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Sample records for oxygen-bomb combustion calorimetry

  1. Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, B.

    1983-01-01

    An overall review of properties of various types of calorimeters is given, with special attention given to the challenges of high luminosity and high energy. The calorimeters described include continuous calorimeters, scintillation sampling calorimetry, gas sampling calorimetry, and liquid ionization calorimeters. Next explored are some limiting factors involved in experiments at high luminosities (or at high energies), and some examples are offered of detectors capable of operating at the highest luminosities (energies). Specific areas where substantial research and development work is needed are itemized

  2. Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The techniques and equipment currently employed for calorimetric dosimetry have been briefly surveyed and the status of some recent measurements presented. The problems which remain to be investigated are: the thermal defect, the suitability of A-150 plastic as a material for heavy charged particle calorimetry and calorimeter designs that are appropriate for specific radiation situations, including cryogenic calorimeters

  3. Micro-combustion calorimetry employing a Calvet heat flux calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Aguilar, Aaron; Valdes-Ordonez, Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    Two micro-combustion bombs developed from a high pressure stainless steel vessel have been adapted to a Setaram C80 Calvet calorimeter. The constant of each micro-bomb was determined by combustions with benzoic acid NIST 39j, giving for the micro-combustion bomb in the measurement sensor k m =(1.01112±0.00054) and for the micro-combustion bomb in the reference sensor k r =(1.00646±0.00059) which means an uncertainty of less than 0.06 per cent for calibration. The experimental methodology to get results of combustion energy of organic compounds with a precision also better than 0.06 per cent is described by applying this micro-combustion device to the measurement of the enthalpy of combustion of the succinic acid, giving Δ c H compfn m (cr, T=298.15 K)=-(1492.89 ± 0.77) kJ · mol -1

  4. Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    We have divided this study of calorimetry at the SLC into five topics: physics with calorimeters, readout geometries, performance of existing detectors, calorimeter technologies, and new calorimeter designs. The first topic is a review of the Z 0 physics in which calorimetry would be important. We discuss the Monte Carlo model and the general features of the events which it generates. We consider how the physics affects the design of the electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters in energy resolution, segmentation, solid angle coverage, and general performance. The two ways of reading out a calorimeter, strips and towers, are the basis of the second topic. We discuss a model which makes quantitative comparisons of these two schemes, with particular reference to electromagnetic calorimeters. These programs should be useful in other studies of calorimeter performance as well. There are six detectors at PEP and SPEAR with calorimetric elements. The third topic is a review of their performance at present energies and an evaluation of the problems which would arise at SLC energies. The new technologies which may be mature enough for use in an SLC detector are considered as the fourth topic. Some are now being built into anti pp detectors, others are in test beam stages, and others are still bright ideas. We review ten techniques and include references for further pursuit. The last section combines the physics goals, readout schemes, and present and future techniques into sensible calorimeter designs which sharpen the issues. Six models resulted. We discuss their strengths, weaknesses, feasibility, and rough costs

  5. Gas phase enthalpies of formation of nitrobenzamides using combustion calorimetry and thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ximello, Arturo; Flores, Henoc; Rojas, Aarón; Adriana Camarillo, E.; Patricia Amador, M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Formation enthalpies of the nitrobenzamides were derived from combustion calorimetry. • Enthalpies of vaporisation and sublimation were calculated by thermogravimetry. • From gas phase enthalpies of formation the stability of the isomers is studied. • Stability of isomers is not driven by a steric hindrance between functional groups. - Abstract: The standard molar energies of combustion of 2-nitrobenzamide, 3-nitrobenzamide and 4-nitrobenzamide were determined with an isoperibolic, static-bomb, combustion calorimeter. From the combustion results, the standard molar enthalpies of combustion and formation for these compounds in the condensed phase at T = 298.15 K were derived. Subsequently, to determine the enthalpies of sublimation, the vapour pressure data as a function of the temperature for the compounds under investigation were estimated using thermogravimetry by applying Langmuir’s equation, and the enthalpies of vaporisation were derived. Standard enthalpies of fusion were measured by differential scanning calorimetry then added to those of vaporisation to obtain reliable results for the enthalpy of sublimation. From the combustion and sublimation data, the gas phase enthalpies of formation were determined to be (−138.9 ± 3.5) kJ · mol −1 , (−122.9 ± 2.9) kJ · mol −1 and (−108.5 ± 3.7) kJ · mol −1 for the ortho, meta and para isomers of nitrobenzamide, respectively. The meaning of these results with regard to the enthalpic stability of these molecular structures is discussed herein

  6. Ionic liquids. Combination of combustion calorimetry with high-level quantum chemical calculations for deriving vaporization enthalpies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Verevkin, Sergey P; Heintz, Andreas; Schick, Christoph

    2008-07-10

    In this work, the molar enthalpies of formation of the ionic liquids [C2MIM][NO3] and [C4MIM][NO3] were measured by means of combustion calorimetry. The molar enthalpy of fusion of [C2MIM][NO3] was measured using differential scanning calorimetry. Ab initio calculations of the enthalpy of formation in the gaseous phase have been performed for the ionic species using the G3MP2 theory. We have used a combination of traditional combustion calorimetry with modern high-level ab initio calculations in order to obtain the molar enthalpies of vaporization of a series of the ionic liquids under study.

  7. Biomass pyrolysis and combustion integral and differential reaction heats with temperatures using thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiacheng; Igathinathane, C; Yu, Manlu; Pothula, Anand Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Integral reaction heats of switchgrass, big bluestem, and corn stalks were determined using thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC). Iso-conversion differential reaction heats using TGA/DSC pyrolysis and combustion of biomass were not available, despite reports available on heats required and released. A concept of iso-conversion differential reaction heats was used to determine the differential reaction heats of each thermal characteristics segment of these materials. Results showed that the integral reaction heats were endothermic from 30 to 700°C for pyrolysis of switchgrass and big bluestem, but they were exothermic for corn stalks prior to 587°C. However, the integral reaction heats for combustion of the materials followed an endothermic to exothermic transition. The differential reaction heats of switchgrass pyrolysis were predominantly endothermic in the fraction of mass loss (0.0536-0.975), and were exothermic for corn stalks (0.0885-0.850) and big bluestem (0.736-0.919). Study results provided better insight into biomass thermal mechanism. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Estimating the Energy Content of Wastewater Using Combustion Calorimetry and Different Drying Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korth, Benjamin; Maskow, Thomas; Günther, Susanne; Harnisch, Falk, E-mail: falk.harnisch@ufz.de [Department of Environmental Microbiology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2017-09-19

    The energy content of wastewater is routinely assessed by chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements that only provide an incomplete picture and the data fundament of other energy parameters remains scarce. The volumetric heat of combustion (Δ{sub C}H) of raw wastewater from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was assessed using oven drying method (Δ{sub C}H{sub vol} = −6.8 ± 4.3 kJ L{sup −1}, n = 20) and freeze drying method (Δ{sub C}H{sub vol} = −20.2 ± 9.7 kJ L{sup −1}, n = 6) illustrating the substantial loss during the oven drying approach. Normalizing Δ{sub C}H to COD of raw wastewater yielded −6.2 ± 3.5 kJ gCOD{sup −1} for oven-dried samples (n = 14) and −13.0 ± 1.6 kJ gCOD{sup −1} for freeze-dried samples (n = 3). A subsequent correlation analysis with further chemical wastewater parameters revealed a dependency of Δ{sub C}H{sub vol} on COD, total organic carbon (TOC), C:N ratio, and total sulfur content. To verify these correlations, wastewater of a second WWTP was sampled and analyzed. Only COD and TOC were in accordance with the data set from the first WWTP representing potential predictors for the chemical energy stored in wastewater for comparable WWTPs. Unfortunately, during the most practical method (oven drying), a certain loss of volatile compounds is inevitable so that the derived Δ{sub C}H{sub vol} systematically underestimates the total energetic potential of wastewater. Nevertheless, this work expands the, so far, little data fundament on the energy resource wastewater and implies the requirement for further long-term studies on different sites and different wastewater types with a highly standardized sample treatment protocol.

  9. Calorimetry of fluorinated products. I. Combustion of ClF3 and ClF5 in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caton, J.; Barberi, P.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal effects due to combustion of chlorine trifluoride and pentafluoride in hydrogen were measured by means of a suitable bomb calorimeter. The enthalpies of formation of these halides can be determined from this measurement. That of ClF 3 , already fairly well known, was used to set the apparatus fpr the measurement concerning ClF 5 , for which no direct data are available [fr

  10. The gaseous enthalpy of formation of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide from combustion calorimetry, vapor pressure measurements, and ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Verevkin, Sergey P; Heintz, Andreas

    2007-04-04

    Ionic liquids are attracting growing interest as alternatives to conventional molecular solvents. Experimental values of vapor pressure, enthalpy of vaporization, and enthalpy of formation of ionic liquids are the key thermodynamic quantities, which are required for the validation and development of the molecular modeling and ab initio methods toward this new class of solvents. In this work, the molar enthalpy of formation of the liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide, 206.2 +/- 2.5 kJ.mol-1, was measured by means of combustion calorimetry. The molar enthalpy of vaporization of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide, 157.2 +/- 1.1 kJ.mol-1, was obtained from the temperature dependence of the vapor pressure measured using the transpiration method. The latter method has been checked with measurements of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, where data are available from the effusion technique. The first experimental determination of the gaseous enthalpy of formation of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide, 363.4 +/- 2.7 kJ.mol-1, from thermochemical measurements (combustion and transpiration) is presented. Ab initio calculations of the enthalpy of formation in the gaseous phase have been performed for 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide using the G3MP2 theory. Excellent agreement with experimental results has been observed. The method developed opens a new way to obtain thermodynamic properties of ionic liquids which have not been available so far.

  11. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  12. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    2008-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, a topic generally taught at the upper undergraduate and graduate level in most mechanical engineering programs, and many chemical engineering programs, is the study of rapid energy and mass transfer usually through the common physical phenomena of flame oxidation. It covers the physics and chemistry of this process and the engineering applications-from the generation of power such as the internal combustion automobile engine to the gas turbine engine. Renewed concerns about energy efficiency and fuel costs, along with continued concerns over toxic and particulate emissions have kept the interest in this vital area of engineering high and brought about new developments in both fundamental knowledge of flame and combustion physics as well as new technologies for flame and fuel control. *New chapter on new combustion concepts and technologies, including discussion on nanotechnology as related to combustion, as well as microgravity combustion, microcombustion, and catalytic combustion-all ...

  13. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1997-01-01

    This Third Edition of Glassman's classic text clearly defines the role of chemistry, physics, and fluid mechanics as applied to the complex topic of combustion. Glassman's insightful introductory text emphasizes underlying physical and chemical principles, and encompasses engine technology, fire safety, materials synthesis, detonation phenomena, hydrocarbon fuel oxidation mechanisms, and environmental considerations. Combustion has been rewritten to integrate the text, figures, and appendixes, detailing available combustion codes, making it not only an excellent introductory text but also an important reference source for professionals in the field. Key Features * Explains complex combustion phenomena with physical insight rather than extensive mathematics * Clarifies postulates in the text using extensive computational results in figures * Lists modern combustion programs indicating usage and availability * Relates combustion concepts to practical applications.

  14. Theory of calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Zielenkiewicz, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to give a comprehensive description of the theoretical fundamentals of calorimetry. The considerations are based on the relations deduced from the laws and general equations of heat exchange theory and steering theory.

  15. Scintillator plate calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Calorimetry using scintillator plates or tiles alternated with sheets of (usually heavy) passive absorber has been proven over multiple generations of collider detectors. Recent detectors including UA1, CDF, and ZEUS have shown good results from such calorimeters. The advantages offered by scintillator calorimetry for the SSC environment, in particular, are speed (<10 nsec), excellent energy resolution, low noise, and ease of achieving compensation and hence linearity. On the negative side of the ledger can be placed the historical sensitivity of plastic scintillators to radiation damage, the possibility of nonuniform response because of light attenuation, and the presence of cracks for light collection via wavelength shifting plastic (traditionally in sheet form). This approach to calorimetry is being investigated for SSC use by a collaboration of Ames Laboratory/Iowa State University, Argonne National Laboratory, Bicron Corporation, Florida State University, Louisiana State University, University of Mississippi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, and University of Wisconsin

  16. Calorimetry for the SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, H.A.; Grannis, P.D.

    1984-01-01

    The activities related to calorimetry at Snowmass took place in three main areas. These were: (1) The performance criteria for SSC calorimetry, including the requirements on hermeticity, shower containment, segmentation and time resolution. The use of calorimetric means of particle identification was studied. (2) The study of triggering methods using calorimeter energy, angle and timing information. (3) A review of a wide variety of calorimeter materials for absorber and sampling, as well as several means of obtaining the readout of the energy deposits. 48 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  17. Calorimetry for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, H.A.; Grannis, P.D.

    1984-01-01

    The activities related to calorimetry at Snowmass took place in three main areas. These were: (1) The performance criteria for SSC calorimetry, including the requirements on hermeticity, shower containment, segmentation and time resolution. The use of calorimetric means of particle identification was studied. (2) The study of triggering methods using calorimeter energy, angle and timing information. (3) A review of a wide variety of calorimeter materials for absorber and sampling, as well as several means of obtaining the readout of the energy deposits. 48 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  18. Calorimetry at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigmans, R.

    1988-01-01

    The state of the art, and the present understanding of the basic limitations in hadron calorimetry, are briefly described. The various options for SSC calorimeters are discussed, and the R ampersand D needed for the ones that look most promising is outlined. The most promising candidates are (1) lead/scintillating fibers and (2) lead (or uranium)/TMS (or other warm liquids)

  19. Calorimetry at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigmans, R.

    1987-09-01

    The state of the art, and our present understanding of the basic limitations in hadron calorimetry, are briefly described. The various options for SSC calorimeters are discussed, and the R and D needed for the ones that look most promising is outlined. 13 refs.; 8 figs

  20. Recent developments in silicon calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, J.E.

    1990-11-01

    We present a survey of some of the recent calorimeter applications of silicon detectors. The numerous attractive features of silicon detectors are summarized, with an emphasis on those aspects important to calorimetry. Several of the uses of this technology are summarized and referenced. We consider applications for electromagnetic calorimetry, hadronic calorimetry, and proposals for the SSC

  1. Scintillating-fibre calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livan, M.; Vercesi, V.; Wigmans, R.

    1995-01-01

    In the past decade, calorimetry based on scintillating plastic fibres as active elements was developed from a conceptual idea to a mature detector technology, which is nowadays widely applied in particle physics experiments. This development and the performance characteristics of representative calorimeters, both for the detection of electromagnetic and hadronic showers, are reviewed. We also discuss new information on shower development processes in dense matter and its application to calorimetric principles that has emerged from some very thorough studies that were performed in the framework of this development. (orig.)

  2. Laser-flash calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Nakamura, J.-I.

    1982-01-01

    The heat capacity of vanadium has been measured by laser-flash calorimetry in the temperature region from 80 to 1000 K. The results are compared with available low- and high-temperature heat capacities, and revised thermodynamic values of vanadium are given. No heat-capacity anomaly has been found in the pure vanadium sample over the temperature range investigated, while a small heat-capacity discontinuity, less than 1.2 J.K -1 .mol -1 , has been observed at 220 to 230 K on the same sample but electropolished before measurement. This anomaly disappeared after annealing at 1000 K in vacuo for 1 h and is attributable to the introduction of a small amount of hydrogen during electropolishing. (author)

  3. Calorimetry at industrial electron accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Kovacs, A.

    1985-01-01

    Calorimetry is a convenient way to measure doses at industrial electron accelerators, where high absorbed doses (1-100 kGy) are delivered at dose rates of 102-105 Gy s-1 or even higher. Water calorimeters have been used for this purpose for several years, but recently other materials such as grap......Calorimetry is a convenient way to measure doses at industrial electron accelerators, where high absorbed doses (1-100 kGy) are delivered at dose rates of 102-105 Gy s-1 or even higher. Water calorimeters have been used for this purpose for several years, but recently other materials...

  4. Calorimetry end-point predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a portion of the work presently in progress at Rocky Flats in the field of calorimetry. In particular, calorimetry end-point predictions are outlined. The problems associated with end-point predictions and the progress made in overcoming these obstacles are discussed. The two major problems, noise and an accurate description of the heat function, are dealt with to obtain the most accurate results. Data are taken from an actual calorimeter and are processed by means of three different noise reduction techniques. The processed data are then utilized by one to four algorithms, depending on the accuracy desired to determined the end-point

  5. Calorimetry of non-reacting systems

    CERN Document Server

    McCullough, John P

    2013-01-01

    Experimental Thermodynamics, Volume 1: Calorimetry of Non-Reacting Systems covers the heat capacity determinations for chemical substances in the solid, liquid, solution, and vapor states, at temperatures ranging from near the absolute zero to the highest at which calorimetry is feasible.This book is divided into 14 chapters. The first four chapters provide background information and general principles applicable to all types of calorimetry of non-reacting systems. The remaining 10 chapters deal with specific types of calorimetry. Most of the types of calorimetry treated are developed over a c

  6. Water calorimetry: The heat defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klassen, N.V.; Ross, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    Domen developed a sealed water calorimeter at NIST to measure absorbed dose to water from ionizing radiation. This calorimeter exhibited anomalous behavior using water saturated with gas mixtures of H 2 O 2 . Using computer simulations of the radiolysis of water, the authors show that the observed behavior can be explained if, in the gas mixtures, the amount-of-substance of H 2 and of O 2 differed significantly from 50%. The authors also report the results of simulations for other dilute aqueous solutions that are used for water calorimetry--pure water, air-saturated water, and H 2 -saturated water. The production of H 2 O 2 was measured for these aqueous solutions and compared to simulations. The results indicate that water saturated with a gas mixture containing an amount-of-substance of H 2 of 50% and of O 2 of 50% is suitable for water calorimetry if the water is stirred and is in contact with a gas space of similar volume. H 2 -saturated water does not require a gas space but O 2 contamination must be guarded against. The lack of a scavenger for OH radicals in pure water means that, depending on the water purity, some pure water might require a large priming dose to remove reactive impurities. The experimental and theoretical problems associated with air-saturated water and O 2 -saturated water in water calorimeters are discussed

  7. Development of Quartz Fiber Calorimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD40 \\\\ \\\\ Very Forward Calorimeters (VFCs) in LHC detectors should cover the pseudorapidity range from $\\eta$~=~2.5 to at least $\\eta$~=~5 in order to compute missing transverse energy and for jet tagging. Operation at such high rapidity requires the use of a calorimetry technique that is very radiation resistant, fast and insensitive to radioactivity (especially to neutrons). This can be accomplished through the Quartz-Calorimeter~(Q-Cal) concept of embedding silica core fibers, that resist to the Gigarad radiation level, into an absorber. In this calorimeter the shower particles produce light through the Cherenkov effect generating a signal less than 10~ns in duration. Unique to this new technology the visible energy of hadronic showers has a transverse dimension nearly an order of magnitude smaller than that in conventional calorimeters, enabling precise spatial resolution, sharper isolation cuts and better jet recognition against the minimum bias events background. Last but not least, most radioactive ...

  8. Tritium inventory measurements using calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapulla, H.; Kraemer, R.; Heine, R.

    1992-01-01

    In the past calorimetry has been developed as a powerful tool in radiometrology. Calorimetric methods have been applied for the determination of activities, half lives and mean energies released during the disintegration of radioactive isotopes. The fundamental factors and relations which determine the power output of radioactive samples are presented and some basic calorimeter principles are discussed in this paper. At the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) a family of 3 calorimeters has been developed to measure the energy release from radiative waste products arising from reprocessing operations. With these calorimeters, radiative samples with sizes from a few cm 3 to 2 ·10 5 cm 3 and heat ratings ranging from a few nW to kW can be measured. After modifications of tits inner part the most sensitive calorimeter among the three calorimeters mentioned above would be best suited for measuring the tritium inventory in T-getters of the Amersham-type

  9. Ultra-Fast Hadronic Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Dmitri [Fermilab; Lukić, Strahinja [VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Mokhov, Nikolai [Fermilab; Striganov, Sergei [Fermilab; Ujić, Predrag [VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade

    2017-12-18

    Calorimeters for particle physics experiments with integration time of a few ns will substantially improve the capability of the experiment to resolve event pileup and to reject backgrounds. In this paper time development of hadronic showers induced by 30 and 60 GeV positive pions and 120 GeV protons is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and beam tests with a prototype of a sampling steel-scintillator hadronic calorimeter. In the beam tests, scintillator signals induced by hadronic showers in steel are sampled with a period of 0.2 ns and precisely time-aligned in order to study the average signal waveform at various locations w.r.t. the beam particle impact. Simulations of the same setup are performed using the MARS15 code. Both simulation and test beam results suggest that energy deposition in steel calorimeters develop over a time shorter than 3 ns providing opportunity for ultra-fast calorimetry. Simulation results for an "ideal" calorimeter consisting exclusively of bulk tungsten or copper are presented to establish the lower limit of the signal integration window.

  10. WA80 BGO calorimetry electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintenberg, A.L.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Ericson, M.N.; Maples, R.A.; Young, G.R.; Awes, T.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes instrumentation designed for BGO scintillator-based calorimetry of particles covering a very wide range of energies (from less than 50 MeV to 50 GeV). The instrumentation was designed to have a measurement accuracy of 0.1% over as much of the energy range as possible so the energy resolution of BGO would be the limiting factor. Two 1.5-cm 2 photodiodes were used per 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm x 25 cm BGO crystal. Both a charge-sensitive preamplifier and a pulse processor were developed specifically for the needs of the WA80 experiment. The preamplifier was designed for high detector capacitance (100 to 700 pF), low integral and differential non-linearity and low power consumption (200 mW). The pulse processor is a time-invariant shaping amplifier with integral peak-detect-and-hold and automatic gain selection circuits. The amplifier use quasi-triangular shaping with 4 μs peaking time, and the hold circuit is gated with a fast first level trigger. The system has more than 20 bits of effective resolution when used with an external 12-bit ADC. Results from beam tests at CERN are presented. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  11. Differential scanning calorimetry of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, C A; Mackey, B M; Parsons, S E

    1986-04-01

    Thermograms obtained by differential scanning calorimetry of a range of bacteria of different heat resistances were compared. Equations were derived to calculate the rate at which the numbers of viable organisms in a calorimeter decline as the temperature is raised at a constant rate. Vegetative bacteria scanned at 10 degrees C min-1 showed multi-peaked thermograms with four major peaks (denoted m, n, p and q) occurring in the regions 68-73, 77-84, 89-99 and 105-110 degrees C respectively. Exceptions were that peak m (the largest peak) occurred at 79-82 degrees C in Bacillus stearothermophilus and an additional peak, r, was detected in Escherichia coli at 119 degrees C. At temperatures below the main peak m there were major differences in thermograms between species. There was a direct relationship between the onset of thermal denaturation and the thermoresistance of different organisms. Heat-sensitive organisms displayed thermogram features which were absent in the more heat-resistant types. When samples were cooled to 5 degrees C and re-heated, a small endothermic peak, pr, was observed at the same temperature as p. Peaks p and pr were identified as the melting endotherms of DNA. In all vegetative organisms examined, maximum death rates, computed from published D and z values, occurred at temperatures above the onset of thermal denaturation, i.e. cell death and irreversible denaturation of cell components occurred within the same temperature range.

  12. Liquid ionization calorimetry: review and preview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabjan, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    The experimental requirements at existing and planned accelerators, and new facilities for underground or space-borne experimentation have stimulated a wide-ranging R and D programme in liquid ionization calorimetry. Precision sampling calorimetry is approaching ''crystal'' energy resolution whilst their rate capabilities will be able to cope with the highest LHC luminosities. (Quasi)-homogeneous noble-liquid calorimeters are under construction or in the planning stage to address some of the most fundamental physics questions. (orig.)

  13. Hydroxylamine nitrate self-catalytic kinetics study with adiabatic calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lijun [Mary Kay O' Connor Process Safety Center, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University System, College Station, TX 77843-3122 (United States); Wei Chunyang [BASF Corporation, Wyandotte, MI 48192 (United States); Guo Yuyan; Rogers, William J. [Mary Kay O' Connor Process Safety Center, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University System, College Station, TX 77843-3122 (United States); Sam Mannan, M. [Mary Kay O' Connor Process Safety Center, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University System, College Station, TX 77843-3122 (United States)], E-mail: mannan@tamu.edu

    2009-03-15

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) is an important member of the hydroxylamine compound family with applications that include equipment decontamination in the nuclear industry and aqueous or solid propellants. Due to its instability and autocatalytic behavior, HAN has been involved in several incidents at the Hanford and Savannah River Site (SRS) [Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate, US Department of Energy, 1998]. Much research has been conducted on HAN in different areas, such as combustion mechanism, decomposition mechanism, and runaway behavior. However, the autocatalytic decomposition behavior of HAN at runaway stage has not been fully addressed due to its highly exothermic and rapid decomposition behavior. This work is focused on extracting HAN autocatalytic kinetics and analyzing HAN critical behavior from adiabatic calorimetry measurements. A lumped autocatalytic kinetic model for HAN and associated model parameters are determined. Also the storage and handling critical conditions of diluted HAN solution without metal presence are quantified.

  14. Hydroxylamine nitrate self-catalytic kinetics study with adiabatic calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lijun; Wei Chunyang; Guo Yuyan; Rogers, William J.; Sam Mannan, M.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) is an important member of the hydroxylamine compound family with applications that include equipment decontamination in the nuclear industry and aqueous or solid propellants. Due to its instability and autocatalytic behavior, HAN has been involved in several incidents at the Hanford and Savannah River Site (SRS) [Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate, US Department of Energy, 1998]. Much research has been conducted on HAN in different areas, such as combustion mechanism, decomposition mechanism, and runaway behavior. However, the autocatalytic decomposition behavior of HAN at runaway stage has not been fully addressed due to its highly exothermic and rapid decomposition behavior. This work is focused on extracting HAN autocatalytic kinetics and analyzing HAN critical behavior from adiabatic calorimetry measurements. A lumped autocatalytic kinetic model for HAN and associated model parameters are determined. Also the storage and handling critical conditions of diluted HAN solution without metal presence are quantified

  15. Calorimetry energy measurement in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wigmans, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Particle physics is the science that pursues the age-old quest for the innermost structure of matter and the fundamental interactions between its constituents. Modern experiments in this field rely increasingly on calorimetry, a detection technique in which the particles of interest are absorbed in the detector. Calorimeters are very intricate instruments. Their performance characteristics depend on subtle, sometimes counter-intuitive design details. This book, written by one of the world's foremost experts, is the first comprehensive text on this topic. It provides a fundamental and systematic introduction to calorimetry. It describes the state of the art in terms of both the fundamental understanding of calorimetric particle detection, and the actual detectors that have been or are being built and operated in experiments. The last chapter discusses landmark scientific discoveries in which calorimetry has played an important role. This book summarizes and puts into perspective the work described in some 900...

  16. Study of asphaltene precipitation by Calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdier, Sylvain Charles Roland; Plantier, Frédéric; Bessières, David

    2007-01-01

    Can calorimetry bring new input to the Current understanding of asphaltene precipitation? In this work, two types of precipitation were studied by means of calorimetry: addition of n-heptane into asphaltene solutions and temperature/pressure variations on a recombined live oil. The first series...... of experiments showed that weak forces determine precipitation. Indeed, isothermal titration calorimetry could not detect any clear signal although this technique can detect low-energy transitions such as liquid-liquid equilibrium and rnicellization. The second series of tests proved that precipitation caused...... by T and P variations is exothermic for this system. Furthermore, the temperature-induced precipitation is accompanied by an increase in the apparent thermal expansivity. Therefore, it seems that these two phase transitions exhibit different calorimetric behaviours and they may not be as similar...

  17. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of semicrystalline polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, C

    2009-11-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is an effective analytical tool to characterize the physical properties of a polymer. DSC enables determination of melting, crystallization, and mesomorphic transition temperatures, and the corresponding enthalpy and entropy changes, and characterization of glass transition and other effects that show either changes in heat capacity or a latent heat. Calorimetry takes a special place among other methods. In addition to its simplicity and universality, the energy characteristics (heat capacity C(P) and its integral over temperature T--enthalpy H), measured via calorimetry, have a clear physical meaning even though sometimes interpretation may be difficult. With introduction of differential scanning calorimeters (DSC) in the early 1960s calorimetry became a standard tool in polymer science. The advantage of DSC compared with other calorimetric techniques lies in the broad dynamic range regarding heating and cooling rates, including isothermal and temperature-modulated operation. Today 12 orders of magnitude in scanning rate can be covered by combining different types of DSCs. Rates as low as 1 microK s(-1) are possible and at the other extreme heating and cooling at 1 MK s(-1) and higher is possible. The broad dynamic range is especially of interest for semicrystalline polymers because they are commonly far from equilibrium and phase transitions are strongly time (rate) dependent. Nevertheless, there are still several unsolved problems regarding calorimetry of polymers. I try to address a few of these, for example determination of baseline heat capacity, which is related to the problem of crystallinity determination by DSC, or the occurrence of multiple melting peaks. Possible solutions by using advanced calorimetric techniques, for example fast scanning and high frequency AC (temperature-modulated) calorimetry are discussed.

  18. Calorimetry and thermal methods in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Auroux, Aline

    2013-01-01

    The book is about calorimetry and thermal analysis methods, alone or linked to other techniques, as applied to the characterization of catalysts, supports and adsorbents, and to the study of catalytic reactions in various domains: air and wastewater treatment, clean and renewable energies, refining of hydrocarbons, green chemistry, hydrogen production and storage. The book is intended to fill the gap between the basic thermodynamic and kinetics concepts acquired by students during their academic formation, and the use of experimental techniques such as thermal analysis and calorimetry to answ

  19. New crystals for dual-readout calorimetry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Akchurin, N.; Bedeschi, F.; Cardini, A.; Carosi, R.; Ciapetti, G.; Ferrari, R.; Franchino, S.; Fraternali, M.; Gaudio, G.; Hauptman, J.; Incagli, M.; Korzhik, M.; Lacava, F.; La Rotonda, L.; Livan, M.; Meoni, E.; Nikl, Martin; Pinci, D.; Policicchio, A.; Popescu, S.; Scuri, F.; Sill, A.; Vandelli, W.; Vedda, A.; Venturelli, T.; Voena, C.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 604, č. 3 (2009), s. 512-526 ISSN 0168-9002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : calorimetry * Cherenkov light * high-Z scintillating crystals Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.317, year: 2009

  20. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry in the Student Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadso, Lars; Li, Yujing; Li, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the measurement of the heat produced by the stepwise addition of one substance to another. It is a common experimental technique, for example, in pharmaceutical science, to measure equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies. We describe a stirring device and an injection pump that can be used with a…

  1. Liquid argon calorimetry for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid argon calorimetry is a mature technique. However, adapting it to the challenging environment of the SSC requires a large amount of R ampersand D. The advantages of the liquid argon approach are summarized and the issues being addressed by the R ampersand D program are described. 18 refs

  2. Monte Carlo studies of uranium calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, J.; Hargis, H.J.; Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed Monte Carlo calculations of uranium calorimetry are presented which reveal a significant difference in the responses of liquid argon and plastic scintillator in uranium calorimeters. Due to saturation effects, neutrons from the uranium are found to contribute only weakly to the liquid argon signal. Electromagnetic sampling inefficiencies are significant and contribute substantially to compensation in both systems. 17 references

  3. Analyzing Protein Denaturation using Fast Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Splinter, R.; Van Herwaarden, A.W.; Iervolino, E.; Vanden Poel, G.; Istrate, D.; Sarro, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the possibility to measure protein denaturation with Fast Differential Scanning Calorimetry (FDSC). Cancer can be diagnosed by measuring protein denaturation in blood plasma using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). FDSC can reduce diagnosis time from hours to minutes,

  4. Calorimetry and thermodynamics of living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamprecht, Ingolf

    2003-01-01

    Calorimetry of living systems and classical thermodynamics developed in parallel, from Lavoisier's early ice calorimeter experiments on guinea pigs, followed by Dubrunfaut's macrocalorimetric research of fermentation processes and Atwater-Rosa's whole-body calorimetry on humans and domestic animals, to the introduction of the famous Tian-Calvet instrument that found entrance into so many different fields of biology. In this work, six examples of living-system calorimetry and thermodynamics are presented. These are: (i) glycolytic oscillations far off the thermodynamic equilibrium; (ii) growth and energy balances in fermenting and respiring yeast cultures; (iii) direct and indirect calorimetric monitoring of electrically stimulated reptile metabolism; (iv) biologic and climatic factors influencing the temperature constancy and distribution in the mound of a wood ant colony as an example of a complex ecological system; (v) energetic considerations on the clustering of European honeybees in winter as a means to save energy and stored food as well as for their Japanese counterparts in defending against hornet predators; and (vi) energetic and evolutionary aspects of the mass specific entropy production rate, the so-called bound dissipation or psiu-function. The examples presented here are just a very personal selection of living systems from a broad spectrum at all levels of complexity. Common for all of them is that they were investigated calorimetrically on the background of classical and irreversible thermodynamics

  5. The use of calorimetry for plutonium assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.A.

    1982-12-01

    Calorimetry is a technique for measuring the thermal power of heat-producing substances. The technique may be applied to the measurement of plutonium-bearing materials which evolve heat as a result of alpha and beta decay. A calorimetric measurement of the thermal power of a plutonium sample, combined with a knowledge or measurement of the plutonium isotopic mass ratios of the sample provides a convenient and accurate, non-destructive measure of the total plutonium mass of the sample. The present report provides a description, and an assessment of the calorimetry technique applied to the assay of plutonium-bearing materials. Types and characteristics of plutonium calorimeters are considered, as well as calibration and operating procedures. The instrumentation used with plutonium calorimeters is described and the use of computer control for calorimeter automation is discussed. A critical review and assessment of plutonium calorimetry literature since 1970 is presented. Both fuel element and plutonium-bearing material calorimeters are considered. The different types of plutonium calorimeters are evaluated and their relative merits are discussed. A combined calorimeter and gamma-ray measurement assay system is considered. The design principles of plutonium assay calorimeters are considered. An automatic, computer-based calorimeter control system is proposed in conjunction with a general plutonium assay calorimeter design. (author)

  6. Combustion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ragland, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Combustion Engineering The Nature of Combustion Combustion Emissions Global Climate Change Sustainability World Energy Production Structure of the Book   Section I: Basic Concepts Fuels Gaseous Fuels Liquid Fuels Solid Fuels Problems Thermodynamics of Combustion Review of First Law Concepts Properties of Mixtures Combustion StoichiometryChemical EnergyChemical EquilibriumAdiabatic Flame TemperatureChemical Kinetics of CombustionElementary ReactionsChain ReactionsGlobal ReactionsNitric Oxide KineticsReactions at a Solid SurfaceProblemsReferences  Section II: Combustion of Gaseous and Vaporized FuelsFlamesLaminar Premixed FlamesLaminar Flame TheoryTurbulent Premixed FlamesExplosion LimitsDiffusion FlamesGas-Fired Furnaces and BoilersEnergy Balance and EfficiencyFuel SubstitutionResidential Gas BurnersIndustrial Gas BurnersUtility Gas BurnersLow Swirl Gas BurnersPremixed-Charge Engine CombustionIntroduction to the Spark Ignition EngineEngine EfficiencyOne-Zone Model of Combustion in a Piston-...

  7. Scintillating Fibre Calorimetry at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. The lead/scintillating fibre calorimeter technique provides a fast signal response well matched to the LHC rate requirements. It can be made to give equal response for electrons and hadrons (compensation) with good electromagnetic and hadronic energy resolutions.\\\\ \\\\ The aim of this R&D proposal is to study in detail the aspects that are relevant for application of this type of calorimeter in an LHC environment, including its integration in a larger system of detectors, e.g.~projective geometry, radiation hardness, light detection, calibration and stability monitoring, electron/hadron separation.....

  8. Fabrication of 12% 240Pu calorimetry standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, S.M.; Hildner, S.; Gutierrez, D.; Mills, C.; Garcia, W.; Gurule, C.

    1995-01-01

    Throughout the DOE complex, laboratories are performing calorimetric assays on items containing high burnup plutonium. These materials contain higher isotopic range and higher wattages than materials previously encountered in vault holdings. Currently, measurement control standards have been limited to utilizing 6% 240 Pu standards. The lower isotopic and wattage value standards do not complement the measurement of the higher burnup material. Participants of the Calorimetry Exchange (CALEX) Program have identified the need for new calorimetric assay standards with a higher wattage and isotopic range. This paper describes the fabrication and verification measurements of the new CALEX standard containing 12% 240 Pu oxide with a wattage of about 6 to 8 watts

  9. A guide to automation techniques in calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renz, D.P.; Wetzel, J.R.; Breakall, K.L.; James, S.J.; Kasperski, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    Many improvements occurring in calorimetry measurement technology in the past few years will help current users of calorimeters to achieve better use of their existing systems. These include a more user friendly operator computer interface, a more detailed printout at the end of each run, improved data processing to eliminate operator error, and improved system monitoring to detect system or environmental problems. In addition, an electrical calibration heater has been developed to replace plutonium-238 heat standards for calibrating calorimeters, and several automation systems allow for easier and safer system operation

  10. Isothermal calorimetry of enzymatic biodiesel reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene; Westh, Peter; Christensen, Knud Villy

    2010-01-01

      Isothermal calorimetry ITC has been used to investigate enzymatic biodiesel production. The transesterification of rapeseed oil with methanol and ethanol was catalyzed by the immobilized lipase Novozym 435 at 40°C. The ITC-experiments clearly demonstrate the possibilities of investigating complex...... and composition change in the system, the heat of reaction at 40°C for the two systems has been determined to -9.8 ± 0.9 kJ/mole biodiesel formed from rapeseed oil and methanol, and - 9.3 ± 0.7 kJ/mole when rapeseed oil and ethanol is used....

  11. Development of Resistive Micromegas for Sampling Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geralis, T.; Fanourakis, G.; Kalamaris, A.; Nikas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Chefdeville, M.; Karyotakis, I.; Koletsou, I.; Titov, M.

    2018-02-01

    Resistive micromegas is proposed as an active element for sampling calorimetry. Future linear collider experiments or the HL-LHC experiments can profit from those developments for Particle Flow Calorimetry. Micromegas possesses remarkable properties concerning gain stability, reduced ion feedback, response linearity, adaptable sensitive element granularity, fast response and high rate capability. Recent developments on Micromegas with a protective resistive layer present excellent results, resolving the problem of discharges caused by local high charge deposition, thanks to its RC-slowed charge evacuation. Higher resistivity though, may cause loss of the response linearity at high rates. We have scanned a wide range of resistivities and performed laboratory tests with X-rays that demonstrate excellent response linearity up to rates of (a few) times 10MHz/cm2, with simultaneous mitigation of discharges. Beam test studies at SPS/CERN with hadrons have also shown a remarkable stability of the resistive Micromegas and low currents for rates up to 15MHz/cm2. We present results from the aforementioned studies confronted with MC simulation

  12. Characterization of pitches by differential scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrburger, P.; Martin, C.; Lahaye, J.; Saint-Romain, J.L.; Couderc, P.

    1988-12-01

    Pitch materials have generally a very complex composition with molecular mass ranging from a few hundred to several thousands units. In order to characterize these materials their properties related to the glassy transformation, in particular to enthalpy relaxation, have been investigated. Solvent soluble fractions have been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). As with polymeric materials, enthalpy relaxation can provide information about pitches and the interactions occurring between the different types of molecules present in the pitch: mean molecular size, structural factor, molecular-size distribution. The determination of glass transition properties provides a useful means for the characterization of pitch and of their solvent extracts. It also permits insight into the complex reactions which occur when pitch materials are heat-treated. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Synergies between electromagnetic calorimetry and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, William W.

    2002-01-01

    The instrumentation used for the nuclear medical imaging technique of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) shares many features with the instrumentation used for electromagnetic calorimetry. Both fields can certainly benefit from technical advances in many common areas, and this paper discusses both the commonalties and the differences between the instrumentation needs for the two fields. The overall aim is to identify where synergistic development opportunities exist. While such opportunities exist in inorganic scintillators, photodetectors, amplification and readout electronics, and high-speed computing, it is important to recognize that while the requirements of the two fields are similar, they are not identical, and so it is unlikely that advances specific to one field can be transferred without modification to the other

  14. Silicon calorimetry for the SSC[ Superconducting Supercollider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, C.; Borchi, E.; Brau, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    SSC experiments will rely heavily on their calorimeters. Silicon calorimetry, which has been introduced in recent years as a useful technology, has many attractive characteristics which may make it a viable option for consideration. The many attractive properties of silicon detectors are reviewed. The relevant present day applications of large areas of silicon detectors are summarize to illustrate the emerging use. The troublesome issue of radiation damage in a high luminosity environment like the SSC is considered with a summary of much of the recent new measurements which help clarify this situation. A discussion of the electronics and a possible mechanical configuration is presented, followed by a summary of the outstanding R and D issues. 31 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Isothermal calorimetry on enzymatic biodiesel production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjerbæk, Lene

    2008-01-01

    information about effects taking place when using lipases immobilized on an inert carrier for transesterification of a triglyceride and an alcohol as for biodiesel production. The biodiesel is produced by rapeseed oil and methanol as well as ethanol and a commercial biocatalyst Novozym 435 from Novozymes...... containing a Candida Antarctica B lipase immobilized on an acrylic resin. The reaction investigated is characterized by immiscible liquids (oil, methanol, glycerol and biodiesel) and enzymes imm. on an inert carrier during reaction, which allows several effects to take place that during normal reaction...... conditions can not be elucidated. These effects have been observed with isothermal calorimetry bringing forth new information about the reaction of enzymes catalyzing transesterification. Enzymatic biodiesel production has until now not been investigated with isothermal microcalorimetry, but the results...

  16. CMS Forward Calorimetry R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilki, Burak [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-11-11

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of the CMS Forward Calorimetry Taskforce (FCAL group) who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2013-2016 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The TSW is intended primarily for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. It reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this scope of work to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents.

  17. Combustion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  18. Differential scanning calorimetry techniques: applications in biology and nanoscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Pooria; Moghadam, Tahereh Tohidi; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews the best-known differential scanning calorimetries (DSCs), such as conventional DSC, microelectromechanical systems-DSC, infrared-heated DSC, modulated-temperature DSC, gas flow-modulated DSC, parallel-nano DSC, pressure perturbation calorimetry, self-reference DSC, and high-performance DSC. Also, we describe here the most extensive applications of DSC in biology and nanoscience.

  19. Differential Scanning Calorimetry Techniques: Applications in Biology and Nanoscience

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Pooria; Moghadam, Tahereh Tohidi; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the best-known differential scanning calorimetries (DSCs), such as conventional DSC, microelectromechanical systems-DSC, infrared-heated DSC, modulated-temperature DSC, gas flow-modulated DSC, parallel-nano DSC, pressure perturbation calorimetry, self-reference DSC, and high-performance DSC. Also, we describe here the most extensive applications of DSC in biology and nanoscience.

  20. Current status of tritium calorimetry at TLK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buekki-Deme, A.; Alecu, C.G.; Kloppe, B.; Bornschein, B. [Institute of Technical Physics, Tritium Laboratory Karsruhe - TLK, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Inside a tritium facility, calorimetry is an important analytical method as it is the only reference method for accountancy (it is based on the measurement of the heat generated by the radioactive decay). Presently, at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK), 4 calorimeters are in operation, one of isothermal type and three of inertial guidance control type (IGC). The volume of the calorimeters varies between 0.5 and 20.6 liters. About two years ago we started an extensive work to improve our calorimeters with regard to reliability and precision. We were forced to upgrade 3 of our 4 calorimeters due to the outdated interfaces and software. This work involved creating new LabView programs driving the devices, re-tuning control loops and replacing obsolete hardware components. In this paper we give a review on the current performance of our calorimeters, comparing it to recently available devices from the market and in the literature. We also show some ideas for a next generation calorimeter based on experiences with our IGC calorimeters and other devices reported in the literature. (authors)

  1. Current status of tritium calorimetry at TLK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buekki-Deme, A.; Alecu, C.G.; Kloppe, B.; Bornschein, B.

    2015-01-01

    Inside a tritium facility, calorimetry is an important analytical method as it is the only reference method for accountancy (it is based on the measurement of the heat generated by the radioactive decay). Presently, at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK), 4 calorimeters are in operation, one of isothermal type and three of inertial guidance control type (IGC). The volume of the calorimeters varies between 0.5 and 20.6 liters. About two years ago we started an extensive work to improve our calorimeters with regard to reliability and precision. We were forced to upgrade 3 of our 4 calorimeters due to the outdated interfaces and software. This work involved creating new LabView programs driving the devices, re-tuning control loops and replacing obsolete hardware components. In this paper we give a review on the current performance of our calorimeters, comparing it to recently available devices from the market and in the literature. We also show some ideas for a next generation calorimeter based on experiences with our IGC calorimeters and other devices reported in the literature. (authors)

  2. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  3. The CLEO-III Trigger: Calorimetry and tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergfeld, T.J.; Gollin, G.D.; Haney, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The CLEO-III Trigger provides a trigger decision every 42ns, with a latency of approximately 2.5μs. This paper describes the pipelined signal processing and pattern recognition schemes used by the calorimeter, and the axial and stereo portions of the drift chamber, to provide the information necessary to make these decisions. Field programmable gate arrays are used extensively to provide cluster filtering and location sorting for calorimetry, and path finding for tracking. Analog processing is also employed in the calorimetry to provide additional leverage on the problem. Timing information is extracted from both calorimetry and tracking

  4. Forward calorimetry in the upgraded UA1 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Taviel, F.J.; Diez-Hedo, F.; Doncel, P.; Marquina, M.A.; Rodrigo, T.; Bacci, C.; Petrolo, E.; Tusi, A.; Ferrando, A.; Givernaud, A.; Rubbia, C.; Vuillemin, V.

    1989-01-01

    The major improvement in the upgraded UA1 calorimetry at the Santi ppS is the general use of ionization chambers filled with tetramethylpentane (TMP) as a detection medium interspersed with uranium plates as absorber. To achieve overall uniformity of detection down to very small angles, an identical solution is proposed for the forward calorimetry. Forward calorimetry is essential for good total and missing energy measurement at high luminosity in view of the increasing rate of multiple collisions. Both designs for forward and very forward calorimeters are presented along with expected resolutions. (orig.)

  5. COMBUSTION OF BIOMASS AND CHARCOAL MADE FROM BABASSU NUTSHELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago de Paula Protásio

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, studies have examined the use of lignocellulosic wastes for energy generation. However, there is a lack of information on the combustibility of the residual biomass, especially the bark and charcoal of babassu nut. In this study, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential thermal analysis (DTA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC were used to achieve the following objectives: to evaluate the combustion of the residual biomass from the babassu nut; to evaluate the combustion of charcoal produced from this biomass, considering different final carbonization temperatures; and to determine the effect of the final carbonization temperature on the thermal stability of charcoal and on its performance in combustion. Thermal analyses were performed in synthetic air. In order to evaluate the characteristics of charcoal combustion and fresh biomass, the ignition temperature (Ti, the burnout temperature (Tf, characteristic combustion index (S, ignition index (Di, time corresponding to the maximum combustion rate (tp, and ignition time (tig were considered. The combustion of the babassu nutshell occurred in three phases and it was observed that this lignocellulosic material is suitable for the direct generation of heat. The increase in the final carbonization temperature caused an increase in the ignition temperature, as well as in the burnout temperature, the ignition time and the time corresponding to the maximum combustion rate. The results indicate that the increase in the carbonization temperature causes a decrease in combustion reactivity and, consequently, the charcoals produced at lower temperatures are easier to ignite and exhibit better performance in ignition.

