-based with the design and functionality of pmm to facilitate optimal and 'real life' access to information. pmm is targeted at medical students and the primary care environment although messages are transferable to all health care professionals involved in the care of children and young people.

  19. Transfusion therapy in paediatric trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrup, Kristin Brønnum; Stensballe, Jakob; Bøttger, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhage is a leading cause of death in paediatric trauma patients. Predefined massive transfusion protocols (MTP) have the potential to significantly reduce mortality by treating haemorrhagic shock and coagulopathy, in adhering to the principles of haemostatic resuscitation with rapid...... in paediatric trauma patients is challenging, and the optimal blood product ratio that will increase survival in massively bleeding paediatric trauma patients has yet to be determined. To date, only a few small descriptive studies and case reports have investigated the use of predefined MTP in paediatric trauma...... patients.MTP with increased FFP or PLT to RBC ratios combined with viscoelastic haemostatic assay (VHA) guided haemostatic resuscitation have not yet been tested in paediatric populations but based on results from adult trauma patients, this therapeutic approach seems promising.Considering the high...

  20. Integrated community-based dementia care: the Geriant model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludo Glimmerveen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an in-depth description of the service delivery model of Geriant, a Dutch organization providing community-based care services for people suffering from dementia. Core to its model is the provision of clinical case management, embedded in multidisciplinary dementia care teams. As Geriant's client group includes people from the first presumption of dementia until they can no longer live at home, its care model provides valuable lessons about how different mechanisms of integration are flexibly put to use if the complexity of clients” care needs increases. It showcases how the integration of services for a specific sub-population is combined with alignment of these services with generalist network partners. After a detailed description of the programme and its results, this article builds on the work of Walter Leutz for a conceptual discussion of Geriant's approach to care integration. 

  1. Development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwick, Ann W; Svavarsdóttir, Erla Kolbrun; Seppelt, Ann M; Looman, Wendy S; Anderson, Lori S; Örlygsdóttir, Brynja

    2015-03-01

    To identify and compare how school nurses in Reykjavik, Iceland and St. Paul, Minnesota coordinated care for youth with asthma (ages 10-18) and to develop an asthma school nurse care coordination model. Little is known about how school nurses coordinate care for youth with asthma in different countries. A qualitative descriptive study design using focus group data. Six focus groups with 32 school nurses were conducted in Reykjavik (n = 17) and St. Paul (n = 15) using the same protocol between September 2008 and January 2009. Descriptive content analytic and constant comparison strategies were used to categorize and compare how school nurses coordinated care, which resulted in the development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model. Participants in both countries spontaneously described a similar asthma care coordination process that involved information gathering, assessing risk for asthma episodes, prioritizing healthcare needs and anticipating and planning for student needs at the individual and school levels. This process informed how they individualized symptom management, case management and/or asthma education. School nurses played a pivotal part in collaborating with families, school and healthcare professionals to ensure quality care for youth with asthma. Results indicate a high level of complexity in school nurses' approaches to asthma care coordination that were responsive to the diverse and changing needs of students in school settings. The conceptual model derived provides a framework for investigators to use in examining the asthma care coordination process of school nurses in other geographic locations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. An interprofessional approach to improving paediatric medication safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Neil

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe drug prescribing and administration are essential elements within undergraduate healthcare curricula, but medication errors, especially in paediatric practice, continue to compromise patient safety. In this area of clinical care, collective responsibility, team working and communication between health professionals have been identified as key elements in safe clinical practice. To date, there is limited research evidence as to how best to deliver teaching and learning of these competencies to practitioners of the future. Methods An interprofessional workshop to facilitate learning of knowledge, core competencies, communication and team working skills in paediatric drug prescribing and administration at undergraduate level was developed and evaluated. The practical, ward-based workshop was delivered to 4th year medical and 3rd year nursing students and evaluated using a pre and post workshop questionnaire with open-ended response questions. Results Following the workshop, students reported an increase in their knowledge and awareness of paediatric medication safety and the causes of medication errors (p Conclusion This study has helped bridge the knowledge-skills gap, demonstrating how an interprofessional approach to drug prescribing and administration has the potential to improve quality and safety within healthcare.

