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Sample records for oxygen erosion depth

  1. MISSE PEACE Polymers Atomic Oxygen Erosion Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim, K.; Banks, Bruce A.; McCarthy, Catherine E.; Rucker, Rochelle N.; Roberts, Lily M.; Berger, Lauren A.

    2006-01-01

    Forty-one different polymer samples, collectively called the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) Polymers, have been exposed to the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) for nearly 4 years as part of Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2). The objective of the PEACE Polymers experiment was to determine the atomic oxygen erosion yield of a wide variety of polymeric materials after long term exposure to the space environment. The polymers range from those commonly used for spacecraft applications, such as Teflon (DuPont) FEP, to more recently developed polymers, such as high temperature polyimide PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants). Additional polymers were included to explore erosion yield dependence upon chemical composition. The MISSE PEACE Polymers experiment was flown in MISSE Passive Experiment Carrier 2 (PEC 2), tray 1, on the exterior of the ISS Quest Airlock and was exposed to atomic oxygen along with solar and charged particle radiation. MISSE 2 was successfully retrieved during a space walk on July 30, 2005, during Discovery s STS-114 Return to Flight mission. Details on the specific polymers flown, flight sample fabrication, pre-flight and post-flight characterization techniques, and atomic oxygen fluence calculations are discussed along with a summary of the atomic oxygen erosion yield results. The MISSE 2 PEACE Polymers experiment is unique because it has the widest variety of polymers flown in LEO for a long duration and provides extremely valuable erosion yield data for spacecraft design purposes.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Dependence Upon Texture Development in Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Loftus, Ryan J.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2016-01-01

    The atomic oxygen erosion yield (volume of a polymer that is lost due to oxidation per incident atom) of polymers is typically assumed to be reasonably constant with increasing fluence. However polymers containing ash or inorganic pigments, tend to have erosion yields that decrease with fluence due to an increasing presence of protective particles on the polymer surface. This paper investigates two additional possible causes for erosion yields of polymers that are dependent upon atomic oxygen. These are the development of surface texture which can cause the erosion yield to change with fluence due to changes in the aspect ratio of the surface texture that develops and polymer specific atomic oxygen interaction parameters. The surface texture development under directed hyperthermal attack produces higher aspect ratio surface texture than isotropic thermal energy atomic oxygen attack. The fluence dependence of erosion yields is documented for low Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) effective fluences for a variety of polymers under directed hyperthermal and isotropic thermal energy attack.

  3. MISSE 6 Stressed Polymers Experiment Atomic Oxygen Erosion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Mitchell, Gianna G.; Yi, Grace T.; Guo, Aobo; Ashmeade, Claire C.; Roberts, Lily M.; McCarthy, Catherine E.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Polymers and other oxidizable materials used on the exterior of spacecraft in the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment can be eroded away by reaction with atomic oxygen (AO). For spacecraft design, it is important to know the LEO AO erosion yield, Ey (volume loss per incident oxygen atom), of materials susceptible to AO erosion. The Stressed Polymers Experiment was developed and flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 6 (MISSE 6) to compare the AO erosion yields of stressed and non-stressed polymers to determine if erosion is dependent upon stress while in LEO. The experiment contained 36 thin film polymer samples that were exposed to ram AO for 1.45 years. This paper provides an overview of the Stressed Polymers Experiment with details on the polymers flown, the characterization techniques used, the AO fluence, and the erosion yield results. The MISSE 6 data are compared to data for similar samples flown on previous MISSE missions to determine fluence or solar radiation effects on erosion yield.

  4. Erosion characteristics and horizontal variability for small erosion depths in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoellhamer, David H.; Manning, Andrew J.; Work, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Erodibility of cohesive sediment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (Delta) was investigated with an erosion microcosm. Erosion depths in the Delta and in the microcosm were estimated to be about one floc diameter over a range of shear stresses and times comparable to half of a typical tidal cycle. Using the conventional assumption of horizontally homogeneous bed sediment, data from 27 of 34 microcosm experiments indicate that the erosion rate coefficient increased as eroded mass increased, contrary to theory. We believe that small erosion depths, erosion rate coefficient deviation from theory, and visual observation of horizontally varying biota and texture at the sediment surface indicate that erosion cannot solely be a function of depth but must also vary horizontally. We test this hypothesis by developing a simple numerical model that includes horizontal heterogeneity, use it to develop an artificial time series of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) in an erosion microcosm, then analyze that time series assuming horizontal homogeneity. A shear vane was used to estimate that the horizontal standard deviation of critical shear stress was about 30% of the mean value at a site in the Delta. The numerical model of the erosion microcosm included a normal distribution of initial critical shear stress, a linear increase in critical shear stress with eroded mass, an exponential decrease of erosion rate coefficient with eroded mass, and a stepped increase in applied shear stress. The maximum SSC for each step increased gradually, thus confounding identification of a single well-defined critical shear stress as encountered with the empirical data. Analysis of the artificial SSC time series with the assumption of a homogeneous bed reproduced the original profile of critical shear stress, but the erosion rate coefficient increased with eroded mass, similar to the empirical data. Thus, the numerical experiment confirms the small-depth erosion hypothesis. A linear

  5. A Sensitive Technique Using Atomic Force Microscopy to Measure the Low Earth Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Clark, Gregory W.; Hammerstrom, Anne M.; Youngstrom, Erica E.; Kaminski, Carolyn; Fine, Elizabeth S.; Marx, Laura M.

    2001-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton and Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials due to their desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen erosion of polymers occurs in LEO and is a threat to spacecraft durability. It is therefore important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield (E, the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. Because long-term space exposure data is rare and very costly, short-term exposures such as on the shuttle are often relied upon for atomic oxygen erosion determination. The most common technique for determining E is through mass loss measurements. For limited duration exposure experiments, such as shuttle experiments, the atomic oxygen fluence is often so small that mass loss measurements can not produce acceptable uncertainties. Therefore, a recession measurement technique has been developed using selective protection of polymer samples, combined with postflight atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis, to obtain accurate erosion yields of polymers exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. This paper discusses the procedures used for this recession depth technique along with relevant characterization issues. In particular, a polymer is salt-sprayed prior to flight, then the salt is washed off postflight and AFM is used to determine the erosion depth from the protected plateau. A small sample was salt-sprayed for AFM erosion depth analysis and flown as part of the Limited Duration Candidate Exposure (LDCE-4,-5) shuttle flight experiment on STS-51. This sample was used to study issues such as use of contact versus non-contact mode imaging for determining recession depth measurements. Error analyses were conducted and the percent probable

  6. Centennial- to millennial-scale hard rock erosion rates deduced from luminescence-depth profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Liu, Jinfeng; Jain, Mayank

    2018-01-01

    to quantify hard rock erosion rates at centennial to millennial timescales. Here we propose a novel technique, based on the solar bleaching of luminescence signals with depth into rock surfaces, to bridge this analytical gap. We apply our technique to glacial and landslide boulders in the Eastern Pamirs...

  7. Spatial sensitivity and penetration depth of three cerebral oxygenation monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunadi, Sonny; Leung, Terence S.; Elwell, Clare E.; Tachtsidis, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    The spatial sensitivities of NIRO-100, ISS Oximeter and TRS-20 cerebral oxygenation monitors are mapped using the local perturbation method to inform on their penetration depths and susceptibilities to superficial contaminations. The results show that TRS-20 has the deepest mean penetration depth and is less sensitive than the other monitors to a localized absorption change in the superficial layer. However, an integration time of more than five seconds is required by the TRS-20 to achieve an acceptable level of signal-to-noise ratio, which is the poorest amongst the monitors. With the exception of NIRO-100 continuous wave method, the monitors are not significantly responsive to layer-wide absorption change that occurs in the superficial layer. PMID:25401006

  8. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  9. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Prediction for Spacecraft Polymers in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Backus, Jane A.; Manno, Michael V.; Waters, Deborah L.; Cameron, Kevin C.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to predict the atomic oxygen erosion yield of polymers based on their chemistry and physical properties has been only partially successful because of a lack of reliable low Earth orbit (LEO) erosion yield data. Unfortunately, many of the early experiments did not utilize dehydrated mass loss measurements for erosion yield determination, and the resulting mass loss due to atomic oxygen exposure may have been compromised because samples were often not in consistent states of dehydration during the pre-flight and post-flight mass measurements. This is a particular problem for short duration mission exposures or low erosion yield materials. However, as a result of the retrieval of the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2), the erosion yields of 38 polymers and pyrolytic graphite were accurately measured. The experiment was exposed to the LEO environment for 3.95 years from August 16, 2001 to July 30, 2005 and was successfully retrieved during a space walk on July 30, 2005 during Discovery s STS-114 Return to Flight mission. The 40 different materials tested (including Kapton H fluence witness samples) were selected specifically to represent a variety of polymers used in space as well as a wide variety of polymer chemical structures. The MISSE 2 PEACE Polymers experiment used carefully dehydrated mass measurements, as well as accurate density measurements to obtain accurate erosion yield data for high-fluence (8.43 1021 atoms/sq cm). The resulting data was used to develop an erosion yield predictive tool with a correlation coefficient of 0.895 and uncertainty of +/-6.3 10(exp -25)cu cm/atom. The predictive tool utilizes the chemical structures and physical properties of polymers to predict in-space atomic oxygen erosion yields. A predictive tool concept (September 2009 version) is presented which represents an improvement over an earlier (December 2008) version.

  10. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Predictive Tool for Spacecraft Polymers in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Bruce A.; de Groh, Kim K.; Backus, Jane A.

    2008-01-01

    A predictive tool was developed to estimate the low Earth orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen erosion yield of polymers based on the results of the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) Polymers experiment flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2). The MISSE 2 PEACE experiment accurately measured the erosion yield of a wide variety of polymers and pyrolytic graphite. The 40 different materials tested were selected specifically to represent a variety of polymers used in space as well as a wide variety of polymer chemical structures. The resulting erosion yield data was used to develop a predictive tool which utilizes chemical structure and physical properties of polymers that can be measured in ground laboratory testing to predict the in-space atomic oxygen erosion yield of a polymer. The properties include chemical structure, bonding information, density and ash content. The resulting predictive tool has a correlation coefficient of 0.914 when compared with actual MISSE 2 space data for 38 polymers and pyrolytic graphite. The intent of the predictive tool is to be able to make estimates of atomic oxygen erosion yields for new polymers without requiring expensive and time consumptive in-space testing.

  11. MISSE 2 PEACE Polymers Experiment Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Error Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Catherine E.; Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim, K.

    2010-01-01

    Atomic oxygen erosion of polymers in low Earth orbit (LEO) poses a serious threat to spacecraft performance and durability. To address this, 40 different polymer samples and a sample of pyrolytic graphite, collectively called the PEACE (Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment) Polymers, were exposed to the LEO space environment on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) for nearly 4 years as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 1 & 2 (MISSE 1 & 2). The purpose of the PEACE Polymers experiment was to obtain accurate mass loss measurements in space to combine with ground measurements in order to accurately calculate the atomic oxygen erosion yields of a wide variety of polymeric materials exposed to the LEO space environment for a long period of time. Error calculations were performed in order to determine the accuracy of the mass measurements and therefore of the erosion yield values. The standard deviation, or error, of each factor was incorporated into the fractional uncertainty of the erosion yield for each of three different situations, depending on the post-flight weighing procedure. The resulting error calculations showed the erosion yield values to be very accurate, with an average error of 3.30 percent.

  12. Ground-Laboratory to In-Space Atomic Oxygen Correlation for the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambler, Arielle H.; Inoshita, Karen E.; Roberts, Lily M.; Barbagallo, Claire E.; deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    The Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2) Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) polymers were exposed to the environment of low Earth orbit (LEO) for 3.95 years from 2001 to 2005. There were 41 different PEACE polymers, which were flown on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) in order to determine their atomic oxygen erosion yields. In LEO, atomic oxygen is an environmental durability threat, particularly for long duration mission exposures. Although spaceflight experiments, such as the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment, are ideal for determining LEO environmental durability of spacecraft materials, ground-laboratory testing is often relied upon for durability evaluation and prediction. Unfortunately, significant differences exist between LEO atomic oxygen exposure and atomic oxygen exposure in ground-laboratory facilities. These differences include variations in species, energies, thermal exposures and radiation exposures, all of which may result in different reactions and erosion rates. In an effort to improve the accuracy of ground-based durability testing, ground-laboratory to in-space atomic oxygen correlation experiments have been conducted. In these tests, the atomic oxygen erosion yields of the PEACE polymers were determined relative to Kapton H using a radio-frequency (RF) plasma asher (operated on air). The asher erosion yields were compared to the MISSE 2 PEACE erosion yields to determine the correlation between erosion rates in the two environments. This paper provides a summary of the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment; it reviews the specific polymers tested as well as the techniques used to determine erosion yield in the asher, and it provides a correlation between the space and ground laboratory erosion yield values. Using the PEACE polymers asher to in-space erosion yield ratios will allow more accurate in-space materials performance predictions to be made based on plasma asher durability evaluation.

  13. Quantitative analysis of oxygen depth distribution by means of deuteron reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyumin, A.N.; Eremin, V.K.; Konnikov, S.G.

    1993-01-01

    Experimentally are investigated and realized possibilities for using the reaction for quantitative determination of the depth profiles of the oxygen distribution in HTSC structures in layers up to 10 4 A. It is concluded that in the near-surface layers when profiling the oxygen content is achieved the spatial resolution of 150 A

  14. Bonding of xenon to oxygen in magmas at depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Clémence; Sanloup, Chrystèle; Bureau, Hélène; Schmidt, Burkhard C.; Konôpková, Zuzana; Raepsaet, Caroline

    2018-02-01

    The field of noble gases chemistry has witnessed amazing advances in the last decade with over 100 compounds reported including Xe oxides and Xe-Fe alloys stable at the pressure-temperature conditions of planetary interiors. The chemistry of Xe with planetary materials is nonetheless still mostly ignored, while Xe isotopes are used to trace a variety of key planetary processes from atmosphere formation to underground nuclear tests. It is indeed difficult to incorporate the possibility of Xe reactivity at depth in isotopic geochemical models without a precise knowledge of its chemical environment. The structure of Xe doped hydrous silica-rich melts is investigated by in situ high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction using resistive heating diamond anvil cells. Obtained pair distribution functions reveal the oxidation of Xe between 0.2 GPa and 4 GPa at high T up to 1000 K. In addition to the usual interatomic distances, a contribution at 2.05 ± 0.05 Å is observed. This contribution is not observed in the undoped melt, and is interpreted as the Xe-O bond, with a coordination number of about 12 consistent with Xe insertion in rings of the melt structure. Xe solubility measurements by electron microprobe and particle induced X-rays emission analysis confirm that Xe and Ar have similar solubility values in wt% in silicate melts. These values are nonetheless an order of magnitude higher than those theoretically calculated for Xe. The formation of Xe-O bonds explains the enhanced solubility of Xe in deep continental crust magmas, revealing a mechanism that could store Xe and fractionate its isotopes. Xenon is indeed atypical among noble gases, the atmosphere being notably depleted in elemental Xe, and very strongly depleted in Xe light isotopes. These observations are known as the 'missing' Xe paradox, and could be solved by the present findings.

  15. Response function during oxygen sputter profiling and its application to deconvolution of ultrashallow B depth profiles in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Lin; Liu Jiarui; Wang Chong; Ma, Ki B.; Zhang Jianming; Chen, John; Tang, Daniel; Patel, Sanjay; Chu Weikan

    2003-01-01

    The secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) response function to a B 'δ surface layer' has been investigated. Using electron-gun evaporation combined with liquid nitrogen cooling of target, we are able to deposit an ultrathin B layer without detectable island formation. The B spatial distribution obtained from SIMS is exponentially decaying with a decay length approximately a linear function of the incident energy of the oxygen during the SIMS analysis. Deconvolution with the response function has been applied to reconstruct the spatial distribution of ultra-low-energy B implants. A correction to depth and yield scales due to transient sputtering near the Si surface region was also applied. Transient erosion shifts the profile shallower, but beam mixing shifts it deeper. These mutually compensating effects make the adjusted distribution almost the same as original data. The one significant difference is a buried B peak observed near the surface region

  16. Centennial- to millennial-scale hard rock erosion rates deduced from luminescence-depth profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sohbati, Reza; Liu, Jinfeng; Jain, Mayank; Murray, Andrew; Egholm, David; Paris, Richard; Guralnik, Benny

    2018-01-01

    The measurement of erosion and weathering rates in different geomorphic settings and over diverse temporal and spatial scales is fundamental to the quantification of rates and patterns of earth surface processes. A knowledge of the rates of these surface processes helps one to decipher their

  17. The Effect of Ash and Inorganic Pigment Fill on the Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers and Paints (ISMSE-12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Simmons, Julie C.; de Groh, Kim K.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2012-01-01

    Low atomic oxygen fluence (below 1x10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm) exposure of polymers and paints that have a small ash content and/or inorganic pigment fill does not cause a significant difference in erosion yield compared to unfilled (neat) polymers or paints. However, if the ash and/or inorganic pigment content is increased, the surface population of the inorganic content will begin to occupy a significant fraction of the surface area as the atomic oxygen exposure increases because the ash is not volatile and remains as a loosely attached surface layer. This results in a reduction of the flux of atomic oxygen reacting with the polymer and a reduction in the rate of erosion of the polymer remaining. This paper presents the results of ground laboratory and low Earth orbital (LEO) investigations to evaluate the fluence dependence of atomic oxygen erosion yields of polymers and paints having inorganic fill content.

  18. Modelling river bank erosion processes and mass failure mechanisms using 2-D depth averaged numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Die Moran, Andres; El kadi Abderrezzak, Kamal; Tassi, Pablo; Herouvet, Jean-Michel

    2014-05-01

    Bank erosion is a key process that may cause a large number of economic and environmental problems (e.g. land loss, damage to structures and aquatic habitat). Stream bank erosion (toe erosion and mass failure) represents an important form of channel morphology changes and a significant source of sediment. With the advances made in computational techniques, two-dimensional (2-D) numerical models have become valuable tools for investigating flow and sediment transport in open channels at large temporal and spatial scales. However, the implementation of mass failure process in 2D numerical models is still a challenging task. In this paper, a simple, innovative algorithm is implemented in the Telemac-Mascaret modeling platform to handle bank failure: failure occurs whether the actual slope of one given bed element is higher than the internal friction angle. The unstable bed elements are rotated around an appropriate axis, ensuring mass conservation. Mass failure of a bank due to slope instability is applied at the end of each sediment transport evolution iteration, once the bed evolution due to bed load (and/or suspended load) has been computed, but before the global sediment mass balance is verified. This bank failure algorithm is successfully tested using two laboratory experimental cases. Then, bank failure in a 1:40 scale physical model of the Rhine River composed of non-uniform material is simulated. The main features of the bank erosion and failure are correctly reproduced in the numerical simulations, namely the mass wasting at the bank toe, followed by failure at the bank head, and subsequent transport of the mobilised material in an aggradation front. Volumes of eroded material obtained are of the same order of magnitude as the volumes measured during the laboratory tests.

  19. Bayesian inversion of a CRN depth profile to infer Quaternary erosion of the northwestern Campine Plateau (NE Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Laloy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The rate at which low-lying sandy areas in temperate regions, such as the Campine Plateau (NE Belgium, have been eroding during the Quaternary is a matter of debate. Current knowledge on the average pace of landscape evolution in the Campine area is largely based on geological inferences and modern analogies. We performed a Bayesian inversion of an in situ-produced 10Be concentration depth profile to infer the average long-term erosion rate together with two other parameters: the surface exposure age and the inherited 10Be concentration. Compared to the latest advances in probabilistic inversion of cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN data, our approach has the following two innovative components: it (1 uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling and (2 accounts (under certain assumptions for the contribution of model errors to posterior uncertainty. To investigate to what extent our approach differs from the state of the art in practice, a comparison against the Bayesian inversion method implemented in the CRONUScalc program is made. Both approaches identify similar maximum a posteriori (MAP parameter values, but posterior parameter and predictive uncertainty derived using the method taken in CRONUScalc is moderately underestimated. A simple way for producing more consistent uncertainty estimates with the CRONUScalc-like method in the presence of model errors is therefore suggested. Our inferred erosion rate of 39 ± 8. 9 mm kyr−1 (1σ is relatively large in comparison with landforms that erode under comparable (paleo-climates elsewhere in the world. We evaluate this value in the light of the erodibility of the substrate and sudden base level lowering during the Middle Pleistocene. A denser sampling scheme of a two-nuclide concentration depth profile would allow for better inferred erosion rate resolution, and including more uncertain parameters in the MCMC inversion.

  20. Bayesian inversion of a CRN depth profile to infer Quaternary erosion of the northwestern Campine Plateau (NE Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloy, Eric; Beerten, Koen; Vanacker, Veerle; Christl, Marcus; Rogiers, Bart; Wouters, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    The rate at which low-lying sandy areas in temperate regions, such as the Campine Plateau (NE Belgium), have been eroding during the Quaternary is a matter of debate. Current knowledge on the average pace of landscape evolution in the Campine area is largely based on geological inferences and modern analogies. We performed a Bayesian inversion of an in situ-produced 10Be concentration depth profile to infer the average long-term erosion rate together with two other parameters: the surface exposure age and the inherited 10Be concentration. Compared to the latest advances in probabilistic inversion of cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) data, our approach has the following two innovative components: it (1) uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling and (2) accounts (under certain assumptions) for the contribution of model errors to posterior uncertainty. To investigate to what extent our approach differs from the state of the art in practice, a comparison against the Bayesian inversion method implemented in the CRONUScalc program is made. Both approaches identify similar maximum a posteriori (MAP) parameter values, but posterior parameter and predictive uncertainty derived using the method taken in CRONUScalc is moderately underestimated. A simple way for producing more consistent uncertainty estimates with the CRONUScalc-like method in the presence of model errors is therefore suggested. Our inferred erosion rate of 39 ± 8. 9 mm kyr-1 (1σ) is relatively large in comparison with landforms that erode under comparable (paleo-)climates elsewhere in the world. We evaluate this value in the light of the erodibility of the substrate and sudden base level lowering during the Middle Pleistocene. A denser sampling scheme of a two-nuclide concentration depth profile would allow for better inferred erosion rate resolution, and including more uncertain parameters in the MCMC inversion.

  1. Oxygen plasma treatment and deposition of CNx on a fluorinated polymer matrix composite for improved erosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muratore, C.; Korenyi-Both, A.; Bultman, J. E.; Waite, A. R.; Jones, J. G.; Storage, T. M.; Voevodin, A. A.

    2007-01-01

    The use of polymer matrix composites in aerospace propulsion applications is currently limited by insufficient resistance to erosion by abrasive media. Erosion resistant coatings may provide necessary protection; however, adhesion to many high temperature polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials is poor. A low pressure oxygen plasma treatment process was developed to improve adhesion of CN x coatings to a carbon reinforced, fluorinated polymer matrix composite. Fullerene-like CN x was selected as an erosion resistant coating for its high hardness-to-elastic modulus ratio and elastic resilience which were expected to reduce erosion from media incident at different angles (normal or glancing) relative to the surface. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to evaluate the effect of the plasma treatment on surface chemistry, and electron microscopy was used to identify changes in the surface morphology of the PMC substrate after plasma exposure. The fluorine concentration at the surface was significantly reduced and the carbon fibers were exposed after plasma treatment. CN x coatings were then deposited on oxygen treated PMC substrates. Qualitative tests demonstrated that plasma treatment improved coating adhesion resulting in an erosion resistance improvement of a factor of 2 compared to untreated coated composite substrates. The combination of PMC pretreatment and coating with CN x reduced the erosion rate by an order of magnitude for normally incident particles

  2. Photoirradiation system with depth optical dosimetry control in initial oxygen saturation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintanar, L.; Stolik, S.; Rosa, J. de la; Moreno, E.

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic Therapy is a technique in which a photosensitizing substance is applied that is activated by light and it generates reactive oxygen species which cause selective cell destruction. The efficiency of the therapy is affected by the parameters dose. In this work it is shown a photo-irradiation system for superficial Photodynamic Therapy, using as a light source a light emitting diode with an automatic control of optical power based on a model of the distribution of light in depth that was tested in tissue phantoms. It also has a reflective pulse oximeter for the measurement of the initial oxygen saturation. (Author)

  3. Shelf erosion and submarine river canyons: implications for deep-sea oxygenation and ocean productivity during glaciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tsandev

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The areal exposure of continental shelves during glacial sea level lowering enhanced the transfer of erodible reactive organic matter to the open ocean. Sea level fall also activated submarine canyons thereby allowing large rivers to deposit their particulate load, via gravity flows, directly in the deep-sea. Here, we analyze the effects of shelf erosion and particulate matter re-routing to the open ocean during interglacial to glacial transitions, using a coupled model of the marine phosphorus, organic carbon and oxygen cycles. The results indicate that shelf erosion and submarine canyon formation may significantly lower deep-sea oxygen levels, by up to 25%, during sea level low stands, mainly due to the supply of new material from the shelves, and to a lesser extent due to particulate organic matter bypassing the coastal zone. Our simulations imply that deep-sea oxygen levels can drop significantly if eroded shelf material is deposited to the seafloor. Thus the glacial ocean's oxygen content could have been significantly lower than during interglacial stages. Primary production, organic carbon burial and dissolved phosphorus inventories are all affected by the erosion and rerouting mechanisms. However, re-routing of the continental and eroded shelf material to the deep-sea has the effect of decoupling deep-sea oxygen demand from primary productivity in the open ocean. P burial is also not affected showing a disconnection between the biogeochemical cycles in the water column and the P burial record.

  4. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of Ti in 0.35% NaCl solution with bubbling oxygen and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D G; Wang, J D; Chen, D R; Liang, P

    2015-09-01

    The influences of oxygen and nitrogen on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion of Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution at room temperature, were investigated using a magnetostrictive-induced ultrasonic cavitation erosion (CE) facility and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The roles of oxygen and nitrogen in the composition and the electronic property of the passive film on Ti, were studied by Mott-Schottky plot and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the mass loss of Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution increased with increasing cavitation time. Bubbling oxygen can evidently increase the resistance of ultrasonic cavitation erosion comparing with bubbling nitrogen. XPS results showed that the thickness of the passive film on Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution in the case of bubbling oxygen for 3 weeks, was about 7 nm, and the passive film was mainly composed of TiO2 with an anatase structure. While TiO2 with a rutile structure was found to be the major component of the passive film on Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution in the case of bubbling nitrogen for 3 weeks, and the film thickness was 5 nm. The results extracted from Mott-Schottky plot showed that the passive film on Ti in the case of bubbling oxygen had more donor density than the passive film on Ti in the case of bubbling nitrogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Topology and immersion depth of an integral membrane protein by paramagnetic rates from dissolved oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdul-Wahid, M Sameer; Verardi, Raffaello; Veglia, Gianluigi; Prosser, R Scott

    2011-09-01

    In studies of membrane proteins, knowledge of protein topology can provide useful insight into both structure and function. In this work, we present a solution NMR method for the measurement the tilt angle and average immersion depth of alpha helices in membrane proteins, from analysis of the paramagnetic relaxation rate enhancements arising from dissolved oxygen. No modification to the micelle or protein is necessary, and the topology of both transmembrane and amphipathic helices are readily determined. We apply this method to the measure the topology of a monomeric mutant of phospholamban (AFA-PLN), a 52-residue membrane protein containing both an amphipathic and a transmembrane alpha helix. In dodecylphosphocholine micelles, the amphipathic helix of AFA-PLN was found to have a tilt angle of 87° ± 1° and an average immersion depth of 13.2 Å. The transmembrane helix was found to have an average immersion depth of 5.4 Å, indicating residues 41 and 42 are closest to the micelle centre. The resolution of paramagnetic relaxation rate enhancements from dissolved oxygen compares favourably to those from Ni (II), a hydrophilic paramagnetic species.

  6. Topology and immersion depth of an integral membrane protein by paramagnetic rates from dissolved oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Abdul-Wahid, M. Sameer; Verardi, Raffaello; Veglia, Gianluigi; Prosser, R. Scott

    2011-01-01

    In studies of membrane proteins, knowledge of protein topology can provide useful insight into both structure and function. In this work, we present a solution NMR method for the measurement the tilt angle and average immersion depth of alpha helices in membrane proteins, from analysis of the paramagnetic relaxation rate enhancements arising from dissolved oxygen. No modification to the micelle or protein is necessary, and the topology of both transmembrane and amphipathic helices are readily determined. We apply this method to the measure the topology of a monomeric mutant of phospholamban (AFA-PLN), a 52-residue membrane protein containing both an amphipathic and a transmembrane alpha helix. In dodecylphosphocholine micelles, the amphipathic helix of AFA-PLN was found to have a tilt angle of 87° ± 1° and an average immersion depth of 13.2 Å. The transmembrane helix was found to have an average immersion depth of 5.4 Å, indicating residues 41 and 42 are closest to the micelle centre. The resolution of paramagnetic relaxation rate enhancements from dissolved oxygen compares favourably to those from Ni (II), a hydrophilic paramagnetic species.

  7. Oxygen depth profiling using the 16O(d,α)14N nuclear reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khubeis, I.; Al-Rjob, R.

    1997-01-01

    The excitation function of the 16 O(d,α) 14 N nuclear reaction has been determined in the deuteron energy range of 0.88-2.28 MeV. Major resonances are observed at deuteron energies of 0.98, 1.31, 1.53, 1.60, 1.73 and 2.22 MeV. The present results show good agreement with those of Haase and Khubeis, however there is a shift of 60 keV in the first resonance compared with the measurements of Amsel. The use of a thin surface barrier detector (t=22 μm) and a bias voltage of +20 V coupled with a proper pile-up rejection circuit has allowed the determination of the oxygen depth profiling to a resolution of 16 nm for thick targets. This method is efficient in eliminating interferences from other nuclear reactions such as 16 O(d,p) 17 O and 12 C(d,p) 19 C, where emitted protons have severely obscured α-particles from the 16 O(d,α) 14 N reaction. A 1.08 MeV deuteron beam has been employed to increase the α-yield from the target. The target has been tilted at 70 to enhance depth resolution. This reaction is well suited for the determination of oxygen concentration in oxides of high temperature superconductors. (orig.)

  8. The oxygen isotope effect on the in-plane penetration depth in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, R; Shengelaya, A; Morenzoni, E; Conder, K; Savic, I M; Keller, H

    2004-01-01

    Muon spin rotation (μSR) studies of the oxygen isotope ( 16 O/ 18 O) effect (OIE) on the in-plane magnetic field penetration depth λ ab in cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are presented. First, the doping dependence of the OIE on the transition temperature T c in various HTS is briefly discussed. It is observed that different cuprate families show similar doping dependences of the OIE on T c . Then, bulk μSR, low-energy μSR, and magnetization studies of the total and site-selective OIE on λ ab are described in some detail. A substantial OIE on λ ab was observed in various cuprate families at all doping levels, suggesting that cuprate HTS are non-adiabatic superconductors. The experiments clearly demonstrate that the total OIE on T c and λ ab arise from the oxygen sites within the superconducting CuO 2 planes, demonstrating that the phonon modes involving the movement of planar oxygen are dominantly coupled to the supercarriers. Finally, it is shown that the OIE on T c and λ ab exhibit a relation that appears to be generic for different families of cuprate HTS. The observation of these unusual isotope effects implies that lattice effects play an essential role in cuprate HTS and have to be considered in any realistic model of high-temperature superconductivity

  9. The oxygen isotope effect on the in-plane penetration depth in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khasanov, R [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Shengelaya, A [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Morenzoni, E [Laboratory for Muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Conder, K [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, ETH Zuerich and PSI Villigen, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Savic, I M [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Keller, H [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2004-10-13

    Muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) studies of the oxygen isotope ({sup 16}O/{sup 18}O) effect (OIE) on the in-plane magnetic field penetration depth {lambda}{sub ab} in cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are presented. First, the doping dependence of the OIE on the transition temperature T{sub c} in various HTS is briefly discussed. It is observed that different cuprate families show similar doping dependences of the OIE on T{sub c}. Then, bulk {mu}SR, low-energy {mu}SR, and magnetization studies of the total and site-selective OIE on {lambda}{sub ab} are described in some detail. A substantial OIE on {lambda}{sub ab} was observed in various cuprate families at all doping levels, suggesting that cuprate HTS are non-adiabatic superconductors. The experiments clearly demonstrate that the total OIE on T{sub c} and {lambda}{sub ab} arise from the oxygen sites within the superconducting CuO{sub 2} planes, demonstrating that the phonon modes involving the movement of planar oxygen are dominantly coupled to the supercarriers. Finally, it is shown that the OIE on T{sub c} and {lambda}{sub ab} exhibit a relation that appears to be generic for different families of cuprate HTS. The observation of these unusual isotope effects implies that lattice effects play an essential role in cuprate HTS and have to be considered in any realistic model of high-temperature superconductivity.

  10. A Space Experiment to Measure the Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers and Demonstrate a Technique to Identify Sources of Silicone Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Baney-Barton, Elyse; Sechkar, Edward A.; Hunt, Patricia K.; Willoughby, Alan; Bemer, Meagan; Hope, Stephanie; Koo, Julie; Kaminski, Carolyn; hide

    1999-01-01

    A low Earth orbital space experiment entitled, "Polymers Erosion And Contamination Experiment", (PEACE) has been designed as a Get-Away Special (GAS Can) experiment to be accommodated as a Shuttle in-bay environmental exposure experiment. The first objective is to measure the atomic oxygen erosion yields of approximately 40 different polymeric materials by mass loss and erosion measurements using atomic force microscopy. The second objective is to evaluate the capability of identifying sources of silicone contamination through the use of a pin-hole contamination camera which utilizes environmental atomic oxygen to produce a contaminant source image on an optical substrate.

  11. Sub-keV secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling: comparison of sample rotation and oxygen flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, R.; Wee, A.T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Following the increasingly stringent requirements in the characterization of sub-micron IC devices, an understanding of the various factors affecting ultra shallow depth profiling in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has become crucial. Achieving high depth resolution (of the order of 1 nm) is critical in the semiconductor industry today, and various methods have been developed to optimize depth resolution. In this paper, we will discuss ultra shallow SIMS depth profiling using B and Ge delta-doped Si samples using low energy 0.5 keV O 2 + primary beams. The relationship between depth resolution of the delta layers and surface topography measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is studied. The effect of oxygen flooding and sample rotation, used to suppress surface roughening is also investigated. Oxygen flooding was found to effectively suppress roughening and gives the best depth resolution for B, but sample rotation gives the best resolution for Ge. Possible mechanisms for this are discussed

  12. Preparation of high-content hexagonal boron nitride composite film and characterization of atomic oxygen erosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Wang, Shaokai, E-mail: wsk@buaa.edu.cn; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets can be well exfoliated with the help of nanofibrillated cellulose. • A carpet-like rough surface and distortion in crystal structure of h-BN are found in both h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film after AO exposure. • H-BN/epoxy film exhibits a higher mass loss and erosion yield, different element content changes and chemical oxidations compared with h-BN film. - Abstract: Space aircrafts circling in low earth orbit are suffered from highly reactive atomic oxygen (AO). To shield AO, a flexible thin film with 80 wt.% hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and h-BN/epoxy film were fabricated through vacuum filtration and adding nanofibrillated cellulose fibers. H-BN nanosheets were hydroxylated for enhancing interaction in the films. Mass loss and erosion yield at accumulated AO fluence about 3.04 × 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 2} were adopted to evaluate the AO resistance properties of the films. A carpet-like rough surface, chemical oxidations and change in crystal structure of h-BN were found after AO treatment, and the degrading mechanism was proposed. The mass loss and erosion yield under AO attack were compared between h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film, and the comparison was also done for various types of shielding AO materials. Excellent AO resistance property of h-BN film is shown, and the reasons are analyzed.

  13. Oxygenation measurement by multi-wavelength oxygen-dependent phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence: catchment depth and application in intact heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balestra, Gianmarco M.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Specht, Patricia A. C.; Ince, Can; Mik, Egbert G.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen delivery and metabolism represent key factors for organ function in health and disease. We describe the optical key characteristics of a technique to comprehensively measure oxygen tension (PO(2)) in myocardium, using oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence of

  14. Depth distribution of carrier lifetime in 65 MeV oxygen ion irradiated silicon wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinde, N.S. [Ecotopia Science Institute, Division of Energy Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Dahiwale, S.S. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Dhole, S.D. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)]. E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.in

    2006-03-15

    CZ-grown, n-doped crystalline Si(1 1 1) of resistivity 60 {omega} cm and 140 {omega} cm were irradiated with 65 MeV energy oxygen ions, in the fluence range of 2 x 10{sup 1}-10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. The depth and spatial profile of excess minority carrier recombination time {tau} (lifetime) was measured using photoconductive decay (PCD) method. Lifetime measurements were carried out before the stopping range of impinging ions. Results show a monotonous decrease in lifetime with fluence, which is attributed to defect creation mechanism by electronic energy loss based on the thermal spike model. Also, surface modification is expected with a small loss in crystalline quality. This surface is considered to be a multi-crystalline surface with large grain boundaries that act as trapping sites for excess holes in n-Si(1 1 1). Annealing of the irradiated samples showed a near complete recovery at 750 deg. C for a period of 1 h.

  15. Oxygen input and oxygen yield of tanks of great depth in theory and practice; Theorie und Praxis von Sauerstoffeintrag und -ertrag bei groesseren Beckentiefen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poepel, H.J.; Wagner, M. [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Wasserversorgung, Abwasserbeseitigung und Raumplanung; Weidmann, F.

    1999-07-01

    Activated sludge tanks are nowadays planned and built with greater depths (8.00 to 12.00 m) than hitherto (4.00 to 6.00 m); some are already in operation. For such depths there exist no confirmed dimensioning approaches. The fundamentals of oxygen transfer in deep tanks are pointed out and a model for calculating the influence of depth is set up. It is confirmed via an extensive test program with variation of water depth, the rate of density of membrane aerators, and air volume flows. It permits converting oxygen supply parameters of an aeration system established for a certain blow-in depth to a given alternative depth. For oxygen yield, too, relations are developed, which indicate gross yield for different compressor types (sliding vane rotary compressor, turbo compressor, screw-type compressor) as a function of blow-in-depth, air volume flow and rate of density with great accuracy. (orig.) [German] Belebungsbecken werden heute tiefer (8,00 bis 12,00 m) als bisher (4,00 bis 6,00 m) geplant, gebaut und bereits betrieben. Fuer diese Tiefen liegen keine gesicherten Bemesssungsansaetze vor. Die Grundlagen des Sauerstoffuebergangs in tiefen Becken werden dargelegt und ein Modell zur Berechnung des Tiefeneinflusses erstellt. Ueber ein ausfuehrliches Versuchsprogramm mit Variation der Wassertiefe, der Belegungsdichte mit Membranbelueftern und der Luftvolumenstroeme wird das Modell bestaetigt. Damit koennen Sauerstoffzufuhrparametern eines Belueftungssystems, die fuer eine bestimmte Einblastiefe bekannt sind, auf beliebige andere Tiefen umgerechnet werden. Auch fuer den Sauerstoffertrag werden Beziehungen entwickelt, die den Bruttoertrag fuer unterschiedliche Verdichterarten (Drehkolben-, Turbo- und Schraubenverdichter) in Abhaengigkeit von Einblastiefe, Luftvolumenstrom und Belegungsdichte mit grosser Genauigkeit festlegen. (orig.)

  16. Temperature Dependence of Apparent Respiratory Quotients and Oxygen Penetration Depth in Contrasting Lake Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobek, Sebastian; Gudasz, Cristian; Koehler, Birgit; Tranvik, Lars J.; Bastviken, David; Morales-Pineda, María.

    2017-11-01

    Lake sediments constitute an important compartment in the carbon cycle of lakes, by burying carbon over geological timescales and by production and emission of greenhouse gases. The degradation of organic carbon (OC) in lake sediments is linked to both temperature and oxygen (O2), but the interactive nature of this regulation has not been studied in lake sediments in a quantitative way. We present the first systematic investigation of the effects of temperature on the apparent respiratory quotient (RQ, i.e., the molar ratio between carbon dioxide (CO2) production and O2 consumption) in two contrasting lake sediments. Laboratory incubations of sediment cores of a humic lake and an eutrophic lake across a 1-21°C temperature gradient over 157 days revealed that both CO2 production and O2 consumption were positively, exponentially, and similarly dependent on temperature. The apparent RQ differed significantly between the lake sediments (0.63 ± 0.26 and 0.99 ± 0.28 in the humic and the eutrophic lake, respectively; mean ± SD) and was significantly and positively related to temperature. The O2 penetration depth into the sediment varied by a factor of 2 over the 1-21°C temperature range and was significantly, negatively, and similarly related to temperature in both lake sediments. Accordingly, increasing temperature may influence the overall extent of OC degradation in lake sediments by limiting O2 supply to aerobic microbial respiration to the topmost sediment layer, resulting in a concomitant shift to less effective anaerobic degradation pathways. This suggests that temperature may represent a key controlling factor of the OC burial efficiency in lake sediments.

  17. Oxygen flooding and sample cooling during depth profiling of HfSiON thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miwa, Shiro [Materials Analysis Center, Materials Laboratories, Sony Corporation, 4-16-1 Okata, Atsugi 243-0021 (Japan)], E-mail: Shiro.Miwa@jp.sony.com

    2008-12-15

    A combination of oxygen flooding and. Cs primary ion bombardment can suppress the enhancement of the secondary ion signal at the surface and at the interface of a thin HfSiON layer on a Si substrate. The surface concentration of both Cs and O during Cs primary ion bombardment with oxygen flooding was higher than that without oxygen flooding, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. When the sample was cooled to about -150 deg. C, the enhancement of the secondary ion signal could be suppressed at a lower oxygen pressure.

  18. Oxygen isotopic ratios of quartz from wind-erosive soils of southwestern United States in relation to aerosol dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridhar, K.; Jackson, M.L.; Clayton, R.N.; Gillette, D.A.; Hawley, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The oxygen isotopic ratios (expressed as parts per thousand relative to mean ocean water, SMOW, delta/sup 18/O) of the quartz from 13 soils undergoing much wind erosion during the study period of 1972-1975 in four southwestern states and from comparison areas were determined. The delta/sup 18/O for quartz from eight Texas (TX) and Arizona (AZ) soils range from 13.0 to 15.9 /sup 0///sub 00/. The quartz of the sands and silts coarser than 20 ..mu..m from three of the soils had delta/sup 18/O values ranging from 13.1 to 15.1 /sup 0///sub 00/, characteristic of an ultimate igneous-metamorphic origin. The delta/sup 18/O values increase greatly with decreasing particle size of quartz from three soils ranging from loamy fine sand to loam to clay in texture. The delta/sup 18/O of the 1-10 ..mu..m quartz fraction (aerosol size) ranged from 19.2 to 20.2 /sup 0///sub 00/ (19.55 +- 0.28 /sup 0///sub 00/; +- sigma) for the thirteen soils most affected by dust storms. The oxygen isotopic ratios of 1-10 ..mu..m quartz from three Hawaiian soils and two sediments from Lake Waiau occurring at 3,970 m altitude on the Mauna Kea summit on the Island of Hawaii give a delta/sup 18/O mean of 18.3 +- 0.2 /sup 0///sub 00/.

  19. Polymers Erosion and Contamination Experiment Being Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Barney-Barton, Elyse A.; Sechkar, Edward; Hunt, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    The Polymers Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) is currently being developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center by the Electro-Physics Branch in conjunction with students and faculty from Hathaway Brown School in Cleveland. The experiment is a Get Away Special Canister shuttle flight experiment sponsored by the American Chemical Society. The two goals of this experiment are (1) to measure ram atomic oxygen erosion rates of approximately 40 polymers that have potential use in space applications and (2) to validate a method for identifying sources of silicone contamination that occur in the shuttle bay. Equipment to be used in this flight experiment is shown in the schematic diagram. Spacecraft materials subjected to attack by atomic oxygen in the space environment experience significant degradation over the span of a typical mission. Therefore, learning the rates of atomic oxygen erosion of a wide variety of polymers would be of great benefit to future missions. PEACE will use two independent techniques to determine the atomic oxygen erosion rates of polymers. Large (1-in.-diameter) samples will be used for obtaining mass loss. Preflight and postflight dehydrated masses will be obtained, and the mass lost during flight will be determined. Small (0.5-in.-diameter) samples will be protected with isolated particles (such as NaCl crystals) and then exposed to the space environment. After flight, the protective particles will be removed (washed off) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) will be used to measure the erosion depth from protected mesas. Erosion depth measurements are more sensitive than traditional mass measurements and are very useful for materials with low erosion yields or with very low fluence missions.

  20. Mid-depth respired carbon storage and oxygenation of the eastern equatorial Pacific over the last 25,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umling, Natalie E.; Thunell, Robert C.

    2018-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that respired carbon was stored in mid-depth waters (∼1-3 km) during the last glacial maximum (LGM) and released to the atmosphere from upwelling regions during deglaciation. Decreased ventilation, enhanced productivity, and enhanced carbonate dissolution are among the mechanisms that have been cited as possible drivers of glacial CO2 drawdown. However, the relative importance of each of these mechanisms is poorly understood. New approaches to quantitatively constrain bottom water carbonate chemistry and oxygenation provide methods for estimating historic changes in respired carbon storage. While increased CO2 drawdown during the LGM should have resulted in decreased oxygenation and a shift in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation towards lower carbonate ion concentrations, this is complicated by the interplay of carbonate compensation, export productivity, and circulation. To disentangle these processes, we use a multiproxy approach that includes boron to calcium (B/Ca) ratios of the benthic foraminifera Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi to reconstruct deep-water carbonate ion concentrations ([CO32-]) and the uranium to calcium (U/Ca) ratio of foraminiferal coatings in combination with benthic foraminiferal carbon isotopes to reconstruct changes in bottom water oxygen concentrations ([O2]) and organic carbon export. Our records indicate that LGM [CO32-] and [O2] was reduced at mid water depths of the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP), consistent with increased respired carbon storage. Furthermore, our results suggest enhanced mixing of lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) to EEP mid water depths and provide evidence for the importance of circulation for oceanic-atmospheric CO2 exchange.

  1. Oxygen accumulation on metal surfaces investigated by XPS, AES and LEIS, an issue for sputter depth profiling under UHV conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberger, R., E-mail: roland.steinberger@jku.at [Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Celedón, C.E., E-mail: carlos.celedon@usm.cl [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Abteilung für Atom- und Oberflächenphysik, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Valaparaíso, Casilla 110-V (Chile); Bruckner, B., E-mail: barbara.bruckner@jku.at [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Abteilung für Atom- und Oberflächenphysik, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Roth, D., E-mail: dietmar.roth@jku.at [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Abteilung für Atom- und Oberflächenphysik, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Duchoslav, J., E-mail: jiri.duchoslav@jku.at [Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Arndt, M., E-mail: martin.arndt@voestalpine.com [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, voestalpine-Straße 3, 4031 Linz (Austria); Kürnsteiner, P., E-mail: p.kuernsteiner@mpie.de [Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); and others

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Investigation on the impact of residual gas prevailing in UHV chambers. • For some metals detrimental oxygen uptake could be observed within shortest time. • Totally different behavior was found: no changes, solely adsorption and oxidation. • The UHV residual gas may severely corrupt results obtained from depth profiling. • A well-considered data acquisition sequence is the key for reliable depth profiles. - Abstract: Depth profiling using surface sensitive analysis methods in combination with sputter ion etching is a common procedure for thorough material investigations, where clean surfaces free of any contamination are essential. Hence, surface analytic studies are mostly performed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, but the cleanness of such UHV environments is usually overrated. Consequently, the current study highlights the in principle known impact of the residual gas on metal surfaces (Fe, Mg, Al, Cr and Zn) for various surface analytics methods, like X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low-energy ion scattering (LEIS). The investigations with modern, state-of-the-art equipment showed different behaviors for the metal surfaces in UHV during acquisition: (i) no impact for Zn, even after long time, (ii) solely adsorption of oxygen for Fe, slight and slow changes for Cr and (iii) adsorption accompanied by oxide formation for Al and Mg. The efficiency of different counter measures was tested and the acquired knowledge was finally used for ZnMgAl coated steel to obtain accurate depth profiles, which exhibited before serious artifacts when data acquisition was performed in an inconsiderate way.

  2. Latitudinal variations in intermediate depth ventilation and biological production over northeastern Pacific Oxygen Minimum Zones during the last 60 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Tachikawa, Kazuyo; Bard, Edouard

    2012-10-01

    Mechanisms affecting past variability in the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) are poorly known. We analyzed core MD02-2524, obtained from the Nicaragua Margin in the present ETNP OMZ for major and minor elements (titanium (Ti), brome (Br), silicon (Si), potassium (K), and calcium (Ca)) using an X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) core scanner, and redox-sensitive trace elements (uranium (U), molybdenum (Mo), and nickel (Ni)) determined by ICP-MS. The U and Mo content was higher during the deglaciation than during the Holocene and the last glacial maximum, whereas enrichment was not observed for Ni, an element closely associated with organic matter. High-resolution XRF scanning indicated that the Ca-based carbonate content had millennial-scale variability inversely correlated with Br-based organic matter and Si/K-based opal content during the last glacial period. The available data suggest no clear regional trend in biological productivity during the last deglaciation, but significant local variability in the coastal eastern equatorial Pacific. The trace element enrichment and the lack of a concomitant increase in biogenic phases indicated that an enhanced ETNP OMZ, at least between 15°N and 12°N at a water depth of 500-900 m, was principally caused by a reduced oxygen supply driven by oceanic circulation to the Nicaragua Basin during the deglaciation. The observed patterns can be interpreted as the distinct changes in the oxygenation state of northern and southern water masses at intermediate depths. We also found evidence for a decoupling between local productivity and pore water oxygenation for several millennial-scale events during Marine Isotopic Stage 3, indicating that remote oxygen consumption and/or oceanic ventilation impacted OMZ intensity. Multi-millennial scale variations of the productivity at Papagayo upwelling cell displayed an opposite trend from productivity at the Costa Rica Dome, in relation with the latitudinal shift

  3. Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 February 1973 to 19 August 1980 (NODC Accession 0000289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from February 5, 1973 to August 19, 1980. These...

  4. Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 February 1987 to 18 February 1991 (NODC Accession 0000290)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from February 7, 1987 to February 18, 1991....

  5. Influence of the depth of sedation on regional cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring in neurosurgery of supratentorial gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Kai⁃ying

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the influence on regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2 of sedation depth during anesthesia induction and maintenance in supratentorial glioma resections. Methods Thirty patients with Ⅰ - Ⅱ supratentorial glioma (graded by American Society of Anesthesiologists underwent elective supratentorial glioma resection were included in this study. Rocuronium, sufentanil and propofol were used for anesthesia induction. After trachea cannula, total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA was maintained with plasma concentration of propofol 2.80-3.20 μg/ml and remifentanil 0.10-0.20 μg/(kg·min. Thirty groups of rScO2, bispectral index (BIS, mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR were recorded continuously till the incision. Results During anesthesia induction, BIS decreased along with the infusion of anesthetics, and there was significant negative correlation between BIS and rScO2 (r = ⁃0.803, P = 0.001. During anesthesia maintenance, rScO2 and BIS were not significantly related (r = 0.147, P = 0.396. Conclusion The rScO2 monitoring can reflect the influence of sedation depth on cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption balance during supratentorial glioma resection under TIVA.

  6. Magma Ocean Depth and Oxygen Fugacity in the Early Earth--Implications for Biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    A large class of elements, referred to as the siderophile (iron-loving) elements, in the Earth's mantle can be explained by an early deep magma ocean on the early Earth in which the mantle equilibrated with metallic liquid (core liquid). This stage would have affected the distribution of some of the classic volatile elements that are also essential ingredients for life and biochemistry - H, C, S, and N. Estimates are made of the H, C, S, and N contents of Earth's early mantle after core formation, considering the effects of variable temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and composition on their partitioning. Assessment is made of whether additional, exogenous, sources are required to explain the observed mantle concentrations, and areas are identified where additional data and experimentation would lead to an improved understanding of this phase of Earth's history.

  7. Slurry Erosion Behavior of F6NM Stainless Steel and High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel-Sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, S. Y.; Miao, Q.; Liang, W. P.; Huang, B. Z.; Ding, Z.; Chen, B. W.

    2017-02-01

    WC-10Co-4Cr coating was applied to the surface of F6NM stainless steel by high-velocity oxygen-fuel spraying. The slurry erosion behavior of the matrix and coating was examined at different rotational speeds using a self-made machine. This experiment effectively simulates real slurry erosion in an environment with high silt load. At low velocity (<6 m/s), the main failure mechanism was cavitation. Small bubbles acted as an air cushion, obstructing direct contact between sand and the matrix surface. However, at velocity above 9 m/s, abrasive wear was the dominant failure mechanism. The results indicate that WC-10Co-4Cr coating significantly improved the slurry resistance at higher velocity, because it created a thin and dense WC coating on the surface.

  8. Oxygen depth profiling in Kr+-implanted polycrystalline alpha titanium by means of 16O(α,α)16O resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nsengiyumva, S.; Riviere, J.P.; Raji, A.T.; Comrie, C.M.; Britton, D.T.; Haerting, M.

    2011-01-01

    The 16 O(α,α) 16 O resonance scattering was applied to study the effects of ion implantation on the oxygen distribution in the near surface region of polycrystalline titanium implanted with 180 keV krypton ions at fluences, ranging between 1 x 10 14 and 5 x 10 15 Kr + /cm 2 . Two sample sets were chosen: as-received polycrystalline titanium discs rolled and annealed in half-hard condition which had a thick oxygen layer and similar samples in which this surface layer was removed by polishing. An increase of the mean oxygen concentration observed in both unpolished and polished samples at low fluence suggests a knock-on implantation of surface oxygen atoms. At high fluence, an overall decrease in the mean oxygen concentration and mean oxygen depth suggests an out-diffusion of near-surface oxygen atoms.

  9. Oxygen depth profiling in Kr{sup +}-implanted polycrystalline alpha titanium by means of {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}){sup 16}O resonance scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nsengiyumva, S., E-mail: schadnse@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Kigali Institute of Education, P.O. Box 5039 Kigali (Rwanda); Riviere, J.P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux UMR6630-CNRS, 86960 (France); Raji, A.T.; Comrie, C.M.; Britton, D.T.; Haerting, M. [Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2011-07-15

    The {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}){sup 16}O resonance scattering was applied to study the effects of ion implantation on the oxygen distribution in the near surface region of polycrystalline titanium implanted with 180 keV krypton ions at fluences, ranging between 1 x 10{sup 14} and 5 x 10{sup 15} Kr{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. Two sample sets were chosen: as-received polycrystalline titanium discs rolled and annealed in half-hard condition which had a thick oxygen layer and similar samples in which this surface layer was removed by polishing. An increase of the mean oxygen concentration observed in both unpolished and polished samples at low fluence suggests a knock-on implantation of surface oxygen atoms. At high fluence, an overall decrease in the mean oxygen concentration and mean oxygen depth suggests an out-diffusion of near-surface oxygen atoms.

  10. Effects of recoil-implanted oxygen on depth profiles of defects and annealing processes in P{sup +}-implanted Si studied using monoenergetic positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Moriya, Tsuyoshi; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Kitano, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Masahito; Kawano, Takao; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Mikado, Tomohisa

    1996-04-01

    Effects of oxygen atoms recoiled from SiO{sub 2} films on depth profiles of defects and annealing processes in P{sup +}-implanted Si were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. For an epitaxial Si specimen, the depth profile of defects was found to be shifted toward the surface by recoil implantation of oxygen atoms. This was attributed to the formation of vacancy-oxygen complexes and a resultant decrease in the diffusion length of vacancy-type defects. The recoiled oxygen atoms stabilized amorphous regions introduced by P{sup +}-implantation, and the annealing of these regions was observed after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 700degC. For a Czochralski-grown Si specimen fabricated by through-oxide implantation, the recoiled oxygen atoms introduced interstitial-type defects upon RTA below the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, and such defects were dissociated by annealing at 1000degC. (author)

  11. Oxygen accumulation on metal surfaces investigated by XPS, AES and LEIS, an issue for sputter depth profiling under UHV conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, R.; Celedón, C. E.; Bruckner, B.; Roth, D.; Duchoslav, J.; Arndt, M.; Kürnsteiner, P.; Steck, T.; Faderl, J.; Riener, C. K.; Angeli, G.; Bauer, P.; Stifter, D.

    2017-07-01

    Depth profiling using surface sensitive analysis methods in combination with sputter ion etching is a common procedure for thorough material investigations, where clean surfaces free of any contamination are essential. Hence, surface analytic studies are mostly performed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, but the cleanness of such UHV environments is usually overrated. Consequently, the current study highlights the in principle known impact of the residual gas on metal surfaces (Fe, Mg, Al, Cr and Zn) for various surface analytics methods, like X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low-energy ion scattering (LEIS). The investigations with modern, state-of-the-art equipment showed different behaviors for the metal surfaces in UHV during acquisition: (i) no impact for Zn, even after long time, (ii) solely adsorption of oxygen for Fe, slight and slow changes for Cr and (iii) adsorption accompanied by oxide formation for Al and Mg. The efficiency of different counter measures was tested and the acquired knowledge was finally used for ZnMgAl coated steel to obtain accurate depth profiles, which exhibited before serious artifacts when data acquisition was performed in an inconsiderate way.

  12. Runoff erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Evelpidou, Niki (Ed.); Cordier, Stephane (Ed.); Merino, Agustin (Ed.); Figueiredo, Tomás de (Ed.); Centeri, Csaba (Ed.)

    2013-01-01

    Table of Contents PART I – THEORY OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 1 - RUNOFF EROSION – THE MECHANISMS CHAPTER 2 - LARGE SCALE APPROACHES OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 3 - MEASURING PRESENT RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 4 - MODELLING RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 5 - RUNOFF EROSION AND HUMAN SOCIETIES: THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON SOIL EROSION PART II - CASE STUDIES CASE STUDIES – INTRODUCTION: RUNOFF EROSION IN MEDITERRANEAN AREA CASE STUDY 1: Soil Erosion Risk...

  13. Using REE tracers to measure sheet erosion changing to rill erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Puling; Xue Yazhou; Song Wei; Wang Mingyi; Ju Tongjun

    2004-01-01

    Rare Earth Elements (REE) tracer method was used to study sheet erosion changing to rill erosion on slope land. By placing different rare earth elements of different soil depth across a slope in an indoor plot, two simulated rainfalls were applied to study the change of erosion type and the rill erosion process. The results indicate that the main erosion type is sheet erosion at the beginning of the rainfalls, and serious erosion happens after rill erosion appears. Accumulated sheet and rill erosion amounts increase with the rainfalls time. The percentage of sheet erosion amount decreases and rill erosion percentage increases with time. At the end of the rainfalls, the total rill erosion amounts are 4-5 times more than sheet erosion. In this paper, a new REE tracer method was used to quantitatively distinguish sheet and rill erosion amounts. The new REE tracer method should be useful to future studying of erosion processes on slope lands. (authors)

  14. Up-and-down shift in residence depth of slickheads (Alepocephalidae) revealed by otolith stable oxygen isotopic composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, J C; Liu, E Y; Sui, T D

    2016-03-01

    Otolith δ(18)O profiles for four slickhead species (Alepocephalidae) suggested that Alepocephalus umbriceps, Talismania okinawensis and Rouleina watasei migrated hundreds of metres to shallower depths during the juvenile to young stages before returning to their original depth or even deeper waters. Xenodermichthys nodulosus gradually shifted residence depth from shallow to deeper water during their life. These migratory patterns indicated that the slickheads examined had allopatric residence depths at different life stages, which might enhance the pelagic survival and growth rates of the juvenile and young fishes. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  15. Erosion behaviour of physically vapour-deposited and chemically vapour-deposited SiC films coated on molybdenum during oxygenated argon beam thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, T.; Kitajima, M.; Fukutomi, M.; Okada, M.