  6. Continuing Studies on Lead/Scintillating Fibres Calorimetry (LFC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Starting from the results obtained in the framework of the LAA Project~2B, we propose a continuation of the R&D on lead/scintillating fibres calorimetry (``spaghetti calorimetry''), including further tests on the old calorimeter prototypes and the construction and testing of new prototypes. The main results we pursue concern the performances of a projective calorimeter built with new, cheaper, techniques and the radiation hardness of the scintillating fibres, the optimization of a preshower detector system is also studied.

  7. Tubular combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Tubular combustors are cylindrical tubes where flame ignition and propagation occur in a spatially confined, highly controlled environment, in a nearly flat, elongated geometry. This allows for some unique advantages where extremely even heat dispersion is required over a large surface while still maintaining fuel efficiency. Tubular combustors also allow for easy flexibility in type of fuel source, allowing for quick changeover to meet various needs and changing fuel pricing. This new addition to the MP sustainable energy series will provide the most up-to-date research on tubular combustion--some of it only now coming out of private proprietary protection. Plentiful examples of current applications along with a good explanation of background theory will offer readers an invaluable guide on this promising energy technology. Highlights include: * An introduction to the theory of tubular flames * The "how to" of maintaining stability of tubular flames through continuous combustion * Examples of both small-scal...

  8. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  9. Pyrolysis kinetics and combustion of thin wood using advanced cone calorimetry test method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger

    2011-01-01

    Mechanistic pyrolysis kinetics analysis of extractives, holocellulose, and lignin in solid wood over entire heating regime was possible using specialized cone calorimeter test and new mathematical analysis tools. Added hardware components include: modified sample holder for thin specimen with tiny thermocouples, methane ring burner with stainless steel mesh above cone...

  10. Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-3 Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications \\\\ \\\\Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. Among the techniques used so far, or under development, the liquid argon sampling calorimetry offers high radiation resistence, good energy resolution (electromagnetic and hadronic), excellent calibration stability and response uniformity. Its rate capabilities, however, do not yet match the requirements for LHC. \\\\ \\\\The aim of this proposal is to improve the technique in such a way that high granularity, good hermiticity and adequate rate capabilities are obtained, without compromising the above mentioned properties. To reach this goal, we propose to use a novel structure, the $^{\\prime\\prime}$accordion$^{\\prime\\prime}$, coupled to fast preamplifiers working at liquid argon temperature. Converter and readout electrodes are no longer planar and perpendicular to particles, as usual, but instead they are wiggled around a plane containing particles. ...

  11. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  12. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  13. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  14. Fast sampling calorimetry with solid argon ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, E.; Linn, S.; Piekarz, H.; Wahl, H.; Womersley, J.; Hansen, S.; Hurh, P.; Rivetta, C.; Sanders, R.; Schmitt, R.; Stanek, R.; Stefanik, A.

    1992-01-01

    A proposal for the fast sampling calorimetry with solid argon as active medium and the preliminary results from the solid argon test cell are presented. The proposed test calorimeter module structure, the signal routing and the mechanical and cryogenic arrangements are also discussed

  15. Optimization of crystals for applications in dual-readout calorimetry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Akchurin, N.; Bedeschi, F.; Cardini, A.; Carosi, R.; Ciapetti, G.; Fasoli, M.; Ferrari, R.; Franchino, S.; Fraternali, M.; Gaudio, G.; Hauptman, J.; Incagli, M.; Lacava, F.; La Rotonda, L.; Lee, S.; Livan, M.; Meoni, E.; Nikl, Martin; Pinci, D.; Policicchio, A.; Popescu, S.; Scuri, F.; Sill, A.; Susinno, G.; Vandelli, W.; Vedda, A.; Venturelli, T.; Voena, C.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 621, 1-3 (2010), 212-221 ISSN 0168-9002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : calorimetry * Cherenkov light * High-Z scintillating crystals Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.142, year: 2010

  16. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Can Provide Critical Thinking Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dale E.; Goode, David R.; Seney, Caryn S.; Boatwright, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    College chemistry faculties might not have considered including isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in their majors' curriculum because experimental data from this instrumental method are often analyzed via automation (software). However, the software-based data analysis can be replaced with a spreadsheet-based analysis that is readily…

  17. Hadronic shower development in iron-scintillator tile calorimetry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amaral, P.; Amorim, A.; Anderson, K.; Lokajíček, Miloš; Němeček, Stanislav

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 443, - (2000), s. 51-70 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MPO RP-4210/69 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : ATLAS Iron-Scintillator * hadron calorimeter * shower parametrisation * calorimetry * computer data analysis Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.964, year: 2000

  18. Particle flow calorimetry at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Particle flow calorimetry at the international linear ... It is widely believed that the most promising strategy for achieving a jet ... this level of performance for two main reasons. Firstly ... (i) Tracking: For the studies presented in this paper, the track pattern ... that particles propagating outward from the interaction region will cross ...

  19. Differential Binding Models for Direct and Reverse Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Isaac; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2016-03-10

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a technique to measure the stoichiometry and thermodynamics from binding experiments. Identifying an appropriate mathematical model to evaluate titration curves of receptors with multiple sites is challenging, particularly when the stoichiometry or binding mechanism is not available. In a recent theoretical study, we presented a differential binding model (DBM) to study calorimetry titrations independently of the interaction among the binding sites (Herrera, I.; Winnik, M. A. J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 8659-8672). Here, we build upon our DBM and show its practical application to evaluate calorimetry titrations of receptors with multiple sites independently of the titration direction. Specifically, we present a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with the general form d[S]/dV that can be integrated numerically to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of free and bound species S at every injection step and, subsequently, to evaluate the volume-normalized heat signal (δQ(V) = δq/dV) of direct and reverse calorimetry titrations. Additionally, we identify factors that influence the shape of the titration curve and can be used to optimize the initial concentrations of titrant and analyte. We demonstrate the flexibility of our updated DBM by applying these differentials and a global regression analysis to direct and reverse calorimetric titrations of gadolinium ions with multidentate ligands of increasing denticity, namely, diglycolic acid (DGA), citric acid (CIT), and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and use statistical tests to validate the stoichiometries for the metal-ligand pairs studied.

  20. Indirect calorimetry: assessing animal response to heat and cold stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaughan, J.B.; Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Hendriks, P.

    2015-01-01

    Calorimetric thermal stress studies where indirect calorimetry is used as a tool to estimate energy expenditure have been undertaken since this technique was developed. Some examples of these studies are presented in this chapter. The measurement of gas exchange by means of an open-circuit

  1. Rotary combustion device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Rotary combustion device (1) with rotary combustion chamber (4). Specific measures are taken to provide ignition of a combustible mixture. It is proposed that a hollow tube be provided coaxially with the axis of rotation (6), so that a small part of the mixture is guided into the combustion chamber.

  2. What does calorimetry and thermodynamics of living cells tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskow, Thomas; Paufler, Sven

    2015-04-01

    This article presents and compares several thermodynamic methods for the quantitative interpretation of data from calorimetric measurements. Heat generation and absorption are universal features of microbial growth and product formation as well as of cell cultures from animals, plants and insects. The heat production rate reflects metabolic changes in real time and is measurable on-line. The detection limit of commercially available calorimetric instruments can be low enough to measure the heat of 100,000 aerobically growing bacteria or of 100 myocardial cells. Heat can be monitored in reaction vessels ranging from a few nanoliters up to many cubic meters. Most important the heat flux measurement does not interfere with the biological process under investigation. The practical advantages of calorimetry include the waiver of labeling and reactants. It is further possible to assemble the thermal transducer in a protected way that reduces aging and thereby signal drifts. Calorimetry works with optically opaque solutions. All of these advantages make calorimetry an interesting method for many applications in medicine, environmental sciences, ecology, biochemistry and biotechnology, just to mention a few. However, in many cases the heat signal is merely used to monitor biological processes but only rarely to quantitatively interpret the data. Therefore, a significant proportion of the information potential of calorimetry remains unutilized. To fill this information gap and to motivate the reader using the full information potential of calorimetry, various methods for quantitative data interpretations are presented, evaluated and compared with each other. Possible errors of interpretation and limitations of quantitative data analysis are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  4. Reduced NOX combustion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delano, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for combusting fuel and oxidant to achieve reduced formation of nitrogen oxides. It comprises: It comprises: heating a combustion zone to a temperature at least equal to 1500 degrees F.; injecting into the heated combustion zone a stream of oxidant at a velocity within the range of from 200 to 1070 feet per second; injecting into the combustion zone, spaced from the oxidant stream, a fuel stream at a velocity such that the ratio of oxidant stream velocity to fuel stream velocity does not exceed 20; aspirating combustion gases into the oxidant stream and thereafter intermixing the aspirated oxidant stream and fuel stream to form a combustible mixture; combusting the combustible mixture to produce combustion gases for the aspiration; and maintaining the fuel stream substantially free from contact with oxidant prior to the intermixture with aspirated oxidant

  5. Glass transition of anhydrous starch by fast scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Xavier; Maigret, Jean-Eudes; Lourdin, Denis; Saiter, Allisson

    2017-10-01

    By means of fast scanning calorimetry, the glass transition of anhydrous amorphous starch has been measured. With a scanning rate of 2000Ks -1 , thermal degradation of starch prior to the glass transition has been inhibited. To certify the glass transition measurement, structural relaxation of the glassy state has been investigated through physical aging as well as the concept of limiting fictive temperature. In both cases, characteristic enthalpy recovery peaks related to the structural relaxation of the glass have been observed. Thermal lag corrections based on the comparison of glass transition temperatures measured by means of differential and fast scanning calorimetry have been proposed. The complementary investigations give an anhydrous amorphous starch glass transition temperature of 312±7°C. This estimation correlates with previous extrapolation performed on hydrated starches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Scintillating glasses for total absorption dual readout calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonvicini, V. [INFN, Trieste; Driutti, A. [Udine U.; Cauz, D. [Udine U.; Pauletta, G. [Udine U.; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab; Santi, L. [Udine U.; Wenzel, H. [Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Scintillating glasses are a potentially cheaper alternative to crystal - based calorimetry with common problems related to light collection, detection and processing. As such, their use and development are part of more extensive R&D aimed at investigating the potential of total absorption, combined with the readout (DR) technique, for hadron calorimetry. A recent series of measurements, using cosmic and particle beams from the Fermilab test beam facility and scintillating glass with the characteristics required for application of the DR technique, serve to illustrate the problems addressed and the progress achieved by this R&D. Alternative solutions for light collection (conventional and silicon photomultipliers) and signal processing are compared, the separate contributions of scintillation and Cherenkov processes to the signal are evaluated and results are compared to simulation.

  7. Inherent limitations of fixed time servo-controlled radiometric calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzel, J.R.; Duff, M.F.; Lemming, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    There has been some interest in low precision, short run time calorimetry measurements. This type of calorimetry measurement has been proposed for use when high precision measurements are not required, for example, to screen scrap containers to determine if there is enough material to be measured more accurately of for confirmatory measurements that only require low precision results. The equipment needed to make these measurements is a servo-controlled calorimeter with a sample preequilibration bath. The preequilibration bath temperature is set to the internal temperature of the calorimeter running at a fixed servo-controlled wattage level. The sample power value is determined at a fixed time form the sample loading into the calorimeter. There are some limitations and areas of uncertainties in the use of data obtained by this method. Data collected under controlled conditions demonstrate the limitations. Sample packaging, preequilibration time, and item wattage were chosen as the variables most likely to be encountered in a plant environment

  8. Physicochemical characterization of pitches by differential scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahaye, J.; Ehrburger, P.; Saint-Romain, J.L.; Couderc, P.

    1987-11-01

    The glass transition characterization of pitches has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (d.s.c.). Experimental results and theoretical considerations indicate that: (1) the average molecular mass of pitches can be characterized by the apparent activation energy of the relaxation phenomenon of pitch molecules; (2) the molecular polydispersity is correlated with the width of the glass transition. Characterization of pitch by d.s.c. is well adapted to follow pitch transformation during heat treatment. 6 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. The upgraded CDF front end electronics for calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, G.; Frei, D.; Hahn, S.R.; Nelson, C.A.; Segler, S.L.; Stuermer, W.

    1991-11-01

    The front end electronics used in the calorimetry of the CDF detector has been upgraded to meet system requirements for higher expected luminosity. A fast digitizer utilizing a 2 {mu}Sec, 16 bit ADC has been designed and built. Improvements to the front end trigger circuitry have been implemented, including the production of 900 new front end modules. Operational experience with the previous system is presented, with discussion of the problems and performance goals.

  10. The upgraded CDF front end electronics for calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, G.; Frei, D.; Hahn, S.R.; Nelson, C.A.; Segler, S.L.; Stuermer, W.

    1991-11-01

    The front end electronics used in the calorimetry of the CDF detector has been upgraded to meet system requirements for higher expected luminosity. A fast digitizer utilizing a 2 μSec, 16 bit ADC has been designed and built. Improvements to the front end trigger circuitry have been implemented, including the production of 900 new front end modules. Operational experience with the previous system is presented, with discussion of the problems and performance goals

  11. The Philosophy and Feasibility of Dual Readout Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, John

    2006-01-01

    I will discuss the general physical ideas behind dual-readout calorimetry, their implementation in DREAM (Dual REAdout Module) with exact separation of scintillation and Cerenkov light, implementation with mixed light in DREAM fibers, anticipated implementation in PbWO4 crystals with applications to the 4th Concept detector and to CMS, use in high energy gamma-ray and cosmic ray astrophysics with Cerenkov and N2 fluorescent light, and implementation in the 4th Concept detector for muon identification

  12. Application of kinetic inductance thermometers to x-ray calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, Y.C.; Labov, S.E.; Silver, E.H.

    1990-01-01

    A kinetic inductance thermometer is applied to x-ray calorimetry, and its operation over a wide range of frequencies and geometries is discussed. Three amplifier configurations are described, one using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) amplifier, another incorporating an FET amplifier in an amplitude modulated system, and the third, using a tunnel diode frequency modulated oscillator circuit. The predicted performance of each configuration is presented. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  13. The Spontaneous Combustion of Railway Ties and Asphalt Shingles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Geoffrey

    Many Low Carbon Fuels (LCFs) present unknown spontaneous combustion risks, which must be quantified before their use as fossil fuel replacements. Wood and coal spontaneous combustion is well understood; however, LCFs weather, and subsequent chemical changes could affect their spontaneous combustion properties. LCF spontaneous combustion could lead to accidental fires with possible loss of life, limb and property. The spontaneous combustion risks of two LCFs, discarded creosote-treated wooden railway ties and roofing asphalt shingles, were investigated with calorimetry and heat transfer experiments. Chemical changes due to weathering were studied with pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (py-GC/MS). Creosote-treated wooden railway tie dust, roofing asphalt shingle particles, poplar wood pellets, and petroleum coke self-heating were studied with isothermal calorimetry. Railway tie dust and asphalt shingle heat transfer were characterized with a guarded hot plate. Petroleum coke self-heating was consistent with coal, while both poplar pellets and railway tie dust were found to be more reactive compared to oven test results of similar materials. The observed increase in reactivity was probably a result of significant moisture contenint in the pellet and railway tie dust. Critical conditions for spontaneous combustion were evaluated with the Frank-Kamenetskii parameter, assuming an ambient temperature of 40°C and constant moisture content. Kamenetskii calculations indicate that a 1.6 m cube of railway tie dust, or a 58 m cube of asphalt particles, would be unstable and combust. LCF chemistry may have been affected by weathering, which would cause chemical changes that affect their spontaneous combustion properties. Therefore, railway tie wood and roofing asphalt shingle chemistry were investigated by identifying products of 250° and 550°C pyrolysis with py-GC/MS. Railway tie wood pyrolyzates did not show signs of weathering; in contrast, asphalt pyrolysis

  14. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  15. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani; Oß wald, Patrick; Hansen, Nils; Kohse-Hö inghaus, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    . While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides

  16. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golodova, E; Shchepakina, E

    2006-01-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models

  17. Uncertainties in hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamps, D.W.; Wong, C.C.; Nelson, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three important areas of hydrogen combustion with uncertainties are identified: high-temperature combustion, flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition, and aerosol resuspension during hydrogen combustion. The uncertainties associated with high-temperature combustion may affect at least three different accident scenarios: the in-cavity oxidation of combustible gases produced by core-concrete interactions, the direct containment heating hydrogen problem, and the possibility of local detonations. How these uncertainties may affect the sequence of various accident scenarios is discussed and recommendations are made to reduce these uncertainties. 40 references

  18. Calorimetry exchange program annual data report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are: discuss measurement differences; review and improve analytical measurements and methods; discuss new measurement capabilities; provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences; provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants; and provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO 2 powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. The data report includes summary tables for each measurement and charts showing the performance of each laboratory. Comparisons are made to the accepted values for the exchange sample and to data previously reported by that laboratory. This information is presented, in the form of quarterly and annual reports, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections may be appropriate. No attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not been collected to the same precision or for the same time periods. A meeting of the participants of the Calorimetry Exchange is held annually at EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies. The purposes of this meeting are to discuss measurement differences, problems, and new measurement capabilities, and to determine the additional activities needed to fulfill the goals of the Exchange. This document provides data for 1992

  19. Fast differential scanning calorimetry of liquid samples with chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Splinter, R.; van Herwaarden, A. W.; van Wetten, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    Based on a modified version of standard chips for fast differential scanning calorimetry, DSC of liquid samples has been performed at temperature scan rates of up to 1000 °C/s. This paper describes experimental results with the protein lysozyme, bovine serum, and olive oil. The heating and cooling....... The bovine serum measurements show two main peaks, in good agreement with standard DSC measurements. Olive oil has been measured, with good agreement for the cooling curve and qualitative agreement for the heater curve, compared to DSC measurements....

  20. Neutral-beam aiming and calorimetry for MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldner, A.I.; Margolies, D.

    1981-01-01

    The vessel for the Tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) will have up to eleven 0.5-s-duration neutral-beam injectors for the initial heating of the MFTF-B plasma. Knowing the exact alignment of the beams and their total power is critical to the performance of the experiment. Using prototype aiming and calorimetry systems on the High Voltage Test Stand (HVTS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we hope to prove our ability to obtain an aiming accuracy of +-1 cm at the plasma and a calorimetric accuracy of +-5% of the actual total beam energy

  1. A custom floating point format ADC for LHC calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermel, V.; Lecoq, J.; Bohner, G.

    1996-01-01

    Due to their large dynamic range (in excess of 16 bits) signals from LHC calorimetry poses severe problems to the shaping and digitizing circuits. We are investigating a solution for an ADC based on a custom floating point format. Since the calorimeter precision is limited, the full dynamic range can be split into 8 positive sub-ranges and 5 negative ones, each with an 8 bits dynamic. The reduced number of bits (8 for the mantissa, 4 for the exponent and 1 for the sign) translates itself into a reduction of the power consumption both of the ADC and of the following digital filtering stages. (authors)

  2. New class of combustion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzhanov, A.G.; Borovinskaya, I.P.

    1975-01-01

    A short review is given of the results of work carried out since 1967 on studying the combustion processes caused by the interaction of chemical elements in the condensed phase and leading to the formation of refractory compounds. New phenomena and processes are described which are revealed when investigating the combustion of the systems of this class, viz solid-phase combustion, fast combustion in the condensed phase, filtering combustion, combustion in liquid nitrogen, spinning combustion, self-oscillating combustion, and repeated combustion. A new direction in employment of combustion processes is discussed, viz. a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of refractory nitrides, carbides, borides, silicides and other compounds

  3. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  4. The Heat of Combustion of Tobacco and Carbon Oxide Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman AB

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated a relationship between mass burn rates of straight-grade cigarettes and heats of combustion of the tobacco materials. In the present work, relationships between measured heats of combustion and elemental composition of the tobacco materials were further analyzed. Heats of combustion measured in oxygen were directly correlated with the carbon and hydrogen content of the tobacco materials tested. Ash content of the materials was inversely related to the heats of combustion. The water insoluble residues from exhaustively extracted tobacco materials showed higher heats of combustion and higher carbon content than the non-extracted materials, confirming a direct relationship between carbon content and heat of combustion. A value for the heat of formation of tobacco was estimated (1175 cal/g from the heat of combustion data and elemental analysis results. The estimated value for heat of formation of tobacco appears to be constant regardless of the material type. Heat values measured in air were uniformly lower than the combustion heats in oxygen, suggesting formation of CO and other reaction products. Gases produced during bomb calorimetry experiments with five tobacco materials were analyzed for CO and CO2 content. When the materials were burned in oxygen, no CO was found in the gases produced. Measured heats of combustion matched estimates based on CO2 found in the gas and conversion of the sample hydrogen content to water. Materials burned in air produced CO2 (56% to 77% of the sample carbon content and appreciable amounts of CO (7% to 16% of the sample carbon content. Unburned residue containing carbon and hydrogen was found in the air combustion experiments. Estimated heat values based on amounts of CO and CO2 found in the gas and water formed from the hydrogen lost during combustion in air were higher than the measured values. These observations indicate formation of products containing hydrogen when the materials

  5. The Pandora Software Development Kit for Particle Flow Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, J S; Thomson, M A

    2012-01-01

    Pandora is a robust and efficient framework for developing and running pattern-recognition algorithms. It was designed to perform particle flow calorimetry, which requires many complex pattern-recognition techniques to reconstruct the paths of individual particles through fine granularity detectors. The Pandora C++ software development kit (SDK) consists of a single library and a number of carefully designed application programming interfaces (APIs). A client application can use the Pandora APIs to pass details of tracks and hits/cells to the Pandora framework, which then creates and manages named lists of self-describing objects. These objects can be accessed by Pandora algorithms, which perform the pattern-recognition reconstruction. Development with the Pandora SDK promotes the creation of small, re-usable algorithms containing just the kernel of a specific operation. The algorithms are configured via XML and can be nested to perform complex reconstruction tasks. As the algorithms only access the Pandora objects in a controlled manner, via the APIs, the framework can perform most book-keeping and memory-management operations. The Pandora SDK has been fully exploited in the implementation of PandoraPFA, which uses over 60 algorithms to provide the state of the art in particle flow calorimetry for ILC and CLIC.

  6. Evaluation of aluminosilicate glass sintering during differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Juliana Pereira de

    2015-01-01

    In this work a difference in the baseline in differential scanning calorimetry analyses, observed in a work where aluminosilicate glasses microspheres containing Ho were studied for application in selective internal radiotherapy as hepatocellular carcinoma treatment, was studied. The glasses with nominal composition 53,7 SiO 2 .10,5 Al 2 O 3 . 35,8 MgO in %mol were produced from traditional melting. The first obtained were milled and sieved in the range of 45 a 63 μm. The material was used to produce glass microspheres by the gravitational fall method. The glass powder and the microspheres were characterized by X ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser diffraction, X ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetry, mass spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy. After the thermal analyses, pellets were formed in the crucibles and were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X ray diffraction, and He pycnometry. The difference in the baseline was associated to the viscous flow sintering process and happens because of the decrease in the detected heat flow due to the sample shrinkage. Other events as concurrent crystallization with the sintering process were also studied. (author)

  7. Tritium inventory measurements by 'in-bed' gas flowing calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Suzuki, T.; Yamada, M.; Okuno, K.

    1996-01-01

    In order to establish the 'in-bed' tritium accounting technology for the ITER scale tritium storage system, a gas flowing calorimetry has been studied using a scaled ZrCo bed (25 g tritium capacity). The basic calorimetric characteristics, steady state temperature raise of He gas stream flowing through a secondary coil line fixed in the ZrCo tritide, was measured and correlated with the stored tritium inventory. The results shows that about 4 degrees raise of He stream temperature can be detected for each gram of tritium storage. The sensitivity of this calorimetry is about 0.05 g of tritium, calculated by 0.2 degrees of temperature sensor error. The accuracy is better than 0.25 g of tritium on 25 g storage, evaluated by 2 times of standard deviation from the repeat measurements. This accuracy of < 1% on full storage capacity is satisfied the target accountability to measure ± 1 gram of tritium on 100 g storage for ITER. 13 refs., 7 figs

  8. Boiler using combustible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  9. Lump wood combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  10. Advanced ion beam calorimetry for the test facility ELISE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocentini, R.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.; Wünderlich, D.; Bonomo, F.; Pimazzoni, A.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2015-01-01

    The negative ion source test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) is in operation since beginning of 2013 at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) in Garching bei München. The large radio frequency driven ion source of ELISE is about 1×1 m 2 in size (1/2 the ITER source) and can produce a plasma for up to 1 h. Negative ions can be extracted and accelerated by an ITER-like extraction system made of 3 grids with an area of 0.1 m 2 , for 10 s every 3 minutes. A total accelerating voltage of up to 60 kV is available, i.e. a maximum ion beam power of about 1.2 MW can be produced. ELISE is equipped with several beam diagnostic tools for the evaluation of the beam characteristics. In order to evaluate the beam properties with a high level of detail, a sophisticated diagnostic calorimeter has been installed in the test facility at the end of 2013, starting operation in January 2014. The diagnostic calorimeter is split into 4 copper plates with separate water calorimetry for each of the plates. Each calorimeter plate is made of 15×15 copper blocks, which act as many separate inertial calorimeters and are attached to a copper plate with an embedded cooling circuit. The block geometry and the connection with the cooling plate are optimized to accurately measure the time-averaged power of the 10 s ion beam. The surface of the blocks is covered with a black coating that allows infrared (IR) thermography which provides a 2D profile of the beam power density. In order to calibrate the IR thermography, 48 thermocouples are installed in as many blocks, arranged in two vertical and two horizontal rows. The paper describes the beam calorimetry in ELISE, including the methods used for the IR thermography, the water calorimetry and the analytical methods for beam profile evaluation. It is shown how the maximum beam inhomogeneity amounts to 13% in average. The beam divergence derived by IR thermography ranges between 1° and 4° and

  11. Flameless Combustion Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutmark, Ephraim

    2005-01-01

    .... "Flameless Combustion" is characterized by high stability levels with virtually no thermoacoustic instabilities, very low lean stability limits and therefore extremely low NOx production, efficient...

  12. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  13. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  14. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  15. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Yanzhao; Dawood, Alaaeldin; Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Somers, Bart; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON

  16. Review of MEMS differential scanning calorimetry for biomolecular study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shifeng; Wang, Shuyu; Lu, Ming; Zuo, Lei

    2017-12-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is one of the few techniques that allow direct determination of enthalpy values for binding reactions and conformational transitions in biomolecules. It provides the thermodynamics information of the biomolecules which consists of Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy in a straightforward manner that enables deep understanding of the structure function relationship in biomolecules such as the folding/unfolding of protein and DNA, and ligand bindings. This review provides an up to date overview of the applications of DSC in biomolecular study such as the bovine serum albumin denaturation study, the relationship between the melting point of lysozyme and the scanning rate. We also introduce the recent advances of the development of micro-electro-mechanic-system (MEMS) based DSCs.

  17. On the Interpretation of Low Temperature Calorimetry Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Ane Mette; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    The effect of selected factors and phenomena on Low Temperature Calorimetry (LTC) results has been investigated, in order to determine the possibilities and limitations of using LTC for characterisation of the porosity of cement-based materials. LTC was carried out on a model material with mono......-sized pores of approximately 14 nm saturated with either distilled water or a sodium chloride solution, as well as on water, the salt solution, and an artificial pore solution, alone. It was found that supercooling is unavoidable during the liquid-solid phase transition, and that even at low temperature...... to limit transport of liquid, whereas heating should be undertaken at a low rate to limit the effect of non-equilibrium....

  18. Probing Free-Energy Surfaces with Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2011-05-01

    Many aspects of protein folding can be understood in terms of projections of the highly dimensional energy landscape onto a few (or even only one) particularly relevant coordinates. These free-energy surfaces can be probed conveniently from experimental differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms, as DSC provides a direct relation with the protein partition function. Free-energy surfaces thus obtained are consistent with two fundamental scenarios predicted by the energy-landscape perspective: (a) well-defined macrostates separated by significant free-energy barriers, in some cases, and, in many other cases, (b) marginal or even vanishingly small barriers, which furthermore show a good correlation with kinetics for fast- and ultrafast-folding proteins. Overall, the potential of DSC to assess free-energy surfaces for a wide variety of proteins makes it possible to address fundamental issues, such as the molecular basis of the barrier modulations produced by natural selection in response to functional requirements or to ensure kinetic stability.

  19. Novel investigation of enzymatic biodiesel reaction by isothermal calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søtoft, Lene Fjerbaek; Westh, Peter; Christensen, Knud V.

    2010-01-01

    Isothermal calorimetry (ITC) was used to investigate solvent-free enzymatic biodiesel production. The transesterification of rapeseed oil with methanol and ethanol was catalyzed by immobilized lipase Novozym 435 at 40 °C. The aim of the study was to determine reaction enthalpy for the enzymatic...... transesterification and to elucidate the mass transfer and energetic processes taking place. Based on the measured enthalpy and composition change in the system, the heat of reaction at 40 °C for the two systems was determined as −9.8 ± 0.9 kJ/mole biodiesel formed from rapeseed oil and methanol, and −9.3 ± 0.7 k...

  20. Prospects for and tests of hadron calorimetry with silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, J.E.; Gabriel, T.A.; Rancoita, P.G.

    1989-03-01

    Hadron calorimetry with silicon may provide crucial capabilities in experiments at the high luminosity, high energy colliders of the future, particularly due to silicon's fast intrinsic speed and absolute calibration. The important underlying processes of our understanding of hadron calorimeters are reviewed to set the framework for the presentation of recent calculations of the expected performance of silicon detector based hadron calorimeters. Such devices employing uranium are expected to achieve the compensation condition (that is, the ratio of the most probable electron signal to hadron signal (e/h) is ∼1.0) based on the understanding that has been derived from the uranium-liquid argon and uranium-plastic scintillator systems. In fact, even lead-silicon calorimeters are found to achieve the attractive value for the e/h ratio of 1.16 at 10 GeV. An experimental test of these predictions is underway at CERN by the SICAPO Collaboration. 64 refs., 19 figs

  1. The importance of calorimetry for highly-boosted jet substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Evan [Brown U.; Freytsis, Marat [Oregon U.; Hinzmann, Andreas [Hamburg U.; Narain, Meenakshi [Brown U.; Thaler, Jesse [MIT, Cambridge, CTP; Tran, Nhan [Fermilab; Vernieri, Caterina [Fermilab

    2017-09-25

    Jet substructure techniques are playing an essential role in exploring the TeV scale at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), since they facilitate the efficient reconstruction and identification of highly-boosted objects. Both for the LHC and for future colliders, there is a growing interest in using jet substructure methods based only on charged-particle information. The reason is that silicon-based tracking detectors offer excellent granularity and precise vertexing, which can improve the angular resolution on highly-collimated jets and mitigate the impact of pileup. In this paper, we assess how much jet substructure performance degrades by using track-only information, and we demonstrate physics contexts in which calorimetry is most beneficial. Specifically, we consider five different hadronic final states - W bosons, Z bosons, top quarks, light quarks, gluons - and test the pairwise discrimination power with a multi-variate combination of substructure observables. In the idealized case of perfect reconstruction, we quantify the loss in discrimination performance when using just charged particles compared to using all detected particles. We also consider the intermediate case of using charged particles plus photons, which provides valuable information about neutral pions. In the more realistic case of a segmented calorimeter, we assess the potential performance gains from improving calorimeter granularity and resolution, comparing a CMS-like detector to more ambitious future detector concepts. Broadly speaking, we find large performance gains from neutral-particle information and from improved calorimetry in cases where jet mass resolution drives the discrimination power, whereas the gains are more modest if an absolute mass scale calibration is not required.

  2. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''

  3. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  4. Catalytically enhanced combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel having improved combustion efficiency. It comprises a petroleum based liquid hydrocarbon; and a combustion catalyst comprising from about 18 to about 21 weight percent naphthalene, from about 75 to about 80 weight percent toluene, and from about 2.8 to about 3.2 weight percent benzyl alcohol

  5. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers

  6. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  7. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  8. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    .... The PDF approach to turbulent combustion has the advantages of fully representing the turbulent fluctuations of species and temperature, and of allowing realistic combustion chemistry to be implemented...

  9. Front-End Electronics in calorimetry: from LHC to ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Taille, Ch.

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes the electronics developments for liquid argon calorimeter read-out at LHC and the development carried out in the framework of the CALICE collaboration for those of the future linear collider (ILC). It also includes chips designed for multi-anode photomultipliers (MaPMT) used in the OPERA experiment or on ATLAS luminometer, which also find applications in medical imaging. Started in the early 90's, the development for ATLAS calorimetry was extremely challenging in terms of readout speed, radiation tolerance and measurement accuracy. The high speed has required a new approach using current-sensitive preamplifiers instead of charge sensitive ones and the redefinition of noise performance in terms of ENI. The preamplifiers developed at Orsay and the monolithic shapers are described in Chapter 1, including considerations of digital filtering, which was a new technique in our field. Chapter 2 is dedicated to the calibration system, designed and built by Orsay, for which the high performance and accuracy necessitated in-depth studies. The 3. chapter closes the studies for ATLAS with a summary of the detector measurements which had to be carried out on the 200 000 channels in order to understand and model the detector and achieve everywhere the accuracy and uniformity at per-cent level. These developments for ATLAS ended in 2004, although parallel work was also carried out for the NA48 and DO calorimeters which are not detailed here. The next generation of collider will require a new generation of calorimeters, much more granular, referred to as 'imaging calorimetry' with embedded read-out electronics. The ASICs developed for this purpose in the framework of the CALICE collaboration are described in Chapter 4. They integrate all the functionalities of amplification, digitization and read-out making them complex 'System-On-Chip' circuits extremely efficient that find many other applications. A family of 3 chips reads out the Si-W electromagnetic

  10. Fuel Combustion Laboratory | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion Laboratory Fuel Combustion Laboratory NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the combustion chamber platform for fuel ignition kinetics research, was acquired to expand the lab's

  11. Thermodynamics of biphasic lanthanide extraction by tripodal diglycolamide: a solution calorimetry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansari, S.A.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Verboom, Willem; Rao, L.

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry was employed for the direct measurement of the enthalpy of extraction (ΔHextr) of Eu(NO3)3 by using a tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) ligand dissolved in n-dodecane containing 5% (v/v) 2-decanol. The enthalpy of extraction obtained by titration calorimetry was in good

  12. Standard thermochemical characteristics of combustion and formation of 3,5-di-tert-butyl-o-benzoquinone and 3,6-di-tert-butyl-o-benzoquinone at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashanova, Kira I.; Abakumov, Gleb A.; Markin, Alexey V.; Piskunov, Alexander V.; Smirnova, Natalia N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We report the results of thermochemical study for benzoquinone derivatives. • Optimal conditions for determination of combustion energy for benzoquinone were done. • The formation enthalpies for crystalline benzoquinone have been detected at T = 298.15 K. • The formation enthalpy of isomeric quinones were compared. - Abstract: Optimal conditions for investigations of thermodynamic properties have been determined experimentally by the method of combustion calorimetry for compounds of the o-benzoquinone series. In the present work, the energies of combustion in oxygen were measured at T = 298.15 K by static bomb combustion calorimetry for 3,5-di-tert-butyl-o-benzoquinone and 3,6-di-tert-butyl-o-benzoquinone. The experimental values have been used to calculate the standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of combustion Δ_cH"o_m and formation Δ_fH"o_m for the examined compounds in the crystalline phase.

  13. An investigation of calibration methods for solution calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yff, Barbara T S; Royall, Paul G; Brown, Marc B; Martin, Gary P

    2004-01-28

    Solution calorimetry has been used in a number of varying applications within pharmaceutical research as a technique for the physical characterisation of pharmaceutical materials, such as quantifying small degrees of amorphous content, identifying polymorphs and investigating interactions between drugs and carbohydrates or proteins and carbohydrates. A calibration test procedure is necessary to validate the instrumentation; a few of the suggested calibration reactions are the enthalpies of solution associated with dissolving Tris in 0.1 M HCl or NaCl, KCl or propan-1-ol in water. In addition, there are a number of different methods available to determine enthalpies of solution from the experimental data provided by the calorimeter, for example, the Regnault-Pfaundler's method, a graphical extrapolation based on the Dickinson method, or a manual integration-based method. Thus, the aim of the study was to investigate how each of these methods influences the values for the enthalpy of solution. Experiments were performed according to the method outlined by Hogan and Buckton [Int. J. Pharm. 207 (2000) 57] using KCl (samples of 50, 100 and 200 mg), Tris and sucrose as calibrants. For all three materials the manual integration method was found to be the most consistent with the KCl in water (sample mass of 200 mg) being the most precise. Thus, this method is recommended for the validation of solution calorimeters.

  14. Applying fast calorimetry on a spent nuclear fuel calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liljenfeldt, Henrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management (Sweden); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    Recently at Los Alamos National Laboratory, sophisticated prediction algorithms have been considered for the use of calorimetry for treaty verification. These algorithms aim to predict the equilibrium temperature based on early data and therefore be able to shorten the measurement time while maintaining good accuracy. The algorithms have been implemented in MATLAB and applied on existing equilibrium measurements from a spent nuclear fuel calorimeter located at the Swedish nuclear fuel interim storage facility. The results show significant improvements in measurement time in the order of 15 to 50 compared to equilibrium measurements, but cannot predict the heat accurately in less time than the currently used temperature increase method can. This Is both due to uncertainties in the calibration of the method as well as identified design features of the calorimeter that limits the usefulness of equilibrium type measurements. The conclusions of these findings are discussed, and suggestions of both improvements of the current calorimeter as well as what to keep in mind in a new design are given.

  15. Isothermal reaction calorimetry as a tool for kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zogg, Andreas; Stoessel, Francis; Fischer, Ulrich; Hungerbuehler, Konrad

    2004-01-01

    Reaction calorimetry has found widespread application for thermal and kinetic analysis of chemical reactions in the context of thermal process safety as well as process development. This paper reviews the most important reaction calorimetric principles (heat-flow, heat-balance, power-compensation, and Peltier principle) and their applications in commercial or scientific devices. The discussion focuses on the different dynamic behavior of the main calorimetric principles during an isothermal reaction measurement. Examples of available reaction calorimeters are further compared considering their detection limit, time constant as well as temperature range. In a second part, different evaluation methods for the isothermally measured calorimetric data are reviewed and discussed. The methods will be compared, focusing especially on the fact that reaction calorimetric data always contains additional informations not directly related to the actual chemical reaction such as heat of mixing, heat of phase-transfer/change processes or simple measurement errors. Depending on the evaluation method applied such disturbances have a significant influence on the calculated reaction enthalpies or rate constants

  16. Thermodynamic properties of soddyite from solubility and calorimetry measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Mazeina, Lena; Fein, Jeremy B.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E.S.; Burns, Peter C.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    The release of uranium from geologic nuclear waste repositories under oxidizing conditions can only be modeled if the thermodynamic properties of the secondary uranyl minerals that form in the repository setting are known. Toward this end, we synthesized soddyite ((UO 2 ) 2 (SiO 4 )(H 2 O) 2 ), and performed solubility measurements from both undersaturation and supersaturation. The solubility measurements rigorously constrain the value of the solubility product of synthetic soddyite, and consequently its standard-state Gibbs free energy of formation. The log solubility product (lg K sp ) with its error (1σ) is (6.43 + 0.20/-0.37), and the standard-state Gibbs free energy of formation is (-3652.2 ± 4.2 (2σ)) kJ mol -1 . High-temperature drop solution calorimetry was conducted, yielding a calculated standard-state enthalpy of formation of soddyite of (-4045.4 ± 4.9 (2σ)) kJ . mol -1 . The standard-state Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of formation yield a calculated standard-state entropy of formation of soddyite of (-1318.7 ± 21.7 (2σ)) J . mol -1 . K -1 . The measurements and associated thermodynamic calculations not only describe the T = 298 K stability and solubility of soddyite, but they also can be used in predictions of repository performance through extrapolation of these properties to repository temperatures

  17. Test of calorimetry for high burn-up plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beets, C.; Carchon, R.; Fettweis, P.

    1984-01-01

    In recent times, the interest of applying calorimetry for safeguards purpose is steadily increasing. Calorimetric measurements have been performed on a set of high burn-up (25000 MWd/t) Pu samples, ranging in mass between 60 g and 2.5 kg Pu, distributed as PuO 2 powder embedded in stainless steel containers. The powers produced by these containers ranged between 0.8 W and 36 W. The calorimeter used was the Mound 150 type, and the isotopics and the Am content have been determined earlier by mass spectroscopy, completed with α and γ counting, and were later verified by the same methods. Watts/gram measurements were made on twelve 60 g samples of the same plutonium lot to demonstrate the Pu elemental and isotopic homogeneity, and hence, its suitability for subsequent NDA experiments. These samples were also measured in a stacked way to fill up the mass and wattage gaps between 60 g (0.8W) and 1 kg (14W). Calorimetric assay values, obtained with both isotopic measurements are discussed

  18. Prospects for and tests of hadron calorimetry with silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [Univ. of Oregon, OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Gabriel, Tony A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rancoita, P. G. [INFN, Milan (Italy)

    1989-03-01

    Hadron calorimetry with silicon may provide crucial capabilities in experiments at the high luminosity, high energy colliders of the future, particularly due to silicon's fast intrinsic speed and absolute calibration. The important underlying processes of our understanding of hadron calorimeters are reviewed to set the framework for the presentation of recent calculations of the expected performance of silicon detector based hadron calorimeters. Such devices employing uranium are expected to achieve the compensation condition (that is, the ratio of the most probable electron signal to hadron signal (e/h) is approx.1.0) based on the understanding that has been derived from the uranium-liquid argon and uranium-plastic scintillator systems. In fact, even lead-silicon calorimeters are found to achieve the attractive value for the e/h ratio of 1.16 at 10 GeV. An experimental test of these predictions is underway at CERN by the SICAPO Collaboration. 64 refs., 19 figs.

  19. Novel Technique for Quantitative Fast Scanning Calorimetry on Electrospun Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David; Govinna, Nelaka; Schick, Christoph; Cebe, Peggy

    Fast scanning chip calorimetry allows for the study of polymers which have rapid nucleation and/or crystallization kinetics, or degrade within their melting range. Heating rates used, up to 4000 K/s, allow studies of hetero and homogeneous nucleation at time scales inaccessible with conventional calorimeters, whose rates are typically alcohol (PVA) were chosen in the development of a new methodology to obtain quantitative fast scanning thermal data from electrospun nanofibers using a Flash DSC1. The structure of nanofibers requires special methods to load nanogram-sized samples onto a UFSC1 sensor. Fibers were directly spun onto TEM grids which provide a durable substrate to support bundles of nanofibers and possess excellent thermal conductivity allowing for a strong, repeatable signal and ensure good sample to sensor contact. As spun samples were held isothermally at temperatures ranging from Tg to Tm then heated at 2,000 K/s to assess as-spun crystallinity and cold crystallization behaviors. Above Tm the fibers break up into micro- and nano-droplets. On these samples, melt crystallization experiments were performed to study nucleation and crystallization of polymer confined to nanodroplet morphology. NSF DMR-1608125.

  20. Study of Liquid Argon Dopants for LHC Hadron Calorimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hadron calorimetry based on the Liquid Argon Ionisation Chamber technique is one of the choice techniques for LHC-experimentation. A systematic study of the effect of selected dopants on Liquid Argon (LAr) will be carried out with the aim to achieve an improvement on: \\item (i)~``Fast Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the drift velocity. It has been already shown that CH&sub4. added at a fraction of one percent increases the drift velocity by a factor of two or more. \\item (ii)~``Compensated Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the response to densely ionising particles, resulting in improved compensation, such as photosensitive dopants. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ Monitoring of the parameters involved in understanding the response of a calorimeter is essential. In case of doped LAr, the charge yield, the non-saturated drift velocity and the electron lifetime in the liquid should be precisely and simultaneously monitored as they all vary with the level of dopant concentrati...

  1. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  2. Shale oil combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-dabbas, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    A 'coutant' carbon steel combustion chamber cooled by water jacket was conslructed to burn diesel fuel and mixlure of shale oil and diesel fuels. During experimental work nir fuel ratio was determined, temperaturces were measured using Chromel/ Almel thermocouple, finally the gasous combustion product analysis was carricd out using gas chromatograph technique. The constructed combustion chamber was operating salisfactory for several hours of continous work. According to the measurements it was found that: the flame temperature of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was greater than the flame temperature of diesel fuel. and the sulfer emissious of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was higher than that of diesel fuel. Calculation indicated that the dry gas energy loss was very high and the incomplete combustion energy loss very small. (author). 23 refs., 35 figs

  3. Shale oil combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-dabbas, M A

    1992-05-01

    A `coutant` carbon steel combustion chamber cooled by water jacket was conslructed to burn diesel fuel and mixlure of shale oil and diesel fuels. During experimental work nir fuel ratio was determined, temperaturces were measured using Chromel/ Almel thermocouple, finally the gasous combustion product analysis was carricd out using gas chromatograph technique. The constructed combustion chamber was operating salisfactory for several hours of continous work. According to the measurements it was found that: the flame temperature of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was greater than the flame temperature of diesel fuel. and the sulfer emissious of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was higher than that of diesel fuel. Calculation indicated that the dry gas energy loss was very high and the incomplete combustion energy loss very small. (author). 23 refs., 35 figs.

  4. Indoor combustion and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W

    2008-08-01

    Indoor combustion produces both gases (eg, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide) and particulate matter that may affect the development or exacerbation of asthma. Sources in the home include both heating devices (eg, fireplaces, woodstoves, kerosene heaters, flued [ie, vented] or nonflued gas heaters) and gas stoves for cooking. This article highlights the recent literature examining associations between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma development and severity. Since asthma is a chronic condition affecting both children and adults, both age groups are included in this article. Overall, there is some evidence of an association between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma, particularly asthma symptoms in children. Some sources of combustion such as coal stoves have been more consistently associated with these outcomes than other sources such as woodstoves.

  5. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  6. Calorimetry at the international linear collider. From simulation to reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattimena, Nanda

    2010-02-15

    Calorimetry plays a crucial role in ongoing and upcoming high-energy physics experiments. To build a powerful calorimetric system with a performance tailored to the expected physics signatures, demands dedicated research and development of new readout technologies as well as dedicated reconstruction algorithms. The presented design of a calorimetric system which meets the high demands of precision physics at the future linear collider ILC, follows the paradigm of particle ow. Particle ow is a reconstruction principle that relies on a calorimetric system with high spatial granularity. In the detector optimisation process, the development of hardware and software are interlinked and cannot be judged independently. This thesis addresses two different aspects of detector optimisation, a test of the detector design against one example physics scenario and the development of a stable calibration procedure. In the rst part, a gauge-mediated Supersymmetry breaking scenario is used to test the design of the electromagnetic calorimeter in a full detector simulation study. The reconstruction of the neutralino properties, each decaying into a photon and a gravitino, requires a good energy resolution, as well as excellent position and angular resolution. The error bounds on the neutralino mass is strongly linked to the energy resolution, while the position and angular reconstruction of neutral particles is essential for the determination of the neutralino lifetime. The second part of this thesis focuses on the calibration procedure for a prototype of the hadron calorimeter. 7608 novel photodetectors are operated and tested in this prototype. They are exposed to beams of well de ned particle type and energy. The calibration is tested with a detailed study of electromagnetic showers inside the cubic-metre-sized prototype, with special attention paid towards the non-linearity correction. (orig.)