  3. Marketing paediatric influenza vaccination: results of a major metropolitan trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buynder, Paul G.; Carcione, Dale; Rettura, Vince; Daly, Alison; Woods, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Van Buynder et al. (2010) Marketing paediatric influenza vaccination: results of a major metropolitan trial. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 33–38. Objectives  After a cluster of rapidly fulminant influenza related toddler deaths in a Western Australian metropolis, children aged six to 59 months were offered influenza vaccination in subsequent winters. Some parental resistance was expected and previous poor uptake of paediatric influenza vaccination overseas was noted. A marketing campaign addressing barriers to immunization was developed to maximise uptake. Design  Advertising occurred in major statewide newspapers, via public poster displays and static ‘eye‐lite’ displays, via press releases, via a series of rolling radio advertisements, via direct marketing to child care centres, and via a linked series of web‐sites. Parents were subsequently surveyed to assess reasons for vaccination. Main Outcome Results  The campaign produced influenza vaccination coverage above that previously described elsewhere and led to a proportionate reduction in influenza notifications in this age group compared to previous seasons. Conclusions  Influenza in children comes with significant morbidity and some mortality. Paediatric influenza vaccination is safe, well tolerated and effective if two doses are given. A targeted media campaign can increase vaccine uptake if it reinforces the seriousness of influenza and addresses community ‘myths’ about influenza and influenza vaccine. The lessons learned enabling enhancements of similar programs elsewhere. PMID:21138538

  4. Conflict escalation in paediatric services: findings from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbat, Liz; Teuten, Bea; Barclay, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    To explore clinician and family experiences of conflict in paediatric services, in order to map the trajectory of conflict escalation. Qualitative interview study, employing extreme-case sampling. Interviews were analysed using an iterative thematic approach to identify common themes regarding the experience and escalation of conflict. Thirty-eight health professionals and eight parents. All participants had direct experience of conflict, including physical assault and court proceedings, at the interface of acute and palliative care. Two teaching hospitals, one district general hospital and two paediatric hospices in England, in 2011. Conflicts escalate in a predictable manner. Clearly identifiable behaviours by both clinicians and parents are defined as mild, moderate and severe. Mild describes features like the insensitive use of language and a history of unresolved conflict. Moderate involves a deterioration of trust, and a breakdown of communication and relationships. Severe marks disintegration of working relationships, characterised by behavioural changes including aggression, and a shift in focus from the child's best interests to the conflict itself. Though conflicts may remain at one level, those which escalated tended to move sequentially from one level to the next. Understanding how conflicts escalate provides clinicians with a practical, evidence-based framework to identify the warning signs of conflict in paediatrics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. [Comparison of level of satisfaction of users of home care: integrated model vs. dispensaries model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorina, Marta; Limonero, Joaquín T; Peñart, Xavier; Jiménez, Jordi; Gassó, Javier

