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Sample records for oxidation reduction chemical

  1. Study of film graphene/graphene oxide obtained by partial reduction chemical of oxide graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascho, J.L.S.; Costa, S.F.; Hoepfner, J.C.; Pezzin, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the morphology of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained by partial chemical reduction of graphite oxide (OG) as well as its resistance to solvents. Films of graphene/graphene oxide are great candidates for replacement of indium oxide doped with tin (ITO) in photoelectric devices. The OG was obtained from natural graphite, by Hummer's method modified, and its reduction is made by using sodium borohydride. Infrared spectroscopy analysis of Fourier transform (FTIR), Xray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution (SEM/FEG) for the characterization of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained were performed. This film proved to be resilient, not dispersing in any of the various tested solvents (such as ethanol, acetone and THF), even under tip sonication, this resistance being an important property for the applications. Furthermore, the film had a morphology similar to that obtained by other preparation methods.(author)

  2. Chemical reduction of refractory oxides by atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, D.; Balooch, M.; Olander, D.R.

    1978-11-01

    The chemical reduction of UO 2 and Al 2 O 3 by atomic hydrogen was studied. Results of the UO 2 /H investigation indicates that reduction of UO 2 by atomic hydrogen proceeds by the production of water vapor and hypostoichiometric urania. Water vapor and aluminum metal are formed in the Al 2 O 3 /H system. The relative ease which UO 2 is reduced by atomic hydrogen compared with Al 2 O 3 is due to two factors. The first is related to the thermochemistry of the reactions. The second factor which favors efficient reduction of UO 2 but not of Al 2 O 3 is the oxygen diffusivity

  3. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in coffee wastewater through chemical flocculation and advanced oxidation processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZAYAS Pérez Teresa; GEISSLER Gunther; HERNANDEZ Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The removal of the natural organic matter present in coffee processing wastewater through chemical coagulation-flocculatio and advanced oxidation processes(AOP)had been studied.The effectiveness of the removal of natural organic matter using commercial flocculants and UV/H202,UVO3 and UV/H-H202/O3 processes was determined under acidic conditions.For each of these processes,different operational conditions were explored to optimize the treatment efficiency of the coffee wastewater.Coffee wastewater is characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand(COD)and low total suspended solids.The outcomes of coffee wastewater reeatment using coagulation-flocculation and photodegradation processes were assessed in terms of reduction of COD,color,and turbidity.It was found that a reductiOn in COD of 67%could be realized when the coffee wastewater was treated by chemical coagulation-flocculatlon witll lime and coagulant T-1.When coffee wastewater was treated by coagulation-flocculation in combination with UV/H202,a COD reduction of 86%was achieved,although only after prolonged UV irradiation.Of the three advanced oxidation processes considered,UV/H202,uv/03 and UV/H202/03,we found that the treatment with UV/H2O2/O3 was the most effective,with an efficiency of color,turbidity and further COD removal of 87%,when applied to the flocculated coffee wastewater.

  4. Tuning the nonlinear optical absorption of reduced graphene oxide by chemical reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongfei; Wang, Can; Sun, Zhipei; Zhou, Yueliang; Jin, Kuijuan; Redfern, Simon A T; Yang, Guozhen

    2014-08-11

    Reduced graphene oxides with varying degrees of reduction have been produced by hydrazine reduction of graphene oxide. The linear and nonlinear optical properties of both graphene oxide as well as the reduced graphene oxides have been measured by single beam Z-scan measurement in the picosecond region. The results reveal both saturable absorption and two-photon absorption, strongly dependent on the intensity of the pump pulse: saturable absorption occurs at lower pump pulse intensity (~1.5 GW/cm2 saturation intensity) whereas two-photon absorption dominates at higher intensities (≥5.7 GW/cm2). Intriguingly, we find that the two-photon absorption coefficient (from 1.5 cm/GW to 4.5cm/GW) and the saturation intensity (from 1 GW/cm2 to 2 GW/cm2) vary with chemical reduction, which is ascribed to the varying concentrations of sp2 domains and sp2 clusters in the reduced graphene oxides. Our results not only provide an insight into the evolution of the nonlinear optical coefficient in reduced graphene oxide, but also suggest that chemical engineering techniques may usefully be applied to tune the nonlinear optical properties of various nano-materials, including atomically thick graphene sheets.

  5. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza, E-mail: moussavi@modares.ac.ir; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous advanced oxidation and reduction processes were explored in VUV system. • Complete reduction of nitrate to N{sub 2} was achieved at the presence of acetaminophen. • Complete degradation of acetaminophen was achieved at the presence of nitrate. • Over 95% of acetaminophen was mineralized in the VUV photoreactor. • VUV is a chemical-less advanced process for treating water emerging contaminants. - Abstract: This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO· while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N{sub 2} selectivity achieved at HRT of 80 min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80 min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate.

  6. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Simultaneous advanced oxidation and reduction processes were explored in VUV system. • Complete reduction of nitrate to N_2 was achieved at the presence of acetaminophen. • Complete degradation of acetaminophen was achieved at the presence of nitrate. • Over 95% of acetaminophen was mineralized in the VUV photoreactor. • VUV is a chemical-less advanced process for treating water emerging contaminants. - Abstract: This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO· while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N_2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80 min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80 min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate.

  7. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Advanced Chemical Reduction of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Its Photocatalytic Activity in Degrading Reactive Black 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Pau Ping Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Textile industries consume large volumes of water for dye processing, leading to undesirable toxic dyes in water bodies. Dyestuffs are harmful to human health and aquatic life, and such illnesses as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis A, and hinder the photosynthetic activity of aquatic plants. To overcome this environmental problem, the advanced oxidation process is a promising technique to mineralize a wide range of dyes in water systems. In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO was prepared via an advanced chemical reduction route, and its photocatalytic activity was tested by photodegrading Reactive Black 5 (RB5 dye in aqueous solution. rGO was synthesized by dispersing the graphite oxide into the water to form a graphene oxide (GO solution followed by the addition of hydrazine. Graphite oxide was prepared using a modified Hummers’ method by using potassium permanganate and concentrated sulphuric acid. The resulted rGO nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Raman, and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to further investigate their chemical properties. A characteristic peak of rGO-48 h (275 cm−1 was observed in the UV spectrum. Further, the appearance of a broad peak (002, centred at 2θ = 24.1°, in XRD showing that graphene oxide was reduced to rGO. Based on our results, it was found that the resulted rGO-48 h nanoparticles achieved 49% photodecolorization of RB5 under UV irradiation at pH 3 in 60 min. This was attributed to the high and efficient electron transport behaviors of rGO between aromatic regions of rGO and RB5 molecules.

  9. Direct chemical reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium and calcium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squires, Leah N.; Lessing, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A process of direct reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium metal as the reducing agent is discussed. After reduction of the oxide to metal, the metal is separated by density from the other components of the reaction mixture and can be easily removed upon cooling. The direct reduction technique consistently produces high purity (98%–99% pure) neptunium metal.

  10. A rapid room temperature chemical route for the synthesis of graphene: metal-mediated reduction of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ramendra Sundar; Hajra, Saumen; Sahu, Ranjan K; Raj, C Retna; Panigrahi, M K

    2012-02-07

    A rapid and facile route for the synthesis of reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGOs) at room temperature by the chemical reduction of graphene oxide using Zn/acid in aqueous solution is demonstrated. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  11. The Effect of Thickness and Chemical Reduction of Graphene Oxide on Nanoscale Friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sangku; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Hyunsoo; Koh, Sang Joon; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Sang Ouk; Park, Jeong Young

    2018-01-18

    The tribological properties of two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are quite different from three-dimensional continuum materials because of the unique mechanical responses of 2D layers. It is known that friction on graphene shows a remarkable decreasing behavior as the number of layers increases, which is caused by the puckering effect. On other graphene derivatives, such as graphene oxide (GO) or reduced graphene oxide (rGO), the thickness dependence of friction is important because of the possibilities for technical applications. In this report, we demonstrate unexpected layer-dependent friction behavior on GO and rGO layers. Friction force microscopy measurements show that nanoscale friction on GO does not depend on the number of layers; however, after reduction, friction on rGO shows an inverse thickness dependence compared with pristine graphene. We show that the friction on rGO is higher than that on SiO 2 at low load, and that an interesting crossover behavior at higher load occurs because of the lower friction coefficient and higher adhesion of the rGO. We provide a relevant interpretation that explains the effect of thickness and chemical reduction on nanoscale friction.

  12. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via chemical reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Alpana; Rangra, V. S.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Natural flake Graphite was used as the starting material for the graphene synthesis. In the first step flake graphite was treated with oxidizing agents under vigorous conditions to obtain graphite oxide. Layered graphite oxide decorated with oxygen has large inter-layer distance leading easy exfoliation into single sheets by ultrasonication giving graphene oxide. In the last step exfoliated graphene oxide sheets were reduced slowly with the help of reducing agent to obtain fine powder which is labeled as reduced graphene oxide (rGO). This rGO was further characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman Spectroscopy techniques. XRD pattern shows peaks corresponding to (002) graphitic lattice planes indicating the formation of network of sp 2 like carbon structure. SEM images show the ultrathin, wrinkled, paper-like morphology of graphene sheets. IR study shows that the graphite has been oxidized to graphite oxide with the presence of various absorption bands confirming the presence of oxidizing groups. The FTIR spectrum of rGO shows no sharp peaks confirming the efficient reduction of rGO. The Raman spectrum shows disorder in the graphene sheets

  13. Sub-2 nm SnO2 nanocrystals: A reduction/oxidation chemical reaction synthesis and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Du Ning; Chen Bindi; Cui Tianfeng; Yang Deren

    2008-01-01

    A simple reduction/oxidation chemical solution approach at room temperature has been developed to synthesize ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals, in which NaBH 4 is used as a reducing agent instead of mineralizers such as sodium hydroxide, ammonia, and alcohol. The morphology, structure, and optical property of the ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (DSC-TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. It is indicated that the uniform tetragonal ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals with the size below 2 nm have been fabricated at room temperature. The band gap of the ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals is about 4.1 eV, exhibiting 0.5 eV blue shift from that of the bulk SnO 2 (3.6 eV). Furthermore, the mechanism for the reduction/oxidation chemical reaction synthesis of the ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals has been preliminary presented

  14. Multifunctional surface modification of silk fabric via graphene oxide repeatedly coating and chemical reduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiliang; Wang, Chaoxia

    2017-05-01

    Multifunctional silk fabrics with electrical conductive, anti-ultraviolet and water repellent were successfully prepared by surface modification with graphene oxide (GO). The yellow-brown GO deposited on the surface of silk fabric was converted into graphitic black reduced graphene (RGO) by sodium hydrosulfite. The surface properties of silk fabrics were changed by repeatedly RGO coating process, which have been proved by SEM and XPS. The SEM results showed that the RGO sheets were successive form a continuously thin film on the surface of silk fabrics, and the deposition of GO or RGO also can be proved by XPS. The electrical conductivity was tested by electrical surface resistance value of the silk fabric, the surface resistance decreased with increasing of RGO surface modification times, and a low surface resistance value reached to 3.24 KΩ cm-1 after 9 times of modification, indicating the silk obtained excellent conductivity. The UPF value of one time GO modification silk fabric (silk-1RGO) was enhanced significantly to 24.45 in comparison to 10.40 of original silk. The contact angle of RGO coating silk samples was all above of 120°. The durability of RGO coated silk fabrics was tested by laundering. The electrical surface resistance of silk-4RGO (65.74 KΩ cm-1), silk-6RGO (15.54 KΩ cm-1) and silk-8RGO (3.86 KΩ cm-1) fabrics was up to 86.82, 22.30 and 6.57 KΩ cm-1 after 10 times of standard washing, respectively. The UPF value, contact angle and color differences of RGO modified silk fabric slightly changed before and after 10 times of standard washing. Therefore, the washing fastness of electric conduction, anti-ultraviolet and water repellent multifunctional silk fabrics was excellent.

  15. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  16. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  17. Influence of hydrogen reduction on photoelectro-chemical behavior of anodic oxidized n-TiO2 layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartig, K J; Getoff, N

    1983-07-01

    The behavior of polycrystalline n-TiO2 photoanodes produced by anodic oxidation of Ti metal foils and subsequently reduced in hydrogen atmosphere at various temperatures and different times was investigated. The employed methods for their characterization were: scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thickness determination, open-circuit voltage and capacitance/voltage studies as well as photoelectrochemical measurements. The reduction process results in an increase of oxygen deficiencies and a decrease of the amount of recombination centers and of grain-boundary energy barriers between the crystallites. All these parameters lead to a significant increase of the photoefficiency. The best photoanodes were obtained when the anodically oxidized samples were reduced under hydrogen at 800-850 C for 15 min (conversion of anatase to rutile crystal structures). 17 references.

  18. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Malpica Galassi, Riccardo

    2017-03-06

    A general strategy for analysis and reduction of uncertain chemical kinetic models is presented, and its utility is illustrated in the context of ignition of hydrocarbon fuel–air mixtures. The strategy is based on a deterministic analysis and reduction method which employs computational singular perturbation analysis to generate simplified kinetic mechanisms, starting from a detailed reference mechanism. We model uncertain quantities in the reference mechanism, namely the Arrhenius rate parameters, as random variables with prescribed uncertainty factors. We propagate this uncertainty to obtain the probability of inclusion of each reaction in the simplified mechanism. We propose probabilistic error measures to compare predictions from the uncertain reference and simplified models, based on the comparison of the uncertain dynamics of the state variables, where the mixture entropy is chosen as progress variable. We employ the construction for the simplification of an uncertain mechanism in an n-butane–air mixture homogeneous ignition case, where a 176-species, 1111-reactions detailed kinetic model for the oxidation of n-butane is used with uncertainty factors assigned to each Arrhenius rate pre-exponential coefficient. This illustration is employed to highlight the utility of the construction, and the performance of a family of simplified models produced depending on chosen thresholds on importance and marginal probabilities of the reactions.

  19. Reduction of blue tungsten oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilken, T.; Wert, C.; Woodhouse, J.; Morcom, W.

    1975-01-01

    A significant portion of commercial tungsten is produced by hydrogen reduction of oxides. Although several modes of reduction are possible, hydrogen reduction is used where high purity tungsten is required and where the addition of other elements or compounds is desired for modification of the metal, as is done for filaments in the lamp industry. Although several investigations of the reduction of oxides have been reported (1 to 5), few principles have been developed which can aid in assessment of current commercial practice. The reduction process was examined under conditions approximating commercial practice. The specific objectives were to determine the effects of dopants, of water vapor in the reducing atmosphere, and of reduction temperature upon: (1) the rate of the reaction by which blue tungsten oxide is reduced to tungsten metal, (2) the intermediate oxides associated with reduction, and (3) the morphology of the resulting tungsten powder

  20. Study of film graphene/graphene oxide obtained by partial reduction chemical of oxide graphite; Estudo de filme de grafeno/oxido de grafeno obtido por reducao quimica parcial do oxido de grafite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascho, J.L.S.; Costa, S.F.; Hoepfner, J.C.; Pezzin, S.H., E-mail: juliagascho@hotmail.com [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the morphology of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained by partial chemical reduction of graphite oxide (OG) as well as its resistance to solvents. Films of graphene/graphene oxide are great candidates for replacement of indium oxide doped with tin (ITO) in photoelectric devices. The OG was obtained from natural graphite, by Hummer's method modified, and its reduction is made by using sodium borohydride. Infrared spectroscopy analysis of Fourier transform (FTIR), Xray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution (SEM/FEG) for the characterization of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained were performed. This film proved to be resilient, not dispersing in any of the various tested solvents (such as ethanol, acetone and THF), even under tip sonication, this resistance being an important property for the applications. Furthermore, the film had a morphology similar to that obtained by other preparation methods.(author)

  1. On the Theory of Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Involving Electron Transfer. V. Comparison and Properties of Electrochemical and Chemical Rate Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1962-01-01

    Using a theory of electron transfers which takes cognizance of reorganization of the medium outside the inner coordination shell and of changes of bond lengths inside it, relations between electrochemical and related chemical rate constants are deduced and compared with the experimental data. A correlation is found, without the use of arbitrary parameters. Effects of weak complexes with added electrolytes are included under specified conditions. The deductions offer a way of coordinating a variety of data in the two fields, internally as well as with each those in another. For example, the rate of oxidation or reduction of a series of related reactants by one reagent is correlated with that of another and with that of the corresponding electrochemical oxidation-reduction reaction, under certain specified conditions. These correlations may also provide a test for distinguishing an electron from an atom transfer mechanism. (auth)

  2. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Malpica Galassi, Riccardo; Valorani, Mauro; Najm, Habib N.; Safta, Cosmin; Khalil, Mohammad; Ciottoli, Pietro P.

    2017-01-01

    A general strategy for analysis and reduction of uncertain chemical kinetic models is presented, and its utility is illustrated in the context of ignition of hydrocarbon fuel–air mixtures. The strategy is based on a deterministic analysis

  3. Green reduction of graphene oxide using alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiabin; Salihi, Elif Caliskan; Šiller, Lidija

    2017-01-01

    There remains a real need for the easy, eco-friendly and scalable preparation method of graphene due to various potential applications. Chemical reduction is the most versatile method for the large scale production of graphene. Here we report the operating conditions for a one-step, economical and green synthesis method for the reduction of graphene oxide using a biomolecule (alanine). Graphene oxide was produced by the oxidation and exfoliation of natural graphite flake with strong oxidants using Hummers method (Hummers and Offeman, 1958), but the method was revised in our laboratory to set up a safe and environmentally friendly route. The reduction of graphene oxide was investigated using alanine at various operating conditions in order to set up optimum conditions (treatment time, temperature and concentration of the reagent). Samples have been characterized by using UV–Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. - Highlights: • An environmentally friendly route was reported for the chemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO). • Alanine could reduce GO to rGO (reduced graphene oxide) without using any stabilizer or alcaline medium. • Characterization studies confirmed the successful deoxygenation of GO.

  4. Green reduction of graphene oxide using alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiabin [Newcastle University, School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Salihi, Elif Caliskan, E-mail: caliskanelif@gmail.com [Newcastle University, School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Marmara University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, 34668 Istanbul (Turkey); Šiller, Lidija [Newcastle University, School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-01

    There remains a real need for the easy, eco-friendly and scalable preparation method of graphene due to various potential applications. Chemical reduction is the most versatile method for the large scale production of graphene. Here we report the operating conditions for a one-step, economical and green synthesis method for the reduction of graphene oxide using a biomolecule (alanine). Graphene oxide was produced by the oxidation and exfoliation of natural graphite flake with strong oxidants using Hummers method (Hummers and Offeman, 1958), but the method was revised in our laboratory to set up a safe and environmentally friendly route. The reduction of graphene oxide was investigated using alanine at various operating conditions in order to set up optimum conditions (treatment time, temperature and concentration of the reagent). Samples have been characterized by using UV–Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. - Highlights: • An environmentally friendly route was reported for the chemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO). • Alanine could reduce GO to rGO (reduced graphene oxide) without using any stabilizer or alcaline medium. • Characterization studies confirmed the successful deoxygenation of GO.

  5. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Najm, Habib; Galassi, R. Malpica; Valorani, M.

    2016-01-01

    We outline a strategy for chemical kinetic model reduction under uncertainty. We present highlights of our existing deterministic model reduction strategy, and describe the extension of the formulation to include parametric uncertainty in the detailed mechanism. We discuss the utility of this construction, as applied to hydrocarbon fuel-air kinetics, and the associated use of uncertainty-aware measures of error between predictions from detailed and simplified models.

  6. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Najm, Habib

    2016-01-05

    We outline a strategy for chemical kinetic model reduction under uncertainty. We present highlights of our existing deterministic model reduction strategy, and describe the extension of the formulation to include parametric uncertainty in the detailed mechanism. We discuss the utility of this construction, as applied to hydrocarbon fuel-air kinetics, and the associated use of uncertainty-aware measures of error between predictions from detailed and simplified models.

  7. Effect of high-temperature treatment on Fe/ZSM-5 prepared by chemical vapor deposition of FeCl3. II. Nitrous oxide decomposition, selective oxidation of benzene to phenol, and selective reduction of nitric oxide by isobutane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Q.; Teeffelen, van R.M.; Santen, van R.A.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic performance (nitrous oxide decomposition, hydroxylation of benzene to phenol with nitrous oxide, and selective reduction of nitric oxide by i-butane) was evaluated for a set of HZSM-5 and sublimed Fe/ZSM-5 catalysts, which have been extensively characterized in an earlier contribution

  8. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos; Mackey, Paul; Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction methods are expensive, time-consuming or restricted to small, limited formats. Graphene has potential uses in ultracapacitors, energy storage, solar cells, flexible and light-weight circuits, touch screens, and chemical sensors. In addition, graphite oxide is a sustainable material that can be produced from any form of carbon, making this method environmentally friendly and adaptable for in-situ reduction.

  9. Oxidation and Reduction of Iron-Titanium Oxides in Chemical Looping Combustion: A Phase-Chemical Description Oxydation et réduction des minerais de fer-titane dans la combustion en boucle chimique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    den Hoed P.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Ilmenite (FeTiO3 is being explored as an oxygen carrier in chemical looping processes. Its reduction and oxidation are described by the system Fe-Fe2O3-TiO2-Ti2O3. The phase diagram at 1 000°C, presented here, offers a useful tool for predicting reactions and their products. We see that Fe2TiO5 (pseudobrookite and TiO2 (rutile form a stable phase assemblage following the oxidation of FeTiO3 (ilmenite in air. The subsequent reduction of Fe2TiO5 at oxygen partial pressures of 10-15.5atm stabilizes Fe1.02Ti0.98O3, a solid solution of ilmenite. Further reduction will produce metallic iron, which compromises the integrity of the oxygen carrier for chemical looping processes. We speculate that the reduction of Fe-Ti oxides in several practical instances does not reach completion (and equilibrium under the imposed atmospheres operating in fuel reactors. L’ilménite (FeTiO3 est considéré comme un transporteur d’oxygène potentiel pour les procédés en boucle chimique. Ses mécanismes de réduction et d’oxydation sont décrits à travers le système Fe-Fe2O3-TiO2-TiO3. Le diagramme de phase à 1 000°C, présenté ici, est un outil utile pour prédire les réactions et les produits. Nous constatons que Fe2TiO5 (pseudobrookite et TiO2 (rutile forment un assemblage de phase stable après oxydation de l’ilménite (FeTiO3 dans l’air. La réduction subséquente de Fe2TiO5 à la pression partielle de 10−15,5atm stabilise vers Fe1.02Ti0.98O3, une solution solide d’ilménite. Une réduction plus poussée va produire du fer métallique et compromettre l’intégrité du transporteur d’oxygène dans la boucle chimique. Il est probable que la réduction des oxydes Fe-Ti ne soit pas, en pratique, complète et n’atteigne pas l’équilibre dans les conditions rencontrées en opération dans les réacteurs de réduction.