  7. Calorimetry at the international linear collider. From simulation to reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattimena, Nanda

    2010-02-01

    Calorimetry plays a crucial role in ongoing and upcoming high-energy physics experiments. To build a powerful calorimetric system with a performance tailored to the expected physics signatures, demands dedicated research and development of new readout technologies as well as dedicated reconstruction algorithms. The presented design of a calorimetric system which meets the high demands of precision physics at the future linear collider ILC, follows the paradigm of particle ow. Particle ow is a reconstruction principle that relies on a calorimetric system with high spatial granularity. In the detector optimisation process, the development of hardware and software are interlinked and cannot be judged independently. This thesis addresses two different aspects of detector optimisation, a test of the detector design against one example physics scenario and the development of a stable calibration procedure. In the rst part, a gauge-mediated Supersymmetry breaking scenario is used to test the design of the electromagnetic calorimeter in a full detector simulation study. The reconstruction of the neutralino properties, each decaying into a photon and a gravitino, requires a good energy resolution, as well as excellent position and angular resolution. The error bounds on the neutralino mass is strongly linked to the energy resolution, while the position and angular reconstruction of neutral particles is essential for the determination of the neutralino lifetime. The second part of this thesis focuses on the calibration procedure for a prototype of the hadron calorimeter. 7608 novel photodetectors are operated and tested in this prototype. They are exposed to beams of well de ned particle type and energy. The calibration is tested with a detailed study of electromagnetic showers inside the cubic-metre-sized prototype, with special attention paid towards the non-linearity correction. (orig.)

  8. Silk I and Silk II studied by fast scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebe, Peggy; Partlow, Benjamin P.; Kaplan, David L.; Wurm, Andreas; Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Schick, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Using fast scanning calorimetry (FSC), we investigated the glass transition and crystal melting of samples of B. mori silk fibroin containing Silk I and/or Silk II crystals. Due to the very short residence times at high temperatures during such measurements, thermal decomposition of silk protein can be significantly suppressed. FSC was performed at 2000 K/s using the Mettler Flash DSC1 on fibroin films with masses around 130–270 ng. Films were prepared with different crystalline fractions (ranging from 0.26 to 0.50) and with different crystal structures (Silk I, Silk II, or mixed) by varying the processing conditions. These included water annealing at different temperatures, exposure to 50% MeOH in water, or autoclaving. The resulting crystal structure was examined using wide angle X-ray scattering. Degree of crystallinity was evaluated from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and from analysis of the heat capacity increment at the glass transition temperature. Silk fibroin films prepared by water annealing at 25 °C were the least crystalline and had Silk I structure. FTIR and FSC studies showed that films prepared by autoclaving or 50% MeOH exposure were the most crystalline and had Silk II structure. Intermediate crystalline fraction and mixed Silk I/Silk II structures were found in films prepared by water annealing at 37 °C. FSC results indicate that Silk II crystals exhibit endotherms of narrower width and have higher mean melting temperature Tm(II) = 351 ± 2.6 °C, compared to Silk I crystals which melt at Tm(I) = 292 ± 3.8 °C. Films containing mixed Silk I/Silk II structure showed two clearly separated endothermic peaks. Evidence suggests that the two types of crystals melt separately and do not thermally interconvert on the extremely short time scale (0.065 s between onset and end of melting) of the FSC experiment.

  9. Laser-Driven Calorimetry Measurements of Petroleum and Biodiesel Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Millo, Amit

    2018-02-01

    Thermochemical characteristics were determined for several National Institute of Standards and Technology standard-reference-material petroleum and biodiesel fuels, using a novel laser-heating calorimetry technique. Measurements focused on the sample thermal behavior, specific heat release rate, and total specific heat release. The experimental apparatus consists of a copper sphere-shaped reactor mounted within a chamber, along with laser-beam-steering optical components, gas-supply manifold, and a computer-controlled data-acquisition system. At the center of the reactor, liquid sample is injected onto a copper pan substrate that rests and is in contact with a fine-wire thermocouple. A second thermocouple is in contact with the inner reactor sphere surface. The reactor is heated from opposing sides by a continuous-wave, near-infrared laser to achieve nearly uniform sample temperature. The change in temperature with time (thermogram) is recorded for both thermocouples, and compared to a baseline thermogram (without liquid in the pan). The thermograms are then processed (using an equation for thermal energy conservation) for the thermochemical information of interest. The results indicated that the energy reaching the pan is dominated by radiative heat transfer processes, while the dominant thermal process for the reactor sphere is the stored (internal) thermal energy within the sphere material. Sufficient laser power is necessary to detect the fuel thermal-related characteristics, and the required power can differ from one fuel to another. With sufficient laser power, one can detect the preferential vaporization of the lighter and heavier fuel fractions. The total specific heat release obtained for the different conventional and biodiesel fuels used in this investigation were similar to the expected values available in the literature.

  10. Application of calorimetry and thermodynamics to critical problems in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atake, Tooru

    2009-01-01

    Calorimetry and thermodynamic studies have long been playing a very important role in the research fields of fundamental science and technology. Some topics and examples of thermodynamics studies are given, and the details are explained on the basis of the present author's experience, focusing attention to application of adiabatic calorimetry and thermodynamics to solve critical problems in materials science: (1) condensed gas calorimetry and third law entropy, (2) phase transition and polymorphism in simple molecular crystals, (3) incommensurate phase transitions, (4) particle size effects on the phase transitions in ferroelectric/ferroelastic crystals, (5) relaxor ferroelectrics and multi-ferroics, and some other topics in materials science and technology

  11. Application of prediction of equilibrium to servo-controlled calorimetry measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.L. II

    1987-01-01

    Research was performed to develop an endpoint prediction algorithm for use with calorimeters operating in the digital servo-controlled mode. The purpose of this work was to reduce calorimetry measurement times while maintaining the high degree of precision and low bias expected from calorimetry measurements. Data from routine operation of two calorimeters were used to test predictive models at each stage of development against time savings, precision, and robustness criteria. The results of the study indicated that calorimetry measurement times can be significantly reduced using this technique. The time savings is, however, dependent on parameters in the digital servo-control algorithm and on packaging characteristics of measured items

  12. Transient flow combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Non-steady combustion problems can result from engine sources such as accelerations, decelerations, nozzle adjustments, augmentor ignition, and air perturbations into and out of the compressor. Also non-steady combustion can be generated internally from combustion instability or self-induced oscillations. A premixed-prevaporized combustor would be particularly sensitive to flow transients because of its susceptability to flashback-autoignition and blowout. An experimental program, the Transient Flow Combustion Study is in progress to study the effects of air and fuel flow transients on a premixed-prevaporized combustor. Preliminary tests performed at an inlet air temperature of 600 K, a reference velocity of 30 m/s, and a pressure of 700 kPa. The airflow was reduced to 1/3 of its original value in a 40 ms ramp before flashback occurred. Ramping the airflow up has shown that blowout is more sensitive than flashback to flow transients. Blowout occurred with a 25 percent increase in airflow (at a constant fuel-air ratio) in a 20 ms ramp. Combustion resonance was found at some conditions and may be important in determining the effects of flow transients.

  13. Combustion and regulation; Combustion et reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This conference was organized after the publication of the French by-law no 2010 relative to combustion installations and to the abatement of atmospheric pollution. Five topics were discussed during the conference: the new regulations, their content, innovations and modalities of application; the means of energy suppliers to face the new provisions and their schedule; the manufacturers proposals for existing installations and the new equipments; the administration control; and the impact of the new measures on exploitation and engineering. Twenty papers and 2 journal articles are reported in these proceedings. (J.S.)

  14. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  15. Parallelism between gradient temperature raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy (TDR) applies the temperature gradients utilized in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to Raman spectroscopy, providing a straightforward technique to identify molecular rearrangements that occur just prior to phase transitions. Herein we apply TDR and D...

  16. Optical Tomography in Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evseev, Vadim

    spectral measurements at several line-of-sights with a view to applications for tomographic measurements on full-scale industrial combustion systems. The system was successfully applied on industrial scale for simultaneous fast exhaust gas temperature measurements in the three optical ports of the exhaust......D project, it was also important to investigate the spectral properties of major combustion species such as carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the infrared range at high temperatures to provide the theoretical background for the development of the optical tomography methods. The new software....... JQSRT 113 (2012) 2222, 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.07.015] included in the PhD thesis as an attachment. The knowledge and experience gained in the PhD project is the first important step towards introducing the advanced optical tomography methods of combustion diagnostics developed in the project to future...

  17. Internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Quentin A.; Mecredy, Henry E.; O'Neal, Glenn B.

    1991-01-01

    An improved engine is provided that more efficiently consumes difficult fuels such as coal slurries or powdered coal. The engine includes a precombustion chamber having a portion thereof formed by an ignition plug. The precombustion chamber is arranged so that when the piston is proximate the head, the precombustion chamber is sealed from the main cylinder or the main combustion chamber and when the piston is remote from the head, the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication. The time for burning of fuel in the precombustion chamber can be regulated by the distance required to move the piston from the top dead center position to the position wherein the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication.

  18. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a clear definition of “fuel and combustion stratifications” is obvious in literature. Hence, it is difficult to compare stratification levels of different PPC strategies or other combustion concepts. T...

  19. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  20. High Gravity (g) Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    UNICORN (Unsteady Ignition and Combustion with Reactions) code10. Flame propagation in a tube that is 50-mm wide and 1000-mm long (similar to that...turbine engine manufacturers, estimating the primary zone space heating rate. Both combustion systems, from Company A and Company B, required a much...MBTU/atm-hr-ft3) Te m pe ra tu re R is e (K ) dP/P = 2% dP/P = 2.5% dP/P = 3% dP/P = 3.5% dP/P = 4% Company A Company B Figure 13: Heat Release Rate

  1. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2014-10-01

    Alternative transportation fuels, preferably from renewable sources, include alcohols with up to five or even more carbon atoms. They are considered promising because they can be derived from biological matter via established and new processes. In addition, many of their physical-chemical properties are compatible with the requirements of modern engines, which make them attractive either as replacements for fossil fuels or as fuel additives. Indeed, alcohol fuels have been used since the early years of automobile production, particularly in Brazil, where ethanol has a long history of use as an automobile fuel. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the use of non-petroleum-based fuels made from biological sources, including alcohols (predominantly ethanol), as important liquid biofuels. Today, the ethanol fuel that is offered in the market is mainly made from sugar cane or corn. Its production as a first-generation biofuel, especially in North America, has been associated with publicly discussed drawbacks, such as reduction in the food supply, need for fertilization, extensive water usage, and other ecological concerns. More environmentally friendly processes are being considered to produce alcohols from inedible plants or plant parts on wasteland. While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides ethanol, many linear and branched members of the alcohol family, from methanol to hexanols, have been studied, with a particular emphasis on butanols. These fuels and their combustion properties, including their ignition, flame propagation, and extinction characteristics, their pyrolysis and oxidation reactions, and their potential to produce pollutant emissions have been intensively investigated in dedicated experiments on the laboratory and the engine scale

  2. Combustibility of tetraphenylborate solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid slurries expected under normal in-tank processing (ITP) operations are not ignitible because of their high water content. However, deposits of dry solids from the slurries are combustible and produce dense, black smoke when burned. The dry solids burn similarly to Styrofoam and more easily than sawdust. It is the opinion of fire hazard experts that a benzene vapor deflagration could ignite the dry solids. A tetraphenylborate solids fire will rapidly plug the waste tank HEPA ventilation filters due to the nature of the smoke produced. To prevent ignition and combustion of these solids, the waste tanks have been equipped with a nitrogen inerting system

  3. Studies in combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koszykowski, M.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding and a quantitative predictive capability in combustion modeling. A large part of the understanding of the chemistry of combustion processes comes from {open_quotes}chemical kinetic modeling.{close_quotes} However, successful modeling is not an isolated activity. It necessarily involves the integration of methods and results from several diverse disciplines and activities including theoretical chemistry, elementary reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics and computational science. Recently the authors have developed and utilized new tools for parallel processing to implement the first numerical model of a turbulent diffusion flame including a {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} chemical mechanism.

  4. Combustion stratification for naphtha from CI combustion to PPC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Y.; Dawood, A.; Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Somers, L.M.T.; Johansson, B.H.

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrated the change in combustion homogeneity from conventional diesel combustion via partially premixed combustion towards HCCI. Experiments are performed in an optical diesel engine at a speed of 1200 rpm with diesel fuel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is

  5. Enzyme-catalyzed and binding reaction kinetics determined by titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lee D; Transtrum, Mark K; Quinn, Colette; Demarse, Neil

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal calorimetry allows monitoring of reaction rates via direct measurement of the rate of heat produced by the reaction. Calorimetry is one of very few techniques that can be used to measure rates without taking a derivative of the primary data. Because heat is a universal indicator of chemical reactions, calorimetry can be used to measure kinetics in opaque solutions, suspensions, and multiple phase systems and does not require chemical labeling. The only significant limitation of calorimetry for kinetic measurements is that the time constant of the reaction must be greater than the time constant of the calorimeter which can range from a few seconds to a few minutes. Calorimetry has the unique ability to provide both kinetic and thermodynamic data. This article describes the calorimetric methodology for determining reaction kinetics and reviews examples from recent literature that demonstrate applications of titration calorimetry to determine kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed and ligand binding reactions. A complete model for the temperature dependence of enzyme activity is presented. A previous method commonly used for blank corrections in determinations of equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for binding reactions is shown to be subject to significant systematic error. Methods for determination of the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and for simultaneous determination of thermodynamics and kinetics of ligand binding reactions are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  7. Effect of Body Position on Energy Expenditure of Preterm Infants as Determined by Simultaneous Direct and Indirect Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Edward F; Johnson, Karen J; Dove, Edwin L

    2017-04-01

    Background  Indirect calorimetry is the standard method for estimating energy expenditure in clinical research. Few studies have evaluated indirect calorimetry in infants by comparing it with simultaneous direct calorimetry. Our purpose was (1) to compare the energy expenditure of preterm infants determined by these two methods, direct calorimetry and indirect calorimetry; and (2) to examine the effect of body position, supine or prone, on energy expenditure. Study Design  We measured energy expenditure by simultaneous direct (heat loss by gradient-layer calorimeter corrected for heat storage) and indirect calorimetry (whole-body oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production) in 15 growing preterm infants during two consecutive interfeeding intervals, once in the supine position and once in the prone position. Results  The mean energy expenditure for all measurements in both positions did not differ significantly by the method used: 2.82 (standard deviation [SD] 0.42) kcal/kg/h by direct calorimetry and 2.78 (SD 0.48) kcal/kg/h by indirect calorimetry. The energy expenditure was significantly lower, by 10%, in the prone than in the supine position, whether examined by direct calorimetry (2.67 vs. 2.97 kcal/kg/h, p  Direct calorimetry and indirect calorimetry gave similar estimates of energy expenditure. Energy expenditure was 10% lower in the prone position than in the supine position. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Underground treatment of combustible minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarapuu, E

    1954-10-14

    A process is described for treating oil underground, consisting in introducing several electrodes spaced one from the other in a bed of combustibles underground so that they come in electric contact with this bed of combustibles remaining insulated from the ground, and applying to the electrodes a voltage sufficient to produce an electric current across the bed of combustibles, so as to heat it and create an electric connection between the electrodes on traversing the bed of combustibles.

  9. Picowatt Resolution Calorimetry for Micro and Nanoscale Energy Transport Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Seid H.

    Precise quantification of energy transport is key to obtaining insights into a wide range of phenomena across various disciplines including physics, chemistry, biology and engineering. This thesis describes technical advancements into heat-flow calorimetry which enable measurement of energy transport at micro and nanoscales with picowatt resolution. I have developed two types of microfabricated calorimeter devices and demonstrated single digit picowatt resolution at room temperature. Both devices incorporate two distinct features; an active area isolated by a thermal conductance (GTh) of less than 1 microW/K and a high resolution thermometer with temperature resolution (DeltaTres) in the micro kelvin regime. These features enable measurements of heat currents (q) with picowatt resolution (q= Th xDeltaTres). In the first device the active area is suspended via silicon nitride beams with excellent thermal isolation (~600 nW/K) and a bimaterial cantilever (BMC) thermometer with temperature resolution of ~6 microK. Taken together this design enabled calorimetric measurements with 4 pW resolution. In the second device, the BMC thermometry technique is replaced by a high-resolution resistance thermometry scheme. A detailed noise analysis of resistance thermometers, confirmed by experimental data, enabled me to correctly predict the resolution of different measurement schemes and propose techniques to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in the resolution of resistive thermometers. By incorporating resistance thermometers with temperature resolution of ~30 microK, combined with a thermal isolation of ~150 nW/K, I demonstrated an all-electrical calorimeter device with a resolution of ~ 5 pW. Finally, I used these calorimeters to study Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer (NF-RHT). Using these devices, we studied--for the first time--the effect of film thickness on the NF-RHT between two dielectric surfaces. We showed that even a very thin film (~50 nm) of silicon

  10. Silk I and Silk II studied by fast scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Peggy; Partlow, Benjamin P; Kaplan, David L; Wurm, Andreas; Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Schick, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Using fast scanning calorimetry (FSC), we investigated the glass transition and crystal melting of samples of B. mori silk fibroin containing Silk I and/or Silk II crystals. Due to the very short residence times at high temperatures during such measurements, thermal decomposition of silk protein can be significantly suppressed. FSC was performed at 2000K/s using the Mettler Flash DSC1 on fibroin films with masses around 130-270ng. Films were prepared with different crystalline fractions (ranging from 0.26 to 0.50) and with different crystal structures (Silk I, Silk II, or mixed) by varying the processing conditions. These included water annealing at different temperatures, exposure to 50%MeOH in water, or autoclaving. The resulting crystal structure was examined using wide angle X-ray scattering. Degree of crystallinity was evaluated from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and from analysis of the heat capacity increment at the glass transition temperature. Silk fibroin films prepared by water annealing at 25°C were the least crystalline and had Silk I structure. FTIR and FSC studies showed that films prepared by autoclaving or 50%MeOH exposure were the most crystalline and had Silk II structure. Intermediate crystalline fraction and mixed Silk I/Silk II structures were found in films prepared by water annealing at 37°C. FSC results indicate that Silk II crystals exhibit endotherms of narrower width and have higher mean melting temperature T m (II)=351±2.6°C, compared to Silk I crystals which melt at T m (I)=292±3.8°C. Films containing mixed Silk I/Silk II structure showed two clearly separated endothermic peaks. Evidence suggests that the two types of crystals melt separately and do not thermally interconvert on the extremely short time scale (0.065s between onset and end of melting) of the FSC experiment. Silkworm silk is a naturally occurring biomaterial. The fibroin component of silk forms two types of crystals. Silk properties depend upon the

  11. Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    was in collaboration with Prof. R. Bowersox (Texas A&M University) and Dr. K. Kobayashi ( Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA). 4.2 Ignition... cinema stereoscopic PIV system for the measurement of micro- and meso-scale turbulent premixed flame dynamics,” Paper B13, 5th US Combustion

  12. Infrared monitoring of combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, S.C.; Morrison, P.W. Jr.; Solomon, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the use of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy for combustion monitoring is described. A combination of emission, transmission, and reflection FT-IR spectroscopy yields data on the temperature and composition of the gases, surfaces and suspended particles in the combustion environment. Detection sensitivity of such trace exhaust gases as CO, CO 2 , SO 2 , NO x , and unburned hydrocarbons is at the ppm level. Tomographic reconstruction converts line-of-sight measurements into spatially resolved temperature and concentration data. Examples from various combustion processes are used to demonstrate the capabilities of the technique. Industrial measurements are described that have been performed directly in the combustion zone and in the exhaust duct of a large chemical recovery boiler. Other measurements of hot slag show how FT-IR spectroscopy can determine the temperature and optical properties of surfaces. In addition, experiments with water droplets show that transmission FT-IR data yield spectra that characterize particle size and number density

  13. Combustible dust tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sugar dust explosion in Georgia on February 7, 2008 killed 14 workers and injured many others (OSHA, 2009). As a consequence of this explosion, OSHA revised its Combustible Dust National Emphasis (NEP) program. The NEP targets 64 industries with more than 1,000 inspections and has found more tha...

  14. Effects of catalysts on combustion characteristics and kinetics of coal-char blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingjie; Wang, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Xingxing; Liu, Ming; Ma, Chunyuan

    2018-04-01

    The effects of Fe2O3, CaO, and MnO2 on the combustion characteristics and kinetics of coal-char blends were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicated that catalysts exhibited positive effects on the combustion characteristics of coal-char blends, especially in the initial period of coal-char blends combustion. With catalysts addition (mass 1.5%), it could improves volatile matter release, and reduces ignition point, promotes char to begin burning under lower temperature. The ignition index (C) was increased, respectively, by 27% for Fe2O3, 6% for CaO, 11.3% for MnO2, and the combustion characteristic index ( S ) was increased respectively, by 29% for Fe2O3, 5% for CaO, 8.3% for MnO2. In addition, two kinetic models (R2 and F1) were adopted to calculate the kinetic parameters in different stage of combustion processes. The results showed that with Fe2O3 or CaO addition, the activation energy at second stage decreases from 86.0 KJ/mol to 76.92 KJ/mol and 75.12 KJ/mol, respectively. There are no obvious decreases at the third stage of samples combustion process.

  15. Controlling the excess heat from oxy-combustion of coal by blending with biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Turan, A.Z.; Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Two different biomass species such as sunflower seed shell and hazelnut shell were blended with Soma-Denis lignite to determine the effects of co-combustion on the thermal reactivity and the burnout of the lignite sample. For this purpose, Thermogravimetric Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry techniques were applied from ambient to 900 C with a heating rate of 40 C/min under dry air and pure oxygen conditions. It was found that the thermal reactivities of the biomass materials and the lignite are highly different from each other under each oxidizing medium. On the other hand, the presence of biomass in the burning medium led to important influences not only on the burnout levels but also on the heat flows. The heat flow from the burning of lignite increased fivefold when the oxidizing medium was altered from dry air to pure oxygen. But, in case of co-combustion under oxygen, the excess heat arising from combustion of lignite could be reduced and this may be helpful to control the temperature of the combustion chamber. Based on this, co-combustion of coal/biomass blends under oxygen may be suggested as an alternative method to the ''Carbon Dioxide Recycle Method'' encountered in the oxyfuel combustion systems. (author)

  16. Low emission internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaba, Albert M.

    1979-01-01

    A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

  17. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilik, Gregory K.; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Hedan; Haworth, Daniel C. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Herreros, Jose Martin [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla La-Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine, with a focus on exhaust emissions. Hydrogen was substituted for diesel fuel on an energy basis of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10% and 15% by aspiration of hydrogen into the engine's intake air. Four speed and load conditions were investigated (1800 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output and 3600 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output). A significant retarding of injection timing by the engine's electronic control unit (ECU) was observed during the increased aspiration of hydrogen. The retarding of injection timing resulted in significant NO{sub X} emission reductions, however, the same emission reductions were achieved without aspirated hydrogen by manually retarding the injection timing. Subsequently, hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was examined, with the pilot and main injection timings locked, to study the effects caused directly by hydrogen addition. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion resulted in a modest increase of NO{sub X} emissions and a shift in NO/NO{sub 2} ratio in which NO emissions decreased and NO{sub 2} emissions increased, with NO{sub 2} becoming the dominant NO{sub X} component in some combustion modes. Computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD) of the hydrogen assisted diesel combustion process captured this trend and reproduced the experimentally observed trends of hydrogen's effect on the composition of NO{sub X} for some operating conditions. A model that explicitly accounts for turbulence-chemistry interactions using a transported probability density function (PDF) method was better able to reproduce the experimental trends, compared to a model that ignores the influence of turbulent fluctuations on mean chemical production rates, although the importance of the fluctuations is not as strong as has been reported in some other recent modeling studies. The CFD results confirm

  18. Evaluation of the amorphous content of lactose by solution calorimetry and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katainen, Erja; Niemelä, Pentti; Harjunen, Päivi; Suhonen, Janne; Järvinen, Kristiina

    2005-11-15

    Solution calorimetry can be used to determine the amorphous content of a compound when the solubility and dissolution rate of the compound in the chosen solvent are reasonably high. Sometimes, it can be difficult find a solvent in which a sample is freely soluble. The present study evaluated the use of solution calorimetry for the assessment of the amorphous content of a sample that is poorly soluble in a solvent. Physical mixtures of lactose and spray-dried lactose samples (the amorphous content varied from 0 to 100%) were analyzed by a solution calorimeter and the results were compared with Raman spectroscopy determinations. The heat of solvation of the samples was determined by solution calorimetry in organic solvents MeOH, EtOH, ACN, THF, acetone (400mg sample/100ml solvent). Lactose is virtually insoluble in ACN, THF and acetone and very slightly soluble in EtOH and MeOH. The amorphous content of the samples could not be determined by solution calorimetry in EtOH, ACN, THF or acetone. However, an excellent correlation was observed between the heat of solvation and the amorphous content of the samples in MeOH. Furthermore, the heat of solvation values of the samples in MeOH showed a linear correlation with the Raman quantifications. Therefore, our results demonstrate that solution calorimetry may represent a rapid and simple method for determining the amorphous content also in samples that are not freely soluble in the solvent.

  19. Combustion strategy : United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, D. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edingburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom). School of Engineering and Physical Sciences

    2009-07-01

    The United Kingdom's combustion strategy was briefly presented. Government funding sources for universities were listed. The United Kingdom Research Councils that were listed included the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC); the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC); the Economic and Social Research Council; the Medical Research Council; the Natural Environment Research Council; and the Science and Technology Facilities Council. The EPSRC supported 65 grants worth 30.5 million pounds. The combustion industry was noted to be dominated by three main players of which one was by far the largest. The 3 key players were Rolls-Royce; Jaguar Land Rover; and Doosan Babcock. Industry and government involvement was also discussed for the BIS Technology Strategy Board, strategy technology areas, and strategy application areas.

  20. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  1. Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-28

    Tracking an individual streamer branch among others in a pulsed induced discharge J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 35 2823--9 [29] van Veldhuizen E M and Rutgers...2005) AIAA–2005–0405. [99] E.M. Van Veldhuizen (ed) Electrical Discharges for Environmental Purposes: Fun- damentals and Applications (New York: Nova...Vandooren J, Van Tiggelen P J 1977 Reaction Mechanism and Rate Constants in Lean Hydrogen–Nitrous Oxide Flames Combust. Flame 28 165 [201] Dean A M, Steiner

  2. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  3. Combustion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Annamalai, Kalyan

    2006-01-01

    Introduction and Review of Thermodynamics Introduction Combustion Terminology Matter and Its Properties Microscopic Overview of Thermodynamics Conservation of Mass and Energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics The Second Law of Thermodynamics Summary Stoichiometry and Thermochemistry of Reacting Systems Introduction Overall Reactions Gas Analyses Global Conservation Equations for Reacting Systems Thermochemistry Summary Appendix Reaction Direction and Equilibrium Introduction Reaction Direction and Chemical Equilibrium Chemical Equilibrium Relations Vant Hoff Equation Adi

  4. Issues in waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Robertson, Kerstin; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Sundquist, Lena; Wrangensten, Lars [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Blom, Elisabet [AaF-Processdesign AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    The main purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art on research and development issues related to waste combustion with relevance for Swedish conditions. The review focuses on co-combustion in grate and fluidised bed furnaces. It is primarily literature searches in relevant databases of scientific publications with to material published after 1995. As a complement, findings published in different report series, have also been included. Since the area covered by this report is very wide, we do not claim to cover the issues included completely and it has not been possitile to evaluate the referred studies in depth. Basic knowledge about combustion issues is not included since such information can be found elsewhere in the literature. Rather, this review should be viewed as an overview of research and development in the waste-to-energy area and as such we hope that it will inspire scientists and others to further work in relevant areas.

  5. The Diesel Combustion Collaboratory: Combustion Researchers Collaborating over the Internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Pancerella; L. A. Rahn; C. Yang

    2000-02-01

    The Diesel Combustion Collaborator (DCC) is a pilot project to develop and deploy collaborative technologies to combustion researchers distributed throughout the DOE national laboratories, academia, and industry. The result is a problem-solving environment for combustion research. Researchers collaborate over the Internet using DCC tools, which include: a distributed execution management system for running combustion models on widely distributed computers, including supercomputers; web-accessible data archiving capabilities for sharing graphical experimental or modeling data; electronic notebooks and shared workspaces for facilitating collaboration; visualization of combustion data; and video-conferencing and data-conferencing among researchers at remote sites. Security is a key aspect of the collaborative tools. In many cases, the authors have integrated these tools to allow data, including large combustion data sets, to flow seamlessly, for example, from modeling tools to data archives. In this paper the authors describe the work of a larger collaborative effort to design, implement and deploy the DCC.

  6. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D [Rochester Hills, MI; Reitz, Rolf D [Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  7. The physics of compensating calorimetry and the new CALOR89 code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Brau, J.E.; Bishop, B.L.

    1989-03-01

    Much of the understanding of the physics of calorimetry has come from the use of excellent radiation transport codes. A new understanding of compensating calorimetry was introduced four years ago following detailed studies with a new CALOR system. Now, the CALOR system has again been revised to reflect a better comprehension of high energy nuclear collisions by incorporating a modified high energy fragmentation model from FLUKA87. This revision will allow for the accurate analysis of calorimeters at energies of 100's of GeV. Presented in this paper is a discussion of compensating calorimetry, the new CALOR system, the revisions to HETC, and recently generated calorimeter related data on modes of energy deposition and secondary neutron production (E < 50 MeV) in infinite iron and uranium blocks. 38 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Application of prediction of equilibrium to servo-controlled calorimetry measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.L. II.

    1987-01-01

    Research was performed to develop an endpoint prediction algorithm for use with calorimeters operating in the digital servo-controlled mode. The purpose of this work was to reduce calorimetry measurement times while maintaining the high degree of precision and low bias expected from calorimetry measurements. Data from routine operation of two calorimeters were used to test predictive models at each stage of development against time savings, precision, and robustness criteria. The results of the study indicated that calorimetry measurement times can be significantly reduced using this technique. The time savings is, however, dependent on parameters in the digital servo-control algorithm and on packaging characteristics of measured items. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  9. Development of flameless combustion; Desarrollo de la combustion sin flama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Sauceda, M. Leonardo; Cervantes de Gortari, Jaime Gonzalo [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: 8344afc@prodigy.net.mx; jgonzalo@servidor.unam.mx

    2010-11-15

    The paper intends contribute to global warming mitigation joint effort that develops technologies to capture the CO{sub 2} produced by fossil fuels combustion and to reduce emission of other greenhouse gases like the NO{sub x}. After reviewing existing combustion bibliography is pointed out that (a) touches only partial aspects of the collective system composed by Combustion-Heat transfer process-Environment, whose interactions are our primary interest and (b) most specialists think there is not yet a clearly winning technology for CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper the study of combustion is focused as integrated in the aforementioned collective system where application of flameless combustion, using oxidant preheated in heat regenerators and fluent gas recirculation into combustion chamber plus appropriated heat and mass balances, simultaneously results in energy saving and environmental impact reduction. [Spanish] El trabajo pretende contribuir al esfuerzo conjunto de mitigacion del calentamiento global que aporta tecnologias para capturar el CO{sub 2} producido por la combustion de combustibles fosiles y para disminuir la emision de otros gases invernadero como NOx. De revision bibliografica sobre combustion se concluye que (a) trata aspectos parciales del sistema compuesto por combustion-proceso de trasferencia de calor-ambiente, cuyas interacciones son nuestro principal interes (b) la mayoria de especialistas considera no hay todavia una tecnologia claramente superior a las demas para captura y almacenaje de CO{sub 2}. Se estudia la combustion como parte integrante del mencionado sistema conjunto, donde la aplicacion de combustion sin flama, empleando oxidante precalentado mediante regeneradores de calor y recirculacion de gases efluentes ademas de los balances de masa y energia adecuados, permite tener simultaneamente ahorros energeticos e impacto ambiental reducido.

  10. Study of interactions between hyaluronan and cationic surfactants by means of calorimetry, turbidimetry, potentiometry and conductometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krouská, J; Pekař, M; Klučáková, M; Šarac, B; Bešter-Rogač, M

    2017-02-10

    The thermodynamics of the micelle formation of the cationic surfactants tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with and without the addition of hyaluronan of two molecular weights was studied in aqueous solution by titration calorimetry. Macroscopic phase separation, which was detected by calorimetry and also by conductometry, occurs when charges on the surfactant and hyaluronan are balanced. In contrast, turbidimetry and potentiometry showed hyaluronan-surfactant interactions at very low surfactant concentrations. The observed differences between systems prepared with CTAB and TTAB indicate that besides the electrostatic interactions, which probably predominate, hydrophobic effects also play a significant role in hyaluronan interactions with cationic surfactants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optical fibre temperature sensor technology and potential application in absorbed dose calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P.D.; Hargrave, N.J.

    1992-09-01

    Optical fibre based sensors are proposed as a potential alternative to the thermistors traditionally used as temperature sensors in absorbed dose calorimetry. The development of optical fibre temperature sensor technology over the last ten years is reviewed. The potential resolution of various optical techniques is assessed with particular reference to the requirements of absorbed dose calorimetry. Attention is drawn to other issues which would require investigation before the development of practical optical fibre sensors for this purpose could occur. 192 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs

  12. Thermodynamics of Surfactants, Block Copolymers and Their Mixtures in Water: The Role of the Isothermal Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lisi, Rosario; Milioto, Stefania; Muratore, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamics of conventional surfactants, block copolymers and their mixtures in water was described to the light of the enthalpy function. The two methodologies, i.e. the van’t Hoff approach and the isothermal calorimetry, used to determine the enthalpy of micellization of pure surfactants and block copolymers were described. The van’t Hoff method was critically discussed. The aqueous copolymer+surfactant mixtures were analyzed by means of the isothermal titration calorimetry and the enthalpy of transfer of the copolymer from the water to the aqueous surfactant solutions. Thermodynamic models were presented to show the procedure to extract straightforward molecular insights from the bulk properties. PMID:19742173

  13. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Glarborg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    of the sulphur compounds in fossil fuels and the possibilities to remove them will be given. Then the combustion of sulphur species and their influence on the combustion chemistry and especially on the CO oxidation and the NOx formation will be described. Finally the in-situ removal of sulphur in the combustion...... process by reaction between SO2 and calcium containing sorbents and the influence on the NOx chemistry will be treated....

  14. Pulsating combustion - Combustion characteristics and reduction of emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, Annika

    1999-11-01

    In the search for high efficiency combustion systems pulsating combustion has been identified as one of the technologies that potentially can meet the objectives of clean combustion and good fuel economy. Pulsating combustion offers low emissions of pollutants, high heat transfer and efficient combustion. Although it is an old technology, the interest in pulsating combustion has been renewed in recent years, due to its unique features. Various applications of pulsating combustion can be found, mainly as drying and heating devices, of which the latter also have had commercial success. It is, however, in the design process of a pulse combustor, difficult to predict the operating frequency, the heat release etc., due to the lack of a well founded theory of the phenomenon. Research concerning control over the combustion process is essential for developing high efficiency pulse combustors with low emissions. Natural gas fired Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been the experimental objects of this study. In order to investigate the interaction between the fluid dynamics and the chemistry in pulse combustors, laser based measuring techniques as well as other conventional measuring techniques have been used. The experimental results shows the possibilities to control the combustion characteristics of pulsating combustion. It is shown that the time scales in the large vortices created at the inlet to the combustion chamber are very important for the operation of the pulse combustor. By increasing/decreasing the time scale for the large scale mixing the timing of the heat release is changed and the operating characteristics of the pulse combustor changes. Three different means for NO{sub x} reduction in Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been investigated. These include exhaust gas recirculation, alteration of air/fuel ratio and changed inlet geometry in the combustion chamber. All used methods achieved less than 10 ppm NO{sub x} emitted (referred to stoichiometric

  15. Combustion from basics to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Maximilian; Winter, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Combustion, the process of burning, is defined as a chemical reaction between a combustible reactant (the fuel) and an oxidizing agent (such as air) in order to produce heat and in most cases light while new chemical species (e.g., flue gas components) are formed. This book covers a gap on the market by providing a concise introduction to combustion. Most of the other books currently available are targeted towards the experienced users and contain too many details and/or contain knowledge at a fairly high level. This book provides a brief and clear overview of the combustion basics, suitable f

  16. Mathematical Modeling in Combustion Science

    CERN Document Server

    Takeno, Tadao

    1988-01-01

    An important new area of current research in combustion science is reviewed in the contributions to this volume. The complicated phenomena of combustion, such as chemical reactions, heat and mass transfer, and gaseous flows, have so far been studied predominantly by experiment and by phenomenological approaches. But asymptotic analysis and other recent developments are rapidly changing this situation. The contributions in this volume are devoted to mathematical modeling in three areas: high Mach number combustion, complex chemistry and physics, and flame modeling in small scale turbulent flow combustion.

  17. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  18. The combustion of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    The burning rates of sodium in the form of vapour jets, droplets, sprays and unconfined and confined pools have been reviewed. Attention has been paid to assessing the value of models in the various combustion modes. Additional models have been constructed for the descriptions of laminar and turbulent vapour jets, stationary droplets, forced convection over ambient pool fires together with correlations for peak pressures in confined pool environments. Where appropriate experiments with sodium have not been conducted, the likely behaviour is predicted by comparison with the burning of other fuels, particularly in the field of large free ambient fires. Some areas where further knowledge is required are highlighted. (author)

  19. Alternate fuels; Combustibles alternos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero Paredes R, Hernando; Ambriz G, Juan Jose [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the definition and description of alternate fuels we must center ourselves in those technological alternatives that allow to obtain compounds that differ from the traditional ones, in their forms to be obtained. In this article it is tried to give an overview of alternate fuels to the conventional derivatives of petroleum and that allow to have a clear idea on the tendencies of modern investigation and the technological developments that can be implemented in the short term. It is not pretended to include all the tendencies and developments of the present world, but those that can hit in a relatively short term, in accordance with agreed with the average life of conventional fuels. Nevertheless, most of the conversion principles are applicable to the spectrum of carbonaceous or cellulosic materials which are in nature, are cultivated or wastes of organic origin. Thus one will approach them in a successive way, the physical, chemical and biological conversions that can take place in a production process of an alternate fuel or the same direct use of the fuel such as burning the sweepings derived from the forests. [Spanish] En la definicion y descripcion de combustibles alternos nos debemos centrar en aquellas alternativas tecnologicas que permitan obtener compuestos que difieren de los tradicionales, al menos en sus formas de ser obtenidos. En este articulo se pretende dar un panorama de los combustibles alternos a los convencionales derivados del petroleo y que permita tener una idea clara sobre las tendencias de la investigacion moderna y los desarrollos tecnologicos que puedan ser implementados en el corto plazo. No se pretende abarcar todas las tendencias y desarrollos del mundo actual, sino aquellas que pueden impactar en un plazo relativamente corto, acordes con la vida media de los combustibles convencionales. Sin embargo, la mayor parte de los principios de conversion son aplicables al espectro de materiales carbonaceos o celulosicos los cuales se

  20. Fluidised bed combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion systems that facilitates the maintenance of the depth of the bed are described. A discharge pipe projects upwardly into the bed so that bed material can flow into its upper end and escape downwardly. The end of the pipe is surrounded by an enclosure and air is discharged into the enclosure so that material will enter the pipe from within the enclosure and have been cooled in the enclosure by the air discharged into it. The walls of the enclosure may themselves be cooled

  1. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a

  2. Aqueous solutions of proline and NaCl studied by differential scanning calorimetry at subzero temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Have; Jørgensen, Bo; Nielsen, Jette

    1997-01-01

    The hydration properties of proline are studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in aqueous solutions during freezing to -60 degrees C and subsequent heating to +20 degrees C. The concentration of proline in the freeze concentrated solution was estimated to approximately 50 wt% (w/w) in...... plants and insects living under water stress conditions is discussed. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V....

  3. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry and Macromolecular Visualization for the Interaction of Lysozyme and Its Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Jensen, Drake; Boyle, Tiffany; O'Brien, Leah C.; De Meo, Cristina; Shabestary, Nahid; Eder, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    To provide a research-like experience to upper-division undergraduate students in a biochemistry teaching laboratory, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is employed to determine the binding constants of lysozyme and its inhibitors, N-acetyl glucosamine trimer (NAG[subscript 3]) and monomer (NAG). The extremely weak binding of lysozyme/NAG is…

  4. Subsite binding energies of an exo-polygalacturonase using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermodynamic parameters for binding of a series of galacturonic acid oligomers to an exo-polygalacturonase, RPG16 from Rhizopus oryzae, were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of oligomers varying in chain length from two to five galacturonic acid residues is an exothermic proc...

  5. Thermodynamic investigations of protein's behaviour with ionic liquids in aqueous medium studied by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharmoria, Pankaj; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-05-01

    While a number of reports appear on ionic liquids-proteins interactions, their thermodynamic behaviour using suitable technique like isothermal titration calorimetry is not systematically presented. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a key technique which can directly measure the thermodynamic contribution of IL binding to protein, particularly the enthalpy, heat capacities and binding stoichiometry. Ionic liquids (ILs), owing to their unique and tunable physicochemical properties have been the central area of scientific research besides graphene in the last decade, and growing unabated. Their encounter with proteins in the biological system is inevitable considering their environmental discharge though most of them are recyclable for a number of cycles. In this article we will cover the thermodynamics of proteins upon interaction with ILs as osmolyte and surfactant. The up to date literature survey of IL-protein interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry will be discussed and parallel comparison with the results obtained for such studies with other techniques will be highlighted to demonstrate the accuracy of ITC technique. Net stability of proteins can be obtained from the difference in the free energy (ΔG) of the native (folded) and denatured (unfolded) state using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation (ΔG=ΔH-TΔS). Isothermal titration calorimetry can directly measure the heat changes upon IL-protein interactions. Calculation of other thermodynamic parameters such as entropy, binding constant and free energy depends upon the proper fitting of the binding isotherms using various fitting models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Monolithic front-end preamplifiers for a broad range of calorimetry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radeka, V.; Rescia, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Manfredi, P.F.; Speziali, V. [Pavia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Elettronica]|[INFN--Sezzione di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    1993-12-31

    The present paper summarizes the salient results of a research and development activity in the area of low noise preamplifiers for different applications in calorimetry. Design target for all circuits considered here are low noise, ability to cope with broad energy ranges and radiation hardness.

  7. Proton and Copper Binding to Humic Acids Analyzed by XAFS Spectroscopy and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Jinling; Koopal, Luuk K.; Fang, Linchuan; Xiong, Juan; Tan, Wenfeng

    2018-01-01

    Proton and copper (Cu) binding to soil and lignite-based humic acid (HA) was investigated by combining X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and nonideal-competitive-adsorption (NICA) modeling. NICA model calculations and XAFS results showed

  8. Study of phase transition in hard microcrystalline waxes and wax blends by differential scanning calorimetry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, S.; Agrawal, K. M.; Khan, H. U.; Sikora, Antonín

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 22, 3 & 4 (2004), s. 337-345 ISSN 1091-6466 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : phase transition * hard microscrystalline waxes * differential scanning calorimetry Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.312, year: 2004

  9. Monolithic junction field-effect transistor charge preamplifier for calorimetry at high luminosity hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Rehn, L.A.; Manfredi, P.F.; Speziali, V.

    1991-11-01

    The outstanding noise and radiation hardness characteristics of epitaxial-channel junction field-effect transistors (JFET) suggest that a monolithic preamplifier based upon them may be able to meet the strict specifications for calorimetry at high luminosity colliders. Results obtained so far with a buried layer planar technology, among them an entire monolithic charge-sensitive preamplifier, are described

  10. Detection of sunflower oil in extra virgin olive oil by fast differential scanning calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetten, I.A.; Herwaarden, A.W.; Splinter, R.; Boerrigter-Eenling, R.; Ruth, van S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is an economically valuable product, due to its high quality and premium price. Therefore it is vulnerable for adulteration by means of the addition of cheaper vegetable oils. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been suggested as a fast technique for the

  11. Impact of sample saturation on the detected porosity of hardened concrete using low temperature calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn

    2014-01-01

    The present work studied the impact of sample saturation on the analysis of pore volume and pore size distribution by low temperature (micro-)calorimetry. The theoretical background was examined, which emphasizes that the freezing/melting temperature of water/ice confined in non-fully saturated p...

  12. Designing a compensating quartz fiber calorimeter for low angle calorimetry at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrando, A.; Fouz, M.C.; Josa, M.I.; Khan, A.; Rosowsky, A.; Salicio, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    We present a design of a compensating quartz fiber calorimeter, made of a unique active section, and ment for the specific physics requirements of the low angle calorimetry in LHC experiments. The purposed calorimeter is exemplified for the case of the CMS experiment

  13. Coulometry and Calorimetry of Electric Double Layer Formation in Porous Electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Mathijs; Griffioen, Elian; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Van Roij, René; Erné, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Coulometric measurements on salt-water-immersed nanoporous carbon electrodes reveal, at a fixed voltage, a charge decrease with increasing temperature. During far-out-of-equilibrium charging of these electrodes, calorimetry indicates the production of both irreversible Joule heat and reversible

  14. Thermodynamic profiling of Peptide membrane interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry: a search for pores and micelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2011-01-01

    in mixed peptide-lipid micelles. We have investigated the mode of action of the antimicrobial peptide mastoparan-X using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The results show that mastoparan-X induces a range of structural transitions of POPC/POPG (3...

  15. Examination of water phase transitions in Loblolly pine and cell wall components by differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Michael J. Lambrecht; Samuel V. Glass; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; Daniel J. Yelle

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines phase transformations of water in wood and isolated wood cell wall components using differential scanning calorimetry with the purpose of better understanding "Type II water" or "freezable bound water" that has been reported for cellulose and other hydrophilic polymers. Solid loblolly pine (Pinus taeda...

  16. High Pressure Differential Scanning Calorimetry of poly(4-methyl-pentene-1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoehne, G.W.H.; Rastogi, S.; Wunderlich, B.

    2000-01-01

    The polymer poly(4-methyl pentene-1), P4MP1, displays an unusual pressure–temperature phase diagram. The previous exploration of this phase behavior through X-ray diffraction has been extended through high-pressure calorimetry. The resulting phase diagram displays a melt area, the common tetragonal

  17. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2017-03-28

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON = 46). The motored pressure at TDC is maintained at 35 bar and fuelMEP is kept constant at 5.1 bar to account for the difference in fuel properties between naphtha and diesel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is injected at a pressure of 800 bar. Photron FASTCAM SA4 that captures in-cylinder combustion at the rate of 10000 frames per second is employed. The captured high speed video is processed to study the combustion homogeneity based on an algorithm reported in previous studies. Starting from late fuel injection timings, combustion stratification is investigated by advancing the fuel injection timings. For late start of injection (SOI), a direct link between SOI and combustion phasing is noticed. At early SOI, combustion phasing depends on both intake air temperature and SOI. In order to match the combustion phasing (CA50) of diesel, the intake air temperature is increased to 90°C for naphtha. The combustion stratification from CI to PPC is also investigated for various level of dilution by displacing oxygen with nitrogen in the intake. The start of combustion (SOC) was delayed with the increase in dilution and to compensate for this, the intake air temperature is increased. The mixture homogeneity is enhanced for higher dilution due to longer ignition delay. The results show that high speed image is initially blue and then turned yellow, indicating soot formation and oxidation. The luminosity of combustion images decreases with early SOI and increased dilution. The images are processed to generate the level of stratification based on the image intensity. The level of stratification is same for diesel and naphtha at various SOI. When O concentration in the intake is decreased to 17.7% and 14

  18. Some Factors Affecting Combustion in an Internal-Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, A M; Cohn, Mildred

    1936-01-01

    An investigation of the combustion of gasoline, safety, and diesel fuels was made in the NACA combustion apparatus under conditions of temperature that permitted ignition by spark with direct fuel injection, in spite of the compression ratio of 12.7 employed. The influence of such variables as injection advance angle, jacket temperature, engine speed, and spark position was studied. The most pronounced effect was that an increase in the injection advance angle (beyond a certain minimum value) caused a decrease in the extent and rate of combustion. In almost all cases combustion improved with increased temperature. The results show that at low air temperatures the rates of combustion vary with the volatility of the fuel, but that at high temperatures this relationship does not exist and the rates depend to a greater extent on the chemical nature of the fuel.