    1984-01-01

    The erosion behaviour during bombardment with a 5 keV argon beam at room temperature was studied for silicon carbide (SiC) films of thickness of about 10 μm coated on molybdenum by physical vapour deposition (PVD) and chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The PVD SiC (plasma-assisted ion plating) exhibited a greater thinning rate than the CVD SiC film. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis revealed that the chemical composition of PVD SiC was changed to a composition enriched in silicon by the bombardment, and there was a notable change in its surface morphology. The CVD SiC retained its initial chemical composition with only a small change in its surface morphology. Auger electron spectroscopy indicated that silicon oxide was formed on the surface of PVD SiC by the bombardment. The greater thinning rate and easier change in chemical composition in PVD SiC could be attributed to its readier chemical reaction with oxygen due to its more non-uniform structure and weaker chemical bonding. Oxygen was present as one of the impurities in the argon beam. (Auth.)

  16. Carbon and nitrogen uptake of calcareous benthic foraminifera along a depth-related oxygen gradient in the OMZ of the Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annekatrin Julie Enge

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Foraminifera are an important faunal element of the benthos in oxygen-depleted settings such as Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs where they can play a relevant role in the processing of phytodetritus. We investigated the uptake of phytodetritus (labeled with 13C and 15N by cal-careous foraminifera in the 0-1 cm sediment horizon under different oxygen concentrations within the OMZ in the eastern Arabian Sea. The in situ tracer experiments were carried out along a depth transect on the Indian margin over a period of 4 to 10 days. The uptake of phy-todetrital carbon within 4 days by all investigated species shows that phytodetritus is a rele-vant food source for foraminifera in OMZ sediments. The decrease of total carbon uptake from 540 to 1100 m suggests a higher demand for carbon by species in the low-oxygen core region of the OMZ or less food competition with macrofauna. Especially Uvigerinids showed high uptake of phytodetrital carbon at the lowest oxygenated site. Variation in the ratio of phytodetrital carbon to nitrogen between species and sites indicates that foraminiferal carbon and nitrogen use can be decoupled and different nutritional demands are found between spe-cies. Lower ratio of phytodetrital carbon and nitrogen at 540 m could hint for greater demand or storage of food-based nitrogen, ingestion or hosting of bacteria under almost anoxic condi-tions. Shifts in the foraminiferal assemblage structure (controlled by oxygen or food availabil-ity and in the presence of other benthic organisms account for observed changes in the pro-cessing of phytodetritus in the different OMZ habitats. Foraminifera dominate the short-term processing of phytodetritus in the OMZ core but are less important in the lower OMZ bounda-ry region of the Indian margin as biological interactions and species distribution of foraminif-era change with depth and oxygen levels.

  17. Roughness development in the depth profiling with 500 eV O2+ beam with the combination of oxygen flooding and sample rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui, D.; Xing, Z.X.; Huang, Y.H.; Mo, Z.Q.; Hua, Y.N.; Zhao, S.P.; Cha, L.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Roughness development is one of the most often addressed issues in the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) ultra-shallow depth profiling. The effect of oxygen flooding pressure on the roughness development has been investigated under the bombardment of 500 eV O 2 + beam with simultaneous sample rotation. Oxygen flooding had two competing effects on the surface roughening, i.e., enhancement of initiating roughening and suppression of roughening development, which were suggested to be described by the onset depth z on and transient width w tr of surface roughening. Both z on and w tr decreased as oxygen flooding pressure increased. As the result, surface roughening was most pronounced at the intermediate pressure from 4.4E-5 Pa to 5.8E-5 Pa. The surface roughening is negligible while without flooding or with flooding at the saturated pressure. No flooding is preferable for depth profiling ultra-shallow B implantation because of the better B profile shape and short analysis time

  18. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  19. Erosive gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, S.H.; Conrad, C.; Kjoergaad, J.

    1982-01-01

    Erosive gastritis is a well-defined radiologic and endoscopic entity. It is one of the common causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, yet it is seldom diagnosed and often confused with a number of other diseases. This communication re-emphasizes the characteristic endoscopic and radiologic features of erosive gastritis and its differential diagnosis. Two representative cases are reported. (orig.)

  20. Erosive gastritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, S.H.; Conrad, C.; Kjoergaad, J.

    1982-08-01

    Erosive gastritis is a well-defined radiologic and endoscopic entity. It is one of the common causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, yet it is seldom diagnosed and often confused with a number of other diseases. This communication re-emphasizes the characteristic endoscopic and radiologic features of erosive gastritis and its differential diagnosis. Two representative cases are reported.

  1. Evaluation of the Thickness and Oxygen Transmission Rate before and after Thermoforming Mono- and Multi-layer Sheets into Trays with Variable Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke Buntinx

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During thermoforming, plastic sheets are heated and subsequently deformed through the application of mechanical stretching and/or pressure. This process directly impacts sheet properties such as material thickness in walls, corners, and bottom, crystallinity in the constituent layers, and particularly the oxygen gas permeability. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of thermoforming on thickness and oxygen transmission rate (OTR of selected packaging materials (polypropylene (PP; PP/ethylene-vinyl alcohol co-polymer/PP (PP/EVOH/PP; polystyrene/EVOH/polyethylene (PS/EVOH/PE; amorphous polyethylene terephtalate/PE (APET/PE; APET/PE/EVOH/PE; polyamide/PE (PA/PE; and (PE/PA/EVOH/PA/PE. These materials were extruded in two different thicknesses and thermoformed into trays with the same top dimensions and variable depths of 25, 50, and/or 75 mm and a 50 mm tray with a variable radius of the corners. The distribution of the material thickness in the trays was visualized, showing the locations that were most affected by the deep drawn process. The OTR results indicate that the calculated OTR, based on a homogeneous material distribution, can be used as a rough approximation of the measured OTR. However, detailed analysis of crystallization and unequal thinning, which is also related to the tray design, remains necessary to explain the deviation of the measured OTR as compared to the predicted one.

  2. Hydrogen in oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper - Charging techniques, hydrogen contents and modelling of hydrogen diffusion and depth profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Aasa [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Sandstroem, Rolf [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Div. of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Lilja, Christina [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    In Sweden spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of by encapsulating in cast iron inserts protected by a copper shell. The copper can be exposed to hydrogen released during corrosion processes in the inserts. If the hydrogen is taken up by the copper, it could lead to hydrogen embrittlement. Specimens from oxygen-free copper have been hydrogen charged using two different methods. The purpose was to investigate how hydrogen could be introduced into copper in a controlled way. The thermal charging method resulted in a reduction of the initial hydrogen content. After electrochemical charging of cylindrical specimens, the measured hydrogen content was 2.6 wt. ppm which should compared with 0.6 wt. ppm before charging. The retained hydrogen after two weeks was reduced by nearly 40%. Recently the paper 'Hydrogen depth profile in phosphorus-doped, oxygen-free copper after cathodic charging' (Martinsson and Sandstrom, 2012) has been published. The paper describes experimental results for bulk specimens as well as presenting a model. Almost all the hydrogen is found to be located less than 100 {mu}m from the surface. This model is used to interpret the experimental results on foils in the present report. Since the model is fully based on fundamental equations, it can be used to analyse what happens in new situations. In this report the effect of the charging intensity, the grain size, the critical nucleus size for hydrogen bubble formation as well as the charging time are analysed.

  3. Hydrogen in oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper-Charging techniques, hydrogen contents and modelling of hydrogen diffusion and depth profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinsson, Aasa; Sandstroem, Rolf; Lilja, Christina

    2013-01-01

    In Sweden spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of by encapsulating in cast iron inserts protected by a copper shell. The copper can be exposed to hydrogen released during corrosion processes in the inserts. If the hydrogen is taken up by the copper, it could lead to hydrogen embrittlement. Specimens from oxygen-free copper have been hydrogen charged using two different methods. The purpose was to investigate how hydrogen could be introduced into copper in a controlled way. The thermal charging method resulted in a reduction of the initial hydrogen content. After electrochemical charging of cylindrical specimens, the measured hydrogen content was 2.6 wt. ppm which should compared with 0.6 wt. ppm before charging. The retained hydrogen after two weeks was reduced by nearly 40%. Recently the paper 'Hydrogen depth profile in phosphorus-doped, oxygen-free copper after cathodic charging' (Martinsson and Sandstrom, 2012) has been published. The paper describes experimental results for bulk specimens as well as presenting a model. Almost all the hydrogen is found to be located less than 100 μm from the surface. This model is used to interpret the experimental results on foils in the present report. Since the model is fully based on fundamental equations, it can be used to analyse what happens in new situations. In this report the effect of the charging intensity, the grain size, the critical nucleus size for hydrogen bubble formation as well as the charging time are analysed

  4. Engineering zonal cartilaginous tissue by modulating oxygen levels and mechanical cues through the depth of infrapatellar fat pad stem cell laden hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lu; O'Reilly, Adam R; Thorpe, Stephen D; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    Engineering tissues with a structure and spatial composition mimicking those of native articular cartilage (AC) remains a challenge. This study examined if infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells (FPSCs) can be used to engineer cartilage grafts with a bulk composition and a spatial distribution of matrix similar to the native tissue. In an attempt to mimic the oxygen gradients and mechanical environment within AC, FPSC-laden hydrogels (either 2 mm or 4 mm in height) were confined to half of their thickness and/or subjected to dynamic compression (DC). Confining FPSC-laden hydrogels was predicted to accentuate the gradient in oxygen tension through the depth of the constructs (higher in the top and lower in the bottom), leading to enhanced glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen synthesis in 2 mm high tissues. When subjected to DC alone, both GAG and collagen accumulation increased within 2 mm high unconfined constructs. Furthermore, the dynamic modulus of constructs increased from 0.96 MPa to 1.45 MPa following the application of DC. There was no synergistic benefit of coupling confinement and DC on overall levels of matrix accumulation; however in all constructs, irrespective of their height, the combination of these boundary conditions led to the development of engineered tissues that spatially best resembled native AC. The superficial region of these constructs mimicked that of native tissue, staining weakly for GAG, strongly for type II collagen, and in 4 mm high tissues more intensely for proteoglycan 4 (lubricin). This study demonstrated that FPSCs respond to joint-like environmental conditions by producing cartilage tissues mimicking native AC. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  6. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf

    2009-12-01

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  7. Interrill soil erosion processes on steep slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    To date interrill erosion processes and regimes are not fully understood. The objectives are to 1) identify the erosion regimes and limiting processes between detachment and transport on steep slopes, 2) characterize the interactive effects between rainfall intensity and flow depth on sediment trans...

  8. Erhversbetinget erosion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Gjørup, Hans; Nyvad, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Baggrund – I forbindelse med dental erosion er en grundig udredning af patienten vigtig, således at årsagen til erosionernes opståen findes, og der kan iværksættes adækvat forebyggende indsats. En sådan udredning er ikke mindst vigtig, når arbejdsmiljøet mistænkes. Patienttilfælde – En 30-årig...... arbejdsskade, men ikke anerkendt, da erosioner ikke er optaget på Arbejdsskadestyrelsens liste over erhvervssygdomme. En systematisk registrering af lignende tilfælde kunne imidlertid på sigt ændre retspraksis for fremtidige patienter med arbejdsbetinget erosion....... patient, der arbejder som pladesmed, blev henvist til Landsdels- og Videnscenter, Århus Sygehus, med henblik på udredning af patientens kraftige slid. Patienten udviste ikke-alderssvarende tandslid af emalje og dentin svarende til erosion forårsaget af syredampe i arbejdsmiljøet, muligvis forstærket af...

  9. Space Flight Experiments to Measure Polymer Erosion and Contamination on Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Maura C.; Youngstrom, Erica E.; Marx, Laura M.; Hammerstrom, Anne M.; Finefrock, Katherine D.; Youngstrom, Christiane A.; Kaminski, Carolyn; Fine, Elizabeth S.; Hunt, Patricia K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic oxygen erosion and silicone contamination are serious issues that could damage or destroy spacecraft components after orbiting for an extended period of time, such as on a space station or satellite. An experiment, the Polymer Erosion And Contamination Experiment (PEACE) will be conducted to study the effects of atomic oxygen (AO) erosion and silicone contamination, and it will provide information and contribute to a solution for these problems. PEACE will fly 43 different polymer materials that will be analyzed for AO erosion effects through two techniques: mass loss measurement and recession depth measurement. Pinhole cameras will provide information about the arrival direction of AO, and silicone contamination pinhole cameras will identify the source of silicone contamination on a spacecraft. All experimental hardware will be passively exposed to AO for up to two weeks in the actual space environment when it flies in the bay of a space shuttle. A second set of the PEACE Polymers is being exposed to the space environment for erosion yield determination as part of a second experiment, Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). MISSE is a collaboration between several federal agencies and aerospace companies. During a space walk on August 16, 2001, MISSE was attached to the outside of the International Space Station (ISS) during an extravehicular activity (EVA), where it began its exposure to AO for approximately 1.5 years. The PEACE polymers, therefore, will be analyzed after both short-term and long-term AO exposures for a more complete study of AO effects.

  10. Definition of tolerable soil erosion values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sparovek

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the criteria for defining erosion tolerance are well established, the limits generally used are not consistent with natural, economical and technological conditions. Rates greater than soil formation can be accepted only until a minimum of soil depth is reached, provided that they are not associated with environmental hazard or productivity losses. A sequence of equations is presented to calculate erosion tolerance rates through time. The selection of equation parameters permits the definition of erosion tolerance rates in agreement with environmental, social and technical needs. The soil depth change that is related to irreversible soil degradation can be calculated. The definition of soil erosion tolerance according to these equations can be used as a guideline for sustainable land use planning and is compatible with expert systems.

  11. [Functional state of various physiological systems of the human body during respiration of neon-oxygen mixture at depth up to 400 meters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleshuk, I P; Genin, A M; Unku, R D; Mikhnenko, A E; Sementsov, V N; Suvorov, A V

    1991-01-01

    Hyperbaric neon-oxygen mixture has been studied for the effect of its high density under pressure of 41 ata on basic physiological functions of human organism. Typical changes of the cardiorespiratory system and tissue respiration parameters are revealed. Changes in physical working capacity are shown. Exposure to gaseous medium of high pressure and density is accompanied by the development of some compensatory-adaptive reactions. The possibility to perform mid-hard physical work is attained with overstrain of respiration and circulation function.

  12. Maps showing predicted probabilities for selected dissolved oxygen and dissolved manganese threshold events in depth zones used by the domestic and public drinking water supply wells, Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosecrans, Celia Z.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Gronberg, JoAnn M.

    2018-01-31

    The purpose of the prediction grids for selected redox constituents—dissolved oxygen and dissolved manganese—are intended to provide an understanding of groundwater-quality conditions at the domestic and public-supply drinking water depths. The chemical quality of groundwater and the fate of many contaminants is influenced by redox processes in all aquifers, and understanding the redox conditions horizontally and vertically is critical in evaluating groundwater quality. The redox condition of groundwater—whether oxic (oxygen present) or anoxic (oxygen absent)—strongly influences the oxidation state of a chemical in groundwater. The anoxic dissolved oxygen thresholds of water, making drinking water undesirable with respect to taste, staining, or scaling. Three dissolved manganese thresholds, supply water wells. The 50 µg/L event threshold represents the secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) benchmark for manganese (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2017; California Division of Drinking Water, 2014), whereas the 300 µg/L event threshold represents the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) health-based screening level (HBSL) benchmark, used to put measured concentrations of drinking-water contaminants into a human-health context (Toccalino and others, 2014). The 150 µg/L event threshold represents one-half the USGS HBSL. The resultant dissolved oxygen and dissolved manganese prediction grids may be of interest to water-resource managers, water-quality researchers, and groundwater modelers concerned with the occurrence of natural and anthropogenic contaminants related to anoxic conditions. Prediction grids for selected redox constituents and thresholds were created by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) modeling and mapping team.

  13. Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrite, pH, alkalinity, bottom depth, and meteorology data collected from Arctic Seas and North Western Pacific by various Soviet Union institutions from 1925-11-16 to 1989-05-18 (NODC Accession 0075099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrite, pH, alkalinity, bottom depth, and meteorology data collected from Arctic Seas and North Western Pacific...

  14. Molybdenum erosion measurements in Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, W.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); LaBombard, B.; Lipshultz, B.; Pappas, D.; Pitcher, C.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); McCracken, G.M. [JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1998-05-01

    Erosion of molybdenum was measured on a set of 21 tiles after a run campaign of 1,090 shots in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The net erosion of molybdenum, was determined from changes in the depth of a thin chromium marker layer measured by Rutherford backscattering. Net Mo erosion was found to be approximately 150 nm near the outer divertor strike point, and much less everywhere else. Gross erosion rates by sputtering were estimated using ion energies and fluxes obtained from Langmuir probe measurements of edge-plasma conditions. Predicted net erosion using calculated gross erosion with prompt redeposition and measured net erosion agree within a factor of 3. Sputtering by boron and molybdenum impurities dominates erosion.

  15. Rainfall Erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall is one the main drivers of soil erosion. The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the Rfactor in the USLE model and its revised version, RUSLE. At national...... and continental levels, the scarce availability of data obliges soil erosion modellers to estimate this factor based on rainfall data with only low temporal resolution (daily, monthly, annual averages). The purpose of this study is to assess rainfall erosivity in Europe in the form of the RUSLE R-factor, based...

  16. Oxygen isotopic distribution along the otolith growth axis by secondary ion mass spectrometry: Applications for studying ontogenetic change in the depth inhabited by deep-sea fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, Jen-Chieh; Itoh, Shoichi; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki; Liao, Yun-Chih

    2014-02-01

    This study using tuna otoliths as working standards established a high lateral resolution and precision analysis to measure δ18Ootolith by secondary ion mass spectrometry. This analytical approach of the ion probe was applied to deep-sea fishes to reconstruct the likely depths inhabited by the fishes at different life history stages based on the measured δ18Ootolith values as a proxy of water temperature. Dramatic increases up to 5-6‰ in δ18Ootolith, representing a temperature decrease of approximately 20 °C, were detected in a blind cusk eel (Barathronus maculatus) otolith and in the otoliths of Synaphobranchus kaupii during leptocephalus metamorphosis to glass eel, inferred from the drop of otolith Sr/Ca ratios and increase of otolith growth increment width. δ18Ootolith profiles clearly divided the fish's life history into a planktonic stage in the mixed layer of the ocean and a benthic stage on the deep-sea ocean bottom. The habitat shift signal was recorded within a 150 μm width of otolith growth zone, which was too narrow to be clearly detected by mechanical drilling and conventional isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. However, variations down to -7‰ were found in δ18Ootolith profiles as the result of Cs2+ beam sputter in the core and larval portions of the otoliths. Carbon mapping by electron probe microanalyzer and staining by toluidine blue suggested abundant proteins existed in the areas with anomaly negative δ18Ootolith values, which cannot be interpreted as a habitat change but due to the isotopic fractionation by O emission from the proteins. These results implied that careful design and understanding of the chemical composition of the analytical areas or tracks on the heterogeneous otolith was essential for highly accurate and precise analysis.

  17. Erosion resistance comparison of alternative surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česánek, Z.; Schubert, J.; Houdková, Š.

    2017-05-01

    Erosion is a process characterized by the particle separation and the damage of component functional surfaces. Thermal spraying technology HP/HVOF (High Pressure / High Velocity Oxygen Fuel) is commonly used for protection of component surfaces against erosive wear. Alloy as well as cermet based coatings meet the requirements for high erosion resistance. Wear resistance is in many cases the determining property of required component functioning. The application suitability of coating materials is particularly influenced by different hardness. This paper therefore presents an erosion resistance comparison of alloy and cermet based coatings. The coatings were applied on steel substrates and were subjected to the erosive test using the device for evaluation of material erosion resistance working on the principle of centrifugal erodent flow. Abrasive sand Al2O3 with grain size 212-250 μm was selected as an erosive material. For this purpose, the specimens were prepared by thermal spraying technology HP/HVOF using commercially available powders Stellite 6, NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-25%NiCr, Cr3C2-25%CoNiCrAlY, Hastelloy C-276 and experimental coating TiMoCN-29% Ni. Erosion resistance of evaluated coatings was compared with erosive resistance of 1.4923 high alloyed steel without nitridation and in nitrided state and further with surface treatment using technology PVD. According to the evaluation, the resulting erosive resistance depends not only on the selected erodent and surface protection, but also on the erodent impact angle.

  18. Mapping erosion from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.

    2007-01-01

    Soil erosion by water is the most important land degradation problem worldwide. Spatial information on erosion is required for defining effective soil and water conservation strategies. Satellite remote sensing can provide relevant input to regional erosion assessment. This thesis comprises a review

  19. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghili, B.

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  20. Assessing storm erosion hazards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranasinghe, Ranasinghe W M R J B; Callaghan, D.; Ciavola, Paolo; Coco, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The storm erosion hazard on coasts is usually expressed as an erosion volume and/or associated episodic coastline retreat. The accurate assessment of present-day and future storm erosion volumes is a key task for coastal zone managers, planners and engineers. There are four main approaches that can

  1. RISK LEVEL ANALYSIS ON THE PREVENTIVE EROSION CAPACITY OF BRIDGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Deficiency of the Preventive Erosion Capacity (PEC) of a bridge pier is the main factor leading to bridge failures. In this paper, the PEC of bridge piers was analyzed using the stochastic analysis method. The definitions of the reliability and risk level of a bridge pier subjected to water erosion were proposed and a computational model for erosion depth and risk level in was suggested.

  2. Regionalization of monthly rainfall erosivity patternsin Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Simon; Alewell, Christine; Panagos, Panos; Meusburger, Katrin

    2016-10-01

    One major controlling factor of water erosion is rainfall erosivity, which is quantified as the product of total storm energy and a maximum 30 min intensity (I30). Rainfall erosivity is often expressed as R-factor in soil erosion risk models like the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and its revised version (RUSLE). As rainfall erosivity is closely correlated with rainfall amount and intensity, the rainfall erosivity of Switzerland can be expected to have a regional characteristic and seasonal dynamic throughout the year. This intra-annual variability was mapped by a monthly modeling approach to assess simultaneously spatial and monthly patterns of rainfall erosivity. So far only national seasonal means and regional annual means exist for Switzerland. We used a network of 87 precipitation gauging stations with a 10 min temporal resolution to calculate long-term monthly mean R-factors. Stepwise generalized linear regression (GLM) and leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) were used to select spatial covariates which explain the spatial and temporal patterns of the R-factor for each month across Switzerland. The monthly R-factor is mapped by summarizing the predicted R-factor of the regression equation and the corresponding residues of the regression, which are interpolated by ordinary kriging (regression-kriging). As spatial covariates, a variety of precipitation indicator data has been included such as snow depths, a combination product of hourly precipitation measurements and radar observations (CombiPrecip), daily Alpine precipitation (EURO4M-APGD), and monthly precipitation sums (RhiresM). Topographic parameters (elevation, slope) were also significant explanatory variables for single months. The comparison of the 12 monthly rainfall erosivity maps showed a distinct seasonality with the highest rainfall erosivity in summer (June, July, and August) influenced by intense rainfall events. Winter months have the lowest rainfall erosivity. A proportion of 62 % of

  3. Managing dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Donald A; Jayanetti, Jay; Chu, Raymond; Staninec, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The clinical signs of dental erosion are initially subtle, yet often progress because the patient remains asymptomatic, unaware and uninformed. Erosion typically works synergistically with abrasion and attrition to cause loss of tooth structure, making diagnosis and management complex. The purpose of this article is to outline clinical examples of patients with dental erosion that highlight the strategy of early identification, patient education and conservative restorative management. Dental erosion is defined as the pathologic chronic loss of dental hard tissues as a result of the chemical influence of exogenous or endogenous acids without bacterial involvement. Like caries or periodontal disease, erosion has a multifactorial etiology and requires a thorough history and examination for diagnosis. It also requires patient understanding and compliance for improved outcomes. Erosion can affect the loss of tooth structure in isolation of other cofactors, but most often works in synergy with abrasion and attrition in the loss of tooth structure (Table 1). Although erosion is thought to be an underlying etiology of dentin sensitivity, erosion and loss of tooth structure often occurs with few symptoms. The purpose of this article is threefold: first, to outline existing barriers that may limit early management of dental erosion. Second, to review the clinical assessment required to establish a diagnosis of erosion. And third, to outline clinical examples that review options to restore lost tooth structure. The authors have included illustrations they hope will be used to improve patient understanding and motivation in the early management of dental erosion.

  4. In vitro study on dental erosion provoked by various beverages using electron probe microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willershausen, B; Schulz-Dobrick, B

    2004-09-29

    Tooth erosion is often based on chemical processes, among others the use of soft drinks or diverse beverages. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyse the erosive potential of different acidic beverages. Over a time span of 6 hours, dental slices (n=6 slices per tooth) from fully retained wisdom teeth were incubated with different beverages (coca cola, ice tea with lemon, apple juice and white wine). The controls were incubated with a 0.9% sodium chloride solution under the same conditions (37 degrees C, humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 95% air). The quantitative elementary analysis for calcium, phosphorus, oxygen and other trace elements in the dental slices in various depths ranging from 5 to 50 microm was carried out using an electron probe micro-analyser (Jeol JXA 8900RL). A beverage-induced loss of minerals, particularly of the 2 main components calcium and phosphorus, especially in the uppermost layers of the enamel down to a depth of 30 microm could be observed. In the depth of 10 microm, the following total mineral loss could be determined: white wine (16%), coca cola (14.5%), apple juice (6.5%) and ice tea with lemon (6.5%). A direct correlation between the loss of minerals and the pH value of the beverages was not observed, because of the buffering effect of the drinks. The conversion of the weight percentages from the chemical analysis of Ca and P to their atomic percentages showed that during erosion the 2 main components were not dissolved in significantly different percentages. In this study the erosive potential of the tested soft drinks and other beverages could be demonstrated. However, it must be considered that numerous modifying factors influence the enamel surface, so an extrapolation from the in vitro study to an in vivo situation can only be applied with caution.

  5. The amount of glacial erosion of the bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paasse, Tore

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate an upper bound for the average erosion of fresh bedrock that can reasonably be expected during a glacial period or a single glaciation. The study is based on the assumption that classic sediments, formed by Scandinavian ice erosion during the Quaternary period, still exist within the formerly glaciated area or its periphery. The volume of these sediments thus constitutes the maximum average glacial erosion of bedrock within this area. This volume is calculated by estimating the thickness of the minerogenic Quaternary from well data in Sweden and Denmark and from seismic measurements in adjacent sea areas. The average thickness of the Quaternary deposits and other reogolith in the investigated area was estimated to 16 m. Assuming that the whole volume is the result of glacial erosion of fresh bedrock this corresponds to 12 m depth. However, a great part of the sediments may consist of glacially redistributed Tertiary regolith. As the amount of Tertiary regolith is uncertain the estimated maximum average glacial erosion rate in fresh bedrock is uncertain, and assuming that the total sediment volume is the result of glacial erosion leads to an overestimation of the glacial erosion depth. Considering this, the average glacial erosion during a full glacial period has been estimated to between 0.2 m and 4 m. If the extremes in the made assumptions are excluded the glacial erosion during a glacial cycle can be estimated to about 1 m

  6. The amount of glacial erosion of the bedrock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paasse, Tore [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate an upper bound for the average erosion of fresh bedrock that can reasonably be expected during a glacial period or a single glaciation. The study is based on the assumption that classic sediments, formed by Scandinavian ice erosion during the Quaternary period, still exist within the formerly glaciated area or its periphery. The volume of these sediments thus constitutes the maximum average glacial erosion of bedrock within this area. This volume is calculated by estimating the thickness of the minerogenic Quaternary from well data in Sweden and Denmark and from seismic measurements in adjacent sea areas. The average thickness of the Quaternary deposits and other reogolith in the investigated area was estimated to 16 m. Assuming that the whole volume is the result of glacial erosion of fresh bedrock this corresponds to 12 m depth. However, a great part of the sediments may consist of glacially redistributed Tertiary regolith. As the amount of Tertiary regolith is uncertain the estimated maximum average glacial erosion rate in fresh bedrock is uncertain, and assuming that the total sediment volume is the result of glacial erosion leads to an overestimation of the glacial erosion depth. Considering this, the average glacial erosion during a full glacial period has been estimated to between 0.2 m and 4 m. If the extremes in the made assumptions are excluded the glacial erosion during a glacial cycle can be estimated to about 1 m.

  7. Protection from erosion following wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Robichaud; William J. Elliot

    2006-01-01

    Erosion in the first year after a wildfire can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than the erosion from undisturbed forests. To mitigate potential postfire erosion, various erosion control treatments are applied on highly erodible areas with downstream resources in need of protection. Because postfire erosion rates generally decline by an order of magnitude for...

  8. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  9. Scales and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a need to develop scale explicit understanding of erosion to overcome existing conceptual and methodological flaws in our modelling methods currently applied to understand the process of erosion, transport and deposition at the catchment scale. These models need to be based on a sound under...

  10. Saliva and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Hannas, Angélicas Reis; Kato, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  11. Dental erosion among 12 year-old Libyan schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huew, R; Waterhouse, P J; Moynihan, P J; Maguire, A

    2012-12-01

    As there are limited data on dental erosion in Libya, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and severity of dental erosion in a sample of 12 year-old children in Benghazi, Libya. Cross-sectional observational study. Elementary schools in Benghazi, Libya. A random sample of 791 12 year-old children (397 boys and 394 girls) attending 36 schools. Clinical dental examination for erosion using UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2000) criteria and self-completion questionnaire. The area and depth of dental erosion affecting the labial and palatal surfaces of the upper permanent incisors and occlusal surfaces of the first permanent molars. Dental erosion was observed in 40.8% of subjects; into enamel affecting 32.5%, into dentine affecting 8.0% and into pulp affecting 0.3% of subjects. Based on area affected, 323 subjects (40.8%) exhibited dental erosion (code > 0), with 32.6% of these subjects having erosion affecting more than two thirds of one or more surfaces examined. Mean total scores for dental erosion for all surfaces per mouth by area and by depth were both 2.69 (sd 3.81). Of the 9492 tooth surfaces examined, 2128 surfaces (22.4%) had dental erosion. Girls had more experience of erosion than boys at all levels of severity (p = 0.001). In a cohort of 12 year-old Libyan schoolchildren, more than one third of children examined showed dental erosion, requiring clinical preventive counselling. Significantly more erosion occurred in girls than boys.

  12. Measurement of erosion: Is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reasons for erosion measurements are: (1) to determine the environmental impact of erosion and conservation practices, (2) scientific erosion research; (3) development and evaluation of erosion control technology; (4) development of erosion prediction technology and (5) allocation of conservation

  13. Numerical modelling of concentrated leak erosion during Hole Erosion Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Mercier, F.; Bonelli, S.; Golay, F.; Anselmet, F.; Philippe, P.; Borghi, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the numerical modelling of concentrated leak erosion of a cohesive soil by a turbulent flow in axisymmetrical geometry, with application to the Hole Erosion Test (HET). The numerical model is based on adaptive remeshing of the water/soil interface to ensure accurate description of the mechanical phenomena occurring near the soil/water interface. The erosion law governing the interface motion is based on two erosion parameters: the critical shear stress and the erosion co...

  14. Rainfall erosivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Meusburger, Katrin; Klik, Andreas; Rousseva, Svetla; Tadić, Melita Perčec; Michaelides, Silas; Hrabalíková, Michaela; Olsen, Preben; Aalto, Juha; Lakatos, Mónika; Rymszewicz, Anna; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Beguería, Santiago; Alewell, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall is one the main drivers of soil erosion. The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the R-factor in the USLE model and its revised version, RUSLE. At national and continental levels, the scarce availability of data obliges soil erosion modellers to estimate this factor based on rainfall data with only low temporal resolution (daily, monthly, annual averages). The purpose of this study is to assess rainfall erosivity in Europe in the form of the RUSLE R-factor, based on the best available datasets. Data have been collected from 1541 precipitation stations in all European Union (EU) Member States and Switzerland, with temporal resolutions of 5 to 60 min. The R-factor values calculated from precipitation data of different temporal resolutions were normalised to R-factor values with temporal resolutions of 30 min using linear regression functions. Precipitation time series ranged from a minimum of 5 years to a maximum of 40 years. The average time series per precipitation station is around 17.1 years, the most datasets including the first decade of the 21st century. Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) has been used to interpolate the R-factor station values to a European rainfall erosivity map at 1 km resolution. The covariates used for the R-factor interpolation were climatic data (total precipitation, seasonal precipitation, precipitation of driest/wettest months, average temperature), elevation and latitude/longitude. The mean R-factor for the EU plus Switzerland is 722 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1), with the highest values (>1000 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1)) in the Mediterranean and alpine regions and the lowest (<500 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1)) in the Nordic countries. The erosivity density (erosivity normalised to annual precipitation amounts) was also the highest in Mediterranean regions which implies high risk for erosive events and floods

  15. Illuminating wildfire erosion and deposition patterns with repeat terrestrial lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengers, Francis K.; Tucker, G.E.; Moody, J.A.; Ebel, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Erosion following a wildfire is much greater than background erosion in forests because of wildfire-induced changes to soil erodibility and water infiltration. While many previous studies have documented post-wildfire erosion with point and small plot-scale measurements, the spatial distribution of post-fire erosion patterns at the watershed scale remains largely unexplored. In this study lidar surveys were collected periodically in a small, first-order drainage basin over a period of 2 years following a wildfire. The study site was relatively steep with slopes ranging from 17° to > 30°. During the study period, several different types of rain storms occurred on the site including low-intensity frontal storms (2.4 mm h−1) and high-intensity convective thunderstorms (79 mm h−1). These storms were the dominant drivers of erosion. Erosion resulting from dry ravel and debris flows was notably absent at the site. Successive lidar surveys were subtracted from one another to obtain digital maps of topographic change between surveys. The results show an evolution in geomorphic response, such that the erosional response after rain storms was strongly influenced by the previous erosional events and pre-fire site morphology. Hillslope and channel roughness increased over time, and the watershed armored as coarse cobbles and boulders were exposed. The erosional response was spatially nonuniform; shallow erosion from hillslopes (87% of the study area) contributed 3 times more sediment volume than erosion from convergent areas (13% of the study area). However, the total normalized erosion depth (volume/area) was highest in convergent areas. From a detailed understanding of the spatial locations of erosion, we made inferences regarding the processes driving erosion. It appears that hillslope erosion is controlled by rain splash (for detachment) and overland flow (for transport and quasi-channelized erosion), with the sites of highest erosion corresponding to locations

  16. 137Cs profiles in erosion plots with different soil cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrello, A.C.; Appoloni, C.R.; Cassol, E.A.; Melquiades, F.L.

    2006-01-01

    Cesium-137 methodology has been successfully used to assess soil erosion. Seven erosion plots were sampled to determine the 137 Cs profile and to assess the erosion rates. Cesium-137 profile for native pasture plot showed an exponential decline below 5 cm depth, with little 137 Cs activity in the superficial layer (0-5 cm). Cesium-137 profile for wheat-soybean rotation plot in conventional tillage showed a uniform distribution with depth. For this plot, the soil loss occurs more in middle than upper and lower level. Cesium-137 profile for wheat-soybean rotation and wheat-maize rotation plots in no-tillage showed a similar result to the native pasture, with a minimum soil loss in the superficial layer. Cesium-137 profile for bare soil and cultivated pasture plots are similar, with a soil erosion rate of 229 t ha -1 year -1 . In the plots with a conventional tillage a greater soil loss occur in middle than upper and lower level. In no-tillage cultivation plots occurs soil loss in lower level, but no sign of soil loss neither gain in the upper level is observed. Cesium-137 methodology is a good tool to assess soil erosion and the 137 Cs profile gives a possibility to understand the soil erosion behavior in erosion plots. (author)

  17. Coastal Erosion Control Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, V.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal erosion is bad because the ecosystem there will be washed away and the animals could drown or be displaced and have to adapt to a new ecosystem that they are not prepared for. I'm interested in this problem because if there aren't beaches when I grow up I won't be able to do the things I would really like to do. I would like to be a marine biologist. Secondly, I don't want to see beach houses washed away. I would like to see people live in harmony with their environment. So, to study ways in which to preserve beaches I will make and use models that test different erosion controls. Two different ideas for erosion control I tested are using seaweed or a rock berm. I think the rock berm will work better than the model of seaweed because the seaweed is under water and the waves can carry the sand over the seaweed, and the rock berm will work better because the rocks will help break the waves up before they reach the shore and the waves can not carry the sand over the rocks that are above the water. To investigate this I got a container to use to model the Gulf of Mexico coastline. I performed several test runs using sand and water in the container to mimic the beach and waves from the Gulf of Mexico hitting the shoreline. I did three trials for the control (no erosion control), seaweed and a rock berm. Rock berms are a border of a raised area of rock. The model for seaweed that I used was plastic shopping bags cut into strips and glued to the bottom of my container to mimic seaweed. My results were that the control had the most erosion which ranged from 2.75 - 3 inches over 3 trials. The seaweed was a little better than the control but was very variable and ranged from 1.5 - 3 inches over 3 trials. The rock berm worked the best out of all at controlling erosion with erosion ranging from 1.5 - 2 inches. My hypothesis was correct because the rock berm did best to control erosion compared to the control which had no erosion control and the model with seaweed.

  18. Erosive Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauskar, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    Lichen planus is an inflammatory mucocutaneous condition with a myriad of clinical manifestations. There are 3 forms of lichen planus that effect the vulva: papulosquamous, hypertrophic, and erosive. Erosive lichen planus can progress to vulvar scaring, vaginal stenosis, and squamous cell carcinoma; these long-term sequelae cause sexual distress, depression, and decreased quality of life for patients. Diagnosis is often delayed because of patient embarrassment or clinician misdiagnosis. Early recognition and treatment is essential to decreasing the morbidity of this condition. Multimodal treatment, along with a multidisciplinary approach, will improve outcomes and further clinical advances in studying this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mesh erosion after abdominal sacrocolpopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, N; Walsh, P M; Roat, T W; Karram, M M

    1998-12-01

    To report our experience with erosion of permanent suture or mesh material after abdominal sacrocolpopexy. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify patients who underwent sacrocolpopexy by the same surgeon over 8 years. Demographic data, operative notes, hospital records, and office charts were reviewed after sacrocolpopexy. Patients with erosion of either suture or mesh were treated initially with conservative therapy followed by surgical intervention as required. Fifty-seven patients underwent sacrocolpopexy using synthetic mesh during the study period. The mean (range) postoperative follow-up was 19.9 (1.3-50) months. Seven patients (12%) had erosions after abdominal sacrocolpopexy with two suture erosions and five mesh erosions. Patients with suture erosion were asymptomatic compared with patients with mesh erosion, who presented with vaginal bleeding or discharge. The mean (+/-standard deviation) time to erosion was 14.0+/-7.7 (range 4-24) months. Both patients with suture erosion were treated conservatively with estrogen cream. All five patients with mesh erosion required transvaginal removal of the mesh. Mesh erosion can follow abdominal sacrocolpopexy over a long time, and usually presents as vaginal bleeding or discharge. Although patients with suture erosion can be managed successfully with conservative treatment, patients with mesh erosion require surgical intervention. Transvaginal removal of the mesh with vaginal advancement appears to be an effective treatment in patients failing conservative management.

  20. Erosion of dust aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seizinger, A.; Krijt, S.; Kley, W.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple

  1. Hydrology and soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard J. Lane; Mary R. Kidwell

    2003-01-01

    We review research on surface water hydrology and soil erosion at the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER). Almost all of the research was associated with eight small experimental watersheds established from 1974 to 1975 and operated until the present. Analysis of climatic features of the SRER supports extending research findings from the SRER to broad areas of the...

  2. Erosion scenarios for Wellenberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemenz, W.

    1993-09-01

    The proposed Wellenberg site for a radioactive waste repository is located between Altzellen in the Engelberger valley and the Oberrickenbach valley, in a thick Valanginian marl series. The marl is generally overlaid with unconsolidated rocks but reaches to the surface in some places. In contrast to the situation in the Oberbauenstock region this marl complex is not protected by an overlying erosion resistant series and exhibits a marked relief. The question therefore arises with respect to the Wellenberg site, to what extent will the marl (i.e. the repository host rock formation) be removed by erosion processes during the 100,000 years interval under consideration and what overburden will remain at the end of this period. This report presents the results of an investigation of the longterm behaviour of the proposed site in respect of those processes of erosion and deposition which can lead to changes in the terrain surface and its location relative to the repository. A wide range of possible scenarios encompassing different developments of climatic conditions during the 100,000 year period of interest, was investigated. In addition to the continuation of the present climate and the occurrence of a new ice age on the scale of the Wuerm glaciation the consequences of altered climatic conditions on erosion removal of the repository overburden were considered. Within the 100,000 year period of interest none of the scenarios considered leads to the exposure of the repository. (author) figs., tabs, refs

  3. Dune erosion above revetments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In a situation with a narrow dune, the dune base can be protected with a revetment to reduce dune erosion during extreme events. To quantify the effects of a revetment on storm impact, the functionality of the numerical storm impact model XBeach (Roelvink et al., 2009) is extended to account for the

  4. Spatial bedrock erosion distribution in a natural gorge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, A. R.; Turowski, J. M.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of morphological evolution both in terrestrial and planetary landscapes is of increasing interest in the geosciences. In mountainous regions, bedrock channel formation as a consequence of the interaction of uplift and erosion processes is fundamental for the entire surface evolution. Hence, the accurate description of bedrock channel development is important for landscape modelling. To verify existing concepts developed in the lab and to analyse how in situ channel erosion rates depend on the interrelations of discharge, sediment transport and topography, there is a need of highly resolved topographic field data. We analyse bedrock erosion over two years in a bedrock gorge downstream of the Gorner glacier above the town of Zermatt, Switzerland. At the study site, the Gornera stream cuts through a roche moutonnée in serpentine rock of 25m length, 5m width and 8m depth. We surveyed bedrock erosion rates using repeat terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) with an average point spacing of 5mm. Bedrock erosion rates in direction of the individual surface normals were studied directly on the scanned point clouds applying the M3C2 algorithm (Lague et al., 2013, ISPRS). The surveyed erosion patterns were compared to a simple stream erosivity visualisation obtained from painted bedrock sections at the study location. Spatially distributed erosion rates on bedrock surfaces based on millions of scan points allow deduction of millimeter-scale mean annual values of lateral erosion, incision and downstream erosion on protruding streambed surfaces. The erosion rate on a specific surface point is shown to depend on the position of this surface point in the channel's cross section, its height above the streambed and its spatial orientation to the streamflow. Abrasion by impacting bedload was likely the spatially dominant erosion process, as confirmed by the observed patterns along the painted bedrock sections. However, a single plucking event accounted for the half

  5. Bentonite erosion - Laboratory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, Mats

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonite clay is proposed as buffer material in the KBS-3 concept of storing spent nuclear fuel. Since the clay is plastic it will protect the canisters containing the spent fuel from movements in the rock. Furthermore, the clay will expand when taking up water, become very compact and hence limit the transport of solutes to and from the canister to only diffusion. The chemical stability of the bentonite barrier is of vital importance. If much material would be lost the barrier will lose its functions. As a side effect, lots of colloids will be released which may facilitate radionuclide transport in case of a breach in the canister. There are scenarios where during an ice age fresh melt water may penetrate down to repository depths with relatively high flow rates and not mix with older waters of high salinity. Under such conditions bentonite colloids will be more stable and there is a possibility that the bentonite buffer would start to disperse and bentonite colloids be carried away by the passing water. This work is a part of a larger project called Bentonite Erosion, initiated and supported by SKB. In this work several minor experiments have been performed in order to investigate the influence of for instance di-valent cations, gravity, etc. on the dispersion behaviour of bentonite and/or montmorillonite. A bigger experiment where the real situation was simulated using an artificial fracture was conducted. Two Plexiglas slabs were placed on top of each other, separated by plastic spacers. Bentonite was placed in a container in contact with a fracture. The bentonite was water saturated before deionized water was pumped through the fracture. The evolution of the bentonite profile in the fracture was followed visually. The eluate was collected in five different slots at the outlet side and analyzed for colloid concentration employing Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) and a Single Particle Counter (SPC). Some

  6. Categorization of erosion control matting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    Erosion control is a critical aspect of any Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) : construction project, with the extreme negative impacts of high sediment loads in natural : waterways having been well documented. A variety of erosion control ...

  7. Headcut erosive regimes influenced by groundwater on disturbed agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, D L

    2011-02-01

    A series of simulated rainfall experiments, testing several soils and slope gradients in a 10 m x 0.8m laboratory flume, displayed close correlations between initial development of a water table at a 10 cm depth and highly erosive headcut formation. On some soils and gradients, highly erosive headcuts formed consistently and predictably within minutes or seconds of initial water table rise. However, headcuts alone were not good indicators of increased erosion. In most experiments some headcuts formed early, often when surface hydraulic parameter values reached established rill initiation thresholds, but resulted in little or no erosion increase. Later, at initial water table rise, other headcuts formed coincident with major erosion increase, often with surface hydraulic values then less than rill initiation thresholds. On the four soils tested, highly erosive headcuts never formed without groundwater development, except on steep 9 ° slopes. Common visual indicators such as headcut morphology and headcut advance rates were not effective means of determining either erosion or the existence of groundwater. Only local monitoring of subsurface moisture conditions with micro-standpipes and TDR aided in determining headcut processes and erosive regimes. Groundwater-influenced headcut formation was likely caused by increased soil pore-water pressures and decreased soil shear strengths in surface rainflow, not by sapping or seepage from the soil matrix. Highly erosive headcuts can thus form under common agricultural conditions where reductions in permeability, such as plow pans, exist near the surface--without the need for saturated soils. Headcut erosive regimes were also significantly influenced by soil type and slope gradient, with the greatest effects of groundwater on moderate slopes and fairly permeable soils. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Numerical simulation of CFC and tungsten target erosion in ITER-FEAT divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filatov, V.

    2003-01-01

    Physical, chemical and thermal surface erosion for water-cooled target armoured by CFC and tungsten is simulated by numerical code ERosion OF Immolated Layer (EROFIL-1). Some calculation results on the CFC and tungsten vertical target (VT) erosion in the ITER-FEAT divertor are presented for various operation modes (normal operations, slow transients, ELMs and disruptions). The main erosion mechanisms of CFC armour are the chemical and sublimation ones. Maximum erosion depth per 3000 cycles during normal operations and slow transients is of 2.7 mm at H phase and of 13.5 mm at DT phase. An evaluation of VT tungsten armour erosion per 3000 cycles of H and DT operations shows that no physical or chemical erosion as well as no melting are expected for tungsten armour at normal operations and slow transients. The tungsten armour melting at 2x10 6 ELMs is not allowable. The 300 disruptions are not dangerous in view of evaporation

  9. Erosion on spark plug electrodes; Funkenerosion an Zuendkerzenelektroden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rager, J.

    2006-07-01

    Durability of spark plugs is mainly determined by spark gap widening, caused by electrode wear. Knowledge about the erosion mechanisms of spark plug materials is of fundamental interest for the development of materials with a high resistance against electrode erosion. It is therefore crucial to identify those parameters which significantly influence the erosion behaviour of a material. In this work, a reliable and reproducible testing method is presented which produces and characterizes electrode wear under well-defined conditions and which is capable of altering parameters specifically. Endurance tests were carried out to study the dependence of the wear behaviour of pure nickel and platinum on the electrode temperature, gas, electrode gap, electrode diameter, atmospheric pressure, and partial pressure of oxygen. It was shown that erosion under nitrogen is negligible, irrespective of the material. This disproves all common mechanism discussed in the literature explaining material loss of spark plug electrodes. Based on this observation and the variation of the mentioned parameters a new erosion model was deduced. This relies on an oxidation of the electrode material and describes the erosion of nickel and platinum separately. For nickel, electrode wear is caused by the removal of an oxide layer by the spark. In the case of platinum, material loss occurs due to the plasma-assisted formation and subsequent evaporation of volatile oxides in the cathode spot. On the basis of this mechanism a new composite material was developed whose erosion resistance is superior to pure platinum. Oxidation resistant metal oxide particles were added to a platinum matrix, thus leading to a higher erosion resistance of the composite. However, this can be decreased by a side reaction, the separation of oxygen from the metal oxides, which effectively assists the oxidation of the matrix. This reaction can be suppressed by using highly stable oxides, characterized by a large negative Gibbs

  10. Erosion corrision in water steam circuits - reasons and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitmann, H.G.; Kastner, W.

    An increased material erosion on tubes in steam generators, preheaters and condensers but also on turbine casings and connecting pipes of unalloyed and low-alloy steels occurs, to an essential extent, due to erosion-corrosion processes in the fluid-swept plant sections. On the one hand, they cause thinning of the material and sometimes leaks, on the other hand the erosion material leads to contamination of the water-steam cycle with its harmful consequences. The cause of erosion-corrosion is a dissolving corrosion due to the convective effect of pure fluid turbulences. The occurrence of erosion-corrosion is limited to such metallic materials, which are in need of oxide protection layers for their constancy. The cover layers are destroyed by erosive influence and the formation of new protection layers is prevented. At KWU, experimental studies of plates were carried out in the Benson test section to obtain information about the most important parameters of influence. These are in particular the flow velocity, the medium temperature and the water quality (pH value and oxygen content). Moreover, the resistivity of different materials has been compared and the resistance of magnetite protection layers to erosion-corrosion was examined. The results of these studies deliver fundamentals to avoid erosion-corrosion also in power plant engineering to the greatest possible extent. The following variants reveal to be important: 1. Use of chrome alloy materials. 2. Decrease of the flow velocity. 3. Increase of the pH value or the oxygen content. The importance of the test results for power plant engineering is briefly described. (orig.) [de

  11. A "1"3"7Cs erosion model with moving boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Chuan; Ji, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    A novel quantitative model of the relationship between diffused concentration changes and erosion rates using assessment of soil losses was developed. It derived from the analysis of surface soil "1"3"7Cs flux variation under persistent erosion effect and based on the principle of geochemistry kinetics moving boundary. The new moving boundary model improves the basic simplified transport model (Zhang et al., 2008), and mainly applies to uniform rainfall areas which show a long-time soil erosion. The simulation results for this kind of erosion show under a long-time soil erosion, the influence of "1"3"7Cs concentration will decrease exponentially with increasing depth. Using the new model fit to the measured "1"3"7Cs depth distribution data in Zunyi site, Guizhou Province, China which has typical uniform rainfall provided a good fit with R"2 = 0.92. To compare the soil erosion rates calculated by the simple transport model and the new model, we take the Kaixian reference profile as example. The soil losses estimated by the previous simplified transport model are greater than those estimated by the new moving boundary model, which is consistent with our expectations. - Highlights: • The diffused moving boundary principle analysing "1"3"7Cs flux variation. • The new erosion model applies to uniform rainfall areas. • The erosion effect on "1"3"7Cs will decrease exponentially with increasing depth. • The new model provides two methods of calculating erosion rate.

  12. Estimating soil erosion losses in Korea with fallout cesium-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, R.G.; Pilkyun Jung; Kwanshig Ryu; Kitai Um

    1987-01-01

    The contents of fallout 137 Cs in soil profiles were used to estimate erosion losses from steeply sloping croplands in Korea. Seven undisturbed sites with no apparent erosion or deposition, and 15 cropland sites were examined to a depth of 30 cm. The cropland sites had been cultivated for periods ranging from 5 to more than 80 y (median 10 y), and their slopes ranged from 5 to 26% (median 13%). All except one of the cropland sites contained less 137 Cs than undisturbed sites in the same area. Three cropland sites contained essentially no 137 Cs, indicating erosion of the entire cultivated layer of soil in from 6 to 10 years. Other cropland sites, particularly those with sandy texture, showed little loss of 137 Cs over longer periods of cultivation. Cesium-137 measurements may be useful in identifying site characteristics that reduce the vulnerability of sloping soils to erosion damage. (author)

  13. Protection of uranium tailings impoundments against overland erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, W.H.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This study investigates the problems involved in designing protection methods to prevent erosion of a uranium tailings impoundment cover from rainfall and runoff (overland flow) processes. The study addresses the side slopes and top surface as separate elements. The side slopes are more subject to gully erosion and require absolute protection such as that provided by rock riprap. The flatter top surface needs much less protection (vegetation/rock combinations) but some estimate of erosion rates are needed to compare alternatives. A literature review indicated that, currently, procedures are not available for the design of rock riprap to prevent gully erosion. Therefore, rock protection on the side slope will have to be based upon engineering judgment determined by the particular site conditions. The Manning-kinetic equations (velocity and depth of runoff) were investigated as a possible aid to the design of gully erosion protection. Guidelines are suggested for the use of rock riprap to prevent gully erosion. Three mathematical models were used to compute erosion rates for the top surface of a hypothetical tailings impoundment. The results recommend that one or possibly both of the regression models could be used to evaluate preliminary protection designs for the top surface. A physical process simulation model should be used for the final design. 30 refs., 13 figs., 16 tabs

  14. Prevalence and risk factors of dental erosion in American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Mariam; Hottel, Timothy L; Hong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and characteristics of dental erosion in children aged 2-4 years old and 12 years old. 243 subjects were recruited from daycare centers, preschools, and grade schools; they received dental examinations assessing their condition of dental erosion, including both depth and area of tooth surface loss on four maxillary incisors. Questionnaires were given to the subjects to obtain socio-demographic, oral health behaviors at home, and access to dental care. Dental erosion was analyzed and risk factors were assessed using Chi-Square and logistic regression analysis. The subjects were 60% Caucasians, 31% Black, 7% Hispanic and others were 2%. 34% of children could not get the dental care they needed within the past 12 months and 61% of all children brushed their teeth twice or more daily. Overall, 12% of study children had dental erosion with 13% for 2-4 years old and 10% for 12 years old, with the majority of erosive lesions within enamel. Family income (OR 3.98, p = 0.021) and acidic fruit juice consumption (OR 2.38, p = 0.038) were significant risk factors for dental erosion, even after controlling for other factors, such as source of drinking water and oral hygiene using logistic regression analysis. Dental erosion is a relatively common problem among the children in this study and it is seen as a multi-factorial process.

  15. Rainfall erosivity map for Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oduro Afriyie, K.

    1995-10-01

    Monthly rainfall data, spanning over a period of more than thirty years, were used to compute rainfall erosivity indices for various stations in Ghana, using the Fournier index, c, defined as p 2 /P, where p is the rainfall amount in the wettest month and P is the annual rainfall amount. Values of the rainfall erosivity indices ranged from 24.5 mm at Sunyani in the mid-portion of Ghana to 180.9 mm at Axim in the south western coastal portion. The indices were used to construct a rainfall erosivity map for the country. The map revealed that Ghana may be broadly divided into five major erosion risk zones. The middle sector of Ghana is generally in the low erosion risk zone; the northern sector is in the moderate to severe erosion risk zone, while the coastal sector is in the severe to extreme severe erosion risk zone. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Mechanisms of hypolimnion erosion in a deep lake (Lago Maggiore, N. Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta A. CARRARA

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Holo-oligomixis is one of the most important hydrodynamic characteristics of deep lakes in temperate regions, especially those of the Southern Alps. It influences such important lake chemical and biological processes as the oxygenation of deep layers, recycling of nutrients, vertical migration of plankton, and reproduction. Analysis of physico-chemical data from Lago Maggiore over the years 1951 – 2008 has shown that in addition to ever active but relatively inefficient convective mixing, three other mechanisms act to oxygenate this lake’s deep waters in winter. These are conveyor belt currents, cold and well-oxygenated tributary inflows that sink down to depths of equal density, and differential cooling of littoral waters that subsequently slide down the lake flanks. Their common outcome is to cause deep erosion of the hypolimnion. Heat content and thermal stability also are affected and are analyzed here in relation to external driving forces, examining in particular how dynamics may be altered by climate change.

  17. Erosion-corrosion synergistics in the low erosion regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corey, R.G.; Sethi, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Many engineering alloys display good high temperature corrosion resistance. However, when they are used in corrosive environments where they are subjected to erosion also, the corrosion resistance has been adversely affected. The phenomenon known as erosion-corrosion is complex and requires detailed investigation of how the erosion and corrosion kinetics interact and compete. At the Kentucky Center for Energy Research Laboratory, an erosion-corrosion tester was used to perform erosion-oxidation tests on 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel at 500-600 0 C using alumina abrasive at low velocities. The erosion-oxidation rate data and morphology of exposed surfaces are consistent with oxide chipping and fracturing being the mode of material loss

  18. Can we manipulate root system architecture to control soil erosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola, A.; Dodd, I. C.; Quinton, J. N.

    2015-09-01

    Soil erosion is a major threat to soil functioning. The use of vegetation to control erosion has long been a topic for research. Much of this research has focused on the above-ground properties of plants, demonstrating the important role that canopy structure and cover plays in the reduction of water erosion processes. Less attention has been paid to plant roots. Plant roots are a crucial yet under-researched factor for reducing water erosion through their ability to alter soil properties, such as aggregate stability, hydraulic function and shear strength. However, there have been few attempts to specifically manipulate plant root system properties to reduce soil erosion. Therefore, this review aims to explore the effects that plant roots have on soil erosion and hydrological processes, and how plant root architecture might be manipulated to enhance its erosion control properties. We demonstrate the importance of root system architecture for the control of soil erosion. We also show that some plant species respond to nutrient-enriched patches by increasing lateral root proliferation. The erosional response to root proliferation will depend upon its location: at the soil surface dense mats of roots may reduce soil erodibility but block soil pores thereby limiting infiltration, enhancing runoff. Additionally, in nutrient-deprived regions, root hair development may be stimulated and larger amounts of root exudates released, thereby improving aggregate stability and decreasing erodibility. Utilizing nutrient placement at specific depths may represent a potentially new, easily implemented, management strategy on nutrient-poor agricultural land or constructed slopes to control erosion, and further research in this area is needed.

  19. A terminological matter: paragenesis, antigravitative erosion or antigravitational erosion ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasini G.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the speleological literature three terms are utilized to designate the “ascending erosion”: paragenesis (= paragénésis, coined in1968, antigravitative erosion (= erosione antigravitativa, coined in 1966 and antigravitational erosion (wrong English translation ofthe Italian term erosione antigravitativa, utilized later on. The term paragenesis should be abandoned because of the priority of theterm erosione antigravitativa - on the ground of the “law of priority” – and because of its ambiguous etimology. On the other hand,the term antigravitational erosion should be forsaken in favour of the term antigravitative erosion, given the meaning that the termsgravitation and gravity have in Physics. Therefore, to designate the phenomenon of the “ascending erosion” there would be nothingleft but the term antigravitative erosion.The antigravitative erosion process and its recognizability are illustrated.Examples of caves with evident antigravitative erosion phenomena, developed in different karstifiable rocks and in several partsof the world, are given.It is recalled that the antigravitative erosion is a phenomenon well-known since 1942 and widely proven and supported, and that it isrelatively easy – in many cases - to recognize the antigravitative origin of karstic passages.It is stressed that the antigravitative erosion is an important phenomenon, exclusive of the karstic caves and unique in nature.

  20. Limited role for thermal erosion by turbulent lava in proximal Athabasca Valles, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Vincenzo; Williams, David A.; Dundas, Colin M.; Kestay, Laszlo P.