  10. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, Basudev, E-mail: swain@iae.re.kr [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Yongin, 449-863 (Korea, Republic of); Mishra, Chinmayee [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Yongin, 449-863 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hyun Seon [Sungshin University, Dept. of Interdisciplinary ECO Science, Seoul, 142-732 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Soo [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Yongin, 449-863 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11 kg/m{sup 3} of copper and 1.35 kg/m{sup 3} of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100–500 nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. - Highlights: • From the Indium-Tin-Oxide etching

  11. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11 kg/m 3 of copper and 1.35 kg/m 3 of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100–500 nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. - Highlights: • From the Indium-Tin-Oxide etching wastewater

  12. Photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2 into chemicals using Pt-modified reduced graphene oxide combined with Pt-modified TiO2 nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Meng; Wu, Gai; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2014-06-17

    The photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) reduction of CO2 into high-value chemicals is beneficial in alleviating global warming and advancing a low-carbon economy. In this work, Pt-modified reduced graphene oxide (Pt-RGO) and Pt-modified TiO2 nanotubes (Pt-TNT) were combined as cathode and photoanode catalysts, respectively, to form a PEC reactor for converting CO2 into valuable chemicals. XRD, XPS, TEM, AFM, and SEM were employed to characterize the microstructures of the Pt-RGO and Pt-TNT catalysts. Reduction products, such as C2H5OH and CH3COOH, were obtained from CO2 under band gap illumination and biased voltage. A combined liquid product generation rate (CH3OH, C2H5OH, HCOOH, and CH3COOH) of approximately 600 nmol/(h·cm(2)) was observed. Carbon atom conversion rate reached 1,130 nmol/(h·cm(2)), which were much higher than those achieved using Pt-modified carbon nanotubes and platinum carbon as cathode catalysts.

  13. Role reductants in dilute chemical decontamination formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganathan, S. [Univ. of New Brunswick (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Srinivasan, M.P.; Narasimhan, S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay, Mumbai (India). Water and Steam Chemistry Lab.; Raghavan, P.S. [Madras Christian Coll., Chennai (India); Gopalan, R. [Madras Christian Coll., Chennai (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2004-10-01

    Iron(III) oxides are the major corrosion products formed in boiling water reactors. The iron(III) oxides are of two types, namely hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and maghemite ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The dissolution of these oxides is in no way simple because of the labile nature of the Fe(III)-O bond towards the chelants. The leaching of metal ions is partially controlled by reductive dissolution. In order to understand the role of the reductant, it is essential to study the dissolution behaviour of a system like Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which does not contain any Fe{sup 2+} in the crystal lattice. The present study was carried out with {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and dilute chemical decontamination (DCD) formulations containing ascorbic acid and citric acid with the addition of Fe(II)-L as a reductant. The chelants used for the dissolution process were nitrilotriacetic acid, 2,6-pyridinedicorboxylic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was chosen since the earlier studies revealed that the dissolution kinetics of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is slow and it is difficult to dissolve even by strong complexing agents, whereas {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} dissolution is comparatively easier. This is due to the structural difference between these two oxides. The studies also revealed that the dissolution was partly influenced by the nature of the chelating agents but mainly controlled by the power of the reductants used in the formulation. The dissolution behaviour of {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} under various experimental conditions is discussed and compared with that of magnetite in order to arrive at a suitable mechanism for the dissolution of iron oxides and emphasize the role of reductants in DCD formulations. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of the reduction methods used to develop chemical schemes: building of a new chemical scheme for VOC oxidation suited to three-dimensional multiscale HOx-NOx-VOC chemistry simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Szopa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to develop and assess an automatic procedure to generate reduced chemical schemes for the atmospheric photooxidation of volatile organic carbon (VOC compounds. The procedure is based on (i the development of a tool for writing the fully explicit schemes for VOC oxidation (see companion paper Aumont et al., 2005, (ii the application of several commonly used reduction methods to the fully explicit scheme, and (iii the assessment of resulting errors based on direct comparison between the reduced and full schemes. The reference scheme included seventy emitted VOCs chosen to be representative of both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and their atmospheric degradation chemistry required more than two million reactions among 350000 species. Three methods were applied to reduce the size of the reference chemical scheme: (i use of operators, based on the redundancy of the reaction sequences involved in the VOC oxidation, (ii grouping of primary species having similar reactivities into surrogate species and (iii grouping of some secondary products into surrogate species. The number of species in the final reduced scheme is 147, this being small enough for practical inclusion in current three-dimensional models. Comparisons between the fully explicit and reduced schemes, carried out with a box model for several typical tropospheric conditions, showed that the reduced chemical scheme accurately predicts ozone concentrations and some other aspects of oxidant chemistry for both polluted and clean tropospheric conditions.

  15. Green reduction of graphene oxide using alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiabin; Salihi, Elif Caliskan; Šiller, Lidija

    2017-03-01

    There remains a real need for the easy, eco-friendly and scalable preparation method of graphene due to various potential applications. Chemical reduction is the most versatile method for the large scale production of graphene. Here we report the operating conditions for a one-step, economical and green synthesis method for the reduction of graphene oxide using a biomolecule (alanine). Graphene oxide was produced by the oxidation and exfoliation of natural graphite flake with strong oxidants using Hummers method (Hummers and Offeman, 1958), but the method was revised in our laboratory to set up a safe and environmentally friendly route. The reduction of graphene oxide was investigated using alanine at various operating conditions in order to set up optimum conditions (treatment time, temperature and concentration of the reagent). Samples have been characterized by using UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrochemical reduction of cerium oxide into metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claux, Benoit [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Universite de Grenoble, LEPMI-ENSEEG, 1130 rue de la Piscine, BP75, F-38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Serp, Jerome, E-mail: jerome.serp@cea.f [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Fouletier, Jacques [Universite de Grenoble, LEPMI-ENSEEG, 1130 rue de la Piscine, BP75, F-38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)

    2011-02-28

    The Fray Farthing and Chen (FFC) and Ono and Suzuki (OS) processes were developed for the reduction of titanium oxide to titanium metal by electrolysis in high temperature molten alkali chloride salts. The possible transposition to CeO{sub 2} reduction is considered in this study. Present work clarifies, by electro-analytical techniques, the reduction pathway leading to the metal. The reduction of CeO{sub 2} into metal was feasible via an indirect mechanism. Electrolyses on 10 g of CeO{sub 2} were carried out to evaluate the electrochemical process efficiency. Ca metal is electrodeposited at the cathode from CaCl{sub 2}-KCl solvent and reacts chemically with ceria to form not only metallic cerium, but also cerium oxychloride.

  17. Chemical Reduction Synthesis of Iron Aluminum Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Méndez, N. N.; la Torre, G. Carbajal-De; Ballesteros-Almanza, L.; Villagómez-Galindo, M.; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Espinosa-Medina, M. A.

    In this study, a chemical reduction synthesis method of iron aluminum (FeAl) nano-dimensional intermetallic powders is described. The process has two stages: a salt reduction and solvent evaporation by a heat treatment at 1100°C. The precursors of the synthesis are ferric chloride, aluminum foil chips, a mix of Toluene/THF in a 75/25 volume relationship, and concentrated hydrochloric acid as initiator of the reaction. The reaction time was 20 days, the product obtained was dried at 60 °C for 2 h and calcined at 400, 800, and 1100 °C for 4 h each. To characterize and confirm the obtained synthesis products, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques were used. The results of morphology and chemical characterization of nano-dimensional powders obtained showed a formation of agglomerated particles of a size range of approximately 150 nm to 1.0 μm. Composition of powders was identified as corundum (Al2O3), iron aluminide (FeAl3), and iron-aluminum oxides (Fe0. 53Al0. 47)2O3 phases. The oxide phases formation were associated with the reaction of atmospheric concentration-free oxygen during synthesis and sintering steps, reducing the concentration of the iron aluminum phase.

  18. Effect of the Lithium Oxide Concentration on a Reduction of Lanthanide Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In-Kyu; Jeong, Myeong-Soo; Do, Jae-Bum; Seo, Chung-Seok

    2007-01-01

    The pyrochemical reduction process of spent oxide fuel is one of the options to handle spent PWR fuels in Korea. After spent oxide fuel is converted to a metallic form, fission products will be removed from the resultant uranium and higher actinide metals by an electrorefining process. The chemical behaviors of lanthanide oxides during the pyrochemical process has been extensively studied. It was also reported that about 30 to 50% of several lanthanide oxides were reduced to corresponding metals by an electrolytic reduction process having 1 wt% of a lithium oxide concentration. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), however, has been used 3 wt% of lithium oxide to increase the applied current of the electrolytic reduction process. Though it was reported that U 3 O 8 was reduced to uranium metal having a high reduction yield at 3 wt% of the Li 2 O concentration, the effect of the lithium oxide concentration on the reduction of lanthanide oxides has not been clarified

  19. Reduction of graphene oxide and its effect on square resistance of reduced graphene oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Yin; Li, Guang Bin; Wang, Shaohong; Wang, Mei Han; Hu, Xiaodan; Li, Siming [Liaoning Province Key Laboratory of New Functional Materials and Chemical Technology, School ofMechanical Engineering, Shenyang University, Shenyang (China)

    2015-06-15

    Graphite oxide was prepared via the modified Hummers’ method and graphene via chemical reduction. Deoxygenation efficiency of graphene oxide was compared among single reductants including sodium borohydride, hydrohalic acids, hydrazine hydrate, and vitamin C. Two-step reduction of graphene oxide was primarily studied. The reduced graphene oxide was characterized by XRD, TG, SEM, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy. Square resistance was measured as well. Results showed that films with single-step N2H4 reduction have the best transmittance and electrical conductivity with square resistance of ~5746 Ω/sq at 70% transmittance. This provided an experimental basis of using graphene for electronic device applications.

  20. Chemical oxidizers treat wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    Based on the inherent benefits of these original oxidation systems, a second generation of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) has emerged. These processes combine key features of the first generation technologies with more sophisticated advances in UV technology, such as the new pulsed plasma xenon flash lamp that emits high-energy, high-intensity UV light. Second generation systems can be equipped with a transmittance controller to prevent lamp fouling or scaling. The coupling of the first generation's technology with the new UV sources provides the rapid destruction of chlorinated and nonchlorinated hydrocarbons and humic acids from contaminated water. It also is effective in the treatment of organic laden gases from soil vapor extraction systems. AOPs may promote the oxidation (and subsequent removal) of heavy metals in water, though few data are available to verify the claim. The success of AOPs, including ozonation with UV light, hydrogen peroxide with UV light and advanced photolysis, is linked with their creation of hydroxyl-free radicals (OH·) that are effective in eliminating contaminants such as formaldehyde, chlorinated hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. Hydroxyl free-radicals are consumed in microsecond reactions and exhibit little substrate selectivity with the exception of halogenated alkanes such as chloroform. They can act as chain carriers. Given their power, hydroxyl free-radicals react with virtually all organic solutes more quickly (especially in water) than any other oxidants, except fluorine. There are projects that have found the combination of some AOPs to be the most efficient organic destruction techniques for the job. For example, one project successfully remediated groundwater contaminated with gasoline and Number 2 diesel through successive treatments of ozone and hydrogen peroxide with ultraviolet light, followed by granular activated carbon. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  1. In-Situ Chemical Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    wells at a bioremediation field site (Weisner et al., 1996). Colloidal clay particles mobilized during injec- tion have resulted in permeability losses...phase material. Nevertheless, O3 was readily delivered and transported through unsaturated porous media where phenanthrene and diesel range...tion, but is not currently a well-developed technology. Bioremediation : Sequencing oxidation and reduction reactions may be achieved through

  2. Electrochemical, Chemical and Enzymatic Oxidations of Phenothiazines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankert, B.; Hayen, H.; van Leeuwen, S.M.; Karst, U.; Bodoki, E.; Lotrean, S.; Sandulescu, R.; Mora Diaz, N.; Dominguez, O.; Arcos, J.; Kauffmann, J.-M.

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation of several phenothiazine drugs (phenothiazine, promethazine hydrochloride, promazine hydrochloride, trimeprazine hydrochloride and ethopropazine hydrochloride) has been carried out in aqueous acidic media by electrochemical, chemical and enzymatic methods. The chemical oxidation was

  3. [Small scale direct oxide reduction (DOR) experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Objectives were to provide process design information to the Plutonium Recovery Project and to produce DOR (direct oxide reduction) product which meets Foundry purity specifications and Oh-0 Foundry specifications

  4. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction...

  5. Investigation of the Reduction of Graphene Oxide by Lithium Triethylborohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyuan Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical reduction of a wet colloidal suspension of graphene oxide is a cost-effective and adaptable method for large scale production of “quasi” graphene for a wide variety of optoelectronic applications. In this study, modified Hummers’ procedure was used to synthesize high quality graphene oxide at 50°C. This modified protocol thus eliminates the potentially hazardous second high-temperature step in Hummers’ method for the production of GO. Furthermore, the reduction of graphene oxide by lithium triethylborohydride is demonstrated for the first time. According to FT-IR, UV-Vis, TGA, Raman, SEM/EDS, and AFM results, the reduced graphene oxide (LiEt3BH-RGO has properties comparable to other reduced graphene oxide products reported in the literature.

  6. Green reduction of graphene oxide by ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosroshahi, Zahra; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Allafchian, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    Graphene, a single layer of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms in a hexagonal (two-dimensional honey-comb) lattice, has attracted strong scientific and technological interest due to its novel and excellent optical, chemical, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. The solution-processable chemical reduction of Graphene oxide (GO is considered as the most favorable method regarding mass production of graphene. Generally, the reduction of GO is carried out by chemical approaches using different reductants such as hydrazine and sodium borohydride. These components are corrosive, combustible and highly toxic which may be dangerous for personnel health and the environment. Hence, these reducing agents are not promising choice for reducing of graphene oxide (GO). As a consequence, it is necessary for further development and optimization of eco-friendly, natural reducing agent for clean and effective reduction of GO. Ascorbic acid, an eco-friendly and natural reducing agents, having a mild reductive ability and nontoxic property. So, the aim of this research was to green synthesis of GO with ascorbic acid. For this purpose, the required amount of NaOH and ascorbic acid were added to GO solution (0.5 mg/ml) and were heated at 95 °C for 1 hour. According to the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electrochemical results, GO were reduced with ascorbic acid like hydrazine with better electrochemical properties and ascorbic acid is an ideal substitute for hydrazine in the reduction of graphene oxide process.

  7. Electrochemical reduction of actinides oxides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claux, B.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive metals are currently produced from their oxide by multiple steps reduction techniques. A one step route from the oxide to the metal has been suggested for metallic titanium production by electrolysis in high temperature molten chloride salts. In the so-called FFC process, titanium oxide is electrochemically reduced at the cathode, generating O 2- ions, which are converted on a graphite anode into carbon oxide or dioxide. After this process, the spent salt can in principle be reused for several batches which is particularly attractive for a nuclear application in terms of waste minimization. In this work, the electrochemical reduction process of cerium oxide (IV) is studied in CaCl 2 and CaCl 2 -KCl melts to understand the oxide reduction mechanism. Cerium is used as a chemical analogue of actinides. Electrolysis on 10 grams of cerium oxide are made to find optimal conditions for the conversion of actinides oxides into metals. The scale-up to hundred grams of oxide is also discussed. (author) [fr

  8. Mechanisms of electrochemical reduction and oxidation of nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vooys, de A.C.A.; Beltramo, G.L.; Riet, van B.; Veen, van J.A.R.; Koper, M.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    A summary is given of recent work on the reactivity of nitric oxide on various metal electrodes. The significant differences between the reactivity of adsorbed NO and NO in solution are pointed out, both for the reduction and the oxidation reaction(s). Whereas adsorbed NO can be reduced only to

  9. Graphene oxide reduction by microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, Angela; Carotenuto, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to prepare thermal reduced graphene oxide (Tr-GO) colloidal suspensions by microwave heating of graphene oxide (GO) suspensions in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) has been investigated. According to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and absorption and emission spectroscopy characterization, such a type of thermal reduction does not lead to graphene quantum dots formation because only mono-functional oxygen-containing groups are removed.

  10. Graphene oxide reduction by microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longo, Angela; Carotenuto, Gianfranco [Institute for Polymers, Composites, and Biomaterials, National Research Council, Piazzale Enrico Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2016-05-18

    The possibility to prepare thermal reduced graphene oxide (Tr-GO) colloidal suspensions by microwave heating of graphene oxide (GO) suspensions in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) has been investigated. According to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and absorption and emission spectroscopy characterization, such a type of thermal reduction does not lead to graphene quantum dots formation because only mono-functional oxygen-containing groups are removed.

  11. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  12. Oxidative stress in chemical toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappus, H.

    1986-05-01

    The toxic effect of compounds which undergo redox cycling enzymatic one-electron reduction are reviewed. First of all, the enzymatic reduction of these compounds leads to reactive intermediates, mainly radicals which react with oxygen, whereby superoxide anion radicals are formed. Further oxygen metabolites are hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals. The role of these oxygen metabolites in toxicity is discussed. The occurrence of lipid peroxidation during redox cycling of quinonoide compounds, e.g., adriamycin, and the possible relationship to their toxicity is critically evaluated. It is shown that iron ions play a crucial role in lipid peroxidation induced by redox cycling compounds. DNA damage by metal chelates, e.g., bleomycin, is discussed on the basis of findings that enzymatic redox cycling of a bleomycin-iron complex has been observed. The involvement of hydroxyl radicals in bleomycin-induced DNA damage occurring during redox cycling in cell nuclei is claimed. Redox cycling of other substances, e.g., aromatic amines, is discussed in relation to carcinogenesis. Other chemical groups, e.g., nitroaromatic compounds, hydroxylamines and azo compounds are included. Other targets for oxygen radical attack, e.g., proteins, are also dealt with. It is concluded that oxygen radical formation by redox cycling may be a critical event in toxic effects of several compounds if the protective mechanisms of cells are overwhelmed.

  13. Electrochemical reduction of cerium oxides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claux, B.; Serp, J.; Fouletier, J.

    2011-01-01

    This brief article describes a pyrochemical process that is used by CEA to turn actinide oxides into metal actinides. This process is applied to Cerium oxides (CeO 2 ) that simulate actinide oxides well chemically as cerium belongs to the lanthanide family. The process is in fact an electrolysis of cerium oxide in a bath of molten calcium chloride salt whose temperature is between 800 and 900 Celsius degrees. At those temperatures calcium chloride becomes a ionic liquid (Ca 2+ and Cl - ) that is a good electrical conductor and is particularly well-adapted as solvent to an electrolytic process. The electrolysis current allows the transformation of solvent Ca 2+ ions into metal calcium which, in turn, can reduce cerium oxide into metal cerium through chromatically. Experimental data shows the reduction of up to 90% of 10 g samples of CeO 2 in a 6 hour long electrolysis while the best reduction rate ever known was 80% so far. This result is all the more promising that cerium oxides are more difficult to reduce than actinide oxides from the thermodynamical perspective

  14. Use of ion conductors in the pyrochemical reduction of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.E.; Tomczuk, Z.

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical process and electrochemical cell for reducing a metal oxide are provided. First the oxide is separated as oxygen gas using, for example, a ZrO 2 oxygen ion conductor anode and the metal ions from the reduction salt are reduced and deposited on an ion conductor cathode, for example, sodium ion reduced on a β-alumina sodium ion conductor cathode. The generation of and separation of oxygen gas avoids the problem with chemical back reaction of oxygen with active metals in the cell. The method also is characterized by a sequence of two steps where an inert cathode electrode is inserted into the electrochemical cell in the second step and the metallic component in the ion conductor is then used as the anode to cause electrochemical reduction of the metal ions formed in the first step from the metal oxide where oxygen gas formed at the anode. The use of ion conductors serves to isolate the active components from chemically reacting with certain chemicals in the cell. While applicable to a variety of metal oxides, the invention has special importance for reducing CaO to Ca o used for reducing UO 2 and PuO 2 to U and Pu. 2 figures

  15. On chemical activity of heavy metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechev, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Interaction of solid oxides of heavy nonferrous metals with sulfur and carbon is investigated. The results are discussed. Direct dependence of chemical activity of oxides on disordering of their crystal lattice at heating is established. Beginning of interaction in the systems studied is accompanied by change of oxide conductivity type

  16. Characterization and study of reduction and sulfurization processing in phase transition from molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 2}) to molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) chalcogenide semiconductor nanoparticles prepared by one-stage chemical reduction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shomalian, K.; Bagheri-Mohagheghi, M.M.; Ardyanian, M. [Damghan University, School of Physics, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    In this research, molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction method using MoO{sub 3} and thiourea as a precursor. The physical properties of the synthesized MoO{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles annealed at different temperatures of 200, 300, 750 C have been investigated, before and after exposure to sulfur vapor. The nanostructure of nanoparticles has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) analyses and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of MoS{sub 2} single phase at annealing temperature of 750 C in the presence of sulfur vapor. The Raman spectrum of the nanoparticles revealed that the formation of MoS{sub 2} at 750 C after annealing in sulfur vapor. The values of band gap were obtained in the range of 3.64-3.17 eV and 3.47-1.95 eV for MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles before and after exposure to sulfur vapor, respectively. According to SEM images, the grain size decreases with increasing annealing temperature up to 750 C. Also, nanoplate-nanoparticles of MoS{sub 2} are formed at annealing temperature of 200-750 C. The TEM images of MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles at T{sub a} = 750 C confirm that the nanoparticles have a homogeneous distribution with a hexagonal structure. The FTIR spectra of the MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles showed the peaks at about 467 cm {sup -1} belong to the characteristic bands of Mo-S. (orig.)