  19. Preliminary assessment of combustion modes for internal combustion wave rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalim, M. Razi

    1995-01-01

    Combustion within the channels of a wave rotor is examined as a means of obtaining pressure gain during heat addition in a gas turbine engine. Several modes of combustion are considered and the factors that determine the applicability of three modes are evaluated in detail; premixed autoignition/detonation, premixed deflagration, and non-premixed compression ignition. The last two will require strong turbulence for completion of combustion in a reasonable time in the wave rotor. The compression/autoignition modes will require inlet temperatures in excess of 1500 R for reliable ignition with most hydrocarbon fuels; otherwise, a supplementary ignition method must be provided. Examples of combustion mode selection are presented for two core engine applications that had been previously designed with equivalent 4-port wave rotor topping cycles using external combustion.

  20. Path planning during combustion mode switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Ravi, Nikhil

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods are provided for transitioning between a first combustion mode and a second combustion mode in an internal combustion engine. A current operating point of the engine is identified and a target operating point for the internal combustion engine in the second combustion mode is also determined. A predefined optimized transition operating point is selected from memory. While operating in the first combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion engine to approach the selected optimized transition operating point. When the engine is operating at the selected optimized transition operating point, the combustion mode is switched from the first combustion mode to the second combustion mode. While operating in the second combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion to approach the target operating point.

  1. AIR EMISSIONS FROM SCRAP TIRE COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  2. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  3. Chemical kinetics on thermal decompositions of cumene hydroperoxide in cumene studied by calorimetry: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duh, Yih-Shing, E-mail: yihshingduh@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Occupation Safety and Health, Jen-Teh Junior College of Medicine, Nursing and Management, Miaoli, 35664, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, National United University, No. 1 Lien-Da, Miaoli, 36052, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-08-10

    Highlights: • Chemical kinetics on thermal decompositions of CHP are conducted and summarized. • Kinetics agrees well between data from DSC and adiabatic calorimetry. • Ea is determined to be about 120 kJ mol{sup −1} by various calorimetry. • LogA (A in s{sup −1}) is determined to be about 11.8 by various calorimetry. - Abstract: Study on chemical kinetics related to the thermal decomposition of cumene hydoperoxide (CHP) in cumene is summarized in this work. It is of great importance to gather and compare the differences between these kinetic parameters for further substantial applications in the chemical industry and process safety. CHP has been verified to possess an autocatalytic behavior by using microcalorimetry (such as TAM and C-80) operated at isothermal mode in the temperature range from 70 °C to 120 °C. However, it exhibits a reaction of n-th order detected by non-isothermal DSC scanning and adiabatic calorimeter. By the isothermal aging tests, activation energy and frequency factor in logA(s{sup −1}) were averaged to be (117.3 ± 5.9) kJ mol{sup −1}and (11.4 ± 0.3), respectively. Kinetic parameters acquired from data of interlaboratories by using heat-flow calorimetry, the averaged activation energy and frequency factor in logA(s{sup −1}) were (119.3 ± 11.3) kJ mol{sup −1}and (12.0 ± 0.2), respectively. On the analogy of results from adiabatic calorimetry, the activation energy and frequency factor in logA(s{sup −1}) were respectively averaged to be (122.4 ± 9.2) kJ mol{sup −1}and (11.8 ± 0.8). Five sets of kinetic models in relation to autocatalytic reactions are collected and discussed as well.

  4. Manifold methods for methane combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Pope, S.B. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Great progresses have been made in combustion research, especially, the computation of laminar flames and the probability density function (PDF) method in turbulent combustion. For one-dimensional laminar flames, by considering the transport mechanism, the detailed chemical kinetic mechanism and the interactions between these two basic processes, today it is a routine matter to calculate flame velocities, extinction, ignition, temperature, and species distributions from the governing equations. Results are in good agreement with those obtained for experiments. However, for turbulent combustion, because of the complexities of turbulent flow, chemical reactions, and the interaction between them, in the foreseeable future, it is impossible to calculate the combustion flow field by directly integrating the basic governing equations. So averaging and modeling are necessary in turbulent combustion studies. Averaging, on one hand, simplifies turbulent combustion calculations, on the other hand, it introduces the infamous closure problems, especially the closure problem with chemical reaction terms. Since in PDF calculations of turbulent combustion, the averages of the chemical reaction terms can be calculated, PDF methods overcome the closure problem with the reaction terms. It has been shown that the PDF method is a most promising method to calculate turbulent combustion. PDF methods have been successfully employed to calculate laboratory turbulent flames: they can predict phenomena such as super equilibrium radical levels, and local extinction. Because of these advantages, PDF methods are becoming used increasingly in industry combustor codes.

  5. Combustion & Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLDRC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Combustion and Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLRDC) supports the experimental and computational study of fundamental combustion phenomena to...

  6. Combustion instability control in the model of combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmadullin, A N; Ahmethanov, E N; Iovleva, O V; Mitrofanov, G A

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study of the influence of external periodic perturbations on the instability of the combustion chamber in a pulsating combustion. As an external periodic disturbances were used sound waves emitted by the electrodynamics. The purpose of the study was to determine the possibility of using the method of external periodic perturbation to control the combustion instability. The study was conducted on a specially created model of the combustion chamber with a swirl burner in the frequency range from 100 to 1400 Hz. The study found that the method of external periodic perturbations may be used to control combustion instability. Depending on the frequency of the external periodic perturbation is observed as an increase and decrease in the amplitude of the oscillations in the combustion chamber. These effects are due to the mechanisms of synchronous and asynchronous action. External periodic disturbance generated in the path feeding the gaseous fuel, showing the high efficiency of the method of management in terms of energy costs. Power required to initiate periodic disturbances (50 W) is significantly smaller than the thermal capacity of the combustion chamber (100 kW)

  7. Calibration and test of an aneroid mini-bomb combustion calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A.V.; Pilcher, Geoffrey; Santos, Luis M.N.B.F.; Lima, Luis M. Spencer S.

    2007-01-01

    A new mini-bomb combustion calorimeter designed at the University of Lund was improved, installed and calibrated at the University of Porto. This calorimeter is suitable for high precision combustion calorimetry with samples of mass about (10 to 40)mg. The energy equivalent of the calorimeter, ε cal =(1946.45+/-0.11)J.K -1 , was obtained from 15 independent calibration experiments with benzoic acid SRM 39i. Anthracene, succinic acid, acetanilide, and 1,2,4-triazole were used as test compounds, with excellent agreement with the literature values. -Δ c H m o Δ f H m o (cr)kJ.mol -1 kJ.mol -1 Anthracene7062.6+/-2.1124.3+/-2.8Succinic acid1490.2+/-0.7-941.3+/-0.9Acetanilide4226.2+/-1.1-208.2+/-1.61,2, 4-Triazole1326.1+/-0.4110.3+/-0.5

  8. Space Station Freedom combustion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Extended operations in microgravity, on board spacecraft like Space Station Freedom, provide both unusual opportunities and unusual challenges for combustion science. On the one hand, eliminating the intrusion of buoyancy provides a valuable new perspective for fundamental studies of combustion phenomena. On the other hand, however, the absence of buoyancy creates new hazards of fires and explosions that must be understood to assure safe manned space activities. These considerations - and the relevance of combustion science to problems of pollutants, energy utilization, waste incineration, power and propulsion systems, and fire and explosion hazards, among others - provide strong motivation for microgravity combustion research. The intrusion of buoyancy is a greater impediment to fundamental combustion studies than to most other areas of science. Combustion intrinsically heats gases with the resulting buoyant motion at normal gravity either preventing or vastly complicating measurements. Perversely, this limitation is most evident for fundamental laboratory experiments; few practical combustion phenomena are significantly affected by buoyancy. Thus, we have never observed the most fundamental combustion phenomena - laminar premixed and diffusion flames, heterogeneous flames of particles and surfaces, low-speed turbulent flames, etc. - without substantial buoyant disturbances. This precludes rational merging of theory, where buoyancy is of little interest, and experiments, that always are contaminated by buoyancy, which is the traditional path for developing most areas of science. The current microgravity combustion program seeks to rectify this deficiency using both ground-based and space-based facilities, with experiments involving space-based facilities including: laminar premixed flames, soot processes in laminar jet diffusion flames, structure of laminar and turbulent jet diffusion flames, solid surface combustion, one-dimensional smoldering, ignition and flame

  9. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  10. Producer for vegetal combustibles for internal-combustion motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-12-28

    A producer is described for internal-combustion motors fed with wood or agricultural byproducts characterized by the fact that its full operation is independent of the degree of wetness of the material used.

  11. Reducing emissions from diesel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains information dealing with engine design to reduce emissions and improve or maintain fuel economy. Topics include: Observation of High Pressure Fuel Spray with Laser Light Sheet Method; Determination of Engine Cylinder Pressures from Crankshaft Speed Fluctuations; Combustion Similarity for Different Size Diesel Engines: Theoretical Prediction and Experimental Results; Prediction of Diesel Engine Particulate Emission During Transient Cycles; Characteristics and Combustibility of Particulate Matter; Dual-Fuel Diesel Engine Using Butane; Measurement of Flame Temperature Distribution in D.I. Diesel Engine with High Pressure Fuel Injection: and Combustion in a Small DI Diesel Engine at Starting

  12. Picosecond calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiou, Panayiotis; Vincent, Jonathan; Andersson, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    to rapidly heat liquid C H2 Cl2 using UV pulses of 100 fs duration. A significant x-ray diffraction signal is visible prior to the onset of thermal expansion, which characterizes a highly compressed superheated liquid. Liquid C H2 Cl2 then expands as a shock wave propagates through the sample...

  13. Comparison of calorimetry and destructive analytical measurement techniques for excess plutonium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, T.L.

    1996-01-01

    In Dec. 1994, IAEA safeguards were initiated on inventory of Pu- bearing materials, originating from the US nuclear weapons complex, at vault 3 of DOE's Plutonium Finishing Plant at Hanford. Because of the diversity and heterogeneity of the Pu, plant operators have increasingly used calorimetry for accountability measurements. During the recent commencement of IAEA safeguards at vault 3, destructive (electrochemical titration) methods were used to determine Pu concentrations in subsamples of inventory items with widely ranging chemical purities. The Pu concentrations in the subsamples were determined and contribution of heterogeneity to total variability was identified. Measurement results, gathered by PFP and IAEA laboratories, showed total measurement variability for calorimetry to be comparable with or lower than those of sampling and chemical analyses

  14. Application of isothermal calorimetry and uv spectroscopy for stability monitoring of pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosser, L.R.; Pickard, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal stabilities for a series of pentaerythritol-tetranitrate (PETN) samples with variable surf ace areas were monitored by isothermal calorimetry and UV spectroscopy over the temperature range of 363 to 408 K. Isothermal induction times measured with constant volume calorimetry under an air atmosphere and No evolution rates monitored by UV absorbance at 213 nm under vacuum correlated with the PETN surface area at temperatures equal to or exceeding 383 K. Rate data measured at 383 K are in accord with predictions based on detailed kinetic modeling. Below 383 K, NO evolution data suggested that additional geometric factors may be significant in controlling PETN stability. Mechanisms for influencing surface area upon the rate-determining step are addressed

  15. Radiation damage study for silicon calorimetry: Summary of first year's activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russ, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the first contract year of this activity at Carnegie-Mellon we have had two major objectives. These were to devise and test a non-intrusive means to measure the energy and spatial profiles of the neutrons generated in a hadronic cascade at high energy; and to study the calibration systematics of silicon diode detectors as a prelude to their evaluation for SSC calorimetry. These objectives have been carried out, as are described in this paper. In addition we have recoded the ORNL detector simulation program HETC to operate on a VAX and are working on the conversion of the low energy neutron transport program MORSE. These programs are used heavily at Oak Ridge (Gabriel and coworkers) for cascade studies. For silicon calorimetry one wants to have more control over the energy deposition routines, especially in MORSE. Unfortunately, MORSE is heavily-laden with machine code, and its conversion is going slowly. 11 refs., 5 figs

  16. Laser Calorimetry Spectroscopy for ppm-level Dissolved Gas Detection and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K S, Nagapriya; Sinha, Shashank; R, Prashanth; Poonacha, Samhitha; Chaudhry, Gunaranjan; Bhattacharya, Anandaroop; Choudhury, Niloy; Mahalik, Saroj; Maity, Sandip

    2017-02-20

    In this paper we report a newly developed technique - laser calorimetry spectroscopy (LCS), which is a combination of laser absorption spectroscopy and calorimetry - for the detection of gases dissolved in liquids. The technique involves determination of concentration of a dissolved gas by irradiating the liquid with light of a wavelength where the gas absorbs, and measuring the temperature change caused by the absorbance. Conventionally, detection of dissolved gases with sufficient sensitivity and specificity was done by first extracting the gases from the liquid and then analyzing the gases using techniques such as gas chromatography. Using LCS, we have been able to detect ppm levels of dissolved gases without extracting them from the liquid. In this paper, we show the detection of dissolved acetylene in transformer oil in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength (3021 nm) region.

  17. Modulated Temperature Differential Scanning Calorimetry Theoretical and Practical Applications in Polymer Characterisation

    CERN Document Server

    Reading, Mike

    2006-01-01

    MTDSC provides a step-change increase in the power of calorimetry to characterize virtually all polymer systems including curing systems, blends and semicrystalline polymers. It enables hidden transitions to be revealed, miscibility to be accurately assessed, and phases and interfaces in complex blends to be quantified. It also enables crystallinity in complex systems to be measured and provides new insights into melting behaviour. All of this is achieved by a simple modification of conventional DSC. In 1992 a new calorimetric technique was introduced that superimposed a small modulation on top of the conventional linear temperature program typically used in differential scanning calorimetry. This was combined with a method of data analysis that enabled the sample’s response to the linear component of the temperature program to be separated from its response to the periodic component. In this way, for the first time, a signal equivalent to that of conventional DSC was obtained simultaneously with a measure ...

  18. Characterization of the phase transformations in shape-memory alloys by modulated differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Z.G.; Sandstroem, R.

    1999-01-01

    Modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) is a recently developed calorimetric technique, which has demonstrated some significant advantages over the conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). By separating the reversing quantity from the non-reversing component in the total thermal events, it provides some new information that can not be obtained from the conventional DSC. The technique has been applied to various polycrystalline and single crystalline shape-memory alloys, including Cu-Zn-Al, Cu-Al-Ni, Ti-Ni(Cu), Ni-Mn-Ga and Fe-Mn-Si, to characterize the martensitic transformations, bainitic transformation, chemical and magnetic ordering transitions, atomic reordering and other kinetic relaxation processes in the alloys. The preliminary results of the MDSC measurements are summarized and the interpretation of the MDSC results and some factors affecting the results are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Inherent limitations of fixed-time, servo-controlled radiometric calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzel, J.R.; Lemming, J.F.; Duff, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    Interest has been shown in using fixed-time, servo-controlled calorimetry to shorten the measurement times for certain samples that require low precision values (3 to 5%). This type of calorimeter measurement could be particularly useful for screening scrap samples to determine whether there is a need for a more accurate measurement or for certain confirmatory measurements for which low precision numbers are sufficient. The equipment required for this type of measurement is a servo-controlled calorimeter and a preconditioning unit. Samples to be measured are placed in the preconditioning unit, which is maintained at the internal temperature of the calorimeter. The power value for the sample is determined at a fixed time after loading into the calorimeter, for example, 30 min. When a calorimeter is operated using a fixed cutoff time, there are additional sources of uncertainty that need to be considered. The major factors affecting the uncertainty of the calorimetry power values are discussed. 2 refs., 4 figs

  20. Immersion Calorimetry for the Characterization of PD Catalysts Supported on Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Giraldo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons obtained from coconut peel were oxidized using hydrogen peroxide. Superficial characteristics of these carbons were determined through N2 and CO2 isotherms and functional groups were characterized by TPD. Finally, the microcalorimetry technique was used in order to obtain the immersion enthalpies in diverse liquids and established the relation between them and the results obtained by the other characterization techniques. The results suggested that the immersion calorimetry allow establishing the difference between the supports and the catalysts.

  1. Monitoring of an RNA Multistep Folding Pathway by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Reymond, Cédric; Bisaillon, Martin; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to monitor the energetic landscape of a catalytic RNA, specifically that of the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme. Using mutants that isolated various tertiary interactions, the thermodynamic parameters of several ribozyme-substrate intermediates were determined. The results shed light on the impact of several tertiary interactions on the global structure of the ribozyme. In addition, the data indicate that the formation of the P1.1 pseudoknot is the lim...

  2. Low-temperature heat capacity of small Nb3Sn polycrystals by ac calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Johnston, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown by an ac calorimetry technique that the multiple heat capacity anomalies which occur below the superconducting transition temperature for small polycrystalline Nb 3 Sn samples are intrinsic to these samples. The recent suggestions that shear stresses can account for these results are analyzed for their validity. The dependence of the occurrence of these multiple anomalies upon the thermal history of the samples was investigated

  3. A survey of the year 2007 literature on applications of isothermal titration calorimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Bjelic, S; Jelesarov, I

    2008-01-01

    Elucidation of the energetic principles of binding affinity and specificity is a central task in many branches of current sciences: biology, medicine, pharmacology, chemistry, material sciences, etc. In biomedical research, integral approaches combining structural information with in-solution biophysical data have proved to be a powerful way toward understanding the physical basis of vital cellular phenomena. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a valuable experimental tool facilitating ...

  4. Photothermal beam deflection calorimetry in solution photochemistry: recent progress and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvey, D E

    1997-01-01

    Photothermal beam deflection (PBD) calorimetry is a technique that measures changes in the solvent's refractive index that accompanies photothermal heating. This method is capable of extracting both kinetic and thermodynamic information from photochemical reactions. A qualitative description of physical basis of time-resolved PBD is presented. Several recent examples of its application to photochemical and photobiological problems are discussed. Finally, the advantages and limitations of PBD are described.

  5. Application of calorimetry in evaluation of phase transformations in the selected hypoeutectic silumins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szymszal

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The investigations of phase transformations described in this study were carried out on hypoeutectic alloys from the Al-Si during heating and cooling. The determination and analysis of characteristic temperature values from the solidification range was made by the DSC method in calorimetric investigations carried out on a high-temperature multi HTC Setaram scanning calorimeter. Applying the lever rule, the phase composition of the examined slumins was calculated and compared with the results of DSC calorimetry.

  6. A bipolar monolithic preamplifier for high-capacitance SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] silicon calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Kennedy, E.J.; Bugg, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a preamplifier designed and fabricated specifically to address the requirements of silicon calorimetry for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The topology and its features are discussed in addition to the design methodology employed. The simulated and measured results for noise, power consumption, and speed are presented. Simulated an measured data for radiation damage effects as well as data for post-damage annealing are also presented. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Advanced forward calorimetry for the SSC and TeVatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiBitonto, D.; Van Peteghem, P.M.; Geiger, R.L.; McIntyre, P.M.; Pang, Y.; Thane, J.M.; White, J.T.; Atac, M.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a project to develop fast, radiation hardened forward calorimetry for the SSC and TeVatron collider. Detector technologies discussed are based on gas and warm liquid media. In particular, we present the design of an ultrasensitive hybrid charge preamplifier for liquid technology capable of operating at 0.1-1 GHz. The actual detector bandwidth will depend on the choice of detector media used and the maximum allowable operating high voltage. (orig.)

  8. Recent advances and potential applications of modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC) in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knopp, Matthias Manne; Löbmann, Korbinian; Elder, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is frequently the thermal analysis technique of choice within preformulation and formulation sciences because of its ability to provide detailed information about both the physical and energetic properties of a substance and/or formulation. However, convent......-dried formulations. However, as discussed in the present review, a number of other potential applications could also be relevant for the pharmaceutical scientist....

  9. Determination of the aggregation number for micelles by isothermal titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Holm, Rene; Westh, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has previously been applied to estimate the aggregation number (n), Gibbs free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) of micellization. However, some difficulties of micelle characterization by ITC still remain; most micelles have aggregation numbers...... insight into optimal design of titration protocols for micelle characterization. By applying the new method, the aggregation number of sodium dodecyl sulphate and glycochenodeoxycholate was determined at concentrations around their critical micelle concentration (CMC)...

  10. Computational Modeling of Turbulent Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is development and validation of predictive models or modeling approaches of liquid fuel combustion (spray combustion) in hot-diluted environments, known as flameless combustion or MILD combustion. The goal is to combine good physical insight,

  11. Measures for a quality combustion (combustion chamber exit and downstream); Mesures pour une combustion de qualite (sortie de chambre de combustion et en aval)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epinat, G. [APAVE Lyonnaise, 69 (France)

    1996-12-31

    After a review of the different pollutants related to the various types of stationary and mobile combustion processes (stoichiometric, reducing and oxidizing combustion), measures and analyses than may be used to ensure the quality and efficiency of combustion processes are reviewed: opacimeters, UV analyzers, etc. The regulation and control equipment for combustion systems are then listed, according to the generator capacity level

  12. Fuels and Combustion | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuels and Combustion Fuels and Combustion This is the March 2015 issue of the Transportation and , combustion strategy, and engine design hold the potential to maximize vehicle energy efficiency and performance of low-carbon fuels in internal combustion engines with a whole-systems approach to fuel chemistry

  13. Indirect calorimetry in nutritional therapy. A position paper by the ICALIC study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Taku; Berger, Mette M; De Waele, Elisabeth; Guttormsen, Anne Berit; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Hiesmayr, Michael; Singer, Pierre; Wernerman, Jan; Pichard, Claude

    2017-06-01

    This review aims to clarify the use of indirect calorimetry (IC) in nutritional therapy for critically ill and other patient populations. It features a comprehensive overview of the technical concepts, the practical application and current developments of IC. Pubmed-referenced publications were analyzed to generate an overview about the basic knowledge of IC, to describe advantages and disadvantages of the current technology, to clarify technical issues and provide pragmatic solutions for clinical practice and metabolic research. The International Multicentric Study Group for Indirect Calorimetry (ICALIC) has generated this position paper. IC can be performed in in- and out-patients, including those in the intensive care unit, to measure energy expenditure (EE). Optimal nutritional therapy, defined as energy prescription based on measured EE by IC has been associated with better clinical outcome. Equations based on simple anthropometric measurements to predict EE are inaccurate when applied to individual patients. An ongoing international academic initiative to develop a new indirect calorimeter aims at providing innovative and affordable technical solutions for many of the current limitations of IC. Indirect calorimetry is a tool of paramount importance, necessary to optimize the nutrition therapy of patients with various pathologies and conditions. Recent technical developments allow broader use of IC for in- and out-patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. CALOR2012 XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akchurin, Nural .

    2015-05-04

    The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, or the CALOR series, have always been where the calorimeter experts come together to review the state of calorimetry and bring forth new ideas every two years. The fteenth conference, CALOR2012, in Santa Fe was no exception. Although they were built roughly a decade ago, we are now witnessing the exceptional power of the LHC calorimeters and the crucial role they have been playing in the discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs-like boson. As we ruminate on the coming generation of experiments at the next (linear) collider and on the upgrades at the LHC, we are heartened by the substantial advances we made in calorimetry in the last decade. These advances will certainly help uncover new physics in the years to come, not only at colliders but also in astroparticle experiments that take advantage of natural elements such as air, water, and ice. The proceedings were published by the IOP in Journal of Physics, Vol 404 2011. The conference web site is calor2012.ttu.edu.

  15. Combustion modeling in waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.; Unal, C.; Travis, J.R.; Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    1997-01-01

    This paper has two objectives. The first one is to repeat previous simulations of release and combustion of flammable gases in tank SY-101 at the Hanford reservation with the recently developed code GASFLOW-II. The GASFLOW-II results are compared with the results obtained with the HMS/TRAC code and show good agreement, especially for non-combustion cases. For combustion GASFLOW-II predicts a steeper pressure rise than HMS/TRAC. The second objective is to describe a so-called induction parameter model which was developed and implemented into GASFLOW-II and reassess previous calculations of Bureau of Mines experiments for hydrogen-air combustion. The pressure time history improves compared with the one-step model, and the time rate of pressure change is much closer to the experimental data

  16. Environmental sensing and combustion diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoleri, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of Environmental Sensing and Combustion Diagnostics. Topics covered include: Incineration Systems Applications, Permitting, And Monitoring Overview; Infrared Techniques Applied to Incineration Systems; Continuous Emission Monitors; Analyzers and Sensors for Process Control And Environmental Monitoring

  17. Sodium nitrate combustion limit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1976-04-01

    Sodium nitrate is a powerful solid oxidant. Energetically, it is capable of exothermically oxidizing almost any organic material. Rate-controlling variables such as temperature, concentration of oxidant, concentration of fuel, thermal conductivity, moisture content, size, and pressure severely limit the possibility of a self-supported exothermic reaction (combustion). The tests reported in this document were conducted on one-gram samples at atmospheric pressure. Below 380 0 C, NaNO 3 was stable and did not support combustion. At moisture concentrations above 22 wt percent, exothermic reactions did not propagate in even the most energetic and reactive compositions. Fresh resin and paraffin were too volatile to enable a NaNO 2 -supported combustion process to propagate. Concentrations of NaNO 3 above 95 wt percent or below 35 wt percent did not react with enough energy release to support combustion. The influence of sample size and confining pressure, both important factors, was not investigated in this study

  18. 75 FR 3881 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ..., rubber, drugs, dried blood, dyes, certain textiles, and metals (such as aluminum and magnesium..., furniture manufacturing, metal processing, fabricated metal products and machinery manufacturing, pesticide... standard that will comprehensively address the fire and explosion hazards of combustible dust. The Agency...

  19. Combustion synthesis of nanocrystalline ceria (CeO2) powders by a dry route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, C.-C.; Huang, T.-H.; Tsai, J.-S.; Lin, C.-S.; Peng, C.-H.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, ceria (CeO 2 ) powders were synthesized with 50 g per batch via a combustion technique using two kinds of starting materials-urea [(NH 2 ) 2 CO] (as a fuel) and ceric ammonium nitrate [Ce(NH 4 ) 2 (NO 3 ) 6 ] (acting as both the source of cerium ion and an oxidizer). The starting materials were mixed thoroughly without adding water, and then ignited in the air at room temperature. It underwent a self-combustion process with a large amount of smoke, a voluminous loose product. The as-synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), CHN elemental analyzer, surface area measurements, and sinterability. Experimental results revealed that the nanocrystalline CeO 2 powders with low impurity content ( 2 /g and ∼25 nm, respectively, through the stoichiometric fuel/oxidizer ratio reaction. The powder, when cold pressed and sintered in the air at 1250 deg. C for 1 h, was measured to attain the sintered density ∼92% of theoretical density having submicron grain size. In addition, the thermal decomposition and combustion process of the reactant mixture were investigated using thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and mass spectrometry (MS) techniques simultaneously. Based on the results of thermal analysis, a possible mechanism concerning the combustion reaction is proposed

  20. Modeling of microgravity combustion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, John

    1995-01-01

    This program started in February 1991, and is designed to improve our understanding of basic combustion phenomena by the modeling of various configurations undergoing experimental study by others. Results through 1992 were reported in the second workshop. Work since that time has examined the following topics: Flame-balls; Intrinsic and acoustic instabilities in multiphase mixtures; Radiation effects in premixed combustion; Smouldering, both forward and reverse, as well as two dimensional smoulder.

  1. Quantifying emissions from spontaneous combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous combustion can be a significant problem in the coal industry, not only due to the obvious safety hazard and the potential loss of valuable assets, but also with respect to the release of gaseous pollutants, especially CO2, from uncontrolled coal fires. This report reviews methodologies for measuring emissions from spontaneous combustion and discusses methods for quantifying, estimating and accounting for the purpose of preparing emission inventories.

  2. Combustion means for solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, D.

    1987-09-23

    A combustion device for solid fuel, suitable for coal, coke, charcoal, coal-dust briquettes etc., comprising:- a base stand with an opening therein, an imperforate heat resistant holding board locatable to close said opening; a combustion chamber standing on the base stand with the holding board forming the base of the combustion chamber; a wiper arm pivoted for horizontal wiping movement over the upper surface of the holding board; an inlet means at a lower edge of said chamber above the base stand, and/or in a surrounding wall of said chamber, whereby combustion air may enter as exhaust gases leave the combustion chamber; an exhaust pipe for the exhaust gases; generally tubular gas-flow heat-exchange ducting putting the combustion chamber and exhaust pipe into communication; and means capable of moving the holding board into and out of the opening for removal of ash or other residue. The invention can be used for a heating system in a house or in a greenhouse or for a boiler.

  3. Techniques de combustion Combustin Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perthuis E.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'efficacité d'un processus de chauffage par flamme est étroitement liée à la maîtrise des techniques de combustion. Le brûleur, organe essentiel de l'équipement de chauffe, doit d'une part assurer une combustion complète pour utiliser au mieux l'énergie potentielle du combustible et, d'autre part, provoquer dans le foyer les conditions aérodynamiques les plus propices oux transferts de chaleur. En s'appuyant sur les études expérimentales effectuées à la Fondation de Recherches Internationales sur les Flammes (FRIF, au Groupe d'Étude des Flammes de Gaz Naturel (GEFGN et à l'Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP et sur des réalisations industrielles, on présente les propriétés essentielles des flammes de diffusion aux combustibles liquides et gazeux obtenues avec ou sans mise en rotation des fluides, et leurs répercussions sur les transferts thermiques. La recherche des températures de combustion élevées conduit à envisager la marche à excès d'air réduit, le réchauffage de l'air ou son enrichissement à l'oxygène. Par quelques exemples, on évoque l'influence de ces paramètres d'exploitation sur l'économie possible en combustible. The efficiency of a flame heating process is closely linked ta the mastery of, combustion techniques. The burner, an essential element in any heating equipment, must provide complete combustion sa as to make optimum use of the potential energy in the fuel while, at the same time, creating the most suitable conditions for heat transfers in the combustion chamber. On the basis of experimental research performed by FRIF, GEFGN and IFP and of industrial achievements, this article describesthe essential properties of diffusion flames fed by liquid and gaseous fuels and produced with or without fluid swirling, and the effects of such flames on heat transfers. The search for high combustion temperatures means that consideration must be given to operating with reduced excess air, heating the air or

  4. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  5. Immersion calorimetry as a tool to evaluate the catalytic performance of titanosilicate materials in the epoxidation of cyclohexene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernimmen, Jarian; Guidotti, Matteo; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquin; Jardim, Erika O; Mertens, Myrjam; Lebedev, Oleg I; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Psaro, Rinaldo; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Meynen, Vera; Cool, Pegie

    2011-04-05

    Different types of titanosilicates are synthesized, structurally characterized, and subsequently catalytically tested in the liquid-phase epoxidation of cyclohexene. The performance of three types of combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials is compared with that of widely studied Ti-grafted-MCM-41 molecular sieve and the TS-1 microporous titanosilicate. The catalytic test results are correlated with the structural characteristics of the different catalysts. Moreover, for the first time, immersion calorimetry with the same substrate molecule as in the catalytic test reaction is applied as an extra means to interpret the catalytic results. A good correlation between catalytic performance and immersion calorimetry results is found. This work points out that the combination of catalytic testing and immersion calorimetry can lead to important insights into the influence of the materials structural characteristics on catalysis. Moreover, the potential of using immersion calorimetry as a screening tool for catalysts in epoxidation reactions is shown.

  6. HERCULES Advanced Combustion Concepts Test Facility: Spray/Combustion Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, K. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Labor fuer Aerothermochemie und Verbrennungssysteme, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This yearly report for 2004 on behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) at the Laboratory for Aero-thermochemistry and Combustion Systems at the Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich, Switzerland, presents a review of work being done within the framework of HERCULES (High Efficiency R and D on Combustion with Ultra Low Emissions for Ships) - the international R and D project concerning new technologies for ships' diesels. The work involves the use and augmentation of simulation models. These are to be validated using experimental data. The report deals with the development of an experimental set-up that will simulate combustion in large two-stroke diesel engines and allow the generation of reference data. The main element of the test apparatus is a spray / combustion chamber with extensive possibilities for optical observation under variable flow conditions. The results of first simulations confirm concepts and shall help in further work on the project. The potential offered by high-speed camera systems was tested using the institute's existing HTDZ combustion chamber. Further work to be done is reviewed.

  7. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Antoni K.; Maxson, James A.; Hensinger, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  8. Twenty-fifth symposium (international) on combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of the papers presented at this conference are contained in this volume. The other one-third appear in special issues of ''Combustion and Flame'', Vol. 99, 1994 and Vol. 100, 1995. Papers are divided into the following sections: Supersonic combustion; Detonations and explosions; Internal combustion engines; Practical aspects of combustion; Incineration and wastes; Sprays and droplet combustion; Coal and organic solids combustion; Soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Reaction kinetics; NO x ; Turbulent flames; Turbulent combustion; Laminar flames; Flame spread, fire and halogenated fire suppressants; Global environmental effects; Ignition; Two-phase combustion; Solid propellant combustion; Materials synthesis; Microgravity; and Experimental diagnostics. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  9. Percent relative cumulative frequency analysis in indirect calorimetry: application to studies of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riachi, Marc; Himms-Hagen, Jean; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2004-12-01

    Indirect calorimetry is commonly used in research and clinical settings to assess characteristics of energy expenditure. Respiration chambers in indirect calorimetry allow measurements over long periods of time (e.g., hours to days) and thus the collection of large sets of data. Current methods of data analysis usually involve the extraction of only a selected small proportion of data, most commonly the data that reflects resting metabolic rate. Here, we describe a simple quantitative approach for the analysis of large data sets that is capable of detecting small differences in energy metabolism. We refer to it as the percent relative cumulative frequency (PRCF) approach and have applied it to the study of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) deficient and control mice. The approach involves sorting data in ascending order, calculating their cumulative frequency, and expressing the frequencies in the form of percentile curves. Results demonstrate the sensitivity of the PRCF approach for analyses of oxygen consumption (.VO2) as well as respiratory exchange ratio data. Statistical comparisons of PRCF curves are based on the 50th percentile values and curve slopes (H values). The application of the PRCF approach revealed that energy expenditure in UCP1-deficient mice housed and studied at room temperature (24 degrees C) is on average 10% lower (p lower environmental temperature, there were no differences in .VO2 between groups. The latter is likely due to augmented shivering thermogenesis in UCP1-deficient mice compared with controls. With the increased availability of murine models of metabolic disease, indirect calorimetry is increasingly used, and the PRCF approach provides a novel and powerful means for data analysis.

  10. Water calorimetry and ionization chamber dosimetry in an 85-MeV clinical proton beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmans, H; Seuntjens, J; Verhaegen, F; Denis, J M; Vynckier, S; Thierens, H

    1996-05-01

    In recent years, the increased use of proton beams for clinical purposes has enhanced the demand for accurate absolute dosimetry for protons. As calorimetry is the most direct way to establish the absorbed dose and because water has recently been accepted as standard material for this type of beam, the importance of water calorimetry is obvious. In this work we report water calorimeter operation in an 85-MeV proton beam and a comparison of the absorbed dose to water measured by ionometry with the dose resulting from water calorimetric measurements. To ensure a proper understanding of the heat defect for defined impurities in water for this type of radiation, a relative response study was first done in comparison with theoretical calculations of the heat defect. The results showed that pure hypoxic water and hydrogen-saturated water yielded the same response with practically zero heat defect, in agreement with the model calculations. The absorbed dose inferred from these measurements was then compared with the dose derived from ionometry by applying the European Charged Heavy Particle Dosimetry (ECHED) protocol. Restricting the comparison to chambers recommended in the protocol, the calorimeter dose was found to be 2.6% +/- 0.9% lower than the average ionometry dose. In order to estimate the significance of chamber-dependent effects in this deviation, measurements were performed using a set of ten ionization chambers of five different types. The maximum internal deviation in the ionometry results amounted to 1.1%. We detected no systematic chamber volume dependence, but observed a small but systematic effect of the chamber wall thickness. The observed deviation between calorimetry and ionometry can be attributed to a combination of the value of (Wair/e)p for protons, adopted in the ECHED protocol, the mass stopping power ratios of water to air for protons, and possibly small ionization chamber wall effects.

  11. pytc: Open-Source Python Software for Global Analyses of Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvvuri, Hiranmayi; Wheeler, Lucas C; Harms, Michael J

    2018-05-08

    Here we describe pytc, an open-source Python package for global fits of thermodynamic models to multiple isothermal titration calorimetry experiments. Key features include simplicity, the ability to implement new thermodynamic models, a robust maximum likelihood fitter, a fast Bayesian Markov-Chain Monte Carlo sampler, rigorous implementation, extensive documentation, and full cross-platform compatibility. pytc fitting can be done using an application program interface or via a graphical user interface. It is available for download at https://github.com/harmslab/pytc .

  12. Determination of magnetic characteristics of nanoparticles by low-temperature calorimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugulava, A.; Toklikishvili, Z. [Department of Physics, I.Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University,I.Chavchavadze av. 3, 0179 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Chkhaidze, S., E-mail: simon.chkhaidze@tsu.ge [Department of Physics, I.Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University,I.Chavchavadze av. 3, 0179 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Kekutia, Sh. [V. Chavchanidze Institute of Cybernetics, at the Technical State University, S. Euli str. 5, 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States)

    2017-05-15

    At low temperatures, the heat capacity of a superparamagnetic “ideal gas” determined by magnetic degrees of freedom can greatly exceed the lattice heat capacity. It is shown that in the presence of an external magnetic field, the temperature dependence of the magnetic part of the heat capacity has two maxima. The relations between the temperature at which these maxima are achieved, the magnetic moment of the nanoparticles and the magnetic anisotropy constant have been obtained. Measuring the heat capacity maxima temperatures by low-temperature calorimetry methods and using the obtained relations, we can obtain the numerical values both of the magnetic moment of nanoparticles and the magnetic anisotropy constants.

  13. Physico-chemical changes in heavy ions irradiated polymer foils by differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciesla, K.; Trautmann, Ch.; Vansant, E.F.

    1994-01-01

    The sample of commercial PETP (Hostaphan) and very heavy ions irradiated products were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry in nitrogen flow. Irradiation were performed with Dy ions of 13 MeV/u with fluences 5 x 10 10 ions/cm 2 . Differences were observed in melting behaviour of unirradiated and irradiated foils. The influence of irradiation conditions on the results was noticed. Moreover the samples of polyimide (Kapton) and polycarbonate (Macrofol) irradiated in similar conditions were examined by DSC. The DSC traces have been compared with those of unirradiated reference samples. (author). 8 refs, 5 figs

  14. Test in a beam of large-area Micromegas chambers for sampling calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Dalmaz, A.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Jacquemier, J.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Peltier, F.; Samarati, J.; Vouters, G.

    2014-06-11

    Application of Micromegas for sampling calorimetry puts specific constraints on the design and performance of this gaseous detector. In particular, uniform and linear response, low noise and stability against high ionisation density deposits are prerequisites to achieving good energy resolution. A Micromegas-based hadronic calorimeter was proposed for an application at a future linear collider experiment and three technologically advanced prototypes of 1$\\times$1 m$^{2}$ were constructed. Their merits relative to the above-mentioned criteria are discussed on the basis of measurements performed at the CERN SPS test-beam facility.

  15. Calorimetry of Pu in the context of fuel fabrication follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanson, C.; Arnal, Thierry

    1979-01-01

    Calorimetry appears to be a particularly attractive method for obtaining balances within the context of fuel fabrication follow-up. Under this method the heat released by any plutonium sample is determined with calorimeters fitted with thermocouples, thereby ensuring perfect stability in time response. The first results achieved with two inexpensive prototype calorimeters are as follows, so far: response time, six hours approximately; sensitivity greater than 4 mv.W -1 and repeatability in the order 1%. It will no doubt be possible to improve this performance to a notable extent in the near future [fr

  16. Insights into glass transition and relaxation behavior using temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, J.C.; Allan, D.C.

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) is based on conventional DSC but with a sinusoidally modulated temperature path. Our simulations of TMDSC signals prove that the frequency correction of non-reversing heat flow can give a master curve within a certain range...... of frequencies. This frequency range is dependent not only on the measurement parameters such as linear heating/cooling rate and frequency and amplitude of the modulation, but also on the previous thermal history before the TMDSC measurement. The frequency correction for the reversing heat flow gives more...

  17. On the Frequency Correction in Temperature-Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Glass Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, J.C.; Allan, D.C.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) is based on conventional DSC but with a sinusoidally modulated temperature path. Simulations of TMDSC signals were performed for Corning EAGLE XG® glass over a wide range of modulation frequencies. Our results reveal that the frequency...... correction commonly used in the interpretation of TMDSC signals leads to a master nonreversing heat flow curve independent of modulation frequency, provided that sufficiently high frequencies are employed in the TMDSC measurement. A master reversing heat flow curve can also be generated through the frequency...

  18. A novel calorimetry technique for monitoring electron beam curing of polymer resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.H.; Johnston, A.; Petrescue, L.; Hojjati, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a calorimetry-based technique for monitoring of the curing of electron beam (EB) curable resins, including design of the calorimeter hardware and the development of an analytical model for calculating resin cure rates and radiation dose. Factors affecting the performance of the calorimeter were investigated. Experimental trials monitoring the curing of epoxy resin were conducted under single pass and multiple passes of EB irradiation. Results show that the developed calorimeter is a simple, inexpensive and reasonably accurate technique for monitoring the EB curing of cationic epoxies

  19. Conductivity, calorimetry and phase diagram of the NaHSO4–KHSO4 system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hind, Hamma-Cugny; Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Rogez, J.

    2006-01-01

    to polynomials of the form κ(X)=A(X)+B(X)(T-Tm)+C(X)(T-Tm)2, where Tm is the intermediate temperature of the measured temperature range and X, the mole fraction of KHSO4. The possible role of this binary system as a catalyst solvent is also discussed. (C) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......Physico-chemical properties of the binary system NaHSO4-KHSO4 were studied by calorimetry and conductivity, The enthalpy of mixing has been measured at 505 K in the full composition range and the phase diagram calculated. The phase diagram has also been constructed from phase transition...

  20. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    The combustion of wood chips and wood pellets for the production of renewable energy in Denmark increased from 5.7 PJ to 16 PJ during the period 2000-2015, and further increases are expected to occur within the coming years. In 2012, about 22,300 tonnes of wood ashes were generated in Denmark....... Currently, these ashes are mainly landfilled, despite Danish legislation allowing their application onto forest and agricultural soils for fertilising and/or liming purposes. During this PhD work, 16 wood ash samples generated at ten different Danish combustion plants were collected and characterised...... for their composition and leaching properties. Despite the relatively large variations in the contents of nutrients and trace metals, the overall levels were comparable to typical ranges reported in the literature for other wood combustion ashes, as well as with regards to leaching. In general, the composition...

  1. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  2. Determination of the oxidizing property: proposal of an alternative method based on differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigante, L.; Dellavedova, M.; Pasturenzi, C.; Lunghi, A.; Mattarella, M.; Cardillo, P.

    2008-01-01

    Determination of chemical-physical and hazardous properties of substances is a very important matter in the chemical industry, considering the growing attention of public opinion regarding safety and eco-compatibility aspects of products. In the present work, attention was focused on characterization of oxidizing properties. In case of solid compounds, the current method (Dir 84/449/CEE 6) compares the maximum combustion rate of the examined substance to the maximum combustion rate of a reference mixture. This method shows a lot of disvantages and does not provide a quantitative result. In the following work an alternative method, based on DSC measurements, is proposed for the determination of oxidizing properties. [it

  3. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sheppard, E.J. [Tuskeggee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  4. Improvement of fuel combustion technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumanovskii, A.G.; Babii, V.I.; Enyakin, Y.P.; Kotler, V.R.; Ryabov, G.V.; Verbovetskii, E.K.; Nadyrov, I.I. [All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-07-01

    The main problems encountered in the further development of fuel combustion technologies at thermal power stations in Russia are considered. Experience is generalized and results are presented on the efficiency with which nitrogen oxide emissions are reduced by means of technological methods when burning natural gas, fuel oil, and coal. The problems that arise in the introduction of new combustion technologies and in using more promising grades of coal are considered. The results studies are presented that show that low grade Russian coals can be burnt in circulating fluidized bed boilers. 14 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  6. Application of the FIRST Combustion model to Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, B.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2004-01-01

    Liquid fuel is of interest to apply to gas turbines. The large advantage is that liquids are easily storable as compared to gaseous fuels. Disadvantage is that liquid fuel has to be sprayed, vaporized and mixed with air. Combustion occurs at some stage of mixing and ignition. Depending on the

  7. Development of a Premixed Combustion Capability for Scramjet Combustion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; Rice, Brian E.; Chelliah, Harsha; McDaniel, James C.; Edwards, Jack R.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing engines rely on scramjet combustion processes, which involve high speed, compressible, and highly turbulent flows. The combustion environment and the turbulent flames at the heart of these engines are difficult to simulate and study in the laboratory under well controlled conditions. Typically, wind-tunnel testing is performed that more closely approximates engine testing rather than a careful investigation of the underlying physics that drives the combustion process. The experiments described in this paper, along with companion data sets being developed separately, aim to isolate the chemical kinetic effects from the fuel-air mixing process in a dual-mode scramjet combustion environment. A unique fuel injection approach is taken that produces a nearly uniform fuel-air mixture at the entrance to the combustor. This approach relies on the precombustion shock train upstream of the dual-mode scramjet combustor. A stable ethylene flame anchored on a cavity flameholder with a uniformly mixed combustor inflow has been achieved in these experiments allowing numerous companion studies involving coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), particle image velocimetry (PIV), and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be performed.

  8. Interactive wood combustion for botanical tree models

    KAUST Repository

    Pirk, Sö ren; Jarząbek, Michał; Hadrich, Torsten; Michels, Dominik L.; Palubicki, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel method for the combustion of botanical tree models. Tree models are represented as connected particles for the branching structure and a polygonal surface mesh for the combustion. Each particle stores biological and physical

  9. Free Energy and Internal Combustion Engine Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, William D.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of one type (Carnot) of Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) cycle is analyzed within the framework of thermodynamic free energies. ICE performance is different from that of an External Combustion Engine (ECE) which is dictated by Carnot's rule.

  10. Method for storing radioactive combustible waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, H.W.; Lovelace, R.C.

    1973-10-01

    A method is described for preventing pressure buildup in sealed containers which contain radioactively contaminated combustible waste material by adding an oxide getter material to the container so as to chemically bind sorbed water and combustion product gases. (Official Gazette)

  11. Scramjet Combustion Stability Behavior Modeling, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in combustion stability analysis (UCDS) offers the potential to predict the combustion stability of a scramjet. This capability is very...

  12. Scramjet Combustion Stability Behavior Modeling, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in combustion stability analysis (UCDS) offers the means to accurately predict the combustion stability of a scramjet. This capability is very...

  13. Publication sites productive uses of combustion ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Publication Sites Productive Uses of Combustion Ash For more information contact: e:mail: Public waste combustion ash in landfills. The new technology brief describes recent studies where ash was used

  14. Combustion Research Facility | A Department of Energy Office of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaborative Research Facility Back to Sandia National Laboratory Homepage Combustion Research Search the CRF Combustion Chemistry Flame Chemistry Research.Combustion_Chemistry.Flame_Chemistry Theory and Modeling Theory and Modeling Combustion Kinetics High Pressure Chemistry Chemistry of Autoignition

  15. Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Photo of a gasoline emissions in advanced engine technologies. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL's combustion research and combustion and engine research activities include: Developing experimental and simulation research platforms

  16. Direct calorimetry of free-moving eels with manipulated thyroid status

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginneken, Vincent; Ballieux, Bart; Antonissen, Erik; van der Linden, Rob; Gluvers, Ab; van den Thillart, Guido

    2007-02-01

    In birds and mammals, the thyroid gland secretes the iodothyronine hormones of which tetraiodothyronine (T4) is less active than triiodothyronine (T3). The action of T3 and T4 is calorigenic and is involved in the control of metabolic rate. Across all vertebrates, thyroid hormones also play a major role in differentiation, development and growth. Although the fish thyroidal system has been researched extensively, its role in thermogenesis is unclear. In this study, we measured overall heat production to an accuracy of 0.1 mW by direct calorimetry in a free-moving European eel ( Anguilla anguilla L.) with different thyroid status. Hyperthyroidism was induced by injection of T3 and T4, and hypothyroidism was induced with phenylthiourea. The results show for the first time at the organismal level, using direct calorimetry, that neither overall heat production nor overall oxygen consumption in eels is affected by hyperthyroidism. Therefore, we conclude that the thermogenic metabolism-stimulating effect of thyroid hormones (TH) is not present with a cold-blooded fish species like the European eel. This supports the concept that TH does not stimulate thermogenesis in poikilothermic species.