    2014-01-01

    To determine the level of satisfaction of users that receive home health care through two different models of primary health care: integrated model and dispensaries model. cross-sectional, observational study. Two primary care centers in the province of Barcelona. The questionnaire was administered to 158 chronic patients over 65 years old, of whom 67 were receiving health care from the integrated model, and 91 from the dispensaries model. The Evaluation of Satisfaction with Home Health Care (SATISFAD12) questionnaire was, together with other complementary questions about service satisfaction of home health care, as well as social demographic questions (age, sex, disease, etc). The patients of the dispensaries model showed more satisfaction than the users receiving care from the integrated model. There was a greater healthcare continuity for those patients from the dispensaries model, and a lower percentage of hospitalizations during the last year. The satisfaction of the users from both models was not associated to gender, the health perception,or independence of the The user satisfaction rate of the home care by primary health care seems to depend of the typical characteristics of each organisational model. The dispensaries model shows a higher rate of satisfaction or perceived quality of care in all the aspects analysed. More studies are neede to extrapolate these results to other primary care centers belonging to other institutions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Paediatric imaging manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troeger, Jochen; Seidensticker, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Children and adolescents are not simply small adults; they suffer from different diseases and require different treatments. The same is true where imaging is concerned. The diagnostic strategies - using identical diagnostic instruments - are different; the care prior to, during, and following the examination differs from that of adults. For this reason, there exists in many countries a specialized line of advanced training for pediatric radiology. The aim of this book, therefore, is to provide readily available information, limited to what is essential, for physicians doing advanced training in radiology and pediatrics and for advanced students concerning the most important aspects of imaging in newborns, children, and adolescents. The diagnostic strategies used for children differ from those used for adults in many respects. One of the most important aspects is radiation protection, as children are particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation and with their longer life expectancy, can also expect to accumulate a higher dose from natural and artificial - above all medical - causes. The latter increase the individual risk (malignant disease) as well as the genetic risk. The best radiation protection is the avoidance of an examination employing ionizing radiation (X-rays, CT scan) and, on the other hand, if possible, by substituting ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging for X-rays or computer tomography. Without them, modern medicine, in particular emergency medicine, would be unthinkable. Thus it is not a matter of preventing the application of ionizing radiation, but of its responsible use where necessary and of substitution with non-ionizing radiation where possible. The ALARA principle states: ''as low as reasonably achievable'', in other words, the lowest dose possible and the largest necessary

  7. Conventional imaging in paediatric uroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, M.; Lindbichler, F.; Sinzig, M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To briefly describe basic conventional imaging in paediatric uroradiology. Method: The state of the art performance of standard imaging techniques (intravenous urography (IVU), voiding cystourethrography (VCU), and ultrasound (US)) is described, with emphasis on technical aspects, indications, and patient preparation such as adequate hydration. Only basic applications as used in routine clinical work are included. Result and conclusion: Conventional imaging methods are irreplaceable. They cover the majority of daily clinical routine queries, with consecutive indication of more sophisticated modalities in those patients who need additional imaging for establishing the final diagnosis or outlining therapeutic options

  8. Conventional imaging in paediatric uroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccabona, M. E-mail: michael.riccabona@kfunigraz.ac.at; Lindbichler, F.; Sinzig, M

    2002-08-01

    Objective: To briefly describe basic conventional imaging in paediatric uroradiology. Method: The state of the art performance of standard imaging techniques (intravenous urography (IVU), voiding cystourethrography (VCU), and ultrasound (US)) is described, with emphasis on technical aspects, indications, and patient preparation such as adequate hydration. Only basic applications as used in routine clinical work are included. Result and conclusion: Conventional imaging methods are irreplaceable. They cover the majority of daily clinical routine queries, with consecutive indication of more sophisticated modalities in those patients who need additional imaging for establishing the final diagnosis or outlining therapeutic options.

  9. Promoting excellence in end-of-life care: a report on innovative models of palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byock, Ira; Twohig, Jeanne Sheils; Merriman, Melanie; Collins, Karyn

    2006-02-01

    Promoting Excellence in End-of Life Care, a national program of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, funded 22 demonstration projects representing a wide range of health care settings and patient populations to develop innovative models for delivering palliative care that addressed documented deficiencies in the care of patients and families facing the final stage of life. To determine the practicality (feasibility of development and operation as well as acceptance by stakeholders) of new models of care and to determine the impact of the models on access to, quality of and financing for palliative care. The program cannot report scientifically rigorous outcomes, but the grant-funded projects used a variety of methods and measures to assess acceptance of new models and their impact from the perspectives of various stakeholders, including patients and their families, clinicians, administrators and payers. While it is not possible to aggregate data across projects, the data reported to the Promoting Excellence national program office were used to describe program impact with respect to the practicality of palliative care service integration into existing clinical care settings (feasibility and acceptance by stakeholders), the availability and use of palliative care services (access), quality of care (conformance to patient expectations and accepted clinical standards) and costs of care. The 22 projects provided services in urban as well as rural settings, in integrated health systems, hospitals, outpatient clinics, cancer centers, nursing homes, renal dialysis clinics, inner city public health and safety net systems and prisons. Populations served included prison inmates, military veterans, renal dialysis patients, Native Americans, Native Alaskans, and African American patients, inner-city medically underserved patients, pediatric patients, and persons with serious mental illness patients. Hosting or adopting institutions sustained or expanded twenty of the 22 models