  17. Green reduction of graphene oxide via Lycium barbarum extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Dandan, E-mail: houdandan114@163.com; Liu, Qinfu, E-mail: lqf@cumtb.edu.cn; Cheng, Hongfei, E-mail: h.cheng@cumtb.edu.cn; Zhang, Hao, E-mail: 1073261516@qq.com; Wang, Sen, E-mail: wscumtb@163.com

    2017-02-15

    The synthesis of graphene from graphene oxide (GO) usually involves toxic reducing agents that are harmful to human health and the environment. Here, we report a facile approach for effective reduction of GO, for the first time, using Lycium barbarum extract as a green and natural reducing agent. The morphology and de-oxidation efficiency of the reduced graphene were characterized and results showed that Lycium barbarum extract can effectively reduce GO into few layered graphene with a high carbon to oxygen ratio (6.5), comparable to that of GO reduced by hydrazine hydrate (6.6). The possible reduction mechanism of GO may be due to the active components existing in Lycium barbarum fruits, which have high binding affinity to the oxygen containing groups to form their corresponding oxides and other by-products. This method avoided the use of any nocuous chemicals, thus facilitating the mass production of graphene and graphene-based bio-materials. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the preparation of reduced graphene by Lycium barbarum extract. - Highlights: • The Lycium barbarum extract was used for the reduction of graphene oxide. • The obtained few layered graphene exhibited high carbon to oxygen ratio. • This approach can be applied in the preparation of graphene-based bio-materials.

  18. CoPt nanoparticles by chemical reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.L.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, Y.; Zeng, Q.; Hadjipanayis, G.C.

    2004-01-01

    CoPt nanoparticles with a size of 1-2 nm were synthesized by chemical reduction using the solvents of water and alcohol. A phase transformation from the originally disordered face centered cubic (FCC) structure to an ordered face centered tetragonal L1 0 structure occurred after annealing, which results in the coercivity up to 9 kOe because of the high anisotropy of the tetragonal phase (K∼2-4x10 7 erg/cm 3 ) (Philos. Mag. 13 (1966) 567; IEEE Trans. Magn. 20 (1984) 1625). HREM images of as-grow Co 48 Pt 52 shows the single-crystalline FCC structure with the shape of columnar and spherical

  19. Effects of Borax on the Reduction of Pre-oxidized Panzhihua Ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yufeng; Zheng, Fuqiang; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Feng; Wang, Shuai; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2018-01-01

    The effects of borax (sodium borate) on the enhancement reduction of pre-oxidized Panzhihua ilmenite were investigated. The effects of borax on the mineral phase transformation, microstructures, crystal cell parameter, melting point and Mg distribution were studied to reveal the mechanism of enhancement reduction. Under the constant reduction conditions, the borax could reduce the reduction activation energy of pre-oxidized ilmenite. The reduction kinetics analysis indicated that the reduction rate was controlled by interfacial chemical reaction. The reduction activation energy of the pre-oxidized ilmenite with 4% borax was 80.263 kJ/mol, which was 28.585 kJ/mol less than that of the pre-oxidized ilmenite without borax. Borax could eliminate the migration of Mg into the reduced particle center. The crystal cell parameter of the reduced product was increased by adding borax. Borax could improve the growth of dendritic crystals in the pre-oxidized ilmenite.

  20. Nanoscale reduction of graphene oxide thin films and its characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni, M; Giugni, A; Di Fabrizio, E; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Mescola, A; Torre, B

    2015-07-17

    In this paper, we report on a method to reduce thin films of graphene oxide (GO) to a spatial resolution better than 100 nm over several tens of micrometers by means of an electrochemical scanning probe based lithography. In situ tip-current measurements show that an edged drop in electrical resistance characterizes the reduced areas, and that the reduction process is, to a good approximation, proportional to the applied bias between the onset voltage and the saturation thresholds. An atomic force microscope (AFM) quantifies the drop of the surface height for the reduced profile due to the loss of oxygen. Complementarily, lateral force microscopy reveals a homogeneous friction coefficient of the reduced regions that is remarkably lower than that of native graphene oxide, confirming a chemical change in the patterned region. Micro Raman spectroscopy, which provides access to insights into the chemical process, allows one to quantify the restoration and de-oxidation of the graphitic network driven by the electrochemical reduction and to determine characteristic length scales. It also confirms the homogeneity of the process over wide areas. The results shown were obtained from accurate analysis of the shift, intensity and width of Raman peaks for the main vibrational bands of GO and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) mapped over large areas. Concerning multilayered GO thin films obtained by drop-casting we have demonstrated an unprecedented lateral resolution in ambient conditions as well as an improved control, characterization and understanding of the reduction process occurring in GO randomly folded multilayers, useful for large-scale processing of graphene-based material.

  1. Nanoscale reduction of graphene oxide thin films and its characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Lorenzoni, M.

    2015-06-29

    In this paper, we report on a method to reduce thin films of graphene oxide (GO) to a spatial resolution better than 100 nm over several tens of micrometers by means of an electrochemical scanning probe based lithography. In situ tip-current measurements show that an edged drop in electrical resistance characterizes the reduced areas, and that the reduction process is, to a good approximation, proportional to the applied bias between the onset voltage and the saturation thresholds. An atomic force microscope (AFM) quantifies the drop of the surface height for the reduced profile due to the loss of oxygen. Complementarily, lateral force microscopy reveals a homogeneous friction coefficient of the reduced regions that is remarkably lower than that of native graphene oxide, confirming a chemical change in the patterned region. Micro Raman spectroscopy, which provides access to insights into the chemical process, allows one to quantify the restoration and de-oxidation of the graphitic network driven by the electrochemical reduction and to determine characteristic length scales. It also confirms the homogeneity of the process over wide areas. The results shown were obtained from accurate analysis of the shift, intensity and width of Raman peaks for the main vibrational bands of GO and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) mapped over large areas. Concerning multilayered GO thin films obtained by drop-casting we have demonstrated an unprecedented lateral resolution in ambient conditions as well as an improved control, characterization and understanding of the reduction process occurring in GO randomly folded multilayers, useful for large-scale processing of graphene-based material. © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Reduction of chromium oxide from slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Paredes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical work were performed to estimate the effect of slag basicity and amount of reducing agents on the reduction of chromium oxide from the slag which interacted with molten steel at 1,600 °C. The slag system contained CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 and Cr2O3 together with Fe-alloys (Fe-Si and Fe-Si-Mg. The CaF2 and MgO contents in the slags were 10 mass % each; Cr2O3 was 25%. The amount of the ferroalloys ranged from 12.5 to 50 g per 100 g of slag. The (CaO+MgO/SiO2 ratio was held at 1 and 2. The Cr yield was determined using both Fe-alloys as reducing agents. Some estimations were made to determine the theoretical effect of temperature, slag basicity, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, and amount of reducing agents in the slag on the chromium recovery. The FACT (Facility for the Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computational package is used to determine the equilibrium between the slag and molten steel.

    En el presente trabajo se realiza un estudio teórico y experimental para determinar el efecto de la basicidad de la escoria y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducción de óxidos de cromo contenidos en la escoria, la cual está en contacto con acero líquido a 1.600 °C. La escoria se prepara con los reactivos CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 y ferroaleaciones (Fe-Si y Fe-Si-Mg. Los contenidos de CaF2 y MgO en la escoria son de 10 %, cada uno, y el de Cr2O3 es 25 %. La cantidad de la ferroaleación varía de 12,5 a 50 g por cada 100 g de escoria. La relación (CaO+MgO/SiO2 tiene los valores de 1 y 2. Se determina la eficiencia de recuperación de cromo empleando los dos tipos de ferroaleaciones. Se realizaron cálculos para determinar el efecto teórico de la temperatura, la basicidad de la escoria, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducci

  3. Thermal properties of graphite oxide, thermally reduced graphene and chemically reduced graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovský, Ondřej; Sedmidubský, David; Lojka, Michal; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2017-07-01

    We compared thermal behavior and other properties of graphite oxide, thermally reduced graphene and chemically reduced graphene. Graphite was oxidized according to the Hofmann method using potassium chlorate as oxidizing agent in strongly acidic environment. In the next step, the formed graphite oxide was chemically or thermally reduced yielding graphene. The mechanism of thermal reduction was studied using STA-MS. Graphite oxide and both thermally and chemically reduced graphenes were analysed by SEM, EDS, elemental combustion analysis, XPS, Raman spectroscopy, XRD and BET. These findings will help for the large scale production of graphene with appropriate chemical composition.

  4. Catalyst for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Kevin C.

    2010-04-06

    A Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst was prepared by slurry coating ZSM-5 zeolite onto a cordierite monolith, then subliming an iron salt onto the zeolite, calcining the monolith, and then dipping the monolith either into an aqueous solution of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate and then calcining, or by similar treatment with separate solutions of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate. The supported catalyst containing iron, manganese, and cerium showed 80 percent conversion at 113 degrees Celsius of a feed gas containing nitrogen oxides having 4 parts NO to one part NO.sub.2, about one equivalent ammonia, and excess oxygen; conversion improved to 94 percent at 147 degrees Celsius. N.sub.2O was not detected (detection limit: 0.6 percent N.sub.2O).

  5. Processing of effluent salt from the direct oxide reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The production of reactive metals by Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR) process using calcium in a molten calcium salt system generates significant amount of contaminated waste as calcium oxide saturated calcium chloride salt mix with calcium oxide content of up to 15 wt. pct. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated salt mix has been carried out to electrowin calcium, which can be recycled to the DOR reactor along with the calcium chloride salt or may be used in-situ in a combined DOR and electrowinning process. Many reactive metal oxides could thus be reduced in a one-step process without generating a significant amount of waste. The process has been optimized in terms of the calcium solubility, cell temperature, current density and the cell design to maximize the current efficiency. Based on the information available regarding the solubility of calcium in calcium chloride salt in the presence of calcium oxide, and the back reactions occurring in-situ between the electrowon calcium and other components present in the cell, e.g. carbon, oxygen, carbon dioxide and calcium oxide, it is difficult to recover elemental calcium within the system. However, a liquid cathode or a rising cathode has been used in the past to recover calcium. The solubility has also been found to depend on the use of graphite as the anode material as evidenced by the presence of calcium carbonate in the final salt. The rate of recovery for metallic calcium has to be enhanced to levels that overcome the back reactions in a system where quick removal of anodic gases is achieved. Calcium has been detected by the hydrogen evolution technique and the amount of calcia has been determined by titration. A porous ceramic sheath has been used in the cell to prevent the chemical reaction of electrowon calcium to produce oxide or carbonate and to prevent the contamination of salt by the anodic carbon

  6. Chemical Reductive Transformations of Synthetic Organic Compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peyton, Gary

    2001-01-01

    Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) can be used to selectively remove DNT (2,4-dinitrotoluene) from a complex waste stream by adding a precursor compound such as ethanol which forms a reducing radical upon reaction with hydroxyl radical...

  7. Toxic chemicals: risk prevention through use reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Higgins, Thomas E; Sachdev, Jayanti A; Engleman, Stephen A

    2011-01-01

    "Catastrophic events such as the Bhopal, India tragedy and rising incidences of cancer in areas neighboring industrial facilities have heightened concern over the use of toxic chemicals in manufacturing and industry...

  8. Toxic chemicals: risk prevention through use reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Higgins, Thomas E; Sachdev, Jayanti A; Engleman, Stephen A

    2011-01-01

    ... on the actual toxicity of chemicals currently in use, discusses variables that contribute to the relative toxicity of a substance, compares alternate emphases in existing programs for reducing environmental...

  9. Graphene oxide reduction recipes, spectroscopy, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on a group of new materials labeled ""graphene oxides."" It provides a comprehensive overview of graphene oxide-based nanomaterials in terms of their synthesis, structures, properties, and extensive applications in catalysis, separation, filtration, energy storage and conversion. The book also covers emerging research on graphite oxides and the impact of the research on fundamental and applied sciences.

  10. Reduction of Graphene Oxide to Graphene by Using Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamellia Sharin; Irman Abdul Rahman; Ainee Fatimah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to gauge the ability of gamma radiation to induce the reduction of graphene oxide to graphene. Graphene oxide powders were dispersed into a mixture of alcohol and deionized water, and the mixture was then irradiated with a "6"0Co source using a GammaCell 220 Excel irradiator at absorbed doses of 0, 5, 15, 20 and 35 kGy. According to characterization using Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), it can be seen that almost every oxygen-containing functional group has been removed after irradiation of the graphene oxide mixture. Reduction of graphene oxide was also proven from the characterization using UV-Vis Spectroscopy, in which the wavelength of graphene oxide at 237 nm was red-shifted to 277 nm after being irradiated and the peak at 292 nm, (indicating the carboxyl group) disappears in the UV-Vis spectrum of reduced graphene oxide. Morphology of graphene oxide also changed from a smooth and flat surface to crumpled. The ratio of carbon/ oxygen in the graphene oxide was lower than the carbon/ oxygen of reduced graphene oxide. At the end of the experiment, it can be deduced that graphene oxide underwent reduction, characterized before and after irradiation using Emission Scanned Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy and UV-Vis Spectroscopy. Therefore, we postulate that the irradiation technique that induces reduction, can be used to obtain reduced graphene oxide from graphene oxide. (author)

  11. Metallothermic reduction of rare earth oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Rare earth oxides can be reduced to rare earth metals by a novel, high yield, metallothermic process. The oxides are dispersed in a suitable, molten, calcium chloride bath along with sodium metal. The sodium reacts with the calcium chloride to produce calcium metal which reduces the rare earth oxides to rare earth metals. The metals are collected in a discrete layer in the reaction vessel

  12. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the oxide layers are chemically bonded to graphene (Zhang ... sists of three glass chambers, one to contain the metal halide. (TiCl4, SiCl4 ... In this step, the metal halide reacts with the oxygen function- ... 1·0 g of FeCl3 were vigorously stirred in 30 ml of ethylene ... Reaction with water vapour results in hydrolysis of the un-.

  13. Oxidative reduction of glove box wipers with a downdraft thermal oxidation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.R.; Wilcox, W.A.

    1996-04-01

    Wipers (rags) used for decontamination and glove box cleanup in the Plutonium Finishing Plant often become soaked with acid and plutonium-rich solutions. After use, these wipers are rinsed in a dilute NaOH solution and dried, but the formation of unstable nitrates and the hydrogen gas caused by hydrolysis are concerns that still must be addressed. This report gives the results of testing with a small downdraft thermal oxidation system that was constructed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to stabilize glove wiper waste, reduce the waste volume, and reclaim plutonium. Proof-of-principle testing was conducted with eight runs using various combinations of rag moisture and chemical pretreatment. All runs went to planned completion. Results of these tests indicate that the thermal oxidation system has the potential for providing significant reductions in waste volume. Weight reductions of 150:1 were easily obtainable during this project. Modifications could result in weight reductions of over 200:1, with possible volume reductions of 500:1

  14. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santha Kumar, Arunjunai Raja Shankar [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Piana, Francesco [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany); Mičušík, Matej [Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 41, Bratislava (Slovakia); Pionteck, Jürgen, E-mail: pionteck@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Banerjee, Susanta [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Voit, Brigitte [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Heavily oxidized and ordered graphene nanoplatelets were produced from natural graphite by oxidation using a mixture of phosphoric acid, sulphuric acid, and potassium permanganate (Marcano's method). The atomic percentage of oxygen in the graphite oxide produced was more than 30% confirmed by XPS studies. The graphite oxide produced had intact basal planes and remains in a layered structure with interlayer distance of 0.8 nm, analyzed by WAXS. The graphite oxide was treated with 4,4′-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) to produce grafted isocyanate functionalization. Introduction of these bulky functional groups widens the interlayer distance to 1.3 nm. In addition, two reduction methods, namely benzyl alcohol mediated reduction and thermal reduction were carried out on isocyanate modified and unmodified graphite oxides and compared to each other. The decrease in the oxygen content and the sp{sup 3} defect-repair were studied with XPS and RAMAN spectroscopy. Compared to the thermal reduction process, which is connected with large material loss, the benzyl alcohol mediated reduction process is highly effective in defect repair. This resulted in an increase of conductivity of at least 9 orders of magnitude compared to the graphite oxide. - Highlights: • Preparation of GO by Marcano's method results in defined interlayer spacing. • Treatment of GO with diisocyanate widens the interlayer spacing to 1.3 nm. • Chemical reduction of GO with benzyl alcohol is effective in defect repair. • Electrical conductivity increases by 9 orders of magnitude during chemical reduction. • The isocyanate functionalization is stable under chemical reducing conditions.

  15. Advanced oxidation technologies for chemical demilitarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosocha, L.A.; Korzekwa, R.A.; Monagle, M.; Coogan, J.J.; Tennant, R.A.; Brown, L.F.; Currier, R.P.

    1996-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The main project objective was to establish a technical basis for future program development in the area of chemical warfare agent destruction using a Los Alamos-developed advanced oxidation process: a two-stage device consisting of thermal packed-bed reactor (PBR) and a nonthermal plasma (NTP) reactor. Various compounds were evaluated as potential surrogates for chemical warfare (CW) agents. Representative effluent mass balances were projected for future comparisons with incinerators. The design and construction of lab-scale PBR/NTP reactors (consisting of a liquid injection and metering system, electric furnace, condensers, chemical traps, plasma reactors, power supplies, and chemical diagnostics) has been completed. This equipment, the experience gained from chemical-processing experiments, process modeling, and an initial demonstration of the feasibility of closed-loop operation, have provided a technical basis for further demonstrations and program development efforts.

  16. Chemical engineering design of CO oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    How a chemical reaction engineer would approach the challenge of designing a CO oxidation catalyst for pulsed CO2 lasers is described. CO oxidation catalysts have a long history of application, of course, so it is instructive to first consider the special requirements of the laser application and then to compare them to the characteristics of existing processes which utilize CO oxidation catalysts. All CO2 laser applications require a CO oxidation catalyst with the following characteristics: (1) active at stoichiometric ratios of O2 and CO, (2) no inhibition by CO2 or other components of the laser environment, (3) releases no particulates during vibration or thermal cycling, and (4) long lifetime with a stable activity. In all applications, low consumption of power is desirable, a characteristic especially critical in aerospace applications and, thus, catalyst activity at low temperatures is highly desirable. High power lasers with high pulse repetition rates inherently require circulation of the gas mixture and this forced circulation is available for moving gas past the catalyst. Low repetition rate lasers, however, do not inherently require gas circulation, so a catalyst that did not require such circulation would be favorable from the standpoint of minimum power consumption. Lasers designed for atmospheric penetration of their infrared radiation utilize CO2 formed from rare isotopes of oxygen and this application has the additional constraint that normal abundance oxygen isotopes in the catalyst must not exchange with rare isotopes in the gas mixture.

  17. Chemical Sensors Based on Metal Oxide Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Mike J.; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2006-01-01

    This paper is an overview of sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures. While nanostructures such as nanorods show significan t potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of s ignificant technical challenges remain. The major issues addressed in this work revolve around the ability to make workable sensors. This paper discusses efforts to address three technical barriers related t o the application of nanostructures into sensor systems: 1) Improving contact of the nanostructured materials with electrodes in a microse nsor structure; 2) Controling nanostructure crystallinity to allow co ntrol of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by using different nanostructured materials. It is concluded that while this work demonstrates useful tools for furt her development, these are just the beginning steps towards realizati on of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostr uctures.

  18. Comparative study of synthesis and reduction methods for graphene oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Alazmi, Amira; Rasul, Shahid; Patole, Shashikant P.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have congregated much interest as promising active materials for a variety of applications such as electrodes for supercapacitors. Yet, partially given the absence of comparative studies in synthesis methodologies, a lack of understanding persists on how to best tailor these materials. In this work, the effect of using different graphene oxidation-reduction strategies in the structure and chemistry of rGOs is systematically discussed. Two of the most popular oxidation routes in the literature were used to obtain GO. Subsequently, two sets of rGO powders were synthesised employing three different reduction routes, totalling six separate products. It is shown that the extension of the structural rearrangement in rGOs is not just dependent on the reduction step but also on the approach followed for the initial graphite oxidation.

  19. Comparative study of synthesis and reduction methods for graphene oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Alazmi, Amira

    2016-05-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have congregated much interest as promising active materials for a variety of applications such as electrodes for supercapacitors. Yet, partially given the absence of comparative studies in synthesis methodologies, a lack of understanding persists on how to best tailor these materials. In this work, the effect of using different graphene oxidation-reduction strategies in the structure and chemistry of rGOs is systematically discussed. Two of the most popular oxidation routes in the literature were used to obtain GO. Subsequently, two sets of rGO powders were synthesised employing three different reduction routes, totalling six separate products. It is shown that the extension of the structural rearrangement in rGOs is not just dependent on the reduction step but also on the approach followed for the initial graphite oxidation.

  20. XPS study of graphene oxide reduction induced by (100) and (111)-oriented Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priante, F.; Salim, M.; Ottaviano, L.; Perrozzi, F.

    2018-02-01

    The reduction of graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively studied in literature in order to let GO partially recover the properties of graphene. Most of the techniques proposed to reduce GO are based on high temperature annealing or chemical reduction. A new procedure, based on the direct reduction of GO by etched Si substrate, was recently proposed in literature. In the present work, we accurately investigated the Si-GO interaction with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In order to avoid external substrate oxidation factors we used EtOH as the GO solvent instead of water, and thermal annealing was carried out in UHV. We investigated the effect of Si(100), Si(111) and Au substrates on GO, to probe the role played by both the substrate composition and substrate orientation during the reduction process. A similar degree of GO reduction was observed for all samples but only after thermal annealing, ruling out the direct reduction effect of the substrate.

  1. Hybrid process for nitrogen oxides reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epperly, W.R.; Sprague, B.N.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes a process for reducing the nitrogen oxide concentration in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises introducing into the effluent a first treatment agent comprising a nitrogenous composition selected from the group consisting of urea, ammonia, hexamethylenetetramine, ammonium salts of organic acids, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic hydrocarbons having at least one cyclic nitrogen, hydroxy amino hydrocarbons, NH{sub 4}-lignosulfonate, fur-furylamine, tetrahydrofurylamine, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanidine, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, biuret, 1.1{prime}-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, dimethyl urea, calcium cyanamide, and mixtures thereof under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen oxides concentration and ensure the presence of ammonia in the effluent; introducing into the effluent a second treatment agent comprising an oxygenated hydrocarbon at an effluent temperature of about 500{degrees} F. to about 1600{degrees} F. under conditions effective to oxidize nitric oxide in the effluent to nitrogen dioxide and ensure the presence of ammonia at a weight ratio of ammonia to nitrogen dioxide of about 1:5 to about 5:1; and contacting the effluent with an aqueous scrubbing solution having a pH of 12 or lower under conditions effective to cause nitrogen dioxide to be absorbed therein.

  2. Reduction of nickel oxide particles by hydrogen studied in an environmental TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeangros, Q.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2013-01-01

    In situ reduction of nickel oxide (NiO) particles is performed under 1.3 mbar of hydrogen gas (H2) in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). Images, diffraction patterns and electron energy-loss spectra (EELS) are acquired to monitor the structural and chemical evolution of the...