  17. Resting energy expenditure and body composition in children with cancer: indirect calorimetry and bioimpedance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Konovalova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Resting energy expenditure (REE by indirect calorimetry and body composition by bioimpedance analysis are studied in three groups of children aged 5–18 years. Group 1 (n = 181 – patients in remission of cancer, group 2 (n = 55 – children with oncology diseases receiving chemotherapy or who are in the early period after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, group 3 (n = 63 – children with non-malignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. To eliminate the influence of age and gender on the intergroup comparisons, body composition parameters were expressed as standardized values (z-scores relative to a reference group of healthy Russian children (n = 138,191. Group 1 was characterized by excess fat content with intact lean body mass, and groups 2 and 3 by protein depletion, more pronounced in Group 2 with a higher percentage of body fat. All used conventional formulas (WHO, Harris–Benedict and others in groups 1 and 3 underestimated REE as compared with indirect calorimetry. A new formula for REE, giving an unbiased estimate in the group 1 was proposed: REE (kcal/day = 28.7 × BCM (kg +10.5 × Height (cm – 38.6 × Age (years – 134, where BCM – body cell mass according to bioimpedance analysis (R2 = 0.67, the standard deviation of 196 kcal/day.

  18. Titration calorimetry of surfactant–drug interactions: Micelle formation and saturation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, Laura J.; Hussain, Talib; Parkes, Gareth M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Isothermal titration calorimetry can be used to monitor the saturation of micelles with pharmaceutical compounds. ► The number of drug molecules per micelle varies depending on the drug used and the temperature of the calorimeter. ► The change in enthalpy for the saturation of micelles with drugs can be endothermic or exothermic. ► The critical micellar concentration of an anionic surfactant (SDS) does not appear to vary in the presence of drugs. - Abstract: Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was employed to monitor the addition of five model drugs to anionic surfactant based micelles, composed of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), through to the point at which they were saturated with drug. Analysis of the resultant data using this newly developed method has confirmed the suitability of the technique to acquire such data with saturation limits established in all cases. Values for the point at which saturation occurred ranged from 17 molecules of theophylline per micelle at T = 298 K up to 63 molecules of caffeine per micelle at 310 K. Micellar systems can be disrupted by the presence of additional chemicals, such as the drugs used in this study, therefore a separate investigation was undertaken to determine the critical micellar concentration (CMC) for SDS in the presence of each drug at T = 298 K and 310 K using ITC. In the majority of cases, there was no appreciable alteration to the CMC of SDS with drug present.

  19. Kinetics of enzymatic high-solid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass studied by calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Søren N; Lumby, Erik; McFarland, Kc; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of high-solid biomass (>10% w/w dry mass) has become increasingly important as a key step in the production of second-generation bioethanol. To this end, development of quantitative real-time assays is desirable both for empirical optimization and for detailed kinetic analysis. In the current work, we have investigated the application of isothermal calorimetry to study the kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis of two substrates (pretreated corn stover and Avicel) at high-solid contents (up to 29% w/w). It was found that the calorimetric heat flow provided a true measure of the hydrolysis rate with a detection limit of about 500 pmol glucose s(-1). Hence, calorimetry is shown to be a highly sensitive real-time method, applicable for high solids, and independent on the complexity of the substrate. Dose-response experiments with a typical cellulase cocktail enabled a multidimensional analysis of the interrelationships of enzyme load and the rate, time, and extent of the reaction. The results suggest that the hydrolysis rate of pretreated corn stover is limited initially by available attack points on the substrate surface (conversion) but becomes proportional to enzyme dosage (excess of attack points) at later stages (>10% conversion). This kinetic profile is interpreted as an increase in polymer end concentration (substrate for CBH) as the hydrolysis progresses, probably due to EG activity in the enzyme cocktail. Finally, irreversible enzyme inactivation did not appear to be the source of reduced hydrolysis rate over time.

  20. Study of gamma irradiated polyethylenes by temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secerov, B.; Galovic, S.; Trifunovic, S.; Milicevic, D.; Suljovrujic, E.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The various polyethylenes (PEs) and effects of high energy radiation on theirs structures were widely studied in the past using conventional Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements. In this work, we applied the Temperature Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TMDSC) technique in order to obtain more information about the influence of initial structural differences and gamma radiation on the evolution in structure and thermal properties of different polyethylenes. For this reason, low density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) samples were exposed to gamma radiation, in air, to a wide range of absorbed doses (up to 2400 kGy). The separation of the total heat flow TMDSC signal into a reversing and nonreversing part enabled to observed the low temperature enthalpy relaxation (related to the existence of the 'rigid amorphous phase') and recrystallization processes as well as to follow their and/or radiation-induced evolution of melting in a more revealing manner compared to the case of the conventional DSC. Consequently, our results indicate that TMDSC could improve the understanding of radiation-induced effects in polymers.

  1. A study of gamma-irradiated polyethylenes by temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galovic, S.; Secerov, B.; Trifunovic, S.; Milicevic, D.; Suljovrujic, E.

    2012-09-01

    Various polyethylenes (PEs) and the effects of high-energy radiation on their structures were widely studied in the past using conventional Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements. In this work, we used the Temperature Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TMDSC) technique in order to obtain more information about the influence of the initial structural differences and gamma radiation on the evolution in structure and thermal properties of different polyethylenes. For this reason, low density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) samples were exposed to gamma radiation, in air, to a wide range of absorbed doses (up to 2400 kGy). The separation of the total heat flow TMDSC signal into a reversing and non-reversing part enabled us to observe the low-temperature enthalpy relaxation (related to the existence of the "rigid amorphous phase") and recrystallisation processes, as well as to follow their radiation-induced evolution and/or that of melting in a more revealing manner compared to the case of the conventional DSC. Consequently, our results indicate that TMDSC could improve the understanding of radiation-induced effects in polymers.

  2. Thermal behavior and phase identification of Valsartan by standard and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotnicki, Marcin; Gaweł, Agnieszka; Cebe, Peggy; Pyda, Marek

    2013-10-01

    Thermal behavior of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, Valsartan (VAL), was examined employing thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), standard differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC). The stability of VAL was measured by TGA from 25 to 600°C. Decomposition of Valsartan starts around 160°C. The DSC curve shows two endotherms, occurring around 80°C and 100°C, related to evaporation of water and enthalpy relaxation, respectively. Valsartan was identified by DSC as an amorphous material and it was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction. The glass transition of fresh Valsartan appears around 76°C (fictive temperature). TMDSC allows separation of the total heat flow rate into reversing and nonreversing parts. The nonreversing curve corresponds to the enthalpy relaxation and the reversing curve shows changes of heat capacity around 94°C. In the second run, TMDSC curve shows the glass transition process occurring at around 74°C. Results from standard DSC and TMDSC of Valsartan were compared over the whole range of temperature.

  3. The heat capacity of polyethylene fibers measured by multi-frequency temperature-modulated calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyda, M.; Nowak-Pyda, E.; Wunderlich, B.

    2006-01-01

    The apparent heat capacity of polyethylene fibers in the melting region was measured by quasi-isothermal, temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) and compared with results from standard differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the solid and liquid thermodynamic heat capacity as references from the ATHAS Data Bank. Using a multi-frequency, complex sawtooth modulation in the quasi-isothermal mode disclosed for the first time that the uncorrected apparent heat capacity C p =A Φ /(A T s ω) of the liquid polyethylene fiber increases with increasing frequency (A Φ is the differential heat-flow rate and A T s is the sample temperature). The frequency-dependent heat capacity cannot be represented by the expression: C p =A Φ /(A T s νω)[1+(τνω) 2 ] 0.5 because of a negative τ 2 . The results were later confirmed by independent measurements on single sinusoidal quasi-isothermal TMDSC on the same material. The error is caused by shrinking of the fiber, which deforms the sample pan

  4. Chip calorimetry for evaluation of biofilm treatment with biocides, antibiotics, and biological agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Frida Mariana; Buchholz, Friederike; Maskow, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Any growth or bioconversion in biofilms is accompanied by the release of heat. The heat (in J) is tightly related to the stoichiometry of the respective process via law of Hess, and the heat production rate (in W or J/s) is additionally related to the process kinetics. This heat and the heat production rate can nowadays be measured by modern calorimetry with extremely high sensitivity. Flow-through calorimetry allows the measurement of bioprocesses in biofilms in real time, without the need of invasive sample preparation and disturbing of biofilm processes. Furthermore, it can be applied for long-term measurements and is even applicable to turbid media. Chip or miniaturized calorimeters have the additional advantages of extremely short thermal equilibration times and the requirement of very small amounts of media and chemicals. The precision of flow-through chip calorimeters (about 3 mW/L) allows the detection of early stages of biofilm development (about 10(5) bacteria cm(-2)).

  5. A High-Throughput Biological Calorimetry Core: Steps to Startup, Run, and Maintain a Multiuser Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennawar, Neela H; Fecko, Julia A; Showalter, Scott A; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2016-01-01

    Many labs have conventional calorimeters where denaturation and binding experiments are setup and run one at a time. While these systems are highly informative to biopolymer folding and ligand interaction, they require considerable manual intervention for cleaning and setup. As such, the throughput for such setups is limited typically to a few runs a day. With a large number of experimental parameters to explore including different buffers, macromolecule concentrations, temperatures, ligands, mutants, controls, replicates, and instrument tests, the need for high-throughput automated calorimeters is on the rise. Lower sample volume requirements and reduced user intervention time compared to the manual instruments have improved turnover of calorimetry experiments in a high-throughput format where 25 or more runs can be conducted per day. The cost and efforts to maintain high-throughput equipment typically demands that these instruments be housed in a multiuser core facility. We describe here the steps taken to successfully start and run an automated biological calorimetry facility at Pennsylvania State University. Scientists from various departments at Penn State including Chemistry, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bioengineering, Biology, Food Science, and Chemical Engineering are benefiting from this core facility. Samples studied include proteins, nucleic acids, sugars, lipids, synthetic polymers, small molecules, natural products, and virus capsids. This facility has led to higher throughput of data, which has been leveraged into grant support, attracting new faculty hire and has led to some exciting publications. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Applications of isothermal titration calorimetry - the research and technical developments from 2011 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry is a widely used biophysical technique for studying the formation or dissociation of molecular complexes. Over the last 5 years, much work has been published on the interpretation of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data for single binding and multiple binding sites. As over 80% of ITC papers are on macromolecules of biological origin, this interpretation is challenging. Some researchers have attempted to link the thermodynamics constants to events at the molecular level. This review highlights work carried out using binding sites characterized using x-ray crystallography techniques that allow speculation about individual bond formation and the displacement of individual water molecules during ligand binding and link these events to the thermodynamic constants for binding. The review also considers research conducted with synthetic binding partners where specific binding events like anion-π and π-π interactions were studied. The revival of assays that enable both thermodynamic and kinetic information to be collected from ITC data is highlighted. Lastly, published criticism of ITC research from a physical chemistry perspective is appraised and practical advice provided for researchers unfamiliar with thermodynamics and its interpretation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Thermochemistry of some binary lead and transition metal compounds by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meschel, S.V., E-mail: meschel@jfi.uchicago.edu [Illinois Institute of Technology,Thermal Processing Technology Center, 10 W. 32nd Street, Chicago, Illinois 60615 (United States); Gordon Center for Integrated Science, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Nash, P. [Illinois Institute of Technology,Thermal Processing Technology Center, 10 W. 32nd Street, Chicago, Illinois 60615 (United States); Chen, X.Q.; Wei, P. [Materials processing Modeling Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metals Research, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang City (China)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Studied binary lead-transition metal alloys by high temperature calorimetry. • Determined the enthalpies of formation of 8 alloys. • Compared the measurements with predictions by the model of Miedema and by the ab initio method. - Abstract: The standard enthalpies of formation of some binary lead and transition metal compounds have been measured by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry. The reported results are: Pb{sub 3}Sc{sub 5}(−61.3 ± 2.9); PbTi{sub 4}(−16.6 ± 2.4); Pb{sub 3}Y{sub 5}(−64.8 ± 3.6); Pb{sub 3}Zr{sub 5}(−50.6 ± 3.1); PbNb{sub 3}(−10.4 ± 3.4); PbRh(−16.5 ± 3.3); PbPd{sub 3}(−29.6 ± 3.1); PbPt(−34.7 ± 3.3) kJ/mole of atoms. We will compare our results with previously published measurements. We will also compare the experimental measurements with enthalpies of formation of transition metal compounds with elements in the same vertical column in the periodic table. We will compare our measurements with predicted values on the basis of the semi empirical model of Miedema and coworkers and with ab initio values when available.

  8. Thin-film calorimetry. In-situ characterization of materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omelcenko, Alexander; Wulfmeier, Hendrik; Albrecht, Daniel; Fritze, Holger [Clausthal Univ. of Technology, Goslar (Germany). Inst. of Energy Research and Physical Technologies; El Mofid, Wassima; Ivanov, Svetlozar; Bund, Andreas [Ilmenau Univ. of Technology (Germany). Dept. of Electrochemistry

    2017-11-15

    Thin-film calorimetry allows for qualitative and quantitative in-situ analysis of thermodynamic properties of thin films and thin-film systems from room temperature up to 1000 C. It is based on highly sensitive piezoelectric langasite resonators which serve simultaneously as planar temperature sensors and substrates for the films of interest. Generation or consumption of heat during phase transformations of the films cause deviations from the regular course of the resonance frequency. Thermodynamic data such as phase transformation temperatures and enthalpies are extracted from these deviations. Thin-film calorimetry on Sn and Al thin films is performed to prove the concept. The results demonstrate high reproducibility of the measurement approach and are in agreement with literature data obtained by established calorimetric techniques. The calibration of the system is done in different atmospheres by application of defined heat pulses via heating structures. The latter replace the films of interest and simulate phase transformations to provide detailed analysis of the heat transfer mechanisms occurring in the measurement system. Based on this analysis, a data evaluation concept is developed. Application-relevant studies are performed on thin films of the lithium-ion battery materials NMC(A), NCA, LMO, and MoS{sub 2}. Their phase transformation temperatures and enthalpies are evaluated in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. Furthermore, their thermodynamic stability ranges are presented. Finally, measurements on all-solid-state thin-film batteries during electrochemical cycling are performed. They demonstrate the suitability of the system for in-situ investigations.

  9. Methodology of hot nucleus calorimetry and thermometry produced by nuclear reactions around Fermi energies; Methodologie de la calorimetrie et de la thermometrie des noyaux chauds formes lors de collisions nucleaires aux energies de Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vient, E

    2006-12-15

    This work deals with the calorimetry and thermometry of hot nuclei produced in collisions Xe + Sn between 25 and 100 MeV/u. The apparatus for hot nucleus physical characterization is the 4{pi} detector array Indra. This study was made by using the event generators Gemini, Simon and Hipse and a data-processing filter simulating the complete operation of the multi-detector. The first chapter presents the different ways of producing hot nuclei. In the second and third chapters, the author presents a critical methodological study of calorimetry and thermometry applied to hot nuclei, different methods are reviewed, their accuracy and application range are assessed. All the calorimetry methods rely on the assumption that we are able to discriminate decay products of the hot nucleus from evaporated particles. In the fourth chapter, the author gives some ways of improving calorimetry characterization of the hot nucleus. An alternative method of calorimetry is proposed in the fifth chapter, this method is based on the experimental determination of an evaporation probability that is deduced from the physical characteristics of the particles present in a restricted domain of the space of velocities.

  10. High Frequency Combustion Instabilities of LOx/CH4 Spray Flames in Rocket Engine Combustion Chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliphorst, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the early stages of space transportation in the 1940’s, and the related liquid propellant rocket engine development, combustion instability has been a major issue. High frequency combustion instability (HFCI) is the interaction between combustion and the acoustic field in the combustion

  11. Leaching from biomass combustion ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    The use of biomass combustion ashes for fertilizing and liming purposes has been widely addressed in scientific literature. Nevertheless, the content of potentially toxic compounds raises concerns for a possible contamination of the soil. During this study five ash samples generated at four...

  12. An incinerator for combustable radwastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingquan; Jiang Yun; Zhang Yinsheng; Chen Boling; Zhang Shihang

    1989-01-01

    An incinerator has been built up in Shanghai. In this paper, the devices of the incinerator, main parameters of the process, and the results of non-radioactive waste and simulated radwaste combustion tests were contributed. That provides reference information for radwaste treatment with incineration process

  13. 75 FR 32142 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    .... Contact Mat Chibbaro, P.E., Fire Protection Engineer, Office of Safety Systems, OSHA Directorate of..., and metals (such as aluminum and magnesium). Industries that may have combustible dust hazards include..., chemical manufacturing, textile manufacturing, furniture manufacturing, metal processing, fabricated metal...

  14. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Kiil, Søren

    2000-01-01

    Several options are available to control the emission of SO2 from combustion processes. One possibility is to use a cleaner technology, i.e. fuel switching from oil and coal to natural gas or biomass, or to desulphurize coal and oil. Another possibility is to change to a different technology...

  15. Multi-zone modelling of PCCI combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egüz, U.; Somers, L.M.T.; Leermakers, C.A.J.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Early Direct Injection Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (EDI PCCI) combustion is a promising concept for the diesel combustion. Although EDI PCCI assures very low soot and NO xemission levels, the injection is uncoupled from combustion, which narrows down the operating conditions. The main

  16. Method and device for diagnosing and controlling combustion instabilities in internal combustion engines operating in or transitioning to homogeneous charge combustion ignition mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert M [Knoxville, TN; Daw, Charles S [Knoxville, TN; Green, Johney B [Knoxville, TN; Edwards, Kevin D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-07

    This invention is a method of achieving stable, optimal mixtures of HCCI and SI in practical gasoline internal combustion engines comprising the steps of: characterizing the combustion process based on combustion process measurements, determining the ratio of conventional and HCCI combustion, determining the trajectory (sequence) of states for consecutive combustion processes, and determining subsequent combustion process modifications using said information to steer the engine combustion toward desired behavior.

  17. Environmental optimisation of waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Robert [AaF Energikonsult, Stockholm (Sweden); Berge, Niclas; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    The regulations concerning waste combustion evolve through R and D and a strive to get better and common regulations for the European countries. This study discusses if these rules of today concerning oxygen concentration, minimum temperature and residence time in the furnace and the use of stand-by burners are needed, are possible to monitor, are the optimum from an environmental point of view or could be improved. No evidence from well controlled laboratory experiments validate that 850 deg C in 6 % oxygen content in general is the best lower limit. A lower excess air level increase the temperature, which has a significant effect on the destruction of hydrocarbons, favourably increases the residence time, increases the thermal efficiency and the efficiency of the precipitators. Low oxygen content is also necessary to achieve low NO{sub x}-emissions. The conclusion is that the demands on the accuracy of the measurement devices and methods are too high, if they are to be used inside the furnace to control the combustion process. The big problem is however to find representative locations to measure temperature, oxygen content and residence time in the furnace. Another major problem is that the monitoring of the operation conditions today do not secure a good combustion. It can lead to a false security. The reason is that it is very hard to find boilers without stratifications. These stratifications (stream lines) has each a different history of residence time, mixing time, oxygen and combustible gas levels and temperature, when they reach the convection area. The combustion result is the sum of all these different histories. The hydrocarbons emission is in general not produced at a steady level. Small clouds of unburnt hydrocarbons travels along the stream lines showing up as peaks on a THC measurement device. High amplitude peaks has a tendency to contain higher ratio of heavy hydrocarbons than lower peaks. The good correlation between some easily detected

  18. Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Joel Meier [Niskayuna, NY; Mosbacher, David Matthew [Cohoes, NY; Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian [Troy, NY; Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan [Mason, OH

    2011-03-22

    A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

  19. Coal combustion waste management study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    Coal-fired generation accounted for almost 55 percent of the production of electricity in the United States in 1990. Coal combustion generates high volumes of ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes, estimated at almost 90 million tons. The amount of ash and flue gas desulfurization wastes generated by coal-fired power plants is expected to increase as a result of future demand growth, and as more plants comply with Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Nationwide, on average, over 30 percent of coal combustion wastes is currently recycled for use in various applications; the remaining percentage is ultimately disposed in waste management units. There are a significant number of on-site and off-site waste management units that are utilized by the electric utility industry to store or dispose of coal combustion waste. Table ES-1 summarizes the number of disposal units and estimates of waste contained at these unites by disposal unit operating status (i.e, operating or retired). Further, ICF Resources estimates that up to 120 new or replacement units may need to be constructed to service existing and new coal capacity by the year 2000. The two primary types of waste management units used by the industry are landfills and surface impoundments. Utility wastes have been exempted by Congress from RCRA Subtitle C hazardous waste regulation since 1980. As a result of this exemption, coal combustion wastes are currently being regulated under Subtitle D of RCRA. As provided under Subtitle D, wastes not classified as hazardous under Subtitle C are subject to State regulation. At the same time Congress developed this exemption, also known as the ''Bevill Exclusion,'' it directed EPA to prepare a report on coal combustion wastes and make recommendations on how they should be managed

  20. Modeling of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki

    2012-10-01

    Recently, many experimental study of plasma-assisted combustion has been done. However, numerous complex reactions in combustion of hydrocarbons are preventing from theoritical study for clarifying inside the plasma-assisted combustion, and the effect of plasma-assist is still not understood. Shinohara and Sasaki [1,2] have reported that the shortening of flame length by irradiating microwave without increase of gas temperature. And they also reported that the same phenomena would occur when applying dielectric barrier discharges to the flame using simple hydrocarbon, methane. It is suggested that these phenomena may result by the electron heating. To clarify this phenomena, electron behavior under microwave and DBD was examined. For the first step of DBD plasma-assisted combustion simulation, electron Monte Carlo simulation in methane, oxygen and argon mixture gas(0.05:0.14:0.81) [2] has been done. Electron swarm parameters are sampled and electron energy distribution function (EEDF)s are also determined. In the combustion, gas temperature is higher(>1700K), so reduced electric field E/N becomes relatively high(>10V/cm/Torr). The electrons are accelerated to around 14 eV. This result agree with the optical emission from argon obtained by the experiment of reference [2]. Dissociation frequency of methane and oxygens are obtained in high. This might be one of the effect of plasma-assist. And it is suggested that the electrons should be high enough to dissociate methane, but plasma is not needed.[4pt] [1] K. Shinohara et al, J. Phys. D:Appl. Phys., 42, 182008 (1-7) (2009).[0pt] [2] K. Sasaki, 64th Annual Gaseous Electronic Conference, 56, 15 CT3.00001(2011).

  1. Combustive management of oil spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Extensive experiments with in situ incineration were performed on a desert site at the University of Arizona with very striking results. The largest incinerator, 6 feet in diameter with a 30 foot chimney, developed combustion temperatures of 3000, F, and attendant soot production approximately 1000 times less than that produced by conventional in situ burning. This soot production, in fact, is approximately 30 times less than current allowable EPA standards for incinerators and internal combustion engines. Furthermore, as a consequence of the high temperature combustion, the bum rate was established at a very high 3400 gallons per hour for this particular 6 foot diameter structure. The rudimentary design studies we have carried out relative to a seagoing 8 foot diameter incinerator have predicted that a continuous burn rate of 7000 gallons per hour is realistic. This structure was taken as a basis for operational design because it is compatible with C130 flyability, and will be inexpensive enough ($120,000 per copy) to be stored at those seaside depots throughout the US coast line in which the requisite ancillary equipments (booms, service tugs, etc.) are already deployed. The LOX experiments verified our expectations with respect to combustion of debris and various highly weathered or emulsified oils. We have concluded, however, that the use of liquid oxygen in actual beach clean up is not promising because the very high temperatures associated with this combustion are almost certain to produce environmentally deleterious effects on the beach surface and its immediately sublying structures. However, the use of liquid oxygen augmentation for shore based and flyable incinerators may still play an important role in handing the problem of accumulated debris

  2. Inhibition Effect of Phosphorus Flame Retardants on the Fire Disasters Induced by Spontaneous Combustion of Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibo Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal spontaneous combustion (CSC generally induces fire disasters in underground mines, thus causing serious casualties, environmental pollution, and property loss around the world. By using six P-containing additives to process three typical coal samples, this study investigated the variations of the self-ignition characteristics of the coal samples before and after treatment. The analysis was performed by combining thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry (TG/DSC Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR and low temperature oxidation. Experimental results showed that P-containing inhibitors could effectively restrain the heat emitted in the combustion of coal samples and therefore the ignition temperature of the coal samples was delayed at varying degrees. The combustion rate of the coal samples was reduced as well. At the temperatures ranging from 50°C to 150°C, the activation energy of the coal samples after the treatment was found to increase, which indicated that the coal samples were more difficult to be oxidized. After being treated with phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs, the content of several active groups represented by the C-O structure in the three coal samples was proved to be obviously changed. This suggested that PFRs could significantly inhibit the content of CO generated by the low temperature oxidation of coal, and the flame-retardant efficiency grew with the increasing temperature. At 200°C, the maximal inhibition efficiency reached approximately 85%.

  3. Heat capacity and transition behavior of sucrose by standard, fast scanning and temperature-modulated calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magoń, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Technology, 35-959 Rzeszów (Poland); Wurm, A.; Schick, C. [Department of Physics, University of Rostock, 18057 Rostock (Germany); Pangloli, Ph.; Zivanovic, S. [Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Skotnicki, M. [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 60-780 Poznań (Poland); Pyda, M., E-mail: mpyda@utk.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Technology, 35-959 Rzeszów (Poland)

    2014-08-10

    Highlights: • Experimental, apparent heat capacity of sucrose was investigated by advanced thermal analysis. • Vibrational heat capacity of solid state was linked with a low temperature experimental heat capacity of sucrose. • Equilibrium melting parameters of sucrose were determined. • Decomposition, superheating of crystalline sucrose during melting process were presented. • TGA, DSC, TMDSC, and FSC are useful tools for characterization of sucrose. - Abstract: The heat capacity (C{sub p}) of crystalline and amorphous sucrose was determined using standard and quasi-isothermal temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry. The results were combined with the published data determined by adiabatic calorimetry, and the C{sub p} values are now reported for the wide 5–600 K range. The experimental C{sub p} of solid sucrose at 5–300 K was used to calculate the vibrational, solid C{sub p} based on the vibrational molecular motions. The calculated solid and liquid C{sub p} together with the transition parameters for equilibrium conditions were used as references for detailed quantitative thermal analysis of crystalline and amorphous sucrose. Melting temperature (T{sub m}) of the crystalline sucrose was identified in a broad 442–465 K range with a heat of fusion of 40–46 J/mol determined at heating rates 0.5–20 K/min, respectively. The equilibrium T{sub m} and heat of fusion of crystalline sucrose were estimated at zero heating rate as T{sup o}{sub m} = 424.4 K and ΔH{sup o}{sub f} = 32 kJ/mol, respectively. The glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of amorphous sucrose was at 331 K with a change in C{sub p} of 267 J/(mol K) as it was estimated from reversing heat capacity by quasi-isothermal TMDSC on cooling. At heating rates less than 30 K/min, thermal decomposition occurred during melting, while at extreme rate of 1000 K/s, degradation was not observed. Data obtained by fast scanning calorimetry (FSC) at 1000 K/s, showed that T{sub m} was

  4. Use of combustible wastes as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.; Salamov, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Achievements of science and technology in creating and using units for combustion of wastes with recovery of heat of the escaping gases has been systematized and generalized. Scales and outlooks are examined for the use of general, industrial and agricultural waste as fuel, composition of the waste, questions of planning and operating units for combustion of solid refuse, settling of waste water and industrial and agricultural waste. Questions are covered for preparing them for combustion use in special units with recovery of heat and at ES, aspects of environmental protection during combustion of waste, cost indicators of the employed methods of recovering the combustible waste.

  5. Distributed Low Temperature Combustion: Fundamental Understanding of Combustion Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    behaviour as compared to ethanol. The latter fuel has also been considered along with methane. Work has also been performed on the further assessment of... behaviour as compared to ethanol. The latter fuel has also been considered along with methane. Work has also been performed on the further assess- ment of...identification of various combustion gas states. A range of Damköhler numbers (Da) from the conventional propagating flamelet regime well into the distributed

  6. Molten salt combustion of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, L.F.; McKenzie, D.E.; Richards, W.L.; Oldenkamp, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    The Atomics International Molten Salt Combustion Process reduces the weight and volume of combustible β-γ contaminated transuranic waste by utilizing air in a molten salt medium to combust organic materials, to trap particulates, and to react chemically with any acidic gases produced during combustion. Typically, incomplete combustion products such as hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide are below detection limits (i.e., 3 ) is directly related to the sodium chloride vapor pressure of the melt; >80% of the particulate is sodium chloride. Essentially all metal oxides (combustion ash) are retained in the melt, e.g., >99.9% of the plutonium, >99.6% of the europium, and >99.9% of the ruthenium are retained in the melt. Both bench-scale radioactive and pilot scale (50 kg/hr) nonradioactive combustion tests have been completed with essentially the same results. Design of three combustors for industrial applications are underway

  7. Dual-Readout Calorimetry for High-Quality Energy Measurements. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigmans, Richard; Nural, Akchurin

    2013-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report on the project Dual-Readout Calorimetry for High-Quality Energy Measurements. The project was carried out by a consortium of US and Italian physicists, led by Dr. Richard Wigmans (Texas tech University). This consortium built several particle detectors and tested these at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland. The idea arose to use scintillating crystals as dual-readout calorimeters. Such crystals were of course already known to provide excellent energy resolution for the detection of particles developing electromagnetic (em) showers. The efforts to separate the signals from scintillating crystals into scintillation and Cerenkov components led to four different methods by which this could be accomplished. These methods are based on a) the directionality, b) spectral differences, c) the time structure, and d) the polarization of the signals

  8. Effect of temperature on studtite stability: Thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, A.; Casas, I.; Gimenez, J.; Quinones, J.; Pablo, J. de

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this work is the study of the influence of temperature on the stability of the uranyl peroxide tetrahydrate (UO 2 O 2 . 4H 2 O) studtite, which may form on the spent nuclear fuel surface as a secondary solid phase. Preliminary results on the synthesis of studtite in the laboratory at different temperatures have shown that the solid phases formed when mixing hydrogen peroxide and uranyl nitrate depends on temperature. Studtite is obtained at 298 K, meta-studtite (UO 2 O 2 . 2H 2 O) at 373 K, and meta-schoepite (UO 3 . nH 2 O, with n 3 O 8 . By means of the differential scanning calorimetry the molar enthalpies of the transformations occurring at 403 and 504 K have been determined to be -42 ± 10 and -46 ± 2 kJ mol -1 , respectively

  9. Melting temperature and enthalpy variations of phase change materials (PCMs): a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoqin; Lee, Kyoung Ok; Medina, Mario A.; Chu, Youhong; Li, Chuanchang

    2018-06-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis is a standard thermal analysis technique used to determine the phase transition temperature, enthalpy, heat of fusion, specific heat and activation energy of phase change materials (PCMs). To determine the appropriate heating rate and sample mass, various DSC measurements were carried out using two kinds of PCMs, namely N-octadecane paraffin and calcium chloride hexahydrate. The variations in phase transition temperature, enthalpy, heat of fusion, specific heat and activation energy were observed within applicable heating rates and sample masses. It was found that the phase transition temperature range increased with increasing heating rate and sample mass; while the heat of fusion varied without any established pattern. The specific heat decreased with the increase of heating rate and sample mass. For accuracy purpose, it is recommended that for PCMs with high thermal conductivity (e.g. hydrated salt) the focus will be on heating rate rather than sample mass.

  10. Low-temperature transitions in cod and tuna determined by differential scanning calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristina Nedenskov; Jørgensen, Bo; Nielsen, Jette

    2003-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry measurements have revealed different thermal transitions in cod and tuna samples. Transition temperatures detected Lit -11degreesC, -15degreesC and -21degreesC were highly dependent on the annealing temperature. In tuna muscle an additional transition was observed...... at -72degreesC. This transition appeared differently than the thermal events observed at higher temperatures, as it spanned a broad temperature interval of 25degreesC. The transition was comparable to low-temperature glass transitions reported in protein-rich systems. No transition at this low...... temperature was detected in cod samples. The transitions observed at higher temperatures (-11degreesC to -21degreesC) may possibly stein from a glassy matrix containing muscle proteins. However, the presence of a glass transition at - 11degreesC was in disagreement with the low storage stability at -18degrees...

  11. Online Particle Detection by Neural Networks Based on Topologic Calorimetry Information

    CERN Document Server

    Ciodaro, T; The ATLAS collaboration; Damazio, D; de Seixas, JM

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the last results from the Ringer algorithm, which is based on artificial neural networks for the electron identification at the online filtering system of the ATLAS particle detector, in the context of the LHC experiment at CERN. The algorithm performs topological feature extraction over the ATLAS calorimetry information (energy measurements). Later, the extracted information is presented to a neural network classifier. Studies showed that the Ringer algorithm achieves high detection efficiency, while keeping the false alarm rate low. Optimizations, guided by detailed analysis, reduced the algorithm execution time in 59%. Also, the payload necessary to store the Ringer algorithm information represents less than 6.2 percent of the total filtering system amount

  12. Design and first measurements of an alternative calorimetry chamber for the HZB quadrupole resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Keckert, Sebastian; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The systematic research on superconducting thin films requires dedicated testing equipment. The Quadrupole Resonator (QPR) is a specialized tool to characterize the superconducting RF properties of circular planar samples. A calorimetric measurement of the RF surface losses allows the surface resistance to be measured with sub nano-ohm resolution. This measurement can be performed over a wide temperature and magnetic field range, at frequencies of 433, 866 and 1300 MHz. The system at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) is based on a resonator built at CERN and has been optimized to lower peak electric fields and an improved resolution. In this paper the design of an alternative calorimetry chamber is presented, providing flat samples for coating which are easy changeable. All parts are connected by screwing connections and no electron beam welding is required. Furthermore this design enables exchangeability of samples between the resonators at HZB and CERN. First measurements with the new design show ambiguous r...

  13. Ln(III)-malate complexation studies using TRLFS and micro titration calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taube, F.; Drobot, B.; Acker, M.; Taut, S.; Stumpf, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    The complexation of trivalent lanthanides was studied using Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). Formation constants, complexation enthalpies and fluorescence lifetimes are determined over a wide pH range at I = 0.5 m NaCl. This subject has the following background: Concrete is widely used as engineering barrier and for waste conditioning in waste repositories. Its binding agent is cement. Organic cement additives, which are used to improve the workability of fresh concrete, are complexation agents for radionuclides after they have been released during the concretes degradation. Thus, these additives might have an impact on the aqueous geochemistry of actinides. Here, the α-hydroxydicarboxylic acid or malic acid is examined. It is used in water-reducers or retarders in cement.

  14. Ln(III)-malate complexation studies using TRLFS and micro titration calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taube, F.; Drobot, B. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Professorship Radiochemistry; Acker, M.; Taut, S. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Central Radionuclide Laboratory; Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2017-06-01

    The complexation of trivalent lanthanides was studied using Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). Formation constants, complexation enthalpies and fluorescence lifetimes are determined over a wide pH range at I = 0.5 m NaCl. This subject has the following background: Concrete is widely used as engineering barrier and for waste conditioning in waste repositories. Its binding agent is cement. Organic cement additives, which are used to improve the workability of fresh concrete, are complexation agents for radionuclides after they have been released during the concretes degradation. Thus, these additives might have an impact on the aqueous geochemistry of actinides. Here, the α-hydroxydicarboxylic acid or malic acid is examined. It is used in water-reducers or retarders in cement.

  15. Measurement of the enthalpies of vaporization and sublimation of solids aromatic hydrocarbons by differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Aaron; Orozco, Eulogio

    2003-01-01

    An experimental procedure is proposed for direct measurement of the heat involved in the vaporization of a solid organic compound above its normal melting temperature. This technique consists on the fusion of a solid aromatic hydrocarbon, which is then vaporized by a sudden decrease of the pressure. The direct register of heat flow as function of time by differential scanning calorimetry allows the quantifying of the enthalpy of vaporization of compounds such as phenanthrene, β-naphthol, pyrene, and anthracene. Enthalpies of vaporization were measured in an isothermal mode over a range of temperatures from 10 to 20 K above the melting temperatures of each compound, while enthalpies of fusion were determined from separate experiments performed in a scanning mode. Enthalpies of sublimation are computed from results of fusion and vaporization, and then compared with results from the literature, which currently are obtained by calorimetric or indirect techniques

  16. A Differential Scanning Calorimetry Method for Construction of Continuous Cooling Transformation Diagram of Blast Furnace Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lei; Zhang, Chunxia; Shangguan, Fangqin; Li, Xiuping

    2012-06-01

    The continuous cooling crystallization of a blast furnace slag was studied by the application of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) method. A kinetic model describing the correlation between the evolution of the degree of crystallization with time was obtained. Bulk cooling experiments of the molten slag coupled with numerical simulation of heat transfer were conducted to validate the results of the DSC methods. The degrees of crystallization of the samples from the bulk cooling experiments were estimated by means of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the DSC method. It was found that the results from the DSC cooling and bulk cooling experiments are in good agreement. The continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram of the blast furnace slag was constructed according to crystallization kinetic model and experimental data. The obtained CCT diagram characterizes with two crystallization noses at different temperature ranges.

  17. Exploring ultrastability in nanostructured glassy polymer films by fast-scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mithun; Wang, Yucheng; Jeong, Hyuncheol; Cangialosi, Daniele; Priestley, Rodney

    A decade ago ultra-stable small molecule glass formers were discovered. Since then a significant amount of research has been devoted to traverse down the energy landscape of such glass formers via physical vapor deposition (PVD). Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) has the known ability to produce vapour deposited nanostructured polymer glass with exceptional kinetic stability. We explored the role of deposition temperature/ growth rate on thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films, deposited over a fast-scanning calorimetry sensor. We found in general any MAPLE deposited glass is kinetically more stable than bulk polymer and its spin-coated film. Moreover slow growth rate and optimum temperature during MAPLE deposition can additionally lead to thermodynamically stable (low-energy) glass. The role of interfaces formed through dramatic nanostructuring and packing of nanoglobules (removal of void space) may have additional role on such ultrastability. NSF-MRSEC through PCCM (Grant: DMR-1420541).

  18. Kinetics of Enzymatic High-Solid Hydrolysis of Lignocellulosic Biomass Studied by Calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren Nymand; Rasmussen, Erik Lumby; McFarland, K.C.

    2011-01-01

    analysis of the interrelationships of enzyme load and the rate, time, and extent of the reaction. The results suggest that the hydrolysis rate of pretreated corn stover is limited initially by available attack points on the substrate surface (conversion) but becomes proportional to enzyme dosage......Enzymatic hydrolysis of high-solid biomass (>10% w/w dry mass) has become increasingly important as a key step in the production of second-generation bioethanol. To this end, development of quantitative real-time assays is desirable both for empirical optimization and for detailed kinetic analysis...... rate with a detection limit of about 500 pmol glucose s−1. Hence, calorimetry is shown to be a highly sensitive real-time method, applicable for high solids, and independent on the complexity of the substrate. Dose–response experiments with a typical cellulase cocktail enabled a multidimensional...

  19. Determination of Energy Characteristic and Microporous Volume by Immersion Calorimetry in Carbon Monoliths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Moreno-Piraján

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon monoliths disc and honeycomb type were prepared by chemical activation of coconut shell with zinc chloride at different concentrations, without using a binder. The structures were characterized by N2 adsorption at 77 K and immersion calorimetry into benzene. The experimental results showed that the activation with zinc chloride produces a wide microporous development, with micropore volume between 0,38 and 0,79 cm3g-1, apparent BET surface area between 725 and 1523 m2g-1 and immersion enthalpy between 73,5 and 164,2 Jg-1. We compared the experimental enthalpy with calculated enthalpy by equation Stoeckli-Kraehenbuehl finding a data dispersion from which can infer that the structures are not purely microporous; this fact is ratified with similar behavior that the evidence t the product EoWo.

  20. Study and characterization of ammonium diuranate and uranium trioxide by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Thermogravimetry (TG), Differential Thermogravimetry (DTG) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) were used to characterize the thermal behavior of ammonium diuranate (ADU) and uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) produced at IPEN'S Chemical Enginnering Department. Compounds characterization was done using the molar ratios among the compounds and the oxides resulting from thermal decomposition. The TG and DTG curves registered for each sample were used for the determination of the following temperatures: - temperature of water evolution (free and crystallized water); - ammonia evolution and oxidation temperature; - ocluded ammonium nitrate decomposition temperature and - oxygen release temperature. The intermediate phases and their thermal stabilities were also identified by TG and DTG and confirmed by DSC curves, DSC curves showed also the exothermic and endothermic behavior of the processes involved. Finally, the great amount of data collected in this study can be handed as a guide by the professionals responsible for the operation of ADU,UO 3 and UF 4 pilot plants. (Author) [pt

  1. Thermodynamic signature of secondary nano-emulsion formation by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Fotticchia, Teresa; Mattia, Carlo Andrea; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta

    2014-12-09

    The stabilization of oil in water nano-emulsions by means of a polymer coating is extremely important; it prolongs the shelf life of the product and makes it suitable for a variety of applications ranging from nutraceutics to cosmetics and pharmaceutics. To date, an effective methodology to assess the best formulations in terms of thermodynamic stability has yet to be designed. Here, we perform a complete physicochemical characterization based on isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) compared to conventional dynamic light scattering (DLS) to identify polymer concentration domains that are thermodynamically stable and to define the degree of stability through thermodynamic functions depending upon any relevant parameter affecting the stability itself, such as type of polymer coating, droplet distance, etc. For instance, the method was proven by measuring the energetics in the case of two different biopolymers, chitosan and poly-L-lysine, and for different concentrations of the emulsion coated with poly-L-lysine.

  2. Determination of ice content in hardened concrete by low-temperature calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    Low-temperature calorimetry has been used to determine the ice content in concrete at different temperatures when exposed to low-temperature environments. However, the analysis of the ice content from the measured data of heat flow is not straightforward. In this study, two important factors...... influencing the ice content calculation are discussed. The importance of the baseline determination for the calculation of the ice content is realized. Two different methods of generating the baseline are discussed. First, the ‘J-baseline’ is discussed which is a recently proposed extrapolation method based...... the ‘J-baseline’ method and the ‘C-baseline’ method can be used to calculate the approximate baseline. The heat of fusion of the water confined in small pores is another important parameter to be considered in ice content calculation. This property must be carefully analyzed in order to accurately...

  3. Study of phase changing characteristics of granular composites using differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rady, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Characterization of the phase changing behavior of granular materials is an important issue for design and optimization of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems. In the present work, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to study the phase changing behavior of granular composites consisting of ceramic encapsulated phase change material (EPCM) with particle diameters of 1-3 mm. The obtained DSC curves characterizing melting and solidification of the composite material are shown to be dependent upon the values of heating and cooling rates. Direct utilization of the measured DSC curves could result in an inexact representation of the sample enthalpy change. A simple procedure has been advised to obtain accurate quantitative results from the DSC measurements based on the estimation of the thermal resistance between the sample and its enclosure. Analysis of the evolution of latent heat of EPCM with temperature at different values of cooling/heating rates is presented.

  4. Evaluation of errors in determination of DNA melting curve registered with differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lando, D.Y.; Fridman, A.S.; Galyuk, E.N.; Dalyan, Y.B.; Grigoryan, I.E.; Haroutiunian, S.G.

    2013-01-01

    The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is more sensitive than UV absorption spectrophotometry as a tool for the measurement of DNA melting curves. The advantage of DSC is a direct determination of differential melting curves (DMC) obtained without numerical differentiation. However, the difference between the helix-coil transition enthalpies of AT and GC base pairs can cause distortions in the shape of melting curve. Up to date, the errors caused by those distortions were not evaluated. In this study, a simple procedure of recalculation of a calorimetric DMC into a real DMC is developed. It demonstrates that the 'real' melting curve and differential melting curve deviate very slightly from the same two curves calculated from DSC data. The melting temperature and the temperature melting range are usually the same even if the difference in the enthalpies is several times higher than a real one

  5. Tritium Accounting Stability of a ZrCo Bed with 'In-Bed' Gas Flowing Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takumi; Suzuki, Takumi; Yamada, Masayuki; Nishi, Masataka

    2005-01-01

    Zirconium-Cobalt (ZrCo) tritium storage bed with 'in-bed' gas flowing calorimetry has been developed as a self-assaying system for the Tritium Storage and Delivery System of ITER. The basic tritium accounting characteristics have been investigated and practical data on the accounting stability has been accumulated under gram level tritium storage for more than 8 years. The initial sensitivity of tritium was about 0.05 g and the accuracy (standard deviation of repeat measurements: two sigma) was about 0.15 g at full tritium storage of 25 g. This initial accounting performance has been maintained after tritium storage for more than 8 years by keeping constant accounting conditions at each inventory measurement. Almost no aging effect of tritium was found except accumulation of 3 He in the primary ZrCo tritide vessel, which was easily evacuated to keep initial accounting condition before each inventory measurement

  6. Integration and global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data for studying macromolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Chad A; Zhao, Huaying; Vargas, Carolyn; Keller, Sandro; Schuck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful and widely used method to measure the energetics of macromolecular interactions by recording a thermogram of differential heating power during a titration. However, traditional ITC analysis is limited by stochastic thermogram noise and by the limited information content of a single titration experiment. Here we present a protocol for bias-free thermogram integration based on automated shape analysis of the injection peaks, followed by combination of isotherms from different calorimetric titration experiments into a global analysis, statistical analysis of binding parameters and graphical presentation of the results. This is performed using the integrated public-domain software packages NITPIC, SEDPHAT and GUSSI. The recently developed low-noise thermogram integration approach and global analysis allow for more precise parameter estimates and more reliable quantification of multisite and multicomponent cooperative and competitive interactions. Titration experiments typically take 1-2.5 h each, and global analysis usually takes 10-20 min.

  7. Using compression calorimetry to characterize powder compaction behavior of pharmaceutical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Ira S; Friedman, Ross A; Wurster, Dale Eric

    2010-02-01

    The process by which pharmaceutical powders are compressed into cohesive compacts or tablets has been studied using a compression calorimeter. Relating the various thermodynamic results to relevant physical processes has been emphasized. Work, heat, and internal energy change values have been determined with the compression calorimeter for common pharmaceutical materials. A framework of equations has been proposed relating the physical processes of friction, reversible deformation, irreversible deformation, and inter-particle bonding to the compression calorimetry values. The results indicate that irreversible deformation dominated many of the thermodynamic values, especially the net internal energy change following the compression-decompression cycle. The relationships between the net work and the net heat from the complete cycle were very clear indicators of predominating deformation mechanisms. Likewise, the ratio of energy stored as internal energy to the initial work input distinguished the materials according to their brittle or plastic deformation tendencies. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  8. A digital Front-End and Readout MIcrosystem for calorimetry at LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-16 A Digital Front-End and Readout Microsystem for Calorimetry at LHC \\\\ \\\\Front-end signal processing for calorimetric detectors is essential in order to achieve adequate selectivity in the trigger function of an LHC experiment, with data identification and compaction before readout being required in the harsh, high rate environment of a high luminosity hadron machine. Other crucial considerations are the extremely wide dynamic range and bandwidth requirements, as well as the volume of data to be transferred to following stages of the trigger and readout system. These requirements are best met by an early digitalization of the detector information, followed by integrated digital signal processing and buffering functions covering the trigger latencies.\\\\ \\\\The FERMI (Front-End Readout MIcrosystem) is a digital implementation of the front-end and readout electronic chain for calorimeters. It is based on dynamic range compression, high speed A to D converters, a fully programmable pipeline/digital filter c...