    2015-01-01

    The Athabasca Valles flood lava is among the most recent (Mars and was probably emplaced turbulently. The Williams et al. (2005) model of thermal erosion by lava has been applied to what we term “proximal Athabasca,” the 75 km long upstream portion of Athabasca Valles. For emplacement volumes of 5000 and 7500 km3and average flow thicknesses of 20 and 30 m, the duration of the eruption varies between ~11 and ~37 days. The erosion of the lava flow substrate is investigated for three eruption temperatures (1270°C, 1260°C, and 1250°C), and volatile contents equivalent to 0–65 vol % bubbles. The largest erosion depths of ~3.8–7.5 m are at the lava source, for 20 m thick and bubble-free flows that erupted at their liquidus temperature (1270°C). A substrate containing 25 vol % ice leads to maximum erosion. A lava temperature 20°C below liquidus reduces erosion depths by a factor of ~2.2. If flow viscosity increases with increasing bubble content in the lava, the presence of 30–50 vol % bubbles leads to erosion depths lower than those relative to bubble-free lava by a factor of ~2.4. The presence of 25 vol % ice in the substrate increases erosion depths by a factor of 1.3. Nevertheless, modeled erosion depths, consistent with the emplacement volume and flow duration constraints, are far less than the depth of the channel (~35–100 m). We conclude that thermal erosion does not appear to have had a major role in excavating Athabasca Valles.

  1. Superficial soil erosion assessment in agricultural land and bare land using 7Be fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marestoni, Luiz Diego

    2007-02-01

    Geologic and hydrologic phenomenon monitoring presents great environmental and financial interest and several radioisotopes, natural and artificial, have been used for this purpose. The more used are 137 Cs, 210 Pb not supported and 7 Be. In the present work, 7 Be was used to determine the soil erosion in three areas: one with soy ploughed at the direction of the slope, one with it perpendicular to the slope and one in an area with bare soil. 7 Be is a cosmogenic radionuclide, with half-life of 53.3 days, produced by spallation of oxygen and nitrogen by cosmic rays in the troposphere and stratosphere. 7 Be deposition occurs by dry and wet deposition, although wet deposition contributed by 95%. This can be verified through the measures of the 7 Be inventory correlated with the precipitation, which resulted in a good linear adjustment. The experimental set up consisted of two HPGe detectors: one with 66% of relative efficiency and one with 10% of relative efficiency, both detectors coupled to standard gamma ray spectrometry nuclear electronic chain. Soil samples were packed in 1 liter Marinelli beckers. Sampling was accomplished until the depth where 7 Be was present and it was possible to verify that its penetration in the soils could be very well adjusted by an exponential type function. The maximum beryllium-7 penetration in the bare soil without sign of soil erosion was 3 cm, that is, beryllium-7 is a useful tool as tracer for superficial soil erosion determination. The constant of mass relaxation h 0 was determined as 4.71 ± 0.36, result that is in agreement with other works in the international literature. It was verified that when the soy is ploughed perpendicular to the slope, the soil redistribution rate is smaller, resulting in economic advantage. The bare soil is very exposed to the erosion, because does not exist any barrier to contain the soil that flows at the direction of the slope, such fact was verified in this work, where it was determined that the

  2. Anthropogenic Increase Of Soil Erosion In The Gangetic Plain Revealed By Geochemical Budget Of Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, V.; France-Lanord, C.; Galy, A.; Gaillardet, J.

    2007-12-01

    Tectonic and climatic factors are the key natural variables controlling the erosion through complex interactions. Nonetheless, over the last few hundred years, human activity also exerts a dominant control in response to extensive land use. The geochemical budget of erosion allows the balance between the different erosion processes to be quantified. The chemical composition of river sediment results from the chemical composition of the source rock modified by (1) weathering reactions occurring during erosion and (2) physical segregation during transport. If erosion is at steady state, the difference between the chemical composition of source rocks and that of river sediments must therefore be counterbalanced by the dissolved flux. However, climatic variations or anthropic impact can induce changes in the erosion distribution in a given basin resulting in non steady state erosion. Using a mass balance approach, the comparison of detailed geochemical data on river sediments with the current flux of dissolved elements allows the steady state hypothesis to be tested. In this study, we present a geochemical budget of weathering for the Ganga basin, one of the most densely populated basin in the world, based on detailed sampling of Himalayan rivers and of the Ganga in the delta. Sampling includes depth profile in the river, to assess the variability generated by transport processes. Himalayan river sediments are described by the dilution of an aluminous component (micas + clays + feldspars) by quartz. Ganga sediments on the other hand correspond to the mixing of bedload, similar to coarse Himalayan sediments, with an aluminous component highly depleted in alkaline elements. Compared with the dissolved flux, the depletion of alkaline elements in Ganga sediments shows that the alkaline weathering budget is imbalanced. This imbalance results from an overabundance of fine soil material in the Ganga sediment relative to other less weathered material directly derived from

  3. Experimental comparison of cavitation erosion rates of different steels used in hydraulic turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ton-That, L

    2010-01-01

    The prediction of cavitation erosion rates has an important role in order to evaluate the exact life of components in fluid machineries. Hydro-Quebec has studied this phenomenon for several years, in particular in hydraulic turbine runners, to try to understand the different degradation mechanisms related to this phenomenon. This paper presents part of this work. In this study, we carried out experimental erosion tests to compare different steels used in actual hydraulic turbine runners (carbon steels, austenitic and martensitic stainless steels) to high strength steels in terms of cavitation erosion resistance. The results for these different classes of steels are presented. The tests have been performed in a cavitating liquid jet apparatus according to the ASTM G134-95 standard to simulate the flow conditions. The mass loss has been followed during the exposure time. The maximum depth of erosion, the mean depth of erosion, and the mean depth erosion rate are determined. As a result we found that ASTM-A514 high strength steels present excellent cavitation erosion resistance properties. The cavitation eroded surface is followed by optical profilometry technique. Determination of mechanical properties and examinations of the eroded surfaces of the samples have also been carried out in order to identify the erosion mechanisms involved in the degradation of these kinds of materials.

  4. Erosion in extruder flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Miron; Fodor, Petru S.

    A detailed analysis of the fluid flow in Tadmor's unwound channel model of the single screw extruder is performed by combining numerical and analytical methods. Using the analytical solution for the longitudinal velocity field (in the limit of zero Reynolds number) allows us to devote all the computational resources solely for a detailed numerical solution of the transversal velocity field. This high resolution 3D model of the fluid flow in a single-screw extruder allows us to identify the position and extent of Moffatt eddies that impede mixing. We further consider the erosion of particles (e.g. carbon-black agglomerates) advected by the polymeric flow. We assume a particle to be made of primary fragments bound together. In the erosion process a primary fragment breaks out of a given particle. Particles are advected by the laminar flow and they disperse because of the shear stresses imparted by the fluid. The time evolution of the numbers of particles of different sizes is described by the Bateman coupled differential equations used to model radioactivity. Using the particle size distribution we compute an entropic fragmentation index which varies from 0 for a monodisperse system to 1 for an extreme poly-disperse system.

  5. Hydrologic controls on equilibrium soil depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicótina, L.; Tarboton, D. G.; Tesfa, T. K.; Rinaldo, A.

    2011-04-01

    This paper deals with modeling the mutual feedbacks between runoff production and geomorphological processes and attributes that lead to patterns of equilibrium soil depth. Our primary goal is an attempt to describe spatial patterns of soil depth resulting from long-term interactions between hydrologic forcings and soil production, erosion, and sediment transport processes under the framework of landscape dynamic equilibrium. Another goal is to set the premises for exploiting the role of soil depths in shaping the hydrologic response of a catchment. The relevance of the study stems from the massive improvement in hydrologic predictions for ungauged basins that would be achieved by using directly soil depths derived from geomorphic features remotely measured and objectively manipulated. Hydrological processes are here described by explicitly accounting for local soil depths and detailed catchment topography. Geomorphological processes are described by means of well-studied geomorphic transport laws. The modeling approach is applied to the semiarid Dry Creek Experimental Watershed, located near Boise, Idaho. Modeled soil depths are compared with field data obtained from an extensive survey of the catchment. Our results show the ability of the model to describe properly the mean soil depth and the broad features of the distribution of measured data. However, local comparisons show significant scatter whose origins are discussed.

  6. Rill erosion rates in burned forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph W. Wagenbrenner; Peter R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Wildfires often produce large increases in runoff and erosion rates (e.g., Moody and Martin, 2009), and land managers need to predict the frequency and magnitude of postfire erosion to determine the needs for hazard response and possible erosion mitigation to reduce the impacts of increased erosion on public safety and valued resources. The Water Erosion...

  7. Lithosphere erosion atop mantle plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrusta, R.; Arcay, D.; Tommasi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mantle plumes are traditionally proposed to play an important role in lithosphere erosion. Seismic images beneath Hawaii and Cape Verde show a lithosphere-asthenosphere-boundary (LAB) up to 50 km shallower than the surroundings. However, numerical models show that unless the plate is stationary the thermo-mechanical erosion of the lithosphere does not exceed 30 km. We use 2D petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical models based on a finite-difference method on a staggered grid and marker in cell method to study the role of partial melting on the plume-lithosphere interaction. A homogeneous peridotite composition with a Newtonian temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity is used to simulate both the plate and the convective mantle. A constant velocity, ranging from 5 to 12.5 cm/yr, is imposed at the top of the plate. Plumes are created by imposing a thermal anomaly of 150 to 350 K on a 50 km wide domain at the base of the model (700 km depth); the plate right above the thermal anomaly is 40 Myr old. Partial melting is modeled using batch-melting solidus and liquidus in anhydrous conditions. We model the progressive depletion of peridotite and its effect on partial melting by assuming that the melting degree only strictly increases through time. Melt is accumulated until a porosity threshold is reached and the melt in excess is then extracted. The rheology of the partially molten peridotite is determined using viscous constitutive relationship based on a contiguity model, which enables to take into account the effects of grain-scale melt distribution. Above a threshold of 1%, melt is instantaneously extracted. The density varies as a function of partial melting degree and extraction. Besides, we analyze the kinematics of the plume as it impacts a moving plate, the dynamics of time-dependent small-scale convection (SSC) instabilities developing in the low-viscosity layer formed by spreading of hot plume material at the lithosphere base, and the resulting thermal

  8. Acquired pellicle as a modulator for dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukosavljevic, Dusa; Custodio, William; Buzalaf, Marilia A R; Hara, Anderson T; Siqueira, Walter L

    2014-06-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that can result in the loss of tooth structure and function, potentially increasing tooth sensitivity. The exposure of enamel to acids from non-bacterial sources is responsible for the progression of erosion. These erosive challenges are counteracted by the anti-erosive properties of the acquired pellicle (AP), an integument formed in vivo as a result of selective adsorption of salivary proteins on the tooth surface, containing also lipids and glycoproteins. This review provides an in-depth discussion regarding how the physical structure of the AP, along with its composition, contributes to AP anti-erosive properties. The physical properties that contribute to AP protective nature include pellicle thickness, maturation time, and site of development. The pellicle contains salivary proteins embedded within its structure that demonstrate anti-erosive properties; however, rather than individual proteins, protein-protein interactions play a fundamental role in the protective nature of the AP. In addition, dietary and synthetic proteins can modify the pellicle, enhancing its protective efficiency against dental erosion. The salivary composition of the AP and its corresponding protein-profile may be employed as a diagnostic tool, since it likely contains salivary biomarkers for oral diseases that initiate at the enamel surface, including dental erosion. Finally, by modifying the composition and structure of the AP, this protein integument has the potential to be used as a target-specific treatment option for oral diseases related to tooth demineralization. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. The erosive potential of lollipops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Gambon, D.L.; Paap, A.; Bulthuis, M.S.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the erosive potential of several commercially available lollipops and the protective effect of saliva. Methods: The erosive potential of lollipops was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. Subsequently, 10 healthy volunteers tested different types of

  10. Wind erosion processes and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion continues to threaten the sustainability of our nations' soil, air, and water resources. To effectively apply conservation systems to prevent wind driven soil loss, an understanding of the fundamental processes of wind erosion is necessary so that land managers can better recognize the ...

  11. The Distribution and Magnitude of Glacial Erosion on 103-year Timescales at Engabreen, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, C.; Goehring, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    We derive the magnitudes of glacial erosion integrated over 103-year timescales across a transect transverse to the direction of ice flow at Engabreen, Norway. Understanding the distribution of glacial erosion is important for several reasons, including sediment budgeting to fjord environments, development of robust landscape evolution models, and if a better understanding between erosion and ice-bed interface properties (e.g., sliding rate, basal water pressure) can be developed, we can use records of glacial erosion to infer glaciological properties that can ultimately benefit models of past and future glaciers. With few exceptions, measurements of glacial erosion are limited to the historical past and even then are rare owing to the difficulty of accessing the glacier bed. One method proven useful in estimating glacial erosion on 103-year timescales is to measure the remaining concentrations of cosmogenic nuclides that accumulate in exposed bedrock during periods of retracted glacier extent and are removed by glacial erosion and radioactive decay during ice cover. Here we will present measurements of 14C and 10Be measured in proglacial bedrock from Engabreen. Our transects are ca. 600 and 400 meters in front of the modern ice front, and based on historical imagery, was ice covered until the recent past. Initial 10Be results show an increase in concentrations of nearly an order of magnitude from the samples near the center of the glacial trough to those on the lateral margin, consistent with conceptual models of glacial erosion parameterized in terms of sliding velocity. Naïve exposure ages that assume no subglacial erosion range from 0.22 - 9.04 ka. More importantly, we can estimate erosion depths by assuming zero erosion of the highest concentration sample along the two transects and calculate the amount of material removed to yield the lower concentrations elsewhere along the two transects. Results indicate minimum erosion depths of 1-183 cm for most ice

  12. Erosion--corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, B.

    1978-01-01

    The deterioration of materials by corrosion or erosion by itself presents a formidable problem and for this reason investigators have studied these two phenomena independently. In fact, there are very few systematic studies on E-C and the majority of references mention it only in passing. In most real systems, however, the two destructive processes take place simultaneously, hence the purpose of this review is to present the various interactions between the chemical and mechanical agents leading to accelerated degradation of the material. The papers cited in the review are those that lead to a better understanding of the process involved in the accelerated rate of material loss under E-C conditions

  13. Erosion corrosion in water-steam systems: Causes and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitmann, H.G.; Kastner, W.

    1985-01-01

    For the purpose of a better understanding of erosion corrosion, the physical and chemical principles will be summarized briefly. Then results obtained at KWU in the BENSON test section in tests on test specimens in single-phase flow of fully demineralized water will be presented. The experimental studies provide information about the most important influencing parameters. These include flow rate, fluid temperature and water quality (pH value and oxygen content). In addition, the resistance of various materials is compared, and the resistance of magnetite coatings to erosion corrosion is investigated. Furthermore, tests are presented that will show the extent to which erosion corrosion in power plants can be influenced by chemical measures

  14. Modeling soil erosion in a watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Lanuza, R.

    1999-01-01

    Most erosion models have been developed based on a plot scale and have limited application to a watershed due to the differences in aerial scale. In order to address this limitation, a GIS-assisted methodology for modeling soil erosion was developed using PCRaster to predict the rate of soil erosion at watershed level; identify the location of erosion prone areas; and analyze the impact of landuse changes on soil erosion. The general methodology of desktop modeling or soil erosion at watershe...

  15. Role of Erosion in Shaping Point Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J.; Meade, R.

    2012-04-01

    A powerful metaphor in fluvial geomorphology has been that depositional features such as point bars (and other floodplain features) constitute the river's historical memory in the form of uniformly thick sedimentary deposits waiting for the geomorphologist to dissect and interpret the past. For the past three decades, along the channel of Powder River (Montana USA) we have documented (with annual cross-sectional surveys and pit trenches) the evolution of the shape of three point bars that were created when an extreme flood in 1978 cut new channels across the necks of two former meander bends and radically shifted the location of a third bend. Subsequent erosion has substantially reshaped, at different time scales, the relic sediment deposits of varying age. At the weekly to monthly time scale (i.e., floods from snowmelt or floods from convective or cyclonic storms), the maximum scour depth was computed (by using a numerical model) at locations spaced 1 m apart across the entire point bar for a couple of the largest floods. The maximum predicted scour is about 0.22 m. At the annual time scale, repeated cross-section topographic surveys (25 during 32 years) indicate that net annual erosion at a single location can be as great as 0.5 m, and that the net erosion is greater than net deposition during 8, 16, and 32% of the years for the three point bars. On average, the median annual net erosion was 21, 36, and 51% of the net deposition. At the decadal time scale, an index of point bar preservation often referred to as completeness was defined for each cross section as the percentage of the initial deposit (older than 10 years) that was still remaining in 2011; computations indicate that 19, 41, and 36% of the initial deposits of sediment were eroded. Initial deposits were not uniform in thickness and often represented thicker pods of sediment connected by thin layers of sediment or even isolated pods at different elevations across the point bar in response to multiple

  16. Oxygen toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. van der Westhuizen

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen has been discovered about 200 years ago. Since then the vital physiological involvement of oxygen in various biologi­cal processes, mainly energy production, has been established. However, in the body molecular oxygen can be converted to toxic oxygen metabolites such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen. These toxic metabolites are produced mainly in the mitochondria, plasma membranes and endoplasmic reticulum.

  17. Effects of tailwater depth on spillway aeration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-15

    Apr 15, 2011 ... Hydraulic structures such as spillways or weirs with their water-air controlling mechanisms are not only important for their structural properties but also for their effects on downstream ecology. Tailwater depth is an important factor affecting dissolved oxygen transfer and aeration rates of spillways. In this ...

  18. Gastric Mucosal Erosions - Radiologic evaluation -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hyup

    1985-01-01

    70 cases of gastric mucosal erosions were diagnosed by double contrast upper gastrointestinal examinations and endoscopic findings. Analyzing the radiologic findings of these 70 cases of gastric mucosal erosions, the following results were obtained. 1. Among the total 70 cases, 65 cases were typical varioliform erosions showing central depressions and surrounding mucosal elevations. Remaining 5 cases were erosions of acute phase having multiple irregular depressions without surrounding elevations. 2. The gastric antrum was involved alone or in part in all cases. Duodenal bulb was involved with gastric antrum in 4 cases. 3. The majority of the cases had multiple erosions. There were only 2 cases of single erosion. 4. In 65 cases of varioliform erosions; 1) The diameter of the surrounding elevations varied from 3 to 20 mm with the majority (47 cases) between 6 and 10 mm. 2) In general, the surrounding elevations with sharp margin on double contrast films were also clearly demonstrated on compression films but those with faint margin were not. 3) The size of the central barium collections varied from pinpoint to 10 mm with the majority under 5 mm. The shape of the central barium collections in majority of the cases were round with a few cases of linear, triangular or star-shape. 5. In 5 cases of acute phase erosions; 1) All the 5 cases were females. 2) On double contrast radiography, all the cases showed multiple irregular depressed lesions without surrounding elevations. 3) 1 case had the history of hematemesis. 4) In 1 case, there was marked radiological improvement on follow-up study of 2 months interval. 6. In 23 cases, there were coexistent diseases with gastric mucosal erosions. These were 13 cases of duodenal bulb ulcers,7 cases of benign gastric ulcers and 3 others

  19. Erosion estimation of guide vane end clearance in hydraulic turbines with sediment water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Kang, Jingbo; Wang, Jie; Peng, Guoyi; Li, Lianyuan; Su, Min

    2018-04-01

    The end surface of guide vane or head cover is one of the most serious parts of sediment erosion for high-head hydraulic turbines. In order to investigate the relationship between erosion depth of wall surface and the characteristic parameter of erosion, an estimative method including a simplified flow model and a modificatory erosion calculative function is proposed in this paper. The flow between the end surfaces of guide vane and head cover is simplified as a clearance flow around a circular cylinder with a backward facing step. Erosion characteristic parameter of csws3 is calculated with the mixture model for multiphase flow and the renormalization group (RNG) k-𝜀 turbulence model under the actual working conditions, based on which, erosion depths of guide vane and head cover end surfaces are estimated with a modification of erosion coefficient K. The estimation results agree well with the actual situation. It is shown that the estimative method is reasonable for erosion prediction of guide vane and can provide a significant reference to determine the optimal maintenance cycle for hydraulic turbine in the future.

  20. Buffer erosion in dilute groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, T.; Kanerva, N.; Martikainen, J.; Sane, P.; Olin, M.; Seppaelae, A.; Koskinen, K.

    2013-08-01

    One scenario of interest for repository safety assessment involves the loss of bentonite buffer material in contact with dilute groundwater flowing through a transmissive fracture interface. In order to examine the extrusion/erosion behavior of bentonite buffer material under such circumstances, a series of experiments were performed in a flow-through, 1 mm aperture, artificial fracture system. These experiments covered a range of solution chemistry (salt concentration and composition), material composition (sodium montmorillonite and admixtures with calcium montmorillonite), and flow velocity conditions. No erosion was observed for sodium montmorillonite against solution compositions from 0.5 g/L to 10 g/L NaCl. No erosion was observed for 50/50 calcium/sodium montmorillonite against 0.5 g/L NaCl. Erosion was observed for both sodium montmorillonite and 50/50 calcium/sodium montmorillonite against solution compositions ≤ 0.25 g/L NaCl. The calculated erosion rates for the tests with the highest levels of measured erosion, i.e., the tests run under the most dilute conditions (ionic strength (IS) < ∼1 mM), were well-correlated to flow velocity, whereas the calculated erosion rates for the tests with lower levels of measured erosion, i.e., the tests run under somewhat less dilute conditions (∼1 mM < IS < ∼4 mM), were not similarly correlated indicating that material and solution composition can significantly affect erosion rates. In every experiment, both erosive and non-erosive, emplaced buffer material extruded into the fracture and was observed to be impermeable to water flowing in the fracture effectively forming an extended diffusive barrier around the intersecting fracture/buffer interface. Additionally, a model which was developed previously to predict the rate of erosion of bentonite buffer material in low ionic strength water in rock fracture environments was applied to three different cases: sodium montmorillonite expansion in a vertical tube, a

  1. Weighted halfspace depth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotík, Lukáš; Hlubinka, D.; Vencálek, O.

    Vol. 46, č. 1 (2010), s. 125-148 ISSN 0023-5954 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : data depth * nonparametric multivariate analysis * strong consistency of depth * mixture of distributions Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.461, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/SI/kotik-weighted halfspace depth.pdf

  2. Constraining local subglacial bedrock erosion rates with cosmogenic nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsig, Christian; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Christl, Marcus; Reitner, Jürgen; Reindl, Martin; Bichler, Mathias; Vockenhuber, Christof; Akcar, Naki; Schlüchter, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The constant buildup of cosmogenic nuclides, most prominently 10Be, in exposed rock surfaces is routinely employed for dating various landforms such as landslides or glacial moraines. One fundamental assumption is that no cosmogenic nuclides were initially present in the rock, before the event to be dated. In the context of glacially formed landscapes it is commonly assumed that subglacial erosion of at least a few meters of bedrock during the period of ice coverage is sufficient to remove any previously accumulated nuclides, since the production of 10Be ceases at a depth of 2-3 m. Insufficient subglacial erosion leads to overestimation of surface exposure ages. If the time since the retreat of the glacier is known, however, a discordant concentration of cosmogenic nuclides delivers information about the depth of subglacial erosion. Here we present data from proglacial bedrock at two sites in the Alps. Goldbergkees in the Hohe Tauern National Park in Austria and Gruebengletscher in the Grimsel Pass area in Switzerland. Samples were taken inside as well as outside of the glaciers' Little Ice Age extent. Measured nuclide concentrations are analyzed with the help of a MATLAB model simulating periods of exposure or glacial cover of user-definable length and erosion rates.

  3. Uncertainty in soil carbon accounting due to unrecognized soil erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderman, Jonathan; Chappell, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    The movement of soil organic carbon (SOC) during erosion and deposition events represents a major perturbation to the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the recognized impact soil redistribution can have on the carbon cycle, few major carbon accounting models currently allow for soil mass flux. Here, we modified a commonly used SOC model to include a soil redistribution term and then applied it to scenarios which explore the implications of unrecognized erosion and deposition for SOC accounting. We show that models that assume a static landscape may be calibrated incorrectly as erosion of SOC is hidden within the decay constants. This implicit inclusion of erosion then limits the predictive capacity of these models when applied to sites with different soil redistribution histories. Decay constants were found to be 15-50% slower when an erosion rate of 15 t soil ha(-1)  yr(-1) was explicitly included in the SOC model calibration. Static models cannot account for SOC change resulting from agricultural management practices focused on reducing erosion rates. Without accounting for soil redistribution, a soil sampling scheme which uses a fixed depth to support model development can create large errors in actual and relative changes in SOC stocks. When modest levels of erosion were ignored, the combined uncertainty in carbon sequestration rates was 0.3-1.0 t CO2  ha(-1)  yr(-1) . This range is similar to expected sequestration rates for many management options aimed at increasing SOC levels. It is evident from these analyses that explicit recognition of soil redistribution is critical to the success of a carbon monitoring or trading scheme which seeks to credit agricultural activities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Modelling soil carbon fate under erosion process in vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Agata; Scalenghe, Riccardo; Minacapilli, Mario; Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; Borgogno Mondino, Enrico; Gristina, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion processes in vineyards beyond water runoff and sediment transport have a strong effect on soil organic carbon loss (SOC) and redistribution along the slope. The variation of SOC across the landscape determines a difference in soil fertility and vine productivity. The aim of this research was to study erosion of a Mediterranean vineyard, develop an approach to estimate the SOC loss, correlate the vines vigor with sediment and carbon erosion. The study was carried out in a Sicilian (Italy) vineyard, planted in 2011. Along the slope, six pedons were studied by digging 6 pits up to 60cm depth. Soil was sampled in each pedon every 10cm and SOC was analyzed. Soil erosion, detachment and deposition areas were measured by pole height method. The vigor of vegetation was expressed in term of NDVI (Normalized difference Vegetation Index) derived from a satellite image (RapidEye) acquired at berry pre-veraison stage (July) and characterized by 5 spectral bands in the shortwave region, including a band in the red wavelength (R, 630-685 nm) and in the near infrared (NIR, 760-850 nm) . Results showed that soil erosion, sediments redistribution and SOC across the hill was strongly affected by topographic features, slope and curvature. The erosion rate was 46Mg ha-1 y-1 during the first 6 years since planting. The SOC redistribution was strongly correlated with the detachment or deposition area as highlighted by pole height measurements. The approach developed to estimate the SOC loss showed that during the whole study period the off-farm SOC amounts to 1.6Mg C ha-1. As highlighted by NDVI results, the plant vigor is strong correlated with SOC content and therefore, developing an accurate NDVI approach could be useful to detect the vineyard areas characterized by low fertility due to erosion process.

  5. Water Erosion in Different Slope Lengths on Bare Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Bagio

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Water erosion degrades the soil and contaminates the environment, and one influential factor on erosion is slope length. The aim of this study was to quantify losses of soil (SL and water (WL in a Humic Cambisol in a field experiment under natural rainfall conditions from July 4, 2014 to June 18, 2015 in individual events of 41 erosive rains in the Southern Plateau of Santa Catarina and to estimate soil losses through the USLE and RUSLE models. The treatments consisted of slope lengths of 11, 22, 33, and 44 m, with an average degree of slope of 8 %, on bare and uncropped soil that had been cultivated with corn prior to the study. At the end of the corn cycle, the stalk residue was removed from the surface, leaving the roots of the crop in the soil. Soil loss by water erosion is related linearly and positively to the increase in slope length in the span between 11 and 44 m. Soil losses were related to water losses and the Erosivity Index (EI30, while water losses were related to rain depth. Soil losses estimated by the USLE and RUSLE model showed lower values than the values observed experimentally in the field, especially the values estimated by the USLE. The values of factor L calculated for slope length of 11, 22, 33, and 44 m for the two versions (USLE and RUSLE of the soil loss prediction model showed satisfactory results in relation to the values of soil losses observed.

  6. Erosive tooth wear in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; Lussi, A.; Jaeggi, T.; Gambon, D.L.; Lussi, A.; Ganss, C.

    2014-01-01

    Erosive tooth wear in children is a common condition. Besides the anatomical differences between deciduous and permanent teeth, additional histological differences may influence their susceptibility to dissolution. Considering laboratory studies alone, it is not clear whether deciduous teeth are

  7. Erosion-resistant composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  8. Quantitative depth profiling of near surface semiconductor structures using ultra low energy SIMS analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliner, D.I.

    1999-09-01

    The continual reduction in size of semiconductor structures and depths of junctions is putting a greater strain on characterization techniques. Accurate device and process modelling requires quantified electrical and dopant profiles from the topmost few nanometres. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an analytical technique commonly used in the semiconductor industry to measure concentration depth profiles. To allow the quantification of the features that are closer to the surface, lower energy ions are employed, which also improves the available depth resolution. The development of the floating ion gun (FLIG) has made it possible to use sub keV beam energies on a routine basis, allowing quantified dopant profiles to be obtained within the first few nanometres of the surface. This thesis demonstrates that, when profiling with oxygen ion beams, greatest certainty in the retained dose is achieved at normal incidence, and when analysing boron accurate profile shapes are only obtained when the primary beam energy is less than half that of the implant. It was shown that it is now possible to profile, though with slower erosion rates and a limited dynamic range, with 100 eV oxygen (0 2 + ) ion beams. Profile features that had developed during rapid thermal annealing, that could only be observed when ultra low energy ion beams were used, were investigated using various analytical techniques. Explanations of the apparently inactive dopant were proposed, and included suggestions for cluster molecules. The oxide thickness of fully formed altered layers has also been investigated. The results indicate that a fundamental change in the mechanism of oxide formation occurs, and interfaces that are sharper than those grown by thermal oxidation can be produced using sub-keV ion beams. (author)

  9. Determining long-term regional erosion rates using impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergarten, Stefan; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    More than 300,000 impact craters have been found on Mars, while the surface of Moon's highlands is even saturated with craters. In contrast, only 184 impact craters have been confirmed on Earth so far with only 125 of them exposed at the surface. The spatial distribution of these impact craters is highly inhomogeneous. Beside the large variation in the age of the crust, consumption of craters by erosion and burial by sediments are the main actors being responsible for the quite small and inhomogeneous crater record. In this study we present a novel approach to infer long-term average erosion rates at regional scales from the terrestrial crater inventory. The basic idea behind this approach is a dynamic equilibrium between the production of new craters and their consumption by erosion. It is assumed that each crater remains detectable until the total erosion after the impact exceeds a characteristic depth depending on the crater's diameter. Combining this model with the terrestrial crater production rate, i.e., the number of craters per unit area and time as a function of their diameter, allows for a prediction of the expected number of craters in a given region as a function of the erosion rate. Using the real crater inventory, this relationship can be inverted to determine the regional long-term erosion rate and its statistical uncertainty. A limitation by the finite age of the crust can also be taken into account. Applying the method to the Colorado Plateau and the Deccan Traps, both being regions with a distinct geological history, yields erosion rates in excellent agreement with those obtained by other, more laborious methods. However, these rates are formally exposed to large statistical uncertainties due to the small number of impact craters. As higher crater densities are related to lower erosion rates, smaller statistical errors can be expected when large regions in old parts of the crust are considered. Very low long-term erosion rates of less than 4

  10. Rehabilitation at Nabarlek: erosion assessment 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K.G.; Saynor, M.J.; Hancock, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    Decommissioning work and the rehabilitation at the Nabarlek minesite were completed at the end of 1995. Site description, mining history, environmental management and rehabilitation have been summarised elsewhere (Prendergast et al 1999, Martin 2000, Waggitt 2001). Tailings were buried in the mined-out pit and capped with waste rock. An erosion assessment of the cap design, using a combination of modelling and analogue estimates, indicated that denudation rates on the cap would be -1 (Riley 1995). Riley (1995) suggested minor design modifications to reduce slope length on the pit cap to improve stability and provide structural integrity for several thousand years. Riley (1995) observed that roads were areas of most severe rill development in the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) and suggested that rill development (0.2-0.3 m depth) on the pit cap would occur in the early stages of adjustment toward equilibrium but not persist in the long term. Consequently, as part of the process of assessing rehabilitation success, erosion at the former minesite was examined by ERISS in August and October 1999. A ground assessment of the perimeter of the evaporation ponds, pit and waste rock dump (WRD), unsealed roads to the north and east of the site and infrastructure area was conducted in August 1999. This survey described, quantified (using a tape and rule) and photographed erosion features. No transects were undertaken. In October 1999, a qualitative (descriptive and photographic) survey of the airstrip, constructed drains, unsealed roads to the west of the site, the pit and WRD was conducted. On this occasion, transects of the WRD and pit were taken but the locations of the transects were not surveyed

  11. Soil Erosion and Agricultural Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    Data drawn from a global compilation of studies support the long articulated contention that erosion rates from conventionally plowed agricultural fields greatly exceed rates of soil production, erosion under native vegetation, and long-term geological erosion. Whereas data compiled from around the world show that soil erosion under conventional agriculture exceeds both rates of soil production and geological erosion rates by up to several orders of magnitude, similar global distributions of soil production and geological erosion rates suggest an approximate balance. Net soil erosion rates in conventionally plowed fields on the order of 1 mm/yr can erode typical hillslope soil profiles over centuries to millennia, time-scales comparable to the longevity of major civilizations. Well-documented episodes of soil loss associated with agricultural activities date back to the introduction of erosive agricultural methods in regions around the world, and stratigraphic records of accelerated anthropogenic soil erosion have been recovered from lake, fluvial, and colluvial stratigraphy, as well as truncation of soil stratigraphy (such as truncated A horizons). A broad convergence in the results from studies based on various approaches employed to study ancient soil loss and rates of downstream sedimentation implies that widespread soil loss has accompanied human agricultural intensification in examples drawn from around the world. While a broad range of factors, including climate variability and society-specific social and economic contexts — such as wars or colonial relationships — all naturally influence the longevity of human societies, the ongoing loss of topsoil inferred from studies of soil erosion rates in conventional agricultural systems has obvious long-term implications for agricultural sustainability. Consequently, modern agriculture — and therefore global society — faces a fundamental question over the upcoming centuries. Can an agricultural system

  12. Erosion Prediction Analysis and Landuse Planning in Gunggung Watershed, Bali, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigunasih, N. M.; Kusmawati, T.; Yuli Lestari, N. W.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to predict the erosion that occurs in Gunggung watershed and sustainable landuse management plan. This research used the USLE (Universal Soil Loss Equation) methodology. The method used observation / field survey and soil analysis at the Soil Laboratory of Faculty of Agriculture, Udayana University. This research is divided into 5 stages, (1) land unit determination, (2) Field observation and soil sampling, (3) Laboratory analysis and data collection, (4) Prediction of erosion using USLE (Universal Soil Loss Equation) method, (5) The permissible erosion determination (EDP) then (6) determines the level of erosion hazard based on the depth of the soil, as well as the soil conservation plan if the erosion is greater than the allowed erosion, and (7) determining landuse management plan for sustainable agriculture. Erosion which value is smaller than soil loss tolerance can be exploited in a sustainable manner, while erosion exceeds allowable erosion will be conservation measures. Conservation action is the improvement of vegetation and land management. Land management like improvements the terrace, addition of organic matter, increase plant density, planting ground cover and planting layered header system will increase the land capability classes. Land use recommended after management is mixed plantation high density with forest plants, mix plantation high density with patio bench construction, seasonal cultivation and perennial crops, cultivation of perennial crops and cultivation of seasonal crops.

  13. Erosion properties of unipolar arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekalin, Eh.K.

    1982-01-01

    Processes modelling the formation of unipolar arcs on the elements of the first wall in limiters of the vacuum chamber and on active elements of tokamak divertor, are experimentally investigated. Erosion, processes that take place at two types of non-stationary cathode spots are considered. Experimental data prove the possibility of reducing erosion intensity by coating the surface of electrodes by oxide films, reduction of the temperature of electrode and discharge current

  14. Soil deflation analyses from wind erosion events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Lackóová

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are various methods to assess soil erodibility for wind erosion. This paper focuses on aggregate analysis by a laser particle sizer ANALYSETTE 22 (FRITSCH GmbH, made to determine the size distribution of soil particles detached by wind (deflated particles. Ten soil samples, trapped along the same length of the erosion surface (150–155 m but at different wind speeds, were analysed. The soil was sampled from a flat, smooth area without vegetation cover or soil crust, not affected by the impact of windbreaks or other barriers, from a depth of maximum 2.5 cm. Prior to analysis the samples were prepared according to the relevant specifications. An experiment was also conducted using a device that enables characterisation of the vertical movement of the deflated material. The trapped samples showed no differences in particle size and the proportions of size fractions at different hourly average wind speeds. It was observed that most of particles travelling in saltation mode (size 50–500 μm – 58–70% – moved vertically up to 26 cm above the soil surface. At greater heights, particles moving in suspension mode (floating in the air; size < 100 μm accounted for up to 90% of the samples. This result suggests that the boundary between the two modes of the vertical movement of deflated soil particles lies at about 25 cm above the soil surface.

  15. Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. S. Wagenbrenner; M. J. Germino; B. K. Lamb; R. B. Foltz; P. R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Wind erosion and aeolian transport processes are largely unstudied in the post-wildfire environment, but recent studies have shown that wind erosion can play a major role in burned landscapes. A wind erosion monitoring system was installed immediately following a wildfire in southeastern Idaho, USA to measure wind erosion from the burned area (Figure 1). This paper...

  16. The oxygen-isotope effect on the in-plane penetration depth in underdoped Y{sub 1-x} Pr{sub x} Ba{sub 2} Cu{sub 3} O{sub 7-{delta}} as revealed by muon-spin rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khasanov, R [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Shengelaya, A [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Conder, K [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, ETH Zuerich and PSI Villigen, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Morenzoni, E [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Savic, I M [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Keller, H [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2003-01-22

    The oxygen-isotope ({sup 16}O/{sup 18}O) effect (OIE) on the in-plane penetration depth {lambda}{sub ab} (0) in underdoped Y{sub 1-x} Pr{sub x} Ba{sub 2} Cu{sub 3} O{sub 7-{delta}} was studied by means of muon-spin rotation. A pronounced OIE on {lambda}{sub ab}{sup -2} (0) was observed with a relative isotope shift of {delta}{lambda}{sub ab}{sup -2} /{lambda} {sub ab}{sup -2} = -5(2)% for x=0.3 and -9(2)% for x=0.4. The OIE exponents of T{sub c} and of {lambda}{sub ab}{sup -2} (0) exhibit a relation that appears to be generic for cuprate superconductors. (letter to the editor)

  17. DEPTH - OBSERVATION and Other Data (NODC Accession 9700138)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other data were collected in the North Sea and other locations. Data include water depths, temperatures, salinities, and oxygen...

  18. Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their breathing to dangerously low levels. Will I need oxygen when I sleep? Usually if you use supplemental oxygen during the ... your health care provider tells you you only need to use oxygen for exercise or sleep. Even if you feel “fine” off of your ...

  19. Use of radioactive fallout cesium-137 to estimate soil erosion on three farms in west central Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajracharya, R.M.; Lal, R.; Kimble, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Assessment of the impact of soil erosion on productivity and environment quality requires comprehensive and credible estimates of erosion. Measuring concentration of 137 Cs fallout is a relatively simple and rapid technique for determining long-term mean annual rates of soil erosion and deposition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of the 137 Cs activity-soil depth relationship in estimating soil erosion from arable land in west central Ohio. Thus, soil samples obtained from three to four genetic horizons of four erosion phases at three farms in Clark Co., Ohio, (hereafter called Sites A, B, and C) were analyzed for 137 Cs activity. Relationships between 137 Cs activity and soil depth at undisturbed reference sites were used to calculate the depth of soil eroded and mean annual erosion rates. Cumulative 137 Cs activities ranged from 6.8 mBq g-1 for the severely eroded phase at Site C to 16.6 mBq g-1 for the deposition phase at Site A. These activities corresponded to soil erosion rates of 125.9 Mg ha-1 y-1 for severe to 26.6 Mg ha-1 y-1 for deposition phases. A general trend of increasing soil erosion (by 24 to 85%) from slightly to severely eroded phases was observed although the data were highly variable. Estimated soil erosion rates depended on the regression model used and were more than an order of magnitude higher than those determined using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation. Sampling rigorously at small depth increments by means of a core sampler, careful selection of reference sites, and calibration or validation of this technique with other models can improve estimation of soil erosion using 137 Cs. The 137 Cs technique is, however, limited to local scale estimates of erosion because the empirical models are site specific

  20. Experiments to study the erosive effect of oxide casting streams on structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuka, B.; Knauss, H.; Kammerer, B.; Perinic, D.

    1992-04-01

    The experiments performed under an activity of the Nuclear Safety Project (PSF) make a contribution to the study of the erosive effect of oxide casting streams on structures. As aluminothermically generated oxide casting stream, 20 mm in diameter, was applied from 1.0 m dropping height to 40 mm thick horizontal stainless steel plates in free air atmosphere. The test parameters were different temperatures of preheating of the plates (900 and 1200deg C). By means of thermocouples offset in depth in the plates it was possible to record and represent the temperature distribution in the plate correlated with time. Regarding the direct erosive effect of an oxide casting stream as a function of the temperature of plate preheating it appeared that a high initial temperature of the stainless steel plate (1200deg C) causes an increased erosion area at the surface only, but does not exert a macroscopically visible influence on erosion depth. (orig.) [de

  1. A New Instrument for Testing Wind Erosion by Soil Surface Shape Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai, C.; Yuan, X.; Jiang, H.; Zhou, R.; Wang, J.; Liu, B.; Ye, Y.; Du, P.

    2010-01-01

    Wind erosion, a primary cause of soil degeneration, is a problem in arid and semiarid areas throughout the world. Many methods are available to study soil erosion, but there is no an effective method for making quantitative measurements in the field. To solve this problem, we have developed a new instrument that can measure the change in the shape of the soil surface, allowing quick quantification of wind erosion. In this paper, the construction and principle of the new instrument are described. Field experiments are carried out using the instrument, and the data are analyzed. The erosion depth is found to vary by 11% compared to the average for measurement areas ranging from 30 x 30 cm 2 to 10 x 10 cm 2 . The results show that the instrument is convenient and reliable for quantitatively measuring wind erosion in the field.

  2. Investigation of Soil Erosion and Phosphorus Transport within an Agricultural Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klik, A.; Jester, W.; Muhar, A.; Peinsitt, A.; Rampazzo, N.; Mentler, A.; Staudinger, B.; Eder, M.

    2003-04-01

    In a 40 ha agricultural used watershed in Austria, surface runoff, soil erosion and nutrient losses are measured spatially distributed with 12 small erosion plots. Crops during growing season 2002 are canola, corn, sunflower, winter wheat, winter barley, rye, sugar beets, and pasture. Canopy height and canopy cover are observed in 14-day intervals. Four times per year soil water content, shear stress and random roughness of the surface are measured in a 25 x 25 m grid (140 points). The same raster is sampled for soil texture analyses and content of different phosphorus fractions in the 0-10 cm soil depth. Spatially distributed data are used for geostatistical analysis. Along three transects hydrologic conditions of the hillslope position (top, middle, foot) are investigated by measuring soil water content and soil matrix potential. After erosive events erosion features (rills, deposition, ...) are mapped using GPS. All measured data will be used as input parameters for the Limburg Soil Erosion Model (LISEM).

  3. Effects of uranium development on erosion and associated sedimentation in southern San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Maurice E.

    1979-01-01

    A reconnaissance was made of some of the effects of uranium development on erosion and associated sedimentation in the southern San Juan Basin, where uranium development is concentrated. In general, the effects of exploration on erosion are minor, although erosion may be accelerated by the building of access roads, by activities at the drilling sites, and by close concentration of drilling sites. Areas where the greatest effects on erosion and sedimentation from mining and milling operations have occurred are: (1) in the immediate vicinity of mines and mills, (2) near waste piles, and (3) in stream channels where modifications, such as changes in depth have been caused by discharge of excess mine and mill water. Collapse of tailings piles could result in localized but excessive erosion and sedimentation.

  4. A new concept for stainless steels ranking upon the resistance to cavitation erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Salcianu, L. C.; Ghera, C.; Micu, L. M.; Badarau, R.; Iosif, A.; Pirvulescu, L. D.; Podoleanu, C. E.

    2017-01-01

    In present, the ranking of materials as their resistance to cavitation erosion is obtained by using laboratory tests finalized with the characteristic curves mean depth erosion against time MDE(t) and mean depth erosion rate against time MDER(t). In some previous papers, Bordeasu and co-workers give procedures to establish exponential equation representing the curves, with minimum scatter of the experimental obtained results. For a given material, both exponential equations MDE(t) and MDER(t) have the same values for the parameters of scale and for the shape one. For the ranking of materials is sometimes important to establish single figure. Till now in Timisoara Polytechnic University Cavitation Laboratory were used three such numbers: the stable value of the curve MDER(t), the resistance to cavitation erosion (Rcav ≡ 1/MDERstable) and the normalized cavitation resistance Rns which is the rate between vs = MDERstable for the analyzed material and vse= MDERse the mean depth erosion rate for the steel OH12NDL (Rns = vs/vse ). OH12NDL is a material used for manufacturing the blades of numerous Kaplan turbines in Romania for which both cavitation erosion laboratory tests and field measurements of cavitation erosions are available. In the present paper we recommend a new method for ranking the materials upon cavitation erosion resistance. This method uses the scale and shape parameters of the exponential equations which represents the characteristic cavitation erosion curves. Till now the method was applied only for stainless steels. The experimental results show that the scale parameter represents an excellent method for ranking the stainless steels. In the future this kind of ranking will be tested also for other materials especially for bronzes used for manufacturing ship propellers.

  5. Complexity and Dynamical Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Deacon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We argue that a critical difference distinguishing machines from organisms and computers from brains is not complexity in a structural sense, but a difference in dynamical organization that is not well accounted for by current complexity measures. We propose a measure of the complexity of a system that is largely orthogonal to computational, information theoretic, or thermodynamic conceptions of structural complexity. What we call a system’s dynamical depth is a separate dimension of system complexity that measures the degree to which it exhibits discrete levels of nonlinear dynamical organization in which successive levels are distinguished by local entropy reduction and constraint generation. A system with greater dynamical depth than another consists of a greater number of such nested dynamical levels. Thus, a mechanical or linear thermodynamic system has less dynamical depth than an inorganic self-organized system, which has less dynamical depth than a living system. Including an assessment of dynamical depth can provide a more precise and systematic account of the fundamental difference between inorganic systems (low dynamical depth and living systems (high dynamical depth, irrespective of the number of their parts and the causal relations between them.

  6. The Erosion of Diamond and Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite After 1.5 Years of Space Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2018-01-01

    Polymers and other oxidizable materials on the exterior of spacecraft in the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment can be eroded due to reaction with atomic oxygen (AO). Therefore, in order to design durable spacecraft, it is important to know the LEO AO erosion yield (Ey, volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of materials susceptible to AO reaction. The Polymers Experiment was developed to determine the AO Ey of various polymers and other materials flown in ram and wake orientations in LEO. The experiment was flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 7 (MISSE 7) mission for 1.5 years on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). As part of the experiment, a sample containing Class 2A diamond (100 plane) and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG, basal and edge planes) was exposed to ram AO and characterized for erosion. The materials were salt-sprayed prior to flight to provide isolated sites of AO protection. The Ey of the samples was determined through post-flight electron microscopy recession depth measurements. The experiment also included a Kapton H witness sample for AO fluence determination. This paper provides an overview of the MISSE 7 mission, a description of the flight experiment, the characterization techniques used, the mission AO fluence, and the LEO Ey results for diamond and HOPG (basal and edge planes). The data is compared to the Ey of pyrolytic graphite exposed to four years of space exposure as part of the MISSE 2 mission. The results indicate that diamond erodes, but with a very low Ey of 1.58 +/- 0.04 x 10(exp -26) cm(exp 3)/atom. The different HOPG planes displayed significantly different amounts of erosion from each other. The HOPG basal plane had an Ey of 1.05 +/- 0.08 x 10(exp -24) cm(exp 3)/atom while the edge plane had a lower Ey of only 5.38 +/- 0.90 x 10(exp -25) -cm(exp 3)/atom. The Ey data from this ISS spaceflight experiment provides valuable information for understanding of chemistry

  7. Oxygen Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Solmes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available LTOT is prescribed for people with chronic lung disease in whom there is a decrease in the ability of the lungs to supply enough oxygen to the body. The heart is obliged to pump faster to meet the body's oxygen requirements. This may place undue stress on the heart, resulting in palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. A low oxygen level in arterial blood is also harmful to the heart, the brain and the pulmonary blood vessels. Oxygen therapy is used to break this cycle. A person with low blood oxygen will often be able to accomplish more with less fatigue with the help of supplemental oxygen therapy. Shortness of breath is a mechanical problem resulting from the effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Oxygen therapy may or may not reduce shortness of breath, but it will help the lungs and heart to function with less stress.

  8. TILLAGE EROSION: THE PRINCIPLES, CONTROLLING FACTORS AND MAIN IMPLICATIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Wysocka-Czubaszek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tillage erosion is one of the major contributors to landscape evolution in hummocky agricultural landscapes. This paper summarizes the available data describing tillage erosion caused by hand-held or other simple tillage implements as well as tools used in typical conventional agriculture in Europe and North America. Variations in equipment, tillage speed, depth and direction result in a wide range of soil translocation rates observed all over the world. The variety of tracers both physical and chemical gives a challenge to introduce the reliable model predicting tillage erosion, considering the number and type of tillage operation in the whole tillage sequence.

  9. Optimizing land use pattern to reduce soil erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Sokouti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion hazard is one of the main problems can affect ecological balance in watersheds. This study aimed to determine the optimal use of land to reduce erosion and increase the resident's income of Qushchi watershed in West Azerbaijan province, Iran. Income and expenses for the current land uses were calculated with field studies. Damages resulting from the soil erosion were estimated by soil depth equal to the specified land uses. For three different options including the current status of land uses without and with land management, and the standard status of land uses, multi-objective linear programming model was established by LINGO software. Then the optimization problem of the land use was solved by simplex method. Finally, the best option of land use was determined by comparing erosion rate and its cost in each scenario. Then the circumstances and the recommended conditions were compared. The results indicated that the current surface area of current land uses is not suitable to reduce erosion and increase income of residents and should change in the optimum conditions. At the optimum level, there should change horticulture area of 408 to 507 (ha, irrigated land area of 169 to 136 (ha and dry farming of 636 to 570 (ha, while conversion of rangeland area not indispensable. In addition, the results showed that in case of the optimization of land use, soil erosion and the profitability of the whole area will decrease 0.75% and increase 3.68%, respectively. In case of land management practices, soil erosion will decrease 42.27% and the profitability increase 21.39% while in the standard conditions, soil erosion will decrease 60.95% and profitability will increase 24.20%. The results of the sensitivity analysis showed that the changes in the horticulture and range land areas have the greatest impact on the increasing profitability and reducing soil erosion of Qushchi watershed. So, it is recommended using Education and Extension to promote

  10. Motivation with Depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an illusional arena by offering experience in optical illusions in which students must apply critical analysis to their innate information gathering systems. Introduces different types of depth illusions for students to experience. (ASK)

  11. Auto consolidated cohesive sediments erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternat, F.

    2007-02-01

    Pollutants and suspended matters of a river can accumulate into the sedimentary column. Once deposited, they are submitted to self-weight consolidation processes, ageing and burying, leading to an increase of their erosion resistance. Pollutant fluxes can be related to sedimentary fluxes, determined by threshold laws. In this work, an erosion threshold model is suggested by introducing a cohesion force into the usual force balance. A model of cohesion is developed on the basis of interactions between argillaceous cohesive particles (clays), particularly the Van der Waals force, whose parameterization is ensured by means of granulometry and porosity. Artificial erosion experiments were performed in a recirculating erosion flume with natural cored sediments where critical shear stress measurements were performed. Other analyses provided granulometry and porosity. The results obtained constitute a good database for the literature. The model is then applied to the experimental conditions and gives good agreement with measurements. An example of the accounting for self-weight consolidation processes is finally suggested, before finishing on a Mohr like diagram dedicated to soft cohesive sediment erosion. (author)

  12. Element depth profiles of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzev, A.P.; Nikonov, O.A.; Kulik, M.; Zuk, J.; Krzyzanowska, H.; Ochalski, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    Element depth profiles of porous silicon were measured on the Van-de-Graaff accelerator in the energy range of 4 He + ions from 2 to 3.2 MeV. Application of complementary RBS, ERD and 16 O(α,α) 16 O nuclear reaction methods permits us to obtain: 1) the exact silicon, oxygen and hydrogen distribution in the samples, 2) the distribution of partial pore concentrations. The oxygen concentration in porous silicon reaches 30%, which allows one to assume the presence of silicon oxide in the pores and to explain the spectrum shift of luminescence into the blue area

  13. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Mats (Div. of Nuclear Chemistry, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden), School of Chemical Science and Engineering)

    2009-11-15

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain

  14. Bed erosion control at 60 degree river confluence using vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuppukondur, Ananth; Chandra, Venu

    2017-04-01

    Confluences are common occurrences along natural rivers. Hydrodynamics at the confluence is complex due to merging of main and lateral flows with different characteristics. Bed erosion occurs at the confluence due to turbulence and also secondary circulation induced by centrifugal action of the lateral flow. The eroded sediment poses various problems in the river ecosystem including river bank failure. Reservoirs are majorly affected due to sediment deposition which reduces storage capacity. The bed erosion also endangers stability of pipeline crossings and bridge piers. The aim of this experimental study is to check the performance of vanes in controlling bed erosion at the confluence. Experiments are performed in a 600 confluence mobile bed model with a non-uniform sediment of mean particle size d50 = 0.28mm. Discharge ratio (q=ratio of lateral flow discharge to main flow discharge) is maintained as 0.5 and 0.75 with a constant average main flow depth (h) of 5cm. Vanes of width 0.3h (1.5cm) and thickness of 1 mm are placed along the mixing layer at an angle of 150, 300 and 600(with respect to main flow) to perform the experiments. Also, two different spacing of 2h and 3h (10cm and 15cm) between the vanes are used for conducting the experiments. A digital point gauge with an accuracy of ±0.1mm is used to measure bed levels and flow depths at the confluence. An Acoustic Doppler Velocitimeter (ADV) with a frequency of 25Hz and accuracy of ±1mm/s is used to measure flow velocities. Maximum scour depth ratio Rmax, which is ratio between maximum scour depth (Ds) and flow depth (h), is used to present the experimental results.From the experiments without vanes, it is observed that the velocities are increasing along the mixing layer and Rmax=0.82 and 1.06, for q=0.5 and 0.75, respectively. The velocities reduce with vanes since roughness increases along the mixing layer. For q=0.5 and 0.75, Rmax reduces to 0.62 and 0.7 with vanes at 2h spacing, respectively. Similarly

  15. Soil erosion in Slovene Istria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Mikoš

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available From the end of nineties of the 20th century, intense hydrologic and geomorphologic research is taking place in the Slovene Istria. As a part of this research also studies on soil erosion were undertaken in the period from 2005 to 2008. The field measurements were under taken onclosed 1m2 large erosion plots under three different land uses (on bare soils in an olive grove, on an overgrown meadow, in a forest, placed south of the Marezige village in the Rokava River basin.We show weekly measurements of surface erosion (interrill erosion for the period of 13 months (the end of March 2005 – the end of April 2006, as well as monthly and seasonal averages together with selected linear statistical correlations between soil erosion and weather parameters.From May 2005 to April 2006 the interrill erosion on bare soils in an olive grove with an inclination of 5.5° amounted to 9013 g/m2 (90 t/ha that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 8.5 mm/yr; on an overgrown meadow with an inclination of 9.4° it amounted to 168 g/m2 (1,68 t/ha that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 0.16 mm//yr; and in a forest with an inclination of 7.8° it amounted to 391 g/m2 (3,91 t/ha and in a forest with an inclination of 21.4° it amounted to 415 g/m2 (4,15 t/ha, respectively, that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 0.4 mm/yr.

  16. Erosion patterns produced by the paleo Haizishan ice cap, SE Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, P.; Stroeven, A. P.; Harbor, J.; Hättestrand, C.; Heyman, J.; Caffee, M. W.

    2017-12-01

    Erosion is a primary driver of landscape evolution, topographic relief production, geochemical cycles, and climate change. Combining in situ 10Be and 26Al exposure age dating, geomorphological mapping, and field investigations, we examine glacial erosion patterns of the almost 4,000 km2 paleo Haizishan ice cap on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Our results show that ice caps on the low relief Haizishan Plateau produced a zonal pattern of landscape modification. In locations where apparent exposure ages on bedrock are consistent with the last deglaciation, complete resetting of the cosmogenic exposure age clock indicates glacial erosion of at least a few meters. However, older apparent exposure ages on bedrock in areas known to have been covered by the paleo ice cap during the Last Glacial Maximum indicate inheritance and thus limited glacial erosion. Inferred surface exposure ages from cosmogenic depth profiles through two saprolites vary from resetting and thus saprolite profile truncation to nuclide inheritance indicating limited erosion. Finally, significant nuclide inheritance in river sand samples from basins on the scoured plateau surface also indicate limited glacial erosion during the last glaciation. Hence, for the first time, our study shows clear evidence of preservation under non-erosive ice on the Tibetan Plateau. As patterns of glacial erosion intensity are largely driven by the basal thermal regime, our results confirm earlier inferences from geomorphology for a concentric basal thermal pattern for the paleo Haizishan ice cap during the LGM.

  17. Cavitation erosion behavior of Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhen [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Han, Jiesheng; Lu, Jinjun [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen, Jianmin, E-mail: chenjm@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Cavitation erosion behavior of Hastelloy C-276 was studied by ultrasonic apparatus. • The cavitation-induced precipitates formed in the eroded surface for Hastelloy C-276. • The selective cavitation erosion was found in Hastelloy C-276 alloy. - Abstract: The cavitation erosion behavior of Hastelloy C-276 alloy was investigated using an ultrasonic vibratory apparatus and compared with that of 316L stainless steel. The mean depth of erosion (MDE) and erosion rate (ER) curves vs. test time were attained for Hastelloy C-276 alloy. Morphology and microstructure evolution of the eroded surface were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the predominant erosion mechanism was also discussed. The results show that the MDE is about 1/6 times lower than that of the stainless steel after 9 h of testing. The incubation period of Hastelloy C-276 alloy is about 3 times longer than that of 316L stainless steel. The cavitation-induced nanometer-scaled precipitates were found in the local zones of the eroded surface for Hastelloy C-276. The selective cavitation erosion was found in Hastelloy C-276 alloy. The formation of nanometer-scaled precipitates in the eroded surface may play a significant role in the cavitation erosion resistance of Hastelloy C-276.

  18. Cavitation erosion behavior of Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhen; Han, Jiesheng; Lu, Jinjun; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cavitation erosion behavior of Hastelloy C-276 was studied by ultrasonic apparatus. • The cavitation-induced precipitates formed in the eroded surface for Hastelloy C-276. • The selective cavitation erosion was found in Hastelloy C-276 alloy. - Abstract: The cavitation erosion behavior of Hastelloy C-276 alloy was investigated using an ultrasonic vibratory apparatus and compared with that of 316L stainless steel. The mean depth of erosion (MDE) and erosion rate (ER) curves vs. test time were attained for Hastelloy C-276 alloy. Morphology and microstructure evolution of the eroded surface were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the predominant erosion mechanism was also discussed. The results show that the MDE is about 1/6 times lower than that of the stainless steel after 9 h of testing. The incubation period of Hastelloy C-276 alloy is about 3 times longer than that of 316L stainless steel. The cavitation-induced nanometer-scaled precipitates were found in the local zones of the eroded surface for Hastelloy C-276. The selective cavitation erosion was found in Hastelloy C-276 alloy. The formation of nanometer-scaled precipitates in the eroded surface may play a significant role in the cavitation erosion resistance of Hastelloy C-276

  19. EFFECTS OF SLOPE SHAPES ON SOIL EROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin ŞENSOY, Şahin PALTA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Water is one of the most important erosive forces. A great number of factors also play a role in erosion process and slope characteristic is also one of them. The steepness and length of the slope are important factors for runoff and soil erosion. Another slope factor that has an effect on erosion is the shape of the slope. Generally, different erosion and runoff characteristics exist in different slopes which can be classified as uniform, concave, convex and complex shape. In this study, the effects of slope shape on erosion are stated and emphasized by taking similar researches into consideration.