  3. C3 Epimerization of Glucose, via Regioselective Oxidation and Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jumde, Varsha R.; Eisink, Niek N. H. M.; Witte, Martin D.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed oxidation can single out the secondary hydroxyl group at C3 in glucose, circumventing the more readily accessible hydroxyl at C6 and the more reactive anomeric hydroxyl. Oxidation followed by reduction results in either allose or allitol, each a rare sugar that is important in

  4. Nickel oxide reduction studied by environmental TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeangros, Q.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2012-01-01

    In situ reduction of an industrial NiO powder is performed under 1.3 mbar of H2 (2 mlN/min) in a differentially pumped FEI Titan 80-300 environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). Images, diffraction patterns and electron energy loss spectra (EELS) are acquired to monitor the structura...

  5. Kinetics of the reduction of uranium oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heynen, H.W.G.; Camp-van Berkel, M.M.; Bann, H.S. van der

    1977-01-01

    The reduction of uranium oxide and uranium oxide on alumina catalysts by ethylbenzene and by hydrogen has been studied in a thermobalance. Ethylbenzene mole fractions between 0.0026 and 0.052 and hydrogen mole fractions between 0.1 and 0.6 were applied at temperatures of 425--530 0 C. During the reduction the uranium oxides are converted into UO 2 . The rate of reduction of pure uranium oxide appears to be constant in the composition region UO/sub 2.6/-UO/sub 2.25/. The extent of this region is independent of the concentration of the reducing agents and of the reaction temperature. The constant rate is explained in terms of a constant oxygen pressure which is in equilibrium with the two solid phases, U 3 O/sub 8-x/ and U 4 O 9 . The reduction rate is first order in hydrogen and zero order in ethylbenzene with activation energies of 120 and 190 kJ mol -1 , respectively. Oxygen diffusion through the lattice is probably not rate limiting. The reduction behavior of uranium oxide on alumina is different from that of pure uranium oxide; the rate of reduction continuously decreases with increasing degree of reduction. An explanation for this behavior has been given by visualizing this catalyst as a set of isolated uranium oxide crystallites with a relative wide variation of diameters, in an alumina matrix. At the beginning of the reduction, carbon dioxide and water are the only reaction products. Thereafter, benzene is found as well and, finally, at U/O ratios below 2.25, styrene also appears in the reactor outlet

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of reduction reactions of niobium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, C.

    1981-01-01

    Reduction processes of niobium oxides by hydrogen, carbon and aluminium are analysed thermodinamically. It is shown that reduction by hydrogen is not technically feasible. High purity of raw materials is required. In the carbothermic process impurities which react to form high stability carbides should be avoided. (Author) [pt

  7. 2-22 Study of Oxidation/reduction Volatilization Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan; Cunmin[1; Cao; Shiwei[1; Tian; Yuan[1; Qin; Zhi[1

    2015-01-01

    As an advanced dry head-end processing of spent fuel reprocessing, the oxidation-reduction volatilization technology will use for pulverizing uranium oxide ceramic pellets, decladding, and removal of most of volatile and semi-volatile fission elements, 3H, 14C, Kr, Xe, I, Cs, Ru and Tc, from fuel prior to main treatment process. The AIROX and ORIOX process, including circulation of oxidation in oxygen atmosphere and reduction in hydrogen atmosphere, researched on international at present, is considered to be the first choice for head-end processing.

  8. Catalytic activity of lanthanum oxide for the reduction of cyclohexanone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugunan, S.; Sherly, K.B.

    1994-01-01

    Lanthanum oxides, La 2 O 3 has been found to be an effective catalyst for the liquid phase reduction of cyclohexanone. The catalytic activities of La 2 O 3 activated at 300, 500 and 800 degC and its mixed oxides with alumina for the reduction of cylcohexanone with 2-propanol have been determined and the data parallel that of the electron donating properties of the catalysts. The electron donating properties of the catalysts have been determined from the adsorption of electron acceptors of different electron affinities on the surface of these oxides. (author). 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Chemically abrupt interface between Ce oxide and Fe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.G.; Lee, D.; Kim, S.; Kim, S.G.; Hwang, Chanyong

    2005-01-01

    A chemically abrupt Fe/Ce oxide interface can be formed by initial oxidation of an Fe film followed by deposition of Ce metal. Once a Ce oxide layer is formed on top of Fe, it acts a passivation barrier for oxygen diffusion. Further deposition of Ce metal followed by its oxidation preserve the abrupt interface between Ce oxide and Fe films. The Fe and Ce oxidation states have been monitored at each stage using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

  10. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao-Yan; Tong, Xi-Li; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Han, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Ying-Yong; Jin, Guo-Qiang; Qin, Yong; Guo, Xiang-Yun

    2012-02-11

    Cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O) nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) were prepared by reducing copper acetate supported on graphite oxide using diethylene glycol as both solvent and reducing agent. The Cu(2)O/RGO composite exhibits excellent catalytic activity and remarkable tolerance to methanol and CO in the oxygen reduction reaction. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  11. Reduction-oxidation Enabled Glass-ceramics to Stainless Steel Bonding Part I: screening of doping oxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Lithium silicate-based glass-ceramics with high coefficients of thermal expansion, designed to form matched hermetic seals in 304L stainless steel housing, show little evidence of interfacial chemical bonding, despite extensive inter-diffusion at the glass-ceramic-stainless steel (GC-SS) interface. A series of glass-ceramic compositions modified with a variety of oxidants, AgO, FeO, NiO, PbO, SnO, CuO, CoO, MoO3 and WO3, are examined for the feasibility of forming bonding oxides through reduction-oxidation (redox) at the GC-SS interface. The oxidants were selected according to their Gibbs free energy to allow for oxidation of Cr/Mn/Si from stainless steel, and yet to prevent a reduction of P2O5 in the glass-ceramic where the P2O5 is to form Li3PO4 nuclei for growth of high expansion crystalline SiO2 phases. Other than the CuO and CoO modified glass-ceramics, bonding from interfacial redox reactions were not achieved in the modified glass-ceramics, either because of poor wetting on the stainless steel or a reduction of the oxidants at the surface of glass-ceramic specimens rather than the GC-SS interface.

  12. Development of reduction technology for oxide fuel. Behaviour of rare-earth in lithium reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tetsuya; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Yuda, Ryoichi; Kurata, Masateru; Moriyama, Hirotake

    2000-01-01

    Solubility measurements of rare-earth oxides in molten LiCl-Li 2 O salt and reduction tests of UO 2 doped with rare-earth oxides were carried out to determine the behavior of rare-earths in lithium reduction process. The solubility of rare-earth oxides increases in the order of Gd 2 O concentration. In multi-element systems including 6 rare-earth oxides, the solubility of each element is smaller than that in the individual systems. In the reduction tests, more than 90% of UO 2 was reduced within 1 hour after starting reduction and about 7% of rare-earths eluded into the LiCl molten salt bath containing Li 2 O which is formed by the reduction of UO 2 . The rare-earth concentrations in the bath were evaluated using the solubility data, assuming that rare-earth oxides in multi-element systems form solid solution as the equilibrium solid phase and that the activity coefficients in the solid phase are independent of the compositions. The calculated concentrations are consistent with the experimental ones obtained in the reduction tests. (author)

  13. High-rate reduction of copper oxide using atmospheric-pressure inductively coupled plasma microjets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Satomi; Tsuchiya, Shouichi; Matsumori, Masashi; Nakatsuka, Shigeki; Ichiki, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of copper oxide was performed using an atmospheric-pressure inductively coupled plasma (AP-ICP) microjet while varying the input power P between 15 and 50 W. Cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) and cupric oxide (CuO) were formed on the sputtered Cu surface by thermal annealing. Dynamic behavior of the microplasma jet, optical emission from H atoms, the substrate temperature, chemical bonding states of the treated surface, and the thickness of the reduced Cu layer were measured to study the fundamental reduction process. Surface composition and the thickness of the reduced Cu layer changed significantly with P. Rapid reduction of CuO and Cu 2 O was achieved at a rate of 493 nm/min at P = 50 W since high-density H atoms were produced by the AP-ICP microjet.

  14. High-rate reduction of copper oxide using atmospheric-pressure inductively coupled plasma microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Satomi; Tsuchiya, Shouichi [Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8656 (Japan); Matsumori, Masashi; Nakatsuka, Shigeki [Panasonic Factory Solutions Co., Ltd., 2-7 Matsuba-cho, Kadoma-city, Osaka, 571-8502 (Japan); Ichiki, Takanori, E-mail: ichiki@sogo.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8656 (Japan); Institute of Engineering Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2011-08-01

    Reduction of copper oxide was performed using an atmospheric-pressure inductively coupled plasma (AP-ICP) microjet while varying the input power P between 15 and 50 W. Cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) and cupric oxide (CuO) were formed on the sputtered Cu surface by thermal annealing. Dynamic behavior of the microplasma jet, optical emission from H atoms, the substrate temperature, chemical bonding states of the treated surface, and the thickness of the reduced Cu layer were measured to study the fundamental reduction process. Surface composition and the thickness of the reduced Cu layer changed significantly with P. Rapid reduction of CuO and Cu{sub 2}O was achieved at a rate of 493 nm/min at P = 50 W since high-density H atoms were produced by the AP-ICP microjet.

  15. Nitrous oxide reduction in nodules: denitrification or N2 fixation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyne, M.S.; Focht, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    Detached cowpea nodules that contained a nitrous oxide reductase-positive (Nor + ) rhizobium strain (8A55) and a nitrous oxide reductase-negative (Nor - ) rhizobium strain (32H1) were incubated with 1% 15 N 2 O (95 atom% 15 N) in the following three atmospheres: aerobic with C 2 H 2 (10%), aerobic without C 2 H 2 , and anaerobic (argon atmosphere) without C 2 H 2 . The greatest production of 15 N 2 occurred anaerobically with 8A55, yet very little was formed with 32H1. Although acetylene reduction activity was slightly higher with 32H1, about 10 times more 15 N 2 was produced aerobically by 8A55 than by 32H1 in the absence of acetylene. The major reductive pathway of N 2 O reduction by denitrifying rhizobium strain 8A55 is by nitrous oxide reductase rather than nitrogenase

  16. Reduction of nitric oxide by arc vaporized carbons (AVC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, S C; Chen, Y K; Green, M L.H. [The Catalysis Centre, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-04

    The reduction of nitric oxide by arc vaporized carbons (AVC) including the compound C{sub 6}0, fullerene soot and carbon nanotubes, giving dinitrogen and carbon oxides has been studied. It is found that the AVC carbons are more active towards oxidation by NO than by oxygen gas at low temperatures (300-400C). In contrast, conventional carbons such as graphite and microporous carbons are more readily oxidised by oxygen than by NO. The addition of copper salts and to a lesser extent, cobalt salts, to fullerene soot substantially promote NO reduction. The high intrinsic activity for NO reduction by AVC carbons compared to graphitic carbons is attributed to the presence of five membered carbon rings in the AVC carbons

  17. Volatile organic compounds and oxides of nitrogen. Further emission reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froste, H [comp.

    1997-12-31

    This report presents the current status in relation to achievement of the Swedish Environmental target set by Parliament to reduce emission of volatile organic compounds by 50 per cent between 1988 and 2000. It also instructed the Agency to formulate proposed measures to achieve a 50 per cent reduction of emission of nitrogen oxides between 1985 and 2005. The report presents an overall account of emission trends for volatile organic compounds (from all sectors) and nitrogen oxides (from the industry sector) and steps proposed to achieve further emission reductions. 43 refs

  18. Volatile organic compounds and oxides of nitrogen. Further emission reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froste, H. [comp.

    1996-12-31

    This report presents the current status in relation to achievement of the Swedish Environmental target set by Parliament to reduce emission of volatile organic compounds by 50 per cent between 1988 and 2000. It also instructed the Agency to formulate proposed measures to achieve a 50 per cent reduction of emission of nitrogen oxides between 1985 and 2005. The report presents an overall account of emission trends for volatile organic compounds (from all sectors) and nitrogen oxides (from the industry sector) and steps proposed to achieve further emission reductions. 43 refs

  19. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  20. Mechanistic investigation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by low molecular weight organic sulfur species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Eryn M.; Taillefert, Martial

    2017-10-01

    Low molecular weight organic sulfur species, often referred to as thiols, are known to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments and represent important chemical reductants of Fe(III) oxides. Thiols are excellent electron shuttles used during dissimilatory iron reduction, and in this capacity could indirectly affect the redox state of sediments, release adsorbed contaminants via reductive dissolution, and influence the carbon cycle through alteration of bacterial respiration processes. Interestingly, the reduction of Fe(III) oxides by thiols has not been previously investigated in environmentally relevant conditions, likely due to analytical limitations associated with the detection of thiols and their oxidized products. In this study, a novel electrochemical method was developed to simultaneously determine thiol/disulfide pair concentrations in situ during the reduction of ferrihydrite in batch reactors. First order rate laws with respect to initial thiol concentration were confirmed for Fe(III) oxyhydroxide reduction by four common thiols: cysteine, homocysteine, cysteamine, and glutathione. Zero order was determined for both Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and proton concentration at circumneutral pH. A kinetic model detailing the molecular mechanism of the reaction was optimized with proposed intermediate surface structures. Although metal oxide overall reduction rate constants were inversely proportional to the complexity of the thiol structure, the extent of metal reduction increased with structure complexity, indicating that surface complexes play a significant role in the ability of these thiols to reduce iron. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of considering the molecular reaction mechanism at the iron oxide surface when investigating the potential for thiols to act as electron shuttles during dissimilatory iron reduction in natural environments.

  1. Fundamental limits on gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx in a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In the plasma, the electrons do not react directly with the NOx molecules. The electrons collide mainly with the background gas molecules like N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Electron impact on these molecules result partly in dissociation reactions that produce reactive species like N, O and OH. The NOx in the engine exhaust gas initially consist mostly of NO. The ground state nitrogen atom, N, is the only species that could lead to the chemical reduction of NO to N{sub 2}. The O radical oxidizes NO to NO{sub 2} leaving the same amount of NOx. The OH radical converts NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. Acid products in the plasma can easily get adsorbed on surfaces in the plasma reactor and in the pipes. When undetected, the absence of these oxidation products can often be mistaken for chemical reduction of NOx. In this paper the authors will examine the gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx. They will show that under the best conditions, the plasma can chemically reduce 1.6 grams of NOx per brake-horsepower-hour [g(NOx)/bhp-hr] when 5% of the engine output energy is delivered to the plasma.

  2. Highly controllable and green reduction of graphene oxide to flexible graphene film with high strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Wubo; Zhao, Zongbin; Hu, Han; Gogotsi, Yury; Qiu, Jieshan

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highly controllable and green reduction of GO to chemical converted graphene (CCG) was achieved with sodium citrate as a facile reductant. Self-assembly of the as-made CCG sheets results in a flexible CCG film, of which the tensile strength strongly depends on the deoxygenation degree of graphene sheets. - Highlights: • Graphene was synthesized by an effective and environmentally friendly approach. • We introduced a facile X-ray diffraction analysis method to investigate the reduction process from graphene oxide to graphene. • Flexible graphene films were prepared by self-assembly of the graphene sheets. • The strength of the graphene films depends on the reduction degree of graphene. - Abstract: Graphene film with high strength was fabricated by the assembly of graphene sheets derived from graphene oxide (GO) in an effective and environmentally friendly approach. Highly controllable reduction of GO to chemical converted graphene (CCG) was achieved with sodium citrate as a facile reductant, in which the reduction process was monitored by XRD analysis and UV–vis absorption spectra. Self-assembly of the as-made CCG sheets results in a flexible CCG film. This method may open an avenue to the easy and scalable preparation of graphene film with high strength which has promising potentials in many fields where strong, flexible and electrically conductive films are highly demanded

  3. Oxygen Reduction Kinetics Enhancement on a Heterostructured Oxide Surface for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Crumlin, Ethan J.

    2010-11-04

    Heterostructured interfaces of oxides, which can exhibit transport and reactivity characteristics remarkably different from those of bulk oxides, are interesting systems to explore in search of highly active cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we show that the ORR of ∼85 nm thick La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on (001)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates is dramatically enhanced (∼3-4 orders of magnitude above bulk LSC113) by surface decorations of (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214) with coverage in the range from ∼0.1 to ∼15 nm. Their surface and atomic structures were characterized by atomic force, scanning electron, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, and the ORR kinetics were determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Although the mechanism for ORR enhancement is not yet fully understood, our results to date show that the observed ORR enhancement can be attributed to highly active interfacial LSC113/LSC214 regions, which were shown to be atomically sharp. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  4. Oxygen Reduction Kinetics Enhancement on a Heterostructured Oxide Surface for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mutoro, Eva; Ahn, Sung-Jin; la O’ , Gerardo Jose; Leonard, Donovan N.; Borisevich, Albina; Biegalski, Michael D.; Christen, Hans M.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Heterostructured interfaces of oxides, which can exhibit transport and reactivity characteristics remarkably different from those of bulk oxides, are interesting systems to explore in search of highly active cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we show that the ORR of ∼85 nm thick La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on (001)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates is dramatically enhanced (∼3-4 orders of magnitude above bulk LSC113) by surface decorations of (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214) with coverage in the range from ∼0.1 to ∼15 nm. Their surface and atomic structures were characterized by atomic force, scanning electron, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, and the ORR kinetics were determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Although the mechanism for ORR enhancement is not yet fully understood, our results to date show that the observed ORR enhancement can be attributed to highly active interfacial LSC113/LSC214 regions, which were shown to be atomically sharp. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. A new green approach for the reduction of graphene oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2.2 Preparation of GO. GO was prepared by oxidizing the graphite powder in a mix- ... measured using a Diamond TG/DTA analyzer (Perkin Elmer. Instruments). ... domains during the reduction of GO.23 This change of ID/IG value is in good ...

  6. Simultaneous iridium catalysed oxidation and enzymatic reduction employing orthogonal reagents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutti, Francesco G.; Orthaber, Andreas; Schrittwieser, Joerg H.; Vries, Johannes G. de; Pietschnig, Rudolf; Kroutil, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    An iridium catalysed oxidation was coupled concurrently to an asymmetric biocatalytic reduction in one-pot; thus it was shown for the first time that iridium- and alcohol dehydrogenase-catalysed redox reactions are compatible. As a model system racemic chlorohydrins were transformed to

  7. Boron carbide synthesis by carbothermic reduction of boron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1988-01-01

    Boron carbide (B 4 C) is a ceramic material of technological applications due to its extreme hardness and high chemical as well as thermal stability. Some parameters of the process for obtaining B 4 C by carbothermic reduction of B 2 O 3 have been determined. The starting powders and the final products have been analysed by chemical, spectrographic and X-ray diffraction methods. The results show that the B 4 C obtained by the carbothermic reduction process is suitable for applications with a definite determination of the free carbon content. (author) [pt

  8. Catalytic/non-catalytic combination process for nitrogen oxides reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luftglass, B.K.; Sun, W.H.; Hofmann, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises introducing a nitrogenous treatment agent comprising urea, one or more of the hydrolysis products of urea, ammonia, compounds which produce ammonia as a by-product, ammonium salts of organic acids, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic hydrocarbons having at least one cyclic nitrogen, hydroxy amino hydrocarbons, or mixtures thereof into the effluent at an effluent temperature between about 1200 degrees F and about 2100 degrees F; and contacting the treated effluent under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen oxides in the effluent with a catalyst effective for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia

  9. Chemical nature of catalysts of oxide nanoparticles in environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon nanostructures (CNS) are often grown using oxide nanoparticles as catalyst in chemical vapour deposition and these oxides are not expected to survive as such during growth. In the present study, the catalysts of cobalt- and nickel oxide-based nanoparticles of sizes varying over a range have been reduced at 575 ...

  10. Oxidation of a Dimethoxyhydroquinone by Ferrihydrite and Goethite Nanoparticles: Iron Reduction versus Surface Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumina, Lelde; Lyngsie, Gry; Tunlid, Anders; Persson, Per

    2017-08-15

    Hydroquinones are important mediators of electron transfer reactions in soils with a capability to reduce Fe(III) minerals and molecular oxygen, and thereby generating Fenton chemistry reagents. This study focused on 2,6-dimethoxy hydroquinone (2,6-DMHQ), an analogue to a common fungal metabolite, and its reaction with ferrihydrite and goethite under variable pH and oxygen concentrations. Combined wet-chemical and spectroscopic analyses showed that both minerals effectively oxidized 2,6-DMHQ in the presence of oxygen. Under anaerobic conditions the first-order oxidation rate constants decreased by one to several orders of magnitude depending on pH and mineral. Comparison between aerobic and anaerobic results showed that ferrihydrite promoted 2,6-DMHQ oxidation both via reductive dissolution and heterogeneous catalysis while goethite mainly caused catalytic oxidation. These results were in agreement with changes in the reduction potential (E H ) of the Fe(III) oxide/Fe(II) aq redox couple as a function of dissolved Fe(II) where E H of goethite was lower than ferrihydrite at any given Fe(II) concentration, which makes ferrihydrite more prone to reductive dissolution by the 2,6-DMBQ/2,6-DMHQ redox couple. This study showed that reactions between hydroquinones and iron oxides could produce favorable conditions for formation of reactive oxygen species, which are required for nonenzymatic Fenton-based decomposition of soil organic matter.

  11. Improved Understanding of In Situ Chemical Oxidation Contaminant Oxidation Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    natural oxidant demand •OH hydroxide radical Ox oxidant O3 ozone PCE perchloroethylene HSO5− peroxymonosulfate PNDA p...properties (e.g., soil mineralogy , natural carbon content) affect oxidant mobility and stability in the subsurface, and develop a standardized natural...chlorinated ethenes For contaminant oxidation by activated S2O82−, it is more difficult to develop a general description of kobs vs. T because there are

  12. High Efficient Reduction of Graphene Oxide via Nascent Hydrogen at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiqi Zhuo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To develop a green and efficient method to synthesize graphene in relative milder conditions is prerequisite for graphene applications. A chemical reducing method has been developed to high efficiently reduce graphene oxide (GO using Fe2O3 and NH3BH3 as catalyst and reductants, respectively. During the process, environmental and strong reductive nascent hydrogen were generated surrounding the surface of GO sheets by catalyst hydrolysis reaction of NH3BH3 and were used for reduction of GO. The reduction process was studied by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectrum. The structure and morphology of the reduced GO were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Compared to metal (Mg/Fe/Zn/Al particles and acid system which also use nascent hydrogen to reduce GO, this method exhibited higher reduction efficiency (43.6%. Also the reduction was carried out at room temperature condition, which is environmentally friendly. As a supercapacitor electrode, the reversible capacity of reduced graphene oxide was 113.8 F g−1 at 1 A g−1 and the capacitance retention still remained at 90% after 200 cycles. This approach provides a new method to reduce GO with high reduction efficiency by green reductant.