  9. DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN DESORBED THROUGH THERMAL CALORIMETRY IN A HIGH STRENGTH STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina A. Asmus

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The following study aims to quantify the release activation energy (Ea of hydrogen (H from lattice sites, reversible or irreversible, where the H can be trapped. Moreover, enthalpy changes associated with the main hydrogen (H trapping sites can be analyzed by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. In this technique, the peak temperature measurement is determined at two different heating rates, 3ºC/min y 5ºC/min, from ambient temperature to 500°C. In order to simulate severe conditions of hydrogen income into resulfurized high strength steel, electrolytic permeation tests were performed on test tubes suitable for fatigue tests. Sometimes during charging, H promoters were aggregated to electrolytic solution. Subsequently, the test tubes were subjected to flow cycle fatigue tests. Finally, irreversible trap which anchor more strongly H atoms are MnS inclusions. Its role on hydrogen embrittlement during fatigue tests is conclusive.

  10. Building a graphite calorimetry system for the dosimetry of therapeutic x-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Jung; Kim, Byoung Chul; Kim, Joong Hyun; Chung, Jae Pil; Kim, Hyun Moon; Yi, Chul Young [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    A graphite calorimetry system was built and tested under irradiation. The noise level of the temperature measurement system was approximately 0.08 mK (peak to peak). The temperature of the core part rose by approximately 8.6 mK at 800 MU (monitor unit) for 6-MV X-ray beams, and it increased as X-ray energy increased. The temperature rise showed less spread when it was normalized to the accumulated charge, as measured by an external monitoring chamber. The radiation energy absorbed by the core part was determined to have values of 0.798 J/μC, 0.389 J/μC, and 0.352 J/μC at 6 MV, 10 MV, and 18 MV, respectively. These values were so consistent among repeated runs that their coefficient of variance was less than 0.15%.

  11. Theoretical studies of hadronic calorimetry for high luminosity, high energy colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, J.E.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments at the high luminosity, high energy colliders of the future are going to demand optimization of the state of the art of calorimetry design and construction. During the past few years, the understanding of the basic phenomenology of hadron calorimeters has advanced through paralleled theoretical and experimental investigations. The important underlying processes are reviewed to set the framework for the presentation of recent calculations of the expected performance of silicon detector based hadron calorimeters. Such devices employing uranium are expected to achieve the compensation condition (that is, e/h approx. 1.0) based on the understanding that has been derived from the uranium-liquid argon and uranium-plastic scintillator systems. In fact, even lead-silicon calorimeters are found to achieve the attractive value for the e/h ratio of 1.16 at 10 GeV. 62 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. New methodology developed for the differential scanning calorimetry analysis of polymeric matrixes incorporating phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreneche, Camila; Solé, Aran; Miró, Laia; Martorell, Ingrid; Cabeza, Luisa F; Fernández, A Inés

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, thermal comfort needs in buildings have led to an increase in energy consumption of the residential and service sectors. For this reason, thermal energy storage is shown as an alternative to achieve reduction of this high consumption. Phase change materials (PCM) have been studied to store energy due to their high storage capacity. A polymeric material capable of macroencapsulating PCM was developed by the authors of this paper. However, difficulties were found while measuring the thermal properties of these materials by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The polymeric matrix interferes in the detection of PCM properties by DSC. To remove this interfering effect, a new methodology which replaces the conventional empty crucible used as a reference in the DSC analysis by crucibles composed of the polymeric matrix was developed. Thus, a clear signal from the PCM is obtained by subtracting the new full crucible signal from the sample signal. (paper)

  13. Considerations on the design of front-end electronics for silicon calorimetry for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintenberg, A.L.; Bauer, M.L.; Britton, C.L.; Kennedy, E.J.; Todd, R.A.; Berridge, S.C.; Bugg, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    Some considerations are described for the design of a silicon-based sampling calorimetry detector for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The use of silicon as the detection medium allows fast, accurate, and fine-grained energy measurements - but for optimal performance, the front-end electronics must be matched to the detector characteristics and have the speed required by the high SSC interaction rates. The relation between the signal-to-noise rtio of the calorimeter electronics and the charge collection time, the preamplifier power dissipation, detector capacitance and leakage, charge gain, and signal shaping and sampling was studied. The electrostatic transformer connection was analyzed and found to be unusable for a tightly arranged calorimeter because of stray capacitance effects. The method of deconvolutional sampling was developed as a means for pileup correction following synchronous sampling and analog storage

  14. Analysis of the microbial growth in 60Co γ-irradiated foods by calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Masakazu; Hayashi, Toshio; Hamasaki, Koji; Wirkner, Sandra; Constantinoiu, Elena; Takahashi, Katsutada

    2002-01-01

    Using a heat conduction calorimeter equipped with 24 sample units the heat evolutions from growing 60 Co γ-irradiated bioburden of black pepper seeds and frozen beef were detected in the form of growth thermograms. 60 Co γ-irradiation affected the growth pattern in which a dose-dependent reduction of the growth rate constant was observed together with the retardation in growth, indicating a combination of bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects. We successfully determined the minimal inactivation doses for the two food samples using the relationship between the irradiation dose and the retardation in growth t α , or the growth rate constant μ obtained from the growth thermograms. These results strongly suggested the possibility of calorimetry as measure of predictive microbiology in food irradiation. (author)

  15. Analysis of the microbial growth in 60Co gamma-irradiated foods by calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, M.; Hamasaki, K.; Wirkner, S.; Constantinoiu, E.; Takahashi, K.; Hayashi, T.

    2002-01-01

    Using a heat conduction calorimeter equipped with 24 sample units the heat evolutions from growing 60Co gamma-irradiated bioburden of black pepper seeds and frozen beef were detected in the form of growth thermograms. 60Co gamma-irradiation affected the growth pattern in which a dose-dependent reduction of the growth rate constant was observed together with the retardation in growth, indicating a combination of bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects. We successfully determined the minimal inactivation doses for the two food samples using the relationship between the irradiation dose and the retardation in growth talpha, or the growth rate constant mu obtained from the growth thermograms. These results strongly suggested the possibility of calorimetry as a measure of predictive microbiology in food irradiation

  16. CZECHOSLOVAK FOOTPRINTS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF METHODS OF THERMOMETRY, CALORIMETRY AND THERMAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Holba

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A short history on the development of thermometric methods are reviewed accentuating the role of Rudolf Bárta in underpinning special thermoanalytical conferences and new journal Silikáty in fifties as well as Vladimir Šatava mentioning his duty in the creation of the Czech school on thermoanalytical kinetics. This review surveys the innovative papers dealing with thermal analysis and the related fields (e.g. calorimetry, kinetics which have been published by noteworthy postwar Czechoslovak scholars and scientists and by their disciples in 1950-1980. Itemized 227 references with titles show rich scientific productivity revealing that many of them were ahead of time even at international connotation.

  17. From calorimetry to medical imaging: a shining example of successful transfer!

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2012-01-01

    A team at CERN has drawn inspiration from calorimetry methods developed for high-energy physics to create a new positron-emission tomography system for use in medical imaging, which they’ve dubbed AX-PET. With support from European and American laboratories*, the project is reaching fruition, as initial tests confirm its promise.   Snapshot of a “phantom”, a test object, surrounded by the AX-PET photon detectors. Positron-emission tomography (PET) is a medical imaging technique based on the matter-antimatter interaction that can provide a three-dimensional representation of the metabolic activity of an organ. To do so, radioactive marker molecules are first injected into the subject. As the marker decays, it emits positrons (antimatter particles), which are annihilated upon encountering electrons in the surrounding environment. The resulting flash, consisting of two photons, is detected by the PET machine. In conventional PET systems, it is impossible to improv...

  18. The design and PCB layout of the CDF Run 2 calorimetry readout module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theresa Shaw

    1999-01-01

    The CDF Calorimetry Readout module, called the ADMEM, has been designed to contain both the analog circuitry which digitizes the phototube charge pulses, and the digital logic which supports the readout of the results through the CDF Run 2 DAQ system. The ADMEM module is a 9Ux400mm VMEbus module, which is housed in a CDF VMEbus VIPA crate. The ADMEM must support near deadtimeless operation, with data being digitized and stored for possible readout every 132ns or 7.6 Mhz. This paper will discuss the implementation of the analog and digital portions of the ADMEM module, and how the board was laid out to avoid the coupling of digital noise into the analog circuitry

  19. Theoretical studies of hadronic calorimetry for high luminosity, high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, J.E.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments at the high luminosity, high energy colliders of the future are going to demand optimization of the state of the art of calorimetry design and construction. During the past few years, the understanding of the basic phenomenology of hadron calorimeters has advanced through paralleled theoretical and experimental investigations. The important underlying processes are reviewed to set the framework for the presentation of recent calculations of the expected performance of silicon detector based hadron calorimeters. Such devices employing uranium are expected to achieve the compensation condition (that is, e/h ∼ 1.0) based on the understanding that has been derived from the uranium-liquid argon and uranium-plastic scintillator systems. In fact, even lead-silicon calorimeters are found to achieve the attractive value for the e/h ratio of 1.16 at 10 GeV. 62 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Measurement and Model Validation of Nanofluid Specific Heat Capacity with Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry O'Hanley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are being considered for heat transfer applications; therefore it is important to know their thermophysical properties accurately. In this paper we focused on nanofluid specific heat capacity. Currently, there exist two models to predict a nanofluid specific heat capacity as a function of nanoparticle concentration and material. Model I is a straight volume-weighted average; Model II is based on the assumption of thermal equilibrium between the particles and the surrounding fluid. These two models give significantly different predictions for a given system. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, a robust experimental methodology for measuring the heat capacity of fluids, the specific heat capacities of water-based silica, alumina, and copper oxide nanofluids were measured. Nanoparticle concentrations were varied between 5 wt% and 50 wt%. Test results were found to be in excellent agreement with Model II, while the predictions of Model I deviated very significantly from the data. Therefore, Model II is recommended for nanofluids.

  1. Research and Development for the ATLAS Forward Calorimetry at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cheplakov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A total luminosity of 3000/fb is expected at the HL-LHC, which corresponds to total irradiation doses which are more than doubled compared to the original design, taking into account a safety factor of 2 representing our confidence in radiation background simulations. Moreover, the increased instantaneous luminosity will result in a much higher detector occupancy. The ATLAS Forward Calorimeters (FCal) will be affected by these factors. A rich R&D program is ongoing to evaluate the consequences of the LHC modernization and to investigate di_erent scenarios proposed for the Phase-II detector upgrade. This contribution will concentrate on simulation studies of the FCal degradation and on irradiation tests performed at the IBR-2m reactor in Dubna. Results from radiation-tolerant sensors and components of the future read-out and voltage distribution system for various upgrade options of the forward calorimetry will be presented.

  2. Electron beam water calorimetry measurements to obtain beam quality conversion factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Bryan R; Cojocaru, Claudiu D; McEwen, Malcolm R; Ross, Carl K

    2017-10-01

    To provide results of water calorimetry and ion chamber measurements in high-energy electron beams carried out at the National Research Council Canada (NRC). There are three main aspects to this work: (a) investigation of the behavior of ionization chambers in electron beams of different energies with focus on long-term stability, (b) water calorimetry measurements to determine absorbed dose to water in high-energy beams for direct calibration of ion chambers, and (c) using measurements of chamber response relative to reference ion chambers, determination of beam quality conversion factors, k Q , for several ion chamber types. Measurements are made in electron beams with energies between 8 MeV and 22 MeV from the NRC Elekta Precise clinical linear accelerator. Ion chamber measurements are made as a function of depth for cylindrical and plane-parallel ion chambers over a period of five years to investigate the stability of ion chamber response and for indirect calibration. Water calorimetry measurements are made in 18 MeV and 22 MeV beams. An insulated enclosure with fine temperature control is used to maintain a constant temperature (drifts less than 0.1 mK/min) of the calorimeter phantom at 4°C to minimize effects from convection. Two vessels of different designs are used with calibrated thermistor probes to measure radiation induced temperature rise. The vessels are filled with high-purity water and saturated with H 2 or N 2 gas to minimize the effect of radiochemical reactions on the measured temperature rise. A set of secondary standard ion chambers are calibrated directly against the calorimeter. Finally, several other ion chambers are calibrated in the NRC 60 Co reference field and then cross-calibrated against the secondary standard chambers in electron beams to realize k Q factors. The long-term stability of the cylindrical ion chambers in electron beams is better (always <0.15%) than plane-parallel chambers (0.2% to 0.4%). Calorimetry measurements

  3. FLUKA studies of hadron-irradiated scintillating crystals for calorimetry at the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Quittnat, Milena Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Calorimetry at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will be performed in a harsh radiation environment with high hadron fluences. The upgraded CMS electromagnetic calorimeter design and suitable scintillating materials are a focus of current research. In this paper, first results using the Monte Carlo simulation program FLUKA are compared to measurements performed with proton-irradiated LYSO, YSO and cerium fluoride crystals. Based on these results, an extrapolation to the behavior of an electromagnetic sampling calorimeter, using one of the inorganic scintillators above as an active medium, is performed for the upgraded CMS experiment at the HL-LHC. Characteristic parameters such as the induced ambient dose, fluence spectra for different particle types and the residual nuclei are studied, and the suitability of these materials for a future calorimeter is surveyed. Particular attention is given to the creation of isotopes in an LYSO-tungsten calorimeter that might contribute a prohibitive background to the measu...

  4. Resolving glass transition in Te-based phase-change materials by modulated differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yimin; Mu, Sen; Wang, Guoxiang; Shen, Xiang; Wang, Junqiang; Dai, Shixun; Xu, Tiefeng; Nie, Qiuhua; Wang, Rongping

    2017-10-01

    Glass transitions of Te-based phase-change materials (PCMs) were studied by modulated differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that both Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeTe are marginal glass formers with ΔT (= T x - T g) less than 2.1 °C when the heating rate is below 3 °C min-1. The fragilities of Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeTe can be estimated as 46.0 and 39.7, respectively, around the glass transition temperature, implying that a fragile-to-strong transition would be presented in such Te-based PCMs. The above results provide direct experimental evidence to support the investigation of crystallization kinetics in supercooled liquid PCMs.

  5. Stability of some Cactaceae proteins based on fluorescence, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinstein, S; Zemser, M; Vargas-Albores, F; Ochoa, J L; Paredes-Lopez, O; Scheler, C; Aksu, S; Salnikow, J

    1999-02-01

    Characterization of three cactus proteins (native and denatured) from Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria), Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo), and Cholla opuntia (Cholla), was based on electrophoretic, fluorescence, CD (circular dichroism), DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), and FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) measurements. The obtained results of intrinsic fluorescence, DSC, and CD were dissimilar for the three species of cactus, providing evidence of differences in secondary and tertiary structures. Cactus proteins may be situated in the following order corresponding to their relative stability: Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria) > Cholla opuntia (Cholla) > Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo). Thermodynamic properties of proteins and their changes upon denaturation (temperature of denaturation, enthalphy, and the number of ruptured hydrogen bonds) were correlated with the secondary structure of proteins and disappearance of alpha-helix.

  6. Irreversible denaturation of maltodextrin glucosidase studied by differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism, and turbidity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Megha; Chaudhuri, Tapan K; Kuwajima, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    Thermal denaturation of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism (230 nm), and UV-absorption measurements (340 nm), which were respectively used to monitor heat absorption, conformational unfolding, and the production of solution turbidity. The denaturation was irreversible, and the thermal transition recorded at scan rates of 0.5-1.5 K/min was significantly scan-rate dependent, indicating that the thermal denaturation was kinetically controlled. The absence of a protein-concentration effect on the thermal transition indicated that the denaturation was rate-limited by a mono-molecular process. From the analysis of the calorimetric thermograms, a one-step irreversible model well represented the thermal denaturation of the protein. The calorimetrically observed thermal transitions showed excellent coincidence with the turbidity transitions monitored by UV-absorption as well as with the unfolding transitions monitored by circular dichroism. The thermal denaturation of the protein was thus rate-limited by conformational unfolding, which was followed by a rapid irreversible formation of aggregates that produced the solution turbidity. It is thus important to note that the absence of the protein-concentration effect on the irreversible thermal denaturation does not necessarily means the absence of protein aggregation itself. The turbidity measurements together with differential scanning calorimetry in the irreversible thermal denaturation of the protein provided a very effective approach for understanding the mechanisms of the irreversible denaturation. The Arrhenius-equation parameters obtained from analysis of the thermal denaturation were compared with those of other proteins that have been reported to show the one-step irreversible thermal denaturation. Maltodextrin glucosidase had sufficiently high kinetic stability with a half-life of 68 days at a physiological temperature (37°C).

  7. Hydrogen concentration determination in pressure tube samples using differential scanning calorimetry (dsc)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, R.; Mincu, M.

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are widely used as a structural material in nuclear reactors. It is known that zirconium based cladding alloys absorb hydrogen as a result of service in a pressurized water reactor. Hydrogen absorbed (during operation of the reactor) in the zirconium alloy, out of which the pressure tube is made, is one of the major factors determining the life time of the pressure tube. For monitoring the hydrides, samples of the pressure tube are periodically taken and analyzed. At normal reactor operating temperature, hydrogen has limited solubility in the zirconium lattice and precipitates out of solid solution as zirconium hydride when the solid solubility is exceeded. As a consequences material characterization of Zr-2.5Nb CANDU pressure tubes is required after manufacturing but also during the operation to assess its structural integrity and to predict its behavior until the next in-service inspection. Hydrogen and deuterium concentration determination is one of the most important parameters to be evaluated during the experimental tests. Hydrogen present in zirconium alloys has a strong effect of weakening. Following the zirconium-hydrogen reaction, the resulting zirconium hydride precipitates in the mass of material. Weakening of the material, due to the presence of 10 ppm of precipitated hydrogen significantly affects some of its properties. The concentration of hydrogen in a sample can be determined by several methods, one of them being the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The principle of the method consists in measuring the difference between the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a sample and a reference to a certain value. The experiments were made using a TA Instruments DSC Q2000 calorimeter. This paper contains experimental work for hydrogen concentration determination by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) method. Also, the reproducibility and accuracy of the method used at INR Pitesti are presented. (authors)

  8. An investigation of student thinking regarding calorimetry, entropy, and the second law of thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Warren Michael

    This thesis constitutes an investigation into student understanding of concepts in thermal physics in an introductory calculus-based university physics course. Nearly 90% of students enrolled in the course had previous exposure to thermodynamics concepts in chemistry and/or high-school physics courses. The two major thrusts of this work are (1) an exploration of student approaches to solving calorimetry problems involving two substances with differing specific heats, and (2) a careful probing of student ideas regarding certain aspects of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics. We present extensive free-response, interview, and multiple-choice data regarding students' ideas, collected both before and after instruction from a diverse set of course semesters and instructors. For topics in calorimetry, we found via interviews that students frequently get confused by, or tend to overlook, the detailed proportional reasoning or algebraic procedures that could lead to correct solutions. Instead, students often proceed with semi-intuitive reasoning that at times may be productive, but more often leads to inconsistencies and non-uniform conceptual understanding. Our investigation of student thinking regarding entropy suggests that prior to instruction, students have consistent and distinct patterns of incorrect or incomplete responses that often persist despite deliberate and focused efforts by the instructor. With modified instruction based on research-based materials, significant learning gains were observed on certain key concepts, e.g., that the entropy of the universe increases for all non-ideal processes. The methodology for our work is described, the data are discussed and analyzed, and a description is given of goals for future work in this area.

  9. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  10. The thermochemical behavior of some binary shape memory alloys by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meschel, S.V.; Pavlu, J.; Nash, P.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We studied 14 shape memory alloys. → The enthalpies of formation and structure characteristics are summarized. → Theoretical predictions by ab initio calculations compare better with experimental measurements than Miedema's semi empirical model. - Abstract: The standard enthalpies of formation of some shape memory alloys have been measured by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry at 1373 K. The following results (in kJ/mol of atoms) are reported: CoCr (-0.3 ± 2.9); CuMn (-3.7 ± 3.2); Cu 3 Sn (-10.4 ± 3.1); Fe 2 Tb (-5.5 ± 2.4); Fe 2 Dy (-1.6 ± 2.9); Fe 17 Tb 2 (-2.1 ± 3.1); Fe 17 Dy 2 (-5.3 ± 1.7); FePd 3 (-16.0 ± 2.7); FePt (-23.0 ± 1.9); FePt 3 (-20.7 ± 2.3); NiMn (-24.9 ± 2.6); TiNi (-32.7 ± 1.0); TiPd (-60.3 ± 2.5). The results are compared with some earlier experimental values obtained by calorimetry and by EMF technique. They are also compared with predicted values on the basis of the semi empirical model of Miedema and co-workers and with ab initio calculations when available. We will also assess the available information regarding the structures of these alloys.

  11. Comparison of a Handheld Indirect Calorimetry Device and Predictive Energy Equations Among Individuals on Maintenance Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Ellis A; Marcus, Andrea; Byham-Gray, Laura

    2017-11-01

    Practical methods for determining resting energy expenditure (REE) among individuals on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) are needed because of the limitations of indirect calorimetry. Two disease-specific predictive energy equations (PEEs) have been developed for this metabolically complex population. The aim of this study was to compare estimated REE (eREE) by PEEs to measured REE (mREE) with a handheld indirect calorimetry device (HICD). A prospective pilot study of adults on MHD (N = 40) was conducted at 2 dialysis clinics in Houston and Texas City, Texas. mREE by an HICD was compared with eREE determined by 6 PEEs using Bland-Altman analysis with a band of acceptable agreement of ±10% of the group mean mREE. Paired t-test and the intraclass correlation coefficient were also used to compare the alternate methods of measuring REE. A priori alpha was set at P Maintenance Hemodialysis Equation-Creatinine version (MHCD-CR) was the most accurate PEE with 52.5% of values within the band of acceptable agreement, followed by the Mifflin-St. Jeor Equation and the Vilar et al. Equation at 45.0% and 42.5%, respectively. When compared with mREE by the HICD, the MHDE-CR was more accurate and precise than other PEEs evaluated; however, this must be interpreted with caution as mREE was consistently lower than eREE from all PEEs. Further research is needed to validate the MHDE-CR and other practical methods for determining REE among individuals on MHD. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of isothermal titration calorimetry to study the interaction of short-chain alcohols with lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trandum, Christa; Westh-Andersen, Peter; Jørgensen, Kent

    1999-01-01

    of short-chain alcohols on Lipid bilayers. isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has been used to determine the energy involved in the association of the alcohols with lipid bilayers. Pure unilamellar DMPC liposomes and DMPC liposomes incorporated with different amounts of cholesterol, sphingomyelin...... dependent on the lipid bilayer composition. In the presence of high concentrations of cholesterol, the binding enthalpy of ethanol is decreased, whereas the presence of ceramides enhances the enthalpic response of the lipid bilayer to ethanol. Isothermal titration calorimetry offers a new methodology...

  13. Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, William de

    2010-07-31

    The project which extended from November 2005 to May of 2010 demonstrated the application of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) with engine out NOx levels of 0.2 g/bhp-hr throughout the program target load of 12.6bar BMEP. The project showed that the range of loads could be extended to 16.5bar BMEP, therefore matching the reference lug line of the base 2007 MY Navistar 6.4L V8 engine. Results showed that the application of LTC provided a dramatic improvement over engine out emissions when compared to the base engine. Furthermore LTC improved thermal efficiency by over 5% from the base production engine when using the steady state 13 mode composite test as a benchmark. The key enablers included improvements in the air, fuel injection, and cooling systems made in Phases I and II. The outcome was the product of a careful integration of each component under an intelligent control system. The engine hardware provided the conditions to support LTC and the controller provided the necessary robustness for a stable combustion. Phase III provided a detailed account on the injection strategy used to meet the high load requirements. During this phase, the control strategy was implemented in a production automotive grade ECU to perform cycle-by-cycle combustion feedback on each of the engine cylinders. The control interacted on a cycle base with the injection system and with the Turbo-EGR systems according to their respective time constants. The result was a unique system that could, first, help optimize the combustion system and maintain high efficiency, and secondly, extend the steady state results to the transient mode of operation. The engine was upgraded in Phase IV with a Variable Valve Actuation system and a hybrid EGR loop. The impact of the more versatile EGR loop did not provide significant advantages, however the application of VVA proved to be an enabler to further extend the operation of LTC and gain considerable benefits in fuel economy and soot reduction. Finally

  14. Microscale combustion and power generation

    CERN Document Server

    Cadou, Christopher; Ju, Yiguang

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in microfabrication technologies have enabled the development of entirely new classes of small-scale devices with applications in fields ranging from biomedicine, to wireless communication and computing, to reconnaissance, and to augmentation of human function. In many cases, however, what these devices can actually accomplish is limited by the low energy density of their energy storage and conversion systems. This breakthrough book brings together in one place the information necessary to develop the high energy density combustion-based power sources that will enable many of these devices to realize their full potential. Engineers and scientists working in energy-related fields will find: An overview of the fundamental physics and phenomena of microscale combustion; Presentations of the latest modeling and simulation techniques for gasphase and catalytic micro-reactors; The latest results from experiments in small-scale liquid film, microtube, and porous combustors, micro-thrusters, a...

  15. Combustion process science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    An important and substantial area of technical work in which noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) is desired is that involving combustion process research. In the planning for this workshop, it was hoped that W. Serignano would provide a briefing regarding the experimental requirements for thermal measurements to support such research. The particular features of thermal measurement requirements included those describing the timeline for combustion experiments, the requirements for thermal control and diagnostics of temperature and other related thermal measurements and the criticality to the involved science to parametric features of measurement capability including precision, repeatability, stability, and resolution. In addition, it was hoped that definitions could be provided which characterize the needs for concurrent imaging as it relates to science observations during the conduct of experimentation.

  16. Dynamical issues in combustion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, P.C.; Williams, F.

    1991-01-01

    This book looks at the world of combustion phenomena covering the following topics: modeling, which involves the elucidation of the essential features of a given phenomenon through physical insight and knowledge of experimental results, devising appropriate asymptotic and computational methods, and developing sound mathematical theories. Papers in this book describe how all of these challenges have been met for particular examples within a number of common combustion scenarios: reactive shocks, low Mach number premixed reactive flow, nonpremixed phenomena, and solid propellants. The types of phenomena examined are also diverse: the stability and other properties of steady structures, the long time dynamics of evolving solutions, properties of interfaces and shocks, including curvature effects, and spatio-temporal patterns

  17. SPECIFIC EMISSIONS FROM BIOMASS COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skopec

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with determining the specific emissions from the combustion of two kinds of biomass fuels in a small-scale boiler. The tested fuels were pellets made of wood and pellets made of rape plant straw. In order to evaluate the specific emissions, several combustion experiments were carried out using a commercial 25 kW pellet-fired boiler. The specific emissions of CO, SO2 and NOx were evaluated in relation to a unit of burned fuel, a unit of calorific value and a unit of produced heat. The specific emissions were compared with some data acquired from the reference literature, with relatively different results. The differences depend mainly on the procedure used for determining the values, and references provide no information about this. Although some of our experimental results may fit with one of the reference sources, they do not fit with the other. The reliability of the references is therefore disputable.

  18. Steady state HNG combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louwers, J.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L. [TNO Prins Maurits Lab., Rijswijk (Netherlands); Brewster, M.Q. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Son, S.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Parr, T.; Hanson-Parr, D. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Two simplified modeling approaches are used to model the combustion of Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF, N{sub 2}H{sub 5}-C(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}). The condensed phase is treated by high activation energy asymptotics. The gas phase is treated by two limit cases: the classical high activation energy, and the recently introduced low activation energy approach. This results in simplification of the gas phase energy equation, making an (approximate) analytical solution possible. The results of both models are compared with experimental results of HNF combustion. It is shown that the low activation energy approach yields better agreement with experimental observations (e.g. regression rate and temperature sensitivity), than the high activation energy approach.

  19. Oxy-coal Combustion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Eddings, E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Lighty, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Ring, T. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Smith, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Thornock, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Y Jia, W. Morris [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Pedel, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rezeai, D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wang, L. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Zhang, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kelly, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-01-06

    The objective of this project is to move toward the development of a predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for pilot-scale, single-burner, oxy-coal operation. This validation research brings together multi-scale experimental measurements and computer simulations. The combination of simulation development and validation experiments is designed to lead to predictive tools for the performance of existing air fired pulverized coal boilers that have been retrofitted to various oxy-firing configurations. In addition, this report also describes novel research results related to oxy-combustion in circulating fluidized beds. For pulverized coal combustion configurations, particular attention is focused on the effect of oxy-firing on ignition and coal-flame stability, and on the subsequent partitioning mechanisms of the ash aerosol.

  20. Trace impurities in coal by wet chemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, E.N.

    1975-01-01

    In determining trace elements in coal by wet chemical methods, conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to determine Li, Be, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd, and Pb after dry ashing and acid dissolutions. A graphite furnace accessory was used for the flameless AAS determination of Bi, Se, Sn, Te, Be, Pb, As, Cd, Cr, Sb, and Ge. Mercury can be determined by flameless AAS after oxygen bomb combustion. Arsenic and antimony can be determined as their hydrides by AAS after low temperature ashing. Germanium, tin, bismuth, and tellurium can be determined as their hydrides by AAS after high temperature ashing. Selenium can be determined as its hydride by AAS after a special combustion procedure or after oxygen bomb combustion. Fluorine can be determined by specific ion analysis after oxygen bomb combustion. Boron can be determined colorimetrically. (U.S.)

  1. Coal combustion technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.X.

    1994-01-01

    Coal is the most important energy source in China, the environmental pollution problem derived from coal burning is rather serious in China. The present author discusses coal burning technologies both in boilers and industrial furnaces and their relations with environmental protection problems in China. The technological situations of Circulating Fluidized Bed Coal Combustor, Pulverized Coal Combustor with Aerodynamic Flame Holder and Coal Water Slurry Combustion have been discussed here as some of the interesting problems in China only. (author). 3 refs

  2. Example Problems in LES Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Lesieur, M., Turbulence in Fluids , 2nd Revised Ed., Fluid Mechanics and Its Applications, Vol. 1, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, Massachusetts, 1990...34, Journal of Fluid Mechanics , Vol. 238, 1992, pp. 155-185. 5. Hirsch, C., Numerical Computation of Internal and External Flows, Vol. 2, Computational...reaction mechanisms for the oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels in flames", Combustion Science and Technology, Vol. 27, 1981, pp. 31-43. 14. Spalding, D.B

  3. Dosage of fission products in irradiated fuel treatment effluents (radio-chemical method); Dosage des produits de fission dans les effluents du traitement des combustibles irradies (methode radiochimique)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchapt, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    The dosage methods presented here are applicable to relatively long-lived fission products present in the effluents resulting from irradiated fuel treatment processes (Sr - Cs - Ce - Zr - Nb - Ru - I). The methods are based on the same principle: - addition of a carrying-over agent - chemical separation over several purification stages, - determination of the chemical yield by calorimetry - counting of an aliquot liquid portion. (author) [French] Les methodes de dosage presentees concernent les produits de fission a vie relativement longue presents dans les effluents de traitement des combustibles irradies (Sr - Cs - Ce - Zr - Nb - Ru - I). Elles sont toutes basees sur le meme principe: - addition d'entraineur, - separation chimique en plusieurs stades de purification, - determination du rendement chimique par calorimetrie, - comptage d'une aliquote liquide. (auteur)

  4. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. Clearly, the key to successful gas turbine development is based on understanding the effects of geometry and operating conditions on combustion instability, emissions (including UHC, CO and NO{sub x}) and performance. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors.

  5. Combustion char characterisation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, P; Ingermann Petersen, H; Sund Soerensen, H; Thomsen, E; Guvad, C

    1996-06-01

    The aim was to correlate reactivity measures of raw coals and the maceral concentrates of the coals obtained in a previous project with the morphology of the produced chars by using a wire grid devolatilization method. Work involved determination of morphology, macroporosity and a detailed study by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Systematic variations in the texture of chars produced in different temperature domains and heating rates were demonstrated by using incident light microscopy on polished blocks and by SEM studies directly on the surfaces of untreated particles. Results suggest that work in the field of char reactivity estimates and correlations between char morphology and coal petrography can be accomplished only on chars produced under heating rates and temperatures comparable to those for the intended use of coal. A general correlation between the coals` petrography and the the morphology of high temperature chars was found. The SEM study of the chars revealed that during the devolatilization period the particles fuse and the macroporosity and thus the morphotypes are formed. After devolatilization ceases, secondary micropores are formed. These develop in number and size throughout the medium combustion interval. At the end of the combustion interval the macrostructure breaks down, caused by coalescence of the increased number of microspores. This can be observed as a change in the morphology and the macroporosity of the chars. Results indicate that char reactivity is a function of the macroporosity and thus the morphology of combustion chars. (AB) 34 refs.

  6. Management of coal combustion wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-02-01

    It has been estimated that 780 Mt of coal combustion products (CCPs) were produced worldwide in 2010. Only about 53.5% were utilised, the rest went to storage or disposal sites. Disposal of coal combustion waste (CCW) on-site at a power plant may involve decades-long accumulation of waste, with hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of tonnes of dry ash or wet ash slurry being stored. In December 2008, a coal combustion waste pond in Kingston, Tennessee, USA burst. Over 4 million cubic metres of ash sludge poured out, burying houses and rivers in tonnes of toxic waste. Clean-up is expected to continue into 2014 and will cost $1.2 billion. The incident drew worldwide attention to the risk of CCW disposal. This caused a number of countries to review CCW management methods and regulations. The report begins by outlining the physical and chemical characteristics of the different type of ashes generated in a coal-fired power plant. The amounts of CCPs produced and regulations on CCW management in selected countries have been compiled. The CCW disposal methods are then discussed. Finally, the potential environmental impacts and human health risks of CCW disposal, together with the methods used to prevent them, are reviewed.

  7. Modeling the internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible and computationally economical model of the internal combustion engine was developed for use on large digital computer systems. It is based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The computer program is capable of multicycle calculations, with some parameters varying from cycle to cycle, and has restart capabilities. It can accommodate a broad spectrum of reactants, permits changes in physical properties, and offers a wide selection of alternative modeling functions without any reprogramming. It readily adapts to the amount of information available in a particular case because the model is in fact a hierarchy of five models. The models range from a simple model requiring only thermodynamic properties to a complex model demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. Among its many features the model includes heat transfer, valve timing, supercharging, motoring, finite burning rates, cycle-to-cycle variations in air-fuel ratio, humid air, residual and recirculated exhaust gas, and full combustion kinetics.

  8. Bulk synthesis of nanocrystalline urania powders by citrate gel-combustion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjay Kumar, D.; Ananthasivan, K.; Venkata Krishnan, R.; Amirthapandian, S.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2016-01-01

    Bulk quantities (60 g) of nanocrystalline (nc) free flowing urania powders with crystallite size ranging from 38 to 252 nm have been synthesized for the first time by the citrate gel combustion method. A systematic study of the influence of the fuel (citric acid) to oxidant (nitrate) ratio (R) on the characteristics of the urania powders has been carried out for the first time. Mixture with an "R" value of 0.25 exhibited a vigorous auto-ignition reaction. This reaction was investigated with Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and in-situ thermogravimetry coupled with differential thermal analysis and mass spectrometry (TG-DTA-MS). The bulk density, specific surface area, X-ray crystallite size, residual carbon and size distribution of particles of this powder were unique. Microscopic and microstructural investigation of selected samples revealed the presence of nanocrystals with irregular exfoliated morphology; their Electron Energy Loss Spectra testified the covalency of the U-O bond.

  9. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  10. Particle Emissions from Biomass Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpila, Aneta; Bohgard, Mats [Lund Inst. of Technology (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology; Strand, Michael; Lillieblad, Lena; Sanati, Mehri [Vaexjoe Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Bioenergy Technology; Pagels, Joakim; Rissler, Jenny; Swietlicki, Erik; Gharibi, Arash [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Physics

    2003-05-01

    We have shown that high concentrations of fine particles of the order of 2-7x10{sup -7} particles per cm{sup 3} are being formed in all the combustion units studied. There was a higher difference between the units in terms of particle mass concentrations. While the largest differences was found for gas-phase constituents (CO and THC) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. In 5 out of 7 studied units, multi-cyclones were the only measure for flue-gas separation. The multicyclones had negligible effect on the particle number concentration and a small effect on the mass of particles smaller than 5 {mu}m. The separation efficiency was much higher for the electrostatic precipitators. The boiler load had a dramatic influence on the coarse mode concentration during combustion of forest residue. PM0.8-6 increased from below 5 mg/m{sup 3} to above 50 mg/m{sup 3} even at a moderate change in boiler load from medium to high. A similar but less pronounced trend was found during combustion of dry wood. PM0.8-PM6 increased from 12 to 23 mg/m{sup 3} when the load was changed from low to high. When increasing the load, the primary airflow taken through the grate is increased; this itself may lead to a higher potential of the air stream to carry coarse particles away from the combustion zone. Measurements with APS-instrument with higher time-resolution showed a corresponding increase in coarse mode number concentration with load. Additional factor influencing observed higher concentration of coarse mode during combustion of forest residues, could be relatively high ash content in this type of fuel (2.2 %) in comparison to dry wood (0.3 %) and pellets (0.5 %). With increasing load we also found a decrease in PM1 during combustion of forest residue. Whether this is caused by scavenging of volatilized material by the high coarse mode concentration or a result of a different amount of volatilized material available for formation of fine particles needs to be shown in future studies. The

  11. IEA combustion agreement : a collaborative task on alternative fuels in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larmi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the alternative fuels in combustion task of the International Energy Agency is on high efficiency engine combustion, furnace combustion, and combustion chemistry. The objectives of the task are to develop optimum combustion for dedicated fuels by fully utilizing the physical and chemical properties of synthetic and renewable fuels; a significant reduction in carbon dioxide, NOx and particulate matter emissions; determine the minimum emission levels for dedicated fuels; and meet future emission standards of engines without or with minimum after-treatment. This presentation discussed the alternative fuels task and addressed issues such as synthetic fuel properties and benefits. The anticipated future roadmap was presented along with a list of the synthetic and renewable engine fuels to be studied, such as neat oxygenates like alcohols and ethers, biogas/methane and gas combustion, fuel blends, dual fuel combustion, high cetane number diesel fuels like synthetic Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel and hydrogenated vegetable oil, and low CN number fuels. Implementation examples were also discussed, such as fuel spray studies in optical spray bombs; combustion research in optical engines and combustion chambers; studies on reaction kinetics of combustion and emission formation; studies on fuel properties and ignition behaviour; combustion studies on research engines; combustion optimization; implementing the optimum combustion in research engines; and emission measurements. Overall milestone examples and the overall schedule of participating countries were also presented. figs.

  12. Assessment of Metabolic Flexibility of Old and Adult Mice Using Three Noninvasive, Indirect Calorimetry-Based Treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivenvoorde, L.P.M.; Schothorst, van E.M.; Swarts, J.J.M.; Keijer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Indirect calorimetry (InCa) can potentially be used to noninvasively assess metabolic and age-related flexibility. To assess the use of InCa for this purpose, we tested the sensitivity and response stability over time of three InCa-based treatments in old versus adult mice. Diurnal patterns of

  13. The use of immersion calorimetry in the determination of micropore distribution of carbons in the course of activation

    OpenAIRE

    Kraehenbuehl, F.; Stoeckli, Fritz; Addoun, A.; Ehrburger, P.; Donnet, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    The combination of gas-solid adsorption experiments with immersion calorimetry of carbons into liquids of increasing molecular dimensions leads to accurate micropore distributions in the range 0.4-0.8 nm. This technique is used to study the development of the micropore structure during activation of carbons with CO2 or KOH.

  14. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance allow quantifying substrate binding to different binding sites of Bacillus subtilis xylanase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuyvers, Sven; Dornez, Emmie; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first...

  15. Kinetic properties of two Rhizopus exo-polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyzing galacturonic acid oligomers using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The kinetic characteristics of two Rhizopus oryzae exo-polygalacturonases acting on galacturonic acid oligomers (GalpA) were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). RPG15 hydrolyzing (GalpA)2 demonstrated a Km of 55 uM and kcat of 10.3 s^-1^ while RPG16 was shown to have greater af...

  16. Thermodynamic characteristics of the acid-base equilibria of taurine in aqueous solutions, according to calorimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridchin, S. N.; Shekhanov, R. F.; Pyreu, D. F.

    2015-02-01

    Enthalpies of the neutralization and protonation of taurine (HL) are measured by direct calorimetry at 298.15 K and ionic strengths of 0.3, 0.5, and 1.0 (KNO3). The standard thermodynamic characteristics of HL protolytic equilibria are calculated.

  17. Influence of frost damage and sample preconditioning on the porosity characterization of cement based materials using low temperature calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Fridh, Katja; Johannesson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature calorimetry (LTC) can be used to study the meso-porosity of cement based materials. The influence of frost damage on the meso-porosity determination by LTC was explored on a model material MCM-41 and two cement pastes by conducting repeated cycles of freezing and melting measureme...

  18. Combustion of Solid Propellants (La Combustion des Propergols Solides)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    the of ether and ethyl alcohol and removing objective of these lectures to give a this solvent. Instead of having a fibrous comprehensive understanding...do cetto esrne do Les propergols composites, A matrice confifrences une description tout A fait A polymarique charg~o pst, un oxydant at un jour des...rusa., De nouveaux souvant suppos6 qua la vitesa des gaz de oxydes de for ultrafirts mont aujourd’hui combustion est n~gligeable at qua d~velopps pour

  19. Straw combustion on slow-moving grates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2005-01-01

    Combustion of straw in grate-based boilers is often associated with high emission levels and relatively poor fuel burnout. A numerical grate combustion model was developed to assist in improving the combustion performance of these boilers. The model is based on a one-dimensional ‘‘walking......-column’’ approach and includes the energy equations for both the fuel and the gas accounting for heat transfer between the two phases. The model gives important insight into the combustion process and provides inlet conditions for a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the freeboard. The model predictions...... indicate the existence of two distinct combustion modes. Combustion air temperature and mass flow-rate are the two parameters determining the mode. There is a significant difference in reaction rates (ignition velocity) and temperature levels between the two modes. Model predictions were compared...

  20. Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Maja Bøg; Brix, Jacob; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is suggested as one of the possible, promising technologies for capturing CO2 from power plants. The concept of oxy-fuel combustion is removal of nitrogen from the oxidizer to carry out the combustion process in oxygen and, in most concepts, recycled flue gas to lower the flame...... provide additional options for improvement of process economics are however likewise investigated. Of particular interest is the change of the combustion process induced by the exchange of carbon dioxide and water vapor for nitrogen as diluent. This paper reviews the published knowledge on the oxy......-fuel process and focuses particularly on the combustion fundamentals, i.e. flame temperatures and heat transfer, ignition and burnout, emissions, and fly ash characteristics. Knowledge is currently available regarding both an entire oxy-fuel power plant and the combustion fundamentals. However, several...

  1. Numerical investigation of biogas flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ehsan; Bagheri, Ghobad; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel consumption decreases from 3.24 g/s in biogas conventional combustion to 1.07 g/s in flameless mode. • The differences between reactants and products temperature intensifies irreversibility in traditional combustion. • The temperature inside the chamber is uniform in biogas flameless mode and exergy loss decreases in this technique. • Low O 2 concentration in the flameless mode confirms a complete and quick combustion process in flameless regime. - Abstract: The purpose of this investigation is to analyze combustion characteristics of biogas flameless mode based on clean technology development strategies. A three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study has been performed to illustrate various priorities of biogas flameless combustion compared to the conventional mode. The effects of preheated temperature and wall temperature, reaction zone and pollutant formation are observed and the impacts of combustion and turbulence models on numerical results are discussed. Although preheated conventional combustion could be effective in terms of fuel consumption reduction, NO x formation increases. It has been found that biogas is not eligible to be applied in furnace heat up due to its low calorific value (LCV) and it is necessary to utilize a high calorific value fuel to preheat the furnace. The required enthalpy for biogas auto-ignition temperature is supplied by enthalpy of preheated oxidizer. In biogas flameless combustion, the mean temperature of the furnace is lower than traditional combustion throughout the chamber. Compared to the biogas flameless combustion with uniform temperature, very high and fluctuated temperatures are recorded in conventional combustion. Since high entropy generation intensifies irreversibility, exergy loss is higher in biogas conventional combustion compared to the biogas flameless regime. Entropy generation minimization in flameless mode is attributed to the uniform temperature inside the chamber

  2. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  3. Evaluation of Staphylococcus aureus DNA aptamer by enzyme-linked aptamer assay and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraç, Ceren; Öktem, Hüseyin Avni

    2017-02-01

    To monitor the specificity of Staphylococcus aureus aptamer (SA-31) against its target cell, we used enzyme-linked aptamer assay. In the presence of target cell, horseradish peroxidase-conjugated streptavidin bound to biotin-labeled SA-31 showed specific binding to S  aureus among 3 different bacteria with limit of detection of 10 3 colony-forming unit per milliliter. The apparent K a was 1.39 μM -1  ± 0.3 μM -1 . The binding of SA-31 to membrane proteins extracted from cell surface was characterized using isothermal titration calorimetry, and the effect of changes in binding temperature and salt concentrations of binding buffer was evaluated based on thermodynamic parameters (K a , ΔH, and ΔG). Since binding of aptamer to its targets solely depends on its 3-dimensional structure under experimental conditions used in selection process, the change in temperature and ion concentration changed the affinity of SA-31 to its target on surface of bacteria. At 4°C, SA-31 did not show an affinity to its target with poor heat change upon injection of membrane fraction to aptamer solution. However, the apparent association constants of SA-31 slightly varied from K a  = 1.56 μM -1  ± 0.69 μM -1 at 25°C to K a  = 1.03 μM -1  ± 0.9 μM -1 at 37°C. At spontaneously occurring exothermic binding reactions, affinities of S aureus aptamer to its target were also 9.44 μM -1  ± 0.38 μM -1 at 50mM, 1.60 μM -1  ± 0.11 μM -1 at 137mM, and 3.28 μM -1  ± 0.46 μM -1 at 200 mM of salt concentration. In this study, it was demonstrated that enzyme-linked aptamer assay and isothermal titration calorimetry were useful tools for studying the fundamental binding mechanism between a DNA aptamer and its target on the outer surface of S aureus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The determination of the enthalpy of formation and the enthalpy increment of Cd0.5 Te0.5 by Calvet calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, R.; Venugopal, V.; Sood, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    In the present study the enthalpy of formation of Cd 0.5 Te 0.5 compound at 785 K were determined from the two elements by direct reaction calorimetry using two different types of set-ups. The enthalpy increment values were measured by drop technique in Calvet calorimetry. (author). 3 refs., 4 tabs

  5. Turbine Burners: Turbulent Combustion of Liquid Fuels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sirignano, William A; Liu, Feng; Dunn-Rankin, Derek

    2006-01-01

    The proposed theoretical/computational and experimental study addresses the vital two-way coupling between combustion processes and fluid dynamic phenomena associated with schemes for burning liquid...