  20. Prestack depth migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postma, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Two lines form the southern North Sea, with known velocity inhomogeneities in the overburden, have been pre-stack depth migrated. The pre-stack depth migrations are compared with conventional processing, one with severe distortions and one with subtle distortions on the conventionally processed sections. The line with subtle distortions is also compared with post-stack depth migration. The results on both lines were very successful. Both have already influenced drilling decisions, and have caused a modification of structural interpretation in the respective areas. Wells have been drilled on each of the lines, and well tops confirm the results. In fact, conventional processing led to incorrect locations for the wells, both of which were dry holes. The depth migrated sections indicate the incorrect placement, and on one line reveals a much better drilling location. This paper reports that even though processing costs are high for pre-stack depth migration, appropriate use can save millions of dollars in dry-hole expense

  1. Radon depth migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, S.T.; Carroll, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    A depth migration method is presented that used Radon-transformed common-source seismograms as input. It is shown that the Radon depth migration method can be extended to spatially varying velocity depth models by using asymptotic ray theory (ART) to construct wavefield continuation operators. These operators downward continue an incident receiver-array plane wave and an assumed point-source wavefield into the subsurface. The migration velocity model is constrain to have longer characteristic wavelengths than the dominant source wavelength such that the ART approximations for the continuation operators are valid. This method is used successfully to migrate two synthetic data examples: (1) a point diffractor, and (2) a dipping layer and syncline interface model. It is shown that the Radon migration method has a computational advantage over the standard Kirchhoff migration method in that fewer rays are computed in a main memory implementation

  2. Study on pipe wastage mechanism by liquid droplet impingement erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Yuma; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Tsuji, Masashi; Ohmori, Shuichi; Mori, Michitsugu; Tezuka, Kenichi

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of wastage speed for nuclear power plant maintains plant reliability and power up rating is important. There are two main cause of wastage flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) and mechanical erosion. This study is to develop evaluating the wastage speed by liquid droplet impingement erosion (LDIE). LDIE often occurs at downstream of corner of pipe or orifice. In this study, the liquid drop impinging tests were conducted with the test pieces mounted on a high speed rotating disk that cross thin water down jet and produced LDIE phenomena. The amount of the wastage by LDIE was evaluated by changing the rotational speed, the impingement frequency, and test piece materials. In addition, the generation mechanism of erosion was investigated by observing the surface of the test piece with a microscope. There is a method of evaluating by the mass difference before and after experiments. But this method is not correct because error becomes larger for mass measurement in the experiment, for the lost mass by LDIE is very little amount. Therefore, the method was developed to measure the volume in the erosion part. In this method, depth of LDIE was measured by the accuracy of ±0.01μm; therefore accurate measurement of the wastage can be improved. (author)

  3. Estimates of soil erosion and deposition of cultivated soil of Nakhla watershed, Morocco, using 137Cs technique and calibration models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhlassa, S.; Moukhchane, M.; Aiachi, A.

    2000-01-01

    Despite the effective threat of erosion, for soil preservation and productivity in Morocco, there is still only limited information on rates of soil loss involved. This study is aimed to establish long-term erosion rates on cultivated land in the Nakhla watershed located in the north of the country, using 137 Cs technique. Two sampling strategies were adopted. The first is aimed at establishing areal estimates of erosion, whereas the second, based on a transect approach, intends to determine point erosion. Twenty-one cultivated sites and seven undisturbed sites apparently not affected by erosion or deposition were sampled to 35 cm depth. Nine cores were collected along the transect of 149 m length. The assessment of erosion rates with models varying in complexity from the simple Proportional Model to more complex Mass Balance Models which attempts to include the processes controlling the redistribution of 137 Cs in soil, enables us to demonstrate the significance of soil erosion problem on cultivated land. Erosion rates rises up to 50 t ha -1 yr -1 . The 137 Cs derived erosion rates provide a reliable representation of water erosion pattern in the area, and indicate the importance of tillage process on the redistribution of 137 Cs in soil. For aggrading sites a Constant Rate Supply (CRS) Model had been adapted and introduced to estimate easily the depositional rate. (author) [fr

  4. Measuring depth in boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodson, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of determining the depth of rock strata and other features of a borehole. It may be employed with particular advantage when access to the top of the borehole is difficult, for example in underwater operations. A radioactive marker, such as a source of gamma rays, is positioned near the top of the riser of a sub-sea wellhead structure. A radiation detector is lowered between the marker and a radioactive stratum and the length of line supplied is measured on the floating platform. This enables the depth of the stratum to be measured irrespective of tidal variations of the height of the platform. (U.K.)

  5. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiyam T. Devi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Impeller submergence governs the performance of mixing tanks employed in oxygen transfer operation. Present work experimentally investigates the effect of impeller submergence depths on oxygen transfer and corresponding power consumption. It has been found that at higher range of impeller submergence, mixing tanks consume less power and gives higher values of oxygen transfer coefficient. Optimal range of submergence depth is 0.7 to 0.9 times the impeller diameter. Copyright ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 4th March 2011; Revised: 12nd July 2011; Accepted: 14th July 2011[How to Cite: T.T. Devi, A.P. Sinha, M. Thakre, and B. Kumar. (2011. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 123-128. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/826] | View in 

  6. Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Jobbágy, Esteban G; Jackson, Robert B; Otero-Casal, Carlos

    2017-10-03

    Plant rooting depth affects ecosystem resilience to environmental stress such as drought. Deep roots connect deep soil/groundwater to the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrologic cycle and climate. Deep roots enhance bedrock weathering, thus regulating the long-term carbon cycle. However, we know little about how deep roots go and why. Here, we present a global synthesis of 2,200 root observations of >1,000 species along biotic (life form, genus) and abiotic (precipitation, soil, drainage) gradients. Results reveal strong sensitivities of rooting depth to local soil water profiles determined by precipitation infiltration depth from the top (reflecting climate and soil), and groundwater table depth from below (reflecting topography-driven land drainage). In well-drained uplands, rooting depth follows infiltration depth; in waterlogged lowlands, roots stay shallow, avoiding oxygen stress below the water table; in between, high productivity and drought can send roots many meters down to the groundwater capillary fringe. This framework explains the contrasting rooting depths observed under the same climate for the same species but at distinct topographic positions. We assess the global significance of these hydrologic mechanisms by estimating root water-uptake depths using an inverse model, based on observed productivity and atmosphere, at 30″ (∼1-km) global grids to capture the topography critical to soil hydrology. The resulting patterns of plant rooting depth bear a strong topographic and hydrologic signature at landscape to global scales. They underscore a fundamental plant-water feedback pathway that may be critical to understanding plant-mediated global change.

  7. Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Jobbágy, Esteban G.; Jackson, Robert B.; Otero-Casal, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Plant rooting depth affects ecosystem resilience to environmental stress such as drought. Deep roots connect deep soil/groundwater to the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrologic cycle and climate. Deep roots enhance bedrock weathering, thus regulating the long-term carbon cycle. However, we know little about how deep roots go and why. Here, we present a global synthesis of 2,200 root observations of >1,000 species along biotic (life form, genus) and abiotic (precipitation, soil, drainage) gradients. Results reveal strong sensitivities of rooting depth to local soil water profiles determined by precipitation infiltration depth from the top (reflecting climate and soil), and groundwater table depth from below (reflecting topography-driven land drainage). In well-drained uplands, rooting depth follows infiltration depth; in waterlogged lowlands, roots stay shallow, avoiding oxygen stress below the water table; in between, high productivity and drought can send roots many meters down to the groundwater capillary fringe. This framework explains the contrasting rooting depths observed under the same climate for the same species but at distinct topographic positions. We assess the global significance of these hydrologic mechanisms by estimating root water-uptake depths using an inverse model, based on observed productivity and atmosphere, at 30″ (˜1-km) global grids to capture the topography critical to soil hydrology. The resulting patterns of plant rooting depth bear a strong topographic and hydrologic signature at landscape to global scales. They underscore a fundamental plant-water feedback pathway that may be critical to understanding plant-mediated global change.

  8. An Establishment of Rainfall-induced Soil Erosion Index for the Slope Land in Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Jung; Chen, Yie-Ruey; Hsieh, Shun-Chieh; Shu, Chia-Chun; Chen, Ying-Hui

    2014-05-01

    With more and more concentrated extreme rainfall events as a result of climate change, in Taiwan, mass cover soil erosion occurred frequently and led to sediment related disasters in high intensity precipiton region during typhoons or torrential rain storms. These disasters cause a severely lost to the property, public construction and even the casualty of the resident in the affected areas. Therefore, we collected soil losses by using field investigation data from the upstream of watershed where near speific rivers to explore the soil erosion caused by heavy rainfall under different natural environment. Soil losses induced by rainfall and runoff were obtained from the long-term soil depth measurement of erosion plots, which were established in the field, used to estimate the total volume of soil erosion. Furthermore, the soil erosion index was obtained by referring to natural environment of erosion test plots and the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). All data collected from field were used to compare with the one obtained from laboratory test recommended by the Technical Regulation for Soil and Water Conservation in Taiwan. With MATLAB as a modeling platform, evaluation model for soil erodibility factors was obtained by golden section search method, considering factors contributing to the soil erosion; such as degree of slope, soil texture, slope aspect, the distance far away from water system, topography elevation, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The distribution map of soil erosion index was developed by this project and used to estimate the rainfall-induced soil losses from erosion plots have been established in the study area since 2008. All results indicated that soil erodibility increases with accumulated rainfall amount regardless of soil characteristics measured in the field. Under the same accumulated rainfall amount, the volume of soil erosion also increases with the degree of slope and soil permeability, but decreases with the

  9. Crater Mound Formation by Wind Erosion on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, L. J.; Kite, E. S.; Michaels, T. I.

    2018-01-01

    Most of Mars' ancient sedimentary rocks by volume are in wind-eroded sedimentary mounds within impact craters and canyons, but the connections between mound form and wind erosion are unclear. We perform mesoscale simulations of different crater and mound morphologies to understand the formation of sedimentary mounds. As crater depth increases, slope winds produce increased erosion near the base of the crater wall, forming mounds. Peak erosion rates occur when the crater depth is ˜2 km. Mound evolution depends on the size of the host crater. In smaller craters mounds preferentially erode at the top, becoming more squat, while in larger craters mounds become steeper sided. This agrees with observations where smaller craters tend to have proportionally shorter mounds and larger craters have mounds encircled by moats. If a large-scale sedimentary layer blankets a crater, then as the layer recedes across the crater it will erode more toward the edges of the crater, resulting in a crescent-shaped moat. When a 160 km diameter mound-hosting crater is subject to a prevailing wind, the surface wind stress is stronger on the leeward side than on the windward side. This results in the center of the mound appearing to "march upwind" over time and forming a "bat-wing" shape, as is observed for Mount Sharp in Gale crater.

  10. Elevated temperature erosive wear of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Solid particle erosion of metals and alloys at elevated temperature is governed by the nature of the interaction between erosion and oxidation, which, in turn, is determined by the thickness, pliability, morphology, adhesion characteristics and toughness of the oxide scale. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present state of understanding of the elevated temperature erosion behaviour of metals and alloys. First of all, the erosion testing at elevated temperature is reviewed. This is followed by discussion of the essential features of elevated temperature erosion with special emphasis on microscopic observation, giving details of the erosion-oxidation (E-O) interaction mechanisms. The E-O interaction has been elaborated in the subsequent section. The E-O interaction includes E-O maps, analysis of transition criteria from one erosion mechanism to another mechanism and quantification of enhanced oxidation kinetics during erosion. Finally, the relevant areas for future studies are indicated. (topical review)

  11. Understanding Soil Erosion in Irrigated Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    O' Schwankl, Lawrence J

    2006-01-01

    A soil's physical and chemical properties determine whether it is vulnerable to erosion, which can reduce soil quality and cause other problems besides. Learn the basics of identifying what type of erosion is affecting your land and what's causing it.

  12. Why bother about depth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter A.; Obrador, Biel; Christensen, Jesper Philip

    We present results from a newly developed method to determine depth specific rates of GPP, NEP and R using frequent automated profiles of DO and temperature. Metabolic rate calculations were made for three lakes of different trophic status using a diel DO methodology that integrates rates across...

  13. Defining depth of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, S L; Stanski, D R

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, drawn largely from the synthesis of material that we first presented in the sixth edition of Miller's Anesthesia, Chap 31 (Stanski and Shafer 2005; used by permission of the publisher), we have defined anesthetic depth as the probability of non-response to stimulation, calibrated against the strength of the stimulus, the difficulty of suppressing the response, and the drug-induced probability of non-responsiveness at defined effect site concentrations. This definition requires measurement of multiple different stimuli and responses at well-defined drug concentrations. There is no one stimulus and response measurement that will capture depth of anesthesia in a clinically or scientifically meaningful manner. The "clinical art" of anesthesia requires calibration of these observations of stimuli and responses (verbal responses, movement, tachycardia) against the dose and concentration of anesthetic drugs used to reduce the probability of response, constantly adjusting the administered dose to achieve the desired anesthetic depth. In our definition of "depth of anesthesia" we define the need for two components to create the anesthetic state: hypnosis created with drugs such as propofol or the inhalational anesthetics and analgesia created with the opioids or nitrous oxide. We demonstrate the scientific evidence that profound degrees of hypnosis in the absence of analgesia will not prevent the hemodynamic responses to profoundly noxious stimuli. Also, profound degrees of analgesia do not guarantee unconsciousness. However, the combination of hypnosis and analgesia suppresses hemodynamic response to noxious stimuli and guarantees unconsciousness.

  14. Erosion of the first wall of Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, M.I.; Ionova, E.S.; Martynenko, Yu.V.

    1980-01-01

    An estimate of the rate of erosion of the wall due to sputtering and blistering requires knowledge of the fluxes and energies of the particles which go from the plasma to the wall, of the sputtering coefficients S, and of the erosion coefficients S* for blistering. The overall erosion coefficient is equal to the sum of the sputtering coefficient and the erosion coefficient for blistering. Here the T-20 Tokamak is examined as an example of a large-scale Tokamak. 18 refs

  15. Soil Erosion. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buydos, John F., Comp.

    Soil erosion is the detachment and movement of topsoil or soil material from the upper part of the soil profile. It may occur in the form of rill, gully, sheet, or wind erosion. Agents of erosion may be water, wind, glacial ice, agricultural implements, machinery, and animals. Soil conservation measures require a thorough understanding of the…

  16. Natural and anthropogenic rates of soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regions of land that are brought into crop production from native vegetation typically undergo a period of soil erosion instability, and long term erosion rates are greater than for natural lands as long as the land continues being used for crop production. Average rates of soil erosion under natur...

  17. Soil erosion in humid regions: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Holz; Karl W.J. Williard; Pamela J. Edwards; Jon E. Schoonover

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion has significant implications for land productivity and surface water quality, as sediment is the leading water pollutant worldwide. Here, erosion processes are defined. The dominant factors influencing soil erosion in humid areas are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of precipitation, soil moisture, soil porosity, slope steepness and length,...

  18. Speckle interferometry application for erosion measurements in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, E.; Roupillard, R. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2003-07-01

    In order to measure erosion/redeposition in fusion devices, a new diagnostic based on speckle interferometry is investigated. First experiments performed on carbon fibre composite (CFC) materials have shown that this technique is able to measure a modification of the surface in the range of 1 {mu}m. Further experiments have been performed on different materials using a second wavelength in order to carry out 3-dimensional measurements of the surface and to increase the dynamic range of the depth measurement. A diagnostic, based on two-wavelength TV-holography to measure in situ erosion/redeposition during long duration discharges on the CIEL limiter in Tore Supra, is under development at CEA Cadarache. (authors)

  19. Modeling the fluid/soil interface erosion in the Hole Erosion Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kissi B.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon which yields at its final stage to insidious fluid leakages under the hydraulic infrastructures known as piping and which are the main cause of their rupture. The Hole Erosion Test is commonly used to quantify the rate of piping erosion. In this work, The Hole Erosion Test is modelled by using Fluent software package. The aim is to predict the erosion rate of soil during the hole erosion test. The renormalization group theory – based k–ε turbulence model equations are used. This modelling makes it possible describing the effect of the clay concentration in flowing water on erosion. Unlike the usual one dimensional models, the proposed modelling shows that erosion is not uniform erosion along the hole length. In particular, the concentration of clay is found to increase noticeably the erosion rate.

  20. The Arctic Coastal Erosion Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Jennifer M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thomas, Matthew Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Craig A. [Integral Consulting Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Roberts, Jesse D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Permafrost-dominated coastlines in the Arctic are rapidly disappearing. Arctic coastal erosion rates in the United States have doubled since the middle of the twentieth century and appear to be accelerating. Positive erosion trends have been observed for highly-variable geomorphic conditions across the entire Arctic, suggesting a major (human-timescale) shift in coastal landscape evolution. Unfortunately, irreversible coastal land loss in this region poses a threat to native, industrial, scientific, and military communities. The Arctic coastline is vast, spanning more than 100,000 km across eight nations, ten percent of which is overseen by the United States. Much of area is inaccessible by all-season roads. People and infrastructure, therefore, are commonly located near the coast. The impact of the Arctic coastal erosion problem is widespread. Homes are being lost. Residents are being dispersed and their villages relocated. Shoreline fuel storage and delivery systems are at greater risk. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operate research facilities along some of the most rapidly eroding sections of coast in the world. The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) is struggling to fortify coastal radar sites, operated to ensure national sovereignty in the air, against the erosion problem. Rapid alterations to the Arctic coastline are facilitated by oceanographic and geomorphic perturbations associated with climate change. Sea ice extent is declining, sea level is rising, sea water temperature is increasing, and permafrost state is changing. The polar orientation of the Arctic exacerbates the magnitude and rate of the environmental forcings that facilitate coastal land area loss. The fundamental mechanics of these processes are understood; their non-linear combination poses an extreme hazard. Tools to accurately predict Arctic coastal erosion do not exist. To obtain an accurate predictive model, a coupling of the influences of

  1. Wind Wave Behavior in Fetch and Depth Limited Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimpour, Arash; Chen, Qin; Twilley, Robert R.

    2017-01-01

    Wetland dominated estuaries serve as one of the most productive natural ecosystems through their ecological, economic and cultural services, such as nursery grounds for fisheries, nutrient sequestration, and ecotourism. The ongoing deterioration of wetland ecosystems in many shallow estuaries raises concerns about the contributing erosive processes and their roles in restraining coastal restoration efforts. Given the combination of wetlands and shallow bays as landscape components that determine the function of estuaries, successful restoration strategies require knowledge of wind wave behavior in fetch and depth limited water as a critical design feature. We experimentally evaluate physics of wind wave growth in fetch and depth limited estuaries. We demonstrate that wave growth rate in shallow estuaries is a function of wind fetch to water depth ratio, which helps to develop a new set of parametric wave growth equations. We find that the final stage of wave growth in shallow estuaries can be presented by a product of water depth and wave number, whereby their product approaches 1.363 as either depth or wave energy increases. Suggested wave growth equations and their asymptotic constraints establish the magnitude of wave forces acting on wetland erosion that must be included in ecosystem restoration design.

  2. Preventing erosion at pipeline crossings of watercourses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawatsky, L.; Arnold, G.

    1997-01-01

    Watercourses are naturally vulnerable to erosion but the risk is particularly acute after sub-soil and armour materials have been disturbed by trenching and backfilling during construction. Various types of erosion (river scour, river bed, river channel bed and river bank ) and the progressive removal of pipeline cover resulting from erosion were discussed. Methods of estimating the risk of progressive erosion, river avulsions and beaver dam scour, and methods of mitigating erosion at pipeline crossings such as deep burial, proper siting, conventional armouring, and a combination of bank toe protection, and upper bank vegetation cover, were described

  3. Estimation of erosion amount by geochemical characteristic in the Horonobe area, northern Hokkaido

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazuharu; Niizato, Tadafumi; Yasue, Ken-ichi; Ishii, Eiichi

    2005-08-01

    This article presents the results of the estimated amount of erosion and uplifting based on mineralogy and organic geochemical characters of the Neogene siliceous rock (Wakkanai and Koetoi Formations) in Horonobe. As a result of the transformational change of silica minerals, it was clarified that the erosion amount was about 0.66 [m ky -1 ] or more at the large uplift site, and about 0.21 [m ky -1 ] or more at the small uplift site at Hokushin region, Horonobe area. In this case of the correlation with the palaeo-geothermal temperature and the sterane/sterene ratio, the ratio is effective measure to estimate the burial depth and erosion amount. We think that the estimation of the amount of erosion and uplifting became possible in high resolution by the organic geochemical character. (author)

  4. Depth perception: the need to report ocean biogeochemical rates as functions of temperature, not depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peter G; Peltzer, Edward T

    2017-09-13

    For over 50 years, ocean scientists have oddly represented ocean oxygen consumption rates as a function of depth but not temperature in most biogeochemical models. This unique tradition or tactic inhibits useful discussion of climate change impacts, where specific and fundamental temperature-dependent terms are required. Tracer-based determinations of oxygen consumption rates in the deep sea are nearly universally reported as a function of depth in spite of their well-known microbial basis. In recent work, we have shown that a carefully determined profile of oxygen consumption rates in the Sargasso Sea can be well represented by a classical Arrhenius function with an activation energy of 86.5 kJ mol -1 , leading to a Q 10 of 3.63. This indicates that for 2°C warming, we will have a 29% increase in ocean oxygen consumption rates, and for 3°C warming, a 47% increase, potentially leading to large-scale ocean hypoxia should a sufficient amount of organic matter be available to microbes. Here, we show that the same principles apply to a worldwide collation of tracer-based oxygen consumption rate data and that some 95% of ocean oxygen consumption is driven by temperature, not depth, and thus will have a strong climate dependence. The Arrhenius/Eyring equations are no simple panacea and they require a non-equilibrium steady state to exist. Where transient events are in progress, this stricture is not obeyed and we show one such possible example.This article is part of the themed issue 'Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Depth perception: the need to report ocean biogeochemical rates as functions of temperature, not depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peter G.; Peltzer, Edward T.

    2017-08-01

    For over 50 years, ocean scientists have oddly represented ocean oxygen consumption rates as a function of depth but not temperature in most biogeochemical models. This unique tradition or tactic inhibits useful discussion of climate change impacts, where specific and fundamental temperature-dependent terms are required. Tracer-based determinations of oxygen consumption rates in the deep sea are nearly universally reported as a function of depth in spite of their well-known microbial basis. In recent work, we have shown that a carefully determined profile of oxygen consumption rates in the Sargasso Sea can be well represented by a classical Arrhenius function with an activation energy of 86.5 kJ mol-1, leading to a Q10 of 3.63. This indicates that for 2°C warming, we will have a 29% increase in ocean oxygen consumption rates, and for 3°C warming, a 47% increase, potentially leading to large-scale ocean hypoxia should a sufficient amount of organic matter be available to microbes. Here, we show that the same principles apply to a worldwide collation of tracer-based oxygen consumption rate data and that some 95% of ocean oxygen consumption is driven by temperature, not depth, and thus will have a strong climate dependence. The Arrhenius/Eyring equations are no simple panacea and they require a non-equilibrium steady state to exist. Where transient events are in progress, this stricture is not obeyed and we show one such possible example. This article is part of the themed issue 'Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world'.

  6. Improvement in cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajian, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei-Nejad, S.S.; Assadi, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadavi, S.M.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MA University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chung, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Engineering Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shokouhimehr, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Commercial AISI 316L plates with the initial grain size of 14.8 μm were friction stir processed (FSP) with different processing parameters, resulting in two fine-grained microstructures with the grain sizes of 4.6 and 1.7 μm. The cavitation erosion behavior, before and after FSP, was evaluated in terms of incubation time, cumulative mass loss and mean depth of erosion. A separate cavitation erosion test was performed on the transverse cross section of a FSP sample to reveal the effect of grain structure. It was observed that FSP samples, depending on their grain size, are at least 3–6 times more resistant than the base material against cavitation erosion. The improvement in cavitation erosion resistance is attributed to smaller grain structure, lower fraction of twin boundaries, and favorable crystallographic orientation of grains in FSP samples. The finer the grain size, the more cavitation erosion resistance was achieved. Moreover, the microstructures of eroded surfaces were studied using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EBSD, and an atomic force microscope. The mechanisms controlling the cavitation erosion damage in friction stir processed AISI 316L are also discussed.

  7. Soil Erosion Threatens Food Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Burgess

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since humans worldwide obtain more than 99.7% of their food (calories from the land and less than 0.3% from the oceans and aquatic ecosystems, preserving cropland and maintaining soil fertility should be of the highest importance to human welfare. Soil erosion is one of the most serious threats facing world food production. Each year about 10 million ha of cropland are lost due to soil erosion, thus reducing the cropland available for world food production. The loss of cropland is a serious problem because the World Health Organization and the Food and Agricultural Organization report that two-thirds of the world population is malnourished. Overall, soil is being lost from agricultural areas 10 to 40 times faster than the rate of soil formation imperiling humanity’s food security.

  8. On inhibition of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rölla, Gunnar; Jonski, Grazyna; Saxegaard, Erik

    2013-11-01

    To examine the erosion-inhibiting effect of different concentrations of hydrofluoric acid. Thirty-six human molars were individually treated with 10 ml of 0.1 M citric acid for 30 min (Etch 1), acid was collected and stored until analysis. The teeth were randomly divided into six groups and then individually treated with 10 ml of one of six dilutions (from 0.1-1%) of hydrofluoric acid. The teeth were then again treated with citric acid (Etch 2). The individual acid samples from Etch 1 and 2 were analyzed for calcium by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy and difference in calcium loss was calculated. The highest erosion inhibiting effect was obtained in groups with the highest concentrations of hydrofluoric acid, where the pH was lowest, below pKa of 3.17, thus the hydrofluoric acids being mainly in an undissociated state. Diluted hydrofluoric acid is present in aqueous solution of SnF2 and TiF4 (which are known to inhibit dental erosion): SnF2 + 3H2O = Sn(OH)2 + 2HF + H2O and TiF4 + 5H2O = Ti(OH)4 + 4HF + H2O. It is also known that pure, diluted hydrofluoric acid can inhibit dental erosion. Teeth treated with hydrofluoric acid are covered by a layer of CaF2-like mineral. This mineral is acid resistant at pH acid resistant mineral, initiated by tooth enamel treatment with hydrofluoric acid. Hydrofluoric acid is different in having fluoride as a conjugated base, which provides this acid with unique properties.

  9. Erosive forms in rivers systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Una Alvarez, E. de; Vidal Romani, J. R.; Rodriguez Martinez-Conde, R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to analyze the geomorphological meaning of the concepts of stability/change and to study its influence on a fluvial erosion system. Different cases of fluvial potholes in Galicia (NW of the Iberian Peninsula) are considered. The work conclusions refer to the nature of the process and its morphological evolution in order to advance towards later contributions with respect of this type of systems. (Author) 14 refs.

  10. Erosion corrosion in wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavast, J.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of different remedies against erosion corrosion in wet steam has been studied in Barsebaeck 1. Accessible steam systems were inspected in 1984, 1985 and 1986. The effect of hydrogen peroxide injection of the transport of corrosion products in the condensate and feed water systems has also been followed through chemical analyses. The most important results of the project are: - Low alloy chromium steels with a chromium content of 1-2% have shown excellent resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. - A thermally sprayed coating has shown good resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. In a few areas with restricted accessibility minor attacks have been found. A thermally sprayed aluminium oxide coating has given poor results. - Large areas in the moisture separator/reheater and in steam extraction no. 3 have been passivated by injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide to the high pressure steam. In other inspected systems no significant effect was found. Measurements of the wall thickness in steam extraction no. 3 showed a reduced rate of attack. - The injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide has not resulted in any significant reduction of the iron level result is contrary to that of earlier tests. An increase to 40 ppb resulted in a slight decrease of the iron level. - None of the feared disadvantages with hydrogen peroxide injection has been observed. The chromium and cobalt levels did not increase during the injection. Neither did the lifetime of the precoat condensate filters decrease. (author)

  11. Remontant erosion in desert soils of Tamaulipas, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ortiz, P.; Andrade-Limas, E.; De la Garza-Requena, F.; Castro-Meza, B.

    2012-04-01

    REMONTANT EROSION IN DESERT SOILS OF TAMAULIPAS MÉXICO Rivera-Ortiz, P.1; Andrade-Limas, E.1; De la Garza-Requena, F.1 and Castro-Meza, B.1 1Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, México The degradation of soil reduces the capacity of soils to produce food and sustain life. Erosion is one of the main types of soil degradation. Hydric erosion of remontant type can occur in soils located close to the channel of a river through the expansion of a gully that begins as a fluvial incision over the ravine of one side of the river. The incision takes place at the point of greatest flow of runoff from areas adjacent to empty into the river. The depth of the incision causes the growth of the gully by collapse to move their heads back, upstream. The soil loss by remontant erosion on land use in agriculture and livestock was estimated in order to understand the evolution of gullies formed by this type of erosion. Through measurements on satellite images and GPS (Global Positioning System) two gullies, developed on alluvial soils which drain into the river Chihue, were studied. The investigation was conducted during 2003 to 2010 period in the municipality of Jaumave, Tamaulipas, in northeastern Mexico. Soil loss in gullies developed by remontant erosion was large and it was caused by soil collapse and drag of soil on the headers. The estimated loss of soil by remontant erosion was 3500 t in the deeper gully during 2010 and nearly 1200 t per year in the period 2003-2009. New sections of gully of about 20 m length, with more than 3 m deep and up to 13 m wide, were formed each year. This degradation has significantly reduced the productive surface of soil that for many years has been used to the cultivation of maize (Zea mays) and beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) as well as pasture production.

  12. Ground-Laboratory to In-Space Atomic Oxygen Correlation for the PEACE Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambler, Arielle H.; Inoshita, Karen E.; Roberts, Lily M.; Barbagallo, Claire E.; de Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    The Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2) Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) polymers were exposed to the environment of low Earth orbit (LEO) for 3.95 years from 2001 to 2005. There were forty-one different PEACE polymers, which were flown on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) in order to determine their atomic oxygen erosion yields. In LEO, atomic oxygen is an environmental durability threat, particularly for long duration mission exposures. Although space flight experiments, such as the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment, are ideal for determining LEO environmental durability of spacecraft materials, ground-laboratory testing is often relied upon for durability evaluation and prediction. Unfortunately, significant differences exist between LEO atomic oxygen exposure and atomic oxygen exposure in ground-laboratory facilities. These differences include variations in species, energies, thermal exposures and radiation exposures, all of which may result in different reactions and erosion rates. In an effort to improve the accuracy of ground-based durability testing, ground-laboratory to in-space atomic oxygen correlation experiments have been conducted. In these tests, the atomic oxygen erosion yields of the PEACE polymers were determined relative to Kapton H using a radio-frequency (RF) plasma asher (operated on air). The asher erosion yields were compared to the MISSE 2 PEACE erosion yields to determine the correlation between erosion rates in the two environments. This paper provides a summary of the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment; it reviews the specific polymers tested as well as the techniques used to determine erosion yield in the asher, and it provides a correlation between the space and ground-laboratory erosion yield values. Using the PEACE polymers' asher to in-space erosion yield ratios will allow more accurate in-space materials performance predictions to be made based on plasma asher durability evaluation.

  13. The influence of different land-use practices on soil erosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fence-line contrast study compared erosion levels, herbage production and grass species diversity in Umfolozi Game Reserve (UGR) and adjacent Kwazulu (KWZ). There was no significant difference in soil loss or A-horizon depths measured in KWZ and UGR, but there were significant differences in both parameters ...

  14. The Incidence of Soil Erosion in Zing Local Government Area of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management Vol. 4 No.2 2011 ... area is erosive, while analysis of data on rills and gullies using the student t-test shows that greater length and depth of .... Haytee and Publishing Comp. Ilorin ...

  15. Comparison of erosion and erosion control works in Macedonia, Serbia and Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Blinkov

    2013-12-01

    Natural conditions in the Balkan countries contribute to the appearance of various erosion forms and the intensity of the erosion processes. Over the history of these countries, people who settled this region used the available natural resources to fill their needs (tree cutting, incorrect plugging, overgrazing, which contributed to soil erosion. Organized erosion control works in the Balkans started in the beginning of the 20th century (1905 in Bulgaria. The highest intensity of erosion control works were carried out during the period 1945 – 1990. Various erosion control works were launched. Bulgaria had a large anti-erosion afforestation, almost 1 million ha. Bulgaria's ecological river restoration approach has been in use for almost 50 years. Serbia contributed significant erosion and torrent control works on hilly agricultural areas. Specific screen barrages and afforestation on extremely dry areas are characteristic in Macedonia. A common characteristic for all countries is a high decrease in erosion control works in the last 20 years.

  16. Durability of Compressed Earth Bricks: Assessing Erosion Resistance Using the Modified Spray Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malarvizhi Baskaran

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The discussion in this paper is part of research directed at establishing optimal stabilization strategy for compressed bricks. The deployment context for the use of the compressed bricks was Dar es Salaam (Tanzania where manually fabricated bricks are increasingly being used in low cost housing units. This discussion specifically focuses on strategies that can be used to counter deterioration due to wind-driven rain erosion. The impact of using cement, lime, fiber and a commercial stabilizing fluid was assessed. Factory-produced bricks were used for benchmarking. The durability of the bricks was assessed using the “modified” Bulletin 5 Spray Test. The different brick specimens were sprayed with water at 2.07 MPa and 4.14 MPa over one-hour time period while measuring the depth of erosion every 15 minutes. Factory-produced bricks hardly eroded at both 2.07 MPa and 4.14 MPa pressure levels. The maximum depth of erosion for Soil-Cement bricks ranged from a maximum of 0.5 mm at 2.07 MPa water pressure to 0.8 mm at 4.14 MPa. The maximum and minimum depths of erosion for Soil-Cement-Lime bricks were 25mm and 17 mm respectively. The inclusion of natural fiber in the bricks resulted in a sharp increase of the erosion depth to a maximum of 40 mm at 2.07 MPa and 55 mm at 4.14 Mpa. As the use of natural fibers and lime enhances some physio-mechanical properties, further research is necessary to determine ways of achieving this goal while maintaining acceptable levels of erosion resistance.

  17. Erosion of water-based cements evaluated by volumetric and gravimetric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Rie; Uchida, Keiko; Momoi, Yasuko; McCabe, John F

    2003-05-01

    To compare the erosion of glass ionomer, zinc phosphate and polycarboxylate cements using volumetric and gravimetric methods. For the volumetric method, the eroded depth of cement placed in a cylindrical cavity in PMMA was measured using a dial gauge after immersion in an eroding solution. For the gravimetric method, the weight of the residue of a solution in which a cylindrical specimen had been immersed was measured. 0.02 M lactic acid solution (0.02 M acid) and 0.1 M lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer solution (0.1 M buffer) were used as eroding solutions. The pH of both solutions was 2.74 and the test period was 24 h. Ranking of eroded depth and weight of residue was polycarboxylate>zinc phosphate>glass ionomers. Differences in erosion were more clearly defined by differences in eroded depth than differences in weight of residue. In 0.02 M acid, the erosion of glass ionomer using the volumetric method was effected by the hygroscopic expansion. In 0.1 M buffer, the erosion for polycarboxylate and zinc phosphate using the volumetric method was much greater than that using the gravimetric method. This is explained by cryo-SEM images which show many holes in the surface of specimens after erosion. It appears that zinc oxide is dissolved leaving a spongy matrix which easily collapses under the force applied to the dial gauge during measurement. The volumetric method that employs eroded depth of cement using a 0.1 M buffer solution is able to quantify erosion and to make material comparisons.

  18. DSM for soil erosion risk in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro; McLeaod, Jim; Castellazzi, Marie; Baggio Compagnucci, Andrea; Irvine, Justin

    2017-04-01

    Soils play a crucial role in ecosystem functioning, and modelling its risk of degradation is fundamental, especially in the context of climate change. In this work we used continuous 3D soil information derived from digital soil mapping (DSM) approaches to map sediment erosion and deposition patterns due to rainfall. The test area covers the whole of mainland Scotland, excluding the Northern Islands. Soil profiles data were interpolated using a geo-statistical hybrid Generalised Additive Models method for a range of soil properties such as organic matter, texture, soil depth and peat presence. The same method was used to interpolate climatic data and management information. Remote sensing data were integrated in the process and land use data included. Information on grazing (sheep and deer) pressure was taken into account in the modelling. The uncertainty was accounted and propagated across the whole process. The Scottish test case highlights the differences in roles between mineral and organic soils with an assessment adapted to each of them. The results and intermediate steps were compared with available continental scale results. The results show the importance of the use of DSM approaches for modeling soils and ecosystem functions and assessing uncertainty propagation.

  19. Shave-off depth profiling: Depth profiling with an absolute depth scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, M.; Maekawa, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Tomiyasu, B.; Sakamoto, T.; Owari, M.; Nihei, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Shave-off depth profiling provides profiling with an absolute depth scale. This method uses a focused ion beam (FIB) micro-machining process to provide the depth profile. We show that the shave-off depth profile of a particle reflected the spherical shape of the sample and signal intensities had no relationship to the depth. Through the introduction of FIB micro-sampling, the shave-off depth profiling of a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) tip was carried out. The shave-off profile agreed with a blue print from the manufacturing process. Finally, shave-off depth profiling is discussed with respect to resolutions and future directions

  20. The comparison of various approach to evaluation erosion risks and design control erosion measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapicka, Jiri

    2015-04-01

    In the present is in the Czech Republic one methodology how to compute and compare erosion risks. This methodology contain also method to design erosion control measures. The base of this methodology is Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and their result long-term average annual rate of erosion (G). This methodology is used for landscape planners. Data and statistics from database of erosion events in the Czech Republic shows that many troubles and damages are from local episodes of erosion events. An extent of these events and theirs impact are conditional to local precipitation events, current plant phase and soil conditions. These erosion events can do troubles and damages on agriculture land, municipally property and hydro components and even in a location is from point of view long-term average annual rate of erosion in good conditions. Other way how to compute and compare erosion risks is episodes approach. In this paper is presented the compare of various approach to compute erosion risks. The comparison was computed to locality from database of erosion events on agricultural land in the Czech Republic where have been records two erosion events. The study area is a simple agriculture land without any barriers that can have high influence to water flow and soil sediment transport. The computation of erosion risks (for all methodology) was based on laboratory analysis of soil samples which was sampled on study area. Results of the methodology USLE, MUSLE and results from mathematical model Erosion 3D have been compared. Variances of the results in space distribution of the places with highest soil erosion where compared and discussed. Other part presents variances of design control erosion measures where their design was done on based different methodology. The results shows variance of computed erosion risks which was done by different methodology. These variances can start discussion about different approach how compute and evaluate erosion risks in areas

  1. Saltmarsh creek bank stability: Biostabilisation and consolidation with depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Thompson, C. E. L.; Collins, M. B.

    2012-03-01

    The stability of cohesive sediments of a saltmarsh in Southern England was measured in the field and the laboratory using a Cohesive Strength Meter (CSM) and a shear vane apparatus. Cores and sediment samples were collected from two tidal creek banks, covered by Atriplex portulacoides (Sea Purslane) and Juncus maritimus (Sea Rush), respectively. The objectives of the study were to examine the variation of sediment stability throughout banks with cantilevers present and investigate the influence of roots and downcore consolidation on bank stability. Data on erosion threshold and shear strength were interpreted with reference to bank depth, sediment properties and biological influences. The higher average erosion threshold was from the Sea Purslane bank whilst the Sea Rush bank showed higher average vane shear strength. The vertical variation in core sediment stability was mainly affected by roots and downcore consolidation with depth. The data obtained from the bank faces revealed that vertical variations in both erosion threshold and vane shear strength were affected primarily by roots and algae. A quantitative estimate of the relative contributions of roots and downcore consolidation to bank sediment stability was undertaken using the bank stability data and sediment density data. This showed that roots contributed more to the Sea Purslane bank stability than downcore consolidation, whilst downcore consolidation has more pronounced effects on the Sea Rush bank stability.

  2. Cavitation erosion - scale effect and model investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, F.; Rutschmann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The experimental works presented in here contribute to the clarification of erosive effects of hydrodynamic cavitation. Comprehensive cavitation erosion test series were conducted for transient cloud cavitation in the shear layer of prismatic bodies. The erosion pattern and erosion rates were determined with a mineral based volume loss technique and with a metal based pit count system competitively. The results clarified the underlying scale effects and revealed a strong non-linear material dependency, which indicated significantly different damage processes for both material types. Furthermore, the size and dynamics of the cavitation clouds have been assessed by optical detection. The fluctuations of the cloud sizes showed a maximum value for those cavitation numbers related to maximum erosive aggressiveness. The finding suggests the suitability of a model approach which relates the erosion process to cavitation cloud dynamics. An enhanced experimental setup is projected to further clarify these issues.

  3. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabio, C; Meusburger, K; Klik, A

    2017-01-01

    to Eastern Europe. The maps also show a clear delineation of areas with different erosivity seasonal patterns, whose spatial outline was evidenced by cluster analysis. The monthly erosivity maps can be used to develop composite indicators that map both intra-annual variability and concentration of erosive...... and seasonal R-factor maps and assess rainfall erosivity both spatially and temporally. During winter months, significant rainfall erosivity is present only in part of the Mediterranean countries. A sudden increase of erosivity occurs in major part of European Union (except Mediterranean basin, western part...... selected among various statistical models to perform the spatial interpolation due to its excellent performance, ability to model non-linearity and interpretability. The monthly prediction is an order more difficult than the annual one as it is limited by the number of covariates and, for consistency...

  4. Erosion and sedimentation caused by watercourse regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, T.E.; Godtland, K.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the observations made by SINTEF NHL in 1993 - 1994 on the development of erosion in three regulated lakes in Norway: Devdesjavri, Store Maalvatn and Gjevilvatnet. Surveys, profile levelling, water sample analyses, aerial photography etc were all used. Erosion was dramatic in all three magazines the first year of regulation and then slowed down. It has since remained relatively stable. However, there is a risk of further strong erosion connected with flooding tributaries, notably at low water such as usually occurs in spring. This is true in particular of the main river discharging into Devdesjavri, which is subject to landslides, wave and river erosion. In addition, ground water erosion may occur if the magazine is drained too fast. The report is lavishly illustrated with colour pictures of the effects of erosion. 21 refs., 15 figs., 13 tabs

  5. Varioliform erosions in the stomach and duodenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotz, W.; Schulz, D.; Munkel, G.

    1984-04-01

    One thousand five hundred and eighty-three patients who were x-rayed for dyspepsia showed varioliform erosions in 15.3%. Men had an incidence of 9.8%, almost twice as common as in women (5.5%). Mucosal polyps, usually of the hyperplastic type, occurred in 2.4%. 15% of patients with gastric ulcers and 16% of patients with duodenal ulcers had varioliform erosions. On the other hand, amongst patients with erosions, 11% had gastric ulcers and 8.3% duodenal ulcers. The definitions of erosion which have been given in the literature are partly contradictory, and are discussed. Varioliform erosions, also known as complete erosions, may be acute or chronic. They are the third most common cause of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. With modern radiological methods of examining the stomach, they are no longer a rare finding. 5 figs.

  6. Varioliform erosions in the stomach and duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, W.; Schulz, D.; Munkel, G.

    1984-01-01

    One thousand five hundred and eighty-three patients who were x-rayed for dyspepsia showed varioliform erosions in 15.3%. Men had an incidence of 9.8%, almost twice as common as in women (5.5%). Mucosal polyps, usually of the hyperplastic type, occurred in 2.4%. 15% of patients with gastric ulcers and 16% of patients with duodenal ulcers had varioliform erosions. On the other hand, amongst patients with erosions, 11% had gastric ulcers and 8.3% duodenal ulcers. The definitions of erosion which have been given in the literature are partly contradictory, and are discussed. Varioliform erosions, also known as complete erosions, may be acute or chronic. They are the third most common cause of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. With modern radiological methods of examining the stomach, they are no longer a rare finding. (orig.) [de

  7. Assessment and management of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojie; Lussi, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    Studies have shown a growing trend toward increasing prevalence of dental erosion, associated with the declining prevalence of caries disease in industrialized countries. Erosion is an irreversible chemical process that results in tooth substance loss and leaves teeth susceptible to damage as a result of wear over the course of an individual's lifetime. Therefore, early diagnosis and adequate prevention are essential to minimize the risk of tooth erosion. Clinical appearance is the most important sign to be used to diagnose erosion. The Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) is a simple method to fulfill this task. The determination of a variety of risk and protective factors (patient-dependent and nutrition-dependent factors) as well as their interplay are necessary to initiate preventive measures tailored to the individual. When tooth loss caused by erosive wear reaches a certain level, oral rehabilitation becomes necessary. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. DENTAL EROSION IN PRIMARY DENTITION- A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafi Shaik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The pattern of oral diseases has been influenced by ever changing human lifestyle. Tooth wear especially dental erosion has drawn increasing attention as risk factor for tooth damage or loss in recent years. It is a common condition in primary dentition compared to permanent dentition due to thinner and less mineralised enamel. However, it is more worrying, when this condition is being found in an alarming proportion among children. The presence of dental erosion in children is likely to be associated with a number of general health and dietary factors, but it is also aggravated by the relatively more rapid progression of erosion in the deciduous teeth. An understanding of the aetiologies and risk factors for erosion is important for early recognition of dental erosion to prevent serious irreversible damage to the dentition. This paper discusses the erosion in children with regard to its epidemiology, prevalence, clinical features, measurement and prevention.

  9. Oxygen safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sure you have working smoke detectors and a working fire extinguisher in your home. If you move around the house with your oxygen, you may need more than one fire extinguisher in different locations. Smoking can be very dangerous. No one should smoke ...

  10. Hydro-abrasive erosion on coated Pelton runners: Partial calibration of the IEC model based on measurements in HPP Fieschertal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, D.; Abgottspon, A.; Albayrak, I.; Boes, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    At medium- and high-head hydropower plants (HPPs) on sediment-laden rivers, hydro-abrasive erosion on hydraulic turbines is a major economic issue. For optimization of such HPPs, there is an interest in equations to predict erosion depths. Such a semi-empirical equation suitable for engineering practice is proposed in the relevant guideline of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62364). However, for Pelton turbines no numerical values of the model's calibration parameters have been available yet. In the scope of a research project at the high-head HPP Fieschertal, Switzerland, the particle load and the erosion on the buckets of two hard-coated 32 MW-Pelton runners have been measured since 2012. Based on three years of field data, the numerical values of a group of calibration parameters of the IEC erosion model were determined for five application cases: (i) reduction of splitter height, (ii) increase of splitter width and (iii) increase of cut-out depth due to erosion of mainly base material, as well as erosion of coating on (iv) the splitter crests and (v) inside the buckets. Further laboratory and field investigations are recommended to quantify the effects of individual parameters as well as to improve, generalize and validate erosion models for uncoated and coated Pelton turbines.

  11. PROBLEMS OF SOIL PROTECTION FROM EROSION

    OpenAIRE

    M. Voloshuk; Natalia Kiriak

    2007-01-01

    In this article the problems of soil protection from erosion in Moldova are considered. The history (evolution) of erosive processes is generalized, the first items of information on presence washed off soils are marked. Purposeful study of soil erosion, development of measures of struggle with it were begun in Moldova at the end of 40 years. In connection with transition to new economic methods of conducting economy (farmers, rent, privatization of land) before pedologist, the experts of des...

  12. Oxygen therapy - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathe increased amounts of oxygen to get normal levels of oxygen in their blood. Oxygen therapy provides babies with the extra oxygen. Information Oxygen is a gas that the cells in your body need to work properly. The ...

  13. Erosion products in disruption simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Barsuk, V.; Kurkin, S.; Mironova, E.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Zhitlukhin, A.; Arkhipov, I.; Werle, H.; Wuerz, H.

    1998-01-01

    Erosion of divertor materials under tokamak disruption event presents a serious problem of ITER technology. Erosion restricts the divertor lifetime and leads to production of redeposited layers of the material retaining large amount of tritium, which is a major safety issue for future fusion reactor. Since ITER disruptive heat loads are not achievable in existing tokamaks, material erosion is studied in special simulation experiments. Till now the simulation experiments have focused mainly on investigation of shielding effect and measurement of erosion rate. In the present work the properties of eroded and redeposited graphite are studied under condition typical for hard ITER disruption. (author)

  14. Reduction of surface erosion in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossing, T.D.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the major processes leading to surface erosion in fusion reactors are reviewed briefly, including blistering by implanted gas, sputtering by ions, atoms, and neutrons, and vaporization by local heating. Surface erosion affects the structural integrity and limits the lifetime of reactor components exposed to plasma radiation. In addition, some of the processes leading to surface erosion also cause the release of plasma contaminants. Methods proposed to reduce surface erosion have included control of surface temperature, selection of materials with a favorable microstructure, chemical and mechanical treatment of surfaces, and employment of protective surface coatings, wall liners, and divertors. The advantages and disadvantages of some of these methods are discussed

  15. Erosive lichen planus: a therapeutic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Williams; Giesen, Laura; Navajas-Galimany, Lucas; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Erosive lichen planus is an uncommon variant of lichen planus. Chronic erosions of the soles, accompanied by intense and disabling pain, are some of its most characteristic manifestations. We present the case of a woman who developed oral and plantar erosive lichen planus associated with lichen planus pigmentosus and ungueal lichen planus that were diagnosed after several years. The patient failed to respond to multiple therapies requiring longstanding medication but remained refractory. Knowledge of the treatment options for erosive lichen planus is insufficient. Further research is required to clarify their effectiveness, ideally adopting an evidence-based methodology.

  16. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The erosion of materials by the impact of solid particles has received increasing attention during the past twenty years. Recently, research has been initiated with the event of advanced coal conversion processes in which erosion plays an important role. The resulting damage, termed Solid Particle Erosion (SPE), is of concern primarily because of the significantly increased operating costs which result in material failures. Reduced power plant efficiency due to solid particle erosion of boiler tubes and waterfalls has led to various methods to combat SPE. One method is to apply coatings to the components subjected to erosive environments. Protective weld overlay coatings are particularly advantageous in terms of coating quality. The weld overlay coatings are essentially immune to spallation due to a strong metallurgical bond with the substrate material. By using powder mixtures, multiple alloys can be mixed in order to achieve the best performance in an erosive environment. However, a review of the literature revealed a lack of information on weld overlay coating performance in erosive environments which makes the selection of weld overlay alloys a difficult task. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of weld overlay coating composition and microstructure on erosion resistance. These results will lead to a better understanding of erosion mitigation in CFB's.

  17. Erosion and deposition in a field/forest system estimated using cesium-137 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrance, R.; McIntyre, S.; Lance, C.

    1988-01-01

    Soil erosion and deposition were estimated using Cs-137 activity within a 7.25-ha field/forest system in the southeastern coastal plain. Sol eroded from the field was deposited both in the riparian forest ecosystem and in downslope areas of the field. Total activity, depth to peak activity, and depth to zero activity increased downslope from field to stream. Erosion and deposition rates, estimated by changes in activity per unit area from a reference undisturbed forest site, showed that about twice as much total deposition had taken place as total erosion. Excess deposition was attributed to deposition from the upstream portions of the watershed. Erosion and deposition rates estimated with this method were about 63 and 256 Mg/ha/yr, respectively. Erosion and deposition rates estimated by two different calculation techniques were nearly identical. These rates were considerably higher than rates estimated in an earlier study. The rates may be overestimated because the differential rates of Cs-137 movement on clay particles were not considered. The riparian ecosystem acted as a very efficient sediment trap. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  18. The origin of Venusian channels: Modelling of thermal erosion by lava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussey, D. B. J.; Sorensen, S-A.; Guest, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Magellan imagery has revealed that channels, apparently volcanic in origin, are abundant on the surface of Venus. There has been much debate about the origin of these channels. Are they the result of erosional (either thermal or mechanical) or constructional processes? A common characteristic of the simple sinuous channels is that they show evidence of erosion near their source and then become purely constructional, forming levees and in some cases roofing over completely. One method of showing that thermal erosion is capable of producing the type of channels seen is to use computer modeling incorporating the physical conditions on Venus and the physical characteristics of the different types of lava that may have been erupted. It is possible to calculate, relatively easily, two channel parameters. The first is the erosion rate, which combined with eruption duration, gives depth. The second is for how long after leaving the source the erupted lava will continue to be capable of thermal erosion before constructional processes dominate. Making assumptions about the rheology of the lava (e.g., assume it behaves as a Bingham plastic) along with the slope angle yields a flow velocity and therefore a distance over which thermal erosion will take place. Due to the resolution (both vertical and horizontal) of the Magellan altimetric data, the distance from the source that the channel is erosional can be much more accurately measured than the depth of the channel. This will remain the case until stereo imagery becomes available for large areas of the planet.

  19. Prevention of dental erosion of a sports drink by nano-sized hydroxyapatite in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ji Hyun; Kwon, Ho Keun; Kim, Baek Il

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the inhibitory effects of the sports drink containing nano-sized hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) on dental erosion in situ. The study had a single-blind, two-treatment crossover design. The two treatment groups were a control group (CG; Powerade only) and an experimental group (EG; 0.25% wt/vol nano-HA was added to Powerade). Ten subjects wore removable palatal appliances containing bovine enamel specimens. The appliances were immersed in each drink for 10 mins, 4 times a day for 10 days. The tooth surface microhardness (SMH) was tested, and the erosion depth and the morphology of the tooth surface were observed. The data were analysed by repeated measures anova and t-test. Between the baseline and the 10th day, SMH was decreased by 80% in the specimens of the CG (P erosion depth of 12.70 ± 4.66 μm and an irregular tooth surface were observed on the 10th day in the specimens of the CG. No dental erosions, however, was observed in the specimens of the EG. The sports drink containing 0.25% nano-HA was effective in preventing dental erosion in situ. © 2014 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The influence of rill density on soil erosion against USLE-soil erosion methode

    OpenAIRE

    Rizalihadi, A.M.; Faimah, B.E.; Nazia, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Land and water is one of the major natural resource which has an important role for human life. Exploitation of land in catchment areas that not correspond to its carrying capacity will cause damage. One of the effect is increassing the soil erosion. Continuous erosion will also lead to increased sediment transport in rivers that disrupt the ship navigation on estuary due sediment accumulation. At present, soil erosion is estimated using USLE method, which is only limited to the erosion in th...

  1. Institutional Strength in Depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weightman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Much work has been undertaken in order to identify, learn and implement the lessons from the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. These have mainly targeted on engineering or operational lessons. Less attention has been paid to the institutional lessons, although there have been some measures to improve individual peer reviews, particularly by the World Association of Nuclear Operators, and the authoritative IAEA report published in 2015 brought forward several important lessons for regulators and advocated a system approach. The report noted that one of the contributing factors the accident was the tendency of stakeholders not to challenge. Additionally, it reported deficiencies in the regulatory authority and system. Earlier, the root cause of the accident was identified by a Japanese independent parliamentary report as being cultural and institutional. The sum total of the institutions, the safety system, was ineffective. While it is important to address the many technical and operational lessons these may not necessary address this more fundamental lesson, and may not serve to provide robust defences against human or institutional failings over a wide variety of possible events and combinations. The overall lesson is that we can have rigorous and comprehensive safety standards and other tools in place to deliver high levels of safety, but ultimately what is important is the ability of the nuclear safety system to ensure that the relevant institutions diligently and effectively apply those standards and tools — to be robust and resilient. This has led to the consideration of applying the principles of the strength in depth philosophy to a nuclear safety system as a way of providing a framework for developing, assessing, reviewing and improving the system. At an IAEA conference in October 2013, a model was presented for a robust national nuclear safety system based on strength in depth philosophy. The model highlighted three main layers: industry, the

  2. Susceptibility of CANDU steam generator preheater to cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroche, S.L.; Sun, L.; Pietralik, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Darlington Steam Generator (SG) tube inspections revealed some tubes had degraded in the preheater. The tube degradation occurred at the clearance gap between the tube and the preheater baffle and reached up to 50% through-wall depth at the baffles in the middle portion of the preheater. The general pattern of the damage and the elemental composition analysis suggested that the degradation was the result of a hydrodynamic process, such as cavitation erosion. Cavitation erosion occurs when vapour bubbles exist or form in the flowing liquid and then these bubbles collapse violently in the vicinity of the wall. These bubbles collapse when steam bubbles contact water that is sufficiently subcooled, below the saturation temperature. In the gap between the tube and the preheater baffle, low flow will exist due to the pressure difference across the baffle plate. In addition, heat transfer occurs from the primary-side fluid to the secondary-side fluid within this clearance gap that is driven by the primary-to-secondary temperature difference. Factors, such as the tube position in the baffle hole and fouling, influence the local conditions and can cause subcooled boiling that result in cavitation. This paper presents a study of flow and heat transfer phenomena to determine the factors contributing to cavitation erosion in SG preheaters. The analysis used the THIRST1 code for a 3-dimensional thermalhydraulic simulation of the steam generators and the ANSYS FLUENT®2 code for detailed calculations of flow and heat transfer in the clearance gaps. This study identifies that tubes in the preheater region are susceptible to cavitation erosion and indicates that this area should be part of the station inspection program because, regardless of preheater design, some tubes may experience the thermalhydraulic conditions and undergo degradations similar to those observed for the tubes in Darlington SGs. (author)

  3. Influence of liquid temperature and flow rate on enamel erosion and surface softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenburger, M; Addy, M

    2003-11-01

    Enamel erosion and softening are based on chemical processes which could be influenced by many factors including temperature and acid flow rate. Knowledge of the influence of these variables could have relevance to research experiments and clinical outcomes. Both parameters were investigated using an ultrasonication and profilometry method to assess erosion depth and surface softening of enamel. The influence of temperature was studied by eroding polished human enamel samples at 4, 20, 35 or 50 degrees C for 2 h. Secondly, different liquid flow conditions were established by varying acid agitation. Additionally, a slow laminar flow and a jet of citric acid, to simulate drinking through a straw, were applied to specimens. Erosion depth increased significantly with acid temperature from 11.0 microm at 4 degrees C to 35.8 microm at 50 degrees C. Surface softening increased much more slowly and plateaued at 2.9 microm to 3.5 microm after 35 degrees C. A strong dependence of erosion on liquid flow was revealed. In unstirred conditions only 8.6 microm erosion occurred, which increased to 22.2 microm with slow stirring and 40.9 microm with fast stirring. Surface softening did not increase correspondingly with its largest extent at slow stirring at 3.4 microm.The implication of these data are: first, the conditions for erosion experiments in vitro or in situ need to be specified for reliable comparisons between studies. Secondly, erosion of teeth by soft drinks are likely to be influenced both by the temperature of the drink and individual drinking habits.

  4. Offshore Wind Technology Depth Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coastal bathymetric depth, measured in meters at depth values of: -30, -60, -900 Shallow Zone (0-30m): Technology has been demonstrated on a commercial scale at...