  13. Solid-state Water-mediated Transport Reduction of Nanostructured Iron Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Vladimir M.; Povarov, Vladimir G.; Voronkov, Gennadii P.; Semenov, Valentin G.; Murin, Igor' V.; Gittsovich, Viktor N.; Sinel'nikov, Boris M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ ratio in two-dimensional iron oxide nanosructures (nanolayers with a thickness of 0.3-1.5 nm on silica surface) may be precisely controlled using the transport reduction (TR) technique. The species ≡-O-Fe(OH) 2 and (≡Si-O-) 2 -FeOH forming the surface monolayer are not reduced at 400-600 deg. C because of their covalent bonding to the silica surface, as demonstrated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Iron oxide microparticles (microstructures) obtained by the impregnation technique, being chemically unbound to silica, are subjected to reduction at T ≥ 500 deg. C with formation of metallic iron in the form of α-Fe. Transport reduction of supported nanostructures (consisting of 1 or 4 monolayers) at T ≥ 600 deg. C produces bulk iron(II) silicate and metallic iron phases. The structural-chemical transformations occurring in transport reduction of supported iron oxide nanolayers are proved to be governed by specific phase processes in the nanostructures themselves

  14. Reduction Behaviors of Carbon Composite Iron Oxide Briquette Under Oxidation Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki-Woo; Kim, Kang-Min; Kwon, Jae-Hong; Han, Jeong-Whan [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Son, Sang-Han [POSCO, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The carbon composite iron oxide briquette (CCB) is considered a potential solution to the upcoming use of low grade iron resources in the ironmaking process. CCB is able to reduce raw material cost by enabling the use of low grade powdered iron ores and coal. Additionally, the fast reduction of iron oxides by direct contact with coal can be utilized. In this study, the reduction behaviors of CCB were investigated in the temperature range of 200-1200 ℃ under oxidizing atmosphere. Briquettes were prepared by mixing iron ore and coal in a weight ratio of 8:2. Then reduction experiments were carried out in a mixed gas atmosphere of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}. Compressive strength tests and quantitative analysis were performed by taking samples at each target temperature. In addition, the reduction degree depending on the reaction time was evaluated by off-gas analysis during the reduction test. It was found that the compressive strength and the metallization degree of the reduced briquettes increased with increases in the reaction temperature and holding time. However, it tended to decrease when the re-oxidation phenomenon was caused by injected oxygen. The degree of reduction reached a maximum value in 26 minutes. Therefore, the re-oxidation phenomenon becomes dominant after 26 minutes.

  15. Technologies for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulica Arsenie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to gas turbines, their main problem concerning pollutant emissions is represented by nitric oxides. Among other emissions, sulphur oxides being much reduced due to the use of liquid distilled and gas fuels with a low content of sulphur. Using water or steam injection became the favourite method during the '80s and especially the '90s since "dry" methods and catalytic reduction were both at the beginning of the development phase. Catalytic convertors have been used since the '80s and they are still used although the costs of renewing the catalyst are very high. In the last twenty years a gradual decrease has been registered on the limits of nitric oxides from 75 ppm to 25 ppm, and now the target is oriented towards the 9 ppm level. The evolution of burning technologies of combustion makes it possible to control the level of production of nitric oxides even from the source without being necessary to use "humid" methods. This, of course, opened the market for gas turbines because they can function even in areas with limited quality water reserves, such as maritime platforms and in the desert. In this paper, we are going to show that, although water injection is still used, "dry" control technologies of burning became favourite methods for the majority of users on the industrial power generators market. The great dependency between the creation of nitric oxides and the temperature reveals the effect of direct water or steam injection on reducing nitric oxides. Recent research showed that a reduction up to 85% of nitric oxides may be obtained by using the water or steam injection all together with the improvement of aerodynamic character of the burning room.

  16. CO2 emissions and reduction potential in China's chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Bing; Zhou, Wenji; Hu, Shanying; Li, Qiang; Griffy-Brown, Charla; Jin, Yong

    2010-01-01

    GHG (Increasing greenhouse gas) emissions in China imposes enormous pressure on China's government and society. The increasing GHG trend is primarily driven by the fast expansion of high energy-intensive sectors including the chemical industry. This study investigates energy consumption and CO 2 emissions in the processes of chemical production in China through calculating the amounts of CO 2 emissions and estimating the reduction potential in the near future. The research is based on a two-level perspective which treats the entire industry as Level one and six key sub-sectors as Level two, including coal-based ammonia, calcium carbide, caustic soda, coal-based methanol, sodium carbonate, and yellow phosphorus. These two levels are used in order to address the complexity caused by the fact that there are more than 40 thousand chemical products in this industry and the performance levels of the technologies employed are extremely uneven. Three scenarios with different technological improvements are defined to estimate the emissions of the six sub-sectors and analyze the implied reduction potential in the near future. The results highlight the pivotal role that regulation and policy administration could play in controlling the CO 2 emissions by promoting average technology performances in this industry.

  17. Carbothermic reduction of uranium oxides into solvent metallic baths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guisard Restivo, Thomaz A.; Capocchi, Jose D.T.

    2004-01-01

    The carbothermic reduction of UO 2 and U 3 O 8 is studied employing tin and silicon solvent metallic baths in thermal analysis equipment, under Ar inert and N 2 reactive atmospheres. The metallic solvents are expected to lower the U activity by several orders of magnitude owing to strong interactions among the metals. The reduction products are composed of the solvent metal matrix and intermetallic U compounds. Silicon is more effective in driving the reduction since there is no residual UO 2 after the reaction. The gaseous product detected by mass spectrometer (MS) during the reduction is CO. A kinetic study for the Si case was accomplished by the stepwise isothermal analysis (SAI) method, leading to the identification of the controlling mechanisms as chemical reaction at the surface and nucleation, for UO 2 and U 3 O 8 charges, respectively. One example for another system containing Al 2 O 3 is also shown

  18. In-situ chemical reduction produced graphene paper for flexible supercapacitors with impressive capacitive performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xingke; Zhu, Yucan; Tang, Zhonghua; Wan, Zhongquan; Jia, Chunyang

    2017-08-01

    For practical applications of graphene-based materials in flexible supercapacitors, a technological breakthrough is currently required to fabricate high-performance graphene paper by a facile method. Herein, highly conductive (∼6900 S m-1) graphene paper with loose multilayered structure is produced by a high-efficiency in-situ chemical reduction process, which assembles graphite oxide suspensions into film and simultaneously conducts chemical reduction. Graphene papers with different parameters (including different types and doses of reductants, different thicknesses and areas of films) are successfully fabricated through this in-situ chemical reduction method. Meanwhile, the influences of the graphene papers with different parameters upon the supercapacitor performance are systematically investigated. Flexible supercapacitor based on the graphene paper exhibits high areal capacitance (152.4 mF cm-2 at current density of 2.0 mA cm-2 in aqueous electrolyte), and excellent rate performance (88.7% retention at 8.0 mA cm-2). Furthermore, bracelet-shaped all-solid supercapacitor with fascinating cycling stability (96.6% retention after 10 000 cycles) and electrochemical stability (an almost negligible capacity loss under different bending states and 99.6% retention after 4000 bending cycles) is established by employing the graphene paper electrode material and polymer electrolyte.

  19. A study of the dissolution mechanism by chemical and electrochemical oxidation-reduction of actinide dioxides (UO2, NpO2, PuO2, and AmO2) in an acid aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, P.

    1991-01-01

    The plan followed to describe our study will be as follows: In a first part, we will review the general properties of MO 2 oxides (M = U, Np, Pu, and Am), as well as the dissolution methods known so far. We will emphasize, in particular, the great similarities in their structures, properties, and methods of dissolution, which justifies a parallel study of these oxides using an electrochemical method. The second part will concern the experimental study of the dissolution under electrolysis. We will, first of all, investigate its thermodynamic aspect, with the calculation of the free enthalpies of dissolution; and we will next show the phenomena of oxidizing dissolution and reducing dissolution using carbon paste electrodes. In a third part, we will present the test results on oxidizing dissolution in solutions that are highly enriched with oxygen-18. The isotopic analysis of the oxygen in the actinyl ions formed, deduced from the Raman spectra of the solutions, will make it possible to demonstrate the existence of a first oxidation step involving the participation of the solid. In the fourth part, we will summarize the experimental observations that might contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms of oxidizing dissolution. A fifth and last part will be devoted to the presentation of a simple model of the dissolution of oxides in a carbon paste electrode under a constant current

  20. Pathogenesis of Chronic Hyperglycemia: From Reductive Stress to Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Jun Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic overnutrition creates chronic hyperglycemia that can gradually induce insulin resistance and insulin secretion impairment. These disorders, if not intervened, will eventually be followed by appearance of frank diabetes. The mechanisms of this chronic pathogenic process are complex but have been suggested to involve production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress. In this review, I highlight evidence that reductive stress imposed by overflux of NADH through the mitochondrial electron transport chain is the source of oxidative stress, which is based on establishments that more NADH recycling by mitochondrial complex I leads to more electron leakage and thus more ROS production. The elevated levels of both NADH and ROS can inhibit and inactivate glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, respectively, resulting in blockage of the glycolytic pathway and accumulation of glycerol 3-phospate and its prior metabolites along the pathway. This accumulation then initiates all those alternative glucose metabolic pathways such as the polyol pathway and the advanced glycation pathways that otherwise are minor and insignificant under euglycemic conditions. Importantly, all these alternative pathways lead to ROS production, thus aggravating cellular oxidative stress. Therefore, reductive stress followed by oxidative stress comprises a major mechanism of hyperglycemia-induced metabolic syndrome.

  1. Laser-Induced Reductive Sintering of Nickel Oxide Nanoparticles under Ambient Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Paeng, Dongwoo; Lee, Daeho; Yeo, Junyeob; Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Allen, Frances I.; Kim, Eunpa; So, Hongyun; Park, Hee K.; Minor, Andrew M.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. This work is concerned with the kinetics of laser-induced reductive sintering of nonstoichiometric crystalline nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles (NPs) under ambient conditions. The mechanism of photophysical reductive sintering upon irradiation using a 514.5 nm continuous-wave (CW) laser on NiO NP thin films has been studied through modulating the laser power density and illumination time. Protons produced due to high-temperature decomposition of the solvent present in the NiO NP ink, oxygen vacancies in the NiO NPs, and electronic excitation in the NiO NPs by laser irradiation all affect the early stage of the reductive sintering process. Once NiO NPs are reduced by laser irradiation to Ni, they begin to coalesce, forming a conducting material. In situ optical and electrical measurements during the reductive sintering process take advantage of the distinct differences between the oxide and the metallic phases to monitor the transient evolution of the process. We observe four regimes: oxidation, reduction, sintering, and reoxidation. A characteristic time scale is assigned to each regime.

  2. Laser-Induced Reductive Sintering of Nickel Oxide Nanoparticles under Ambient Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Paeng, Dongwoo

    2015-03-19

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. This work is concerned with the kinetics of laser-induced reductive sintering of nonstoichiometric crystalline nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles (NPs) under ambient conditions. The mechanism of photophysical reductive sintering upon irradiation using a 514.5 nm continuous-wave (CW) laser on NiO NP thin films has been studied through modulating the laser power density and illumination time. Protons produced due to high-temperature decomposition of the solvent present in the NiO NP ink, oxygen vacancies in the NiO NPs, and electronic excitation in the NiO NPs by laser irradiation all affect the early stage of the reductive sintering process. Once NiO NPs are reduced by laser irradiation to Ni, they begin to coalesce, forming a conducting material. In situ optical and electrical measurements during the reductive sintering process take advantage of the distinct differences between the oxide and the metallic phases to monitor the transient evolution of the process. We observe four regimes: oxidation, reduction, sintering, and reoxidation. A characteristic time scale is assigned to each regime.

  3. Topotactic oxidative and reductive control of the structures and properties of layered manganese oxychalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyett, Geoffrey; Barrier, Nicolas; Clarke, Simon J; Hadermann, Joke

    2007-09-12

    Topotactic modification, by both oxidation and reduction, of the composition, structures, and magnetic properties of the layered oxychalcogenides Sr4Mn3O7.5Cu2Ch2 (Ch=S, Se) is described. These Mn3+ compounds are composed of alternating perovskite-type strontium manganese oxide slabs separated by anti-fluorite-type copper chalcogenide layers and are intrinsically oxide deficient in the central layer of the perovskite slabs. The systems are unusual examples of perovskite-related compounds that may topotactically be both oxidized by fluorination and reduced by deintercalation of oxygen from the oxide-deficient part of the structure. The compounds exhibit antiferromagnetic ordering of the manganese magnetic moments in the outer layers of the perovskite slabs, while the other moments, in the central layers, exhibit spin-glass-like behavior. Fluorination has the effect of increasing the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and the size of the ordered moment, whereas reduction destroys magnetic long-range order by introducing chemical disorder which leads to both further disorder and frustration of the magnetic interactions in the manganese oxide slab.

  4. Chemical solution deposition of functional oxide thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Schneller, Theodor; Kosec, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Chemical Solution Deposition (CSD) is a highly-flexible and inexpensive technique for the fabrication of functional oxide thin films. Featuring nearly 400 illustrations, this text covers all aspects of the technique.

  5. Direct printing and reduction of graphite oxide for flexible supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hanyung [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ve Cheah, Chang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Namjo [Energy Materials and Convergence Research Department, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Junghoon, E-mail: jleenano@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Division of WCU Multiscale Mechanical Design, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-04

    We report direct printing and photo-thermal reduction of graphite oxide (GO) to obtain a highly porous pattern of interdigitated electrodes, leading to a supercapacitor on a flexible substrate. Key parameters optimized include the amount of GO delivered, the suitable photo-thermal energy level for effective flash reduction, and the substrate properties for appropriate adhesion after reduction. Tests with supercapacitors based on the printed-reduced GO showed performance comparable with commercial supercapacitors: the energy densities were 1.06 and 0.87 mWh/cm{sup 3} in ionic and organic electrolytes, respectively. The versatility in the architecture and choice of substrate makes this material promising for smart power applications.

  6. Direct printing and reduction of graphite oxide for flexible supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hanyung; Ve Cheah, Chang; Jeong, Namjo; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-08-01

    We report direct printing and photo-thermal reduction of graphite oxide (GO) to obtain a highly porous pattern of interdigitated electrodes, leading to a supercapacitor on a flexible substrate. Key parameters optimized include the amount of GO delivered, the suitable photo-thermal energy level for effective flash reduction, and the substrate properties for appropriate adhesion after reduction. Tests with supercapacitors based on the printed-reduced GO showed performance comparable with commercial supercapacitors: the energy densities were 1.06 and 0.87 mWh/cm3 in ionic and organic electrolytes, respectively. The versatility in the architecture and choice of substrate makes this material promising for smart power applications.

  7. Direct printing and reduction of graphite oxide for flexible supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hanyung; Ve Cheah, Chang; Jeong, Namjo; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-01-01

    We report direct printing and photo-thermal reduction of graphite oxide (GO) to obtain a highly porous pattern of interdigitated electrodes, leading to a supercapacitor on a flexible substrate. Key parameters optimized include the amount of GO delivered, the suitable photo-thermal energy level for effective flash reduction, and the substrate properties for appropriate adhesion after reduction. Tests with supercapacitors based on the printed-reduced GO showed performance comparable with commercial supercapacitors: the energy densities were 1.06 and 0.87 mWh/cm 3 in ionic and organic electrolytes, respectively. The versatility in the architecture and choice of substrate makes this material promising for smart power applications

  8. Nitrous oxide production kinetics during nitrate reduction in river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverman, Anniet M; Garnier, Josette A; Mounier, Emmanuelle M; Roose-Amsaleg, Céline L

    2010-03-01

    A significant amount of nitrogen entering river basins is denitrified in riparian zones. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of nitrate and carbon concentrations on the kinetic parameters of nitrate reduction as well as nitrous oxide emissions in river sediments in a tributary of the Marne (the Seine basin, France). In order to determine these rates, we used flow-through reactors (FTRs) and slurry incubations; flow-through reactors allow determination of rates on intact sediment slices under controlled conditions compared to sediment homogenization in the often used slurry technique. Maximum nitrate reduction rates (R(m)) ranged between 3.0 and 7.1microg Ng(-1)h(-1), and affinity constant (K(m)) ranged from 7.4 to 30.7mg N-NO(3)(-)L(-1). These values were higher in slurry incubations with an R(m) of 37.9microg Ng(-1)h(-1) and a K(m) of 104mg N-NO(3)(-)L(-1). Nitrous oxide production rates did not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and we deduced a rate constant with an average of 0.7 and 5.4ng Ng(-1)h(-1) for FTR and slurry experiments respectively. The addition of carbon (as acetate) showed that carbon was not limiting nitrate reduction rates in these sediments. Similar rates were obtained for FTR and slurries with carbon addition, confirming the hypothesis that homogenization increases rates due to release of and increasing access to carbon in slurries. Nitrous oxide production rates in FTR with carbon additions were low and represented less than 0.01% of the nitrate reduction rates and were even negligible in slurries. Maximum nitrate reduction rates revealed seasonality with high potential rates in fall and winter and low rates in late spring and summer. Under optimal conditions (anoxia, non-limiting nitrate and carbon), nitrous oxide emission rates were low, but significant (0.01% of the nitrate reduction rates). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical Reduction of SIM MOX in Molten Lithium Chloride Using Lithium Metal Reductant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tetsuya; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Kurata, Masaki; Inoue, Tadashi; Sims, Howard E.; Jenkins, Jan A.

    2007-09-01

    A simulated spent oxide fuel in a sintered pellet form, which contained the twelve elements U, Pu, Am, Np, Cm, Ce, Nd, Sm, Ba, Zr,Mo, and Pd, was reduced with Li metal in a molten LiCl bath at 923 K. More than 90% of U and Pu were reduced to metal to form a porous alloy without significant change in the Pu/U ratio. Small fractions of Pu were also combined with Pd to form stable alloys. In the gap of the porous U-Pu alloy, the aggregation of the rare-earth (RE) oxide was observed. Some amount of the RE elements and the actinoides leached from the pellet. The leaching ratio of Am to the initially loaded amount was only several percent, which was far from about 80% obtained in the previous ones on simple MOX including U, Pu, and Am. The difference suggests that a large part of Am existed in the RE oxide rather than in the U-Pu alloy. The detection of the RE elements and actinoides in the molten LiCl bath seemed to indicate that they dissolved into the molten LiCl bath containing the oxide ion, which is the by-product of the reduction, as solubility of RE elements was measured in the molten LiCl-Li2O previously.

  10. Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of zinc oxide and aluminum zinc oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Kyle W.; Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Sailer, Robert A.; Ahrenkiel, S. Phillip; Schulz, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films were deposited via atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A second-generation precursor, bis(1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato)(N,N′-diethylethylenediamine) zinc, exhibited significant vapor pressure and good stability at one atmosphere where a vaporization temperature of 110 °C gave flux ∼ 7 μmol/min. Auger electron spectroscopy confirmed that addition of H 2 O to the carrier gas stream mitigated F contamination giving nearly 1:1 metal:oxide stoichiometries for both ZnO and AZO with little precursor-derived C contamination. ZnO and AZO thin film resistivities ranged from 14 to 28 Ω·cm for the former and 1.1 to 2.7 Ω·cm for the latter. - Highlights: • A second generation precursor was utilized for atmospheric pressure film growth. • Addition of water vapor to the carrier gas stream led to a marked reduction of ZnF 2 . • Carbonaceous contamination from the precursor was minimal

  11. Reduction of Campylobacter jejuni on chicken wings by chemical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tong; Doyle, Michael P

    2006-04-01

    Eight chemicals, including glycerol monolaurate, hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid, lactic acid, sodium benzoate, sodium chlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium hydroxide, were tested individually or in combination for their ability to inactivate Campylobacter jejuni at 4 degrees C in suspension. Results showed that treatment for up to 20 min with 0.01% glycerol monolaurate, 0.1% sodium benzoate, 50 or 100 mM sodium chlorate, or 1% lactic acid did not substantially (5 log CFU/ml within 2 min. A combination of 0.5% acetic acid plus 0.05% potassium sorbate or 0.5% acetic acid plus 0.05% sodium benzoate reduced C. jejuni populations by >5 log CFU/ml within 1 min; however, substituting 0.5% lactic acid for 0.5% acetic acid was not effective, with a reduction of C. jejuni of 5 log CFU/ml within 1 min. All chemicals or chemical combinations for which there was a >5-log/ml reduction of C. jejuni in suspension were further evaluated for C. jejuni inactivation on chicken wings. Treatments at 4 degrees C of 2% acetic acid, 100 mM sodium carbonate, or 0.1 N sodium hydroxide for up to 45 s reduced C. jejuni populations by ca. 1.4, 1.6, or 3.5 log CFU/g, respectively. Treatment with ACS-LA at 4 degrees C for 15 s reduced C. jejuni by >5 log CFU/g to an undetectable level. The ACS-LA treatment was highly effective in chilled water at killing C. jejuni on chicken and, if recycled, may be a useful treatment in chill water tanks for poultry processors to reduce campylobacters on poultry skin after slaughter.

  12. Possible domestication of uranium oxides using biological assistance reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slah Hidouri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uranium has been defined in material research engineering field as one of the most energetic radioactive elements in the entire Mendeleev periodic table. The manipulation of uranium needs higher theories and sophisticated apparatus even in nuclear energy extraction or in many other chemical applications. Above the nuclear exploitation level, the chemical conventional approaches used, require a higher temperature and pressure to control the destination of ionic form. However, it has been discovered later that at biological scale, the manipulation of this actinide is possible under friendly conditions. The review summarizes the relevant properties of uranium element and a brief characterization of nanoparticles, based on some structural techniques. These techniques reveal the common link between chemical approaches and biological assistance in nanoparticles. Also, those biological entities have been able to get it after reduction. Uranium is known for its ability to destroy ductile materials. So, if biological cell can really reduce uranium, then how does it work?

  13. Mixed chemical-induced oxidative stress in occupational exposure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mixed chemical-induced oxidative stress in occupational exposure in Nigerians. JI Anetor, SA Yaqub, GO Anetor, AC Nsonwu, FAA Adeniyi, S Fukushima. Abstract. Exposure to single chemicals and associated disorders in occupational environments has received significant attention. Understanding these events holds ...