  6. Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion of Sewage Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshizo; Nojima, Tomoyuki; Kakuta, Akihiko; Moritomi, Hiroshi

    A conceptual design of an energy recovering system from sewage sludge was proposed. This system consists of a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, a gas turbine, and a heat exchanger for preheating of combustion air. Thermal efficiency was estimated roughly as 10-25%. In order to know the combustion characteristics of the sewage sludge under the elevated pressure condition, combustion tests of the dry and wet sewage sludge were carried out by using laboratory scale pressurized fluidized bed combustors. Combustibility of the sewage sludge was good enough and almost complete combustion was achieved in the combustion of the actual wet sludge. CO emission and NOx emission were marvelously low especially during the combustion of wet sewage sludge regardless of high volatile and nitrogen content of the sewage sludge. However, nitrous oxide (N2O) emission was very high. Hence, almost all nitrogen oxides were emitted as the form of N2O. From these combustion tests, we judged combustion of the sewage sludge with the pressurized fluidized bed combustor is suitable, and the conceptual design of the power generation system is available.

  7. Melt-Flow Behaviours of Thermoplastic Materials under Fire Conditions: Recent Experimental Studies and Some Theoretical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric materials often exhibit complex combustion behaviours encompassing several stages and involving solid phase, gas phase and interphase. A wide range of qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative testing techniques are currently available, both at the laboratory scale and for commercial purposes, for evaluating the decomposition and combustion behaviours of polymeric materials. They include, but are not limited to, techniques such as: thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA, oxygen bomb calorimetry, limiting oxygen index measurements (LOI, Underwriters Laboratory 94 (UL-94 tests, cone calorimetry, etc. However, none of the above mentioned techniques are capable of quantitatively deciphering the underpinning physiochemical processes leading to the melt flow behaviour of thermoplastics. Melt-flow of polymeric materials can constitute a serious secondary hazard in fire scenarios, for example, if they are present as component parts of a ceiling in an enclosure. In recent years, more quantitative attempts to measure the mass loss and melt-drip behaviour of some commercially important chain- and step-growth polymers have been accomplished. The present article focuses, primarily, on the experimental and some theoretical aspects of melt-flow behaviours of thermoplastics under heat/fire conditions.

  8. Melt-Flow Behaviours of Thermoplastic Materials under Fire Conditions: Recent Experimental Studies and Some Theoretical Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Paul; Tretsiakova-McNally, Svetlana

    2015-12-15

    Polymeric materials often exhibit complex combustion behaviours encompassing several stages and involving solid phase, gas phase and interphase. A wide range of qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative testing techniques are currently available, both at the laboratory scale and for commercial purposes, for evaluating the decomposition and combustion behaviours of polymeric materials. They include, but are not limited to, techniques such as: thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), oxygen bomb calorimetry, limiting oxygen index measurements (LOI), Underwriters Laboratory 94 (UL-94) tests, cone calorimetry, etc. However, none of the above mentioned techniques are capable of quantitatively deciphering the underpinning physiochemical processes leading to the melt flow behaviour of thermoplastics. Melt-flow of polymeric materials can constitute a serious secondary hazard in fire scenarios, for example, if they are present as component parts of a ceiling in an enclosure. In recent years, more quantitative attempts to measure the mass loss and melt-drip behaviour of some commercially important chain- and step-growth polymers have been accomplished. The present article focuses, primarily, on the experimental and some theoretical aspects of melt-flow behaviours of thermoplastics under heat/fire conditions.

  9. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  10. COMBUSTION PROPERTIES OF EUCALYPTUS WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın ÖRS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the combustion properties of some impregnation materials (abiotic and biotic factors used for eucalyptus wood in interior or exterior environments were investigated. The experimental samples were prepared from Eucalyptus wood based on ASTM-D-1413-76 Tanalith-CBC, boric acid, borax, vacsol-WR, immersol-WR, polyethylen glycole-400 and ammonium sulphate were used as an impregnation material. The results indicated that, vacuum treatment on Eucalyptus gave the lowest retention value of salts. Compounds containing boron+salt increased fire resistance however water repellents decreased the wood flammability.

  11. Theoretical studies of combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, J.M. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The basic objectives of this research program are to develop and apply theoretical techniques to fundamental dynamical processes of importance in gas-phase combustion. There are two major areas currently supported by this grant. One is reactive scattering of diatom-diatom systems, and the other is the dynamics of complex formation and decay based on L{sup 2} methods. In all of these studies, the authors focus on systems that are of interest experimentally, and for which potential energy surfaces based, at least in part, on ab initio calculations are available.

  12. Modeling nitrogen chemistry in combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Miller, James A.; Ruscic, Branko

    2018-01-01

    the accuracy of engineering calculations and thereby the potential of primary measures for NOx control. In this review our current understanding of the mechanisms that are responsible for combustion-generated nitrogen-containing air pollutants is discussed. The thermochemistry of the relevant nitrogen...... via NNH or N2O are discussed, along with the chemistry of NO removal processes such as reburning and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction of NO. Each subset of the mechanism is evaluated against experimental data and the accuracy of modeling predictions is discussed....

  13. Thermochemistry of cyclic acetone peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinditskii, V.P., E-mail: vps@rctu.ru [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kolesov, V.I.; Egorshev, V.Yu.; Patrikeev, D.I. [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, O.V. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Old data on DADP and TATP enthalpies of formation have been revised. • Combining Gaussian-4 (G4) theory with an isodesmic reaction scheme allowed calculated enthalpies of formation of TATP and DADP. • Oxygen bomb calorimetry measurements allowed experimental enthalpies of formation of the peroxides. • Both experimental and calculated values show a satisfactory agreement between each other. • The newly obtained enthalpies reasonably account for the observed derivative parameters: heats of decomposition, combustion, and explosion. - Abstract: Two potentially initiating explosive peroxides, diacetonediperoxide (DADP) and triacetonetriperoxide (TATP), were studied in respect to their thermochemical properties. To get the internally self-consistent estimations of gas-phase enthalpy of formation of DADP and TATP, their values were calculated by combining Gaussian-4 (G4) theory with an isodesmic reaction scheme. The energies of combustion (Δ{sub c}U) were measured and the standard enthalpies of formation (Δ{sub f}H{sub 298}{sup °}) of DADP and TATP were derived using the standard enthalpies of formation of the combustion products. The heat of explosion was measured for small low-pressed charges of the peroxides. The obtained enthalpies of formation of DADP and TATP were found to agree well with quantum chemical calculations and reasonably account for the observed derivative parameters: heats of decomposition, combustion, and detonation.

  14. Experimental validation for combustion analysis of GOTHIC code in 2-dimensional combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. W.; Yang, S. Y.; Park, K. C.; Jung, S. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the prediction capability of GOTHIC code for hydrogen combustion phenomena was validated with the results of two-dimensional premixed hydrogen combustion experiment executed by Seoul National University. The experimental chamber has about 24 liter free volume (1x0.024x1 m 3 ) and 2-dimensional rectangular shape. The test were preformed with 10% hydrogen/air gas mixture and conducted with combination of two igniter positions (top center, top corner) and two boundary conditions (bottom full open, bottom right half open). Using the lumped parameter and mechanistic combustion model in GOTHIC code, the SNU experiments were simulated under the same conditions. The GOTHIC code prediction of the hydrogen combustion phenomena did not compare well with the experimental results. In case of lumped parameter simulation, the combustion time was predicted appropriately. But any other local information related combustion phenomena could not be obtained. In case of mechanistic combustion analysis, the physical combustion phenomena of gas mixture were not matched experimental ones. In boundary open cases, the GOTHIC predicted very long combustion time and the flame front propagation could not simulate appropriately. Though GOTHIC showed flame propagation phenomenon in adiabatic calculation, the induction time of combustion was still very long compare with experimental results. Also, it was found that the combustion model of GOTHIC code had some weak points in low concentration of hydrogen combustion simulation

  15. Engine combustion network (Ecn) : characterization and comparison of boundary conditions for different combustion vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, M.; Somers, L.M.T.; Johnson, J.; Naber, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Malbec, L.M.; Bruneaux, G.; Pickett, L.M.; Bardi, M.; Payri, R.; Bazyn, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Engine Combustion Network (ECN) is a worldwide group of institutions using combustion vessels and/or performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, whose aim is to advance the state of spray and combustion knowledge at engine-relevant conditions. A key activity is the use of spray

  16. A study of the use of lead fluoride for electromagnetic calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woody, C.L.; Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.; Stoll, S.; Weingarten, A.B.; Anderson, D.F.; Ramberg, E.J.; Kuno, Y.; Macdonald, J.A.; Konaka, A.; Hutcheon, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    A study has been made on the properties of lead fluoride as a Cherenkov material for use in electromagnetic calorimetry. A prototype calorimeter module consisting of a 5 x 5 array of 2.1 x 2.1 x 18.5 cm 3 crystals has been built and tested in a test beam at the Brookhaven AGS. Results are given on energy resolution, shower size and e/π separation for electrons and pions in the range from 1--4 GeV. The light output has been measured to give approx-gt 1000 photoelectrons per MeV in good quality crystals, and to provide useful signals down to as low as 32 MeV. Measurements were also made on radiation damage in lead fluoride using 60 Co gamma rays and high energy ionizing particles, as well as on thermoluminescence after irradiation. It was found that only modest damage occurs up to a level of ∼ 30 Krad in large, calorimeter size crystals, and that the damage can be easily removed by optical bleaching

  17. Ring-shaped Calorimetry Information for a Neural eGamma Identification with ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Da Fonseca Pinto, Joao Victor; The ATLAS collaboration; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Seixas, Jose

    2016-01-01

    \\title{Ring-shaped Calorimetry Information for a Neural e/$\\gamma$ Identification with ATLAS Detector} After the successful operation of the Large Hadron Collider resulting with the discovery of the Higgs boson, a new data-taking period (Run 2) has started. For the first time, collisions are produced with energies of 13 TeV in the centre of mass. It is foreseen the luminosity increase, reaching values as high as $10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ yet in 2015. These changes in experimental conditions bring a proper environment for possible new physics key-findings. ATLAS is the largest LHC detector and was designed for general-purpose physics studies. Many potential physics channels have electrons or photons in their final states. For efficient studies on these channels precise measurement and identification of such particles is necessary. The identification task consists of disentangling those particles (signal) from collimated hadronic jets (background). Reported work concerns the identification process based on the cal...

  18. Simultaneous Absorptance and Thermal-Diffusivity Determination of Optical Components with Laser Calorimetry Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanru; Li, Bincheng

    2012-11-01

    The laser calorimetry (LCA) technique is used to determine simultaneously the absorptances and thermal diffusivities of optical components. An accurate temperature model, in which both the finite thermal conductivity and the finite sample size are taken into account, is employed to fit the experimental temperature data measured with an LCA apparatus for a precise determination of the absorptance and thermal diffusivity via a multiparameter fitting procedure. The uniqueness issue of the multiparameter fitting is discussed in detail. Experimentally, highly reflective (HR) samples prepared with electron-beam evaporation on different substrates (BK7, fused silica, and Ge) are measured with LCA. For the HR-coated sample on a fused silica substrate, the absorptance is determined to be 15.4 ppm, which is close to the value of 17.6 ppm, determined with a simplified temperature model recommended in the international standard ISO11551. The thermal diffusivity is simultaneously determined via multiparameter fitting to be approximately 6.63 × 10-7 m2 · s-1 with a corresponding square variance of 4.8 × 10-4. The fitted thermal diffusivity is in reasonably good agreement with the literature value (7.5 × 10-7 m2 · s -1). Good agreement is also obtained for samples with BK7 and Ge substrates.

  19. Changes in chromatin structure during the aging of cell cultures as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagor, M.; Cole, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclei from cultured human cells were examined by differential scanning calorimetry. Their melting profiles revealed four structural transitions at 60, 76, 88, and 105 degrees C (transitions I-IV, respectively). In immortalized (i.e., tumor) cell cultures and in normal cell cultures of low passage number, melting profiles were dominated by the 105 degrees C transition (transition IV), but in vitro aging of normal and Werner syndrome cells was associated with a marked decrease in transition IV followed by an increase in transition III at the expense of transition IV. At intermediate times in the aging process, much DNA melted at a temperature range (95-102 degrees C) intermediate between transitions III and IV, and this is consistent with the notion that aging of cell cultures is accompanied by an increase in single-strand character of the DNA. Calorimetric changes were observed in the melting profile of nuclei from UV-irradiated tumor cells that resembled the age-induced intermediate melting of chromatin. It is suggested that aging is accompanied by an increase in single-stranded character of the DNA in chromatin, which lowers its melting temperature, followed by strand breaks in the DNA that destroy its supercoiling potential

  20. Morphological Investigation into Starch Bio-Nanocomposites via Synchrotron Radiation and Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a hydrophilic, plasticized bionanocomposite system involving sorbitol plasticizer, amylose biopolymer, and montmorillonite (MMT for the presence of competitive interactions among them at different moisture content. Synchrotron analysis via small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and thermal analysis using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC were performed to understand crystalline growth and the distribution of crystalline domains within the samples. The SAXS diffraction patterns showed reduced interhelix spacing in the amylose network indicating strong amylose-sorbitol interactions. Depending on the sorbitol and MMT concentration, these interactions also affected the free moisture content and crystalline domains. Domains of around 95 Å and 312 Å were found in the low-moisture-content samples as compared to a single domain of 95 Å in the high-moisture-content samples. DSC measurements confirmed that the MMT increased the onset and the melting temperature of nanocomposites. Moreover, the results showed that the ternary interactions among sorbitol-amylose-MMT supported the crystalline heterogeneity through secondary nucleation.

  1. Synthesized cellulose/succinic anhydride as an ion exchanger. Calorimetry of divalent cations in aqueous suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Julio C.P. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Silva Filho, Edson C. [LIMAV, Federal University of Piaui, 64049-550 Teresina, Piaui (Brazil); Santana, Sirlane A.A. [Departamento de Quimica/CCET, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Av. dos Portugueses S/N, Campus do Bacanga, 65080-540 Sao Luiz, MA (Brazil); Airoldi, Claudio, E-mail: airoldi@iqm.unicamp.br [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-09-20

    Highlights: {yields} Synthetic route based on anhydride melting point. {yields} Cellulosic biopolymer/anhydride as ion exchanger. {yields} Calorimetry of cation exchange at solid/liquid interface. {yields} Favorable thermodynamic data of exchanging process. - Abstract: A synthetic route to a biopolymer/anhydride ion exchanger adds cellulose directly to molten succinic anhydride in a quasi solvent-free procedure. An amount of 3.07 {+-} 0.05 mmol of pendant groups incorporated onto the polymeric structure, which was characterized by elemental analysis, solid state carbon NMR, infrared, X-ray and thermogravimetry. The new polysaccharide is able to exchange cations from aqueous solution through a batchwise methodology, to obtain 2.46 {+-} 0.09 mmol g{sup -1} for divalent cobalt and nickel cations. The net thermal effects obtained from calorimetric titrations gave endothermic values of 3.81 {+-} 0.02 and 2.35 {+-} 0.01 kJ mol{sup -1}. The spontaneity of this ion-exchange process reflected in negative Gibbs energies and also a positive entropic contribution. These thermodynamic data at the solid/liquid interface suggests a favorable ion exchange process for this anchored biopolymer, for cation removal from the environment.

  2. Van ‘t Hoff global analyses of variable temperature isothermal titration calorimetry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiburger, Lee A.; Auclair, Karine; Mittermaier, Anthony K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ▶ We developed a global fitting strategy for ITC data collected at multiple temperatures. ▶ This method does not require prior knowledge of the binding mechanism. ▶ Monte Carlo simulations show that the approach improves the accuracy of extracted thermodynamic parameters. ▶ The method is used to study coupled folding/binding in aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase-Ii. - Abstract: Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) can provide detailed information on the thermodynamics of biomolecular interactions in the form of equilibrium constants, K A , and enthalpy changes, ΔH A . A powerful application of this technique involves analyzing the temperature dependences of ITC-derived K A and ΔH A values to gain insight into thermodynamic linkage between binding and additional equilibria, such as protein folding. We recently developed a general method for global analysis of variable temperature ITC data that significantly improves the accuracy of extracted thermodynamic parameters and requires no prior knowledge of the coupled equilibria. Here we report detailed validation of this method using Monte Carlo simulations and an application to study coupled folding and binding in an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase enzyme.

  3. Biomolecule-nanoparticle interactions: Elucidation of the thermodynamics by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rixiang; Lau, Boris L T

    2016-05-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are often exposed to a broad range of biomolecules of different abundances. Biomolecule sorption driven by various interfacial forces determines the surface structure and composition of NMs, subsequently governs their functionality and the reactivity of the adsorbed biomolecules. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a nondestructive technique that quantifies thermodynamic parameters through in-situ measurement of the heat absorption or release associated with an interaction. This review highlights the recent applications of ITC in understanding the thermodynamics of interactions between various nanoparticles (NPs) and biomolecules. Different aspects of a typical ITC experiment that are crucial for obtaining accurate and meaningful data, as well as the strengths, weaknesses, and challenges of ITC applications to NP research were discussed. ITC reveals the driving forces behind biomolecule-NP interactions and the effects of the physicochemical properties of both NPs and biomolecules by quantifying the crucial thermodynamics parameters (e.g., binding stoichiometry, ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG). Complimentary techniques would strengthen the interpretation of ITC results for a more holistic understanding of biomolecule-NP interactions. The thermodynamic information revealed by ITC and its complimentary characterizations is important for understanding biomolecule-NP interactions that are fundamental to the biomedical and environmental applications of NMs and their toxicological effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enzymatic hydrolysis of Amaranth flour - differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barba de la Rosa, A.P.; Paredes-Lopez, O.; Carabez-Trejo, A.; Ordorica-Falomir, C. (Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Irapuato (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados)

    1989-11-01

    High-protein amaranth flour (HPAF) and carbohydrate rich fraction (CRF) were produced from raw flour in a single-step process using a heat-stable alpha-amylase preparation. Protein content of flour increased from 15 to about 30 or 39% at liquefaction temperatures of 70 or 90{sup 0}C, respectively and 30 min hydrolysis time. CRF exhibited 14-22 DE. Enzymatic action at 70{sup 0}C increased endotherm temperature and gelatinization enthalpy of HPAF, in relation to gelatinized flour, as assessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Hydrolysis at 90{sup 0}C did not affect significantly (P > 0.05) DSC peak temperature. It is suggested that these changes in DSC performance might result from differences in amount and type of low-molecular weight carbohydrates and residual starch. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated that hydrolysis temperature changed substantially the structural appearance of flour particles. HPAF and CRF might find applications as dry milk extender and sweetener, respectively. (orig.).

  5. Uptake and release protocol for assessing membrane binding and permeation by way of isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamaloukas, Alekos D; Keller, Sandro; Heerklotz, Heiko

    2007-01-01

    The activity of many biomolecules and drugs crucially depends on whether they bind to biological membranes and whether they translocate to the opposite lipid leaflet and trans aqueous compartment. A general strategy to measure membrane binding and permeation is the uptake and release assay, which compares two apparent equilibrium situations established either by the addition or by the extraction of the solute of interest. Only solutes that permeate the membrane sufficiently fast do not show any dependence on the history of sample preparation. This strategy can be pursued for virtually all membrane-binding solutes, using any method suitable for detecting binding. Here, we present in detail one example that is particularly well developed, namely the nonspecific membrane partitioning and flip-flop of small, nonionic solutes as characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry. A complete set of experiments, including all sample preparation procedures, can typically be accomplished within 2 days. Analogous protocols for studying charged solutes, virtually water-insoluble, hydrophobic compounds or specific ligands are also considered.

  6. Differential scanning calorimetry method for purity determination: A case study on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and chloramphenicol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestens, V.; Zeleny, R.; Auclair, G.; Held, A.; Roebben, G.; Linsinger, T.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Purity assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and chloramphenicol by DSC. → DSC results compared with traditional purity methods. → Different methods give different results, multiple method approach recommended. → DSC sensitive to impurities that have similar structures as main component. - Abstract: In this study the validity and suitability of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine the purity of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and chloramphenicol has been investigated. The study materials were two candidate certified reference materials (CRMs), 6-methylchrysene and benzo[a]pyrene, and two different batches of commercially available highly pure chloramphenicol. The DSC results were compared with those obtained by other methods, namely gas and liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection, liquid chromatography with diode array detection, and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance. The purity results obtained by these different analytical methods confirm the well-known challenges of comparing results of different method-defined measurands. In comparison with other methods, DSC has a much narrower working range. This limits the applicability of DSC as purity determination method, for instance during the assignment of the purity value of a CRM. Nevertheless, this study showed that DSC can be a powerful technique to detect impurities that are structurally very similar to the main purity component. From this point of view, and because of its good repeatability, DSC can be considered as a valuable technique to investigate the homogeneity and stability of candidate purity CRMs.

  7. PHARMACEUTICAL AMORPHOUS ORGANIC MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION BY USING THE DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY AND DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Dranca

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This research has been carried out in order to demonstrate the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC in detecting and measuring α- and β-relaxation processes in amorphous pharmaceutical systems. DSC has been employed to study amorphous samples of poly (vinylpyrrolidone (PVP, indomethacin (InM, and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDA that are annealed at temperature (Ta around 0.8 of their glass transition temperature (Tg. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA is used to measure β- relaxation in PVP. Yet, the DSC has been used to study the glassy indomethacin aged at 0 and -10 oC for periods of time up to 109 and 210 days respectively. The results demonstrate the emergence of a small melting peak of the α-polymorph after aging for 69 days at 0°C and for 147 days at -10°C (i.e., ~55°C below the glass transition temperature that provides evidence of nucleation occurring in the temperature region of the β-relaxation.

  8. Investigation of phase transformations in ductile cast iron of differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przeliorz, R; Piatkowski, J

    2011-01-01

    The effect of heating rate on phase transformations to austenite range in ductile cast iron of the EN-GJS-450-10 grade was investigated. For studies of phase transformations, the technique of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used. Micro structure was examined by optical microscopy. The calorimetric examinations have proved that on heating three transformations occur in this grade of ductile iron, viz. magnetic transformation at the Curie temperature, pearlite→austenite transformation and ferrite→austenite transformation. An increase in the heating rate shifts the pearlite→austenite and ferrite→austenite transformations to higher temperature range. At the heating rate of 5 and 15 deg. C min -1 , local extrema have been observed to occur: for pearlite→austenite transformation at 784 deg. C and 795 deg. C, respectively, and for ferrite+ graphite →austenite transformation at 805 deg. C and 821 deg. C, respectively. The Curie temperature of magnetic transformation was extrapolated to a value of 740 deg. C. Each transformation is related with a specific thermal effect. The highest value of enthalpy is accompanying the ferrite→austenite transformation, the lowest occurs in the case of pearlite→austenite transformation.

  9. Structure of water in mesoporous organosilica by calorimetry and inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Esthy; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Li, Jichen; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the preparation of mesoporous organosilica samples with hydrophilic or hydrophobic organic functionality inside the silica channel. We synthesized mesoporous organosilica of identical pore sizes based on two different organic surface functionality namely hydrophobic (based on octyltriethoxysilane OTES) and hydrophilic (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane ATES) and MCM-41 was used as a reference system. The structure of water/ice in those porous silica samples have been investigated over a range temperatures by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS). INS study revealed that water confined in hydrophobic mesoporous organosilica shows vibrational behavior strongly different than bulk water. It consists of two states: water with strong and weak hydrogen bonds (with ratio 1:2.65, respectively), compared to ice-Ih. The corresponding O-O distances in these water states are 2.67 and 2.87 Ǻ, which strongly differ compared to ice-Ih (2.76 Ǻ). INS spectra for water in hydrophilic mesoporous organosilica ATES show behavior similar to bulk water, but with greater degree of disorder.

  10. Challenges of the Usual Graphical Methods Used to Characterize Phase Change Materials by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Gibout

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the thermal behavior of a plant or devices using Phase Change Materials (PCM requires to know their thermophysical properties. The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC is a technic largely used to investigate them. However, under the pretext to experiment with small samples, some authors consider the DSC curves as directly representing the properties of the materials without realizing that this interpretation is very often incompatible with the thermodynamics laws: as an example, although a pure substance melts at a fixed temperature T F , it is proposed a melting through a temperature range higher than T F and depending on the experiments (heating rates, sample masses..., for solutions the suggested characteristic temperatures are incompatible with the phase diagram, and also a hysteresis phenomenon is invented... In this paper, we demonstrate by a model coupling thermodynamics and conduction heat transfers, that the DSC curves are exactly compatible with the thermodynamics of phase changes (melting at fixed temperature for pure substances, in conformity with phase diagrams for solutions.... The cases of pure substances, saline solutions, substances with impurities or solid solutions are detailed. We indicate which information can, however, be given by the curves. We also propose a more sophisticated method by inverse calculations to determine the specific enthalpy whose all the thermodynamical properties can be deduced. Finally, we give some indications to understand and use the results indicating supercooling.

  11. Enthalpies of formation of UAl1 and UAl3 by calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagarajan, K.; Babu, R.; Mathews, C.K.

    1993-01-01

    Enthalpies of formation of the intermetallic compounds UAl 4 and UAl 3 at 298.15 K were determined by high temperature solution calorimetry in which liquid aluminium was used as the solvent. The thermal effects of dissolution of UAl 4 , UAl 3 and U in liquid aluminium were measured in separate experiments by dropping the samples held at the ambient temperature into liquid aluminium maintained at 980 K in the calorimeter. The thermal effects of dissolution of these samples at infinite dilution in liquid aluminium were derived from these measurements and based on this data the enthalpies of formation of UAl 4 and UAl 3 at 298.15 K were computed. The values obtained are ΔH f,298.15 (UAl 4 )=-126.5±13.3 kJ mol -1 and ΔH f,298.15 (UAl 3 )=-118.1±8.2 kJ mol -1 . The integral enthalpies of formation of U-Al alloys at 978 K, 1078 K and 1094 K were measured by dropping U samples maintained at the ambient temperature into liquid aluminium in the calorimeter at the experimental temperature. From the integral enthalpies of formation of U-Al alloys in the two phase regions, {U-Al}+ 4 > and {U-Al}+ 3 >, the enthalpies of formation of UAl 4 and UAl 3 , respectively, at the temperatures of measurement were derived. These results are discussed in comparison with the literature data. (orig.)

  12. Calorimetry Minisensor for the Localised Measurement of Surface Heat Dissipated from the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, Fabiola; Rodríguez de Rivera, Pedro Jesús; Rodríguez de Rivera, Manuel

    2016-11-06

    We have developed a calorimetry sensor that can perform a local measurement of the surface heat dissipated from the human body. The operating principle is based on the law of conductive heat transfer: heat dissipated by the human body passes across a thermopile located between the individual and a thermostat. Body heat power is calculated from the signals measured by the thermopile and the amount of power dissipated across the thermostat in order to maintain a constant temperature. The first prototype we built had a detection area measuring 6 × 6 cm², while the second prototype, which is described herein, had a 2 × 2 cm² detection area. This new design offers three advantages over the initial one: (1) greater resolution and three times greater thermal sensitivity; (2) a twice as fast response; and (3) it can take measurements from smaller areas of the body. The sensor has a 5 mW resolution, but the uncertainty is greater, up to 15 mW, due to the measurement and calculation procedure. The order of magnitude of measurements made in healthy subjects ranged from 60 to 300 mW at a thermostat temperature of 28 °C and an ambient room temperature of 21 °C. The values measured by the sensor depend on the ambient temperature and the thermostat's temperature, while the power dissipated depends on the individual's metabolism and any physical and/or emotional activity.

  13. Structural domains and conformational changes in nuclear chromatin: a quantitative thermodynamic approach by differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbi, C; Abelmoschi, M L; Gogioso, L; Parodi, S; Barboro, P; Cavazza, B; Patrone, E

    1989-04-18

    A good deal of information on the thermodynamic properties of chromatin was derived in the last few years from optical melting experiments. The structural domains of the polynucleosomal chain, the linker, and the core particle denature as independent units. The differential scanning calorimetry profile of isolated chromatin is made up of three endotherms, at approximately 74, 90, and 107 degrees C, having an almost Gaussian shape. Previous work on this matter, however, was mainly concerned with the dependence of the transition enthalpy on external parameters, such as the ionic strength, or with the melting of nuclei from different sources. In this paper we report the structural assignment of the transitions of rat liver nuclei, observed at 58, 66, 75, 92, and 107 degrees C. They are representative of the quiescent state of the cell. The strategy adopted in this work builds on the method developed for the investigation of complex biological macromolecules. The heat absorption profile of the nucleus was related to the denaturation of isolated nuclear components; electron microscopy and electrophoretic techniques were used for their morphological and molecular characterization. The digestion of chromatin by endogenous nuclease mimics perfectly the decondensation of the higher order structure and represented the source of several misinterpretations. This point was carefully examined in order to define unambiguously the thermal profile of native nuclei. The low-temperature transitions, centered around 58 and 66 degrees C, arise from the melting of scaffolding structures and of the proteins associated with heterogeneous nuclear RNA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Beam Studies of the Segmented Resistive WELL: a Potential Thin Sampling Element for Digital Hadron Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Arazi, Lior; Breskin, Amos; Bressler, Shikma; Moleri, Luca; Natal da Luz, Hugo; Oliveri, Eraldo; Pitt, Michael; Rubin, Adam; Marques Ferreira dos Santos, Joaquim; Calapez Albuquerque Veloso, João Filipe; White, Andrew Paul

    2013-01-01

    Thick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEMs) have the potential of constituting thin, robust sampling elements in Digital Hadron Calorimetry (DHCAL) in future colliders. We report on recent beam studies of new single- and double-THGEM-like structures; the multiplier is a Segmented Resistive WELL (SRWELL) - a single-faced THGEM in contact with a segmented resistive layer inductively coupled to readout pads. Several 10$\\times$10 cm$^2$ configurations with a total thickness of 5-6 mm (excluding electronics) with 1 cm$^2$ pads coupled to APV-SRS readout were investigated with muons and pions. Detection efficiencies in the 98$%$ range were recorded with average pad-multiplicity of $\\sim$1.1. The resistive anode resulted in efficient discharge damping, with potential drops of a few volts; discharge probabilities were $\\sim10^{-7}$ for muons and $\\sim10^{-6}$ for pions in the double-stage configuration, at rates of a few kHz/cm$^2$. Further optimization work and research on larger detectors are underway.

  15. Thermodynamic study of the interaction between calcium and zoledronic acid by calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostefa Side Larbi, Mohamed A.; Sauzet, Christophe; Piccerelle, Philippe; Cau, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are widely used to treat calcium disorders because of their structural and functional similarities with the organic pyrophosphates present in plasma and urine. BPs are well known for their strong interactions with calcium, and they have been shown to bind to hydroxyapatite or bone; however, no model exists for studying in greater detail how BPs and particularly amino-bisphosphonates (N-BPs) such as zolendronate (Zol) bind to free calcium. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of pH on Ca 2+ /Zol complex formation using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) because these effects might have important implications for the future development of a solid dosage form. In this study, using a predictive model, we can observe, the existence of three Ca 2+ /Zol complexes. Knowledge of the binding constant for each complex is helpful for predicting the predominance of the different species at different Ca 2+ /Zol ratios. Binding is due to ionic interaction between Ca 2+ and the negative charges formed by dissociated Zol as a function of the pKa. Ca 2+ fixation induces a strong rearrangement of the surrounding water molecules and causes proton release or uptake. The pH-dependent affinity of calcium for each site based on the model used in this work is proposed in detail, which might facilitate the development of new bisphosphonates and enable further elucidation of their mode of action.

  16. Ionic liquids: differential scanning calorimetry as a new indirect method for determination of vaporization enthalpies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verevkin, Sergey P; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Ralys, Ricardas V; Schick, Christoph

    2012-04-12

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to measure enthalpies of synthesis reactions of the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide [C(n)mim][Br] ionic liquids from 1-methylimidazole and n-alkyl bromides (with n = 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8). The optimal experimental conditions have been elaborated. Enthalpies of formation of these ionic liquids in the liquid state have been determined using the DSC results according to the Hess Law. The ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of [C(n)mim][Br] were calculated using the methods of quantum chemistry. They were used together with the DSC results to derive indirectly the enthalpies of vaporization of the ionic liquids under study. In order to validate the indirect determination, the experimental vaporization enthalpy of [C(4)mim][Br] was measured by using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The combination of reaction enthalpy measurements by DSC with modern high-level first-principles calculations opens valuable indirect thermochemical options to obtain values of vaporization enthalpies of ionic liquids.

  17. Phosphate sorption by three potential filter materials as assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngsie, Gry; Penn, Chad J; Hansen, Hans C B; Borggaard, Ole K

    2014-10-01

    Phosphorus eutrophication of lakes and streams, coming from drained farmlands, is a serious problem in areas with intensive agriculture. Installation of phosphate (P) sorbing filters at drain outlets may be a solution. The aim of this study was to improve the understanding of reactions involved in P sorption by three commercial P sorbing materials, i.e. Ca/Mg oxide-based Filtralite-P, Fe oxide-based CFH-12 and Limestone in two particle sizes (2-1 mm and 1-0.5 mm), by means of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), sorption isotherms, sequential extractions and SEM-EDS. The results indicate that P retention by CFH is due to surface complexation by rapid formation of strong Fe-P bonds. In contrast, retention of P by Filtralite-P and Limestone strongly depends on pH and time and is interpreted due to formation of calcium phosphate precipitate(s). Consequently, CFH can unambiguously be recommended as P retention filter material in drain outlets, whereas the use of Filtralite-P and Limestone has certain (serious) limitations. Thus, Filtralite-P has high capacity to retain P but only at alkaline pH (pH ≥ 10) and P retention by Limestone requires long-time contact and a high ratio between sorbent and sorbate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A survey of the year 2007 literature on applications of isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelić, Sasa; Jelesarov, Ilian

    2008-01-01

    Elucidation of the energetic principles of binding affinity and specificity is a central task in many branches of current sciences: biology, medicine, pharmacology, chemistry, material sciences, etc. In biomedical research, integral approaches combining structural information with in-solution biophysical data have proved to be a powerful way toward understanding the physical basis of vital cellular phenomena. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a valuable experimental tool facilitating quantification of the thermodynamic parameters that characterize recognition processes involving biomacromolecules. The method provides access to all relevant thermodynamic information by performing a few experiments. In particular, ITC experiments allow to by-pass tedious and (rarely precise) procedures aimed at determining the changes in enthalpy and entropy upon binding by van't Hoff analysis. Notwithstanding limitations, ITC has now the reputation of being the "gold standard" and ITC data are widely used to validate theoretical predictions of thermodynamic parameters, as well as to benchmark the results of novel binding assays. In this paper, we discuss several publications from 2007 reporting ITC results. The focus is on applications in biologically oriented fields. We do not intend a comprehensive coverage of all newly accumulated information. Rather, we emphasize work which has captured our attention with originality and far-reaching analysis, or else has provided ideas for expanding the potential of the method. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. High throughput integrated thermal characterization with non-contact optical calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Sichao; Huo, Ruiqing; Su, Ming

    2017-10-01

    Commonly used thermal analysis tools such as calorimeter and thermal conductivity meter are separated instruments and limited by low throughput, where only one sample is examined each time. This work reports an infrared based optical calorimetry with its theoretical foundation, which is able to provide an integrated solution to characterize thermal properties of materials with high throughput. By taking time domain temperature information of spatially distributed samples, this method allows a single device (infrared camera) to determine the thermal properties of both phase change systems (melting temperature and latent heat of fusion) and non-phase change systems (thermal conductivity and heat capacity). This method further allows these thermal properties of multiple samples to be determined rapidly, remotely, and simultaneously. In this proof-of-concept experiment, the thermal properties of a panel of 16 samples including melting temperatures, latent heats of fusion, heat capacities, and thermal conductivities have been determined in 2 min with high accuracy. Given the high thermal, spatial, and temporal resolutions of the advanced infrared camera, this method has the potential to revolutionize the thermal characterization of materials by providing an integrated solution with high throughput, high sensitivity, and short analysis time.

  20. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Calorimetry using organic scintillators, 'a sideways perspective'.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proudfoot, J.

    1999-09-10

    Over the last two decades, calorimetry baaed on organic scintillators has developed into an excellent technology for many experimental situations in high energy physics. The primary difficulty, that of extracting the light signals, has benefited from two milestone innovations. The first was the use of wavelength-shifting bars to allow light to be efficiently collected from large areas of scintillator and then readily piped to a readout device. The second of these was the extension of this approach to plastic wavelength-shifting optical fibers whose great flexibility and small diameter allowed a minimum of detector volume to be compromised by the read-out. These two innovations coupled with inventiveness have produced many varied and successful calorimeters. Equal response to both hadronic and electromagnetic showers can be realized in scintillator-based calorimeters. However, in general this is not the case and it is likely that in the search for greater performance, in the future, combined tracking and calorimeter systems will be required.

  2. Titration calorimetry of anesthetic-protein interaction: negative enthalpy of binding and anesthetic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, I; Yamanaka, M

    1997-04-01

    Anesthetic potency increases at lower temperatures. In contrast, the transfer enthalpy of volatile anesthetics from water to macromolecules is usually positive. The transfer decreases at lower temperature. It was proposed that a few selective proteins bind volatile anesthetics with negative delta H, and these proteins are involved in signal transduction. There has been no report on direct estimation of binding delta H of anesthetics to proteins. This study used isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze chloroform binding to bovine serum albumin. The calorimetrically measured delta H cal was -10.37 kJ.mol-1. Thus the negative delta H of anesthetic binding is not limited to signal transduction proteins. The binding was saturable following Fermi-Dirac statistics and is characterized by the Langmuir adsorption isotherms, which is interfacial. The high-affinity association constant, K, was 2150 +/- 132 M-1 (KD = 0.47 mM) with the maximum binding number, Bmax = 3.7 +/- 0.2. The low-affinity K was 189 +/- 3.8 M-1 (KD = 5.29 mM), with a Bmax of 13.2 +/- 0.3. Anesthetic potency is a function of the activity of anesthetic molecules, not the concentration. Because the sign of delta H determines the temperature dependence of distribution of anesthetic molecules, it is irrelevant to the temperature dependence of anesthetic potency.

  3. The Enthalpy of Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide: A General Chemistry Calorimetry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzzacco, Charles J.

    1999-11-01

    A calorimetry experiment involving the catalytic decomposition of aqueous hydrogen peroxide is presented. The experiment is simple, inexpensive, and colorful. In its simplest form, it can be performed in less than one hour; therefore, it is quite suitable for high school labs, which often have time restrictions. The chemicals required are household or commercial 3% H2O2(aq) and 0.50 M Fe(NO3)3(aq). Styrofoam cup calorimeters and thermometers with a range from 20 to 50 oC are also required. Ideally, the thermometers should be precise to 0.01 oC. The temperature of the H2O2 solution is monitored before and after the Fe(NO3)3 catalyst is added. The addition of the catalyst results in a color change and the evolution of heat and bubbles of oxygen. At the conclusion of the reaction, the color of the reaction mixture returns to that of the original Fe(NO3)3 solution. The heat change for the reaction is determined from the temperature change, the specific heat of the solution, and the calorimeter constant. The experimental enthalpy change for the reaction is in excellent agreement with the literature value.

  4. Recent advances and potential applications of modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC) in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, Matthias Manne; Löbmann, Korbinian; Elder, David P; Rades, Thomas; Holm, René

    2016-05-25

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is frequently the thermal analysis technique of choice within preformulation and formulation sciences because of its ability to provide detailed information about both the physical and energetic properties of a substance and/or formulation. However, conventional DSC has shortcomings with respect to weak transitions and overlapping events, which could be solved by the use of the more sophisticated modulated DSC (mDSC). mDSC has multiple potential applications within the pharmaceutical field and the present review provides an up-to-date overview of these applications. It is aimed to serve as a broad introduction to newcomers, and also as a valuable reference for those already practising in the field. Complex mDSC was introduced more than two decades ago and has been an important tool for the quantification of amorphous materials and development of freeze-dried formulations. However, as discussed in the present review, a number of other potential applications could also be relevant for the pharmaceutical scientist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of TZERO calibrated modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry to characterize model protein formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badkar, Aniket; Yohannes, Paulos; Banga, Ajay

    2006-02-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using T(ZERO) modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) as a novel technique to characterize protein solutions using lysozyme as a model protein and IgG as a model monoclonal antibody. MDSC involves the application of modulated heating program, along with the standard heating program that enables the separation of overlapping thermal transitions. Although characterization of unfolding transitions for protein solutions requires the application of high sensitive DSC, separation of overlapping transitions like aggregation and other exothermic events may be possible only by use of MDSC. A newer T(ZERO) calibrated MDSC model from TA instruments that has improved sensitivity than previous models was used. MDSC analysis showed total, reversing and non-reversing heat flow signals. Total heat flow signals showed a combination of melting endotherms and overlapping exothermic events. Under the operating conditions used, the melting endotherms were seen in reversing heat flow signal while the exothermic events were seen in non-reversing heat flow signal. This enabled the separation of overlapping thermal transitions, improved data analysis and decreased baseline noise. MDSC was used here for characterization of lysozyme solutions, but its feasibility for characterizing therapeutic protein solutions needs further assessment.

  6. Building a Graphite Calorimetry System for the Dosimetry of Therapeutic X-ray Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Jung Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A graphite calorimetry system was built and tested under irradiation. The noise level of the temperature measurement system was approximately 0.08 mK (peak to peak. The temperature of the core part rose by approximately 8.6 mK at 800 MU (monitor unit for 6-MV X-ray beams, and it increased as X-ray energy increased. The temperature rise showed less spread when it was normalized to the accumulated charge, as measured by an external monitoring chamber. The radiation energy absorbed by the core part was determined to have values of 0.798 J/μC, 0.389 J/μC, and 0.352 J/μC at 6 MV, 10 MV, and 18 MV, respectively. These values were so consistent among repeated runs that their coefficient of variance was less than 0.15%.

  7. Application of Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC in study of phase transformations in ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Przeliorz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heating rate on phase transformations to austenite range in ductile iron of the EN-GJS-450-10 grade was investigated. For studies of phase transformations, the technique of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC was used. Microstructure was examined by optical microscopy. The calorimetric examinations have proved that on heating three transformations occur in this grade of ductile iron, viz. magnetic transformation at the Curie temperature, pearlite→austenite transformation and ferrite→austenite transformation. An increase in the heating rate shifts the pearlite→austenite and ferrite→austenite transformations to higher temperature range. At the heating rate of 5 and 15°C/min, local extrema have been observed to occur: for pearlite→austenite transformation at 784°C and 795°C, respectively, and for ferrite→austenite transformation at 805°C and 821°C, respectively. The Curie temperature of magnetic transformation was extrapolated to a value of 740°C. Each transformation is related with a specific thermal effect. The highest value of enthalpy is accompanying the ferrite→austenite transformation, the lowest occurs in the case of pearlite→austenite transformation.

  8. Partitioning of late gestation energy expenditure in ewes using indirect calorimetry and a linear regression approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiani, Alishir; Chwalibog, André; Nielsen, Mette O

    2007-01-01

    Late gestation energy expenditure (EE(gest)) originates from energy expenditure (EE) of development of conceptus (EE(conceptus)) and EE of homeorhetic adaptation of metabolism (EE(homeorhetic)). Even though EE(gest) is relatively easy to quantify, its partitioning is problematic. In the present...... study metabolizable energy (ME) intake ranges for twin-bearing ewes were 220-440, 350- 700, 350-900 kJ per metabolic body weight (W0.75) at week seven, five, two pre-partum respectively. Indirect calorimetry and a linear regression approach were used to quantify EE(gest) and then partition to EE......(conceptus) and EE(homeorhetic). Energy expenditure of basal metabolism of the non-gravid tissues (EE(bmng)), derived from the intercept of the linear regression equation of retained energy [kJ/W0.75] and ME intake [kJ/W(0.75)], was 298 [kJ/ W0.75]. Values of the intercepts of the regression equations at week seven...

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of Bacillus subtilis endospore protonation using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Zoë R.; Gorman-Lewis, Drew

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial proton and metal adsorption reactions have the capacity to affect metal speciation and transport in aqueous environments. We coupled potentiometric titration and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analyses to study Bacillus subtilis spore-proton adsorption. We modeled the potentiometric data using a four and five-site non-electrostatic surface complexation model (NE-SCM). Heats of spore surface protonation from coupled ITC analyses were used to determine site specific enthalpies of protonation based on NE-SCMs. The five-site model resulted in a substantially better model fit for the heats of protonation but did not significantly improve the potentiometric titration model fit. The improvement observed in the five-site protonation heat model suggests the presence of a highly exothermic protonation reaction circa pH 7 that cannot be resolved in the less sensitive potentiometric data. From the log Ks and enthalpies we calculated corresponding site specific entropies. Log Ks and site concentrations describing spore surface protonation are statistically equivalent to B. subtilis cell surface protonation constants. Spore surface protonation enthalpies, however, are more exothermic relative to cell based adsorption suggesting a different bonding environment. The thermodynamic parameters defined in this study provide insight on molecular scale spore-surface protonation reactions. Coupled ITC and potentiometric titrations can reveal highly exothermic, and possibly endothermic, adsorption reactions that are overshadowed in potentiometric models alone. Spore-proton adsorption NE-SCMs derived in this study provide a framework for future metal adsorption studies.

  10. A Universal Method for Fishing Target Proteins from Mixtures of Biomolecules using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.; Sun, Q; Kini, R; Sivaraman, J

    2008-01-01

    The most challenging tasks in biology include the identification of (1) the orphan receptor for a ligand, (2) the ligand for an orphan receptor protein, and (3) the target protein(s) for a given drug or a lead compound that are critical for the pharmacological or side effects. At present, several approaches are available, including cell- or animal-based assays, affinity labeling, solid-phase binding assays, surface plasmon resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Most of these techniques are not easy to apply when the target protein is unknown and the compound is not amenable to labeling, chemical modification, or immobilization. Here we demonstrate a new universal method for fishing orphan target proteins from a complex mixture of biomolecules using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) as a tracking tool. We took snake venom, a crude mixture of several hundred proteins/peptides, as a model to demonstrate our proposed ITC method in tracking the isolation and purification of two distinct target proteins, a major component and a minor component. Identities of fished out target proteins were confirmed by amino acid sequencing and inhibition assays. This method has the potential to make a significant advancement in the area of identifying orphan target proteins and inhibitor screening in drug discovery and characterization.

  11. Microchip-calorimetry of organic charge transfer complex which shows superconductivity at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, Yuki [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama 1-1, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamashita, Satoshi [RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takashi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama 1-1, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Nakazawa, Yasuhiro, E-mail: nakazawa@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama 1-1, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Institute for Molecular Science, Nishigonaka 38, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2012-03-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic charge transfer salt of {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br shows superconductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We succeeded to detect thermal anomaly microchip device TCG3880. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development details of the calorimeter and the detection system is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic fields dependence shows typical character of layered superconductor. - Abstract: We carried out thermodynamic measurements of organic charge transfer complex of {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br, where BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene by TCG3880 chip device in order to examine capability of the chip calorimeter at low temperature region and under magnetic fields. TCG3880 chip is mounted on a {sup 3}He cryostat available in combination with a superconductive magnet up to 7 T. Thermal anomalies related to the glass-like freezing of ethylene groups of BEDT-TTF molecules and the superconductive transition were observed. A frequency dependence of the thermal anomaly of the glass formation and a magnetic fields dependence of the thermal anomaly of the superconductive transition are reported. The results presented in this work demonstrate that the TCG3880 is quite useful for thermodynamic investigations of the organic charge transfer complex with much reduced sample quantity as compared with those of relaxation and adiabatic calorimetry.