  5. Radiant heat evaluation of concrete: a study of the erosion of concrete due to surface heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the erosion of concrete under high surface heat flux in connection with the core-melt/concrete interaction studies. The dominate erosion mechanism was found to be melting at the surface accompanied by chemical decomposition of the concrete beneath the melt-solid interface. The erosion process reaches a steady state after an initial transient. The steady state is characterized by an essentially constant erosion rate at the surface and a nonvarying (with respect to the moving melt interface) temperature distribution within the concrete. For the range of incident heat flux 64 W/cm 2 to 118 W/cm 2 , the corresponding steady state erosion rate varies from approximately 8 cm/hr to 23 cm/hr. A simple ablation/melting model is proposed for the erosion process. The model was found to be able to correlate all temperature responses at various depths from all tests at large times and for temperatures above approximately 250 0 C

  6. Microstructure and erosion characteristic of nodular cast iron surface modified by tungsten inert gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abboud, Jaafar Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Local surface melting. ► Significant improvement in erosion resistance. ► The ductile behaviour was found. -- Abstract: The surface of nodular cast iron has been melted and rapidly solidified by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) process to produce a chilled structure of high hardness and better erosion resistance. Welding currents of magnitude 100, 150, and 200 A at a constant voltage of 72 have been used to melt the surface of nodular cast iron. Microstructural characterization, hardness measurements, and erosion wear tests have been performed on these modified surfaces as well as on the untreated material. Microstructural characterization has shown that surface melting resulted in complete or partial dissolution of the graphite nodules and resolidification of primary austenite dendrites, which undergo further decomposition into ferrite and cementite, and interdendritic of acicular eutectic; their microhardness measured across the melted depth ranged between 600 and 800 Hv. The scale of the dendrites and the interdendritic eutectic became coarser when a higher current is used. The results also indicated that remelting process by TIG improved erosion resistance by three to four times. Eroded surface observations of the as-received and TIG melted samples showed a ductile behavior with a maximum erosion rate at 30°. The fine microstructures obtained by the rapid cooling and the formation of a large amount of eutectic cementite instead of the graphite have contributed greatly to the plastic flow and consequently to the better erosion resistance of the TIG surface melted samples.

  7. Estimating cumulative soil accumulation rates with in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclide depth profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical model relating spatially averaged rates of cumulative soil accumulation and hillslope erosion to cosmogenic nuclide distribution in depth profiles is presented. Model predictions are compared with cosmogenic 21 Ne and AMS radiocarbon data from soils of the Pajarito Plateau, New Mexico. Rates of soil accumulation and hillslope erosion estimated by cosmogenic 21 Ne are significantly lower than rates indicated by radiocarbon and regional soil-geomorphic studies. The low apparent cosmogenic erosion rates are artifacts of high nuclide inheritance in cumulative soil parent material produced from erosion of old soils on hillslopes. In addition, 21 Ne profiles produced under conditions of rapid accumulation (>0.1 cm/a) are difficult to distinguish from bioturbated soil profiles. Modeling indicates that while 10 Be profiles will share this problem, both bioturbation and anomalous inheritance can be identified with measurement of in situ-produced 14 C

  8. Quantifying accelerated soil erosion through ecological site-based assessments of wind and water erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work explores how organising soil erosion assessments using established groupings of similar soils (ecological sites) can inform systems for managing accelerated soil erosion. We evaluated aeolian sediment transport and fluvial erosion rates for five ecological sites in southern New Mexico, USA...

  9. Farmers' identification of erosion indicators and related erosion damage in the Central Highlands of Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.; Okoba, B.O.

    2006-01-01

    Most soil and water conservation planning approaches rely on empirical assessment methods and hardly consider farmers' knowledge of soil erosion processes. Farmers' knowledge of on-site erosion indicators could be useful in assessing the site-specific erosion risk before planning any conservation

  10. Determination of Erosion Hazard Level And Bio-Mechanical Conservation In Post Merapi Eruption Land At Srumbung Magelang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Setyo Wardoyo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the Erosion hazard, to look for conservation of bio - mechanical techniques are appropriate . Research methods with overlies topographic maps, soil maps, land use maps, to obtain a Land Unit Map. Determined soil physical properties (texture, structure, permeability and chemical properties of soil (soil organic matter, slope, slope length, broad of land unit, crops factor and value conservation factors that have been there for Land Unit. Each land unit is determined the amount of land erosion and erosion hazard level. Erosion hazard level is determined based on soil erosion, and soil depth. Erosion hazzard level is used to determine the bio-mechanical conservation, according Hardjowigeno and Sukmana (1995. The results showed that the highest erosion hazard level with an area of 12.947 ha is classified weight (Land unit 15A, and the classification of an area of 14.665 ha is clssified moderately (Land unit 6A. Soil conservation is done in areas with highest erosion hazard level by making individual terraces and “kerandang” planted as a cover crops.

  11. Sediment Transport and erosion modeling at Heaundae Beach in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, K.; Yoo, J.; McCall, R. T.

    2016-12-01

    The sand pocket beaches with two headlands are global features, but it's not easy to predict berm and dune erosion due to alongshore variation of water depth. This study investigates the sediment transport and morphological change using available wave and beach profile data, as well as to assess the applicability of the XBeach morphological model (Roelvink et al., 2009). The Haeundae is small pocket beach, 1.4 km long, located in the southern corner of the Korean Peninsula. The Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST) measured beach profile along 27 survey lines. The beach profiles were surveyed five times from 17 June 2014 to 10 October 2014. For this duration, a wave gauge (AWAC) was installed at a depth about 23 m off the coast of Haeundae Beach. Severe four storms attacked Haeundae Beach for this duration and these storms lasted about 1 2 days with a peak significant wave height of 2.5 4.0 m. The placed sand is fairly sorted and its median diameter is 0.23 mm. 2DH coastal morphological model, XBeach developed to simulate dune erosion due to storm impacts. The model is based on the nonlinear shallow water equation and resolves nearshore hydrodynamics by employing a 2DH description of wave groups and infragravity motions. In this study, the numerical model XBeach was compared with the field data and used to estimate the sediment transport pattern on the sand pocket beach. The numerical model resulted in a comparable prediction in the west-part, but the east-part cannot reproduce the erosion and accretion of the sand, partly due to complex bathymetry and the lack of sediment. This limitation needs to be improved to use measured sand thickness data in future study

  12. Monthly Rainfall Erosivity Assessment for Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Simon; Meusburger, Katrin; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Water erosion is crucially controlled by rainfall erosivity, which is quantified out of the kinetic energy of raindrop impact and associated surface runoff. Rainfall erosivity is often expressed as the R-factor in soil erosion risk models like the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and its revised version (RUSLE). Just like precipitation, the rainfall erosivity of Switzerland has a characteristic seasonal dynamic throughout the year. This inter-annual variability is to be assessed by a monthly and seasonal modelling approach. We used a network of 86 precipitation gauging stations with a 10-minute temporal resolution to calculate long-term average monthly R-factors. Stepwise regression and Monte Carlo Cross Validation (MCCV) was used to select spatial covariates to explain the spatial pattern of R-factor for each month across Switzerland. The regionalized monthly R-factor is mapped by its individual regression equation and the ordinary kriging interpolation of its residuals (Regression-Kriging). As covariates, a variety of precipitation indicator data has been included like snow height, a combination of hourly gauging measurements and radar observations (CombiPrecip), mean monthly alpine precipitation (EURO4M-APGD) and monthly precipitation sums (Rhires). Topographic parameters were also significant explanatory variables for single months. The comparison of all 12 monthly rainfall erosivity maps showed seasonality with highest rainfall erosivity in summer (June, July, and August) and lowest rainfall erosivity in winter months. Besides the inter-annual temporal regime, a seasonal spatial variability was detectable. Spatial maps of monthly rainfall erosivity are presented for the first time for Switzerland. The assessment of the spatial and temporal dynamic behaviour of the R-factor is valuable for the identification of more susceptible seasons and regions as well as for the application of selective erosion control measures. A combination with monthly vegetation

  13. Erosion and Accretion on a Mudflat: The Importance of Very Shallow-Water Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Benwei; Cooper, James R.; Pratolongo, Paula D.; Gao, Shu; Bouma, T. J.; Li, Gaocong; Li, Chunyan; Yang, S. L.; Wang, Ya Ping

    2017-12-01

    Understanding erosion and accretion dynamics during an entire tidal cycle is important for assessing their impacts on the habitats of biological communities and the long-term morphological evolution of intertidal mudflats. However, previous studies often omitted erosion and accretion during very shallow-water stages (VSWS, water depths 0.2 m (i.e., probe submerged) are considered. These findings suggest that the magnitude of bed-level changes during VSWS should not be neglected when modeling morphodynamic processes. Our results are useful in understanding the mechanisms of micro-topography formation and destruction that often occur at VSWS, and also improve our understanding and modeling ability of coastal morphological changes.

  14. Plutonium as a tracer for soil erosion assessment in northeast China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yihong [School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Qiao, Jixin [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Pan, Shaoming, E-mail: span@nju.edu.cn [School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Hou, Xiaolin, E-mail: xiho@dtu.dk [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Xi' an AMS Center, SKLLQG, Institute of Earth Environment, CAS, Xi' an 710075 (China); Roos, Per [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Cao, Liguo [School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion is one of the most serious environmental and agricultural problems faced by human society. Assessing intensity is an important issue for controlling soil erosion and improving eco-environmental quality. The suitability of the application of plutonium (Pu) as a tracer for soil erosion assessment in northeast China was investigated by comparing with that of {sup 137}Cs. Here we build on preliminary work, in which we investigated the potential of Pu as a soil erosion tracer by sampling additional reference sites and potential erosive sites, along the Liaodong Bay region in northeast China, for Pu isotopes and {sup 137}Cs. {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic ratios in all samples were approximately 0.18, which indicated that the dominant source of Pu was the global fallout. Pu showed very similar distribution patterns to those of {sup 137}Cs at both uncultivated and cultivated sites. {sup 239+240}Pu concentrations in all uncultivated soil cores followed an exponential decline with soil depth, whereas at cultivated sites, Pu was homogenously distributed in plow horizons. Factors such as planted crop types, as well as methods and frequencies of irrigation and tillage were suggested to influence the distribution of radionuclides in cultivated land. The baseline inventories of {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 137}Cs were 88.4 and 1688 Bq m{sup −2} respectively. Soil erosion rates estimated by {sup 239+240}Pu tracing method were consistent with those obtained by the {sup 137}Cs method, confirming that Pu is an effective tracer with a similar tracing behavior to that of {sup 137}Cs for soil erosion assessment. - Highlights: • The potential for the use of Pu as a soil erosion tracer was investigated. • Pu would be a good tracer given its long half-life. • Depth profiles of Pu in soils were systematically studied and compared to {sup 137}Cs. • Pu is an effective soil erosion tracer with behavior similar to that of {sup 137}Cs. • Thus, Pu provides a means of

  15. Crust behavior and erosion rate prediction of EPR sacrificial material impinged by core melt jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gen; Liu, Ming, E-mail: ming.liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Jinshi; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A numerical code was developed to analyze melt jet-concrete interaction in the frame of MPS method. • Crust and ablated concrete layer at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface periodically developed and collapsed. • Concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. • Concrete erosion by Fe-Zr melt jet was significantly faster than that by UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt jet. - Abstract: Sacrificial material is a special ferro-siliceous concrete, designed in the ex-vessel core melt stabilization system of European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR). Given a localized break of RPV lower head, the melt directly impinges onto the dry concrete in form of compact jet. The concrete erosion behavior influences the failure of melt plug, and further affects melt spreading. In this study, a numerical code was developed in the frame of Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method, to analyze the crust behavior and erosion rate of sacrificial concrete, impinged by prototypic melt jet. In validation of numerical modeling, the time-dependent erosion depth and erosion configuration matched well with the experimental data. Sensitivity study of sacrificial concrete erosion indicates that the crust and ablated concrete layer presented at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface, whereas no crust could be found in the interaction of Fe-Zr melt with concrete. The crust went through stabilization-fracture-reformation periodic process, accompanied with accumulating and collapsing of molten concrete layer. The concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. It increased as the concrete surface layer was heated to melting, and dropped down when the cold concrete was revealed. The erosion progression was fast in the conditions of small jet diameter and large concrete inclination angle, and it was significantly faster in the erosion by metallic melt jet than by oxidic melt jet.

  16. Quantifying and modeling soil erosion and sediment export from construction sites in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, A. K.; Beighley, R. E.

    2006-12-01

    Soil erosion is a power process that continuously alters the Earth's landscape. Human activities, such as construction and agricultural practices, and natural events, such as forest fires and landslides, disturb the landscape and intensify erosion processes leading to sudden increases in runoff sediment concentrations and degraded stream water quality. Understanding soil erosion and sediment transport processes is of great importance to researchers and practicing engineers, who routinely use models to predict soil erosion and sediment movement for varied land use and climate change scenarios. However, existing erosion models are limited in their applicability to constructions sites which have highly variable soil conditions (density, moisture, surface roughness, and best management practices) that change often in both space and time. The goal of this research is to improve the understanding, predictive capabilities and integration of treatment methodologies for controlling soil erosion and sediment export from construction sites. This research combines modeling with field monitoring and laboratory experiments to quantify: (a) spatial and temporal distribution of soil conditions on construction sites, (b) soil erosion due to event rainfall, and (c) potential offsite discharge of sediment with and without treatment practices. Field sites in southern California were selected to monitor the effects of common construction activities (ex., cut/fill, grading, foundations, roads) on soil conditions and sediment discharge. Laboratory experiments were performed in the Soil Erosion Research Laboratory (SERL), part of the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at San Diego State University, to quantify the impact of individual factors leading to sediment export. SERL experiments utilize a 3-m by 10-m tilting soil bed with soil depths up to 1 m, slopes ranging from 0 to 50 percent, and rainfall rates up to 150 mm/hr (6 in/hr). Preliminary modeling, field and laboratory

  17. Root characteristics of cover crops and their erosion-reducing potential during concentrated runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baets, S.; Poesen, J.

    2009-04-01

    In the loam region in central Belgium, a lot of research has been conducted on the effects of cover crops for preventing splash and interrill erosion and on their nutrient pumping effectiveness. As this is a very effective erosion and environment conservation technique, planting cover crops during the winter season is widely applied in the loess belt. Most of these cover crops freeze at the beginning of the winter period. Consequently, the above-ground biomass becomes less effective in protecting the soil from water erosion. Apart from the effects of the above-ground biomass in protecting the soil against raindrop impacts and reducing flow velocities by the retarding effects of their stems, plant roots also play an important role in improving soil strength. Previous research showed that roots contribute to a large extent to the resistance of topsoils against concentrated flow erosion. Unfortunately, information on root properties of common cover crops (e.g. Sinapis alba, Phacelia tanacetifoli, Lolium perenne, Avena sativa, Secale cereale, Raphanus sativus subsp. oleiferus) is very scarce. Therefore, root density distribution with depth and their erosion-reducing effects during concentrated flow erosion were assessed by conducting root auger measurements and concentrated flow experiments at the end of the growth period (December). The preliminary results indicate that the studied cover crops are not equally effective in preventing soil loss by concentrated flow erosion at the end of the growing season. Cover crops with thick roots, such as Sinapis alba and Raphanus sativus subsp. oleiferus are less effective than cover crops with fine-branched roots such as Phacelia tanacetifoli, Lolium perenne (Ryegrass), Avena sativa (Oats) and Secale cereale (Rye) in preventing soil losses by concentrated flow erosion. These results enable soil managers to select the most suitable crops and maximize soil protection.

  18. Validation of /sup 137/Cs technique in soil erosion and sedimentation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, F.; Tufail, M.; Sheikh, M.R.; Zahoor, R.; Iiqbal, N.

    2009-01-01

    Soil is the basic constituent required for the production of plants and livestock and this necessary component is mostly affected by erosion worldwide. This factor neglected by most of the developing countries because of the longer time and larger manpower needed to estimates the actual rates of erosion by conventional methods. An alternate, economic and less time-consuming method being applied in many developed countries is the use of fallout radionuclides (FRN) in estimating not only erosion but also re-distribution within the catchment. For this purpose, the reference site was established at Lokot area 33 deg. 52'37 N , 73o23'74 E at altitude 1477 m above the mean sea level near the newly constructed Murree Motor way having the total /sup 137/Cs inventory 4910 Bq/m/sup 2/ with very smooth and well distributed profile along the depth. Mass Balance 1 and the Profile Distribution Model were applied to calculate the soil redistribution. The soil redistribution at fields in Pind Begwal, Islamabad area range from 116 to 12.7 t/h/yr and at Savor village ranging from 127 to 24 t/h/yr. The permanently grassy patches in the same area have very low erosion (approx. 2 t/h/yr). Five samples collected from the area along road construction site on main Murree Motor way have shown severe erosion of topsoil ranging from 176 to 0.7 t/h/yr. The samples collected from the deforested hill in the same area indicate the severe erosion of around 176 t/h/yr. In comparison to this location, the samples in the same area with forest/ permanent plant cover, value range from (erosion) 14 t/h/yr to deposition of 5.4 t/h/yr at different points. In general, the human induced activities are found to be the major source of erosion in this area. (author)

  19. Depth-dependent positron annihilation in different polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Zhang, P.; Cheng, G.D.; Li, D.X.; Wu, H.B.; Li, Z.X.; Cao, X.Z. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analysis Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 19 Yuquan Lu, Beijing 100049 (China); Jia, Q.J. [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 19 Yuquan Lu, Beijing 100049 (China); Yu, R.S. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analysis Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 19 Yuquan Lu, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, B.Y., E-mail: wangboy@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analysis Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 19 Yuquan Lu, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2013-09-01

    Depth-dependent positron annihilation Doppler broadening measurements were conducted for polymers with different chemical compositions. Variations of the S parameter with respect to incident positron energy were observed. For pure hydrocarbons PP, HDPE and oxygen-containing polymer PC, S parameter rises with increasing positron implantation depth. While for PI and fluoropolymers like PTFE, ETFE and PVF, S parameter decreases with higher positron energy. For chlorine-containing polymer PVDC, S parameter remains nearly constant at all incident positron energies. It is suggested that these three variation trends are resulted from a competitive effect between the depth-dependent positronium formation and the influence of highly electronegative atoms on positron annihilation characteristics.

  20. Rainfall erosivity in Brazil: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, we review the erosivity studies conducted in Brazil to verify the quality and representativeness of the results generated and to provide a greater understanding of the rainfall erosivity (R-factor) in Brazil. We searched the ISI Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, and Google Scholar datab...

  1. Soil erosion dynamics response to landscape pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, W.; Skidmore, A.K.; Hao, F.; Wang, T.

    2010-01-01

    Simulating soil erosion variation with a temporal land use database reveals long-term fluctuations in landscape patterns, as well as priority needs for soil erosion conservation. The application of a multi-year land use database in support of a Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) led to an accurate

  2. Wind erosion modelling in a Sahelian environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faye-Visser, S.M.; Sterk, G.; Karssenberg, D.

    2005-01-01

    In the Sahel field observations of wind-blown mass transport often show considerable spatial variation related to the spatial variation of the wind erosion controlling parameters, e.g. soil crust and vegetation cover. A model, used to predict spatial variation in wind erosion and deposition is a

  3. Reduction of soil erosion on forest roads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward R. Burroughs; John G. King

    1989-01-01

    Presents the expected reduction in surface erosion from selected treatments applied to forest road traveledways, cutslopes, fillslopes, and ditches. Estimated erosion reduction is expressed as functions of ground cover, slope gradient, and soil properties whenever possible. A procedure is provided to select rock riprap size for protection of the road ditch.

  4. Forest road erosion control using multiobjective optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Thompson; John Sessions; Kevin Boston; Arne Skaugset; David Tomberlin

    2010-01-01

    Forest roads are associated with accelerated erosion and can be a major source of sediment delivery to streams, which can degrade aquatic habitat. Controlling road-related erosion therefore remains an important issue for forest stewardship. Managers are faced with the task to develop efficient road management strategies to achieve conflicting environmental and economic...

  5. Past, Present, Future Erosion at Locke Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2006-08-08

    This report describes and documents the erosion that has occurred along the northeast side of Locke Island over the last 10 to 20 years. The principal cause of this erosion is the massive Locke Island landslide complex opposite the Columbia River along the White Bluffs, which constricts the flow of the river and deflects the river's thalweg southward against the island.

  6. Tools for Ephemeral Gully Erosion Process Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techniques to quantify ephemeral gully erosion have been identified by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) as one of gaps in current erosion assessment tools. One reason that may have contributed to this technology gap is the difficulty to quantify changes in channel geometry to asses...

  7. Developing empirical relationship between interrill erosion, rainfall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to develop an empirical relationship for interrill erosion based on rainfall intensity, slope steepness and soil types, an interrill erosion experiment was conducted using laboratory rainfall simulator on three soil types (Vertisols, Cambisols and Leptosols) for the highlands of North Shewa Zone of Oromia Region.

  8. Rethinking erosion on Java: a reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de J.; Wiersum, K.F.

    1992-01-01

    In a recent article (Diemont et al., 1991) about erosion on Java, it has been postulated that low inputs, not surface erosion, is the main cause of low productivity of upland food crops on this island. In this article it is argued that this hypothesis is too simple. An analysis of empirical field

  9. The erosive potential of candy sprays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambon, D.L.; Brand, H.S.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the erosive potential of seven different commercially available candy sprays in vitro and in vivo. Material and methods The erosive potential was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. The salivary pH and flow rate were measured in healthy

  10. Dental erosion: prevalence, incidence, and distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, D.H.J.; Amaechi, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erosion is one of the most common dental diseases and it is a growing problem. Numerous epidemiological studies have investigated the prevalence of dental erosion. For these studies different cross sections of the population are investigated. Large differences were found between countries,

  11. Backward erosion piping : Initiation and progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Beek, V.M.

    2015-01-01

    Backward erosion piping is an internal erosion mechanism during which shallow pipes are formed in the direction opposite to the flow underneath water-retaining structures as a result of the gradual removal of sandy material by the action of water. It is an important failure mechanism in both dikes

  12. A Cenozoic record of the equatorial Pacific carbonate compensation depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pälike, Heiko; Lyle, Mitchell W; Nishi, Hiroshi; Raffi, Isabella; Ridgwell, Andy; Gamage, Kusali; Klaus, Adam; Acton, Gary; Anderson, Louise; Backman, Jan; Baldauf, Jack; Beltran, Catherine; Bohaty, Steven M; Bown, Paul; Busch, William; Channell, Jim E T; Chun, Cecily O J; Delaney, Margaret; Dewangan, Pawan; Dunkley Jones, Tom; Edgar, Kirsty M; Evans, Helen; Fitch, Peter; Foster, Gavin L; Gussone, Nikolaus; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Hathorne, Ed C; Hayashi, Hiroki; Herrle, Jens O; Holbourn, Ann; Hovan, Steve; Hyeong, Kiseong; Iijima, Koichi; Ito, Takashi; Kamikuri, Shin-ichi; Kimoto, Katsunori; Kuroda, Junichiro; Leon-Rodriguez, Lizette; Malinverno, Alberto; Moore, Ted C; Murphy, Brandon H; Murphy, Daniel P; Nakamura, Hideto; Ogane, Kaoru; Ohneiser, Christian; Richter, Carl; Robinson, Rebecca; Rohling, Eelco J; Romero, Oscar; Sawada, Ken; Scher, Howie; Schneider, Leah; Sluijs, Appy; Takata, Hiroyuki; Tian, Jun; Tsujimoto, Akira; Wade, Bridget S; Westerhold, Thomas; Wilkens, Roy; Williams, Trevor; Wilson, Paul A; Yamamoto, Yuhji; Yamamoto, Shinya; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Zeebe, Richard E

    2012-08-30

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate are regulated on geological timescales by the balance between carbon input from volcanic and metamorphic outgassing and its removal by weathering feedbacks; these feedbacks involve the erosion of silicate rocks and organic-carbon-bearing rocks. The integrated effect of these processes is reflected in the calcium carbonate compensation depth, which is the oceanic depth at which calcium carbonate is dissolved. Here we present a carbonate accumulation record that covers the past 53 million years from a depth transect in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. The carbonate compensation depth tracks long-term ocean cooling, deepening from 3.0-3.5 kilometres during the early Cenozoic (approximately 55 million years ago) to 4.6 kilometres at present, consistent with an overall Cenozoic increase in weathering. We find large superimposed fluctuations in carbonate compensation depth during the middle and late Eocene. Using Earth system models, we identify changes in weathering and the mode of organic-carbon delivery as two key processes to explain these large-scale Eocene fluctuations of the carbonate compensation depth.

  13. Design of a semi-autonomous boat for measurements of coastal sedimentation and erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Smith

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of sediment deposition and erosion in coastal areas is a challenge due to soft shifting sediments, but is critical to assessing loss or restoration of coastal sediments and wetlands. The aim of this project was to design and construct a semi-autonomous boat with water depth measuring capabilities. It was intended to map the depth of coastal wetlands to determine erosion rates and assess coastal restoration effects. Depth-measuring equipment was incorporated into an autonomous pontoon boat powered by solar panels. The propulsion system consisted of two paddlewheels and two-way motors to allow movement and positioning for measurements. Modifications included a lightweight, hard coating on the pontoons and powder-coating the frame to extend their usable life. A microcontroller controlled the boat and captured depth data from sensors and location data with a GPS system. The depth measuring system consisted of a pulley and counter system that completed each measurement in less than 45 seconds. This allowed the boat to take approximately 400 measurements per day. Net accuracy was approximately 3 cm in the tested configuration. The boat can continually measure the depth of specified areas in the wetlands; with this data, the change in depth can be monitored to see the effects of restoration projects.

  14. Erosion testing of hard materials and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-29

    Erosion is the process by which unconstrained particles, usually hard, impact a surface, creating damage that leads to material removal and component failure. These particles are usually very small and entrained in fluid of some type, typically air. The damage that occurs as a result of erosion depends on the size of the particles, their physical characteristics, the velocity of the particle/fluid stream, and their angle of impact on the surface of interest. This talk will discuss the basics of jet erosion testing of hard materials, composites and coatings. The standard test methods will be discussed as well as alternative approaches to determining the erosion rate of materials. The damage that occurs will be characterized in genera1 terms, and examples will be presented for the erosion behavior of hard materials and coatings (both thick and thin).

  15. Modelling rainfall erosion resulting from climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnell, Peter

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that soil erosion leads to agricultural productivity decline and contributes to water quality decline. The current widely used models for determining soil erosion for management purposes in agriculture focus on long term (~20 years) average annual soil loss and are not well suited to determining variations that occur over short timespans and as a result of climate change. Soil loss resulting from rainfall erosion is directly dependent on the product of runoff and sediment concentration both of which are likely to be influenced by climate change. This presentation demonstrates the capacity of models like the USLE, USLE-M and WEPP to predict variations in runoff and erosion associated with rainfall events eroding bare fallow plots in the USA with a view to modelling rainfall erosion in areas subject to climate change.

  16. Erosion Pressure on the Danish Coasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Sørensen, Per; Kroon, Aart

    Coastlines around the world are receding due to coastal erosion.With rising sea levels and a potential climatic deterioration due to climate change, erosion rates are likely to increase at many locations in the future.Together with the current preference of people to settle near or directly...... by the ocean, coastal erosion issues become increasingly more important to the human values at risk. Along many Danish coastlines, hard structures already act as coastal protection in the form of groins, breakwaters, revetments etc. These eroding coasts however still lack sand and where the public, in general......, neglects the need for sand replenishment i.e. in the form of repeated sand nourishments. Here we present a conceptual model and method for dividing coastal erosion into acute and chronic erosion pressure, respectively. We focus on the model use for management and climate change adaptation purposes...

  17. Dietary assessment and counseling for dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Teresa A

    2018-02-01

    Dental erosion occurs after exposure to intrinsic or extrinsic acids. Exposure to intrinsic gastrointestinal acids is associated with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, rumination syndrome, or gastroesophageal reflux. Extrinsic dietary acids from foods or beverages also can cause erosion, particularly when exposure is prolonged by holding or swishing behaviors. Clinicians should screen patients exhibiting dental erosion for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, rumination syndrome, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Clinicians should screen patients without a medical explanation for their erosion for exposure to acidic foods and beverages, particularly for habits that prolong exposure. Identification of intrinsic and extrinsic acid exposures and recommendations to minimize exposures are important to prevent erosion and maintain oral health. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Medication-related dental erosion: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Manuel S; Vivekananda Pai, A R; Yadav, Amit

    2015-10-01

    Dental erosion has become a major problem that affects the long-term health of the dentition. Among the various potential causes for erosive tooth wear, the different drugs prescribed for patients may be overlooked. Several therapeutic medications can directly or indirectly be associated with dental erosion. It is the responsibility of oral health providers to make both patients and colleagues aware of drugs that may contribute to this condition. Therefore, the purpose of this discussion is to provide an overview of the various therapeutic medications that can be related to tooth erosion. The authors also include precautionary measures-summarized as The 9 Rs-to avoid or at least reduce medication-induced erosion.

  19. Soil erosion processes on sloping land using REE tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhenzhou; Liu Puling; Yang Mingyi; Lian Zhenlong; Ju Tongjun; Yao Wenyi; Li Mian

    2007-01-01

    Sheet erosion is the main performance in the slope soil erosion process at the primary stage of natural rainfall. For three times of rainfall during experiment, the ratios of sheet erosion to total erosion account for 71%, 48% and 49% respectively, which showed that the sloping erosion was still at the primary stage from sheet erosion to rill erosion. With the rainfall going, the rill erosion amount increase. It showed that soil erosion was changing from sheet erosion to rill erosion. The sources of sediment from different sections of the plot were analyzed, and the results indicated that whatever the sheet erosion changed, the ratio erosion of upper part of surface soil was always lower than 10%. Sheet erosion came mainly from the lower section of surface soil. With the ratios to the amount of total rill erosion changes, the rill erosion amount of each section regularly changes too. The general conclusion is that when the rainfall ends, relative erosion of different slope element to the foot of slope is: 1 meter away accounts for 16%, 2-4 meters away is 6% and 5-9 meters away is 3%. The ratio of rill erosion amount of these three slope element is 5:2:1, which shows the rill erosion amount are mainly from the slope element of 4 meters from the foot of slope. (authors)

  20. Dynamic Analysis of Soil Erosion in Songhua River Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Li, Xiuhai; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jiang; Liang, Xin; Li, Dan; Ni, Chundi; Liu, Yan

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, based on RS and GIS technology and Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE), the soil erosion dynamic changes during the two periods of 1990 and 2010 in Bin County was analyzed by using the Landsat TM data of the two periods, so as to reveal the soil erosion spatial distribution pattern and spatial and temporal dynamic evolution rule in the region. The results showed that: the overall patterns of soil erosion were basically the same in both periods, mainly featuring slight erosion and mild erosion, with the area proportions of 80.68% and 74.71% respectively. The slight and extremely intensive erosion changing rates showed a narrowing trend; mild, moderate and intensive erosion was increasing, with a trend of increased soil erosion; mild and intensive erosion were developing towards moderate erosion and moderate and extremely intensive erosion were progressing towards intensive erosion.

  1. Defence in depth perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veneau, Tania; Ferrier, Agnes; Barbaud, Jean

    2017-01-01

    The Defence in Depth (DiD) concept was introduced to the field of nuclear safety in the sixties and early seventies. Even though it was not well developed at the beginning, the principles rapidly became close to those currently used. The concept was then composed of 3 levels, and was already associated with operating conditions. These principles have progressed over time and now there are five levels, including progressively situations issued from design extension conditions, to cope with severe accidents and dealing with accident management off-site. Indeed, human and organizational features are considered as a part of the safety provisions at all levels in an integrated approach that is not just related to reactor design. That's the current vision from IAEA, addressed first in INSAG 3 then in INSAG 10, and in the IAEA standards requirements currently addressed by SSR-2/1 superseding NS-R-1). These five levels of DiD are also referred to in other texts including WENRA documents in Europe, but also in the national requirements from different countries. Thus, the application of DiD principle has become a recognized international practice. The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi accidents, even if they raised many questions on nuclear safety issues, confirmed the merits of the DiD concept. Indeed, lessons learned from the accidents have reinforced the use of the DiD concept to ensure adequate safety. The discussions focused more on the implementation of the concept (how it has been or can be used in practice) than the concept itself, and in particular on the following subjects: the notion of level robustness, generally addressed separately from the levels definition, but playing an important role for the efficiency of the concept; the notion of levels independence and the need for strengthening them; the role of diversity to achieve levels independence. However, a prescription of additional diversity and independence across all safety levels could result in inappropriately

  2. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Spinoni, Jonathan; Meusburger, Katrin; Michaelides, Silas; Beguería, Santiago; Klik, Andreas; Petan, Sašo; Janeček, Miloslav; Olsen, Preben; Aalto, Juha; Lakatos, Mónika; Rymszewicz, Anna; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Tadić, Melita Perčec; Diodato, Nazzareno; Kostalova, Julia; Rousseva, Svetla; Banasik, Kazimierz; Alewell, Christine; Panagos, Panos

    2017-02-01

    Rainfall erosivity as a dynamic factor of soil loss by water erosion is modelled intra-annually for the first time at European scale. The development of Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES) and its 2015 update with the extension to monthly component allowed to develop monthly and seasonal R-factor maps and assess rainfall erosivity both spatially and temporally. During winter months, significant rainfall erosivity is present only in part of the Mediterranean countries. A sudden increase of erosivity occurs in major part of European Union (except Mediterranean basin, western part of Britain and Ireland) in May and the highest values are registered during summer months. Starting from September, R-factor has a decreasing trend. The mean rainfall erosivity in summer is almost 4 times higher (315MJmmha -1 h -1 ) compared to winter (87MJmmha -1 h -1 ). The Cubist model has been selected among various statistical models to perform the spatial interpolation due to its excellent performance, ability to model non-linearity and interpretability. The monthly prediction is an order more difficult than the annual one as it is limited by the number of covariates and, for consistency, the sum of all months has to be close to annual erosivity. The performance of the Cubist models proved to be generally high, resulting in R 2 values between 0.40 and 0.64 in cross-validation. The obtained months show an increasing trend of erosivity occurring from winter to summer starting from western to Eastern Europe. The maps also show a clear delineation of areas with different erosivity seasonal patterns, whose spatial outline was evidenced by cluster analysis. The monthly erosivity maps can be used to develop composite indicators that map both intra-annual variability and concentration of erosive events. Consequently, spatio-temporal mapping of rainfall erosivity permits to identify the months and the areas with highest risk of soil loss where conservation measures should be

  3. Report on the study of erosion and H-recycle/inventory of carbon/graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasz, A.A.; Davis, J.W.

    1990-04-01

    This study investigated the erosion and hydrogen retention capacity of graphite under plasma exposure by performing controlled plasma simulation experiments using a low-energy high-flux mass analyzed ion accelerator. The authors studied radiation-enhanced sublimation (RES) of graphite, the effect of ion angle of incidence on physical sputtering, the effect of oxygen on hydrocarbon formation during O 2 /H 2 impact, chemical erosion of boron carbide, and the effect of thermal atoms on self-sputtering of graphite. The flux dependence of RES is nearly linear (power of .91) for the extended flux range of 10 13 - 10 17 H + /cm 2 s. Physical sputtering yields were enhanced for off-normal angles of incidence, especially for highly-oriented polished surfaces. Oxygen did not appear to have an effect on the hydrocarbon formation rate; however, some erosion through CO formation was observed. Although large transients were observed in hydrocarbon production in B 4 C, steady-state levels were typically about two orders of magnitude below the erosion rate of graphite. To investigate carbon self-sputtering, thermal H 0 atoms were added to impacting C + ions, simulating a condition existing in the tokamak plasma edge. This led to a synergistic enhancement of the chemical erosion process. For C + /H+0 flux ratios of less than about 10 -1 the chemical erosion yield exceeds unity. Work on hydrogen retention concentrated on the study of H + trapping in different types of graphites as a function of flux and fluence of incident H + . The amount of H trapped in the near-surface region of graphite reaches a saturation level, a function of graphite temperature and impacting H + energy. The amount of H trapped in graphite beyond the ion range was found to increase with increasing fluence and varied for different graphites tested. It seems that hydrogen diffuses through grain boundaries and open porosity in the material until trapped by available carbon bonds

  4. X-ray diagnosis of erosive gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taskov, A.; Krastin, A.

    1993-01-01

    A series of 602 patients are studied according to a standard protocol including double contrast examination, taking films with dosed compression and complete filling (accordingly 3+3+1 radiographs). A barium suspension at concentration 200.0 BaSO 4 in 100 ml water is used as a positive contrast medium, and effervescent powder or pills - as a negative contrast. Erosive gastritis is diagnosed in 48 patients (7.9%) of which 38 present complete erosions (79.2%), 6 (12.6%) - incomplete, and 4 (8.3%) - mixed erosions. In 35 cases (72.9%) erosions are differentiated in double-contrast films, while in 21 (43.8%) - in those with compression. The advantage of the double contrast technique consists in visualization of erosions of the body of the stomach and discovering of incomplete erosions. In 483 patients a comparative assessment is done of the X-ray and endoscopic findings. There are recorded 5 false-positive and 25 false-negative radiological results. The sensitivity of the X-ray study in terms of erosive gastritis amounts to 59.7%. 15 refs., 4 figs. (orig.)

  5. Erosion and stability of a mine soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.H.; Stadler, A.T.; Low, C.

    1996-01-01

    Mine soils developed from mine spoils commonly have a wide range of particle size. The slopes of old spoil piles usually are marked by gullies due to years of uncontrolled erosion. These characteristics raise questions about applicability of available theories and models for estimating runoff and erosion. An investigation was made to determine whether available erosion models can work for mine soils and can account for gully erosion. The investigation at an abandoned surface mine consisted of measurement of soil and sediment properties, measurement of runoff and erosion, observations of armor by rock fragments on gully floor, and calculations with available theories of sediment transport and slope stability. The results at this site suggest that (1) predictions with the ANSWERS model have about the same accuracy as those made for agricultural lands; (2) armor provided by rock fragments are temporary as they are periodically removed by debris flows; (3) detachment by rainfall impact is the primary cause of erosion on short steep slopes; and (4) a simplified method can be used for estimating erosion on such slopes

  6. Soft drinks and in vitro dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravelle, Brent L; Hagen Ii, Ted W; Mayhew, Susan L; Crumpton, Brooks; Sanders, Tyler; Horne, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine to what extent the in vitro exposure of healthy teeth to various commonly consumed carbonated soft drinks may precipitate dental erosion. Forty-two healthy, extracted, previously unerupted human molars were weighed prior to, during, and after suspension in various sugared and diet or zero-calorie carbonated beverages for 20 days; the specimens were stored at room temperature while being stirred at 275 rpm. The percentage decrease in tooth weight from before to after exposure represented the weight loss due to enamel erosion; values in the experimental groups varied from 3.22% to 44.52% after 20 days' exposure. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and post hoc Scheffe testing at a level of α = 0.05. Nonsugared drinks (diet and zero-calorie) as a whole were more erosive than sugared beverages. A significant positive correlation was found between the amount of titratable acid and percentage of tooth erosion, while a significant negative correlation was revealed between the beverage pH and percentage of tooth erosion. No significant correlations were found between calcium or phosphate ion concentrations and the amount of erosion. It appears that enamel erosion is dependent on not only the beverage flow rate, pH, and amount of titratable acid, but also whether the soft drink is of the diet or zero-calorie variety, which reflects the type of artificial sweetener present.

  7. Evaluation of Depth of Field for depth perception in DVR

    KAUST Repository

    Grosset, A.V.Pascal; Schott, Mathias; Bonneau, Georges-Pierre; Hansen, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a user study on the use of Depth of Field for depth perception in Direct Volume Rendering. Direct Volume Rendering with Phong shading and perspective projection is used as the baseline. Depth of Field is then added to see its impact on the correct perception of ordinal depth. Accuracy and response time are used as the metrics to evaluate the usefulness of Depth of Field. The onsite user study has two parts: static and dynamic. Eye tracking is used to monitor the gaze of the subjects. From our results we see that though Depth of Field does not act as a proper depth cue in all conditions, it can be used to reinforce the perception of which feature is in front of the other. The best results (high accuracy & fast response time) for correct perception of ordinal depth occurs when the front feature (out of the two features users were to choose from) is in focus and perspective projection is used. © 2013 IEEE.

  8. Evaluation of Depth of Field for depth perception in DVR

    KAUST Repository

    Grosset, A.V.Pascal

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a user study on the use of Depth of Field for depth perception in Direct Volume Rendering. Direct Volume Rendering with Phong shading and perspective projection is used as the baseline. Depth of Field is then added to see its impact on the correct perception of ordinal depth. Accuracy and response time are used as the metrics to evaluate the usefulness of Depth of Field. The onsite user study has two parts: static and dynamic. Eye tracking is used to monitor the gaze of the subjects. From our results we see that though Depth of Field does not act as a proper depth cue in all conditions, it can be used to reinforce the perception of which feature is in front of the other. The best results (high accuracy & fast response time) for correct perception of ordinal depth occurs when the front feature (out of the two features users were to choose from) is in focus and perspective projection is used. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Estimating surface soil erosion losses and mapping erosion risk for Yusufeli micro-catchment (Artvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Tüfekçioğlu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sheet erosion, one of the most important types of water erosion, takes place on the top soil as tiny soil layer movement that affects lake and stream ecosystem. This type of erosion is very important because the productive soil layer on the top soil can be lost in a very short period of time. The goal of this study was to quantify the amount of surface (sheet and rill soil erosion, and to identify areas under high erosion risk within the study area at Yusufeli province in Artvin by using RUSLE erosion methodology. As a result of the study it was found that the average annual potential soil loss by surface erosion was 3.6 ton ha-1yr-1. Additionally, the maps produced and conclusions reached by the study revealed that the areas of high erosion risk were identified spatially and measures to control erosion on some of these high risk areas can be possible with appropriate erosion control techniques.

  10. Erosion by rain in the western Congo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploey, J. de

    1967-01-01

    Vast expanses of the western part of central and southern Africa are covered with uniform, sandy formations of the Kalahari type. The topography of these areas and their present morphological characteristics are mainly the result of erosion by rain. Information on the hydrology of the surface waters in these areas is fairly limited and is insufficient to permit any conclusions regarding the way in which erosion by rain takes place. To obtain a better understanding of these phenomena, the author devised a series of experiments based on the use of 46 Sc-labelled radioactive sand. These experiments began at the beginning of the 1964/65 rainy season and are continuing. The experimental plot corresponds to convex and rectilinear portions of a hillside with a slope varying between 0 and 12 degrees. The vegetation consists of grassy savannah of substeppe appearance and secondary forests. Series of labelled samples were placed successively on the surface of the experimental plot and the erosive effect of rain was determined by measuring the residual concentrations after rainfall. Some samples were placed below a shield so as to eliminate the effects of splash and reveal the part played by runoff. Radiographic films were used to study the dispersion of labelled particles in the surrounding area. This radiographic method made it possible to determine the scale of erosion by splash for different rainfall conditions. The erosion diagrams obtained from these experiments show the correlations that exist between the intensity and duration of the rainfall and the erosion of the soil. Examination of the erosion diagrams and the shielded samples and analysis of the radiographs showed that erosion by rain on Kalahari ground covered with substeppe savannah is caused mainly by splash erosion and by dispersed, intermittent runoff. Sheet wash plays no part if the slope is less than 12 degrees. (author) [fr

  11. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oxygen Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Cao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen level, including blood oxygen saturation (sO2 and tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2, are crucial physiological parameters in life science. This paper reviews the importance of these two parameters and the detection methods for them, focusing on the application of photoacoustic imaging in this scenario. sO2 is traditionally detected with optical spectra-based methods, and has recently been proven uniquely efficient by using photoacoustic methods. pO2, on the other hand, is typically detected by PET, MRI, or pure optical approaches, yet with limited spatial resolution, imaging frame rate, or penetration depth. Great potential has also been demonstrated by employing photoacoustic imaging to overcome the existing limitations of the aforementioned techniques.

  12. Sedimentological regimes for turbidity currents: Depth-averaged theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Thomas C.; Kumar, Amit; Perillo, Mauricio M.

    2017-07-01

    Turbidity currents are one of the most significant means by which sediment is moved from the continents into the deep ocean; their properties are interesting both as elements of the global sediment cycle and due to their role in contributing to the formation of deep water oil and gas reservoirs. One of the simplest models of the dynamics of turbidity current flow was introduced three decades ago, and is based on depth-averaging of the fluid mechanical equations governing the turbulent gravity-driven flow of relatively dilute turbidity currents. We examine the sedimentological regimes of a simplified version of this model, focusing on the role of the Richardson number Ri [dimensionless inertia] and Rouse number Ro [dimensionless sedimentation velocity] in determining whether a current is net depositional or net erosional. We find that for large Rouse numbers, the currents are strongly net depositional due to the disappearance of local equilibria between erosion and deposition. At lower Rouse numbers, the Richardson number also plays a role in determining the degree of erosion versus deposition. The currents become more erosive at lower values of the product Ro × Ri, due to the effect of clear water entrainment. At higher values of this product, the turbulence becomes insufficient to maintain the sediment in suspension, as first pointed out by Knapp and Bagnold. We speculate on the potential for two-layer solutions in this insufficiently turbulent regime, which would comprise substantial bedload flow with an overlying turbidity current.

  13. Modeling Megacusps and Dune Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, M.; Reniers, A. J.; Thornton, E. B.

    2009-12-01

    Megacusps are large, concave, erosional features of beaches, of O(200m) alongshore wavelength, which sometimes occur when rip channel bathymetry is present. It is commonly hypothesized that erosion of the dune and back beach will be greater at the alongshore locations of the megacusp embayments, principally because the beach width is narrower there and larger waves can more easily reach the dune toe (e.g., Short, J. Geol., 1979, Thornton, et al., Mar. Geol., 2007). At present, available field data in southern Monterey Bay provide some support for this hypothesis, but not enough to fully confirm or refute it. This analysis utilizes XBeach, a 2DH nearshore sediment transport model, to test the above hypothesis under a range of wave conditions over several idealized rip-megacusp bathymetries backed by dunes. Model results suggest that while specific wave conditions may result in erosional hot spots at megacusp embayments, other factors such as tides, wave direction, and surf zone bathymetry can often play an equal or stronger role.

  14. [Gastric band erosion: Alternative management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaverry-Navarrete, Denis José; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Cabrera-Jardines, Ricardo; Mondragón-Pinzón, Erwin Eduardo; Castillo-González, Federico Armando

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem, for which the prevalence has increased worldwide at an alarming rate, affecting 1.7 billion people in the world. To describe the technique employed in incomplete penetration of gastric band where endoscopic management and/or primary closure is not feasible. Laparoscopic removal of gastric band was performed in five patients with incomplete penetrance using Foley catheterization in the perforation site that could lead to the development of a gastro-cutaneous fistula. The cases presented include a leak that required surgical lavage with satisfactory outcome, and one patient developed stenosis 3 years after surgical management, which was resolved endoscopically. In all cases, the penetration site closed spontaneously. Gastric band erosion has been reported in 3.4% of cases. The reason for inserting a catheter is to create a controlled gastro-cutaneous fistula, allowing spontaneous closure. Various techniques have been described: the totally endoscopic, hybrid techniques (endoscopic/laparoscopic) and completely laparoscopic. A technique is described here that is useful and successful in cases where the above-described treatments are not viable. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  15. Statistical determination of rainfall-runoff erosivity indices for single storms in the Chinese Loess Plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingguo Zheng

    Full Text Available Correlation analysis is popular in erosion- or earth-related studies, however, few studies compare correlations on a basis of statistical testing, which should be conducted to determine the statistical significance of the observed sample difference. This study aims to statistically determine the erosivity index of single storms, which requires comparison of a large number of dependent correlations between rainfall-runoff factors and soil loss, in the Chinese Loess Plateau. Data observed at four gauging stations and five runoff experimental plots were presented. Based on the Meng's tests, which is widely used for comparing correlations between a dependent variable and a set of independent variables, two methods were proposed. The first method removes factors that are poorly correlated with soil loss from consideration in a stepwise way, while the second method performs pairwise comparisons that are adjusted using the Bonferroni correction. Among 12 rainfall factors, I30 (the maximum 30-minute rainfall intensity has been suggested for use as the rainfall erosivity index, although I30 is equally correlated with soil loss as factors of I20, EI10 (the product of the rainfall kinetic energy, E, and I10, EI20 and EI30 are. Runoff depth (total runoff volume normalized to drainage area is more correlated with soil loss than all other examined rainfall-runoff factors, including I30, peak discharge and many combined factors. Moreover, sediment concentrations of major sediment-producing events are independent of all examined rainfall-runoff factors. As a result, introducing additional factors adds little to the prediction accuracy of the single factor of runoff depth. Hence, runoff depth should be the best erosivity index at scales from plots to watersheds. Our findings can facilitate predictions of soil erosion in the Loess Plateau. Our methods provide a valuable tool while determining the predictor among a number of variables in terms of correlations.

  16. Statistical Determination of Rainfall-Runoff Erosivity Indices for Single Storms in the Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingguo; Chen, Xiaoan

    2015-01-01

    Correlation analysis is popular in erosion- or earth-related studies, however, few studies compare correlations on a basis of statistical testing, which should be conducted to determine the statistical significance of the observed sample difference. This study aims to statistically determine the erosivity index of single storms, which requires comparison of a large number of dependent correlations between rainfall-runoff factors and soil loss, in the Chinese Loess Plateau. Data observed at four gauging stations and five runoff experimental plots were presented. Based on the Meng’s tests, which is widely used for comparing correlations between a dependent variable and a set of independent variables, two methods were proposed. The first method removes factors that are poorly correlated with soil loss from consideration in a stepwise way, while the second method performs pairwise comparisons that are adjusted using the Bonferroni correction. Among 12 rainfall factors, I 30 (the maximum 30-minute rainfall intensity) has been suggested for use as the rainfall erosivity index, although I 30 is equally correlated with soil loss as factors of I 20, EI 10 (the product of the rainfall kinetic energy, E, and I 10), EI 20 and EI 30 are. Runoff depth (total runoff volume normalized to drainage area) is more correlated with soil loss than all other examined rainfall-runoff factors, including I 30, peak discharge and many combined factors. Moreover, sediment concentrations of major sediment-producing events are independent of all examined rainfall-runoff factors. As a result, introducing additional factors adds little to the prediction accuracy of the single factor of runoff depth. Hence, runoff depth should be the best erosivity index at scales from plots to watersheds. Our findings can facilitate predictions of soil erosion in the Loess Plateau. Our methods provide a valuable tool while determining the predictor among a number of variables in terms of correlations. PMID

  17. The effect of the PWR secondary circuit water chemistry on erosion corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, J.

    1993-07-01

    The secondary circuit of WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors is described. The causes of erosion corrosion are outlined, and the effects of the physical properties and chemical composition of water are discussed with emphasis on specific conductivity and concentrations of oxygen, ammonia, iron, sodium, silicon and organics. Described are corrective actions to eliminate the deviations from the normal state during reactor power reduction or reactor shutdown. (J.B.)

  18. Utilizing of magnetic parameters for evaluation of soil erosion rates on two different agricultural sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapicka, A.; Grison, H.; Petrovsky, E.; Jaksik, O.; Kodesova, R.

    2015-12-01

    Field measurements of magnetic susceptibility were carried out on regular grid, resulting in 101 data points at Brumovice and 65 at Vidim locality. Mass specific magnetic susceptibility χ and its frequency dependence χFD was used to estimate the significance of SP ferrimagnetic particles of pedogenic origin in topsoil horizons. The lowest magnetic susceptibility was obtained on the steep valley sides. Here the original topsoil was eroded and mixed by tillage with the soil substrate (loess). Soil profiles unaffected by erosion were investigated in detail. The vertical distribution of magnetic susceptibility along these "virgin" profiles was measured in laboratory on samples collected with 2-cm spacing. The differences between the distribution of susceptibility in the undisturbed soil profiles and the magnetic signal after uniform mixing of the soil material as a result of erosion and tillage are fundamental for the estimation of soil loss in the studied test fields. Maximum cumulative soil erosion depth in Brumovice and Vidim is around 100 cm and 50 cm respectively. The magnetic method is suitable for mapping at the chernozem localities and measurement of soil magnetic susceptibility is in this case useful and fast technique for quantitative estimation of soil loss caused by erosion. However, it is less suitable (due to lower magnetic differentiation with depth) in areas with luvisol as dominant soil unit. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by NAZV Agency of the Ministry of Agriculture of the Czech Republic through grant No QJ1230319.

  19. Plutonium as a tracer for soil erosion assessment in northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Pan, Shaoming; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Cao, Liguo

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion is one of the most serious environmental and agricultural problems faced by human society. Assessing intensity is an important issue for controlling soil erosion and improving eco-environmental quality. The suitability of the application of plutonium (Pu) as a tracer for soil erosion assessment in northeast China was investigated by comparing with that of 137Cs. Here we build on preliminary work, in which we investigated the potential of Pu as a soil erosion tracer by sampling additional reference sites and potential erosive sites, along the Liaodong Bay region in northeast China, for Pu isotopes and 137Cs. 240Pu/239Pu atomic ratios in all samples were approximately 0.18, which indicated that the dominant source of Pu was the global fallout. Pu showed very similar distribution patterns to those of 137Cs at both uncultivated and cultivated sites. 239+240Pu concentrations in all uncultivated soil cores followed an exponential decline with soil depth, whereas at cultivated sites, Pu was homogenously distributed in plow horizons. Factors such as planted crop types, as well as methods and frequencies of irrigation and tillage were suggested to influence the distribution of radionuclides in cultivated land. The baseline inventories of 239+240Pu and 137Cs were 88.4 and 1688 Bq m(-2) respectively. Soil erosion rates estimated by 239+240Pu tracing method were consistent with those obtained by the 137Cs method, confirming that Pu is an effective tracer with a similar tracing behavior to that of 137Cs for soil erosion assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of calibration equations of 137Cs methodology for soil erosion determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Elias Antunes dos

    2001-02-01

    Using the method of 137 Cs and gamma-ray spectrometry, soil samples of two plots erosion were studied at Londrina city. the soil class studied was a dystrophic dark red soil (LRd), with erosion indexes measured by Agronomic Institute of Parana State (IAPAR) using a conventional method, since 1976. Through the percentage reduction of 137 Cs related to the reference site, the soil losses were calculated using the proportional, mass balance and profile distribution models. Making the correlation between the 137 Cs concentrations and the erosion measured by IAPAR, two calibration equations were obtained and applied to the data set measured in the basin of the Unda river and compared to those models in the literature. As reference region, was chosen a natural forest located close to the plots. The average inventory of 137 Cs was 555± 16 Bq.m -2 . The inventories of the erosion plots varied from 112 to 136 Bq.m -2 for samples collected until 30 cm depth. The erosion rates estimated by the models varied from 64 to 85 ton.ha -1 .yr -1 for the proportional and profile distribution models, respectively, and 137 to 165 ton.ha -1 for the mass balance model, while the measured erosion obtained by IAPAR was 86 ton.ha -1 .yr -1 . From the two calibration equations obtained, the one that take into account the 137 Cs distribution with the soil profile was that showed the best consistence with the erosion rated for the basin of the Unda river (same soil class) in the range from 4 to 48 ton.ha -1 .yr -1 , while the proportional and profile distribution models applied rates from 7 to 45 ton.ha -1 .yr -1 and 6 to 69 ton.ha -1 .yr -1 , respectively. (author)

  1. Erosive Wear of Inconel 625 Alloy Coatings Deposited by CMT Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solecka M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the investigation results concerning the determination of the characteristics of erosive wear caused by the impact of Al2O3 solid particles on the surface of Inconel 625 alloy after plastic working and the same material after weld cladding process using the CMT method. Erosion wear tests were performed at two temperatures: 20°C and 650°C. The erosion tests were conducted using the standard ASTM G76. A jet with a specified abrasive waight was directed to the surface of the tested material at an α impingement angle varied in the range of 30-90° at a velocity imparted to the abrasive by the medium, which was compressed air. The eroded surface was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM, while the depths of craters caused by the erosion tests were measured with an optical profilometer. The predominant mechanisms of the formation of mass losses during solid particle erosion were microcutting and microfissuring.

  2. Tritium depth profiling in carbon by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, M.; Pilz, W.; Sun, G.; Behrisch, R.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Bekris, N.; Penzhorn, R.-D.

    2000-01-01

    Tritium depth profiling measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry have been performed at the facility installed at the Rossendorf 3 MV Tandetron. In order to achieve a uniform erosion at the target surface inside a commercial Cs ion sputtering source and to avoid edge effects, the samples were mechanically scanned and the signals were recorded only during sputtering at the centre of the sputtered area. The sputtered negative ions were mass analysed by the injection magnet of the Tandetron. Hydrogen and deuterium profiles were measured with the Faraday cup between the injection magnet and the accelerator, while the tritium was counted after the accelerator with semiconductor detectors. Depth profiles have been measured for carbon samples which had been exposed to the plasma at the first wall of the Garching fusion experiment ASDEX-Upgrade and from the European fusion experiment JET, Culham, UK

  3. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide, pH, oxygen and other variables collected from time series observations using SAMI-CO2, SAMI-pH, and other instruments from Buoy NH-10 off the coast of Newport, Oregon, United States, at the near bottom depth of ~80 meters from 2011-08-16 to 2015-08-25 (NCEI Accession 0145162)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains time series measurements of near bottom partial pressure of carbon dioxide, pH, dissolved oxygen that are measured from SAMI-CO2, and...

  4. Compressor Impeller Erosion Resistant Surface Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riley, Michael

    2000-01-01

    ...). Coatings based on tungsten carbide tantalum carbide. titanium carbide all with a cobalt matrix were evaluated for high velocity particle erosion in conventional wear test studies as well as wind tunnel testing...

  5. Puerto Rico Relative Vulnerability to Erosion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical factors, such as the slope of the land, the texture of the soil, and the precipitation regime influence erosion in an area. Parts of Puerto Rico are very...

  6. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, P; Bardin, T; Laredo, J D; Ziza, J M; D'Anglejan, G; Lansaman, J; Bucki, B; Forest, M; Kuntz, D

    1994-05-01

    To determine the clinical, radiologic, and histologic features of calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion. The records of 6 patients with paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis and adjacent bone cortex erosion were reviewed. Calcific tendinitis involved the linea aspera in 4 patients, the bicipital groove in 1 patient, and the deltoid insertion in another. Calcium deposits were associated with cortical bone erosions, revealed on plain radiographs in 4 patients and computed tomography scans in 2. Bone scans were performed in 2 patients and showed local hyperfixation of the isotope. In 4 patients, suspicion of a neoplasm led to a biopsy. Calcium deposits appeared to be surrounded by a foreign body reaction with numerous giant cells. Apatite crystals were identified by transmission electron microscopy and elemental analysis in 1 surgical sample. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion is an uncommon presentation of apatite deposition disease.

  7. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  8. Understanding and Predicting Gun Barrel Erosion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, Ian A

    2005-01-01

    The Australian Defence Force will soon have to contend with gun barrel erosion issues arising from the use of new low-vulnerability gun propellants, the acquisition of new ammunition and gun systems...

  9. Puerto Rico Relative Erosion Potential (REP) - 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 2000) and (maximum monthly)...

  10. Puerto Rico Relative Erosion Potential (REP) - 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 1990) and (maximum monthly)...

  11. PROBLEMS OF SOIL PROTECTION FROM EROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Voloshuk

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article the problems of soil protection from erosion in Moldova are considered. The history (evolution of erosive processes is generalized, the first items of information on presence washed off soils are marked. Purposeful study of soil erosion, development of measures of struggle with it were begun in Moldova at the end of 40 years. In connection with transition to new economic methods of conducting economy (farmers, rent, privatization of land before pedologist, the experts of design organizations put forward the new requirements to study of erosive processes, development of soil protection, ecologo-adaptive systems of landscape agriculture. The tasks for improvement of a soil cover, restoration of fertility soil and their protection are put forward which are necessary for deciding in a near future.

  12. Rain Erosion/Measurement Impact Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FARM Rain Erosion/Impact Measurement Lab develops solutions for deficiencies in the ability of materials, coatings and designs to withstand a severe operational...

  13. Soil erosion assessment - Mind the gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongho; Ivanov, Valeriy Y.; Fatichi, Simone

    2016-12-01

    Accurate assessment of erosion rates remains an elusive problem because soil loss is strongly nonunique with respect to the main drivers. In addressing the mechanistic causes of erosion responses, we discriminate between macroscale effects of external factors - long studied and referred to as "geomorphic external variability", and microscale effects, introduced as "geomorphic internal variability." The latter source of erosion variations represents the knowledge gap, an overlooked but vital element of geomorphic response, significantly impacting the low predictability skill of deterministic models at field-catchment scales. This is corroborated with experiments using a comprehensive physical model that dynamically updates the soil mass and particle composition. As complete knowledge of microscale conditions for arbitrary location and time is infeasible, we propose that new predictive frameworks of soil erosion should embed stochastic components in deterministic assessments of external and internal types of geomorphic variability.