  10. Confidence amongst Multidisciplinary Professionals in Managing Paediatric Rheumatic Disease in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Cassidy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Interprofessional collaboration is a crucial component of care for children with rheumatic disease. Interprofessional care, when delivered appropriately, prevents disability and improves long-term prognosis in this vulnerable group. Methods. The aim of this survey was to explore allied health professionals’ and nurses’ confidence in treating paediatric rheumatology patients. Results. Overall, 117 participants were recruited, 77.9% of participants reported being “not confident at all,” “not confident,” or “neutral” in treating children with rheumatic diseases (RD despite 65.1% of participants reporting having treated >1 paediatric rheumatology case in the past month. Furthermore, 67.2% of participants felt their undergraduate education in paediatric rheumatology was inadequate. “Journals” or “texts books” were used by 49.3% of participants as their primary source of continuing professional development (CPD and 39.3% of participants indicated that they did not undertake any CPD related to paediatric rheumatology. Small group and online education were perceived to be potentially of “great benefit” for CPD. Conclusion. This paper highlights allied health professionals’ and nurses’ perceived inadequacy of their undergraduate education in paediatric RD and their low confidence in recognising and treating RD. Undergraduate and postgraduate education opportunities focusing on interprofessional collaboration should be developed to address this workforce deficiency.

  11. Toward population management in an integrated care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Franklin W; McMurray, Stephen; Nissenson, Allen R

    2013-01-01

    Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will be the primary mechanism for achieving the dual goals of high-quality patient care at managed per capita costs. To achieve these goals in the newly emerging health care environment, the nephrology community must plan for and direct integrated delivery and coordination of renal care, focusing on population management. Even though the ESRD patient population is a complex group with comorbid conditions that may confound integration of care, the nephrology community has unique experience providing integrated care through ACO-like programs. Specifically, the recent ESRD Management Demonstration Project sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the current ESRD Prospective Payment System with it Quality Incentive Program have demonstrated that integrated delivery of renal care can be accomplished in a manner that provides improved clinical outcomes with some financial margin of savings. Moving forward, integrated renal care will probably be linked to provider performance and quality outcomes measures, and clinical integration initiatives will share several common elements, namely performance-based payment models, coordination of communication via health care information technology, and development of best practices for care coordination and resource utilization. Integration initiatives must be designed to be measured and evaluated, and, consistent with principles of continuous quality improvement, each initiative will provide for iterative improvements of the initiative. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Quality management in home care: models for today's practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhey, M P

    1996-01-01

    In less than a decade, home care providers have been a part of two major transitions in health care delivery. First, because of the advent of managed care and a shift from inpatient to community-based services, home care service delivery systems have experienced tremendous growth. Second, the principles and practices of total quality management and continuous quality improvement have permeated the organization, administration, and practice of home health care. Based on the work of Deming, Juran, and Crosby, the basic tenets of the new quality management philosophy involve a focus on the following five key areas: (1) systems and processes rather than individual performance; (2) involvement, collaboration, and empowerment; (3) internal and external "customers"; (4) data and measurement; and (5) standards, guidelines, and outcomes of care. Home care providers are among those in the forefront who are developing and implementing programs that integrate these foci into the delivery of quality home care services. This article provides a summary of current home care programs that address these five key areas of quality management philosophy and provide models for innovative quality management practice in home care. For further information about each program, readers are referred to the original reports in the home care and quality management journal literature, as cited herein.