  12. Studies on sampling and homogeneous dual readout calorimetry with meta-crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromanolakis, G; Lecoq, P

    2011-01-01

    The meta-crystals concept is an approach that consists of using both undoped and properly doped heavy crystal fibers of identical material as the active medium of a calorimeter. The undoped fibers behave as Cherenkov radiators while the doped ones behave as scintillators. A dual readout calorimeter can be built with its sensitive volume composed of a mixture of both types of crystals. In addition if the calorimeter is adequately finely segmented it can also function as a particle flow calorimeter at the same time. In this way one could possibly combine the advantages of both the particle flow concept and the dual readout scheme. We discuss the approach of dual readout calorimetry with meta-crystals made of Lutetium Aluminium Garnet (LuAG). We brie fly present studies on the material development and first testbeam activities and then focus on performance expectation studies based on simulation. We discuss in more detail the results from generic systematic scannings of the design parameters of a dual readout ca...

  13. AC Calorimetry and Thermophysical Properties of Bulk Glass-Forming Metallic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William L.

    2000-01-01

    Thermo-physical properties of two bulk metallic glass forming alloys, Ti34Zr11Cu47Ni8 (VIT 101) and Zr57Nb5Ni12.6Al10CU15.4 (VIT 106), were investigated in the stable and undercooled melt. Our investigation focused on measurements of the specific heat in the stable and undercooled liquid using the method of AC modulation calorimetry. The VIT 106 exhibited a maximum undercooling of 140 K in free radiative cooling. Specific heat measurements could be performed in stable melt down to an undercooling of 80 K. Analysis of the specific heat data indicate an anomaly near the equilibrium liquidus temperature. This anomaly is also observed in y the temperature dependencies of the external relaxation time, the specific volume, and the surface tension; it is tentatively attributed to a phase separation in the liquid state. The VIT 101 specimen exhibited a small undercooling of about 50 K. Specific heat measurements were performed in the stable and undercooled melt. These various results will be combined with ground based work such as the measurement of T-T-T curves in the electrostatic levitator and low temperature viscosity and specific heat measurements for modeling the nucleation kinetics of these alloys.

  14. Simulating SiD Calorimetry: Software Calibration Procedures and Jet Energy Resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassell, R.

    2009-01-01

    Simulated calorimeter performance in the SiD detector is examined. The software calibration procedures are described, as well as the perfect pattern recognition PFA reconstruction. Performance of the SiD calorimeters is summarized with jet energy resolutions from calorimetry only, perfect pattern recognition and the SiD PFA algorithm. Presented at LCWS08(1). Our objective is to simulate the calorimeter performance of the SiD detector, with and without a Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). Full Geant4 simulations using SLIC(2) and the SiD simplified detector geometry (SiD02) are used. In this geometry, the calorimeters are represented as layered cylinders. The EM calorimeter is Si/W, with 20 layers of 2.5mm W and 10 layers of 5mm W, segmented in 3.5 x 3.5mm 2 cells. The HAD calorimeter is RPC/Fe, with 40 layers of 20mm Fe and a digital readout, segmented in 10 x 10mm 2 cells. The barrel detectors are layered in radius, while the endcap detectors are layered in z(along the beam axis)

  15. Misuse of thermodynamics in the interpretation of isothermal titration calorimetry data for ligand binding to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethica, Brian A

    2015-03-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has given a mass of data on the binding of small molecules to proteins and other biopolymers, with particular interest in drug binding to proteins chosen as therapeutic indicators. Interpretation of the enthalpy data usually follows an unsound protocol that uses thermodynamic relations in circumstances where they do not apply. Errors of interpretation include incomplete definitions of ligand binding and equilibrium constants and neglect of the non-ideality of the solutions under study, leading to unreliable estimates of standard free energies and entropies of binding. The mass of reported thermodynamic functions for ligand binding to proteins estimated from ITC enthalpies alone is consequently of uncertain thermodynamic significance and utility. ITC and related experiments to test the protocol assumptions are indicated. A thermodynamic procedure avoiding equilibrium constants or other reaction models and not requiring protein activities is given. The discussion draws attention to the fundamental but neglected relation between the thermodynamic activity and bioactivity of drugs and to the generally unknown thermodynamic status of ligand solutions, which for drugs relates directly to effective therapeutic dosimetry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. PREFACE: XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchurin, Nural

    2012-12-01

    The XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, CALOR2012, was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico from 4-8 June 2012. The series of conferences on calorimetry started in 1990 at Fermilab, and they have been the premier event for calorimeter aficionados, a trend that CALOR2012 upheld. This year, several presentations focused on the status of the major calorimeter systems, especially at the LHC. Discussions on new and developing techniques in calorimetry took a full day. Excellent updates on uses of calorimeters or about ideas that are deeply rooted in particle physics calorimetry in astrophysics and neutrino physics were followed by talks on algorithms and special triggers that rely on calorimeters. Finally, discussions of promising current developments and ongoing R&D work for future calorimeters capped the conference. The field of calorimetry is alive and well, as evidenced by the more than 100 attendees and the excellent quality of over 80 presentations. You will find the written contributions in this volume. The presentations can be found at calor2012.ttu.edu. The first day of the conference was dedicated to the LHC. In two invited talks, Guillaume Unal (CERN) and Tommaso Tabarelli de Fatis (Universita' & INFN Milano Bicocca) discussed the critical role electromagnetic calorimeters play in the hunt for the Standard Model Higgs boson in ATLAS and CMS, respectively. The enhanced sensitivity for light Higgs in the two-gamma decay channel renders electromagnetic calorimeters indispensible. Much of the higher mass region was already excluded for the SM Higgs by the time of this conference, and after less than a month, on 4 July, CERN announced the discovery of a new boson at 125 GeV, a particle that seems consistent with the Higgs particle so far. Once again, without the electromagnetic calorimeters, this would not have been possible. Professor Geoffrey West from the Santa Fe Institute gave the keynote address. His talk, 'Universal Scaling Laws

  17. Combustion Sensors: Gas Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human, Mel

    2002-01-01

    This report documents efforts to survey the current research directions in sensor technology for gas turbine systems. The work is driven by the current and future requirements on system performance and optimization. Accurate real time measurements of velocities, pressure, temperatures, and species concentrations will be required for objectives such as combustion instability attenuation, pollutant reduction, engine health management, exhaust profile control via active control, etc. Changing combustor conditions - engine aging, flow path slagging, or rapid maneuvering - will require adaptive responses; the effectiveness of such will be only as good as the dynamic information available for processing. All of these issues point toward the importance of continued sensor development. For adequate control of the combustion process, sensor data must include information about the above mentioned quantities along with equivalence ratios and radical concentrations, and also include both temporal and spatial velocity resolution. Ultimately these devices must transfer from the laboratory to field installations, and thus must become low weight and cost, reliable and maintainable. A primary conclusion from this study is that the optics-based sensor science will be the primary diagnostic in future gas turbine technologies.

  18. Combustion chemistry and formation of pollutants; Chimie de la combustion et formation des polluants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This book of proceedings reports on 7 papers on combustion chemistry and formation of pollutants presented during the workshop organized by the `Combustion and Flames` section of the French society of thermal engineers. The chemistry of combustion is analyzed in various situations such as: turbojet engines, spark ignition engines, industrial burners, gas turbines etc... Numerical simulation is used to understand the physico-chemical processes involved in combustion, to describe the kinetics of oxidation, combustion and flame propagation, and to predict the formation of pollutants. (J.S.)

  19. Low NOx combustion technologies for high-temperature natural gas combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamme, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Because of the high process temperature which is required for some processes like glass melting and the high temperature to which the combustion air is preheated, NOx emission are extremely high. Even at these high temperatures, NOx emissions could be reduced drastically by using advanced combustion techniques such as staged combustion or flame-less oxidation, as experimental work has shown. In the case of oxy-fuel combustion, the NOx emission are also very high if conventional burners are used. The new combustion techniques achieve similar NOx reductions. (author)

  20. Study of mechanically activated coal combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burdukov Anatolij P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion and air gasification of mechanically activated micro-ground coals in the flux have been studied. Influence of mechanically activated methods at coals grinding on their chemical activeness at combustion and gasification has been determined. Intense mechanical activation of coals increases their chemical activeness that enables development of new highly boosted processing methods for coals with various levels of metamorphism.

  1. Internal combustion engines in hybrid vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.; Weijer, C.J.T. van de; Beckman, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the use of internal combustion engines in hybrid powertrains is investigated. The substantial difference between the use of internal combustion engines in conventional and in hybrid vehicles mean that engines for hybrid vehicles should be designed specifically for the purpose. At the

  2. Flue Gas Emissions from Fluidized Bed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramer, E.A.; Valk, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the past decades fluidized bed coal combustion was developed as a technology for burning coal in an effective way meeting the standards for pollution control. During the earlier years of research on fluidized bed combustion, the potential for limiting the S02 emission by adding limestone to

  3. Combustion and extinction of magnesium fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.; Duverger de Cuy, G.

    1988-01-01

    The studies made in France on magnesium combustion and extinguishing means are associated at the nuclear fuel of the graphite-gas reactor. Safety studies are made for ameliorate our knowledge on: - magnesium combustion - magnesium fire propagation - magnesium fire extinguishing [fr

  4. Coal combustion ashes: A radioactive Waste?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michetti, F.P.; Tocci, M.

    1992-01-01

    The radioactive substances naturally hold in fossil fuels, such as Uranium and Thorium, after the combustion, are subjected to an increase of concentration in the residual combustion products as flying ashes or as firebox ashes. A significant percentage of the waste should be classified as radioactive waste, while the political strategies seems to be setted to declassify it as non-radioactive waste. (Author)

  5. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  6. 30 CFR 57.4104 - Combustible waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combustible waste. 57.4104 Section 57.4104... Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4104 Combustible waste. (a) Waste materials, including liquids, shall not accumulate in quantities that could create a fire hazard. (b) Waste or rags containing...

  7. Injector tip for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Tsu Pin; Ye, Wen

    2003-05-20

    This invention relates to a the tip structure of a fuel injector as used in a internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines using Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) technology require a tip structure that directs fuel spray in a downward direction. This requirement necessitates a tip design that is capable of withstanding mechanical stresses associated with the design.

  8. Ultra-low pollutant emission combustion method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khinkis, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for ultra-low pollutant emission combustion of fossil fuel. It comprises: introducing into a primary combustion chamber a first fuel portion of about 1 percent to about 20 percent of a total fuel to be combusted; introducing primary combustion air into the primary combustion chamber; introducing a first portion of water into the primary combustion chamber, having a first water heat capacity equivalent to a primary combustion air heat capacity of one of a primary combustion air amount of about 10 percent to about 60 percent of the first stoichiometirc requirement for complete combustion of the first fuel portion and an excess primary combustion air amount of about 20 percent to about 150 percent of the first stoichiometric requirement for complete combustion of the first fuel portion; burning the first fuel portion with the primary combustion air in the primary combustion chamber at a temperature abut 2000 degrees F to about 2700 degrees F producing initial combustion products; passing the initial combustion products into a secondary combustion chamber; introducing into the secondary combustion chamber a second fuel portion of about 80 percent to about 99 percent of the total fuel to be combusted; introducing secondary combustion air into the secondary combustion chamber in an amount of about 105 percent to about 130 percent of a second stoichiometric requirement for complete combustion of the second fuel portion; introducing a second portion of water into the secondary combustion chamber; burning the second fuel portion and any remaining fuel in the initial combustion products; passing the final combustion products into a dilution chamber; introducing dilution air into the dilution chamber; discharging the ultra-low pollutant emission vitiated air form the dilution chamber

  9. Internal and surface phenomena in metal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Molodetsky, Irina E.; Law, Chung K.

    1995-01-01

    Combustion of metals has been widely studied in the past, primarily because of their high oxidation enthalpies. A general understanding of metal combustion has been developed based on the recognition of the existence of both vapor-phase and surface reactions and involvement of the reaction products in the ensuing heterogeneous combustion. However, distinct features often observed in metal particle combustion, such as brightness oscillations and jumps (spearpoints), disruptive burning, and non-symmetric flames are not currently understood. Recent metal combustion experiments using uniform high-temperature metal droplets produced by a novel micro-arc technique have indicated that oxygen dissolves in the interior of burning particles of certain metals and that the subsequent transformations of the metal-oxygen solutions into stoichiometric oxides are accompanied with sufficient heat release to cause observed brightness and temperature jumps. Similar oxygen dissolution has been observed in recent experiments on bulk iron combustion but has not been associated with such dramatic effects. This research addresses heterogeneous metal droplet combustion, specifically focusing on oxygen penetration into the burning metal droplets, and its influence on the metal combustion rate, temperature history, and disruptive burning. A unique feature of the experimental approach is the combination of the microgravity environment with a novel micro-arc Generator of Monodispersed Metal Droplets (GEMMED), ensuring repeatable formation and ignition of uniform metal droplets with controllable initial temperature and velocity. The droplet initial temperatures can be adjusted within a wide range from just above the metal melting point, which provides means to ignite droplets instantly upon entering an oxygen containing environment. Initial droplet velocity will be set equal to zero allowing one to organize metal combustion microgravity experiments in a fashion similar to usual microgravity

  10. A predictive model of natural gas mixture combustion in internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Espinoza

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the development of a predictive natural gas mixture combustion model for conventional com-bustion (ignition engines. The model was based on resolving two areas; one having unburned combustion mixture and another having combustion products. Energy and matter conservation equations were solved for each crankshaft turn angle for each area. Nonlinear differential equations for each phase’s energy (considering compression, combustion and expansion were solved by applying the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The model also enabled studying different natural gas components’ composition and evaluating combustion in the presence of dry and humid air. Validation results are shown with experimental data, demonstrating the software’s precision and accuracy in the results so produced. The results showed cylinder pressure, unburned and burned mixture temperature, burned mass fraction and combustion reaction heat for the engine being modelled using a natural gas mixture.

  11. Interactive wood combustion for botanical tree models

    KAUST Repository

    Pirk, Sören

    2017-11-22

    We present a novel method for the combustion of botanical tree models. Tree models are represented as connected particles for the branching structure and a polygonal surface mesh for the combustion. Each particle stores biological and physical attributes that drive the kinetic behavior of a plant and the exothermic reaction of the combustion. Coupled with realistic physics for rods, the particles enable dynamic branch motions. We model material properties, such as moisture and charring behavior, and associate them with individual particles. The combustion is efficiently processed in the surface domain of the tree model on a polygonal mesh. A user can dynamically interact with the model by initiating fires and by inducing stress on branches. The flames realistically propagate through the tree model by consuming the available resources. Our method runs at interactive rates and supports multiple tree instances in parallel. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through numerous examples and evaluate its plausibility against the combustion of real wood samples.

  12. Solid waste combustion for alpha waste incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1981-02-01

    Radioactive waste incinerator development at the Savannah River Laboratory has been augmented by fundamental combustion studies at the University of South Carolina. The objective was to measure and model pyrolysis and combustion rates of typical Savannah River Plant waste materials as a function of incinerator operating conditions. The analytical models developed in this work have been incorporated into a waste burning transient code. The code predicts maximum air requirement and heat energy release as a function of waste type, package size, combustion chamber size, and temperature. Historically, relationships have been determined by direct experiments that did not allow an engineering basis for predicting combustion rates in untested incinerators. The computed combustion rates and burning times agree with measured values in the Savannah River Laboratory pilot (1 lb/hr) and full-scale (12 lb/hr) alpha incinerators for a wide variety of typical waste materials

  13. Final report: Prototyping a combustion corridor; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutland, Christopher J.; Leach, Joshua

    2001-01-01

    The Combustion Corridor is a concept in which researchers in combustion and thermal sciences have unimpeded access to large volumes of remote computational results. This will enable remote, collaborative analysis and visualization of state-of-the-art combustion science results. The Engine Research Center (ERC) at the University of Wisconsin - Madison partnered with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, and several other universities to build and test the first stages of a combustion corridor. The ERC served two important functions in this partnership. First, we work extensively with combustion simulations so we were able to provide real world research data sets for testing the Corridor concepts. Second, the ERC was part of an extension of the high bandwidth based DOE National Laboratory connections to universities

  14. Solution combustion synthesis of the nanocrystalline NCM oxide for lithium-ion battery uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Amirhosein; Jalaly, Maisam; Rahmanifard, Roohollah; Ghorbanzadeh, Milad

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the NCM cathode with a chemical composition of {{{LiNi}}}1/3}{{{Co}}}1/3}{{{Mn}}}1/3}{{{O}}}2 were synthesized through a solution combustion method. In this method, metal nitrates and urea were used as precursors and fuel, respectively. The powder obtained from combustion were transferred into a alumina crucible and insert to the muffle furnace and calcined at 750 °C for 15 h. The crystallite size of the sample was calculated with sherer equation to be about 41 nm. The prepared cathode were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and battery charge-discharge test. The initial charge and discharge capacities of {{{LiNi}}}1/3}{{{Co}}}1/3}{{{Mn}}}1/3}{{{O}}}2 electrode containing 94% active material at a rate of 0.05 C in voltage window of 2.5-4.3 V at room temperature was obtained 168.03 and 150.01 mAh g-1, respectively.

  15. Effect of the nature of the support on molybdenum catalytic behavior in diesel particulate combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Silvana; Appel, Lucia G.; Schmal, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Mo/SiO 2 and Mo/TiO 2 catalysts with three different molybdenum contents were prepared using non-porous supports and the thermal spreading method for the combustion of a particulate material (PM). The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and N 2 adsorption/desorption techniques showed that the thermal spreading preparation method does not induce relevant textural changes on the supports. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed the occurrence of thermal spreading of MoO 3 onto silica and titania supports. Diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) results provided clear evidence of different Mo species on these systems: highly dispersed species on the silica catalysts and polymolybdates on the titania catalysts. It may be inferred that when prepared by the thermal spreading method the nature of the support determines the kind of molybdenum species formed in these catalysts, irrespective of the Mo content. The reactive data were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), using a physical mixture of PM and the catalysts. The silica-supported catalysts showed higher reactivity for PM combustion than the titania-supported ones, being the most active the systems with the Mo monolayer. The results suggested that the dispersed species are far more active than the polymolybdates or MoO 3 itself

  16. Calibration and test of an aneroid mini-bomb combustion calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A.V. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: risilva@fc.up.pt; Pilcher, Geoffrey [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Santos, Luis M.N.B.F. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Lima, Luis M. Spencer S. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2007-05-15

    A new mini-bomb combustion calorimeter designed at the University of Lund was improved, installed and calibrated at the University of Porto. This calorimeter is suitable for high precision combustion calorimetry with samples of mass about (10 to 40)mg. The energy equivalent of the calorimeter, {epsilon}{sub cal}=(1946.45+/-0.11)J.K{sup -1}, was obtained from 15 independent calibration experiments with benzoic acid SRM 39i. Anthracene, succinic acid, acetanilide, and 1,2,4-triazole were used as test compounds, with excellent agreement with the literature values. -{delta}{sub c}H{sub m}{sup o}{delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup o}(cr)kJ.mol{sup -1}kJ.mol{sup -1}Anthracene7062.6+/-2.1124.3+/-2.8Succinic acid1490.2+/-0.7-941.3+/-0.9Acetanilide4226.2+/-1.1-208.2+/-1.61,2, 4-Triazole1326.1+/-0.4110.3+/-0.5.

  17. Modeling and simulating combustion and generation of NOx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaroiu, Gheorghe

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the modeling and simulation of combustion processes and generation of NO x in a combustion chamber and boiler, with supplementary combustion in a gas turbine installation. The fuel burned in the combustion chamber was rich gas with a chemical composition more complex than natural gas. Pitcoal was used in the regenerative boiler. From the resulting combustion products, 17 compounds were retained, including nitrogen and sulphur compounds. Using the developed model, the simulation resulted in excess air for a temperature imposed at the combustion chamber exhaust. These simulations made it possible to determine the concentrations of combustion compounds with a variation in excess combustion. (author)

  18. Kinetic calorimetry in the study of the mechanism of low-temperature chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkalov, I. M.; Kiryukhin, D. P.

    Chemical reactions are always followed by a change in the reacting system enthalpy, hence, calorimetry as a method of enthalpy and heat capacity measuring is a universal and, sometimes, even the only possible way of studying chemical reaction kinetics. Throughout its long history, the calorimeter, having preserved the positions of the main method of thermodynamic studies, has conquered a new field of application: that of kinetic study of chemical reactions. The advantages and disadvantages of the kinetic calorimeter are now obvious. First, the advantages are: (1) the possibility of measuring the rate of a chemical reaction without any special requirements being imposed on the reaction medium (solid, viscous, multicomponent systems); (2) the high efficiency: a large volume of kinetic information in one experiment and a non-destructive character of changes; (3) the possibility of measuring directly in the field of ionizing radiation (γ-radiation, accelerated electrons) and light; and (4) recording of the chemical conversion directly at the time of its occurrence. The disadvantages of this method are: (1) the high inertia of standard calorimeter systems (τC⋍102-103S), which restricts the possibilities of studying fast processes; and (2) the complexity of the correct organization of the calorimeter experiment when the parameters of the process are changed (overheating in the sample, conversion of the process to explosive and auto wave regimens). One of the oldest and most universal methods of studying the mechanism of chemical reactions, calorimetry, is now passing through a period of turbulent development due to the advances in electronics and computerization. The wide variety of types of calorimeter set-ups and the large assortment of measurement schemes in the currently described methods complicate the experimental selection of the necessary instrument rather than facilitate it. The basic principles of the method, the types of calorimeters, and the measuring

  19. Kinetics of solid-gas reactions characterized by scanning AC nano-calorimetry with application to Zr oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Kechao; Lee, Dongwoo; Vlassak, Joost J.

    2014-01-01

    Scanning AC nano-calorimetry is a recently developed experimental technique capable of measuring the heat capacity of thin-film samples of a material over a wide range of temperatures and heating rates. Here, we describe how this technique can be used to study solid-gas phase reactions by measuring the change in heat capacity of a sample during reaction. We apply this approach to evaluate the oxidation kinetics of thin-film samples of zirconium in air. The results confirm parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 0.59 ± 0.03 eV. The nano-calorimetry measurements were performed using a device that contains an array of micromachined nano-calorimeter sensors in an architecture designed for combinatorial studies. We demonstrate that the oxidation kinetics can be quantified using a single sample, thus enabling high-throughput mapping of the composition-dependence of the reaction rate.

  20. Extensive studies on CeF{sub 3} crystals, a good candidate for electromagnetic calorimetry at future accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auffray, E.; Baccaro, S.; Beckers, T.; Benhammou, Y.; Belsky, A.N.; Borgia, B.; Boutet, D.; Chipaux, R.; Dafinei, I.; De Notaristefani, F.; Depasse, P.; Dujardin, C.; El Mamouni, H.; Faure, J.L.; Fay, J.; Goyot, M.; Gupta, S.K.; Gurtu, A.; Hillemanns, H.; Ille, B.; Kirn, T.; Lebeau, M.; Lebrun, P.; Lecoq, P.; Mares, J.A.; Martin, J.P.; Mikhailin, V.V.; Moine, B.; Nelissen, J.; Nikl, M.; Pedrini, C.; Raghavan, R.; Sahuc, P.; Schmitz, D.; Schneegans, M.; Schwenke, J.; Tavernier, S.; Topa, V.; Vasil`ev, A.N.; Vivargent, M.; Walder, J.P. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)]|[ENEA Casaccia, INFN Rome, Rome (Italy)]|[VUB, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Brussels (Belgium)]|[IPN of Lyon, IN2P3-CNRS and Universite Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne (France)]|[Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[INFN Rome, Rome (Italy)]|[LPCML of Lyon, CNRS and Universite Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne (France)]|[CEA DSM/DAPNIA, CE-Saclay (France)]|[Tara Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India)]|[Physics Institute, RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany)]|[LAPP, IN2P3-CNRS, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)]|[Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)]|[Institute of Atomic Physics (IFA), Bucharest (Romania)

    1996-12-11

    In the framework of its search for new heavy, fast and radiation hard scintillators for calorimetry at future colliders, the Crystal Clear Collaboration performed a systematic investigation of the properties and of the scintillation and radiation damage mechanisms of CeF{sub 3} monocrystals. Many samples of various dimensions up to 3 x 3 x 28 cm{sup 3} were produced by industry and characterised in the laboratories by different methods such as: optical transmission, light yield and decay time measurements, excitation and emission spectra, gamma and neutron irradiations. The results of these measurements are discussed. The measured light yield is compared to the theoretical expectations. Tests in high energy electron beams on a crystal matrix were also performed. The suitability of CeF{sub 3} for calorimetry at high rate machines is confirmed. Production and economical considerations are discussed. (orig.).

  1. Extensive studies on CeF3 crystals, a good candidate for electromagnetic calorimetry at future accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, E.; Baccaro, S.; Beckers, T.; Benhammou, Y.; Belsky, A.N.; Borgia, B.; Boutet, D.; Chipaux, R.; Dafinei, I.; De Notaristefani, F.; Depasse, P.; Dujardin, C.; El Mamouni, H.; Faure, J.L.; Fay, J.; Goyot, M.; Gupta, S.K.; Gurtu, A.; Hillemanns, H.; Ille, B.; Kirn, T.; Lebeau, M.; Lebrun, P.; Lecoq, P.; Mares, J.A.; Martin, J.P.; Mikhailin, V.V.; Moine, B.; Nelissen, J.; Nikl, M.; Pedrini, C.; Raghavan, R.; Sahuc, P.; Schmitz, D.; Schneegans, M.; Schwenke, J.; Tavernier, S.; Topa, V.; Vasil'ev, A.N.; Vivargent, M.; Walder, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of its search for new heavy, fast and radiation hard scintillators for calorimetry at future colliders, the Crystal Clear Collaboration performed a systematic investigation of the properties and of the scintillation and radiation damage mechanisms of CeF 3 monocrystals. Many samples of various dimensions up to 3 x 3 x 28 cm 3 were produced by industry and characterised in the laboratories by different methods such as: optical transmission, light yield and decay time measurements, excitation and emission spectra, gamma and neutron irradiations. The results of these measurements are discussed. The measured light yield is compared to the theoretical expectations. Tests in high energy electron beams on a crystal matrix were also performed. The suitability of CeF 3 for calorimetry at high rate machines is confirmed. Production and economical considerations are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Application of the modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry technique for the determination of the specific heat of copper nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Robertis, E.; Cosme, E.H.H.; Neves, R.S.; Kuznetsov, A.Yu.; Campos, A.P.C.; Landi, S.M.; Achete, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the applicability of the modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry technique to measure specific heat of copper nanofluids by using the ASTM E2719 standard procedure, which is generally applied to thermally stable solids and liquids. The one-step method of preparation of copper nanofluid samples is described. The synthesized nanoparticles were separated from the base fluid and examined by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy in order to evaluate their structure, morphology and chemical nature. The presence of copper nanoparticles in the base fluid alters the characteristics of crystallization and melting processes and reduces the specific heat values of nanofluids in the whole studied temperature range. - Highlights: ► Copper nanofluids prepared by one-step method. ► Methodology of synthesis improved nanofluid stability. ► Specific heat determinations using modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry. ► Good agreement between theoretical and experimental values.

  3. Breath test measurements in combination with indirect calorimetry for estimation of 13C-leucine oxidation in mink (Mustela vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tauson, Anne-Helene; Ali, Abdalla; Kanska, Katarzyna

    2000-01-01

    Gas exchange measurements by means of indirect calorimetry can be used to calculate quantitative substrate oxidation. The results represents average net oxidation values (substrate disappearance rate), but they cannot describe the dynamics of the oxidation processes. Breath test measurements...... to feeding and fasting. Twelve 1-year-old male mink (Mustela vison) were measured in each five consecutive periods by means of indirect calorimetry and simultaneous breath test. In Periods 1, 3 and 5, each lasting 3 days, the animals were fed ad libitum and Periods 2 and 4 were fasting periods, each of 48 h....... In Periods 1 and 5 all animals were fed a diet with a high quality fish meal (FISH; n=12), while in Period 3 half of the animals received the FISH diet (n=6) and the other half a diet with soy protein concentrate (SOY; n=6) as main protein source. An intraperitoneal injection of 1-13C-leucine was given...

  4. The FIR-Radio Correlation in Rapidly Star-Forming Galaxies: The Spectral Index Problem and Proton Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Todd A.; Lacki, Brian C.

    We review the physics of the FIR-radio correlation (FRC) of star-forming galaxies, focusing on "electron calorimetry" as an explanation. We emphasize the importance of the "spectral index problem"—that galaxies have flatter GHz synchrotron spectra than predicted in the strong-cooling calorimeter limit. We argue that these shallow spectra require significant bremsstrahlung and/or ionization losses for the primary and secondary CR electron/positron populations. This then implies that CR protons suffer strong pionic losses before escape in dense starburst galaxies ("proton calorimetry"), and that these systems should be gamma-ray bright, forming a FIR-gamma-ray correlation. Implications for the diffuse non-thermal cosmic gamma-ray and neutrino backgrounds are mentioned. Caveats and uncertainties, as well as other solutions to the "spectral index problem" such as rapid advection of CRs in starburst superwinds, are highlighted.

  5. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu2 + with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15 K in 20 mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu2 + ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu2 + ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu2 + ions are discussed.

  6. Strategies for assessing proton linkage to bimolecular interactions by global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coussens, Nathan P.; Schuck, Peter; Zhao, Huaying

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We demonstrate the usefulness of global analysis of ITC data for proton-linked binding study. ► Various experimental strategies are evaluated for their information content. ► Data at multiple temperatures might improve the precision of binding parameters. ► Methods for detailed error analysis of parameter uncertainties are discussed. ► By global modeling, an uncertainty in molecular concentrations can be accounted for. - Abstract: Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a traditional and powerful method for studying the linkage of ligand binding to proton uptake or release. The theoretical framework has been developed for more than two decades and numerous applications have appeared. In the current work, we explored strategic aspects of experimental design. To this end, we simulated families of ITC data sets that embed different strategies with regard to the number of experiments, range of experimental pH, buffer ionization enthalpy, and temperature. We then re-analyzed the families of data sets in the context of global analysis, employing a proton linkage binding model implemented in the global data analysis platform SEDPHAT, and examined the information content of all data sets by a detailed statistical error analysis of the parameter estimates. In particular, we studied the impact of different assumptions about the knowledge of the exact concentrations of the components, which in practice presents an experimental limitation for many systems. For example, the uncertainty in concentration may reflect imperfectly known extinction coefficients and stock concentrations or may account for different extents of partial inactivation when working with proteins at different pH values. Our results show that the global analysis can yield reliable estimates of the thermodynamic parameters for intrinsic binding and protonation, and that in the context of the global analysis the exact molecular component concentrations may not be required. Additionally

  7. Beam calorimetry at the large negative ion source test facility ELISE: Experimental setup and latest results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocentini, Riccardo; Bonomo, Federica; Ricci, Marina; Pimazzoni, Antonio; Fantz, Ursel; Heinemann, Bernd; Riedl, Rudolf; Wünderlich, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • ELISE is the first step in the European roadmap for the development of the ITER NBI. • Several beam diagnostic tools have been installed, the latest results are presented. • A gaussian fit procedure has been implemented to characterize the large ion beam. • Average beamlet group inhomogeneity is maximum 13%, close to the ITER target of 10%. • Beam divergence measured by calorimeter agrees with the BES measurements within 30%. - Abstract: The test facility ELISE is the first step within the European roadmap for the development of the ITER NBI system. ELISE is equipped with a 1 × 0.9 m"2 radio frequency negative ion source (half the ITER source size) and an ITER-like 3-grid extraction system which can extract an H"− or D"− beam for 10 s every 3 min (limited by available power supplies) with a total acceleration voltage of up to 60 kV. In the beam line of ELISE several beam diagnostic tools have been installed with the aim to evaluate beam intensity, divergence and uniformity. A copper diagnostic calorimeter gives the possibility to measure the beam power density profile with high resolution. The measurements are performed by an IR micro-bolometer camera and 48 thermocouples embedded in the calorimeter. A gaussian fit procedure has been implemented in order to characterize the large negative ion beam produced by ELISE. The latest results obtained from the beam calorimetry at ELISE show that the average beamlet group inhomogeneity is maximum 13%. The measured beam divergence agrees with the one measured by beam emission spectroscopy within 30%.

  8. Approximate time to steady state resting energy expenditure using indirect calorimetry in young, healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin Popp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Indirect calorimetry (IC measurements to estimate resting energy expenditure (REE necessitate a stable measurement period, or steady state (SS. There is limited evidence when assessing the time to reach SS in young, healthy adults. The aims of this prospective study are to determine the approximate time to necessary reach SS using open-circuit IC and to establish the appropriate duration of SS needed to estimate REE. One hundred young, healthy participants (54 males and 46 females; age = 20.6 ± 2.1 years; body weight = 73.6 ± 16.3 kg; height 172.5 ± 9.3 cm; BMI = 24.5 ± 3.8 kg/m2 completed IC measurement for approximately 30-minutes while the volume of oxygen (VO2 and volume of carbon dioxide (VCO2 were collected. SS was defined by variations in the VO2 and VCO2 of ≤10% coefficient of variation (%CV over a period of 5- consecutive minutes. The 30-minute IC measurement was divided into six 5-minute segments, S1, S2, S3, S4, S5 and S6. The results show that SS was achieved during S2 (%CV = 6.81 ± 3.2%, and the %CV continued to met the SS criteria for the duration of the IC measurement (S3= 8.07 ± 4.4%; S4 = 7.93 ± 3.7%; S5 = 7.75 ± 4.1%; S6 = 8.60 ± 4.6%. The current study found that in a population of young, healthy adults the duration of the IC measurement period could be a minimum of 10 minutes. The first 5-minute segment was discarded, while SS occurred by the second 5-minute segment.

  9. Quantifying high-affinity binding of hydrophobic ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Georg; Broecker, Jana; Vargas, Carolyn; Fanghänel, Jörg; Keller, Sandro

    2012-12-18

    A fast and reliable quantification of the binding thermodynamics of hydrophobic high-affinity ligands employing a new calorimetric competition experiment is described. Although isothermal titration calorimetry is the method of choice for a quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions in solution, a reliable determination of a dissociation constant (K(D)) is typically limited to the range 100 μM > K(D) > 1 nM. Interactions displaying higher or lower K(D) values can be assessed indirectly, provided that a suitable competing ligand is available whose K(D) falls within the directly accessible affinity window. This established displacement assay, however, requires the high-affinity ligand to be soluble at high concentrations in aqueous buffer and, consequently, poses serious problems in the study of protein binding involving small-molecule ligands dissolved in organic solvents--a familiar case in many drug-discovery projects relying on compound libraries. The calorimetric competition assay introduced here overcomes this limitation, thus allowing for a detailed thermodynamic description of high-affinity receptor-ligand interactions involving poorly water-soluble compounds. Based on a single titration of receptor into a dilute mixture of the two competing ligands, this competition assay provides accurate and precise values for the dissociation constants and binding enthalpies of both high- and moderate-affinity ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation and high-affinity protein-inhibitor interactions, and explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses.

  10. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-01-15

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu(2+) with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15K in 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu(2+) ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu(2+) ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu(2+) ions are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature-modulated DSC study of three mouthguard materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Frank H; Schricker, Scott R; Brantley, William A; Mendel, Deborah A; Rashid, Robert G; Fields, Henry W; Vig, Katherine W L; Alapati, Satish B

    2007-12-01

    Employ differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature-modulated DSC (TMDSC) to investigate thermal transformations in three mouthguard materials and provide insight into their previously investigated energy absorption. Samples (13-21mg) were obtained from (a) conventional ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), (b) Pro-form, another EVA polymer, and (c) PolyShok, an EVA polymer containing polyurethane. Conventional DSC (n=5) was first performed from -80 to 150 degrees C at a heating rate of 10 degrees C/min to determine the temperature range for structural transformations. Subsequently, TMDSC (n=5) was performed from -20 to 150 degrees C at a heating rate of 1 degrees C/min. Onset and peak temperatures were compared using ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer HSD test. Other samples were coated with a gold-palladium film and examined with an SEM. DSC and TMDSC curves were similar for both conventional EVA and Pro-form, showing two endothermic peaks suggestive of melting processes, with crystallization after the higher-temperature peak. Evidence for crystallization and the second endothermic peak were much less prominent for PolyShok, which had no peaks associated with the polyurethane constituent. The onset of the lower-temperature endothermic transformation is near body temperature. No glass transitions were observed in the materials. SEM examination revealed different surface morphology and possible cushioning effect for PolyShok, compared to Pro-form and EVA. The difference in thermal behavior for PolyShok is tentatively attributed to disruption of EVA crystal formation, which may contribute to its superior impact resistance. The lower-temperature endothermic peak suggests that impact testing of these materials should be performed at 37 degrees C.

  12. Interaction between vitamin D 2 and magnesium in liposomes: Differential scanning calorimetry and FTIR spectroscopy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyran, Neslihan; Severcan, Feride

    2007-08-01

    Magnesium (Mg 2+) ion is of great importance in physiology by its intervention in 300 enzymatic systems, its role in membrane structure, its function in neuromuscular excitability and vitamin D metabolism and/or action. In the present study, the interaction of Mg 2+, at low (1 mole %) and high (7 mole %) concentrations with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes has been studied in the presence and absence of vitamin D 2 (1 mole %) by using two noninvasive techniques, namely differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. DSC studies reveal that the presence of vitamin D 2 in the pure or Mg 2+ (at both low and high concentrations) containing liposomes diminishes the pretransition. The calorimetric results also reveal that, inclusion of Mg 2+ (more significantly at high concentration) into pure or vitamin D 2 containing DPPC liposomes increases the main phase transition temperature. The investigation of the CH 2 symmetric, the CH 3 asymmetric, the C dbnd O stretching, and the PO2- antisymmetric double bond stretching bands in FTIR spectra with respect to changes occurring in the wavenumber and/or the bandwidth values as a function of temperature reveal that, inclusion of vitamin D 2 or Mg 2+ into pure DPPC liposomes orders and decreases the dynamics of the acyl chains in both gel and liquid-crystalline phases and does not induce hydrogen bond formation in the interfacial region. Furthermore, the dynamics of the head groups of the liposomes decreases in both phases. Our findings reveal that, simultaneous presence of vitamin D 2 and Mg 2+ alters the effect of each other, which is reflected as a decrease in the interactions between these two additives within the model membrane.

  13. New developments in calorimetry and thermal analysis above 2000 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrotsky, A.; Ushakov, S.; Kapush, D.; Pavlik, A.; Fyhrie, M.

    2016-12-01

    Thermochemical and structural data above 2000 °C for many refractory oxides, including those of the rare earths, are largely absent. Fusion enthalpies are essential for modeling igneous processes, as are volume changes and enthalpies of high temperature phase transitions . The following set of new experimental techniques has been developed for high temperature studies: i) A commercial ultra-high-temperature differential thermal analyzer (DTA)was modified for use to 2500 °C with sealed crucibles and enthalpies of fusion for La2O3 X-phase (78 kJ/mol at 2300 °C), LaAlO3 perovskite (124 kJ/mol at 2134 °C), MgAl2O4 spinel (180 kJ/mol at 2113 °C) were successfully measured. ii) X-ray and neutron diffraction on crystalline laser heated levitated samples has been used to obtain thermal expansion, refine high temperature crystal structure and for in situ study of phase transitions and melting in variable atmospheres using levitators at the Advanced Photon Source and the Spallation Neutron Source. Pre-melting phase transitions in Y2O3, Ho2O3 and Er2O3 from cubic bixbyite-type structures to disordered hexagonal phases are accompanied by 3-4 % decrease in volume. iii) Drop-and-catch (DnC) calorimetry on laser heated aerodynamically levitated samples was developed to allow direct measurement of fusion enthalpies in various atmospheres. The DnC technique was validated by measurement of fusion enthalpy of Al2O3 corundum (120 kJ/mol at 2054 °C) and used to measure fusion enthalpy of cubic bixbyite type Y2O3 (119 kJ/mol at 2430 °C) and Yb2O3 (97 kJ/mol at 2435 °C). Further methodologiccal improvements and applications to earth and planetary materials are discussed.

  14. Use of Indirect Calorimetry to Detect Overfeeding in Critically Ill Children: Finding the Appropriate Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerklaan, Dorian; Hulst, Jessie M; Verhoeven, Jennifer J; Verbruggen, Sascha C A T; Joosten, Koen F M

    2016-10-01

    Overfeeding during critical illness is associated with adverse effects such as metabolic disturbances and increased risk of infection. Because of the lack of sound studies with clinical endpoints, overfeeding is arbitrarily defined as the ratio caloric intake/measured resting energy expenditure (mREE) or alternatively as a comparison of measured respiratory quotient (RQ) to the predicted RQ based on the macronutrient intake (RQmacr). We aimed to compare definitions of overfeeding in critically ill mechanically ventilated children based on mREE, RQ, and caloric intake to find an appropriate definition. Indirect calorimetry measurements were performed in 78 mechanically ventilated children, median age 6.3 months. Enteral and/or parenteral nutrition was provided according to the local guidelines. Definitions used to indicate overfeeding were the ratio caloric intake/mREE of >110% and >120% and by the measured RQ > RQmacr + 0.05. The proportion of patients identified as overfed varied widely depending on the definition used, ranging from 22% (RQ > RQmacr + 0.05), to 40% and 50% (caloric intake/mREE of >120% and >110%, respectively). Linear regression analysis showed that all patients would be identified as overfed with the definition RQ > RQmacr + 0.05 when the ratio caloric intake/mREE exceeded 165%. Caloric intake was higher in children with a standard deviation-score weight for age definition applied. These currently used definitions fail to take into account several relevant factors affecting metabolism during critical illness and are therefore not generally applicable to the pediatric intensive care unit population.

  15. Digital holographic interferometry: A novel optical calorimetry technique for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavan, Alicia, E-mail: alicia.cavan@cdhb.health.nz [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand and Christchurch Hospital, Private Bag 4710, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Meyer, Juergen, E-mail: juergen@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 Northeast Pacific Street, Box 356043, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To develop and demonstrate the proof-of-principle of a novel optical calorimetry method to determine radiation absorbed dose in a transparent medium. Methods: The calorimetric property of water is measured during irradiation by means of an interferometer, which detects temperature-induced changes in the refractive index that can be mathematically related to absorbed dose. The proposed method uses a technique called digital holographic interferometry (DHI), which comprises an optical laser interferometer setup and consecutive physical reconstruction of the recorded wave fronts by means of the Fresnel transform. This paper describes the conceptual framework and provides the mathematical basis for DHI dosimetry. Dose distributions from a high dose rate Brachytherapy source were measured by a prototype optical setup to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. Results: The developed DHI dosimeter successfully determined absorbed dose distributions in water in the region adjacent to a high dose rate Brachytherapy source. A temperature change of 0.0381 K across a distance of 6.8 mm near the source was measured, corresponding to a dose of 159.3 Gy. The standard deviation in a typical measurement set was ±3.45 Gy (corresponding to an uncertainty in the temperature value of ±8.3 × 10{sup −4} K). The relative dose fall off was in agreement with treatment planning system modeled data. Conclusions: First results with a prototype optical setup and a Brachytherapy source demonstrate the proof-of-principle of the approach. The prototype achieves high spatial resolution of approximately 3 × 10{sup −5} m. The general approach is fundamentally independent of the radiation type and energy. The sensitivity range determined indicates that the method is predominantly suitable for high dose rate applications. Further work is required to determine absolute dose in all three dimensions.

  16. Determination of the thermodynamic properties of complexation and extraction by micro-calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonnel, M.Ch.; Flandin, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The CEA is currently developing the DIAMEX process, the first step in the strategy for the separation of minor actinides from high-level radioactive waste. The extractant belongs to the diamide family of molecules and is able to co-extract trivalent actinides and lanthanides. This study focuses on the thermodynamic properties (ΔH, ΔG, ΔS) of lanthanide extraction by malonamide in order to better understand the mechanisms involved and to account for differences in the behavior of various diamide extractants. The main technique used is microcalorimetric titration. The Thermal Activity Monitor (TAM) microcalorimeter is a modular system with a highly stable (± 0.1 mK) temperature-controlled bath containing up to four calorimetry vessel units. The sensor bulbs inserted in the reaction vessel can measure heat flows in static or dynamic conditions. Micro-calorimetry, and calorimetric titration in particular, is a fast growing field due to technical improvements in both hardware and software. In the case of an equilibrium reaction, titration allows both Δ r G and Δ r H (and thus Δ r S) to be determined simultaneously. It was decided to initiate this thermochemical investigation with a homogeneous phase reaction, and the first study concerned the aqueous phase complexation of a trivalent lanthanide ion by a water-soluble diamide, tetraethyl-malonamide (TEMA: (C 2 H 5 ) 2 NCO-CH 2 CON(C 2 H 5 ) 2 ). In the test system, the heat of dilution of the diamide in water is preponderant over the heat arising from the complexation reaction; the result is a positive value corresponding to an endothermic reaction. However, the equilibration constant K and Δ H are both very small, and cannot be calculated from the resulting Q v f(n TEMA ) curves. Moreover, in aqueous phase, the reactions involved are different from those observed when neodymium(III) is extracted into an organic phase, and the medium must be further characterized before the calorimetry data can be fully

  17. Scan-rate dependence in protein calorimetry: the reversible transitions of Bacillus circulans xylanase and a disulfide-bridge mutant.

    OpenAIRE

    Davoodi, J.; Wakarchuk, W. W.; Surewicz, W. K.; Carey, P. R.

    1998-01-01

    The stabilities of Bacillus circulans xylanase and a disulfide-bridge-containing mutant (S100C/N148C) were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal inactivation kinetics. The thermal denaturation of both proteins was found to be irreversible, and the apparent transition temperatures showed a considerable dependence upon scanning rate. In the presence of low (nondenaturing) concentrations of urea, calorimetric transitions were observed for both proteins in the second...

  18. Measurement of the thermophysical properties of industrial liquid metallic alloys by non-contact calorimetry under reduced gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, R.K.; Fecht, H.-J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: The numerical modeling of casting and solidification is becoming of increased importance in industrial process design. While the numerical algorithms have made large progress towards real process design and optimization, there is a pronounced lack of precise thermophysical input data. This lack is caused by the high chemical reactivity of many metallic alloys in the liquid phase making conventional measurement techniques such as differential thermal analysis difficult if at all possible to apply. In this contribution we report about a project planning to use containerless electromagnetic processing under reduced gravity conditions for thermophysical property measurement of industrially relevant alloys. Alloys of interest are, among others, Ti-alloys, Ni-base superalloys, and steels. In preparation of this project, a survey among leading European industries was conducted revealing properties such as melting range, fraction solid/liquid, specific heat capacity, enthalpy, as well as density, viscosity and surface tension as properties most in need. Non-contact calorimetry of electromagnetically levitated specimens was developed for an investigation of the thermophysical properties of Zr-alloys in the liquid phase. These methods have been applied successfully under reduced gravity conditions on board spacelab to the measurement of the specific heat capacity by modulation calorimetry, the enthalpy of fusion, the total hemispherical emissivity and for an effective thermal conductivity. Specific examples from these experiments demonstrating the applicability of these methods for quantitative calorimetry as well as application at higher Biot numbers will be discussed. New developments include modulation calorimetry in the two phase region for the measurement of the fraction solid. (author)

  19. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  20. Nanoparticle emissions from combustion engines

    CERN Document Server

    Merkisz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

     This book focuses on particulate matter emissions produced by vehicles with combustion engines. It describes the physicochemical properties of the particulate matter, the mechanisms of its formation and its environmental impacts (including those on human beings). It discusses methods for measuring particulate mass and number, including the state-of-the-art in Portable Emission Measurement System (PEMS) equipment for measuring the exhaust emissions of both light and heavy-duty vehicles and buses under actual operating conditions. The book presents the authors’ latest investigations into the relations between particulate emission (mass and number) and engine operating parameters, as well as their new findings obtained through road tests performed on various types of vehicles, including those using diesel particulate filter regeneration. The book, which addresses the needs of academics and professionals alike, also discusses relevant European regulations on particulate emissions and highlights selected metho...