  14. MALIGNANT TRANSFORMATION OF EROSIVE ORAL LICHEN PLANUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Chumaeroh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus is a relatively common inflammatory disorder which may have cutaneous and or mucosal manifestation. The malignant potential of oral lichen planus is still debatable. Some authors are sceptical about the premalignant nature of the disease, while other investigators have reported that malignant transformations occur in 1-10% of the cases. The aim of this study is to report a case of erosive lichen plans which shows malignant transformation of histopathologic examination. A man of 39 years old visited the Dental Department or Kajradi's Hospital with pain symptoms of the palate, buccal and gingival mucosa on both sides for 6 months. The physical examination shows the white lesion with striae configuration and pain, red erosive area inside the palate extends to the buccal mucosa and the gingival mucosa. The suspect diagnosis is erosive lichen planus, but the histopathologic examination shows epidermoid carcinoma. It is concluded that erosive oral lichen planus has the potential to transform into epidermoid carcinoma.

  15. Dental erosion: understanding this pervasive condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida e Silva, Júnio S; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Araujo, Edson; Widmer, Nicolas

    2011-08-01

    Dental erosion is a contemporary disease, mostly because of the change of the eating patterns that currently exist in society. It is a "silent" and multifactorial disease, and is highly influenced by habits and lifestyles. The prevalence of dental erosion has considerably increased, with this condition currently standing as a great challenge for the clinician, regarding the diagnosis, identification of the etiological factors, prevention, and execution of an adequate treatment. This article presents a dental erosion review and a case report of a restorative treatment of dental erosion lesions using a combination of bonded ceramic overlays to reestablish vertical dimension and composite resin to restore the worn palatal and incisal surfaces of the anterior upper teeth. Adequate function and esthetics can be achieved with this approach. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Numerical and experimental investigations on cavitation erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes Patella, R.; Archer, A.; Flageul, C.

    2012-11-01

    A method is proposed to predict cavitation damage from cavitating flow simulations. For this purpose, a numerical process coupling cavitating flow simulations and erosion models was developed and applied to a two-dimensional (2D) hydrofoil tested at TUD (Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany) [1] and to a NACA 65012 tested at LMH-EPFL (Lausanne Polytechnic School) [2]. Cavitation erosion tests (pitting tests) were carried out and a 3D laser profilometry was used to analyze surfaces damaged by cavitation [3]. The method allows evaluating the pit characteristics, and mainly the volume damage rates. The paper describes the developed erosion model, the technique of cavitation damage measurement and presents some comparisons between experimental results and numerical damage predictions. The extent of cavitation erosion was correctly estimated in both hydrofoil geometries. The simulated qualitative influence of flow velocity, sigma value and gas content on cavitation damage agreed well with experimental observations.

  17. Quantifying the Spatial Distribution of Hill Slope Erosion Using a 3-D Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, B. N.; Bogonko, M.; He, Y.; Beighley, R. E.; Milberg, C. T.

    2007-12-01

    Soil erosion is a complicated process involving many interdependent variables including rainfall intensity and duration, drop size, soil characteristics, ground cover, and surface slope. The interplay of these variables produces differing spatial patterns of rill versus inter-rill erosion by changing the effective energy from rain drop impacts and the quantities and timing of sheet and shallow, concentrated flow. The objective of this research is to characterize the spatial patterns of rill and inter-rill erosion produced from simulated rainfall on different soil densities and surface slopes using a 3-D laser scanner. The soil used in this study is a sandy loam with bulk density due to compaction ranging from 1.25-1.65 g/cm3. The surface slopes selected for this study are 25, 33, and 50 percent and represent common slopes used for grading on construction sites. The spatial patterns of soil erosion are measured using a Trimble GX DR 200+ 3D Laser Scanner which employs a time of flight calculation averaged over 4 points using a class 2, pulsed, 532 nm, green laser at a distance of 2 to 11 m from the surface. The scanner measures point locations on an approximately 5 mm grid. The pre- and post-erosion scan surfaces are compared to calculate the change in volume and the dimensions of rills and inter-rill areas. The erosion experiments were performed in the Soil Erosion Research Laboratory (SERL), part of the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at San Diego State University. SERL experiments utilize a 3-m by 10-m tilting soil bed with a soil depth of 0.5 meters. Rainfall is applied to the soil surface using two overhead Norton ladder rainfall simulators, which produce realistic rain drop diameters (median = 2.25 mm) and impact velocities. Simulated storm events used in this study consist of rainfall intensities ranging from 5, 10 to 15 cm/hr for durations of 20 to 30 minutes. Preliminary results are presented that illustrate a change in runoff processes and

  18. A transient analysis of decomposition and erosion of concrete exposed to a surface heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, A.N.

    1994-01-01

    A simple approximation for predicting the concrete erosion rate and depth is derived based on the heat balance integral method for conduction with the time-dependent boundary conditions. The problem is considered a four-region model including separate, moving heat sinks at the boundaries due to endothermic decomposition reactions. Polynomial temperature profiles are assumed, and the results are compared with previous experimental data and other analytical solutions. Since the technique provides an approximate temperature distribution on the average, it does not give the real temperature evaluation but provides a simple prediction of the erosion rates and the depth of defaulted concrete in terms of the parameters that are important during the physical phenomena. Because of its simplicity and reliability, the model might be useful for the larger molten core/concrete interaction codes and aerosol generation models

  19. Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in beach sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Rebecca J; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve

    2011-09-15

    Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of beaches. Although recent work shows that beach sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is not known how deep within beach sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 1 m depth were collected at three sites across the beach face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina before, during and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of beach sand at the three sites also was determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean beach sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause beach erosion or accretion.

  20. Oxygen dynamics around buried lesser sandeels Ammodytes tobianus (Linnaeus 1785): mode of ventilation and oxygen requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Jane W; Stahl, Henrik J; Steffensen, John F

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen environment around buried sandeels (Ammodytes tobianus) was monitored by planar optodes. The oxygen penetration depth at the sediment interface was only a few mm. Thus fish, typically buried at 1-4 cm depth, were generally in anoxic sediment. However, they induced an advective transport...... down along the body, referred to as ;plume ventilation'. Yet, within approximately 30 min the oxic plume was replenished by oxygen-depleted water from the gills. The potential for cutaneous respiration by the buried fish was thus of no quantitative importance. Calculations derived by three independent...... methods (each with N=3) revealed that the oxygen uptake of sandeel buried for 6-7 h was 40-50% of previous estimates on resting respirometry of non-buried fish, indicating lower O(2) requirements during burial on a diurnal timescale. Buried fish exposed to decreasing oxygen tensions gradually approached...

  1. Soil erosion - a local and national problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.G. Bates; O.R. Zeasman

    1930-01-01

    The erosion of soils through the action of rain water and that from melting snow is almost universal in its occurrence. The gradual erosion and levelling of any country is inevitable, being a process which has gone on as long as there has been free water on the face of the earth. Nevertheless, this process is an extremely slow one where the landscape is naturally well...

  2. Natural and anthropogenic rates of soil erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Nearing

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Regions of land that are brought into crop production from native vegetation typically undergo a period of soil erosion instability, and long term erosion rates are greater than for natural lands as long as the land continues being used for crop production. Average rates of soil erosion under natural, non-cropped conditions have been documented to be less than 2 Mg ha−1 yr−1. On-site rates of erosion of lands under cultivation over large cropland areas, such as in the United States, have been documented to be on the order of 6 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or more. In northeastern China, lands that were brought into production during the last century are thought to have average rates of erosion over this large area of as much as 15 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or more. Broadly applied soil conservation practices, and in particular conservation tillage and no-till cropping, have been found to be effective in reducing rates of erosion, as was seen in the United States when the average rates of erosion on cropped lands decreased from on the order of 9 Mg ha−1 yr−1 to 6 or 7 Mg ha−1 yr−1 between 1982 and 2002, coincident with the widespread adoption of new conservation tillage and residue management practices. Taking cropped lands out of production and restoring them to perennial plant cover, as was done in areas of the United States under the Conservation Reserve Program, is thought to reduce average erosion rates to approximately 1 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or less on those lands.

  3. Determining Wind Erosion in the Great Plains

    OpenAIRE

    Elwin G. Smith; Burton C. English

    1982-01-01

    Wind erosion is defined as the movement of soil particles resulting from strong turbulent winds. The movement of soil particles can be categorized as suspension, saltation, or surface creep. Fine soil particles can be suspended in the atmosphere and carried for great distances. Particles too large to be suspended move in a jumping action along the soil surface, known as saltation. Heavier particles have a rolling movement along the surface and this type of erosion is surface creep.

  4. Divertor erosion in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.G.; Bastasz, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Brooks, J.N.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.; Buzhinskij, O.I.; Opimach, I.V.

    1998-08-01

    Net erosion rates of carbon target plates have been measured in situ for the DIII-D lower divertor. The principal method of obtaining this data is the DiMES sample probe. Recent experiments have focused on erosion at the outer strike-point (OSP) of two divertor plasma conditions: attached (T e > 40 eV) ELMing plasmas, and detached (T e 2 . In this case, measurements and modeling agree for both gross and net carbon erosion, showing the near-surface transport and redeposition of the carbon is well understood. In the attached cases, physical sputtering (with enhancement from self-sputtering and oblique incidence) is dominant, and the effective sputtering yield, Y, is greater than 10%. In ELM-free discharges, the total OSP net erosion rate is equal to the rate of carbon accumulation in the core plasma. For the detached divertor cases, the cold incident plasma eliminates physical sputtering. Attempts to measure chemically eroded hydrocarbon molecules spectroscopically indicate an upper limit of Y ≤ 0.1% for the chemical sputtering yield. Net erosion is suppressed at the outer strike-point, which becomes a region of net redeposition (∼ 4 cm/exposure-year). The private flux wall is measured to be a region of net redeposition with dense, high neutral pressure, attached divertor plasmas. Leading edges intercepting parallel heat flux (∼ 50 MW/m 2 ) have very high net erosion rates at the OSP of an attached plasma (∼ 10 microm/s > 1,000x erosion rate of aligned surfaces). Leading edge erosion, and subsequent carbon redeposition, caused by tile gaps can account for half of the deuterium codeposition in the DIII-D divertor

  5. Airphoto analysis of erosion control practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, K. M.; Morris-Jones, D. R.; Lee, G. B.; Kiefer, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) is a widely accepted tool for erosion prediction and conservation planning. In this study, airphoto analysis of color and color infrared 70 mm photography at a scale of 1:60,000 was used to determine the erosion control practice factor in the USLE. Information about contour tillage, contour strip cropping, and grass waterways was obtained from aerial photography for Pheasant Branch Creek watershed in Dane County, Wisconsin.

  6. Divertor erosion in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.G.; Bastasz, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Brooks, J.N.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1998-05-01

    Net erosion rates of carbon target plates have been measured in situ for the DIII-D lower divertor. The principal method of obtaining this data is the DiMES sample probe. Recent experiments have focused on erosion at the outer strike-point of two divertor plasma conditions: (1) attached (Te > 40 eV) ELMing plasmas and (2) detached (Te 10 cm/year, even with incident heat flux 2 . In this case, measurements and modeling agree for both gross and net carbon erosion, showing the near-surface transport and redeposition of the carbon is well understood and that effective sputtering yields are > 10%. In ELM-free discharges, this erosion rate can account for the rate of carbon accumulation in the core plasma. Divertor plasma detachment eliminates physical sputtering, while spectroscopically measured chemical erosion yields are also found to be low (Y(C/D + ) ≤ 2.0 x 10 -3 ). This leads to suppression of net erosion at the outer strike-point, which becomes a region of net redeposition (∼ 4 cm/year). The private flux wall is measured to be a region of net redeposition with dense, high neutral pressure, attached divertor plasmas. Leading edges intercepting parallel heat flux (∼ 50 MW/m 2 ) have very high net erosion rates (∼ 10 microm/s) at the OSP of an attached plasma. Leading edge erosion, and subsequent carbon redeposition, caused by tile gaps can account for half of the deuterium codeposition in the DIII-D divertor

  7. Susceptibility of bovine dental enamel with initial erosion lesion to new erosive challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Cristina de Oliveira

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the impact of initial erosion on the susceptibility of enamel to further erosive challenge. Thirty bovine enamel blocks were selected by surface hardness and randomized into two groups (n = 15: GC- group composed by enamel blocks without erosion lesion and GT- group composed by enamel blocks with initial erosion lesion. The baseline profile of each block was determined using the profilometer. The initial erosion was produced by immersing the blocks into HCl 0.01 M, pH 2.3 for 30 seconds, under stirring. The erosive cycling consisted of blocks immersion in hydrochloric acid (0.01 M, pH 2.3 for 2 minutes, followed by immersion in artificial saliva for 120 minutes. This procedure was repeated 4 times a day for 5 days, and the blocks were kept in artificial saliva overnight. After erosive cycling, final profile measurement was performed. Profilometry measured the enamel loss by the superposition of initial and final profiles. Data were analyzed by t-test (p<0.05. The result showed no statistically significant difference between groups (GS = 14.60±2.86 and GE = .14.69±2.21 μm. The presence of initial erosion on bovine dental enamel does not enhance its susceptibility to new erosive challenges.

  8. Low cost sic coated erosion resistant graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, M.F.; Nicholls, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of materials with unique and improved properties using low cost processes is essential to increase performance and reduce cost of the solid rocket motors. Specifically advancements are needed for boost phase nozzle. As these motors operate at very high pressure and temperatures, the nozzle must survive high thermal stresses with minimal erosion to maintain performance. Currently three material choices are being exploited; which are refractory metals, graphite and carbon-carbon composites. Of these three materials graphite is the most attractive choice because of its low cost, light weight, and easy forming. However graphite is prone to erosion, both chemical and mechanical, which may affect the ballistic conditions and mechanical properties of the nozzle. To minimize this erosion high density graphite is usually preferred; which is again very expensive. Another technique used to minimize the erosion is Pyrolytic Graphite (PG) coating inside the nozzle. However PG coating is prone to cracking and spallation along with very cumbersome deposition process. Another possible methodology to avoid this erosion is to convert the inside surface of the rocket nozzle to Silicon Carbide (SiC), which is very erosion resistant and have much better thermal stability compared to graphite and even PG. Due to its functionally gradient nature such a layer will be very adherent and resistant to spallation. The current research is focused on synthesizing, characterizing and oxidation testing of such a converted SiC layer on commercial grade graphite. (author)

  9. Erosion of Earthen Levees by Wave Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeren, Y.; Wren, D. G.; Reba, M. L.

    2016-02-01

    Earthen levees of aquaculture and irrigation reservoirs in the United States often experience significant erosion due to wind-generated waves. Typically constructed using local soils, unprotected levees are subjected to rapid erosion and retreat due to wind generated waves and surface runoff. Only a limited amount of published work addresses the erosion rates for unprotected levees, and producers who rely on irrigation reservoirs need an economic basis for selecting a protection method for vulnerable levees. This, in turn, means that a relationship between wave energy and erosion of cohesive soils is needed. In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out in order to quantify wave induced levee erosion and retreat. A model erodible bank was packed using a soil consisting of approximately 14% sand, 73% silt, and 13% clay in a 20.6 m long 0.7 m wide and 1.2 m deep wave tank at the USDA-ARS, National Sedimentation Laboratory in Oxford MS. The geometry of the levee face was monitored by digital camera and the waves were measured by means of 6 capacitance wave staffs. Relationships were established between levee erosion, edge and retreat rates, and incident wave energy.

  10. Single phase and two phase erosion corrosion in broilers of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, G.S.; Fountain, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Erosion-corrosion is a phenomenon causing metal wastage in a variety of locations in water and water-steam circuits throughout the power generation industry. Erosion-corrosion can occur in a number of regions of the once-through boiler designs used in the later Magnox and AGR type of gas cooled nuclear reactor. This paper will consider two cases of erosion-corrosion damage (single and two phase) in once through boilers of gas cooled reactors and will describe the solutions that have been developed. The single phase problem is associated with erosion-corrosion damage of mild steel downstream of a boiler inlet flow control orifice. With metal loss rates of up to 1 mm/year at 150 deg. C and pH in the range 9.0-9.4 it was found that 5 μg/kg oxygen was sufficient to reduce erosion-corrosion rates to less than 0.02 mm/year. A combined oxygen-ammonia-hydrazine feedwater regime was developed and validated to eliminate oxygen carryover and hence give protection from stress corrosion in the austenitic section of the AGR once through boiler whilst still providing erosion-corrosion control. Two phase erosion-corrosion tube failures have occurred in the evaporator of the mild steel once through boilers of the later Magnox reactors operating at pressures in the range 35-40 bar. Rig studies have shown that amines dosed in the feedwater can provide a significant reduction in metal loss rates and a tube lifetime assessment technique has been developed to predict potential tube failure profiles in a fully operational boiler. The solutions identified for both problems have been successfully implemented and the experience obtained following implementation including any problems or other benefits arising from the introduction of the new regimes will be presented. Methods for monitoring and evaluating the efficiency of the solutions have been developed and the results from these exercises will also be discussed. Consideration will also be given to the similarities in the metal loss

  11. Single phase and two phase erosion corrosion in broilers of gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, G S; Fountain, M J [Operational Engineering Division (Northern Area), Central Electricity Generating Board, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1988-07-01

    Erosion-corrosion is a phenomenon causing metal wastage in a variety of locations in water and water-steam circuits throughout the power generation industry. Erosion-corrosion can occur in a number of regions of the once-through boiler designs used in the later Magnox and AGR type of gas cooled nuclear reactor. This paper will consider two cases of erosion-corrosion damage (single and two phase) in once through boilers of gas cooled reactors and will describe the solutions that have been developed. The single phase problem is associated with erosion-corrosion damage of mild steel downstream of a boiler inlet flow control orifice. With metal loss rates of up to 1 mm/year at 150 deg. C and pH in the range 9.0-9.4 it was found that 5 {mu}g/kg oxygen was sufficient to reduce erosion-corrosion rates to less than 0.02 mm/year. A combined oxygen-ammonia-hydrazine feedwater regime was developed and validated to eliminate oxygen carryover and hence give protection from stress corrosion in the austenitic section of the AGR once through boiler whilst still providing erosion-corrosion control. Two phase erosion-corrosion tube failures have occurred in the evaporator of the mild steel once through boilers of the later Magnox reactors operating at pressures in the range 35-40 bar. Rig studies have shown that amines dosed in the feedwater can provide a significant reduction in metal loss rates and a tube lifetime assessment technique has been developed to predict potential tube failure profiles in a fully operational boiler. The solutions identified for both problems have been successfully implemented and the experience obtained following implementation including any problems or other benefits arising from the introduction of the new regimes will be presented. Methods for monitoring and evaluating the efficiency of the solutions have been developed and the results from these exercises will also be discussed. Consideration will also be given to the similarities in the metal loss

  12. Wind erosion research at an uranium mill tailings site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1977-07-01

    A uranium mill tailings pile at Grants, New Mexico, was selected for wind erosion research since the configuration provides flat area containing fine sand and made up of larger particles. The wind erosion experiment is discussed. Experimental equipment consists of meteorological instrumentation to automatically activate air samplers as a function of wind speed increments and direction, particle cascade impactors to measure airborne respirable concentrations as a function of particle size, inertial impaction devices to measure nonrespirable fluxes of airborne particles, a virtual particle cascade impactor to measure airborne concentrations of toxic trace elements, and soil depth gauges to measure changes in surface soil elevations as a function of time. Both radioactive particles as well as toxic trace element concentrations are measured. Radioactive particles are measured with both particle cascade impactors as well as high-volume air samplers. In contrast, toxic trace element airborne concentrations are measured only with a two-stage virtual particle cascade impactor. Fluxes of nonrespirable airborne particles are measured with inertial impaction devices. At particle cascade impactor sites, a rotating cyclone preseparator collects nonrespirable particles. In addition at all sites, fluxes of nonrespirable particles are measured using an open cavity inertial impaction device

  13. Satellite-based estimation of rainfall erosivity for Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Sterk, G.; Jong, S.M. de

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity is a measure for the erosive force of rainfall. Rainfall kinetic energy determines the erosivity and is in turn greatly dependent on rainfall intensity. Attempts for its large-scale mapping are rare. Most are based on interpolation of erosivity values derived from rain gauge

  14. Soil erosion as a driver of land-use change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.M.; Govers, G.; Kosmas, C.; VanAcker, H.; Oost, van K.; Rounsevell, M.

    2005-01-01

    Although much research has been carried out on the crop productivity response to soil erosion, little is known about the role of soil erosion as a driver of land-use change. Given, however, the some-times large erosion-induced reductions in crop yields, it appears likely that erosion has a strong

  15. Buoyancy of gas-filled bladders at great depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priede, Imants G.

    2018-02-01

    At high hydrostatic pressures exceeding 20 MPa or 200 bar, equivalent to depths exceeding ca.2000 m, the behaviour of gases deviates significantly from the predictions of standard equations such as Boyle's Law, the Ideal Gas Law and Van der Waals equation. The predictions of these equations are compared with experimental data for nitrogen, oxygen and air at 0 °C and 15 °C, at pressures up to 1100 bar (110 MPa) equivalent to full ocean depth of ca. 11000 m. Owing to reduced compressibility of gases at high pressures, gas-filled bladders at full ocean depth have a density of 847 kg m-3 for Oxygen, 622 kg m-3 for Nitrogen and 660 kg m-3 for air providing potentially useful buoyancy comparable with that available from man-made materials. This helps explain why some of the deepest-living fishes at ca. 7000 m depth (700 bar or 70 MPa) have gas-filled swim bladders. A table is provided of the density and buoyancy of oxygen, nitrogen and air at 0 °C and 15 °C from 100 to 1100 bar.

  16. Erosivity, surface runoff, and soil erosion estimation using GIS-coupled runoff-erosion model in the Mamuaba catchment, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva, Richarde; Guimarães Santos, Celso Augusto; Carneiro de Lima Silva, Valeriano; Pereira e Silva, Leonardo

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluates erosivity, surface runoff generation, and soil erosion rates for Mamuaba catchment, sub-catchment of Gramame River basin (Brazil) by using the ArcView Soil and Water Assessment Tool (AvSWAT) model. Calibration and validation of the model was performed on monthly basis, and it could simulate surface runoff and soil erosion to a good level of accuracy. Daily rainfall data between 1969 and 1989 from six rain gauges were used, and the monthly rainfall erosivity of each station was computed for all the studied years. In order to evaluate the calibration and validation of the model, monthly runoff data between January 1978 and April 1982 from one runoff gauge were used as well. The estimated soil loss rates were also realistic when compared to what can be observed in the field and to results from previous studies around of catchment. The long-term average soil loss was estimated at 9.4 t ha(-1) year(-1); most of the area of the catchment (60%) was predicted to suffer from a low- to moderate-erosion risk (soil erosion was estimated to exceed > 12 t ha(-1) year(-1). Expectedly, estimated soil loss was significantly correlated with measured rainfall and simulated surface runoff. Based on the estimated soil loss rates, the catchment was divided into four priority categories (low, moderate, high and very high) for conservation intervention. The study demonstrates that the AvSWAT model provides a useful tool for soil erosion assessment from catchments and facilitates the planning for a sustainable land management in northeastern Brazil.

  17. Spectrally enhanced imaging of occlusal surfaces and artificial shallow enamel erosions with a scanning fiber endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2012-07-01

    An ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope, originally developed for cancer diagnosis, was used to image dental occlusal surfaces as well as shallow artificially induced enamel erosions from human extracted teeth (n=40). Enhanced image resolution of occlusal surfaces was obtained using a short-wavelength 405-nm illumination laser. In addition, artificial erosions of varying depths were also imaged with 405-, 404-, 532-, and 635-nm illumination lasers. Laser-induced autofluorescence images of the teeth using 405-nm illumination were also obtained. Contrast between sound and eroded enamel was quantitatively computed for each imaging modality. For shallow erosions, the image contrast with respect to sound enamel was greatest for the 405-nm reflected image. It was also determined that the increased contrast was in large part due to volume scattering with a smaller component from surface scattering. Furthermore, images obtained with a shallow penetration depth illumination laser (405 nm) provided the greatest detail of surface enamel topography since the reflected light does not contain contributions from light reflected from greater depths within the enamel tissue. Multilayered Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to confirm the experimental results.

  18. Simulation of long-term erosion on an abandoned mine site using the SIBERIA landscape evolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, G.; Willgoose, G.; Evans, K.

    1999-01-01

    The SIBERIA catchment evolution model can simulate the evolution of landforms over many years as a result of runoff and erosion. This study discusses testing of the reliability of the erosion predictions of the model in a field study. Using erosion parameters calibrated from field studies of rainfall and runoff from the waste rock dump batters, the SIBERIA landscape evolution model was calibrated and then used to simulate erosion over 50 years on the abandoned Scinto 6 mine site. Scinto 6 is a former uranium mine located in the Kakadu Region, Northern Territory, Australia. The SIBERIA runs simulated the geomorphic development of the gullies on the man-made batters of the waste rock dump. The waste rock of the mine had been dumped in the characteristic pattern of a flat top and steep sided batters typical of many former and current dumps and there had been significant degradation from both sheet and gully erosion. Traditional erosion models cannot model this type of degradation because their erosion model cannot change the landform, while SIBERIA does change the landform. The gully position, depth volume and morphology on the waste rock dump were compared with that of SIBERIA simulations. The geomorphic development of the waste rock dump indicated that SIBERIA can simulate features that arise from the long-term effect of erosion and also their rate of development on a man-made post-mining landscape over periods of up to 50 years. The detailed results of this specific study will be discussed with specific discussion of the type of data required and the implications of the uncertain erosion physics on the reliability of the predictions

  19. Soil dynamics and accelerated erosion: a sensitivity analysis of the LPJ Dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoms, Samuel; Van Oost, Kristof; Vanacker, Veerle; Kaplan, Jed O.; Vanwalleghem, Tom

    2013-04-01

    It is widely accepted that humans have become a major geomorphic force by disturbing natural vegetation patterns. Land conversion for agriculture purposes removes the protection of soils by the natural vegetation and leads to increased soil erosion by one to two orders of magnitude, breaking the balance that exists between the loss of soils and its production. Accelerated erosion and deposition have a strong influence on evolution and heterogeneity of basic soil characteristics (soil thickness, hydrology, horizon development,…) as well as on organic matter storage and cycling. Yet, since they are operating at a long time scale, those processes are not represented in state-of-art Dynamic Global Vegetation Models, which is a clear lack when exploring vegetation dynamics over past centuries. The main objectives of this paper are (i) to test the sensitivity of a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model, in terms of NPP and organic matter turnover, variations in state variables in response to accelerated erosion and (ii) to assess the performance of the model under the impact of erosion for a case-study in Central Spain. We evaluated the Lund-Postdam-Jena Dynamic Vegetation Model (LPJ DVGM) (Sitch et al, 2003) which simulates vegetation growth and carbon pools at the surface and in the soil based on climatic, pedologic and topographic variables. We assessed its reactions to changes in key soil properties that are affected by erosion such as texture and soil depth. We present the results of where we manipulated soil texture and bulk density while keeping the environmental drivers of climate, slope and altitude constant. For parameters exhibiting a strong control on NPP or SOM, a factorial analysis was conducted to test for interaction effects. The simulations show an important dependence on the clay content, especially for the slow cycling carbon pools and the biomass production, though the underground litter seems to be mostly influenced by the silt content. The fast cycling C

  20. Gully erosion in the Caatinga biome, Brazil: measurement and stochastic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Alencar, Pedro Henrique; de Araújo, José Carlos; Nonato Távora Costa, Raimundo

    2017-04-01

    In contrast with inter-rill erosion, which takes a long time to modify the terrain form, gully erosion can fast and severely change the landscape. In the Brazilian semiarid region, a one-million km2 area that coincides with the Caatinga biome, inter-rill erosion prevails due to the silty shallow soils. However, gully erosion does occur in the Caatinga, with temporal increasing severity. This source of sediment impacts the existing dense network of small dams, generating significant deleterious effects, such as water availability reduction in a drought-prone region. This study focuses on the Madalena basin (124 km2, state of Ceará, Brazil), a land-reform settlement with 20 inhabitants per km2, whose main economic activities are agriculture (especially Zea mays), livestock and fishing. In the catchment area, where there are 12 dams (with storage capacity ranging from 6.104 to 2.107 m3), gully erosion has become an issue due to its increasing occurrence. Eight gully-erosion sites have been identified in the basin, but most of them have not yet reached great dimensions (depth and/or width), nor interacted with groundwater, being therefore classified as ephemeral gullies. We selected the three most relevant sites and measured the topography of the eroded channels, as well as the neighboring terrain relief, using accurate total stations and unmanned aerial vehicle. The data was processed with the help of software, such as DataGeosis (Office 7.5) and Surfer (11.0), providing information on gully erosion in terms of (μ ± σ): projection area (317±165 m2), eroded mass (61±36 Mg) and volume (42±25 m3), length (38±6 m), maximum depth (0.58±0.13 m) and maximum width (6.00±2.35 m). The measured data are then compared with those provided by the Foster and Lane model (1986). The model generated results with considerable scatter. This is possibly due to uncertainties in the field parameters, which are neglected in the deterministic approach of most physically-based models

  1. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion

    OpenAIRE

    AlShahrani, Mohammed Thamer; Haralur, Satheesh B.; Alqarni, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clini...

  2. ISLSCP II Ecosystem Rooting Depths

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this study was to predict the global distribution of plant rooting depths based on data about global aboveground vegetation structure and climate....

  3. ISLSCP II Ecosystem Rooting Depths

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to predict the global distribution of plant rooting depths based on data about global aboveground vegetation structure and...

  4. Erosion experiments in swelling clays and result evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sane, Petri; Turtiainen, M.; Koskinen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The performance of the bentonite buffer in KBS-3-nuclear waste repository concept relies strongly on the sufficient dry density of the buffer layer surrounding the deposition canister. As the buffer density is essentially fixed during the installation process, erosive mass loss of the buffer material remains as the most significant process reducing the density of the buffer. Most important parameters affecting the mass loss in the erosion process are the groundwater flow rate through the deposition hole from fractures in the surrounding rock and groundwater chemistry. Based on the rock suitability criteria for individual deposition holes in ONKALO, the Finnish spent nuclear fuel repository, the groundwater flow conditions in a single deposition hole/deposition hole tunnel section can be characterized in sufficient certainty in terms of maximum groundwater inflow rate; 0.1 L/min, i.e., deposition holes with larger inflows will not be used. Based on different climate scenarios the evolution of the groundwater chemistry can also be assessed and certain reference bounding salinities can be determined and corresponding fixed laboratory use reference solutions can be defined, most important being the current groundwater composition at deposition depth, which can be defined as 10 g/L reference solution as Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) per a liter of groundwater, relevant salts being NaCl and CaCl 2 . Additional reference salinities relevant to the ONKALO-repository are 1 g/L and 70 g/L, salt composition varying. Based on these fixed environmental parameters, testing of the erosive properties of the buffer can be performed with sufficient reliability. The current material type chosen for the Posiva buffer material in deposition hole is Wyoming MX-80 bentonite with sufficiently high montmorillonite content ensuring sufficient swelling. The dry density and water ratio of the buffer are also currently fixed in the design to

  5. High-Energy-Density Metal-Oxygen Batteries: Lithium-Oxygen Batteries vs Sodium-Oxygen Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyeongse; Agyeman, Daniel Adjei; Park, Mihui; Yang, Junghoon; Kang, Yong-Mook

    2017-12-01

    The development of next-generation energy-storage devices with high power, high energy density, and safety is critical for the success of large-scale energy-storage systems (ESSs), such as electric vehicles. Rechargeable sodium-oxygen (Na-O 2 ) batteries offer a new and promising opportunity for low-cost, high-energy-density, and relatively efficient electrochemical systems. Although the specific energy density of the Na-O 2 battery is lower than that of the lithium-oxygen (Li-O 2 ) battery, the abundance and low cost of sodium resources offer major advantages for its practical application in the near future. However, little has so far been reported regarding the cell chemistry, to explain the rate-limiting parameters and the corresponding low round-trip efficiency and cycle degradation. Consequently, an elucidation of the reaction mechanism is needed for both lithium-oxygen and sodium-oxygen cells. An in-depth understanding of the differences and similarities between Li-O 2 and Na-O 2 battery systems, in terms of thermodynamics and a structural viewpoint, will be meaningful to promote the development of advanced metal-oxygen batteries. State-of-the-art battery design principles for high-energy-density lithium-oxygen and sodium-oxygen batteries are thus reviewed in depth here. Major drawbacks, reaction mechanisms, and recent strategies to improve performance are also summarized. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. IN SITU MEASUREMENT OF BEDROCK EROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Rieke-Zapp

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available While long term erosion rates of bedrock material may be estimated by dating methods, current day erosion rates are – if at all available – based on rough estimates or on point measurements. Precise quantification of short term erosion rates are required to improve our understanding of short term processes, for input in landscape evolution models, as well as for studying the mechanics and efficiency of different erosion processes in varying geomorphological settings. Typical current day erosion rates in the European Alps range from sub-millimetre to several millimetres per year depending on the dominant erosion processes. The level of surveying accuracy required for recurring sub-millimetre to millimetre measurements in the field is demanding. A novel surveying setup for in-situ measurement of bedrock erosion was tested recently in three different locations in Switzerland. Natural bedrock was investigated in the Gornera gorge close to Zermatt. Further on, bedrock samples were installed in exposed locations in the Erlenbach research watershed close to Einsiedeln, and in the Illgraben debris flow channel, located in the Canton Schwyz and Valais, respectively. A twofold measurement approach was chosen for all locations. For the first setup control points providing an absolute reference frame for recurrent measurements were embedded close to the area of interest. Close range photogrammetry was applied to measure surface changes on the bedrock samples. The precision for surface measurements in the field was 0.1 mm (1 σ and thus suitable for the application. The equipment needed for the surveys can easily be carried to the field. At one field site a structured light scanner was used along with the photogrammetric setup. Although the current generation of structured light scanners appeared less suitable for field application, data acquisition was much faster and checking the data for completeness in the field was straight forward. The latest

  7. In Situ Measurement of Bedrock Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke-Zapp, D. H.; Beer, A.; Turowski, J. M.; Campana, L.

    2012-07-01

    While long term erosion rates of bedrock material may be estimated by dating methods, current day erosion rates are - if at all available - based on rough estimates or on point measurements. Precise quantification of short term erosion rates are required to improve our understanding of short term processes, for input in landscape evolution models, as well as for studying the mechanics and efficiency of different erosion processes in varying geomorphological settings. Typical current day erosion rates in the European Alps range from sub-millimetre to several millimetres per year depending on the dominant erosion processes. The level of surveying accuracy required for recurring sub-millimetre to millimetre measurements in the field is demanding. A novel surveying setup for in-situ measurement of bedrock erosion was tested recently in three different locations in Switzerland. Natural bedrock was investigated in the Gornera gorge close to Zermatt. Further on, bedrock samples were installed in exposed locations in the Erlenbach research watershed close to Einsiedeln, and in the Illgraben debris flow channel, located in the Canton Schwyz and Valais, respectively. A twofold measurement approach was chosen for all locations. For the first setup control points providing an absolute reference frame for recurrent measurements were embedded close to the area of interest. Close range photogrammetry was applied to measure surface changes on the bedrock samples. The precision for surface measurements in the field was 0.1 mm (1 σ) and thus suitable for the application. The equipment needed for the surveys can easily be carried to the field. At one field site a structured light scanner was used along with the photogrammetric setup. Although the current generation of structured light scanners appeared less suitable for field application, data acquisition was much faster and checking the data for completeness in the field was straight forward. The latest generation of compact

  8. Soil carbon and nitrogen erosion in forested catchments: implications for erosion-induced terrestrial carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. M. Stacy; S. C. Hart; C. T. Hunsaker; D. W. Johnson; A. A. Berhe

    2015-01-01

    Lateral movement of organic matter (OM) due to erosion is now considered an important flux term in terrestrial carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) budgets, yet most published studies on the role of erosion focus on agricultural or grassland ecosystems. To date, little information is available on the rate and nature of OM eroded from forest ecosystems. We present annual...

  9. Probabilistic soil erosion modeling using the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMIT) after wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. R. Robichaud; W. J. Elliot; J. W. Wagenbrenner

    2011-01-01

    The decision of whether or not to apply post-fire hillslope erosion mitigation treatments, and if so, where these treatments are most needed, is a multi-step process. Land managers must assess the risk of damaging runoff and sediment delivery events occurring on the unrecovered burned hillslope. We developed the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) to address this need...

  10. Predicting of soil erosion with regarding to rainfall erosivity and soil erodibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suif, Zuliziana; Razak, Mohd Amirun Anis Ab; Ahmad, Nordila

    2018-02-01

    The soil along the hill and slope are wearing away due to erosion and it can take place due to occurrence of weak and heavy rainfall. The aim of this study is to predict the soil erosion degree in Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia (UPNM) area focused on two major factor which is soil erodibility and rainfall erosivity. Soil erodibility is the possibilities of soil to detach and carried away during rainfall and runoff. The "ROM" scale was used in this study to determine the degree of soil erodibility, namely low, moderate, high, and very high. As for rainfall erosivity, the erosive power caused by rainfall that cause soil loss. A daily rainfall data collected from January to April was analyzed by using ROSE index classification to identify the potential risk of soil erosion. The result shows that the soil erodibilty are moderate at MTD`s hill, high at behind of block Lestari and Landslide MTD hill, and critical at behind the mess cadet. While, the highest rainfall erosivity was recorded in March and April. Overall, this study would benefit the organization greatly in saving cost in landslide protection as relevant authorities can take early measures repairing the most affected area of soil erosion.

  11. Does a more sophisticated storm erosion model improve probabilistic erosion estimates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranasinghe, R.W.M.R.J.B.; Callaghan, D.; Roelvink, D.

    2013-01-01

    The dependency between the accuracy/uncertainty of storm erosion exceedance estimates obtained via a probabilistic model and the level of sophistication of the structural function (storm erosion model) embedded in the probabilistic model is assessed via the application of Callaghan et al.'s (2008)

  12. Susceptibility of bovine dental enamel with initial erosion lesion to new erosive challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Gabriela Cristina de; Tereza, Guida Paola Genovez; Boteon, Ana Paula; Ferrairo, Brunna Mota; Gonçalves, Priscilla Santana Pinto; Silva, Thiago Cruvinel da; Honório, Heitor Marques; Rios, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the impact of initial erosion on the susceptibility of enamel to further erosive challenge. Thirty bovine enamel blocks were selected by surface hardness and randomized into two groups (n = 15): GC- group composed by enamel blocks without erosion lesion and GT- group composed by enamel blocks with initial erosion lesion. The baseline profile of each block was determined using the profilometer. The initial erosion was produced by immersing the blocks into HCl 0.01 M, pH 2.3 for 30 seconds, under stirring. The erosive cycling consisted of blocks immersion in hydrochloric acid (0.01 M, pH 2.3) for 2 minutes, followed by immersion in artificial saliva for 120 minutes. This procedure was repeated 4 times a day for 5 days, and the blocks were kept in artificial saliva overnight. After erosive cycling, final profile measurement was performed. Profilometry measured the enamel loss by the superposition of initial and final profiles. Data were analyzed by t-test (perosion on bovine dental enamel does not enhance its susceptibility to new erosive challenges.

  13. Superficial soil erosion assessment in agricultural land and bare land using {sup 7}Be fallout; Estudo da redistribuicao de solo superficial em areas cultivadas e nao cultivadas utilizando o fallout do {sup 7}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marestoni, Luiz Diego

    2007-02-15

    Geologic and hydrologic phenomenon monitoring presents great environmental and financial interest and several radioisotopes, natural and artificial, have been used for this purpose. The more used are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 210}Pb not supported and {sup 7}Be. In the present work, {sup 7}Be was used to determine the soil erosion in three areas: one with soy ploughed at the direction of the slope, one with it perpendicular to the slope and one in an area with bare soil. {sup 7}Be is a cosmogenic radionuclide, with half-life of 53.3 days, produced by spallation of oxygen and nitrogen by cosmic rays in the troposphere and stratosphere. {sup 7}Be deposition occurs by dry and wet deposition, although wet deposition contributed by 95%. This can be verified through the measures of the {sup 7}Be inventory correlated with the precipitation, which resulted in a good linear adjustment. The experimental set up consisted of two HPGe detectors: one with 66% of relative efficiency and one with 10% of relative efficiency, both detectors coupled to standard gamma ray spectrometry nuclear electronic chain. Soil samples were packed in 1 liter Marinelli beckers. Sampling was accomplished until the depth where {sup 7}Be was present and it was possible to verify that its penetration in the soils could be very well adjusted by an exponential type function. The maximum beryllium-7 penetration in the bare soil without sign of soil erosion was 3 cm, that is, beryllium-7 is a useful tool as tracer for superficial soil erosion determination. The constant of mass relaxation h{sub 0} was determined as 4.71 {+-} 0.36, result that is in agreement with other works in the international literature. It was verified that when the soy is ploughed perpendicular to the slope, the soil redistribution rate is smaller, resulting in economic advantage. The bare soil is very exposed to the erosion, because does not exist any barrier to contain the soil that flows at the direction of the slope, such fact was verified

  14. Erosion and the limits to planetesimal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijt, S.; Ormel, C. W.; Dominik, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2015-02-01

    Context. The coagulation of microscopic dust into planetesimals is the first step towards the formation of planets. The composition, size, and shape of the growing aggregates determine the efficiency of this early growth. In particular, it has been proposed that fluffy ice aggregates can grow very efficiently in protoplanetary disks, suffering less from the bouncing and radial drift barriers. Aims: While the collision velocity between icy aggregates of similar size is thought to stay below the fragmentation threshold, they may nonetheless lose mass from collisions with much smaller projectiles. As a result, erosive collisions have the potential to terminate the growth of pre-planetesimal bodies. We investigate the effect of these erosive collisions on the ability of porous ice aggregates to cross the radial drift barrier. Methods: We develop a Monte Carlo code that calculates the evolution of the masses and porosities of growing aggregates, while resolving the entire mass distribution at all times. The aggregate's porosity is treated independently of its mass, and is determined by collisional compaction, gas compaction, and eventually self-gravity compaction. We include erosive collisions and study the effect of the erosion threshold velocity on aggregate growth. Results: For erosion threshold velocities of 20-40 m s-1, high-velocity collisions with small projectiles prevent the largest aggregates from growing when they start to drift. In these cases, our local simulations result in a steady-state distribution, with most of the dust mass in particles with Stokes numbers close to unity. Only for the highest erosion threshold considered (60 m s-1) do porous aggregates manage to cross the radial drift barrier in the inner 10 AU of MMSN-like disks. Conclusions: Erosive collisions are more effective in limiting the growth than fragmentary collisions between similar-size particles. Conceivably, erosion limits the growth before the radial drift barrier, although the

  15. Comparing Background and Recent Erosion Rates in Degraded Areas of Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, N.; Bierman, P. R.; Sosa-Gonzalez, V.; Rood, D. H.; Fontes, R. L.; Santos, A. C.; Godoy, J. M.; Bhering, S.

    2014-12-01

    Soil erosion is a major problem in northwestern Rio de Janeiro State where, during the last three centuries, major land-use changes took place, associated with the replacement of the original rainforest by agriculture and grazing. The combination of steep hillslopes, erodible soils, sparse vegetation, natural and human-induced fires, as well as downslope ploughing, led to an increase in surface runoff and surface erosion on soil-mantled hillslopes; together, these actions and responses caused a decline in soil productivity. In order to estimate changes in erosion rates over time, we compared erosion rates measured at different spatial and temporal scales, both background (natural) and short-term (human-induced during last few decades). Background long-term erosion rates were measured using in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be in the sand fraction quartz of active river channel sediment in four basins in the northwestern portion of Rio de Janeiro State. In these basins, average annual precipitation varies from 1,200 to 1,300 mm, while drainage areas vary from 15 to 7,200 km2. Short-term erosion rates were measured in one of these basins from fallout 210Pb in soil samples collected along a hillslope transect located in an abandoned agriculture field. In this transect, 190 undisturbed soil samples (three replicates) were collected from the surface to 0.50 m depth (5 cm vertical intervals) in six soil pits. 10Be average background, basin-wide, erosion rates in the area are ~ 13 m/My; over the last decades, time-integrated (210Pb) average hillslope erosion rates are around 1450 m/Myr, with maximum values at the steepest portion of convex hillslopes of about 2000 m/Myr. These results suggest that recent hillslope erosion rates are about 2 orders of magnitude above background rates of sediment generation integrated over many millennia. This unsustainable rate of soil loss has severely decreased soil productivity eventually leading to the abandonment of farming activities in

  16. Mechanisms of erosion of atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillard, Thibaut; Franck, Grégory; Mawson, Thomas; Folco, Eduardo; Libby, Peter

    2017-10-01

    The present review explores the mechanisms of superficial intimal erosion, a common cause of thrombotic complications of atherosclerosis. Human coronary artery atheroma that give rise to thrombosis because of erosion differ diametrically from those associated with fibrous cap rupture. Eroded lesions characteristically contain few inflammatory cells, abundant extracellular matrix, and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Innate immune mechanisms such as engagement of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on cultured endothelial cells can impair their viability, attachment, and ability to recover a wound. Hyaluronan fragments may serve as endogenous TLR2 ligands. Mouse experiments demonstrate that flow disturbance in arteries with neointimas tailored to resemble features of human eroded plaques disturbs endothelial cell barrier function, impairs endothelial cell viability, recruits neutrophils, and provokes endothelial cells desquamation, NET formation, and thrombosis in a TLR2-dependent manner. Mechanisms of erosion have received much less attention than those that provoke plaque rupture. Intensive statin treatment changes the characteristic of plaques that render them less susceptible to rupture. Thus, erosion may contribute importantly to the current residual burden of risk. Understanding the mechanisms of erosion may inform the development and deployment of novel therapies to combat the remaining atherothrombotic risk in the statin era.

  17. Solid particle erosion of polymers and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, K.; Almajid, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    After a general introduction to the subject of solid particle erosion of polymers and composites, the presentation focusses more specifically on the behavior of unidirectional carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composites under such loadings, using different impact conditions and erodents. The data were analyzed on the basis of a newly defined specific erosive wear rate, allowing a better comparison of erosion data achieved under various testing conditions. Characteristic wear mechanisms of the CF/PEEK composites consisted of fiber fracture, matrix cutting and plastic matrix deformation, the relative contribution of which depended on the impingement angles and the CF orientation. The highest wear rates were measured for impingement angles between 45 and 60°. Using abrasion resistant neat polymer films (in this case PEEK or thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) ones) on the surface of a harder substrate (e.g. a CF/PEEK composite plate) resulted in much lower specific erosive wear rates. The use of such polymeric films can be considered as a possible method to protect composite surfaces from damage caused by minor impacts and erosion. In fact, they are nowadays already successfully applied as protections for wind energy rotor blades.

  18. Water erosion risk prediction in eucalyptus plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayesse Aparecida da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus plantations are normally found in vulnerable ecosystems such as steep slope, soil with low natural fertility and lands that were degraded by agriculture. The objective of this study was to obtain Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE factors and use them to estimate water erosion risk in regions with eucalyptus planted. The USLE factors were obtained in field plots under natural rainfall in the Rio Doce Basin, MG, Brazil, and the model applied to assess erosion risk using USLE in a Geographic Information System. The study area showed rainfall-runoff erosivity values from 10,721 to 10,642 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr-1. Some soils (Latosols had very low erodibility values (2.0 x 10-4 and 1.0 x 10-4t h MJ-1 mm-1, the topographic factor ranged from 0.03 to 10.57 and crop and management factor values obtained for native forest, eucalyptus and planted pasture were 0.09, 0.12 and 0.22, respectively. Water erosion risk estimates for current land use indicated that the areas where should receive more attention were mainly areas with greater topographic factors and those with Cambisols. Planning of forestry activities in this region should consider implementation of other conservation practices beyond those already used, reducing areas with a greater risk of soil erosion and increasing areas with very low risk.

  19. Retrospection of recent 30-year changes in the process of soil wind erosion in the Luanhe River Source Area of North China using Cesium-137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zhifan [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, 19 Xin Jie Kou Wai St., Beijing 100875 (China) and College of Environment and Planning, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China)], E-mail: chenzhf0604@163.com; Zhao Ye [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, 19 Xin Jie Kou Wai St., Beijing 100875 (China)], E-mail: zhaoye@bnu.edu.cn; Qiao Jiejuan [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, 19 Xin Jie Kou Wai St., Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang Qing [National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Protection, Beijing 100088 (China); Zhu Yuen [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, 19 Xin Jie Kou Wai St., Beijing 100875 (China); Xu Cuihua [National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Protection, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The Luanhe River Source Area belongs to typical semi-arid, agro-pastoral ecotone of North China. It is very important for the prevention and treatment of soil erosion in North China to analyze and evaluate quantitatively the recent 30-year changes in the process of soil wind erosion in this area. Based on long field observations, soil samples from different depths in a representative wind-deposited soil profile in the Luanhe River Source Area were collected. Then the {sup 137}Cs activity of soil samples from different depths in the soil profile was determined using a GEM series HPGe (high-purity germanium) coaxial detector system (ADCAM-100), and their soil properties, such as the soil particle fraction and so on, were analyzed. According to the detected {sup 137}Cs activity of different depths, a continuous time sequence of the wind-deposited soil profile in the study area was established. Furthermore, through assumption on a soil relative wind erosion intensity index (SWEI), recent 30-year changes in the process of soil wind erosion in the Luanhe River Source Area were retrospected . The analysis results revealed that weaker soil wind erosion occurred in the study area from the 1970s to the early 1980s and from the late 1980s to the mid to late 1990s. Conversely, intense periods of soil wind erosion occurred in the mid-1980s and from the late 1990s to 2002.

  20. Retrospection of recent 30-year changes in the process of soil wind erosion in the Luanhe River Source Area of North China using Cesium-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhifan; Zhao Ye; Qiao Jiejuan; Zhang Qing; Zhu Yuen; Xu Cuihua

    2009-01-01

    The Luanhe River Source Area belongs to typical semi-arid, agro-pastoral ecotone of North China. It is very important for the prevention and treatment of soil erosion in North China to analyze and evaluate quantitatively the recent 30-year changes in the process of soil wind erosion in this area. Based on long field observations, soil samples from different depths in a representative wind-deposited soil profile in the Luanhe River Source Area were collected. Then the 137 Cs activity of soil samples from different depths in the soil profile was determined using a GEM series HPGe (high-purity germanium) coaxial detector system (ADCAM-100), and their soil properties, such as the soil particle fraction and so on, were analyzed. According to the detected 137 Cs activity of different depths, a continuous time sequence of the wind-deposited soil profile in the study area was established. Furthermore, through assumption on a soil relative wind erosion intensity index (SWEI), recent 30-year changes in the process of soil wind erosion in the Luanhe River Source Area were retrospected . The analysis results revealed that weaker soil wind erosion occurred in the study area from the 1970s to the early 1980s and from the late 1980s to the mid to late 1990s. Conversely, intense periods of soil wind erosion occurred in the mid-1980s and from the late 1990s to 2002.

  1. Evaluation of the serum zinc level in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, N; Mehdipour, M; Najafi, Sh; Bahramian, A; Garjani, Sh; Khoeini Poorfar, H

    2014-06-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory immunologic-based disease involving skin and mucosa. This disease is generally divided into two categories: erosive and non-erosive. Many etiologic factors are deliberated regarding the disease; however, the disorders of immune system and the role of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and monocytes are more highlighted. Zinc is an imperative element for the growth of epithelium and its deficiency induces the cytotoxic activity of T-helper2 cells, which seems to be associated with lichen planus. This study was aimed to evaluate the levels of serum zinc in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus (OLP) and to compare it with the healthy control group to find out any feasible inference. A total of 22 patients with erosive oral lichen planus, 22 patients with non erosive OLP and 44 healthy individuals as the control group were recruited in this descriptive-comparative study. All the participants were selected from the referees to the department of oral medicine, school of dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Serum zinc level was examined for all the individuals with liquid-stat kit (Beckman Instruments Inc.; Carlsbad, CA). Data were analyzed by adopting the ANOVA and Tukey tests, using SPSS 16 statistical software. The mean age of patients with erosive and non-erosive LP was 41.7 and 41.3 years, respectively. The mean age of the healthy control group was 34.4 years .The mean serum zinc levels in the erosive and non erosive lichen planus groups and control groups were 8.3 (1.15), 11.15 (0.92) and 15.74 (1.75) μg/dl respectively. The difference was statistically significant (poral lichen planus. This finding may probably indicate the promising role of zinc in development of oral lichen planus.

  2. Impacts of water erosion on soil physical properties of an Oxisol and an Inceptisol in the Eastern Plains of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obando, Franco H

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of soil losses records during 10 years, three levels of water erosion were established for two soil (Typical Hapludox and Oxic Dystropept) located on high and medium terraces of alluvial flat plain of piedmont in the Eastern Plains in La Libertad Research Center of CORPOICA. Eighteen 3 x 10 m 2 run-off plots were fitted out on a nonrandom arrangement of nine plots by landscape and three soil use and management treatments: zero grazing Brachiaria decumbens pasture for six years, up land rice, soybean and maize rotations for six years and bare soil for 10 years. Soil losses under these treatments allowed to define three degrees of erosion: slight (N 3 moderate (N 2 ) and severe (N 3 ) respectively. From each plot soil samples were taken at two depths for physical analyses. infiltration and resistance to cone penetration were measured in the field. Without exception water erosion produced a detrimental effect on soil physical properties and the hydrological function of both experimental soils. Water retention capacity for N 2 and N 3 erosion levels did not present significant differences. Weighed mean diameter, DPM, of water stable aggregates was significantly greater on in the slightly (N 1 ) erosion level. Bulk density presented values significantly higher at 0-1 cm depth on both a soils

  3. Quantifying gully erosion contribution from morphodynamic analysis of historical aerial photographs in a large catchment SW Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayas, Antonio; Giráldez, Juan V.; Laguna, Ana; Peña, Peña; Vanwalleghem, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Gully erosion is widely recognized as an important erosion process and source of sediment, especially in Mediterranean basins. Recent advances in monitoring techniques, such as ground-based LiDAR, drone-bounded cameras or photoreconstruction, allow quantifying gully erosion rates with unprecedented accuracy. However, many studies only focus on gully growth during a short period. In agricultural areas, farmers frequently erase gullies artificially. Over longer time scales, this results in an important dynamic of gully growth and infilling. Also, given the significant temporal variability of precipitation, land use and the proper gully erosion processes, gully growth is non-linear over time. This study therefore aims at analyzing gully morphodynamics over a long time scale (1957-2011) in a large catchment in order to quantify gully erosion processes and its contribution to overall sediment dynamics. The 20 km2 study area is located in SW Spain. The extension of the gully network was digitized by photographic interpretation based on aerial photographs from 1957, 1981, 1985, 1999, 2002, 2005, 2007, 2009 and 2011. Gully width was measured at representative control points for each of these years. During this period, the dominant land use changed considerably from herbaceous crops to olive orchards. A field campaign was conducted in 2014 to measure current gully width and depth. Total gully volume and uncertainty was determined by Monte Carlo-based simulations of gully cross-sectional area for unmeasured sections. The extension of the gully network both increased and decreased in the study period. Gully density varied between 1.93 km km-2 in 1957, with a minimum of 1.37 km km-2 in 1981 and a maximum of 5.40 km km-2 in 2011. Gully width estimated in selected points from the orthophotos range between 0.9 m and 59.2 m, and showed a good lognormal fit. Field campaigns results in a collection of cross-section measures with gullies widths between 1.87 and 28.5 m and depths from

  4. Λ and Σ well depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Eiji

    1982-01-01

    The Λ well depth was calculated by taking into account the effect of the ΛΣ conversion. Takahashi et al. obtained the separate type of potentials which described the hyperon-nucleon interaction up to p waves. Two types of the potentials among several types they obtained were used to calculate the Λ well depth. The G matrix was easily calculated, and the Λ well depth was obtained by integrating the G matrix in momentum space up to the Fermi surface. The effect of the ΛΣ conversion was given by an equation. The total Λ well depth was estimated to be 9.13 MeV and 49.36 MeV for each type of potential, respectively. It was concluded that the argument by Bodmer et al. was not correct. The Σ well depth was also calculated using the potential obtained by Takahashi et al. for I = 1/2 and the one obtained by Σ + p → Σ + p scattering data for I = 3/2. The obtained value 35.30 MeV may be overestimated, and the experimental value is expected to be in the range from 20 MeV to 30 MeV. (Ito, K.)

  5. Modelling the effect of agricultural management practices on soil organic carbon stocks: does soil erosion matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeu, Elisabet; Van Wesemael, Bas; Van Oost, Kristof

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decades, an increasing number of studies have been conducted to assess the effect of soil management practices on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks. At regional scales, biogeochemical models such as CENTURY or Roth-C have been commonly applied. These models simulate SOC dynamics at the profile level (point basis) over long temporal scales but do not consider the continuous lateral transfer of sediment that takes place along geomorphic toposequences. As a consequence, the impact of soil redistribution on carbon fluxes is very seldom taken into account when evaluating changes in SOC stocks due to agricultural management practices on the short and long-term. To address this gap, we assessed the role of soil erosion by water and tillage on SOC stocks under different agricultural management practices in the Walloon region of Belgium. The SPEROS-C model was run for a 100-year period combining three typical crop rotations (using winter wheat, winter barley, sugar beet and maize) with three tillage scenarios (conventional tillage, reduced tillage and reduced tillage in combination with additional crop residues). The results showed that including soil erosion by water in the simulations led to a general decrease in SOC stocks relative to a baseline scenario (where no erosion took place). The SOC lost from these arable soils was mainly exported to adjacent sites and to the river system by lateral fluxes, with magnitudes differing between crop rotations and in all cases lower under conservation tillage practices than under conventional tillage. Although tillage erosion plays an important role in carbon redistribution within fields, lateral fluxes induced by water erosion led to a higher spatial and in-depth heterogeneity of SOC stocks with potential effects on the soil water holding capacity and crop yields. This indicates that studies assessing the effect of agricultural management practices on SOC stocks and other soil properties over the landscape should

  6. Soil erosion in Iran: Issues and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed; Cerdà, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Iran currently faces many soil erosion-related problems (see citations below). These issues are resulted from some inherent characteristic and anthropogenic triggering forces. Nowadays, the latter plays more important rule to accelerate the erosion with further emphasis on soil erosion-prone arid and semi arid regions of the country. This contribution attempts to identify and describe the existing main reasons behind accelerated soil erosion in Iran. Appropriate solutions viz. structural and non-structural approaches will be then advised to combat or minimise the problems. Iran can be used as a pilot research site to understand the soil erosion processes in semiarid, arid and mountainous terrain and our research will review the scientific literature and will give an insight of the soil erosion rates in the main factors of the soil erosion in Iran. Key words: Anthropogenic Erosion, Land Degradation; Sediment Management; Sediment Problems Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7-ENV-2013- supported this research. References Aghili Nategh, N., Hemmat, A., & Sadeghi, M. (2014). Assessing confined and semi-confined compression curves of highly calcareous remolded soil amended with farmyard manure. Journal of Terramechanics, 53, 75-82. Arekhi, S., Bolourani, A. D., Shabani, A., Fathizad, H., Ahamdy-Asbchin, S. 2012. Mapping Soil Erosion and Sediment Yield Susceptibility using RUSLE, Remote Sensing and GIS (Case study: Cham Gardalan Watershed, Iran). Advances in Environmental Biology, 6(1), 109-124. Arekhi, S., Shabani, A., Rostamizad, G. 2012. Application of the modified universal soil loss equation (MUSLE) in prediction of sediment yield (Case study: Kengir Watershed, Iran). Arabian Journal of Geosciences, 5(6), 1259-1267.Sadeghi, S. H., Moosavi, V., Karami, A., Behnia, N. 2012. Soil erosion assessment and prioritization of affecting factors at plot

  7. Sand transport, erosion and granular electrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    is expanding our current understanding and outline the areas of advancement needed in the future. Presentation is made of current models for wind driven detachment/entrainment and the transport rates of sand and dust, including the effects of contact induced grain electrification. This ubiquitous phenomenon...... can affect grain transport through the generation of intense electric fields and processes of electrostatic assembly. Importantly the transport of sand is characterized by saltation, which is known to be an active process for erosion and therefore a source for dust and sand formation. Using novel...... erosion simulation techniques the link between grain transport rates and erosion rates has been quantified. Furthermore this can be linked to production rates for dust and has been associated with chemical and mineral alteration through a process of mechanical activation of fractured surfaces. This work...