  14. Chemical solution deposition techniques for epitaxial growth of complex oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Elshof, Johan E.; Koster, G.; Huijben, Mark; Rijnders, G.

    2015-01-01

    The chemical solution deposition (CSD) process is a wet-chemical process that is employed to fabricate a wide variety of amorphous and crystalline oxide thin films. This chapter describes the typical steps in a CSD process and their influence on the final microstructure and properties of films, and

  15. Dissimilatory oxidation and reduction of elemental sulfur in thermophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletzin, Arnulf; Urich, Tim; Müller, Fabian; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2004-02-01

    The oxidation and reduction of elemental sulfur and reduced inorganic sulfur species are some of the most important energy-yielding reactions for microorganisms living in volcanic hot springs, solfataras, and submarine hydrothermal vents, including both heterotrophic, mixotrophic, and chemolithoautotrophic, carbon dioxide-fixing species. Elemental sulfur is the electron donor in aerobic archaea like Acidianus and Sulfolobus. It is oxidized via sulfite and thiosulfate in a pathway involving both soluble and membrane-bound enzymes. This pathway was recently found to be coupled to the aerobic respiratory chain, eliciting a link between sulfur oxidation and oxygen reduction at the level of the respiratory heme copper oxidase. In contrast, elemental sulfur is the electron acceptor in a short electron transport chain consisting of a membrane-bound hydrogenase and a sulfur reductase in (facultatively) anaerobic chemolithotrophic archaea Acidianus and Pyrodictium species. It is also the electron acceptor in organoheterotrophic anaerobic species like Pyrococcus and Thermococcus, however, an electron transport chain has not been described as yet. The current knowledge on the composition and properties of the aerobic and anaerobic pathways of dissimilatory elemental sulfur metabolism in thermophilic archaea is summarized in this contribution.

  16. Cell oxidation-reduction imbalance after modulated radiofrequency radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Ana Marija; Pavicic, Ivan; Trosic, Ivancica

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate an influence of modulated radiofrequency field (RF) of 1800 MHz, strength of 30 V/m on oxidation-reduction processes within the cell. The assigned RF field was generated within Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic Mode cell equipped by signal generator, modulator, and amplifier. Cell line V79, was irradiated for 10, 30, and 60 min, specific absorption rate was calculated to be 1.6 W/kg. Cell metabolic activity and viability was determined by MTT assay. In order to define total protein content, colorimetric method was used. Concentration of oxidised proteins was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) marked with fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate were measured by means of plate reader device. In comparison with control cell samples, metabolic activity and total protein content in exposed cells did not differ significantly. Concentrations of carbonyl derivates, a product of protein oxidation, insignificantly but continuously increase with duration of exposure. In exposed samples, ROS level significantly (p < 0.05) increased after 10 min of exposure. Decrease in ROS level was observed after 30-min treatment indicating antioxidant defence mechanism activation. In conclusion, under the given laboratory conditions, modulated RF radiation might cause impairment in cell oxidation-reduction equilibrium within the growing cells.

  17. Investigations involving oxidation-reduction (REDOX) pretreatment in conjunction with biological remediation of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montemagno, C.D.; Peters, R.W.; Tyree, A.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation-reduction (REDOX) reactions are among the most important reactions involved in the environmental engineering field. Oxidation is a reaction in which the oxidation state of the treated compound is increased, i.e., the material loses electrons. Reduction involves the addition of a chemical (reducing) agent which lowers the oxidation state of a substance, i.e., the material gains electrons. Both processes of oxidation and reduction occur together. All REDOX reactions are thermodynamically based. There are a number of oxidizing agents which have been reported in the technical literature for treatment of refractory organic compounds. Common oxidizing agents include: hydrogen peroxide, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and combinations thereof, such as UV/ozone and UV/peroxide. A gradient of REDOX reactions is possible, depending on such factors as the oxidation-reduction reaction conditions, the availability of electron donors and acceptors, and the nature of the organic compounds involved. A review of the technical literature revealed that the majority of the oxidation-reduction applications have been in the areas of wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation, with very little attention devoted to the potential of using REDOX technologies for remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils. In this particular study, feasibility studies were performed on gasoline- contaminated soil. These studies focused on three major phases: 1) containment of the contamination by addition of tailoring agents to the soil, 2) biological remediation either performed in situ or on-site (using a slurry reactor system), and 3) pretreatment of the contaminated soils using REDOX systems, prior to biological remediation. This particular paper focuses on the third phase of the project, aimed at ''softening'' the refractory organics resulting in the formation of organic compounds which are more amenable to biological degradation. This paper focuses its attention on the use of

  18. Investigations involving oxidation-reduction (REDOX) pretreatment in conjunction with biological remediation of contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montemagno, C. D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Peters, R. W.; Tyree, A.

    1991-07-01

    Oxidation-reduction (REDOX) reactions are among the most important reactions involved in the environmental engineering field. Oxidation is a reaction in which the oxidation state of the treated compound is increased, i.e., the material loses electrons. Reduction involves the addition of a chemical (reducing) agent which lowers the oxidation state of a substance, i.e., the material gains electrons. Both processes of oxidation and reduction occur together. All REDOX reactions are thermodynamically based. There are a number of oxidizing agents which have been reported in the technical literature for treatment of refractory organic compounds. Common oxidizing agents include: hydrogen peroxide, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and combinations thereof, such as UV/ozone and UV/peroxide. A gradient of REDOX reactions is possible, depending on such factors as the oxidation-reduction reaction conditions, the availability of electron donors and acceptors, and the nature of the organic compounds involved. A review of the technical literature revealed that the majority of the oxidation-reduction applications have been in the areas of wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation, with very little attention devoted to the potential of using REDOX technologies for remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils. In this particular study, feasibility studies were performed on gasoline- contaminated soil. These studies focused on three major phases: 1) containment of the contamination by addition of tailoring agents to the soil, 2) biological remediation either performed in situ or on-site (using a slurry reactor system), and 3) pretreatment of the contaminated soils using REDOX systems, prior to biological remediation. This particular paper focuses on the third phase of the project, aimed at ''softening'' the refractory organics resulting in the formation of organic compounds which are more amenable to biological degradation. This paper focuses its attention on the use of

  19. Selective Oxidation of Biomass-Derived Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modvig, Amalie Elise

    . These processes should be able to compete with the established processes based on fossil resources. Glycolaldehyde is an often-observed by-product formed from degradation of larger sugars. Due to competing ecological and economical aspects of the well-established processes for extraction and conversion....... The objective of this dissertation was to develop new, alternative and sustainable methods for oxidative catalytic upgrading of biomass-derived compounds, with focus on oxidation of glycolaldehyde and simple alcohols as model substrates for larger sugars. Supported gold nanoparticle were studied...

  20. Metallic oxide reduction in molten chlorides: electrochemical solvent regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.

    2005-11-01

    We consider the reaction MeO 2 + 2 Ca → Me + 2 CaO in CaCl 2 at 850 C. We want to re-use the molten media, which is a CaO-CaCl 2 melt at the end of the reaction. For that we want to de-oxidize it. When we electrolyse CaO we obtain Ca and O 2 ; it presents three difficult points that we want to solve: (1) it is difficult to oxidize O 2 - without oxidizing Cl - because their oxidation potential are very closed, (2) the chemical or electrochemical anodic corrosion, (3) the anodically produced gas dissolution in the mell One way of avoiding chlorine gas evolution is to prevent chloride ions from reaching the anode, for example using a selective membrane. Furthermore, the best prevention of the anodically produced gas dissolution in the melt can be done with a compartment, physically separating the anode from the rest of the reactional media. Thus in this work we have used an yttria stabilized zirconia membrane as a selective membrane for the deoxidation of a CaO-CaCl 2 melt at 850 C. (author)

  1. Oxidation-reduction enzymes of myocardium under ionizing radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uteshev, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Tissue respiration proceses under radiation effect were investigated which allowed one to reveal slight biochemical disturbances in a cell which make up the base of functional changes of different organs and tissues and to get to know the essence of tissue respiration processes. An attempt to explain significant value of oxidation enzyme system radiosensitivity in the course of cell respiration process altogether is made when studying the state of separate links of oxidation-reduction chain. It is shown that at early periods of radiation injury activity of catalase, dehydrogenases (isocitric, α-ketoglutaric, malic, succinic acids) is suppressed, concentration of a number of cytochromes is reduced and general ferrum content is increased which is connected with conformation changes of ultrastructure of mitochondrial membranes

  2. Discrete Event System Based Pyroprocessing Modeling and Simulation: Oxide Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. J.; Ko, W. I.; Choi, S. Y.; Kim, S. K.; Hur, J. M.; Choi, E. Y.; Im, H. S.; Park, K. I.; Kim, I. T.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes according to the batch operation cannot be predicted in an equilibrium material flow. This study began to build a dynamic material balance model based on the previously developed pyroprocessing flowsheet. As a mid- and long-term research, an integrated pyroprocessing simulator is being developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to cope with a review on the technical feasibility, safeguards assessment, conceptual design of facility, and economic feasibility evaluation. The most fundamental thing in such a simulator development is to establish the dynamic material flow framework. This study focused on the operation modeling of pyroprocessing to implement a dynamic material flow. As a case study, oxide reduction was investigated in terms of a dynamic material flow. DES based modeling was applied to build a pyroprocessing operation model. A dynamic material flow as the basic framework for an integrated pyroprocessing was successfully implemented through ExtendSim's internal database and item blocks. Complex operation logic behavior was verified, for example, an oxide reduction process in terms of dynamic material flow. Compared to the equilibrium material flow, a model-based dynamic material flow provides such detailed information that a careful analysis of every batch is necessary to confirm the dynamic material balance results. With the default scenario of oxide reduction, the batch mass balance was verified in comparison with a one-year equilibrium mass balance. This study is still under progress with a mid-and long-term goal, the development of a multi-purpose pyroprocessing simulator that is able to cope with safeguards assessment, economic feasibility, technical evaluation, conceptual design, and support of licensing for a future pyroprocessing facility

  3. Process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in an effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epperly, W.R.; Sullivan, J.C.; Sprague, B.N.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a process for the reduction of the concentration of nitrogen oxides in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. The process comprises introducing a treatment agent which comprises a composition selected from the group consisting of NH/sub 4/-lignosulfonate, calcium lignosulfonate, 2-furoic acid, 1,3 dioxolane, tetrahydrofuran, furfurylamine, furfurylalcohol, gluconic acid, citric acid, n-butyl acetate, 1,3 butylene glycol, methylal, tetrahydrofuryl alcohol, furan, fish oil, coumalic acid, furfuryl acetate, tetrahydrofuran 2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid, tetrahydrofurylamine, furylacrylic acid, tetrahydropyran, 2,5-furandimethanol, mannitol, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, acetic anhydride, oxalic acid, mucic acid and d-galactose.

  4. Kinetics of transuranium element oxidation-reduction reactions in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourisse, D.

    1966-09-01

    A review of the kinetics of U, Np, Pu, Am oxidation-reduction reactions is proposed. The relations between the different activation thermodynamic functions (compensatory effect, formal entropy of the activated complex, magnitude of reactions velocities) are considered. The effects of acidity, ionic strength deuterium and mixed solvents polarity on reactions rates are described. The effect of different anions on reactions rates are explained by variations of the reaction standard free energy and variations of the activation free energy (coulombic interactions) resulting from the complexation of dissolved species by these anions. (author) [fr

  5. Oxidation-reduction induced roughening of platinum (111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, H.; Nagy, Z.

    1993-06-01

    Platinum (111) single crystal surface was roughened by repeated cycles of oxidation and reduction to study dynamic evolution of surface roughening. The interface roughens progressively upon repeated cycles. The measured width of the interface was fit to an assumed pow law, W ∼t β , with β = 0.38(1). The results are compared with a simulation based on a random growth model. The fraction of the singly stepped surface apparently saturates to 0. 25 monolayer, which explains the apparent saturation to a steady roughness observed in previous studies

  6. Particle-particle interactions in aluminum reduction of boron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, K.V.; McLemore, W.J.S.; Sparrow, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute has been studying the use of thermite reactions for the production of specialized compounds since the mid-1950's. One of the goals of the research at GTRI is to define the reaction mechanism in order to be ble to predict the resultant reaction behaviour and thus prevent hazardous conditions. Thermite processing advantages are discussed in this paper. A typical thermite type of reaction to produce a composite titanium diboride/alumina is shown. The reactions typically use three starting materials for the production of a specific compound. A preliminary experimental mechanistic model of the extremely exothermic oxidation-reduction reaction is being developed

  7. Metallization of uranium oxide powders by lithium reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I. S.; Seo, J. S.; Oh, S. C.; Hong, S. S.; Lee, W. K.

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory scale experiments on the reduction of uranium oxide powders into metal by lithium were performed in order to determine the equipment setup and optimum operation conditions. The method of filtration using the porous magnesia filter was introduced to recover uranium metal powders produced. Based on the laboratory scale experimental results, mock-up scale (20 kg U/batch) metallizer was designed and made. The applicability to the metallization process was estimated with respect to the thermal stability of the porous magnesia filter in the high temperature molten salt, the filtration of the fine uranium metal powders, and the operability of the equipment

  8. Nitric oxide reduction and oxidation on stepped Pt[n(111)x(111)] electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltramo, G.L.; Koper, M.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    The structure sensitivity of the reduction and oxidation of saturated and subsaturated NO adlayers has been studied on a series of stepped Pt[n(111)×(111)] electrodes by cyclic and stripping voltammetry experiments in sulfuric and perchloric acid solution. In agreement with earlier experimental

  9. In situ Reduction and Oxidation of Nickel from Solid Oxide Fuel Cells in a Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faes, Antonin; Jeangros, Quentin; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2009-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize in situ the reduction and oxidation of nickel from a Ni/YSZ solid oxide fuel cell anode support between 300-500{degree sign}C. The reduction is done under low hydrogen pressure. The reduction initiates at the NiO/YSZ interface...

  10. A Study on the Electrolytic Reduction Mechanism of Uranium Oxide in a LiCl-Li2O Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seung Chul; Hur, Jin Mok; Seo, Chung Seok; Park, Seong Won

    2003-01-01

    This study proposed a new electrolytic reduction technology that is based on the integration of simultaneous uranium oxide metallization and Li 2 O electrowinning. In this electrolytic reduction reaction, electrolytically reduced Li deposits on cathode and simultaneously reacts with uranium oxides to produce uranium metal showing more than 99% conversion. For the verification of process feasibility, the experiments to obtain basic data on the metallization of uranium oxide, investigation of reaction mechanism, the characteristics of closed recycle of Li 2 O and mass transfer were carried out. This evolutionary electrolytic reduction technology would give benefits over the conventional Li-reduction process improving economic viability such as: avoidance of handling of chemically active Li-LiCl molten salt increase of metallization yield, and simplification of process.

  11. A study on the electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide in a LiCl-Li2O molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, J. S.; Hu, J. M.; Hong, S. S.; Jang, D. S.; Park, S. W.

    2003-01-01

    New electrolytic reduction technology was proposed that is based on the integration of metallization of uranium oxide and Li 2 O electrowinning. In this electrolytic reduction reaction, electrolytically reduced Li deposits on cathode and simultaneously reacts with uranium oxides to produce uranium metal showing more than 99% conversion. For the verification of process feasibility, the experiments to obtain basic data on the metallization of uranium oxide, investigation of reaction mechanism, the characteristics of closed recycle of Li 2 O and mass transfer were carried out. This evolutionary electrolytic reduction technology would give benefits over the conventional Li-reduction process improving economic viability such as: avoidance of handling of chemically active Li-LiCl molten salt, increase of metallization yield, and simplification of process

  12. Applications of direct chemical oxidation to demilitarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.F., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Research is reported concerning an aqueous process for oxidative destruction of solid- and liquid organic wastes, including ongoing work relevant to demilitarization This process uses acidified ammonium- or sodium peroxydisulfate and operates at ambient pressure and at temperatures of 80- 100 C The oxidant may be regenerated by electrolysis of the sulfate by- product at Pt anodes at roughly 80% coulombic efficiency, even in the presence of inorganic contaminants (e g , nitrate, phosphate or chloride) found in the original waste and entrained in the recycle stream Integral rate constants have been determined for the oxidation of diverse organic compounds at low concentrations (50 ppm, C), with rate constants (based on equivalents) of 0 004-O 02 miri Higher concentrations generally react at a 2-4X higher rate. The process has been carried through full- scale laboratory tests and initial pilot plant tests on chlorinated solvents, using a hydrolysis pretreatment Integral rate data indicate throughput rates of about 200 kg- C/m3-day The process may benefit the demilitarization efforts in various specialized applications destruction of solvents; destruction of trace propellants and explosives in shell casings remaining after bulk removal, destruction of red and pink waters, in situ remediation of soils at open pit burning/detonation sites; and as a regenerative filter for offgas carrying toxic or explosive substances.

  13. Effects of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide on mercury oxidation and reduction under homogeneous conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongxin Zhao; Michael D. Mann; Edwin S. Olson; John H. Pavlish; Grant E. Dunham [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2006-05-15

    This paper is particularly related to elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation and divalent mercury (Hg{sup 2+} reduction under simulated flue gas conditions in the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). As a powerful oxidant and chlorinating reagent, Cl{sub 2} has the potential for Hg oxidation. However, the detailed mechanism for the interactions, especially among chlorine (Cl)-containing species, SO{sub 2}, NO, as well as H{sub 2}O, remains ambiguous. Research described in this paper therefore focused on the impacts of SO{sub 2} and NO on Hg{sup 0} oxidation and Hg{sup 2+} reduction with the intent of unraveling unrecognized interactions among Cl species, SO{sub 2}, and NO most importantly in the presence of H{sub 2}O. The experimental results demonstrated that SO{sub 2} and NO had pronounced inhibitory effects on Hg{sup 0} oxidation at high temperatures when H{sub 2}O was also present in the gas blend. Such a demonstration was further confirmed by the reduction of Hg{sup 2+} back into its elemental form. Data revealed that SO{sub 2} and NO were capable of promoting homogeneous reduction of Hg{sup 2+} to Hg{sup 0} with H{sub 2}O being present. However, the above inhibition or promotion disappeared under homogeneous conditions when H{sub 2}O was removed from the gas blend. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Mechanism of the hydrogen reduction of molybdenum oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulmeyer, W.V.; Ortner, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    The two stages of the hydrogen reduction of MoO 3 to Mo were investigated in a thermal balance under well defined reaction conditions. Starting with different grain and agglomerate sizes for both stages, the influence of a set of parameters (temperature, local partial pressure of H 2 O, gas flow, etc.) on the reaction progress and the final result were studied in detail. Depending on the set of parameters used, different reaction mechanisms like pseudomorphic transformation or chemical vapor transport (CVT) were observed. Taking into account that grains and agglomerates deviate from a spherical shape and a definite grain size, the extent of reaction is well described by standard theoretical gas-solid-reaction models such as the shrinking core model (SCM) or the crackling core model (CCM). Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurements (BET-method) and laser diffraction were used for these studies. Under all conditions, the first stage shows a reaction path MoO 3 → Mo 4 O 11 → MoO 2 via chemical vapor transport (CVT). The reaction extent follows the crackling core model (Park/Levenspiel). Depending on the local partial pressure of H 2 O during reduction, the formed Mo 4 O 11 and MoO 2 exhibit different size distributions and shapes of the grains. The extent of reaction of the second stage develops according to the shrinking core model (Yagi/Kunii). Depending on the local dew point, two different reaction paths can occur: pseudomorphic transformation at low dew points and transformation via chemical vapor transport at high dew points. This paper is an extract from the Ph.D. thesis of W.V. Schulmeyer 'Mechanismen der Wasserstoffreduktion von Molybdaenoxiden', 1998, Darmstadt University of Technology, Institute of Material Science, Department of Chemical Analytics, FRG. It therefor focuses on a phenomenological description of the most important results. (author)

  15. Green Approach for the Effective Reduction of Graphene Oxide Using Salvadora persica L. Root (Miswak) Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mujeeb; Al-Marri, Abdulhadi H.; Khan, Merajuddin; Shaik, Mohammed Rafi; Mohri, Nils; Adil, Syed Farooq; Kuniyil, Mufsir; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z.; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Tremel, Wolfgang; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, green reduction of graphene oxide (GRO) using various natural materials, including plant extracts, has drawn significant attention among the scientific community. These methods are sustainable, low cost, and are more environmentally friendly than other standard methods of reduction. Herein, we report a facile and eco-friendly method for the bioreduction of GRO using Salvadora persica L. ( S. persica L.) roots (miswak) extract as a bioreductant. The as-prepared highly reduced graphene oxide (SP-HRG) was characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Various results have confirmed that the biomolecules present in the root extract of miswak not only act as a bioreductant but also functionalize the surface of SP-HRG by acting as a capping ligand to stabilize it in water and other solvents. The dispersion quality of SP-HRG in deionized water was investigated in detail by preparing different samples of SP-HRG with increasing concentration of root extract. Furthermore, the dispersibility of SP-HRG was also compared with chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRG). The developed eco-friendly method for the reduction of GRO could provide a better substitute for a large-scale production of dispersant-free graphene and graphene-based materials for various applications in both technological and biological fields such as electronics, nanomedicine, and bionic materials.

  16. Heterogeneous reduction of nitric oxide on synthetic coal chars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Pevida; A. Arenillas; F. Rubiera; J.J. Pis [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

    2005-12-01

    Model compounds, with a controlled heteroatoms content and well-defined functionalities, were used to study the release of nitrogen compounds from char combustion. In the present work, the mechanisms involved in NO-char heterogeneous reduction were studied with a synthetic coal (SC) char as carbon source. Another synthetic char (SN) without any nitrogen in its composition was also employed in these studies. Temperature programmed reduction (TPR) tests with a gas mixture of 400 ppm NO in argon and with isotopically labelled nitric oxide, {sup 15}NO (500 ppm {sup 15}NO in argon), were carried out. The gases produced were quantitatively determined by means of MS and FTIR analysers. Under the conditions of this work the main products of the NO-C reaction were found to be N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. The main path of reaction involves the formation of surface nitrogen compounds that afterwards react with nitrogen from the reactive gas to form N{sub 2}. It was observed that fuel-N also participates in the overall heterogeneous reduction reaction, although to a lesser extent.

  17. Nitrous oxide emission reduction in temperate biochar-amended soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, R.; Hüppi, R.; Leifeld, J.; Neftel, A.