  13. Consulting Psychiatry within an Integrated Primary Care Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Elizabeth A. Zeidler; Pandhi, Nancy; Fondow, Meghan D. M.; Thomas, Chantelle; Vonk, Jantina; Reardon, Claudia L.; Serrano, Neftali

    2014-01-01

    Summary After implementation of an integrated consulting psychiatry model and psychology services within primary care at a federally qualified health center, patients have increased access to needed mental health services, and primary care clinicians receive the support and collaboration needed to meet the psychiatric needs of the population. PMID:24185149

  14. Canadian Paediatric Neurology Workforce Survey and Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Orr, Serena L; McMillan, Hugh J; Kirton, Adam; Brna, Paula; Esser, Michael; Tang-Wai, Richard; Major, Philippe; Poulin, Chantal; Prasad, Narayan; Selby, Kathryn; Weiss, Shelly K; Yeh, E Ann; Callen, David Ja

    2016-05-01

    Little knowledge exists on the availability of academic and community paediatric neurology positions. This knowledge is crucial for making workforce decisions. Our study aimed to: 1) obtain information regarding the availability of positions for paediatric neurologists in academic centres; 2) survey paediatric neurology trainees regarding their perceptions of employment issues and career plans; 3) survey practicing community paediatric neurologists 4) convene a group of paediatric neurologists to develop consensus regarding how to address these workforce issues. Surveys addressing workforce issues regarding paediatric neurology in Canada were sent to: 1) all paediatric neurology program directors in Canada (n=9) who then solicited information from division heads and from paediatric neurologists in surrounding areas; 2) paediatric neurology trainees in Canada (n=57) and; 3) community paediatric neurologists (n=27). A meeting was held with relevant stakeholders to develop a consensus on how to approach employment issues. The response rate was 100% from program directors, 57.9% from residents and 44% from community paediatric neurologists. We found that the number of projected positions in academic paediatric neurology is fewer than the number of paediatric neurologists that are being trained over the next five to ten years, despite a clinical need for paediatric neurologists. Paediatric neurology residents are concerned about job availability and desire more career counselling. There is a current and projected clinical demand for paediatric neurologists despite a lack of academic positions. Training programs should focus on community neurology as a viable career option.

  15. Interpretation of Chemical Pathology Test Results in Paediatrics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At any time we interprete paediatric chemical pathology test results we must take into consideration a number of factors, which are related with and restricted to paediatric patients. Such factors include the paediatric patient's age that may change from prematurity to above 18 years, and the paediatric patient's body weight ...

  16. Children's health care assistance according to their families: a comparison between models of Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Bertoglio Comassetto Antunes de Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To compare the health assistance models of Basic Traditional Units (UBS with the Family Health Strategy (ESF units for presence and extent of attributes of Primary Health Care (APS, specifically in the care of children. METHOD A cross-sectional study of a quantitative approach with families of children attended by the Public Health Service of Colombo, Paraná. The Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCA-Tool was applied to parents of 482 children, 235 ESF units and 247 UBS units covering all primary care units of the municipality, between June and July 2012. The results were analyzed according to the PCA-Tool manual. RESULTS ESF units reached a borderline overall score for primary health care standards. However, they fared better in their attributes of Affiliation, Integration of care coordination, Comprehensiveness, Family Centeredness and Accessibility of use, while the attributes of Community Guidance/Orientation, Coordination of Information Systems, Longitudinality and Access attributes were rated as insufficient for APS. UBS units had low scores on all attributes. CONCLUSION The ESF units are closer to the principles of APS (Primary Health Care, but there is need to review actions of child care aimed at the attributes of APS in both care models, corroborating similar studies from other regions of Brazil.

  17. Models of care and organization of services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Alina; Xiong, Michael; Lester, Jenna; Burnside, Nancy J

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the overall organization of services and delivery of health care in the United States. Health maintenance organization, fee-for-service, preferred provider organizations, and the Veterans Health Administration are discussed, with a focus on structure, outcomes, and areas for improvement. An over