  8. Erosion protection of uranium tailings impoundments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, W.H.; Skaggs, R.L.; Foley, M.G.; Beedlow, P.A.

    1986-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this report to assist in the design and review of erosion protection works for decommissioned uranium tailings impoundments. The major causes of erosion over the long-term decommissioning period are from rainfall-runoff (overland flow) and stream channel flooding. The method of protection recommended for the impoundment side slopes and site drainage channels is rock riprap. Combinations of vegetation and rock mulch are recommended for the top surface. The design methods were developed from currently available procedures supplemented by field, laboratory, and mathematical model studies performed by PNL. Guidelines for the placement of riprap, inspection, and maintenance are presented. Other subjects discussed are rock selection and testing, slope stability, and overland erosion modeling

  9. Erosion of buffer caused by groundwater leakages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autio, J.; Hanana, K.; Punkkinen, O.; Koskinen, K.; Olin, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the Finnish HLW disposal concept the most important properties of the bentonite clay being considered for these isolation purposes are its thermal behaviour, low hydraulic conductivity, diffusion limited transport, rheology, plasticity, sufficient swelling potential, and exchange capacity. All of these properties depend critically on bentonite density; therefore, any potential mass loss or redistribution events must be well characterized. One such event or process is the erosion of bentonite by flowing groundwater and the groundwater flowing in newly formed channels, in special. Mechanical erosion during the operational phase, due to high groundwater pressure gradients in open excavations, has been identified as a critical issue in TKS-2006 and SR-Can. This work addresses the mechanical erosion of bentonite by fluid shear. In order for buffer erosion to occur three processes must take place: detachment, entrainment, and transport. These processes are followed by the settling of the material and redistribution of buffer mass. Erosion begins with the detachment of a particle from surrounding material, which requires the application of shear forces greater than the attractive force between the particle and parent structure. Entrainment is the process by which the eroding medium lifts the detached particle into the flow. The most important aspect in entrainment is transfer of fluid's inertial forces via surface friction to particles' inertial forces, which, in turn, must overcome the frictional resistance between the particle and its surroundings. Factors influencing frictional resistance include gravity, particle mass, saturation degree of parent structure, composition of water present in parent structure, particle size, and surface roughness. Recent erosion tests, whereby water flow was directed over compacted bentonite blocks or through a system of bentonite pellets, have indicated that bentonite erodes

  10. Relationship Between Cerebral Oxygenation and Hemodynamic and Oxygen Transport Parameters in Surgery for Acquired Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Lenkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the relationship between cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamic and oxygen transport parameters in surgical correction of concomitant acquired heart diseases. Subjects and methods. Informed consent was received from 40 patients who required surgery because of concomitant (two or more acquired heart defects. During procedure, perioperative monitoring of oxygen transport and cerebral oxygenation was performed with the aid of PiCCO2 monitor (Pulsion Medical Systems, Germany and a Fore-Sight cerebral oximeter (CASMED, USA. Anesthesia was maintained with propofol and fen-tanyl, by monitoring the depth of anesthesia. Early postoperative intensive therapy was based on the protocol for early targeted correction of hemodynamic disorders. Oxygen transport and cerebral oxygenation parameters were estimated intraopera-tively and within 24 postoperative hours. A statistical analysis including evaluation of Spearman correlations was performed with the aid of SPSS 15.0. Results. During perfusion, there was a relationship between cerebral oximetry values and hemat-ocrit levels, and oxygen partial pressure in the venous blood. Furthermore, a negative correlation between cerebral oximetry values and blood lactate levels was found 30 minutes after initiation of extracorporeal circulation (EC. During the study, there was a positive correlation between cerebral oxygenation and values of cardiac index, central venous saturation, and oxygen delivery index. There was a negative relationship between cerebral oxygenation and extravascular lung water at the beginning of surgery and a correlation between cerebral oximetry values and oxygenation index by the end of the first 24 postoperative hours. Conclusion. The cerebral oxygenation values correlate -with the main determinants of oxygen transport during EC and after cardiac surgical procedures. Cerebral oximetry may be used in early targeted therapy for the surgical correction of acquired combined

  11. Study of damaged depth profiles of ion-irradiated PEEK

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Červená, Jarmila; Apel, P. Yu.; Posta, S.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 201, 19-20 (2007), s. 8370-8372 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) 1H-PK2/05; GA MŠk 1P04LA213 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Oxygen irradiation * Poly-aryl-ether-ether ketone * Thermal neutron depth profiling (TNDP) Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.678, year: 2007

  12. Soil erosion assessment using geographical information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) study from Ankara-Guvenc Basin, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengiz, Orhan; Yakupoglu, Tugrul; Baskan, Oguz

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this research was to assess vulnerable soil erosion risk with qualitative approach using GIS in Ankara-Guvenc Basin. The study area is located about 44 km north of Ankara and covers 17.5 km2. The selected theme layers of this model include topographic factor, soil factors (depth, texture, impermeable horizon) and land use. Slope layer and land use-land cover data were prepared by using DEM and Landsat-TM satellite image. According to land use classification, the most common land use type and land cover are rangeland (50.5%) then, rainfed (36.4%), week forest land (3.2%), irrigated land (0.7%) and other various lands (rock out crop and lake) (9.2%). Each land characteristic is also considered as a thematic layer in geographical information systems (GIS) process. After combination of the layers, soil erosion risk map was produced. The results showed that 44.4% of the study area is at high soil erosion risk, whereas 42% of the study area is insignificantly and slightly susceptible to erosion risk. In addition, it was found that only 12.6% of the total area is moderately susceptible to erosion risk. Furthermore, conservation land management measures were also suggested for moderate, high and very high erosion risk areas in Ankara-Guvenc Basin.

  13. [Response of sloping water erosion to rainfall and micro-earth pattern in the loess hilly area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Jia, Fu-yan; Chen, Li-ding; Wu, Dong-ping; Chen, Jin

    2012-08-01

    Severe water erosion in the key loess hilly area is affected by the coupling role of rainfall and earth surface features. In this study, rainfall simulation techniques at the micro-plot scale (1.2 m x 1.2 m; 2 m x 1.2 m) was used as the basic measures, the relations between rainfall depth, intensity and runoff-erosion under different plant morphology features as well as micro-landscape positions were quantified and analyzed. Several key findings were captured. Firstly, rainfall depth and intensity both affected water erosion significantly, while the role of the rainfall intensity was more important than that of the depth. Secondly, a strong negative correlation was found between the antecedent soil moisture content and the generation timing of surface runoff, while water erosion had a positive relation with the antecedent soil moisture. Thirdly, different plant morphology and micro-landscape positions of shrub plant (seabuckthorn) played different roles leading to different rates of surface runoff and soil erosion. Dominated by a rainfall intensity ranging from 50 to 60 mm x h(-1), runoff coefficient in those micro-plots covered by seabuckthorn was about 5%-8%, and changed into 25%, 45% and 63% in grassland-plots, bared plots covered by biological-crust and bared plots without any coverage, respectively. Fourthly, the specific landscape position of seabuckthorn in the plots was also found to play a key role in affecting water erosion processes, and seabuckthorn at the lower landscape position, rather than the upper and middle position, played a better buffering role in reducing runoff and soil loss.

  14. Assessing and mapping the severity of soil erosion using the 30-m Landsat multispectral satellite data in the former South African homelands of Transkei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seutloali, Khoboso E.; Dube, Timothy; Mutanga, Onisimo

    2017-08-01

    Soil erosion is increasingly recognised as the principal cause of land degradation, loss of agricultural land area and siltation of surrounding water waterbodies. Accurate and up-to-date soil erosion mapping is key in understanding its severity if these negative impacts are to be minimised and affected areas rehabilitated. The aim of this work was to map the severity of soil erosion, based on the 30-m Landsat series multispectral satellite data in the former South African homelands of Transkei between the year 1994 and 2010. Further, the study assessed if the observed soil erosion trends and morphology that existed in this area could be explained by biophysical factors (i.e. slope, stream erosivity, topographic wetness index) retrieved from the 30-m ASTER Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The results of this study indicate that the Transkei region experiences varying erosion levels from moderate to very severe. The large portion of the land area under the former homelands was largely affected by rill erosion with approximately 74% occurring in the year 1984 and 54% in 2010. The results also revealed specific thresholds of soil erosion drivers. These include steeper areas (≥30°), high stream power index greater than 2.0 (stream erosivity), relatively lower vegetation cover (≤15%) and low topographic wetness index (≤5%). The results of this work demonstrate the severity of soil erosion in the Southern African former homelands of Transkei for the year 1984 and 2010. Additionally, this work has demonstrated the significance of the 30-m Landsat multispectral sensor in examining soil erosion occurrence at a regional scale where in-depth field work still remains a challenging task.

  15. Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrochek, J.E.; Dinsmore, S.R.; Chandler, E.W.

    1986-01-07

    A four-port disc valve is described for sampling erosive, high temperature process streams. A rotatable disc defining opposed first and second sampling cavities rotates between fired faceplates defining flow passageways positioned to be alternatively in axial alignment with the first and second cavities. Silicon carbide inserts and liners composed of [alpha] silicon carbide are provided in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities to limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation when used under harsh process conditions. 1 fig.

  16. Spectrometric kidney depth measurement method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, P.; Soussaline, F.; Raynaud, C.

    1976-01-01

    The method proposed uses the single posterior surface measurement of the kidney radioactivity distribution. The ratio C/P of the number of scattered photons to the number of primary photons, which is a function of the tissue depth penetrated, is calculated for a given region. The parameters on which the C/P value depends are determined from studies on phantoms. On the basis of these results the kidney depth was measured on a series of 13 patients and a correlation was established between the value thus calculated and that obtained by the profile method. The reproducibility of the method is satisfactory [fr

  17. Heat flow of standard depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cull, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Secular and long-term periodic changes in surface temperature cause perturbations to the geothermal gradient which may be significant to depths of at least 1000 m, and major corrections are required to determine absolute values of heat flow from the Earth's interior. However, detailed climatic models remain contentious and estimates of error in geothermal gradients differ widely. Consequently, regions of anomalous heat flow which could contain geothermal resources may be more easily resolved by measuring relative values at a standard depth (e.g. 100 m) so that all data are subject to similar corrections. (orig./ME)

  18. Quantification of short-term erosion rates using the cosmogenic radionuclide 7Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Abhinand

    2012-12-01

    The fallout radionuclides 137 Cs, 210 Pb ex are used widely for obtaining quantitative information on soil erosion and sediment redistribution rates within agricultural landscapes, over several spatial and temporal scales, and they are frequently seen to represent a valuable complement to conventional soil erosion measurement techniques. However, measurements of these radionuclides provide estimates of medium term (i.e. 40-100 years) soil erosion rates. The shorter-term perspective provided by the 7 Be method has the potential to estimate soil erosion rates associated with individual events or short periods. The 7 Be method has become increasingly relevant in an environment impacted by climate change, changing land use and other human activities. The present work establishes a mathematical model based on the physical processes of molecular diffusion and radioactive decay, to study the vertical behaviour of 7 Be in soils. This model was further used to quantify erosion rates for 12 individual erosional events over a period of two years at our study site in Muencheberg, Germany. The scope of the model was explored analytically as well as numerically for Pulselike fallout initial condition, zero concentration initial condition and exponential distribution initial condition. The model was fitted to more than 15 depth distributions and the resulting model parameter, effective diffusion coefficient D, is evaluated. In general diffusion coefficients estimated were of the order of 10 -12 -10 -13 m 2 s -1 for loamy to sandy soil types. Diffusion coefficients estimated for our study site were about 10 -13 m 2 s -1 . The soil analyses indicate that the diffusion coefficient D is not merely a fitting parameter, but is related to the physico-chemical properties of radionuclide transport in soils. The erosion rates estimated at tilled and no-till plots at our study site were between -2 and 0.3±0.5 kg m -2 -2.0±1.4 kg m -2 respectively. The magnitude of erosion rates estimated

  19. Quantification of short-term erosion rates using the cosmogenic radionuclide {sup 7}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Abhinand

    2012-12-15

    The fallout radionuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 210}Pb{sub ex} are used widely for obtaining quantitative information on soil erosion and sediment redistribution rates within agricultural landscapes, over several spatial and temporal scales, and they are frequently seen to represent a valuable complement to conventional soil erosion measurement techniques. However, measurements of these radionuclides provide estimates of medium term (i.e. 40-100 years) soil erosion rates. The shorter-term perspective provided by the {sup 7}Be method has the potential to estimate soil erosion rates associated with individual events or short periods. The {sup 7}Be method has become increasingly relevant in an environment impacted by climate change, changing land use and other human activities. The present work establishes a mathematical model based on the physical processes of molecular diffusion and radioactive decay, to study the vertical behaviour of {sup 7}Be in soils. This model was further used to quantify erosion rates for 12 individual erosional events over a period of two years at our study site in Muencheberg, Germany. The scope of the model was explored analytically as well as numerically for Pulselike fallout initial condition, zero concentration initial condition and exponential distribution initial condition. The model was fitted to more than 15 depth distributions and the resulting model parameter, effective diffusion coefficient D, is evaluated. In general diffusion coefficients estimated were of the order of 10{sup -12}-10{sup -13} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} for loamy to sandy soil types. Diffusion coefficients estimated for our study site were about 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}s{sup -1}. The soil analyses indicate that the diffusion coefficient D is not merely a fitting parameter, but is related to the physico-chemical properties of radionuclide transport in soils. The erosion rates estimated at tilled and no-till plots at our study site were between <0.001-4.7{+-}0.4 kg m{sup -2} and

  20. Numerical Modelling and Prediction of Erosion Induced by Hydrodynamic Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A.; Lantermann, U.; el Moctar, O.

    2015-12-01

    The present work aims to predict cavitation erosion using a numerical flow solver together with a new developed erosion model. The erosion model is based on the hypothesis that collapses of single cavitation bubbles near solid boundaries form high velocity microjets, which cause sonic impacts with high pressure amplitudes damaging the surface. The erosion model uses information from a numerical Euler-Euler flow simulation to predict erosion sensitive areas and assess the erosion aggressiveness of the flow. The obtained numerical results were compared to experimental results from tests of an axisymmetric nozzle.

  1. Wind and water erosion control on semiarid lands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddoway, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Commercial crop production on semiarid lands is difficult because insufficient water is often present to manage the system effectively. Erosion control presents the major management problem. The factors contributing to wind erosion and their interaction have been quantified into a wind erosion equation. The control of wind erosion through agronomic alteration of the various factors is discussed. The quantification and control of water erosion is also discussed with respect to the Universal Soil Loss Equation. Radioisotopes tracers have been used in conjunction with these erosion equations to measure soil losses. (author)

  2. Comparison of Inconel 625 and Inconel 600 in resistance to cavitation erosion and jet impingement erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, H.X. [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zheng, Y.G., E-mail: ygzheng@imr.ac.c [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Qin, C.P. [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Liquid droplet erosion (LDE), which often occurs in bellows made of nickel-based alloys, threatens the security operation of the nuclear power plant. As the candidate materials of the bellows, Inconel 600 and Inconel 625 were both tested for resistance to cavitation erosion (CE) and jet impingement erosion (JIE) through vibratory cavitation equipment and a jet apparatus for erosion-corrosion. Cumulative mass loss vs. exposure time was used to evaluate the erosion rate of the two alloys. The surface and cross-sectional morphologies before and after the erosion tests were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the inclusions were analyzed by an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and the surface roughness was also measured by surface roughness tester to illustrate the evolution of erosion process. The results show that the cumulative mass loss of CE of Inconel 625 is about 1/6 that of Inconel 600 and the CE incubation period of the Inconel 625 is 4 times as long as that of the Inconel 600. The micro-morphology evolution of CE process illustrates that the twinning and hardness of the Inconel 625 plays a significant role in CE. In addition, the cumulative mass loss of JIE of Inconel 625 is about 2/3 that of Inconel 600 at impacting angle of 90{sup o}, and almost equal to that of the Inconel 600 at impacting angle of 30{sup o}. Overall, the resistance to CE and JIE of Inconel 625 is much superior to that of Inconel 600.

  3. Comparison of Inconel 625 and Inconel 600 in resistance to cavitation erosion and jet impingement erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, H.X.; Zheng, Y.G.; Qin, C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid droplet erosion (LDE), which often occurs in bellows made of nickel-based alloys, threatens the security operation of the nuclear power plant. As the candidate materials of the bellows, Inconel 600 and Inconel 625 were both tested for resistance to cavitation erosion (CE) and jet impingement erosion (JIE) through vibratory cavitation equipment and a jet apparatus for erosion-corrosion. Cumulative mass loss vs. exposure time was used to evaluate the erosion rate of the two alloys. The surface and cross-sectional morphologies before and after the erosion tests were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the inclusions were analyzed by an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and the surface roughness was also measured by surface roughness tester to illustrate the evolution of erosion process. The results show that the cumulative mass loss of CE of Inconel 625 is about 1/6 that of Inconel 600 and the CE incubation period of the Inconel 625 is 4 times as long as that of the Inconel 600. The micro-morphology evolution of CE process illustrates that the twinning and hardness of the Inconel 625 plays a significant role in CE. In addition, the cumulative mass loss of JIE of Inconel 625 is about 2/3 that of Inconel 600 at impacting angle of 90 o , and almost equal to that of the Inconel 600 at impacting angle of 30 o . Overall, the resistance to CE and JIE of Inconel 625 is much superior to that of Inconel 600.

  4. Mapping Soil Erosion Factors and Potential Erosion Risk for the National Park "Central Balkan"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, Diliana; Malinov, Ilia

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion is widely recognised environmental problem. The report aims at presenting the main results from assessment and mapping of the factors of sheet water erosion and the potential erosion risk on the territory of National Park "Central Balkan". For this purpose, the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was used for predicting soil loss from erosion. The influence of topography (LS-factor) and soil erodibility (K-factor) was assessed using small-scale topographic and soil maps. Rainfall erosivity (R-factor) was calculated from data of rainfalls with amounts exceeding 9.5 mm from 14 hydro-meteorological stations. The values of the erosion factors (R, K and LS) were presented for the areas of forest, sub-alpine and alpine zones. Using the methods of GIS, maps were plotted presenting the area distribution among the classes of the soil erosion factors and the potential risk in the respective zones. The results can be used for making accurate decisions for soil conservation and sustainable land management in the park.

  5. Carbon mineralization and oxygen dynamics in sediments with deep oxygen penetration, Lake Superior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiying; Crowe, Sean Andrew; Miklesh, David

    2012-01-01

    To understand carbon and oxygen dynamics in sediments with deep oxygen penetration, we investigated eight locations (160–318-m depth) throughout Lake Superior. Despite the 2–4 weight percent organic carbon content, oxygen penetrated into the sediment by 3.5 to > 12 cm at all locations. Such deep ...... volume-specific carbon degradation rates were 0.3–1.5 µmol cm−3 d−1; bioturbation coefficient near the sediment surface was 3–8 cm2 yr−1. These results indicate that carbon cycling in large freshwater systems conforms to many of the same trends as in marine systems.......To understand carbon and oxygen dynamics in sediments with deep oxygen penetration, we investigated eight locations (160–318-m depth) throughout Lake Superior. Despite the 2–4 weight percent organic carbon content, oxygen penetrated into the sediment by 3.5 to > 12 cm at all locations. Such deep......, suggesting that temporal variability in deeply oxygenated sediments may be greater than previously acknowledged. The oxygen uptake rates (4.4–7.7 mmol m−2 d−1, average 6.1 mmol m−2 d−1) and carbon mineralization efficiency (∼ 90% of deposited carbon) were similar to those in marine hemipelagic and pelagic...

  6. Perhydropolysilazane derived silica coating protecting Kapton from atomic oxygen attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Longfei [China Academy of Aerospace Aerodynamics, Beijing 100074 (China); Li Meishuan, E-mail: mshli@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xu Caihong; Luo Yongming [Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2011-11-30

    By using surface sol-gel method with perhydropolysilazane (PHPS) as a precursor, a silica coating was prepared on a Kapton substrate as an atomic oxygen (AO) protective coating. The AO exposure tests were conducted in a ground-based simulator. It is found that the erosion yield of Kapton decreases by about three orders of magnitude after the superficial application of the coating. After AO exposure, the surface of the coating is smooth and uniform, no surface shrinkage induced cracks or undercutting erosion are observed. This is because that during AO exposure the PHPS is oxidized directly to form SiO{sub 2} without through intermediate reaction processes, the surface shrinkage and cracking tendency are prohibited. Meanwhile, this PHPS derived silica coating also presents self-healing effect due to the oxidation of free Si. Compared with other kinds of silica or organic polymer coatings, this PHPS derived silica coating exhibits a superior AO erosion resistance.

  7. Perhydropolysilazane derived silica coating protecting Kapton from atomic oxygen attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Longfei; Li Meishuan; Xu Caihong; Luo Yongming

    2011-01-01

    By using surface sol–gel method with perhydropolysilazane (PHPS) as a precursor, a silica coating was prepared on a Kapton substrate as an atomic oxygen (AO) protective coating. The AO exposure tests were conducted in a ground-based simulator. It is found that the erosion yield of Kapton decreases by about three orders of magnitude after the superficial application of the coating. After AO exposure, the surface of the coating is smooth and uniform, no surface shrinkage induced cracks or undercutting erosion are observed. This is because that during AO exposure the PHPS is oxidized directly to form SiO 2 without through intermediate reaction processes, the surface shrinkage and cracking tendency are prohibited. Meanwhile, this PHPS derived silica coating also presents self-healing effect due to the oxidation of free Si. Compared with other kinds of silica or organic polymer coatings, this PHPS derived silica coating exhibits a superior AO erosion resistance.

  8. Erosion behavior of soft, amorphous deuterated carbon films by heat treatment in air and under vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, K.

    1999-01-01

    The erosion of soft a-C:D films by heat treatment in air and under vacuum is studied by ion-beam analysis. When the films are heated in air above 500 K, the film thickness and the areal densities of C and especially D decrease, and oxygen is incorporated in the films. The initial atomic loss rates of carbon and deuterium from the films are 2.6 x 10 17 C atoms cm -2 h -1 and 4.8 x 10 17 D atoms cm -2 h -1 at 550 K. However, after D depletion the films show a resistivity against further erosion due to annealing in air. When the films are heated under vacuum erosion starts at about 600 K and all components including D decrease proportionally to the film thickness. Thermal desorption spectroscopy of the films reveals the evolution of C x D y type hydrocarbons. Infrared analysis shows that the incorporated oxygen is chemically bonded to carbon. The thermally-activated decomposition of the soft a-C:D films is compared to that of hard a-C:D films and a reaction scheme is suggested. (orig.)

  9. Monitoring bioremediation of weathered diesel NAPL using oxygen depletion profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, G.B.; Johnston, C.D.; Patterson, B.M.; Barber, C.; Bennett, M.

    1995-01-01

    Semicontinuous logging of oxygen concentrations at multiple depths has been used to evaluate the progress of an in situ bioremediation trial at a site contaminated by weathered diesel nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL). The evaluation trial consisted of periodic addition of nutrients and aeration of a 100-m 2 trial plot. During the bioremediation trial, aeration was stopped periodically, and decreases in dissolved and gaseous oxygen concentrations were monitored using data loggers attached to in situ oxygen sensors placed at multiple depths above and within a thin NAPL-contaminated zone. Oxygen usage rate coefficients were determined by fitting zero- and first-order rate equations to the oxygen depletion curves. For nutrient-amended sites within the trial plot, estimates of oxygen usage rate coefficients were significantly higher than estimates from unamended sites. These rates also converted to NPL degradation rates, comparable to those achieved in previous studies, despite the high concentrations and weathered state of the NAPL at this test site

  10. Combined use of stable isotopes and fallout radionuclides as soil erosion indicators in a forested mountain site, South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meusburger, K.; Mabit, L.; Alewell, C.; Park, J.H.; Sandor, T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess and to validate the suitability of the stable nitrogen and carbon isotope signature as soil erosion indicators in a mountain forest site in South Korea. Our approach is based on the comparison of the isotope signature of ''stable'' landscape positions (reference sites), which are neither affected by erosion nor deposition, with eroding sites. For undisturbed soils we expect that the enrichment of δ 15 N and δ 13 C with soil depth, due to fractionation during decomposition, goes in parallel with a decrease in nitrogen and carbon content. Soil erosion processes potentially weaken this correlation. The 137 Cs method and the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) were applied for the soil erosion quantification. Erosion rates obtained with the 137 Cs method range from 0.9 t ha -1 yr -1 to 7 t ha -1 yr -1 . Considering the steep slopes of up to 40 and the erosive monsoon events (R factor of 6600 MJ mm ha -1 h -1 yr -1 ), the rates are plausible and within the magnitude of the RUSLE-modeled soil erosion rates, varying from 0.02 t ha -1 yr -1 to 5.1 t ha -1 yr -1 . The soil profiles of the reference sites showed significant (p < 0.0001) correlations between nitrogen and carbon content and its corresponding δ 15 N and δ 13 C signatures. In contrast, for the eroding sites this relationship was weaker and for the carbon not significant. These results confirm the usefulness of the stable carbon isotope signature as a qualitative indicator for soil disturbance. We could show further that the δ 15 N isotope signature can be used similarly for uncultivated sites. We thus propose that the stable δ 15 N and δ 13 C signature of soil profiles could serve as additional indicators confirming the accurate choice of the reference site in soil erosion studies using the 137 Cs method.

  11. Modeling erosion of unsaturated compacted bentonite by groundwater flow; pinhole erosion test case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurila, T.; Sane, P.; Olin, M.; Koskinen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Erosion of compacted clay material by water flow is a critical factor affecting the performance of radioactive waste confinement. Our emphasis in this work is the buffer of KBS-3V concept, proposed to be compacted MX-80 bentonite. Unsaturated erosion occurs during the saturation phase of the EBS, and the main quantity of interest is the total buffer mass carried away by a groundwater flow that induces erosion by forming piping channels near the buffer/rock interface. The purpose of this work is to provide modeling tools to support erosion experiments. Role of modeling is first to interpret experimental observations in terms of processes, and to estimate robustness of experimental results. Secondly, we seek to scale up results from the laboratory scale, particularly to time scales longer than those experimentally accessible. We have performed modeling and data analysis pertaining to tests of unsaturated clay erosion. Pinhole experiments were used to study this erosion case. The main differences to well-understood pinhole erosion tests are that the material is strongly swelling and that the water flow is not determined by the pressure head but by the total flux. Groundwater flow in the buffer is determined by the flux because pressure losses occur overwhelmingly in the surrounding rock, not in the piping channel. We formulate a simple model that links an effective solid diffusivity -based swelling model to erosion by flow on the solid/liquid interface. The swelling model is similar in concept to that developed at KTH, but simpler. Erosion in the model is caused by laminar flow in the pinhole, and happens in a narrow region at the solid/liquid interface where velocity and solid volume fraction overlap. The erosion model can be mapped to erosion by wall shear, and can thus be considered as extension of that classic erosion model. The main quantity defining the behavior of clay erosion in the model is the ratio of

  12. The vanadium/oxygen system in the analysis of sodium for oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.A.J.; Price, W.B.

    1981-05-01

    An investigation of the V-O-Na system at 1023 K is described for oxygen in sodium contents of 5 to 25 ppm. Electron spectroscopy combined with depth profiling is used to determine the vanadium/oxygen ratios inwards from the surface of vanadium foil and these ratios are compared with theoretical predictions. The validity of the vanadium wire technique as an analytical method is examined and a model for the vanadium oxidation is suggested. (author)

  13. Hydrologic Regulation of Plant Rooting Depth and Vice Versa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.; Miguez-Macho, G.

    2017-12-01

    How deep plant roots go and why may hold the answer to several questions regarding the co-evolution of terrestrial life and its environment. In this talk we explore how plant rooting depth responds to the hydrologic plumbing system in the soil/regolith/bedrocks, and vice versa. Through analyzing 2200 root observations of >1000 species along biotic (life form, genus) and abiotic (precipitation, soil, drainage) gradients, we found strong sensitivities of rooting depth to local soil water profiles determined by precipitation infiltration depth from the top (reflecting climate and soil), and groundwater table depth from below (reflecting topography-driven land drainage). In well-drained uplands, rooting depth follows infiltration depth; in waterlogged lowlands, roots stay shallow avoiding oxygen stress below the water table; in between, high productivity and drought can send roots many meters down to groundwater capillary fringe. We explore the global significance of this framework using an inverse model, and the implications to the coevolution of deep roots and the CZ in the Early-Mid Devonian when plants colonized the upland environments.

  14. Pursuing the Depths of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Today's state literacy standards and assessments demand deeper levels of knowledge from students. But many teachers ask, "What does depth of knowledge look like on these new, more rigorous assessments? How do we prepare students for this kind of thinking?" In this article, Nancy Boyles uses a sampling of questions from the PARCC and SBAC…

  15. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  16. Erosion during extreme flood events dominates Holocene canyon evolution in northeast Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Edwin R C; Attal, Mikaël; Niedermann, Samuel; Kirstein, Linda A; Dugmore, Andrew J; Naylor, Mark

    2015-02-24

    Extreme flood events have the potential to cause catastrophic landscape change in short periods of time (10(0) to 10(3) h). However, their impacts are rarely considered in studies of long-term landscape evolution (>10(3) y), because the mechanisms of erosion during such floods are poorly constrained. Here we use topographic analysis and cosmogenic (3)He surface exposure dating of fluvially sculpted surfaces to determine the impact of extreme flood events within the Jökulsárgljúfur canyon (northeast Iceland) and to constrain the mechanisms of bedrock erosion during these events. Surface exposure ages allow identification of three periods of intense canyon cutting about 9 ka ago, 5 ka ago, and 2 ka ago during which multiple large knickpoints retreated large distances (>2 km). During these events, a threshold flow depth was exceeded, leading to the toppling and transportation of basalt lava columns. Despite continuing and comparatively large-scale (500 m(3)/s) discharge of sediment-rich glacial meltwater, there is no evidence for a transition to an abrasion-dominated erosion regime since the last erosive event because the vertical knickpoints have not diffused over time. We provide a model for the evolution of the Jökulsárgljúfur canyon through the reconstruction of the river profile and canyon morphology at different stages over the last 9 ka and highlight the dominant role played by extreme flood events in the shaping of this landscape during the Holocene.

  17. Short-term transport of glyphosate with erosion in Chinese loess soil--a flume experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaomei; Wang, Fei; Bento, Célia P M; Xue, Sha; Gai, Lingtong; van Dam, Ruud; Mol, Hans; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2015-04-15

    Repeated applications of glyphosate may contaminate the soil and water and threaten their quality both within the environmental system and beyond it through water erosion related processes and leaching. In this study, we focused on the transport of glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) related to soil erosion at two slope gradients (10 and 20°), two rates of pesticide with a formulation of glyphosate (Roundup®) application (360 and 720 mg m(-2)), and a rain intensity of 1.0 mm min(-1) for 1 h on bare soil in hydraulic flumes. Runoff and erosion rate were significantly different within slope gradients (psoil at the end of the experiment decreased significantly with depth (psoil layers, respectively. The risk of contamination in deep soil and the groundwater was thus low, but 5% of the initial application did reach the 2-10 cm soil layer. The risk of contamination of surface water through runoff and sedimentation, however, can be considerable, especially in regions where rain-induced soil erosion is common. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Boron erosion and carbon deposition due to simultaneous bombardment with deuterium and carbon ions in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohya, K.; Kawata, J.; Wienhold, P.; Karduck, P.; Rubel, M.; Seggern, J. von

    1999-01-01

    Erosion of boron out of a thin film exposed to deuterium edge plasmas and the simultaneous carbon deposition have been investigated in the tokamak TEXTOR-94 and simulated by means of a dynamic Monte Carlo code. The calculated results are compared with some observations (colorimetry, spectroscopy and AES) during and after the exposures. The implantation of carbon impurities strongly changes the effective boron sputtering yield of the film, which results into a lowering of the film erosion and a formation of thick carbon deposits. A strong decrease in the observed BII line emission around a surface location far from the plasma edge can be explained by a carbon deposition on the film. The calculated carbon depth profiles in the film, depending on the distance of the exposed surface from the plasma edge, are in reasonable agreement with measurements by AES after the exposures. Although simultaneous surface erosion and carbon deposition can be simulated, the calculated erosion rate is larger, by a factor of 2, than the observations by colorimetry at the early stage of the exposure

  19. Medium-term erosion simulation of an abandoned mine site using the SIBERIA landscape evolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, G.R.; Willgoose, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    This study forms part of a collaborative project designed to validate the long-term erosion predictions of the SIBERIA landform evolution model on rehabilitated mine sites. The SIBERIA catchment evolution model can simulate the evolution of landforms resulting from runoff and erosion over many years. SIBERIA needs to be calibrated before evaluating whether it correctly models the observed evolution of rehabilitated mine landforms. A field study to collect data to calibrate SIBERIA was conducted at the abandoned Scinto 6 uranium mine located in the Kakadu Region, Northern Territory, Australia. The data were used to fit parameter values to a sediment loss model and a rainfall-runoff model. The derived runoff and erosion model parameter values were used in SIBERIA to simulate 50 years of erosion by concentrated flow on the batters of the abandoned site. The SIBERIA runs correctly simulated the geomorphic development of the gullies on the man-made batters of the waste rock dump. The observed gully position, depth, volume, and morphology on the waste rock dump were quantitatively compared with the SIBERIA simulations. The close similarities between the observed and simulated gully features indicate that SIBERIA can accurately predict the rate of gully development on a man-made post-mining landscape over periods of up to 50 years. SIBERIA is an appropriate model for assessment of erosional stability of rehabilitated mine sites over time spans of around 50 years. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  20. Use of 137Cs isotopic technique in soil erosion studies in Central Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theocharopoulos, S.P.; Belis, D.; Tsouloucha, F.; Christou, M.; Kouloumbis, P.; Nikolaou, T.; Florou, H.; Kritidis, P.

    2000-01-01

    The 137 Cs technique was used to study soil erosion and deposition rates in soils in the Viotia prefecture, central Greece. Three sites with different soil types were selected and studied. Soils were sampled along transects and analyzed for 137 Cs. The main goal of this field investigation was to study the 137 Cs 3-D distribution pattern within key sites and to apply this information for the assessment of soil redistribution. The erosion and deposition rates were estimated using the proportional and the simplified mass balance models (Walling and He, 1997). Erosion and deposition rates predicted through the spatial distribution of 137 Cs depended on the location of the profile studied in the landscape and were determined by the soil plough depth, the soil structure (bulk density), and the calibration model used to convert soil 137 Cs measurements to estimates of soil redistribution rates. Estimated erosion rates for the Mouriki area site, varied from 16.62 to 102.56 t ha -1 y -1 for the top of the slope soil profile and from 5.37 to 25.68 t ha -1 y -1 for the middle of the slope soil profile. The deposition rates varied from 7.26 to 42.95 t ha -1 y -1 for the bottom of the slope soil profile. (author)

  1. Soil erosion determinations using 137Cs technique in the agricultural regions of Gediz Basin, Western Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sac, M.; Ymurtaci, E.; Yener, G.; Ugur, A.; Ozden, B.; Camgoz, B.

    2004-01-01

    Gediz basin is one of the regions where intense agricultural activities take place in Western Turkey. Erosion and soil degradation has long been causing serious problems to cultivated fields in the basin. This work describes the application of two different 137 Cs models for estimating soil erosion rates in cultivated sites of the region. Soil samples were collected from five distinct cultivated regions subject to soil erosion. The variations of 137 Cs concentrations with depth in soil profiles were investigated. Soil loss rates were calculated from 137 Cs inventories of the samples using both Proportional Model (PM) and Simplified Mass Balance Model (SMBM). When Proportional Model was used, erosion and deposition rates varied from -15 to -28 t ha -1 y -1 and from +5 to +41 t ha ha -1 y -1 , respectively, they varied from -16 to -33 t ha -1 y -1 and from +5 to +55 t ha -1 y -1 with Simplified Mass Balance Model. A good agreement was observed between the results of two models up to 30 t ha -1 y -1 soil loss and gain in the study area. Ulukent, a small representative agricultural field, was selected to compare the present data of 137 Cs techniques with the results obtained by Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) applied in the area before. (authors)

  2. The water erosion processes in the retreat erosive of cliff on soft rocks in the province of Cadiz (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendon Aragon, J. J.; Gracia Prieto, F. J.; Rio Rodriguez, L. del

    2009-01-01

    The littoral cliffs on soft materials of the Atlantic Cadiz coast show an important activity of the fresh water erosion processes, sometimes even more significant than the marine erosion processes. The connection of the lower cliffs with sandy beaches favours aeolian sand invasion, which fills previous rills and reduces the water erosion intensity by increasing infiltration. Cliff retreat and rill erosion measurement by using erosion sticks has shown very variables values, most of them higher than the estimated error of the employed methods. This indicates the existence of other factors influencing the distribution of water erosion processes along these cliffs, which have to be studied through different techniques. (Author) 5 refs.

  3. Modeling mechanical and thermo-mechanical erosion by flowing lava at Raglan, Cape Smith Belt, New Québec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, V.; Williams, D. A.; Lesher, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    The 1.5-D Williams et al. model of thermal erosion by turbulent lava was recently applied to the Athabasca Valles lava channel on Mars, in an attempt to establish the importance of thermal erosion in excavating this ~80-100 m deep outflow channel. The modeled erosion depths (0.4-7.5 m) are far less than the depth of the channel which, combined with the short duration of the eruption, suggests that mechanical erosion may have had a greater role. Several studies suggest that mechanical erosion by lava is more important in channel-tube formation than previously thought, under certain circumstances. How would we be able to distinguish between mechanical and thermal erosion? By investigating model results when substrate properties change, as we move from a consolidated, mechanically strong substrate to a partially consolidated or unconsolidated, mechanically weaker substrate. The Proterozoic Raglan komatiitic basalt lava channel of the Cape Smith Belt, New Québec, Canada is a complex erosional environment involving invasive erosion of both sediment and gabbro substrates - which makes it a critical test case. The lava eroded an upper layer of soft sediment, with erosion at the tops, bottoms, and sides of the conduit, through underlying gabbro, and then burrowed laterally into underlying sediment, a scenario requiring a two-dimensional modeling approach. Using the available field data, we will simulate two-dimensional thermomechanical and mechanical erosion interfaces on all sides of a turbulent lava flow by creating a finite-element mesh. The mesh will be defined by the geometry of the lava flow at those lava conduits for which data on lava and substrate composition, lava thickness, slope of the ground, conduit area and volume, and lava flow length are available. Ultimately, this model will be applied to lunar sinuous rilles and martian lava channels for which the use of a two-dimensional approach is needed.

  4. Erosions of the Petrous Temporal Bone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tumours of the parotid gland; tumours of the paranasal sinuses; and tumours of ... showed severe erosion of the anterior and posterior walls and floor of the external .... sphenoid sinus, the pituitary fossa, and the greater and lesser wings of the ...

  5. Natural Erosion of Sandstone as Shape Optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostanin, Igor; Safonov, Alexander; Oseledets, Ivan

    2017-12-11

    Natural arches, pillars and other exotic sandstone formations have always been attracting attention for their unusual shapes and amazing mechanical balance that leave a strong impression of intelligent design rather than the result of a stochastic process. It has been recently demonstrated that these shapes could have been the result of the negative feedback between stress and erosion that originates in fundamental laws of friction between the rock's constituent particles. Here we present a deeper analysis of this idea and bridge it with the approaches utilized in shape and topology optimisation. It appears that the processes of natural erosion, driven by stochastic surface forces and Mohr-Coulomb law of dry friction, can be viewed within the framework of local optimisation for minimum elastic strain energy. Our hypothesis is confirmed by numerical simulations of the erosion using the topological-shape optimisation model. Our work contributes to a better understanding of stochastic erosion and feasible landscape formations that could be found on Earth and beyond.

  6. Alleviating gizzard erosion with Hepasan ® - Provisional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Alleviating gizzard erosion with Hepasan® - Provisional Communication. K Boa-Amponsem, A Osei-Somuah. Full Text:.

  7. Identifying conservation hotspots using tillage erosion modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillage operations redistribute soil within agricultural landscapes due to deviations in the quantity of soil moved during tillage. Tillage erosion is the net loss or accumulation of soil at any spot within an agricultural landscape due to soil being directly moved by tillage; it is a dominant erosi...

  8. Slope stability and erosion control: Ecotechnological solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norris, J.E.; Stokes, A.; Mickovski, S.B.; Cammeraat, E.; van Beek, R.; Nicoll, B.C.; Achim, A.

    2008-01-01

    This book is designed to assist the civil and geotechnical engineer, geomorphologist, forester, landscape architect or ecologist in choosing ecotechnological solutions for slopes that are prone to a variety of mass movements e.g. shallow failure or erosion. Within this book, the 'engineer' is used

  9. Modeling Edge Effects of Tillage Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillage erosion has been recognized as an important factor in redistribution of soil over time and in the development of morphological changes within agricultural fields. Field borders, fences, and vegetated strips that interrupt soil fluxes lead to the creation topographic discontinuities or lynche...

  10. Hydrogeological And Geotechnical Investigations Of Gully Erosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consequently, hydrogeological and geotechnical studies of gully erosion sites were carried out in order to provide information on the genesis and continual expansion of gullies in the area. The results indicate that gullies are located in the upper aquifer of the Benin Formation (Coastal Plain Sands). The estimated hydraulic ...

  11. Is dental erosion really a problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, N; Jaeggi, T; Lussi, A

    2012-09-01

    Dental erosion is the non-carious dental substance loss induced by direct impact of exogenous or endogenous acids. It results in a loss of dental hard tissue, which can be serious in some groups, such as those with eating disorders, in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and also in persons consuming high amounts of acidic drinks and foodstuffs. For these persons, erosion can impair their well-being, due to changes in appearance and/or loss of function of the teeth, e.g., the occurrence of hypersensitivity of teeth if the dentin is exposed. If erosion reaches an advanced stage, time- and money-consuming therapies may be necessary. The therapy, in turn, poses a challenge for the dentist, particularly if the defects are diagnosed at an advanced stage. While initial and moderate defects can mostly be treated non- or minimally invasively, severe defects often require complex therapeutic strategies, which often entail extensive loss of dental hard tissue due to preparatory measures. A major goal should therefore be to diagnose dental erosion at an early stage, to avoid functional and esthetic impairments as well as pain sensations and to ensure longevity of the dentition.

  12. Basal erosion: barrier to earthquake propagation? Insight from the northern chilean forearc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubas, N.

    2017-12-01

    Subducted topographic features have often been suspected as barriers to large earthquake propagation. These features would induce basal erosion, leading to a large network of fractures impeding large nucleation or shear localization. Looking for correlation between basal erosion and megathrust ruptures is thus critical nowadays to understand earthquake mechanics and infer rupture scenarios. In this study, we propose to seek possible location of basal erosion from the forearc morphology by applying the critical taper theory. We focus on the North Chile subduction zone that has experienced four major earthquakes during the last two decades and where basal erosion and seamount subduction have already been suspected. Basal erosion should occur when the basal friction approaches the internal friction. We thus seek what part of the forearc is at critical state and select areas for which the two frictions are almost equal. We find a large band, located at 25km depth, from the Mejillones peninsula to the Iquique region at critical state with very high basal friction. The critical areas seem to surround the Tocopilla 2007 Mw 7.7 and the Iquique 2014 Mw 8.1 ruptures. When compared with the interseismic coupling, except for the Tocopilla segment, the critical areas are located in low-coupled zones. More interestingly, the reported normal faults of the forearc do not appear above the erosional areas but rather between them. These normal faults are systematically located above locked patches and seismic asperities. These areas are actually at extensional critical state and characterized by a very low effective friction. We thus suspect the extensional features to be related to earthquakes rather than basal erosion. We then look for similar relationships along the Sumatra subduction zone to see if basal erosion is a common process. The Tocopilla and Iquique earthquakes ruptured only part of the northern Chile seismic gap although the full segment was ready for a new large

  13. Coastal erosion and accretion rates in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foteinis, Spyros; Papadopoulos, Costas; Koutsogiannaki, Irini; Synolakis, Costas

    2010-05-01

    Erosion threatens many coastal regions of Greece. Anthropogenic changes of landforms such as coastal roads built on even narrow beaches, sand mining for construction, poor design of coastal structures that interfere with sediment, and dams without sediment bypasses have significantly reduced beach widths. We present erosion rates for different beaches, some of which are in sensitive ecosystems, otherwise "protected" by local and EU ordinances. By comparing inferences of beach widths in varying intervals from 1933 to 2006, we infer that the construction of dams in Acheloos river in western Greece, built in a faraonic attempt to partially divert its flows to eastern Greece, this is responsible for up to 20m/year erosion rates observed in certain locales in the Acheloos delta. More characteristic erosion rates in the region are ~ 2m/year. By contrast, there appears rapid accretion of up to 4m/year in the beaches around the Nestos delta in northern Greece (Papadopoulos, 2009). In beaches that are not near large river deltas, erosion rates range from 0.5m/year to 1m/year. While we have not done comprehensive comparisons among coastlines with different levels of coastal development, it does appear that rapid coastal development correlates well with erosion rates. The underlying problem is the complete lack of any semblance of coastal zone management in Greece and substandard design of coastal structures, which are often sited without any measurements of waves and currents offshore (Synolakis et al, 2008). Beach maintenance remains an exotic concept for most local authorities, who invariably prefer to build hard coastal structures to "protect" versus nourish, siting lack of experience with nourishment and "environmental" concerns. In certain cases, choices are dictated by costs, the larger the cost the easier the project gets approved by regulatory authorities, hence the preference for concrete or rubble structures. We conclude that, unless urgent salvage measures are

  14. Urban Runoff: Model Ordinances for Erosion and Sediment Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The model ordinance in this section borrows language from the erosion and sediment control ordinance features that might help prevent erosion and sedimentation and protect natural resources more fully.

  15. Categorization of erosion control matting for slope applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-25

    Erosion control is an important aspect of any Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) construction project, with the extreme negative impacts of high sediment loads in natural waterways having been well documented. Selection of a proper erosion c...

  16. Mapping Soil Erosion in a Quaternary Catchment in Eastern Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temp

    2017-04-06

    Apr 6, 2017 ... Keywords: Geographic Information System; Remote Sensing; Soil Erosion; Vegetation Indices ... Soil erosion is considered one of the world's most critical ... the spatial extent of the problem (Le Roux et al., 2007) in other ...

  17. Thermomechanical Erosion Modelling of Baydaratskaya Bay, Russia with COSMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, S.G.; Lubbad, R; Le, T.M.H.; Nairn, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Rapid coastal erosion threatens Arctic coastal infrastructure, including communities and industrial installations. Erosion of permafrost depends on numerous processes, including thermal and mechanical behaviour of frozen and unfrozen soil, nearshore hydrodynamics, atmospheric forcing, and the

  18. Three procedures for estimating erosion from construction areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abt, S.R.; Ruff, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    Erosion from many mining and construction sites can lead to serious environmental pollution problems. Therefore, erosion management plans must be developed in order that the engineer may implement measures to control or eliminate excessive soil losses. To properly implement a management program, it is necessary to estimate potential soil losses from the time the project begins to beyond project completion. Three methodologies are presented which project the estimated soil losses due to sheet or rill erosion of water and are applicable to mining and construction areas. Furthermore, the three methods described are intended as indicators of the state-of-the-art in water erosion prediction. The procedures herein do not account for gully erosion, snowmelt erosion, wind erosion, freeze-thaw erosion or extensive flooding

  19. Laser surface modification of stainless steels for cavitation erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Chi Tat

    1999-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603 (Fe -17.6Cr -11.2Ni -2.5Mo -1.4Mn -0.4Si -0.03C) has higher pitting corrosion resistance but lower cavitation erosion resistance than that of UNS S30400. This is because of its lower tendency for strain induced martensitic transformation and higher stacking fault energy as compared with those of UNS S30400. In order to improve its cavitation erosion resistance, surface modification of S31603 was performed by laser surface melting and laser surface alloying using a 2-kW CW Nd-YAG laser and a 3-kW CW CO2 laser. For laser surface melting, austenitic stainless steel UNS S30400, super duplex stainless steel UNS S32760 and martensitic stainless steel UNS S42000 were also investigated for comparison purpose. For laser surface alloying, alloying materials including various elements (Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si & C), alloys (AlSiFe & NiCrSiB), ceramics (Si3N 4, SiC, Cr3C2, TiC, CrB & Cr2O 3) and alloys-ceramics (Co-WC, Ni-WC, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-Cr2C3) were used to modify the surface of S31603. The alloyed surface was achieved first by flame spraying or pre-placing of the alloy powder on the S31603 surface and then followed by laser surface remelting. The cavitation erosion characteristics of laser surface modified specimens in 3.5% NaCl solution at 23°C were studied by means of a 20-kHz ultrasonic vibrator at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 30 mum. In addition, their pitting corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques. The microstructures, compositions, phase changes and damage mechanisms under cavitation erosion were investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, EDAX and X-ray diffractometry. Mechanical properties such as microhardness profile were also examined. The cavitation erosion resistance Re (reciprocal of the mean depth of penetration rate) of laser surface melted S31603 was found to be improved by 22% and was attributed to the existence of tensile residual stress. Improvement on the Re of S42000 was found to be 8.5 times

  20. Water erosion of dystrophic Red Latosols (Oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Ernesto Bernardes Ayer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In their natural state, Latosols (Oxisols present great stability and resistance to erosion, being the most abundant and used soils for farming and cattle raising activities in southern Minas Gerais State, Brazil. However, along the last one hundred years, they have been submitted to intensive cultivation and managements which favor water erosion. This study aimed to estimate the water erosion rates of dystrophic Red Latosols from the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, compared with the soil loss tolerance limits, and assess the impact on water erosion of the managements more common in the region, by alternative conservation management simulation. Soil loss tolerance limits ranged from 8.94 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 9.99 Mg ha-1 year-1, with the study area presenting a susceptibility of soil loss of 23.86 Mg year-1, with an average rate of 8.40 Mg ha-1 year-1, corresponding to 34.80 % of the area with values above the soil loss tolerance limit. The biggest annual losses occur in areas with use and management of eucalyptus grown downhill (30.67 Mg ha-1 year-1 and pasture under continuous occupancy (11.10 Mg ha-1 year-1. However, when the average loss per type of use is considered, the areas more susceptible to water erosion are those with potato and eucalyptus crops, grown downhill, and those in bare soil. Nevertheless, in the simulated conservation management scenario, the average losses would be drastically reduced (8.40 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 2.84 Mg ha-1 year-1 and only 4.00 % of the area with soil loss would remain above the tolerance limits.

  1. Preliminary study on the use of the 137Cs method for soil erosion investigation in the pampean region of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujan, A.; Yanez, M.S.; Santanatoglia, O.J.; Chagas, C.; Massobrio, M.; Castiglioni, M.; Ciallella, H.; Fernandez, J.

    2000-01-01

    , and these values matched well, with the rates of erosion obtained by classical methods. The 137 Cs spatial and depth distribution are shown in a map, and enabled to study the relationship of the erosion to the topography, and a good discrimination in subclasses within moderate erosion class and sedimentation class. (author)

  2. Tectonic controls of Holocene erosion in a glaciated orogen

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Byron A.; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2018-01-01

    Recent work has highlighted a strong, worldwide, glacial impact of orogen erosion rates over the last 2 Ma. While it may be assumed that glaciers increased erosion rates when active, the degree to which past glaciations influence Holocene erosion rates through the adjustment of topography is not known. In this study, we investigate the influence of long-term tectonic and post-glacial topographic controls on erosion in a glaciated orogen, the Olympic Mountains, USA. We present 14 new 10Be and ...

  3. Photogrammetric techniques for across-scale soil erosion assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Eltner, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is a complex geomorphological process with varying influences of different impacts at different spatio-temporal scales. To date, measurement of soil erosion is predominantly realisable at specific scales, thereby detecting separate processes, e.g. interrill erosion contrary to rill erosion. It is difficult to survey soil surface changes at larger areal coverage such as field scale with high spatial resolution. Either net changes at the system outlet or remaining traces after the ...

  4. Erosion and corrosion of nuclear power plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This conference is composed of 23 papers, grouped in 3 sessions which main themes are: analysis of corrosion and erosion damages of nuclear power plant equipment and influence of water chemistry, temperature, irradiations, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, flow assisted cracking, stress cracking; monitoring and control of erosion and corrosion in nuclear power plants; susceptibility of structural materials to erosion and corrosion and ways to improve the resistance of materials, steels, coatings, etc. to erosion, corrosion and cracking

  5. Comparison of CFD simulations with experimental Jet Erosion Tests results

    OpenAIRE

    Mercier, F.; Bonelli, S.; Pinettes, P.; Golay, F.; Anselmet, F.; Philippe, P.

    2014-01-01

    The Jet Erosion Test (JET) is an experimental device increasingly used to quantify the resistance of soils to erosion. This resistance is characterised by two geotechnical parameters: the critical shear stress and the erosion coefficient. The JET interpretation model of Hanson and Cook (2004) provides an estimation of these erosion parameters. But Hanson's model is simplified, semi-empirical and several assumed hypotheses can be discussed. Our aim is to determine the relevance of the JET inte...

  6. Hydrologic controls on the development of equilibrium soil depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotina, L.; Tarboton, D. G.; Tesfa, T. K.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-12-01

    The object of the present work was the study of the coevolution of runoff production and geomorphological processes and its effects on the formation of equilibrium soil depth by focusing on their mutual feedbacks. The primary goal of this work is to describe spatial patterns of soil depth resulting, under the hypothesis of dynamic equilibrium, from long-term interactions between hydrologic forcings and soil production, erosion and sediment transport processes. These processes dominate the formation of actual soil depth patterns that represent the boundary condition for water redistribution, thus this paper also proposes and attempt to set the premises for decoding their individual role and mutual interactions in shaping the hydrologic response of a catchment. The relevance of the study stems from the massive improvement in hydrologic predictions for ungauged basins that would be achieved by using directly soil depths derived from geomorphic features remotely measured and objectively manipulated. Moreover the setup of a coupled hydrologic-geomorphologic approach represents a first step into the study of such interactions and in particular of the effects of soil moisture in determining soil production functions. Hydrological processes are here described by explicitly accounting for local soil depths and detailed catchment topography from high resolution digital terrain models (DTM). Geomorphological processes are described by means of well-studied geomorphic transport laws. Soil depth is assumed, in the exponential soil production function, as a proxy for all the mechanisms that induce mechanical disruption of bedrock and it’s conversion into soil. This formulation, although empirical, has been widely used in the literature and is currently accepted. The modeling approach is applied to the semi-arid Dry Creek Experimental Watershed, located near Boise, Idaho, USA. Modeled soil depths are compared with field data obtained from an extensive survey of the catchment

  7. An atomic oxygen device based on PIG oxygen negative ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jinxiang; Cai Minghui; Han Jianwei

    2008-01-01

    It is an important research subject for the spaceflight countries to conduct equivalent simulation of 5 eV atomic oxygen effects for the spaceflight material in low earth orbit. This paper introduces an apparatus used for producing atomic oxygen, which consists of a PIG ion source with permanent magnet, two electrodes extraction system, an electron deflector, an einzel lens, an ion decelerating electrode and a sample bracket. At present it has been used on the small debris accelerator in the Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the producing experiments of O - are carried out. 200-300μA of O - ions are extracted at the extraction voltage of 2-3 kV. The experiments for decelerating of O - ions and erosion of kapton foil are carried out also. Because of the target room used for both the atomic oxygen device and the small debris accelerator, the facility can be used for small debris impinging and atomic erosion for spaceflight materials simultaneously. (authors)

  8. Intercomparison On Depth Dose Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohmah, N; Akhadi, M

    1996-01-01

    Intercomparation on personal dose evaluation system has been carried out between CSRSR-NAEA of Indonesia toward Standard Laboratory of JAERI (Japan) and ARL (Australia). The intercomparison was in 10 amm depth dose measurement , Hp (10), from the intercomparison result could be stated that personal depth dose measurement conducted by CSRSR was sufficiently good. Deviation of dose measurement result using personal dosemeter of TLD BG-1 type which were used by CSRSR in the intercomparison and routine photon personal dose monitoring was still in internationally agreed limit. Maximum deviation of reported doses by CSRSR compared to delivered doses for dosemeter irradiation by JAERI was -10.0 percent and by ARL was +29 percent. Maximum deviation permitted in personal dose monitoring is ± 50 percent

  9. Applications of positron depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM)

  10. Applications of positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakvoort, R A

    1993-12-23

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM).

  11. Soil erosion assessment on hillslope of GCE using RUSLE model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Md. Rabiul Islam

    2018-05-22

    May 22, 2018 ... A vegetation density available on these plots is measured ... Finally, erosion prediction is computed based on the RUSLE model in ... which is lower compared to the C value from the soil erosion ..... Comparison of rainfall erosivity factor (R) value. ...... Vorovencii I and Muntean D 2012 Evaluation of super-.

  12. Validation of a probabilistic post-fire erosion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pete Robichaud; William J. Elliot; Sarah A. Lewis; Mary Ellen Miller

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire increases of runoff and erosion often occur and land managers need tools to be able to project the increased risk. The Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) uses the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model as the underlying processor. ERMiT predicts the probability of a given amount of hillslope sediment delivery from a single rainfall or...

  13. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Objective: To summarize the diagnostic protocol and treatment of dental erosion due to GERD. Methods: A Medline ..... reflux in children with cerebral palsy and its relationship to erosion of ... phate (ACP) on root surface hypersensitivity. Operative ... Lussi A. Dental erosion clinical diagnosis and case.

  14. Erosion Modeling Analysis For Modified DWPF SME Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LEE, SI

    2004-01-01

    In support of an erosion evaluation for the modified cooling coil guide and its supporting structure in the DWPF SME vessel, a computational model was developed to identify potential sites of high erosion using the same methodology established by previous work. The erosion mechanism identified in the previous work was applied to the evaluation of high erosion locations representative of the actual flow process in the modified coil guide of the SME vessel, abrasive erosion which occurs by high wall shear of viscous liquid. The results show that primary locations of the highest erosion due to the abrasive wall erosion are at the leading edge of the guide, external surface of the insert plate, the tank floor next to the insert plate of the coil guide support, and the upstream lead-in plate. The present modeling results show a good comparison between the original and the modified cases in terms of high erosion sites, as well as the degree of erosion and the calculated shear stress. Wall she ar of the tank floor is reduced by about 30 per cent because of the new coil support plate. Calculations for the impeller speed lower than 103 rpm in the SME showed similar erosion patterns but significantly reduced wall shear stresses and reduced overall erosion. Comparisons of the 103 rpm results with SME measurements indicated that no significant erosion of the tank floor in the SME is to be expected. Thus, it is recommended that the agitator speed of SME does not exceed 103 rpm

  15. Assessing soil erosion risk in the Tillabery landscape, Niger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show that soil erosion output scenarios predict greater soil erosion in the study area from 2070 onwards. They suggest that human disturbance and topographic factors are the main impact factors in the affected areas. Key words: Tillabéry landscape (Niger), sheet and rill erosion modelling, data mining.