    2012-01-01

    Biochar, a pyrolysis product of organic residues, is an amendment for agricultural soils to improve soil fertility, sequester CO2 and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In highly weathered tropical soils laboratory incubations of soil-biochar mixtures revealed substantial reductions for nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2). In contrast, evidence is scarce for temperate soils. In a three-factorial laboratory incubation experiment two different temperate agricultural soils were amended with green waste and coffee grounds biochar. N2O and CO2 emissions were measured at the beginning and end of a three month incubation. The experiments were conducted under three different conditions (no additional nutrients, glucose addition, and nitrate and glucose addition) representing different field conditions. We found mean N2O emission reductions of 60 % compared to soils without addition of biochar. The reduction depended on biochar type and soil type as well as on the age of the samples. CO2 emissions were slightly reduced, too. NO3- but not NH4+ concentrations were significantly reduced shortly after biochar incorporation. Despite the highly significant suppression of N2O emissions biochar effects should not be transferred one-to-one to field conditions but need to be tested accordingly.

  18. Synthesis of carbide fuels from nano-structured precursors: impact on carbo-reduction and physico-chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravia, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The classical way classically used for manufacturing carbide fuels consists of carbo-reducing at high temperature (1600 C) and under primary vacuum a mixture of AnO 2 and graphite powders. These conditions are disadvantageous for the synthesis of mixed (U,Pu)C carbides on account of plutonium volatilization. Therefore, one of the main aims of these studies is to decrease the carbo-reduction temperature. The experiments focused mainly on the lowering of the uranium oxide temperature. This result has been obtained with the use of uranium oxide and carbon nano-structured precursors. To achieve this goal colloidal suspensions of uranium oxide have been prepared and stabilized by cellulosic ethers. Cellulosic ethers are both stabiliser for uranium oxide nanoparticles and carbon source for carbo-reduction. It has been shown that these precursors are more efficient for carbo-reduction than the standard precursors: a reduction of 300 C of carbo-reduction temperature has been obtained. The impact of these precursors on carbo-reduction and on physico-chemical properties as well as the structural and microstructural characterizations of the obtained carbides have been carried out. (author) [fr

  19. Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction in sedimentary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovely, Derek R.

    2002-01-01

    Although it was previously considered that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms must come into direct contact with Fe(III) oxides in order to reduce them, recent studies have suggested that electron-shuttling compounds and/or Fe(III) chelators, either naturally present or produced by the Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms themselves, may alleviate the need for the Fe(III) reducers to establish direct contact with Fe(III) oxides. Studies with Shewanella alga strain BrY and Fe(III) oxides sequestered within microporous beads demonstrated for the first time that this organism releases a compound(s) that permits electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides which the organism cannot directly contact. Furthermore, as much as 450 w M dissolved Fe(III) was detected in cultures of S. alga growing in Fe(III) oxide medium, suggesting that this organism releases compounds that can solublize Fe(III) from Fe(III) oxide. These results contrast with previous studies, which demonstrated that Geobacter metallireducens does not produce electron-shuttles or Fe(III) chelators. Some freshwater aquatic sediments and groundwaters contained compounds, which could act as electron shuttles by accepting electrons from G. metallireducens and then transferring the electrons to Fe(III). However, other samples lacked significant electron-shuttling capacity. Spectroscopic studies indicated that the electron-shuttling capacity of the waters was not only associated with the presence of humic substances, but water extracts of walnut, oak, and maple leaves contained electron-shuttling compounds did not appear to be humic substances. Porewater from a freshwater aquatic sediment and groundwater from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer contained dissolved Fe(III) (4-16 w M), suggesting that soluble Fe(III) may be available as an electron acceptor in some sedimentary environments. These results demonstrate that in order to accurately model the mechanisms for Fe(III) reduction in sedimentary environments it will be necessary

  20. Global Emissions of Nitrous Oxide: Key Source Sectors, their Future Activities and Technical Opportunities for Emission Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiwarter, W.; Höglund-Isaksson, L.; Klimont, Z.; Schöpp, W.; Amann, M.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrous oxide originates primarily from natural biogeochemical processes, but its atmospheric concentrations have been strongly affected by human activities. According to IPCC, it is the third largest contributor to the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (after carbon dioxide and methane). Deep decarbonization scenarios, which are able to constrain global temperature increase within 1.5°C, require strategies to cut methane and nitrous oxide emissions on top of phasing out carbon dioxide emissions. Employing the Greenhouse gas and Air pollution INteractions and Synergies (GAINS) model, we have estimated global emissions of nitrous oxide until 2050. Using explicitly defined emission reduction technologies we demonstrate that, by 2030, about 26% ± 9% of the emissions can be avoided assuming full implementation of currently existing reduction technologies. Nearly a quarter of this mitigation can be achieved at marginal costs lower than 10 Euro/t CO2-eq with the chemical industry sector offering important reductions. Overall, the largest emitter of nitrous oxide, agriculture, also provides the largest emission abatement potentials. Emission reduction may be achieved by precision farming methods (variable rate technology) as well as by agrochemistry (nitrification inhibitors). Regionally, the largest emission reductions are achievable where intensive agriculture and industry are prevalent (production and application of mineral fertilizers): Centrally Planned Asia including China, North and Latin America, and South Asia including India. Further deep cuts in nitrous oxide emissions will require extending reduction efforts beyond strictly technological solutions, i.e., considering behavioral changes, including widespread adoption of "healthy diets" minimizing excess protein consumption.

  1. Effect of copper oxide electrocatalyst on CO2 reduction using Co3O4 as anode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S.K. Yadav

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 to products electrochemically (RCPE in 0.5 M NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 liquid phase electrolyte solutions was investigated. Cobalt oxide (Co3O4 as anode and cuprous oxide (Cu2O as the cathode were considered, respectively. The impacts of applied potential with time of reaction during reduction of CO2 to products were studied. The anode and cathode were prepared by depositing electrocatalysts on the graphite plate. Ultra-fast liquid chromatography (UFLC was used to analyze the products obtained from the reduction of CO2. The feasible way of reduction by applying voltages with current densities was clearly correlated. The results illustrate the capability of electrocatalyst successfully to remove atmospheric CO2 in the form of valuable chemicals. Maximum Faradaic efficiency of ethanol was 98.1% at 2 V and for formic acid (36.6% at 1.5 V was observed in NaHCO3. On the other hand, in Na2CO3 electrolyte solution maximum efficiency for ethanol was 55.21% at 1.5 V and 25.1% for formic acid at 2 V. In both electrolytes other end products like methanol, propanol, formaldehyde and acetic acid were formed at various applied voltage and output current densities.

  2. Microbial dechlorination activity during and after chemical oxidant treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doğan-Subaşı, Eylem [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Separation and Conversion Technology, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Bastiaens, Leen, E-mail: leen.bastiaens@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Separation and Conversion Technology, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Boon, Nico [Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Dejonghe, Winnie [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Separation and Conversion Technology, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Combined treatment was possible below 0.5 g/L of KMnO{sub 4} and 1 g/L of Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}. • By-products SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and MnO{sub 2(s)} had inhibitory effects on dehalogenating bacteria. • Oxidation reduction potential (ORP) was identified as a crucial parameter for recovery of oxidant exposed cells. • Bioaugmentation is a necessity at 0.5 g/L of KMnO{sub 4} and 1 g/L of Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} and above. -- Abstract: Potassium permanganate (PM) and sodium persulfate (PS) are used in soil remediation, however, their compatibility with a coinciding or subsequent biotreatment is poorly understood. In this study, different concentrations of PM (0.005–2 g/L) and PS (0.01–4.52 g/L) were applied and their effects on the abundance, activity, and reactivation potential of a dechlorinating enrichment culture were investigated. Expression of the tceA, vcrA and 16S rRNA genes of Dehalococcoides spp. were detected at 0.005–0.01 g/L PM and 0.01–0.02 g/L PS. However, with 0.5–2 g/L PM and 1.13–4.52 g/L PS no gene expression was recorded, neither were indicator molecules for total cell activity (Adenosine triphosphate, ATP) detected. Dilution did not promote the reactivation of the microbial cells when the redox potential was above −100 mV. Similarly, inoculated cells did not dechlorinate trichloroethene (TCE) above −100 mV. When the redox potential was decreased to −300 mV and the reactors were bioaugmented for a second time, dechlorination activity recovered, but only in the reactors with 1.13 and 2.26 g/L PS. In conclusion, our results show that chemical oxidants can be combined with a biotreatment at concentrations below 0.5 g/L PM and 1 g/L PS.

  3. Calcium incorporation in graphene oxide particles: A morphological, chemical, electrical, and thermal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Kelly L.S. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias (Brazil); Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Athos da Silveira Ramos, 149, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Curti, Raphael V.; Araujo, Joyce R.; Landi, Sandra M.; Ferreira, Erlon H.M.; Neves, Rodrigo S.; Kuznetsov, Alexei; Sena, Lidia A. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias (Brazil); Archanjo, Braulio S., E-mail: bsarchanjo@inmetro.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias (Brazil); Achete, Carlos A. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Surface chemical modification and functionalization are common strategies used to provide new properties or functionalities to a material or to enhance existing ones. In this work, graphene oxide prepared using Hummers' method has been chemically modified with calcium ions by immersion in a calcium carbonate solution. Transmission electron microscopy analyses showed that graphene oxide (GO) and calcium incorporated graphene oxide have a morphology similar to an ultra-thin membrane composed of overlapping sheets. X-ray diffraction and Fourier-infrared spectroscopy show that calcium carbonate residue was completely removed by hydrochloric acid washes. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping showed spatially homogeneous calcium in Ca-incorporated graphene oxide sample after HCl washing. This Ca is mainly ionic according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its incorporation promoted a small reduction in the graphene oxide structure, corroborated also by four-point probe measurements. A thermal study shows a remarkable increase in the GO stability with the presence of Ca{sup 2+} ions. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide has been chemically modified with Ca ions by immersion in a CaCO{sub 3} solution. • GO–Ca has morphology similar to an ultra-thin membrane composed of overlapping sheets. • CaCO{sub 3} residue was completely removed by acid washes, leaving only ionic calcium. • EDS maps show that Ca incorporation is spatially homogeneous in GO structure. • Thermal analyses show a remarkable increase in GO stability after Ca incorporation.

  4. Calcium incorporation in graphene oxide particles: A morphological, chemical, electrical, and thermal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Kelly L.S.; Curti, Raphael V.; Araujo, Joyce R.; Landi, Sandra M.; Ferreira, Erlon H.M.; Neves, Rodrigo S.; Kuznetsov, Alexei; Sena, Lidia A.; Archanjo, Braulio S.; Achete, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Surface chemical modification and functionalization are common strategies used to provide new properties or functionalities to a material or to enhance existing ones. In this work, graphene oxide prepared using Hummers' method has been chemically modified with calcium ions by immersion in a calcium carbonate solution. Transmission electron microscopy analyses showed that graphene oxide (GO) and calcium incorporated graphene oxide have a morphology similar to an ultra-thin membrane composed of overlapping sheets. X-ray diffraction and Fourier-infrared spectroscopy show that calcium carbonate residue was completely removed by hydrochloric acid washes. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping showed spatially homogeneous calcium in Ca-incorporated graphene oxide sample after HCl washing. This Ca is mainly ionic according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its incorporation promoted a small reduction in the graphene oxide structure, corroborated also by four-point probe measurements. A thermal study shows a remarkable increase in the GO stability with the presence of Ca"2"+ ions. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide has been chemically modified with Ca ions by immersion in a CaCO_3 solution. • GO–Ca has morphology similar to an ultra-thin membrane composed of overlapping sheets. • CaCO_3 residue was completely removed by acid washes, leaving only ionic calcium. • EDS maps show that Ca incorporation is spatially homogeneous in GO structure. • Thermal analyses show a remarkable increase in GO stability after Ca incorporation.

  5. Neodymium cobalt oxide as a chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, I. A.; Rahman, Mohammed M.; Khan, Sher Bahadar

    2018-03-01

    Chemical sensing and electrical transport properties of neodymium coblate, NdCoO3, was investigated in this work. It was prepared by using co-precipitation method. Pure neodymium chloride and cobalt chloride were mixing in the presence of sodium hydroxide and the obtained co-precipitated powder was calcined at 850 and 1000 °C. The synthesized composites, as-grown (NdCoO3-I), calcined at 850 °C (NdCoO3-II), and calcined at 1000 °C (NdCoO3-III) were studied in details in terms of their morphological and structural properties. The X-ray analysis confirmed that the synthesized products are well crystalline possessing single phase orthorhombic crystal system of space group Pbnm(62). The crystallite size of NdCoO3-I, NdCoO3-II, and NdCoO3-III is 22, 111, and 338 nm, respectively which reflect that crystallite size is increasing with increase in firing temperature. The DC resistivity was measured as a function of temperature in the temperature range from room temperature up to 200 °C. All NdCoO3 are semiconductor in this range of temperature but showed different activation energy which strongly depends on the crystallite size of the products. The activation energy decreased with increase in crystallite size, 0.798, 0.414 and 0.371 eV for NdCoO3-I, NdCoO3-II, and NdCoO3-III, respectively. Thus resistivity increases with increase in crystallite size of NdCoO3. All NdCoO3 products were tested as chemical sensor for acetone by electrochemical approaches and showed excellent sensitivity. Among the NdCoO3 samples, NdCoO3-III showed the highest sensitivity (3.4722 μAcm-2 mM-1) compared to other compositions and gradually decreased to 3.2407 μAcm-2 mM-1 with decreasing the crystallite size of NdCoO3-II. It is also observed that the sensitivity drastically decreased to 0.76253 μAcm-2 mM-1 in the case of NdCoO3-I. It is introduced an efficient route for the detection of environmental unsafe chemicals by electrochemical approach for the safety of healthcare and environmental

  6. Graphene oxide chemically decorated with hybrid Ag-Ru/chitosan nanoparticles: fabrication and properties

    OpenAIRE

    Veerapandian, Murugan; Neethirajan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization of distinct materials into a single nanoplatform is relevant to advance material’s properties for functional application such as biosensor platform. We report the synthesis and characterization of nanosheets of graphene oxide decorated with hybrid nanoparticles of silver-ruthenium bipyridine complex (Ag@[Ru(bpy)3]2+) core and chitosan shell. Hybrid nanoparticles were first obtained through a sequential wet-chemical approach using in situ reduction, electrostatic and coordination...

  7. Thermogravimetric study of reduction of oxides present in oxidized nickel-base alloy powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbell, T. P.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon, hydrogen, and hydrogen plus carbon reduction of three oxidized nickel-base alloy powders (a solid solution strengthened alloy both with and without the gamma prime formers aluminum and titanium and the solid solution strengthened alloy NiCrAlY) were evaluated by thermogravimetry. Hydrogen and hydrogen plus carbon were completely effective in reducing an alloy containing chromium, columbium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. However, with aluminum and titanium present the reduction was limited to a weight loss of about 81 percent. Carbon alone was not effective in reducing any of the alloys, and none of the reducing conditions were effective for use with NiCrAlY.

  8. Catalytic aerobic oxidation of bio-renewable chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbanev, Yury

    , EDS, XRF and other methods. Supported gold and ruthenium hydroxide catalyst systems were explored for the aerobic oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDA), a potential polymer building block for the plastic industry, or its dimethyl ester (FDMC). High product......-free conditions. Moreover, a detailed study on the performance and stability of the ruthenium hydroxide catalysts on magnesium-containing supports under reaction conditions was conducted. The aerobic oxidation of HMF to form another value-added chemical, 2,5-diformylfuran (DFF), was also investigated......Ox deposited on various metal oxides. Furthermore, this thesis presents the results of the catalytic aerobic oxidative degradation of higher alcohols over supported ruthenium hydroxide catalysts. A very efficient oxidative cleavage of vic-diols to form respective acids was also shown under examined conditions...

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopy study on the thermal and hydrazine reduction of graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xianqing; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Huiyuan; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • XAS study of GO and reduced GO was performed. • Detailed evolution of the electronic structures and chemical bonding of GO was revealed. • A new efficient route for the reduction of GO is proposed. - Abstract: X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was applied to systemically investigate the deoxygenation of graphene oxide (GO) via annealing and hydrazine treatment. Detailed evolution of the electronic structures and chemical bonding of GO was presented. The enhanced intensity of π * resonance and the appearance of splitting σ * resonance in C K-edge XAS spectra suggest high extents of recoveries of π-conjugation upon reduction using thermal annealing or hydrazine. Experimental results revealed that the carboxyl as well as epoxide and hydroxyl groups on the surface of GO were thermally reduced first, followed by the more difficult removal of carbonyl and cyclic ether groups at higher temperatures. The hydrazine reduction could remove epoxide, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups effectively, whereas the carbonyl groups were partially reduced with the incorporation of nitrogen species simultaneously. The residual oxygen functional groups on hydrazine-reduced GO could be further removed after modest thermal annealing. It was proposed that a combination of both types of reductions would give the best deoxygenation efficiency for the production of graphene

  10. Production of reduction gases: partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tippmer, K

    1976-04-01

    After some general remarks on reduction gas and quality demands, the Texaco process of partial oxidation with scrubbing is dealt with. A comparison of current iron-sponge techniques shows that a heat demand below 3 M kcal/t Fe should be envisaged, which means that heavy fuel oil or coal should be used. The special features of oxygen generation, coal processing, demands made on fuel oil, gasoline, and natural gas, gas generation, soot recovery, hydrogen sulphide-carbon dioxide scrubbing, system Benfield HP process, recycle-carbon dioxide scrubbing, auxiliary steam system, gas preheating, recycle gas cooling and compression, process data and heat balances for natural gas (one-heat system) and heating fuel oil or naphtha (two-heat system) are given.

  11. Catalyst and method for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Kevin C [Los Alamos, NM

    2008-05-27

    A Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst was prepared by slurry coating ZSM-5 zeolite onto a cordierite monolith, then subliming an iron salt onto the zeolite, calcining the monolith, and then dipping the monolith either into an aqueous solution of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate and then calcining, or by similar treatment with separate solutions of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate. The supported catalyst containing iron, manganese, and cerium showed 80 percent conversion at 113 degrees Celsius of a feed gas containing nitrogen oxides having 4 parts NO to one part NO.sub.2, about one equivalent ammonia, and excess oxygen; conversion improved to 94 percent at 147 degrees Celsius. N.sub.2O was not detected (detection limit: 0.6 percent N.sub.2O).

  12. Electrodeposition of uranium metal by reduction of uranium oxides in molten Lif-KF=NaF-CaF 2-UF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pao, D.S.; Burris, L.; Steunenberg, R.K.; Tomczuk, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Although electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides was shown to be feasible in the early 1960's it is recognized that considerable improvement in the electrolytic reduction technology must be achieved for practical applications. This exploratory work on electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide was undertaken to investigate potential improvements in the technology. The approach taken was to deposit solid uranium metal directly on a solid cathode at temperatures below the melting point of uranium (1132 degrees C). The lower temperature electrolytic reduction process has several advantages over the existing chemical reduction processes. It lessens materials problems and special heating and insulating requirements associated with high-temperature operations. It removes most impurities. It does not produce the large quantities of byproduct oxides wastes typical of chemical reduction processes

  13. Surface oxidization-reduction reactions in Columbia Plateau basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.F.; Yee, A.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented which define principal oxidation-reduction reactions expected between ground water and iron in the Umtanum and Cohassett basalt flows of south central Washington. Data include kinetics of aqueous iron speciation, rates of O 2 uptake and nature of oxyhydroxide precipitates. Such data are important in predicting behavior of radionuclides in basalt aquifers including determination of valence states, speciation, solubility, sorption, and coprecipitation on iron oxyhydroxide substrates and colloids. Analyses of the basalt by XPS indicates that ferrous iron is oxidized to ferric iron on the surface and that the total iron decreases as a function of pH during experimental weathering. Iron oxyhydroxide phases did not form surface coating on basalt surfaces but rather nucleated as separate plases in solution. No significant increases in Cs or Sr sorption were observed with increased weathering of the basalt. Concurrent increases in Fe(II) and decreases in Fe(III) in slightly to moderately acid solutions indicated continued oxidization of ferrous iron in the basalt. At neutral to basic pH, Fe(II) was strongly sorbed onto the basalt surface (Kd = 6.5 x 10 -3 1 x m 2 ) resulting in low dissolved concentrations even under anoxic conditions. The rate of O 2 uptake increased with decreasing pH. Diffusion rates (-- 10 -14 cm 2 x s -1 ), calculated using a one-dimensional analytical model, indicate grain boundary diffusion. Comparisons of Eh values calculated by Pt electrode, dissolved O 2 and Fe(II)/Fe(III) measurements showed considerable divergence, with the ferric-ferrous couple being the preferred method of estimating Eh

  14. Molecular beam studies of oxide reduction by atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    The graphite and oxide internals of a CTR are susceptible to chemical corrosion as well as to physical degradation by high-energy particles. Reactions of thermal atomic hydrogen with oxides are being studied. The hydrogen used is at thermal energy (0.22 eV). Typical data are reported for the H/UO 2 system. The reaction probability is plotted as a function of solid temperature at fixed beam intensity and moculation frequency. The reaction probability increases from low temperature to a high-temperature plateau at about 1300 0 C. Here the reaction rate is limited solely by the sticking probability of H on the surface; about one in seven of the incident atoms is chemisorbed by the surface and ultimately returns to the gas phase as water vapor. A reaction model comprising sticking, recombination to H 2 , solution and diffusion of H in the bulk of the UO 2 , surface reaction of adsorbed H with lattice oxygen atoms to produce the hydroxyl radical, and production of water is constructed. The rate constants for the elementary steps in the mechanism are tabulated. 2 figures, 2 tables

  15. Nanostructured Metal Oxides for Stoichiometric Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Henych, Jiří; Janos, P.; Skoumal, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 236, č. 2016 (2016), s. 239-258 ISSN 0179-5953 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/1116 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : chemical warfare agent * metal nanoparticle * unique surface- chemistry * mesoporous manganese oxide Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.930, year: 2016

  16. Optical properties of tetrapod nanostructured zinc oxide by chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique. This work studies the effects of annealing temperature ranging from 100–500 ºC towards its physical and optical properties. FESEM images showed that the structural properties of tetrapod nanostructured ...

  17. Quantum chemical investigation of mechanisms of silane oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mader, Mary M.; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2001-01-01

    Several mechanisms for the peroxide oxidation of organosilanes to alcohols are compared by quantum chemical calculations, including solvation with the PCM method. Without doubt, the reaction proceeds via anionic, pentacoordinate silicate species, but a profound difference is found between in vacuo...