  16. Acoustic measurements of soil-pipeflow and internal erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Internal erosion of soil pipes can lead to embankment failures, landslides, and gully erosion. Therefore, non-intrusive methods are needed to detect and monitor soil pipeflow and the resulting internal erosion. This paper presents a laboratory study using both active and passive acoustic techniques ...

  17. WinDAM C earthen embankment internal erosion analysis software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two primary causes of dam failure are overtopping and internal erosion. For the purpose of evaluating dam safety for existing earthen embankment dams and proposed earthen embankment dams, Windows Dam Analysis Modules C (WinDAM C) software will simulate either internal erosion or erosion resulting f...

  18. Development Of Rainfall Erosivity Map For Nigeria | Ogedengbe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The indices were used to develop a rainfall erosivity map or Nigeria. The map reveals that Nigeria may be broadly divided into five major erosion risk zones. The south-western part is generally in the low erosion zone, with the exception of the coastal portion of Lagos, Ondo, Edo and Delta states. The south-east and central ...

  19. Multivariate erosion risk assessment of lateritic badlands of Birbhum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Erosion risk; soil erosion; sediment yield; multivariate analysis; GIS. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 121, No. ... ers are threatened by excessive soil loss by water. To reach that goal the ... nacle erosion, bare soil cover, barren waste land, tunnels and ...

  20. Experiments on Erosion of Mud from the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, C.; Larsen, Torben; Petersen, O.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments on erosion and consolidation of natural cohesive sediments from the harbour of Esbjerg located in the Danish Watten Sea were conducted using a rotating annular flume. The objective of the paper is to describe the erosion rate of deposited beds and relate the erosion rate...

  1. Pressure and velocity dependence of flow-type cavitation erosion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Auret, JG

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous results on the influence of water pressure and velocity on flow-type cavitations erosion, i.e. an increase in erosion rate with increasing velocity and peaking of erosion rate as a function of pressure, were confirmed by measurements with a...

  2. A longitudinal study of tooth erosion in adolescents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Aidi, H.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Truin, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Incidence studies on tooth erosion among adolescents are scarce. This longitudinal study aimed at estimating the prevalence, incidence, progression, and distribution of erosion in young adolescents over a 1.5-year period. Erosion at baseline was present in 32.2% of the 622 children (mean age, 11.9

  3. The 7Be profiles in the undisturbed soil used for reference site to estimate the soil erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raksawong, S; Bhongsuwan, T; Krmar, M

    2017-01-01

    The cosmogenic radionuclide 7 Be is increasingly used to obtain information on event-related soil erosion rates within agricultural landscapes. In this study, we select two undisturbed and flat areas to calculate the reference inventory and relaxation mass depth by using 7 Be technique to document short-term erosion. Our results showed that the depth distribution of 7 Be in undisturbed soil profiles was 1.0 cm in sites S02 and S03; the initial activities were 31.6 and 38.8 Bq.kg -1 , respectively. The relaxation mass depths were 5.4 and 7.2 kg.m -2 and the measured reference 7 Be inventories were 71 and 110 Bq.m -2 for sites S02 and S03, respectively. The difference values of the relaxation mass depth and the reference inventory of both sites implied that for determining a short term soil erosion using 7 Be, the reference site was suggested to be selected as close as possible to the study site. (paper)

  4. Hydrogen retention and erosion behaviour of tungsten-doped carbon films (a-C:W)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauter, Philipp Andre

    2012-01-01

    In this study tungsten-doped carbon films (a-C:W) were investigated with respect on hydrogen retention and erosion under deuterium (D) impact. a-C:W was used as model system for mixed layers, which will be deposited on the inner wall of the fusion reactor ITER. The erosion is lowered by the successive enrichment of tungsten at the surface and only mildly depends on the dopant concentration and the temperature. The hydrogen retention is determined by the diffusion of D into depth, which increases with temperature. The resulting successive accumulation of D in a-C:W is insensitive on enrichment for high fluences and in line with the accumulation of D in C.

  5. Observation of non-uniform erosion and deposition phenomena on graphite after plasma exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Grote, H.; Schneider, W.; Wienhold, P.; Seggern, J. von

    1999-01-01

    The modifications of fine grain isotropic graphite surfaces after plasma exposure have been investigated using surface analysis techniques with high spatial resolution in area and depth. The samples are graphite target tiles of ASDEX-upgrade and coated graphite collector samples exposed for special erosion/deposition experiments in the divertor plasma of ASDEX-upgrade or in the scrape-off plasma of TEXTOR-94. In addition, a graphite sample was exposed to a low temperature, clean deuterium plasma to study the modifications of the surface morphology during plasma exposure. The results give clear indications of non-uniform erosion and deposition processes. The change of the surface morphology during these processes is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Conception de couches minces tribologiques pour augmenter la resistance a l'erosion par impacts de particules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Salim

    system. Considering both tensile stress reduction and energy absorption, a multi-layer configuration with specific Young's modulus and residual stress distributions along the coating depth is suggested as an optimal coating architecture. In the third part of this work, we propose practical semi-empirical and numerical predictive methods to determine erosion resistance of tribological coatings. The study presents data obtained by FE calculations that can be compared with those obtained by classical theories developed for the erosion of materials. The simulation-based approach allows one to express the functional dependence of erosion on the coating properties, and to quantitatively predict the erosion rate. We determined a proportionality coefficient for a wide range of hard coatings. This coefficient was then used, in combination with the semi-empirical expression derived from FE simulations, to determine the erosion rate of different coatings. The existing erosion theories tend to emphasize hardness, H, and Young's modulus, E, as the main parameters defining erosion resistance. In this context, we specifically focus here on the role of the H/E and H3/E 2 ratios. We demonstrate that the latter characteristics allow one to rank coatings with respect to their erosion performance. Target values for these two ratios were determined for an optimal erosion resistance. We demonstrate that the FE design of the coating architecture, combined with the tailored mechanical properties of individual components of the coating systems, opens new opportunities as a predictive tool for high performance erosion coatings. The present thesis also includes a complementary experimental study of a new kind of ER coatings. We modify the surface profile of hard coatings such as diamond like carbon (DLC) and chrome silicon nitride CrSiN in attempt to correlate the surface characteristics to the functional performance. A specific surface texture (or pattern), designed to enhance erosion resistance

  7. Hydrologic Drivers of Soil Organic Carbon Erosion and Burial: Insights from a Spatially-explicit Model of a Degraded Landscape at the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, Y. G.; Bras, R. L.; Richter, D. D., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Soil erosion and burial of organic material may constitute a substantial sink of atmospheric CO2. Attempts to quantify impacts of soil erosion on the soil-atmosphere C exchange are limited by difficulties in accounting for the fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC), a key factor in estimating of the net effect of erosion on the C cycle. Processes that transport SOC are still inadequately represented in terrestrial carbon (C) cycle models. This study investigates hydrologic controls on SOC redistribution across the landscape focusing on dynamic feedbacks between watershed hydrology, soil erosional processes, and SOC burial. We use tRIBS-ECO (Triangulated Irregular Network-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator-Erosion and Carbon Oxidation), a spatially-explicit model of SOC dynamics coupled with a physically-based hydro-geomorphic model. tRIBS-ECO systematically accounts for the fate of eroded SOC across the watershed: Rainsplash erosion and sheet erosion redistribute SOC from upland sites to depositional environments, altering depth-dependent soil biogeochemical properties in diverse soil profiles. Eroded organic material is transferred with sediment and can be partially oxidized upon transport, or preserved from decomposition by burial. The model was applied in the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory (CZO), a site that is recovering from some of the most serious agricultural erosion in North America. Soil biogeochemical characteristics at multiple soil horizons were used to initialize the model and test performance. Remotely sensed soil moisture data (NASA SMAP) were used for model calibration. Results show significant rates of hydrologically-induced burial of SOC at the Calhoun CZO. We find that organic material at upland eroding soil profiles is largely mobilized by rainsplash erosion. Sheet erosion mainly drives C transport in lower elevation clayey soils. While SOC erosion and deposition rates declined with recent reforestation at the study site, the

  8. The erosion and erosion products of tungsten and carbon based materials bombarded by high energy pulse electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiang; Zhang Fu; Xu Zengyu; Liu Yong; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the erosion behaviors and erosion products of tungsten and some carbon based materials, such as graphite, C/C composite and B 4 C/Cu functionally graded material, were investigated by using a pulse electron beam to simulate the vertical displacement events (VDE) process. The authors will focus on the forms and differences of erosion products among these testing materials, and make clear to their erosion mechanisms

  9. Erosion and deposition on a debris-flow fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, A. L.; Schuerch, P.; Rosser, N. J.; McArdell, B. W.

    2011-12-01

    The ability of a debris flow to entrain or deposit sediment controls the downstream evolution of flow volume, and ultimately dictates both the geomorphic impact of the flow and the potential hazard that it represents. Our understanding of the patterns of, and controls on, such flow volume changes remains extremely limited, however, partly due to a poor mechanistic grasp of the interactions between debris flows and their bed and banks. In addition, we lack a good understanding of the cumulative long-term effects of sequences of flows in a single catchment-fan system. Here we begin to address these issues by using repeated terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to characterize the detailed surface change associated with the passage of multiple debris flows on the Illgraben fan, Switzerland. We calculate surface elevation change along a 300 m study reach, and from this derive the downfan rate of flow volume change, or lag rate; for comparison, we also derive the spatially-averaged lag rate over the entire ~2 km length of the fan. Lag rates are broadly comparable over both length scales, indicating that flow behavior does not vary significantly across the fan for most flows, but importantly we find that flow volume at the fan head is a poor predictor of volume at the fan toe. The sign and magnitude of bed elevation change scale with local flow depth; at flow depths 2 m. On the Illgraben fan, this depth corresponds to a basal shear stress of 3-4 kPa. Because flow depth is in part a function of channel cross-sectional topography, which varies strongly both within and between flows, this result indicates that erosion and deposition are likely to be highly dynamic. The dependence of flow volume change on both the channel topography and the flow history may thus complicate efforts to predict debris-flow inundation areas by simple flow routing. We then apply a 2d numerical model of debris-flow fan evolution to explore the key controls on debris-flow routing and topographic

  10. Transrectal Mesh Erosion Requiring Bowel Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Marta Maria; Slim, Karem; Rabischong, Benoît; Bourdel, Nicolas; Canis, Michel; Botchorishvili, Revaz

    To report a case of a transrectal mesh erosion as complication of laparoscopic promontofixation with mesh repair, necessitating bowel resection and subsequent surgical interventions. Sacrocolpopexy has become a standard procedure for vaginal vault prolapse [1], and the laparoscopic approach has gained popularity owing to more rapid recovery and less morbidity [2,3]. Mesh erosion is a well-known complication of surgical treatment for prolapse as reported in several negative evaluations, including a report from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2011 [4]. Mesh complications are more common after surgeries via the vaginal approach [5]; nonetheless, the incidence of vaginal mesh erosion after laparoscopic procedures is as high as 9% [6]. The incidence of transrectal mesh exposure after laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is roughly 1% [7]. The diagnosis may be delayed because of its rarity and variable presentation. In addition, polyester meshes, such as the mesh used in this case, carry a higher risk of exposure [8]. A 57-year-old woman experiencing genital prolapse, with the cervix classified as +3 according to the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system, underwent laparoscopic standard sacrocolpopexy using polyester mesh. Subtotal hysterectomy and bilateral adnexectomy were performed concomitantly. A 3-year follow-up consultation demonstrated no signs or symptoms of erosion of any type. At 7 years after the surgery, however, the patient presented with rectal discharge, diagnosed as infectious rectocolitis with the isolation of Clostridium difficile. She underwent a total of 5 repair surgeries in a period of 4 months, including transrectal resection of exposed mesh, laparoscopic ablation of mesh with digestive resection, exploratory laparoscopy with abscess drainage, and exploratory laparoscopy with ablation of residual mesh and transverse colostomy. She recovered well after the last intervention, exhibiting no signs of vaginal or rectal fistula and no recurrence

  11. Diffusion and Monod kinetics model to determine in vivo human corneal oxygen-consumption rate during soft contact lens wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Del Castillo

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Present results are relevant for the calculation on the partial pressure of oxygen, available at different depths into the corneal tissue behind contact lenses of different oxygen transmissibility.

  12. Multichannel optical mapping: investigation of depth information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sase, Ichiro; Eda, Hideo; Seiyama, Akitoshi; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Takatsuki, Akira; Yanagida, Toshio

    2001-06-01

    Near infrared (NIR) light has become a powerful tool for non-invasive imaging of human brain activity. Many systems have been developed to capture the changes in regional brain blood flow and hemoglobin oxygenation, which occur in the human cortex in response to neural activity. We have developed a multi-channel reflectance imaging system, which can be used as a `mapping device' and also as a `multi-channel spectrophotometer'. In the present study, we visualized changes in the hemodynamics of the human occipital region in multiple ways. (1) Stimulating left and right primary visual cortex independently by showing sector shaped checkerboards sequentially over the contralateral visual field, resulted in corresponding changes in the hemodynamics observed by `mapping' measurement. (2) Simultaneous measurement of functional-MRI and NIR (changes in total hemoglobin) during visual stimulation showed good spatial and temporal correlation with each other. (3) Placing multiple channels densely over the occipital region demonstrated spatial patterns more precisely, and depth information was also acquired by placing each pair of illumination and detection fibers at various distances. These results indicate that optical method can provide data for 3D analysis of human brain functions.

  13. Effect of final irrigation protocols on microhardness reduction and erosion of root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Emi Razera BALDASSO

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the effect of final irrigation protocols on microhardness reduction and erosion of root canal dentin. Sixty root canals from mandibular incisors were instrumented and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10 according to the irrigant used: QMiX, 17% EDTA, 10% citric acid (CA, 1% peracetic acid (PA, 2.5% NaOCl (solution control, and distilled water (negative control. The chelating solutions were used to irrigate the canal followed by 2.5% NaOCl as a final flush. After the irrigation protocols, all specimens were rinsed with 10 mL of distilled water to remove any residue of the chemical solutions. Before and after the final irrigation protocols, dentin microhardness was measured with a Knoop indenter. Three indentations were made at 100 µm and 500 µm from the root canal lumen. Afterwards, the specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopic analysis and the amount of dentin erosion was examined. Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to analyze the results with a significance level set at 5%. At 100 µm, all protocols significantly reduced dentin microhardness (p < .05, while at 500 µm, this effect was detected only in the EDTA and QMiX groups (p < .05. CA was the irrigant that caused more extensive erosion in dentinal tubules, followed by PA and EDTA. QMiX opened dentinal tubules, but did not cause dentin erosion. Results suggest that QMiX and 17% EDTA reduced dentin microhardness at a greater depth. Additionally, QMiX did not cause dentin erosion.

  14. Effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography in detecting artificially created osteophytes and erosions in the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocasarac, Husniye Demirturk [Dept. of Comprehensive Dentistry, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (United States); Celenk, Peruze [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun (Turkmenistan)

    2017-06-15

    Erosions and osteophytes are radiographic characteristics that are found in different stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. This study assessed the effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography (DSR) in diagnosing simulated osteophytes and erosions in the TMJ. Five intact, dry human skulls were used to assess the effectiveness of DSR in detecting osteophytes. Four cortical bone chips of varying thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.0 mm) were placed at the medial, central, and lateral aspects of the condyle anterior surface. Two defects of varying depth (1.0 mm and 1.5 mm) were created on the lateral, central, and medial poles of the condyles of 2 skulls to simulate erosions. Panoramic images of the condyles were acquired before and after artificially creating the changes. Digital subtraction was performed with Emago dental image archiving software. Five observers familiar with the interpretation of TMJ radiographs evaluated the images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the imaging methods. The area under the ROC curve (Az) value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of DSR in detecting osteophytic changes was 0.931. The Az value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of panoramic imaging was 0.695. The accuracy of DSR in detecting erosive changes was 0.854 and 0.696 for panoramic imaging. DSR was remarkably more accurate than panoramic imaging in detecting simulated osteophytic and erosive changes. The accuracy of panoramic imaging in detecting degenerative changes was significantly lower than the accuracy of DSR (P<.05). DSR improved the accuracy of detection using panoramic images.

  15. Effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography in detecting artificially created osteophytes and erosions in the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocasarac, Husniye Demirturk; Celenk, Peruze

    2017-01-01

    Erosions and osteophytes are radiographic characteristics that are found in different stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. This study assessed the effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography (DSR) in diagnosing simulated osteophytes and erosions in the TMJ. Five intact, dry human skulls were used to assess the effectiveness of DSR in detecting osteophytes. Four cortical bone chips of varying thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.0 mm) were placed at the medial, central, and lateral aspects of the condyle anterior surface. Two defects of varying depth (1.0 mm and 1.5 mm) were created on the lateral, central, and medial poles of the condyles of 2 skulls to simulate erosions. Panoramic images of the condyles were acquired before and after artificially creating the changes. Digital subtraction was performed with Emago dental image archiving software. Five observers familiar with the interpretation of TMJ radiographs evaluated the images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the imaging methods. The area under the ROC curve (Az) value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of DSR in detecting osteophytic changes was 0.931. The Az value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of panoramic imaging was 0.695. The accuracy of DSR in detecting erosive changes was 0.854 and 0.696 for panoramic imaging. DSR was remarkably more accurate than panoramic imaging in detecting simulated osteophytic and erosive changes. The accuracy of panoramic imaging in detecting degenerative changes was significantly lower than the accuracy of DSR (P<.05). DSR improved the accuracy of detection using panoramic images

  16. Application of NAA in study of rill erosion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mian; Li Zhanbin; Ding Wenfeng

    2003-01-01

    Based on the principle and method of rare earth elements (REE) tracer and NAA for the study of soil erosion, the changeable process of rill erosion on loess sloping surface was researched in runoff scouring experiments. The results showed that the REE tracer and NAA method can be used not only quantitatively to determine soil erosion amounts on different slope sections, but also to reveal the changeable trend of relative erosion amounts. The relative errors are mostly less than ±20% for the tracing elements, which is considered satisfactory in the soil erosion studies

  17. Restorative Management of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Dental Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salehi, Samira Kathryn

    2014-12-01

    The restorative management of tooth surface loss is highlighted through the presentation of two advanced cases of dental erosion. On presentation, the causes of the dental erosion in both patients had been previously diagnosed and stopped. The first patient was a 67 year old with intrinsic erosion and an element of attrition where a multidisciplinary approach was used. The other, a 17 year old patient with extrinsic erosion managed via adhesive restorations. Adhesive techniques are a relatively simple, effective and conservative method for the treatment of dental erosion. The two treatment modalities (conventional versus contemporary) are compared and discussed.

  18. Distinguishing and diagnosing contemporary and conventional features of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiouny, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    The vast number and variety of erosion lesions encountered today require reconsideration of the traditional definition. Dental erosion associated with modern dietary habits can exhibit unique features that symbolize a departure from the decades-old conventional image known as tooth surface loss. The extent and diversity of contemporary erosion lesions often cause conflicting diagnoses. Specific examples of these features are presented in this article. The etiologies, genesis, course of development, and characteristics of these erosion lesions are discussed. Contemporary and conventional erosion lesions are distinguished from similar defects, such as mechanically induced wear, carious lesions, and dental fluorosis, which affect the human dentition.

  19. Erosion prediction for alpine slopes: a symbiosis of remote sensing and a physical based erosion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Neugirg, Fabian; Haas, Florian; Schindewolf, Marcus; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    As rainfall simulations represent an established tool for quantifying soil detachment on cultivated area in lowlands and low mountain ranges, they are rarely used on steep slopes high mountain ranges. Still this terrain represents productive sediment sources of high morphodynamic. A quantitative differentiation between gravitationally and fluvially relocated material reveals a major challenge in understanding erosion on steep slopes: does solifluction as a result of melting in spring or heavy convective rainstorms during summer cause the essential erosion processes? This paper aims to answer this question by separating gravitational mass movement (solifluction, landslides, mudflow and needle ice) and runoff-induced detachment. First simulated rainstorm experiments are used to assess the sediment production on bare soil on a strongly inclined plot (1 m², 42°) in the northern limestone Alps. Throughout precipitation experiments runoff and related suspended sediments were quantified. In order to enlarge slope length virtually to around 20 m a runoff feeding device is additionally implemented. Soil physical parameters were derived from on-site sampling. The generated data is introduced to the physically based and catchment-scaled erosion model EROSION 3D to upscale plot size to small watershed conditions. Thus infiltration, runoff, detachment, transport and finally deposition can be predicted for single rainstorm events and storm sequences. Secondly, in order to separate gravitational mass movements and water erosion, a LiDAR and structure-from-motion based monitoring approach is carried out to produce high-resolution digital elevation models. A time series analysis of detachment and deposition from different points in time is implemented. Absolute volume losses are then compared to sediment losses calculated by the erosion model as the latter only generates data that is connected to water induced hillside erosion. This methodology will be applied in other watersheds

  20. The Effect of Impingement Velocity and Angle Variation on the Erosion Corrosion Performance of API 5L-X65 Carbon Steel in a Flow Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan UlHaq Toor

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Erosion corrosion performance of API 5L-X65 carbon steel was investigated at three different impingement velocities (3, 6 & 12 m/s, five different angles (15, 30, 45, 60, & 90°, and with/without solid particles (average particle size of 314 µm. The experiments were conducted in 0.2 M NaCl solution at room temperature for a duration of 24 h and the results showed that the maximum erosion corrosion rate was observed at 45° irrespective of the velocity. The highest erosion corrosion rate at 45° was due to the balance between the shear and normal impact stress at this angle. Ploughing, deep craters, and micro-forging/plastic deformation were found to be the main erosion corrosion mechanisms. The maximum wear scar depth measured using optical profilometery was found to be 51 µm (average at an impingement angle of 45°.

  1. Application of a catchment evolution model to the prediction of long-term erosion on the spoil heap at Ranger uranium mine. Supervising Scientist report 132

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willgoose, G.

    1998-01-01

    There is a need to assess the long-term stability of engineered landforms associated with the rehabilitation of Ranger Uranium Mine, Northern Territory, Australia, as it is a requirement that mill tailings must be contained for periods in excess of 1000 years. The geomorphic model, SIBERIA, is calibrated on hydrology and erosion data collected by a combination of monitoring and rainfall simulation experiments on the waste rock dumps of Ranger. Preliminary analysis of Ranger's preferred above-grade and below-grade rehabilitation options suggests that erosion of the order of 7-8 m will occur on the structure in a period of 1000 years. This depth of erosion may be sufficient to compromise the integrity of the containment. It is shown that SIBERIA has significant advantages over steady-state erosion models. Suggestions are made for the design that will enhance the stability of the structure and extend the structural life of the containment

  2. The effect of slope steepness and antecedent moisture content on interrill erosion, runoff and sediment size distribution in the highlands of Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Defersha

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is a two-phase process consisting of the detachment of individual particles and their transport by the flowing water. This study discusses the results of laboratory experiments in which for three soils, the runoff depth, sediment yield, splash erosion and sediment size were measured. Rainfall intensity, slope and antecedent moisture contents were varied in the experiment. The soil types ranged from clay to sandy clay loam (Alemaya Black soil, Regosols and Cambisols. Rainfall was applied for six sequential 15-min periods with rainfall intensities varying between 55 and 120 mm h−1. The three slopes tested were 9, 25, and 45 %. Results show that as slope increased from 9 to 25 %, splash erosion and sediment yield increased. An increase in slope from 25 to 45 % generally decreases in splash erosion. Sediment yield for one soil increased and one soil decreased with slope and for the third soil the trend was different between the two initial moisture contents. Sediment yield was correlated (r = 0.66 with runoff amounts but not with splash erosion. Interrill erosion models that were based on the flowing water and rainfall intensity fitted the data better than when based on rainfall intensity solely. Models that assume a positive linear relationship between erosion and slope may overestimate sediment yield.

  3. On the geoethical implications of wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Károly, Tatárvári

    2016-04-01

    Human activities exerts an ever growing impact on our environment, and this is undeniably the responsibility of mankind. In spite of this fact there is almost no process in our environment that can be described exactly with complete exactness, and the working of which is known in full extent. Wind erosion is such a process. Although water erosion is mentioned ever more often in scientific circles as a from of erosion, its effect is restrained to a certain region, although it may cause perceptibly damage of a greater extent in short time. Wind erosion, apart from the fact that it may have global impact, may play an important role in the warming of our climate according to recent studies. First of all, wind erosion may cause damage far from its origin in human health, nutrition, or in the environment in general. Today several surveys have proved, that erosion caused by wind significantly contributes to the air pollution of cities, the fine dust carried as drift by the wind may cause severe environmental damage in accumulation zones. Microbes, toxic material may attach themselves to the dust carried this way and carried on and by the wings of the wind they may cause health issues in humans animals and plants as well. In spite of these facts there are almost no measures against wind erosion employed in arable land, although our ever doughtier climate and changes would make these necessary. Reduction of organic matter content presents a great problem in a large part of cultivated land, so the risk of the production of high quality food raises questions of more and more ethical nature. Who is responsible? The fact, that the chemicals used in a growing extent by agriculture may reach many people causing considerable damage to the environment also raises serious ethical questions. More and more periods with extreme weather conditions are experienced in Hungary and Europe as the effect of climate change. Drought periods are longer and more frequent as the intensity of

  4. EPro Non-contact erosion profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Palle

    Pro is a profiling program build to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion. It was developed during 2001 - 2002 at Aalborg University and was part of a Master of Science project dealing with stability of rubble mound breakwaters. The goal was to aut......Pro is a profiling program build to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion. It was developed during 2001 - 2002 at Aalborg University and was part of a Master of Science project dealing with stability of rubble mound breakwaters. The goal...... was to automate the measuring of profiles in order to save manpower and to increase the number of possible measure points. Additional requirement was that measurements should be done in a non-contact way and that the measuring should not be hindered by the presence of water....

  5. Specific decontamination methods: water nozzle, cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulitrop, D.; Gauchon, J.P.; Lecoffre, Y.

    1984-05-01

    The erosion and decontamination tests carried out in the framework of this study, allowed to specify the fields favourable to the use of the high pressure jet taking into account the determinant parameters that are the pressure and the target-nozzle distance. The previous spraying of gels with chemical reagents (sulfuric acid anf hydrazine) allows to get better decontamination factors. Then, the feasibility study of a decontamination method by cavitation erosion is presented. Gelled compounds for decontamination have been developed; their decontamination quality has been evaluated by comparative contamination tests in laboratory and decontamination tests of samples of materials used in nuclear industry; this last method is adapted to remote handling devices and produces a low quantity of secondary effluents, so it allows to clean high contaminated installation on the site without additional exposure of the personnel [fr

  6. Soil Erosion as a stochastic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Markus C.

    2015-04-01

    The main tools to provide estimations concerning risk and amount of erosion are different types of soil erosion models: on the one hand, there are empirically based model concepts on the other hand there are more physically based or process based models. However, both types of models have substantial weak points. All empirical model concepts are only capable of providing rough estimates over larger temporal and spatial scales, they do not account for many driving factors that are in the scope of scenario related analysis. In addition, the physically based models contain important empirical parts and hence, the demand for universality and transferability is not given. As a common feature, we find, that all models rely on parameters and input variables, which are to certain, extend spatially and temporally averaged. A central question is whether the apparent heterogeneity of soil properties or the random nature of driving forces needs to be better considered in our modelling concepts. Traditionally, researchers have attempted to remove spatial and temporal variability through homogenization. However, homogenization has been achieved through physical manipulation of the system, or by statistical averaging procedures. The price for obtaining this homogenized (average) model concepts of soils and soil related processes has often been a failure to recognize the profound importance of heterogeneity in many of the properties and processes that we study. Especially soil infiltrability and the resistance (also called "critical shear stress" or "critical stream power") are the most important empirical factors of physically based erosion models. The erosion resistance is theoretically a substrate specific parameter, but in reality, the threshold where soil erosion begins is determined experimentally. The soil infiltrability is often calculated with empirical relationships (e.g. based on grain size distribution). Consequently, to better fit reality, this value needs to be

  7. Glaucoma Drainage Device Erosion Following Ptosis Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Steven S; Campbell, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    To highlight the potential risk of glaucoma drainage device erosion following ptosis surgery. Case report. A 71-year-old man underwent uncomplicated superotemporal Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in the left eye in 2008. Approximately 8 years later, the patient underwent bilateral ptosis repair, which successfully raised the upper eyelid position. Three months postoperatively, the patient's glaucoma drainage implant tube eroded through the corneal graft tissue and overlying conjunctiva to become exposed. A graft revision surgery was successfully performed with no further complications. Caution and conservative lid elevation may be warranted when performing ptosis repair in patients with a glaucoma drainage implant, and patients with a glaucoma implant undergoing ptosis surgery should be followed closely for signs of tube erosion.

  8. North Fork Feather River Erosion Control Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.

    1991-01-01

    PG and E, an investor owned gas and electric utility serving northern and central California, has been engaged since 1984 in the development and implementation of a regional erosion control program for the 954 square mile northern Sierra Nevada watersheed of the East Branch of the North Fork Feather River in Plumas County, California. PG and E entered into an agreement with 13 governmental agencies and a number of private landowners using Coordinated Resource Management and Planning: to cooperatively develop, fund and implement the program. The group has completed several field projects and has a number of additional projects in various stages of development. This paper reports that the program provides multiple environmental and economic benefits including reduction of soil erosion and sedimentation, improved fisheries, enhancement of riparian habitat, increased land values, improved recreation opportunities, and preservation of watershed resources

  9. In situ erosion of cohesive sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, H.J.; Ockenden, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in tidal power schemes and the effect of a tidal energy barrage on the environment. A large man-made environmental change, such as a barrage, would be expected to have significant effects on the sediment distribution and stability of an estuary and these effects need to be assessed when considering a tidal barrage project. This report describes the development of apparatus for in-situ measurements of cohesive sediment erosion on inter-tidal mudflats. Development of the prototype field erosion bell and field testing was commissioned on behalf of the Department of Trade and Industry by the Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU). This later work commenced in August 1991 and was completed in September 1992. (Author)

  10. Biogeochemistry: Oxygen burrowed away

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular animals probably evolved at the seafloor after a rise in oceanic oxygen levels. Biogeochemical model simulations suggest that as these animals started to rework the seafloor, they triggered a negative feedback that reduced global oxygen.

  11. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  12. Temporal and spatial variations of rainfall erosivity in Southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Hsi; Lin, Huan-Hsuan; Chu, Chun-Kuang

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion models are essential in developing effective soil and water resource conservation strategies. Soil erosion is generally evaluated using the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) with an appropriate regional scale description. Among factors in the USLE model, the rainfall erosivity index (R) provides one of the clearest indications of the effects of climate change. Accurate estimation of rainfall erosivity requires continuous rainfall data; however, such data rarely demonstrate good spatial and temporal coverage. The data set consisted of 9240 storm events for the period 1993 to 2011, monitored by 27 rainfall stations of the Central Weather Bureau (CWB) in southern Taiwan, was used to analyze the temporal-spatial variations of rainfall erosivity. The spatial distribution map was plotted based on rainfall erosivity by the Kriging interpolation method. Results indicated that rainfall erosivity is mainly concentrated in rainy season from June to November typically contributed 90% of the yearly R factor. The temporal variations of monthly rainfall erosivity during June to November and annual rainfall erosivity have increasing trend from 1993 to 2011. There is an increasing trend from southwest to northeast in spatial distribution of rainfall erosivity in southern Taiwan. The results further indicated that there is a higher relationship between elevation and rainfall erosivity. The method developed in this study may also be useful for sediment disasters on Climate Change.

  13. Composition of enamel pellicle from dental erosion patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, G; Cotroneo, E; Moazzez, R; Rojas-Serrano, M; Donaldson, N; Austin, R; Zaidel, L; Bartlett, D; Proctor, G

    2014-01-01

    Oral health is dependent upon a thin mobile film of saliva on soft and hard tissues. Salivary proteins adhere to teeth to form the acquired enamel pellicle which is believed to protect teeth from acid erosion. This study investigated whether patients suffering diet-induced dental erosion had altered enamel pellicles. Thirty patients suffering erosion were compared to healthy age-matched controls. Subjects wore a maxillary splint holding hydroxyapatite and human enamel blocks for 1 h. The acquired enamel pellicle was removed from the blocks and compared to the natural incisor pellicle. Basic Erosive Wear Examination scores confirmed that dental erosion was present in erosion patients and absent from healthy age-matched controls. Erosion patients had half the amount of proteins (BCA assay) within the acquired pellicle forming on splint blocks compared to normal controls (p erosion patients (p erosion patients and healthy controls. In summary, the formation of new acquired pellicles on surfaces was reduced in erosion patients, which may explain their greater susceptibility to acid erosion of teeth. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Protection From Dental Erosion: All Fluorides are Not Equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Robert V; Noble, Warden H

    2018-03-01

    All fluoride sources help strengthen teeth against bacterial acids that cause caries. However, excessive exposure to dietary acids, which can result in dental erosion, presents a more aggressive level of challenge compared to caries. Despite the fact that almost all toothpastes contain fluoride, both the incidence and prevalence of dental erosion appear to be on the rise. This article: (1) describes key differences between caries and dental erosion and the ability of different fluoride sources to help prevent erosion; (2) discusses the importance of the evaluation of patients for dental erosion at the earliest stages using the Basic Erosive Wear Examination scoring system to help assess and educate patients; and (3) provides evidence-based information for making specific recommendations to patients with dental erosion. The objective of this article is to assess the comparative ability of fluoride agents to protect against dental erosion. Though all fluorides are able to help strengthen teeth against cariogenic acids, not all available sources of fluoride provide the same level of erosion protection. Daily use of a stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice has been shown to provide the most effective means of protecting teeth against the increasing risk of dental erosion and erosive tooth wear.

  15. Soil erosion, sedimentation and the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammeraat, L. H.; Kirkels, F.; Kuhn, N. J.

    2012-04-01

    Historically soil erosion focused on the effects of on-site soil quality loss and consequently reduced crop yields, and off-site effects related to deposition of material and water quality issues such as increased sediment loads of rivers. In agricultural landscapes geomorphological processes reallocate considerable amounts of soil and soil organic carbon (SOC). The destiny of SOC is of importance because it constitutes the largest C pool of the fast carbon cycle, and which cannot only be understood by looking at the vertical transfer of C from soil to atmosphere. Therefore studies have been carried out to quantify this possible influence of soil erosion and soil deposition and which was summarized by Quinton et al. (2010) by "We need to consider soils as mobile systems to make accurate predictions about the consequences of global change for terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and climate feedbacks". Currently a debate exists on the actual fate of SOC in relation to the global carbon cycle, represented in a controversy between researchers claiming that erosion is a sink, and those who claim the opposite. This controversy is still continuing as it is not easy to quantify and model the dominating sink and source processes at the landscape scale. Getting insight into the balance of the carbon budget requires a comprehensive research of all relevant processes at broad spatio-temporal scales, from catchment to regional scales and covering the present to the late Holocene. Emphasising the economic and societal benefits, the merits for scientific knowledge of the carbon cycle and the potential to sequester carbon and consequently offset increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations, make the fate of SOC in agricultural landscapes a high-priority research area. Quinton, J.N., Govers, G., Van Oost, K., Bardgett, R.D., 2010. The impact of agricultural soil erosion on biogeochemical cycling. Nature Geosci, 3, 311-314.

  16. Impacts of decentralization - erosion or renewal?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna; Madsen, Jørgen Steen; Due, Jesper Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    In recent decades Germany and Denmark have constituted survival areas for the classical IR system in an era that has otherwise largely been characterised by the deregulation and disorganisation of industrial relations. From the mid-1990s onwards, however, it has to varying degrees been possible...... and the more homogeneous composition of company sizes in Denmark are core explanations why Denmark exhibits fewer erosive trends than Germany and more signs of renewal in the development towards multi-level regulation....

  17. Advancing internal erosion monitoring using seismic methods in field and laboratory studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Minal L.

    embankment surface. Analysis of root mean squared amplitude and AE threshold counts indicated activity focused at the toe in locations matching the sand boils. This analysis also compared the various detection methods employed at the 2012 test to discuss a timeline of detection related to observable behaviors of the structure. The second area of research included designing and fabricating an instrumented laboratory apparatus for investigating active seismic wave propagation through soil samples. This dissertation includes a description of the rigid wall permeameter, instrumentation, control, and acquisitions systems along with descriptions of the custom-fabricated seismic sensors. A series of experiments (saturated sand, saturated sand with a known static anomaly placed near the center of the sample, and saturated sand with a diminishing anomaly near the center of the sample) indicated that shear wave velocity changes reflected changes in the state of stress of the soil. The mean effective stress was influenced by the applied vertical axial load, the frictional interaction between the soil and permeameter wall, and the degree of preloading. The frictional resistance was sizeable at the sidewall of the permeameter and decreased the mean effective stress with depth. This study also included flow tests to monitor changes in shear wave velocities as the internal erosion process started and developed. Shear wave velocity decreased at voids or lower density zones in the sample and increased as arching redistributes loads, though the two conditions compete. Finally, the social and political contexts surrounding nondestructive inspection were considered. An analogous approach utilized by the aerospace industry was introduced: a case study comparing the path toward adopting nondestructive tools as standard practices in monitoring aircraft safety. Additional lessons for dam and levee safety management were discussed from a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Policy (STEP

  18. Depth distributions of light action spectra for skin chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barun, V. V.; Ivanov, A. P.

    2010-03-01

    Light action spectra over wavelengths of 300-1000 nm are calculated for components of the human cutaneous covering: melanin, basal (bloodless) tissue, and blood oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin. The transformation of the spectra with depth in biological tissue results from two factors. The first is the wavelength dependence of the absorption coefficient corresponding to a particular skin chromophore and the second is the spectral selectivity of the radiation flux in biological tissue. This factor is related to the optical properties of all chromophores. A significant change is found to take place in the spectral distribution of absorbed radiant power with increasing depth. The action spectrum of light for the molecular oxygen contained in all components of biological tissue is also studied in the 625-645 nm range. The spectra are found to change with both the volume fraction of blood vessels and the degree of oxygenation of the blood. These results are useful for analyzing processes associated with optical absorption that are possible mechanisms for the interaction of light with biological tissues: photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin and the light-oxygen effect.

  19. TiF4 varnish protects the retention of brackets to enamel after in vitro mild erosive challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Maria Isabel Dantas de; Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Santos, Rogério Lacerda Dos; Sousa, Frederico Barbosa; Castro, Ricardo Dias de; França, Renata Cristina Sobreira; Carvalho, Fabíola Galbiatti de

    2018-05-14

    The effect of fluoride agents on the retention of orthodontic brackets to enamel under erosive challenge is little investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) and sodium fluoride (NaF) agents on the shear bond strength of brackets to enamel and on the enamel microhardness around brackets under erosive challenge. Brackets were bonded to bovine incisors. Five groups were formed according to fluoride application (n=10): TiF4 varnish, TiF4 solution, NaF varnish, NaF solution and control (without application). The specimens were submitted to erosive challenge (90 s cola drink/2h artificial saliva, 4x per day for 7 days). Solutions were applied before each erosive cycle and varnishes were applied once. Vickers Microhardness (VHN) was obtained before and after all cycles of erosion and the percentage of microhardness loss was calculated. Shear bond strength, adhesive remnant index and polarized light microscopy were conducted after erosion. The data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α=0.05). The %VHN had no statistically significant differences among the experimental groups. However, considering the comparisons of all groups with the control group, TiF4 varnish showed the highest protection from enamel demineralization (effect size of 2.94, while the effect size for the other groups was >2.4). The TiF4 varnish group had significantly higher shear bond strength compared to other groups. There was no difference among groups for adhesive remnant index. Polarized light microscopy showed higher demineralization depth for the control group. Application of NaF and TiF4 agents during mild erosive challenge minimized the enamel mineral loss around brackets, however only the experimental TiF4 varnish was able to prevent the reduction of shear bond strength of brackets to enamel.

  20. Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Harden, Jennifer W.; McPherson, B.J.; Sundquist, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

  1. Experimental study of the cavitation erosion in centrifugal pump impeller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayan, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Research on cavitation damage scale effects show that the damage rate is increased with size and velocity. It seems that for constant velocity there is no clear trend for the variation of erosion with cavitation number. Research on the time effects on damage rate show similarity between cavitation and impingement erosion. The cumulative weight loss versus time curve is of a ''S'' shaped type characterized by an incubation period followed by a period of increasing erosion rate, then a maximum erosion rate, and finally a period of decreasing erosion rate. The objective of this investigation is to present a prototype cavitation erosion experiment in order to clarify the time dependency of the erosive wear

  2. Numerical study of impact erosion of multiple solid particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chao; Liu, Yonghong; Chen, Cheng; Qin, Jie; Ji, Renjie; Cai, Baoping

    2017-11-01

    Material erosion caused by continuous particle impingement during hydraulic fracturing results in significant economic loss and increased production risks. The erosion process is complex and has not been clearly explained through physical experiments. To address this problem, a multiple particle model in a 3D configuration was proposed to investigate the dynamic erosion process. This approach can significantly reduce experiment costs. The numerical model considered material damping and elastic-plastic material behavior of target material. The effects of impact parameters on erosion characteristics, such as plastic deformation, contact time, and energy loss rate, were investigated. Based on comprehensive studies, the dynamic erosion mechanism and geometry evolution of eroded crater was obtained. These findings can provide a detailed erosion process of target material and insights into the material erosion caused by multiple particle impingement.

  3. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShahrani, Mohammed Thamer; Haralur, Satheesh B; Alqarni, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  4. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Thamer AlShahrani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  5. Depth as an organizer of fish assemblages in floodplain lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    Depth reduction is a natural process in floodplain lakes, but in many basins has been accelerated by anthropogenic disturbances. A diverse set of 42 floodplain lakes in the Yazoo River Basin (Mississippi, USA) was examined to test the hypothesis of whether depth reduction was a key determinant of water quality and fish assemblage structure. Single and multiple variable analyses were applied to 10 commonly monitored water variables and 54 fish species. Results showed strong associations between depth and water characteristics, and between depth and fish assemblages. Deep lakes provided less variable environments, clearer water, and a wider range of microhabitats than shallow lakes. The greater environmental stability was reflected by the dominant species in the assemblages, which included a broader representation of large-body species, species less tolerant of extreme water quality, and more predators. Stability in deep lakes was further reflected by reduced among-lake variability in taxa representation. Fish assemblages in shallow lakes were more variable than deep lakes, and commonly dominated by opportunistic species that have early maturity, extended breeding seasons, small adult size, and short lifespan. Depth is a causal factor that drives many physical and chemical variables that contribute to organizing fish assemblages in floodplain lakes. Thus, correlations between fish and water transparency, temperature, oxygen, trophic state, habitat structure, and other environmental descriptors may ultimately be totally or partly regulated by depth. In basins undergoing rapid anthropogenic modifications, local changes forced by depth reductions may be expected to eliminate species available from the regional pool and could have considerable ecological implications. ?? 2010 Springer Basel AG (outside the USA).

  6. The Effects of Different Tillage Systems on Soil Hydrology and Erosion in Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolino, A. V. F. A.; Fernandes, N. F.; Souza, A. P.; Miranda, J. P.; Rocha, M. L.

    2009-04-01

    Conventional tillage usually imposes a variety of modifications on soil properties that can lead to important changes in the type and magnitude of the hydrological processes that take place at the upper portion of the soil profile. Plough pan formation, for example, is considered to be an important consequence of conventional tillage practices in southeastern Brazil, decreasing infiltration rates and contributing to soil erosion, especially in steep slopes. In order to characterize the changes in soil properties and soil hydrology due to the plough pan formation we carried out detailed investigations in two experimental plots in Paty do Alferes region, located in the hilly landscape of Serra do Mar in southeastern Brazil, close to Rio de Janeiro city. Farming activities are very important in this area, in particular the ones related to the tomato production. The local hilly topography with short and steep hillslopes, as well as an average annual rainfall of almost 2000 mm, favor surface runoff and the evolution of rill and gully erosion. The two runoff plots are 22m long by 4m wide and were installed side by side along a representative hillslope, both in terms of soil (Oxisol) and steepness. At the lower portion of each plot there is a collecting trough connected by a PVC pipe to a 500 and 1000 liters sediment storage boxes. Soil tillage treatments used in the two plots were: Conventional Tillage (CT), with one plowing using disc-type plow (about 18 cm depth) and one downhill tractor leveling, in addition to burning residues from previous planting; and Minimum Tillage (MT), which did not allow burning residues from previous planting and preserved a vegetative cover between plantation lines. Runoff and soil erosion measurements were carried out in both plots immediately after each rainfall event. In order to characterize soil water movements under the two tillage systems (CT and MT), 06 nests of tensiometers and 04 nests of Watermark sensors were installed in each

  7. Proterozoic atmospheric oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2014-01-01

    This article is concerned with the evolution of atmospheric oxygen concentrations through the Proterozoic Eon. In particular, this article will seek to place the history of atmospheric oxygenation through the Proterozoic Eon in the context of the evolving physical environment including the history...... of continental growth and volcanic outgassing, as well as biogeochemical processing of elements within the oceans. The author will seek to explore constraints on the history of oxygenation and understand which processes have regulated oxygen through this eon....

  8. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  9. Gully erosion in Madagascar: causes and impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveloson, Andrea; Székely, Balázs; Visnovitz, Ferenc

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion has been recognized as the main cause of land degradation worldwide and gully erosion is currently considered as one of the most impressive and striking erosion type. This global environmental problem has numerous causes (both natural and anthropogenic) and inflict serious socio-economic problems all around the world. The present study aims to discuss the occurrence and environmental issues related to lavakization in Madagascar and its impact on landscape (badland formation), land use management, flora and fauna, infrastructures, soil properties and human life itself. We assembled and reviewed lavaka researches since 1953. Exact location of the field surveys, cited triggering factors and results of these scientific papers have been studied in detail and compared with our data collected using satellite imagery. Lavaka distribution was analyzed using GIS methods and the relation between their density and different factors was studied. An overview of the many contributing factors (climate, topography, geology, vegetation cover, fault systems, tectonism and land use including inappropriate cultivation and irrigation systems) is given in order to better understand lavaka formation, distribution and impacts. Synthesis of previous researches might help us define area susceptible to gully formation. This can be used to determine prevention priorities for farmers, to manage their lands sustainably. This is ILARG contribution 18.

  10. LAPSUS: soil erosion - landscape evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gorp, Wouter; Temme, Arnaud; Schoorl, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    LAPSUS is a soil erosion - landscape evolution model which is capable of simulating landscape evolution of a gridded DEM by using multiple water, mass movement and human driven processes on multiple temporal and spatial scales. It is able to deal with a variety of human landscape interventions such as landuse management and tillage and it can model their interactions with natural processes. The complex spatially explicit feedbacks the model simulates demonstrate the importance of spatial interaction of human activity and erosion deposition patterns. In addition LAPSUS can model shallow landsliding, slope collapse, creep, solifluction, biological and frost weathering, fluvial behaviour. Furthermore, an algorithm to deal with natural depressions has been added and event-based modelling with an improved infiltration description and dust deposition has been pursued. LAPSUS has been used for case studies in many parts of the world and is continuously developing and expanding. it is now available for third-party and educational use. It has a comprehensive user interface and it is accompanied by a manual and exercises. The LAPSUS model is highly suitable to quantify and understand catchment-scale erosion processes. More information and a download link is available on www.lapsusmodel.nl.

  11. Erosion in the Beaches of Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synolakis, C. E.; Foteinis, S.; Voukouvalas, V.; Kalligeris, N.

    2009-04-01

    In the past decade, erosion rates for the coastlines of Greece are rapidly increasing. Many beaches on the northern coast of the island have substantially retreated, while others have disappeared or will disappear within the present or the following decade if no action is taken. For the better understanding and visualization of the current situation, specific examples of rapid erosion are described and afterwards we speculate as to the causes. We infer that, as in other parts of the Mediterranean, the causes are anthropogenic and include removal of sand dunes to build roads, sand mining from beaches and rivers, permanent building construction within the active coastal zone, on or too close to shoreline, and poor design of coastal structures. The reason behind the rapid erosion of Greece coastlines is the complete lack of any semblance of coastal zone management and antiquated legislation. We conclude that unless urgent measures for the protection and even salvation of the beaches are taken and if the sand mining and dune removal does not stop, then several beaches will disappear within the present and the following decade.

  12. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Tooth Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbin Ranjitkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in children and adults, and of “silent refluxers” in particular, increases the responsibility of dentists to be alert to this potentially severe condition when observing unexplained instances of tooth erosion. Although gastroesophageal reflux is a normal physiologic occurrence, excessive gastric and duodenal regurgitation combined with a decrease in normal protective mechanisms, including an adequate production of saliva, may result in many esophageal and extraesophageal adverse conditions. Sleep-related GERD is particularly insidious as the supine position enhances the proximal migration of gastric contents, and normal saliva production is much reduced. Gastric acid will displace saliva easily from tooth surfaces, and proteolytic pepsin will remove protective dental pellicle. Though increasing evidence of associations between GERD and tooth erosion has been shown in both animal and human studies, relatively few clinical studies have been carried out under controlled trial conditions. Suspicion of an endogenous source of acid being associated with observed tooth erosion requires medical referral and management of the patient as the primary method for its prevention and control.

  13. Erosion by sliding wear in granular flows: Experiments with realistic contact forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, C. P.; Hung, C. Y.; Smith, B.; Li, L.; Grinspun, E.; Capart, H.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flow erosion is a powerful and sometimes dominant process in steep channels. Despite its importance, this phenomenon is relatively little studied in the lab. The large drum experiments of Hsu are a notable exception, in which almost-field-scale impact forces were generated at the head of a synthetic debris flow whose properties (grain size, proportion of fines, etc) were varied widely.A key challenge in these and similar experiments is to explore how erosion rate varies as a function of the scale of the flow (thereby varying inertial stresses, impact forces, etc). The geometrical limitations of most lab experiments, and their short run time, severely limit the scope of such explorations.We achieve this scale exploration in a set of drum erosion experiments by varying effective gravity across several orders of magnitude (1g, 10g, 100g) in a geotechnical centrifuge. By half-filling our 40cm-diameter drum with dry 2.3mm grains, placing a synthetic rock plate at the back and a glass plate at the front 3cm apart, and rotating the drum at 1-50rpm, we simulate wear in a channelized dry granular flow. In contrast to Hsu's experiments, we focus on sliding wear erosion at the flow boundary rather than impact/frictional wear at the flow head. By varying effective gravity from 1g-100g we can tune the pressure exerted by the grains at the boundary without having to change the scale of our apparatus. Using a recently developed depth-averaged, kinetic-energy closure theory for granular flow, we can simultaneously tune the drum rotation rate such that the flow dynamics remain invariant. We can thereby explore how changing the scale of a granular flow, and thus the contact forces of grains on the boundary, controls the rate of rock erosion. Using a small apparatus we can simulate the erosion generated by debris flows several meters deep involving grains up to 10cm in diameter.Our results suggest that sliding wear is the main erosion process, and are consistent with Archard

  14. [Domiciliary oxygen therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Kafi, S

    2010-09-01

    In Belgium, oxygen therapy is becoming more and more accessible. When oxygen is needed for short periods or for special indications as palliative care, an agreement between mutual insurance companies and pharmacists allows the practitioner the home installation of gazeous oxygen cylinder or of oxygen concentrator. When long term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is indicated for patients with respiratory insufficiency, the pneumologist must first ask the INAMI the authorization to install one of the following modalities: oxygen concentrator with or without demand oxygen delivery cylinder and liquid oxygen. The goal of LTOT is to increase survival and quality of life. The principal and well accepted indication for LTOT is severe hypoxemia. The beneficial effects of oxygen therapy limited at night or on exertion are controversial. In order to increase patient's autonomy, oxygen can be prescribed for ambulation, respecting prescription's rules. At each step of oxygen therapy implementing (indication, choice of the device and follow-up) the patient under oxygen may benefit from a joint approach between the general practitioner and the chest specialist.

  15. Aircraft Oxygen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    An Oxygen Enriched Air System for the AV-8A Harrier (NADC-81198-60).” 70 Horch , T., et. al. “The F-16 Onboard Oxygen Generating System: Performance...Only and Safety Privileged). Horch , T., Miller, R., Bomar, J., Tedor, J., Holden, R., Ikels, K., & Lozano, P. (1983). The F-16 Onboard Oxygen

  16. The role of vegetation on gully erosion stabilization at a severely degraded landscape: A case study from Calhoun Experimental Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastola, S.; Dialynas, Y. G.; Bras, R. L.; Noto, L. V.; Istanbulluoglu, E.

    2018-05-01

    Gully erosion was evidence of land degradation in the southern Piedmont, site of the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory (CCZO), during the cotton farming era. Understanding of the underlying gully erosion processes is essential to develop gully erosion models that could be useful in assessing the effectiveness of remedial and soil erosion control measures such as gully backfilling, revegetation, and terracing. Development and validation of process-based gully erosion models is difficult because observations of the formation and progression of gullies are limited. In this study, analytic formulations of the two dominant gullying processes, namely, plunge pool erosion and slab failure, are utilized to simulate the gullying processes in the 4-km2 Holcombe's Branch watershed. In order to calibrate parameters of the gully erosion model, gully features (e.g., depth and area) extracted from a high-resolution LiDAR map are used. After the calibration, the gully model is able to delineate the spatial extent of gullies whose statistics are in close agreement with the gullies extracted from the LiDAR DEM. Several simulations with the calibrated model are explored to evaluate the effectiveness of various gully remedial measures, such as backfilling and revegetation. The results show that in the short-term, the reshaping of the topographical surface by backfilling and compacting gullies is effective in slowing down the growth of gullies (e.g., backfilling decreased the spatial extent of gullies by 21-46% and decreased the average depth of gullies by up to 9%). Revegetation, however, is a more effective approach to stabilizing gullies that would otherwise expand if no gully remedial measures are implemented. Analyses of our simulations show that the gully stabilization effect of revegetation varies over a wide range, i.e., leading to 23-69% reduction of the spatial extent of gullies and up to 45% reduction in the depth of gullies, depending on the selection of plant species and

  17. Auto consolidated cohesive sediments erosion; Erosion des sediments cohesifs en autoconsolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternat, F

    2007-02-15

    Pollutants and suspended matters of a river can accumulate into the sedimentary column. Once deposited, they are submitted to self-weight consolidation processes, ageing and burying, leading to an increase of their erosion resistance. Pollutant fluxes can be related to sedimentary fluxes, determined by threshold laws. In this work, an erosion threshold model is suggested by introducing a cohesion force into the usual force balance. A model of cohesion is developed on the basis of interactions between argillaceous cohesive particles (clays), particularly the Van der Waals force, whose parameterization is ensured by means of granulometry and porosity. Artificial erosion experiments were performed in a recirculating erosion flume with natural cored sediments where critical shear stress measurements were performed. Other analyses provided granulometry and porosity. The results obtained constitute a good database for the literature. The model is then applied to the experimental conditions and gives good agreement with measurements. An example of the accounting for self-weight consolidation processes is finally suggested, before finishing on a Mohr like diagram dedicated to soft cohesive sediment erosion. (author)

  18. Statistical compilation of NAPAP chemical erosion observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Eldeeb, A. Raouf; Reddy, Michael M.; Fries, Terry L.; Coombs, Mary Jane; Schmiermund, Ron L.; Sherwood, Susan I.

    2001-01-01

    In the mid 1980s, the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), in cooperation with the National Park Service (NPS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), initiated a Materials Research Program (MRP) that included a series of field and laboratory studies with the broad objective of providing scientific information on acid rain effects on calcareous building stone. Among the several effects investigated, the chemical dissolution of limestone and marble by rainfall was given particular attention because of the pervasive appearance of erosion effects on cultural materials situated outdoors. In order to track the chemical erosion of stone objects in the field and in the laboratory, the Ca 2+ ion concentration was monitored in the runoff solution from a variety of test objects located both outdoors and under more controlled conditions in the laboratory. This report provides a graphical and statistical overview of the Ca 2+ chemistry in the runoff solutions from (1) five urban and rural sites (DC, NY, NJ, NC, and OH) established by the MRP for materials studies over the period 1984 to 1989, (2) subevent study at the New York MRP site, (3) in situ study of limestone and marble monuments at Gettysburg, (4) laboratory experiments on calcite dissolution conducted by Baedecker, (5) laboratory simulations by Schmiermund, and (6) laboratory investigation of the surface reactivity of calcareous stone conducted by Fries and Mossotti. The graphical representations provided a means for identifying erroneous data that can randomly appear in a database when field operations are semi-automated; a purged database suitable for the evaluation of quantitative models of stone erosion is appended to this report. An analysis of the sources of statistical variability in the data revealed that the rate of stone erosion is weakly dependent on the type of calcareous stone, the ambient temperature, and the H + concentration delivered in the incident rain. The analysis also showed

  19. Effect of stone coverage on soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, S.; Barry, D. A.; Heng, B. P.; Brovelli, A.; Sander, G. C.; Parlange, J.

    2010-12-01

    Soil surface coverage has a significant impact on water infiltration, runoff and soil erosion yields. In particular, surface stones protect the soils from raindrop detachment, they retard the overland flow therefore decreasing its sediment transport capacity, and they prevent surface sealing. Several physical and environmental factors control to what extent stones on the soil surface modify the erosion rates and the related hydrological response. Among the most important factors are the moisture content of the topsoil, stone size, emplacement, coverage density and soil texture. Owing to the different inter-related processes, there is ambiguity concerning the quantitative effect of stones, and process-based understanding is limited. Experiments were performed (i) to quantify how stone features affect sediment yields, (ii) to understand the local effect of isolated surface stones, that is, the changes of the soil particle size distribution in the vicinity of a stone and (iii) to determine how stones attenuate the development of surface sealing and in turn how this affects the local infiltration rate. A series of experiments using the EPFL 6-m × 2-m erosion flume were conducted at different rainfall intensities (28 and 74 mm h-1) and stone coverage (20 and 40%). The total sediment concentration, the concentration of the individual size classes and the flow discharge were measured. In order to analyze the measurements, the Hairsine and Rose (HR) erosion model was adapted to account for the shielding effect of the stone cover. This was done by suitably adjusting the parameters based on the area not covered by stones. It was found that the modified HR model predictions agreed well with the measured sediment concentrations especially for the long time behavior. Changes in the bulk density of the topsoil due to raindrop-induced compaction with and without stone protection revealed that the stones protect the upper soil surface against the structural seals resulting in

  20. Cathode erosion in high-current high-pressure arc

    CERN Document Server

    Nemchinsky, V A

    2003-01-01

    Cathode erosion rate was experimentally investigated for two types of arcs: one with tungsten cathode in nitrogen atmosphere and one with hafnium cathode in oxygen atmosphere. Conditions were typical for plasma arc cutting systems: gas pressure from 2 to 5 atm, arc current from 200 to 400 A, gas flow rate from 50 to 130 litre min sup - sup 1. It was found that the actual cathode evaporation rate G is much lower than G sub 0 , the evaporation rate that follows from the Hertz-Knudsen formula: G = nu G sub 0. The difference is because some of the evaporated particles return back to the cathode. For conditions of our experiments, the factor nu could be as low as 0.01. It was shown experimentally that nu depends strongly on the gas flow pattern close to the cathode. In particular, swirling the gas increases nu many times. To explain the influence of gas swirling, model calculations of gas flows were performed. These calculations revealed difference between swirling and non-swirling flows: swirling the gas enhances...