  18. Chemical nature of catalysts of oxide nanoparticles in environment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    12

    Chemical nature of catalysts of oxide nanoparticles in environment prevailing during growth of carbon nanostructures by CCVD. M. Jana*, A. Sil and S. Ray. †. Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering. Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee. Roorkee 247 667, India. Present address: *School of Materials ...

  19. The chemical oxidation of lignin found in Sappi Saiccor dissolving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sappi Saiccor (situated in Durban, South Africa) dissolving pulp mill effluent, produced from an acid bisulphite pulping process, uses acacia and eucalyptus hardwoods to produce a unique and different blend of lignin that has not been previously studied. The chemical oxidation of lignin found in Sappi Saiccor's effluent has ...

  20. Modeling of oxide reduction in repeated-batch pyroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyo Jik; Im, Hun Suk; Park, Geun Il

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyroprocessing is a complicated batch-type operation. • Discrete event system modeling was used to create an integrated operation model. • Simulation showed that could be accomplished. • The dynamic material flow helps us understand the process operation. • We showed that complex material flow could be simulated in terms of mass balance. - Abstract: Pyroprocessing is a complicated batch-type operation, involving a highly complex material flow logic with a huge number of unit processes. Discrete event system modeling was used to create an integrated operation model for which simulation showed that dynamic material flow could be accomplished to provide considerable insight into the process operation. In the model simulation, the amount of material transported upstream and downstream in the process satisfies a mass balance equation while considering the hold-up incurred by every batch operation. This study also simulated, in detail, an oxide reduction group process embracing electrolytic reduction, cathode processing, and salt purification. Based on the default operation scenario, it showed that complex material flows could be precisely simulated in terms of the mass balance. Specifically, the amount of high-heat elements remaining in the molten salt bath is analyzed to evaluate the operation scenario.

  1. Biogeochemistry of Fe and Tc Reduction and Oxidation in FRC Sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John M, Zachara; James K, Fredrickson; Ravi K, Kukkadapu; Steven C, Smith; David W, Kennedy

    2004-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) To rigorously characterize the distribution of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in FRC sediment. (2) To identify changes to Fe(II)/Fe(III) distribution and concentration resulting from DIRB activity. (3) To determine the dependence of Tc(VII) reduction rate on biogenic Fe(II) and it's forms. (4) To establish tendency of Tc(IV) and biogenic Fe(II) to oxidize and their effects on Tc immobilization. The mineralogic and chemical properties of the pristine, bioreduced, and chemically extracted FRC sediments were characterized by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray microscopy (XRM, at the PNC-CAT beamline at APS), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy with lattice fringe imaging. Chemical extraction included dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB), acid ammonium oxalate (AAO), and hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HAH). The FRC sediment was incubated under anoxic conditions with the facultative dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32 in defined aqueous solutions/media with bicarbonate and PIPES buffers for time periods exceeding 75 d. Lactate was used as the electron donor. Aqueous and sorbed Fe(II) (ferrozine assay and 0.5 N HCl extraction) and Mn(II) (ICP-MS and 10 mM CuSO 4 extraction), and pH were monitored to define the reduction progress and extent. The bioreduced materials were characterized using the abovementioned techniques. Bioreduced (pasteurized) sediment or chemically extracted/reduced sediment spiked with Fe(II) was washed with a PIPES buffer/electrolyte solution, and spiked with NaTc(VII)O 4 to yield a concentration of 20 (micro)M. The Tc(VII)-spiked samples were agitated and equilibrated at 25 C and sampled over time to assess the Tc(VII) reduction rate. Selected sediment samples containing 20 (micro)M of reduced Tc [Tc(IV)] were subjected to oxidation by: (1) successive headspace replacements of air, and (2) open system equilibration with air. Removed aqueous

  2. Less is Better. Laboratory Chemical Management for Waste Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    An objective of the American Chemical Society is to promote alternatives to landfilling for the disposal of laboratory chemical wastes. One method is to reduce the amount of chemicals that become wastes. This is the basis for the "less is better" philosophy. This bulletin discusses various techniques involved in purchasing control,…

  3. Nanostructured Metal Oxides for Stoichiometric Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štengl, Václav; Henych, Jiří; Janoš, Pavel; Skoumal, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxides have very important applications in many areas of chemistry, physics and materials science; their properties are dependent on the method of preparation, the morphology and texture. Nanostructured metal oxides can exhibit unique characteristics unlike those of the bulk form depending on their morphology, with a high density of edges, corners and defect surfaces. In recent years, methods have been developed for the preparation of metal oxide powders with tunable control of the primary particle size as well as of a secondary particle size: the size of agglomerates of crystallites. One of the many ways to take advantage of unique properties of nanostructured oxide materials is stoichiometric degradation of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) pollutants on their surfaces.

  4. Microbial reduction of graphene oxide by Escherichia coli: a green chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2013-02-01

    Graphene and graphene related materials are an important area of research in recent years due to their unique properties. The extensive industrial application of graphene and related compounds has led researchers to devise novel and simple methods for the synthesis of high quality graphene. In this paper, we developed an environment friendly, cost effective, simple method and green approaches for the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using Escherichia coli biomass. In biological method, we can avoid use of toxic and environmentally harmful reducing agents commonly used in the chemical reduction of GO to obtain graphene. The biomass of E. coli reduces exfoliated GO to graphene at 37°C in an aqueous medium. The E. coli reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) was characterized with UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle analyzer, high resolution X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Besides the reduction potential, the biomass could also play an important role as stabilizing agent, in which synthesized graphene exhibited good stability in water. This method can open up the new avenue for preparing graphene in cost effective and large scale production. Our findings suggest that GO can be reduced by simple eco-friendly method by using E. coli biomass to produce water dispersible graphene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  6. In-Situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 1/29/10-9/30/10 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In situ optical studies of oxidation/reduction kinetics on SOFC cermet anodes 5a...0572 In-situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Montana State University...of Research In-situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes Principal Investigator Robert Walker Organization

  7. Oxidation-reduction reactions. Overview and implications for repository studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apted, Michael J.; Arthur, Randolph C.; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikazu; Iwatsuki, Teruki

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a survey and review on oxidation-reduction ('redox') reactions, with particular emphasis on implications for disposal of high-level waste (HLW) in deep geological formations. As an overview, the focus is on basic principles, problems, and proposed research related specifically to the assessment of redox for a HLW repository in Japan. For a more comprehensive treatment of redox and the myriad associated issues, the reader is directed to the cited textbooks used as primary references in this report. Low redox conditions in deep geological formations is a key assumption in the 'Second Progress Report on Research and Development for the Geological Disposal of HLW in Japan' (hereafter called H12'). The release behavior of multi-valent radioelements (e.g., Tc, Se, U, Pu, Np), as well as daughter radioelements of these radioelements, from a deep geological repository are sensitively related to redox conditions. Furthermore, the performance of certain barrier materials, such as overpack and buffer, may be impacted by redox conditions. Given this importance, this report summarizes some key topics for future technical studies supporting site characterization and repository performance as follows: To fully test the conceptual models for system Eh, it will be necessary to measure and evaluate trace element and isotopic information of both coexisting groundwater and reactive minerals of candidate rocks. Because of importance of volatile species (e.g., O 2 , H 2 etc.) in redox reactions, and given the high total pressure of a repository located 500 to 1000 meter deep, laboratory investigations of redox will necessarily require use of pressurized test devices that can fully simulate repository conditions. The stability (redox capacity) of the repository system with respect to potential changes in redox boundary condition induced by oxidizing waters intrusion should be established experimentally. An overall conceptual model that unifies

  8. Synthesis of carboxylate-functionalized graphene nanosheets for high dispersion of platinum nanoparticles based on the reduction of graphene oxide via 1-pyrenecarboxaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang, Yinjie; Zheng, Xingliang; Zhou, Qionghua; Lu, Cuihong; Chen, Jinhua; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    A one-step reduction/functionalization strategy for the synthesis of carboxylate-functionalized graphene nanosheets is reported in this paper. 1-pyrenecarboxaldehyde (PCA) is introduced as a new reductant for the chemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO), serving three roles: reducing GO to graphene nanosheets (GNs), stabilizing the as-prepared GNs due to the electrostatic repulsion of the oxidation products of PCA (1-pyrenecarboxylate, PC − ) on the surface of the GNs and anchoring Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) with high dispersion and small particle size. Transmission electron microscopy shows that Pt NPs with an average diameter of 1.3 ± 0.2 nm are uniformly dispersed on the surface of the PC − -functionalized GNs (PC − -GNs). The obtained Pt NPs/PC − -GNs nanohybrids have higher electrocatalytic activity and stability towards methanol oxidation in comparison with Pt NPs supported on GNs obtained by the chemical reduction of GO with the typical reductant, hydrazine. (paper)

  9. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  10. Changes in physical properties of graphene oxide with thermal reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Bhishma; Jo, Chang Hee; Joo, Kwan Seon; Cho, Jaehee

    2017-08-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has attracted significant attention as an easily fabricable twodimensional material. Depending on the oxygen-containing functional groups (OFGs) in an rGO specimen, the optical and electrical properties can vary significantly, directly affecting the performance of devices in which rGO is implemented. Here, we investigated the optical and electrical properties of GO treated with various annealing (reduction) temperatures from 350 to 950 °C in H2 ambient. Using diverse characteristic tools, we found that the transmittance, nanoscale domain size, OFGs in GO and rGO, and Schottky barrier height (SBH) measured on n-type GaN are significantly influenced by the annealing temperature. The relative intensity of the defect-induced band in Raman spectroscopy showed a minimum at the annealing temperature of approximately 350 °C, before the OFGs in rGO showed vigorous changes in relative content. When the domain size of rGO reached a minimum at the annealing temperature of 650 °C, the SBH of rGO/GaN showed the maximum value of 1.07 eV.

  11. Direct plutonium oxide reduction/electrorefining interface program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, C.E.; Berry, J.W.; Giebel, R.E.; Long, J.L.; Moser, W.S.; Navratil, J.D.; Tibbitts, S.F.

    1986-01-01

    Research test work and production data evaluation were performed by the Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR)/Electrorefining (ER) Interface Task Team to determine the cause for poor efficiency and yields during ER of DOR metal product. Production data and preliminary test results provided a working hypothesis. Extremely high loadings of impurities (whatever their exact source and identity) in the DOR product metal may lead to failure of the metal to become a molten anode at ER operating temperatures. Moderate impurity levels permit attainment of a molten anode, but lead to low yields because of premature anode solidification. The test results did not conclusively prove the hypothesis or identify specific mechanisms, but were qualitatively supportive. By stirring the molten anode metal pool, as well as the molten salt phase, generally good ER runs were obtained with both DOR and non-DOR feeds. These limited preliminary results suggest that anode stirring decreases the sensitivity of the ER process to DOR-related impurities. Suggested corrective measures included: (1) minimizing impurities in DOR feed to ER and (2) continued evaluation of anode stirring along with run termination by back-EMF measurements. 1 ref., 3 figs., 13 tabs

  12. Oxidation/reduction effects on sapphire thermoluminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, G.; Borossay, J.; Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.

    1998-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The thermoluminescence (TL) and thermally stimulated exoemission (TSEE) properties of Al 2 O 3 has been extensively studied during the past 40 years. It has been suggested as a dosemeter for both ultraviolet light and ionising radiation. Nevertheless the connection between the structure (point defects) of alumina and thermally stimulated relaxation processes has not yet been clearly explained. In this work α-Al 2 O 3 single crystal samples were studied in order to determine the mechanism of electron-hole processes of thermoluminescence and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission peaks. Single crystals prepared in highly reducing conditions were treated in different atmospheres (reducing/oxidising) and their optical absorption (after isochronous annealing), fluorescence, positron-annihilation and TL properties were investigated. Changes of optical absorption and positron annihilation spectra of oxidised samples suggest that Schottky-type defect formation occurred - the concentration of Al-vacancies increased while that of O-vacancies decreased. Also we observed the oxidation of Ti 3+ to Ti 4+ . The reduction of an oxidised sample led to the diminution of Al-vacancy concentration while that of O-vacancies has not been changed. This suggest a Frenkel-type cationic defect. We also tried to correlate these changes to changes of TL glow curves and to explain the origin of some TL peaks

  13. Changes in Physical Properties of Graphene Oxide with Thermal Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandit, Bhishma; Jo, Chang Hee; Joo, Kwan Seon; Cho, Jaehee [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has attracted significant attention as an easily fabricable two dimensional material. Depending on the oxygen-containing functional groups (OFGs) in an rGO specimen, the optical and electrical properties can vary significantly, directly affecting the performance of devices in which rGO is implemented. Here, we investigated the optical and electrical properties of GO treated with various annealing (reduction) temperatures from 350 to 950 ℃ in H2 ambient. Using diverse characteristic tools, we found that the transmittance, nanoscale domain size, OFGs in GO and rGO, and Schottky barrier height (SBH) measured on n-type GaN are significantly influenced by the annealing temperature. The relative intensity of the defect-induced band in Raman spectroscopy showed a minimum at the annealing temperature of approximately 350 ℃, before the OFGs in rGO showed vigorous changes in relative content. When the domain size of rGO reached a minimum at the annealing temperature of 650 ℃, the SBH of rGO/GaN showed the maximum value of 1.07 eV.

  14. Natural printed silk substrate circuit fabricated via surface modification using one step thermal transfer and reduction graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiliang; Huang, Zhan; Wang, Chaoxia

    2018-05-01

    Graphene conductive silk substrate is a preferred material because of its biocompatibility, flexibility and comfort. A flexible natural printed silk substrate circuit was fabricated by one step transfer of graphene oxide (GO) paste from transfer paper to the surface of silk fabric and reduction of the GO to reduced graphene oxide (RGO) using a simple hot press treatment. The GO paste was obtained through ultrasonic stirring exfoliation under low temperature, and presented excellent printing rheological properties at high concentration. The silk fabric was obtained a surface electric resistance as low as 12.15 KΩ cm-1, in the concentration of GO 50 g L-1 and hot press at 220 °C for 120 s. Though the whiteness and strength decreased with the increasing of hot press temperature and time slowly, the electric conductivity of RGO surface modification silk substrate improved obviously. The surface electric resistance of RGO/silk fabrics increased from 12.15 KΩ cm-1 to 18.05 KΩ cm-1, 28.54 KΩ cm-1 and 32.53 KΩ cm-1 after 10, 20 and 30 washing cycles, respectively. The results showed that the printed silk substrate circuit has excellent washability. This process requires no chemical reductant, and the reduction efficiency and reduction degree of GO is high. This time-effective and environmentally-friendly one step thermal transfer and reduction graphene oxide onto natural silk substrate method can be easily used to production of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) based flexible printed circuit.

  15. Reaction and Transport Processes Controlling In Situ Chemical Oxidation of DNAPLs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siegrist, Robert L; Crimi, Michelle; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Illangasekare, Tissa; Dugan, Pamela; Heiderscheidt, Jeff; Jackson, Shannon; Petri, Ben; Sahl, Jason; Seitz, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation involves the introduction of chemical oxidants into the subsurface to destroy organic contaminants in soil and ground water, with the goal being to reduce the mass, mobility...

  16. Low-temperature aluminum reduction of graphene oxide, electrical properties, surface wettability, and energy storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Dongyun; Yang, Chongyin; Lin, Tianquan; Tang, Yufeng; Zhou, Mi; Zhong, Yajuan; Huang, Fuqiang; Lin, Jianhua

    2012-10-23

    Low-temperature aluminum (Al) reduction is first introduced to reduce graphene oxide (GO) at 100-200 °C in a two-zone furnace. The melted Al metal exhibits an excellent deoxygen ability to produce well-crystallized reduced graphene oxide (RGO) papers with a low O/C ratio of 0.058 (Al-RGO), compared with 0.201 in the thermally reduced one (T-RGO). The Al-RGO papers possess outstanding mechanical flexibility and extremely high electrical conductivities (sheet resistance R(s) ~ 1.75 Ω/sq), compared with 20.12 Ω/sq of T-RGO. More interestingly, very nice hydrophobic nature (90.5°) was observed, significantly superior to the reported chemically or thermally reduced papers. These enhanced properties are attributed to the low oxygen content in the RGO papers. During the aluminum reduction, highly active H atoms from H(2)O reacted with melted Al promise an efficient oxygen removal. This method was also applicable to reduce graphene oxide foams, which were used in the GO/SA (stearic acid) composite as a highly thermally conductive reservoir to hold the phase change material for thermal energy storage. The Al-reduced RGO/SnS(2) composites were further used in an anode material of lithium ion batteries possessing a higher specific capacity. Overall, low-temperature Al reduction is an effective method to prepare highly conductive RGO papers and related composites for flexible energy conversion and storage device applications.

  17. Chemical gating of epitaxial graphene through ultrathin oxide layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larciprete, Rosanna; Lacovig, Paolo; Orlando, Fabrizio; Dalmiglio, Matteo; Omiciuolo, Luca; Baraldi, Alessandro; Lizzit, Silvano

    2015-08-07

    We achieved a controllable chemical gating of epitaxial graphene grown on metal substrates by exploiting the electrostatic polarization of ultrathin SiO2 layers synthesized below it. Intercalated oxygen diffusing through the SiO2 layer modifies the metal-oxide work function and hole dopes graphene. The graphene/oxide/metal heterostructure behaves as a gated plane capacitor with the in situ grown SiO2 layer acting as a homogeneous dielectric spacer, whose high capacity allows the Fermi level of graphene to be shifted by a few hundreds of meV when the oxygen coverage at the metal substrate is of the order of 0.5 monolayers. The hole doping can be finely tuned by controlling the amount of interfacial oxygen, as well as by adjusting the thickness of the oxide layer. After complete thermal desorption of oxygen the intrinsic doping of SiO2 supported graphene is evaluated in the absence of contaminants and adventitious adsorbates. The demonstration that the charge state of graphene can be changed by chemically modifying the buried oxide/metal interface hints at the possibility of tuning the level and sign of doping by the use of other intercalants capable of diffusing through the ultrathin porous dielectric and reach the interface with the metal.

  18. Breaking up of pure and simulated 'burnt' mixed oxide fuel by chemical interaction with oxidized sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, R.; Chaudat, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    A large experimental program have permitted to investigate the behaviour of mixed oxide fuel coming in contact with hot oxidized sodium. The kinetic of the reaction, the size and the chemical nature of the particules after interaction have been studied. The main part of experiments have been performed using mixed oxide fuel non irradiated at first and with simulated fission products afterwards. Complementary informations have been obtained with UO 2 fuel pellets. After description of the experimental devices, the results are discussed and the importance of the main parameters, like temperature and fission products effect, are pointed out. (orig.)

  19. Chemical polishing of partially oxidized T-111 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teaney, P.E.

    1974-01-01

    The specimens were pressure-mounted in Bakelite and ground through 600 grit on silicon carbide papers. The specimens were rough-polished on a vibratory polisher for 4 to 6 h, using a water slurry of one micron alumina on Texmet, followed by 0.3-μ alumina on Texmet overnight. Final polishing was accomplished by continuous swabbing with a chemical polish. A chemical polish consisting of ten parts lactic acid, four parts nitric acid, and four parts hydrofluoric acid worked well for the T-111 parent material specimens; however, in the partially oxidized specimens, considerable pitting and staining occurred in the oxygen-affected zone and in the transition zone between the oxygen-affected zone and the parent material. A chemical polish was developed for the partially oxidized specimens by adjusting the ratio of the acids to ten parts lactic acid, two parts nitric acid, and two parts hydrofluoric acid. This slowed the chemical attack on the oxygen-affected zone considerably and, with continuous swabbing, the pitting and stain could be avoided. The specimens were rinsed and checked occasionally on the metallograph to determine when the proper polish had been obtained. Some specimens required intermittent polishing times up to 1 / 2 hour. No relationship could be established between the oxygen content of the specimen and the time required for chemical polishing in the partially oxidized specimens. However, the microstructure of the transition zone was the most difficult to obtain, and specimens with uniform reaction zones across the width of the specimen polished quicker than those with the transition zone

  20. Relationships among oxidation-reduction and acid-base properties of the actinides in high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morss, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    The first chemical identification of plutonium, its subsequent isolation on the macroscopic scale, and more recent chemical separation schemes were achieved by taking advantage of the differences among the oxidation states of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium. Many acid-base properties modify the relative stabilities of oxidation states of the actinides. In the solid state, strongly basic compounds such as Cs 2 O yield complex oxides with oxidation states of Np(VII), Pu(VI), and Am(VI) whereas more acidic compounds such as CsF yield complex fluorides with lower oxidation states. In aqueous solution, high basicity and strongly covalent complexes favor high oxidation states. In nonaqueous solvent systems, high acidity generally favors low oxidation states. This paper elucidates and attempts to interpret the effects of these acid-base properties in a systematic fashion

  1. Chemical oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine transformation products in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madi Abilev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH during a water treatment has several disadvantages including formation of stable toxic byproducts. Effectiveness of treatment methods in relation to UDMH transformation products is currently poorly studied. This work considers the effectiveness of chemical oxidants in respect to main metabolites of UDMH – 1-formyl-2,2-dimethylhydrazine, dimethylaminoacetontrile, N-nitrosodimethylamine and 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole. Experiments on chemical oxidation by Fenton's reagent, potassium permanganate and sodium nitrite were conducted. Quantitative determination was performed by HPLC. Oxidation products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with solid-phase microextraction. 1-Formyl-2,2-dimethylhydrazine was completely oxidized by Fenton's reagent with formation of formaldehyde N-formyl-N-methyl-hydrazone, 1,4-dihydro-1,4-dimethyl-5H-tetrazol-5-one by the action of potassium permanganate and N-methyl-N-nitro-methanamine in the presence of sodium nitrite. Oxidation of 1-formyl-2,2-dimethylhydrazine also resulted in formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine. Oxidation of dimethylaminoacetontrile proceeded with formation of hydroxyacetonitrile, dimethylformamide and 1,2,5-trimethylpyrrole. After 30 days, dimethylaminoacetontrile was not detected in the presence of Fenton’s reagent and potassium permanganate, but it’s concentration in samples with sodium nitrite was 77.3 mg/L. In the presence of Fenton’s reagent, potassium permanganate and sodium nitrite after 30 days, N-nitrosodimethylamine concentration decreased by 85, 80 and 50%, respectively. In control sample, N-nitrosodimethylamine concentration decreased by 50%, indicating that sodium nitrite has no effect of on N-nitrosodimethylamine concentration. Only Fenton's reagent allowed to reduce the concentration of 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole to 50% in 30 days. In the presence of other oxidants, 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole

  2. The effect of ammonia upon the electrocatalysis of hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction on polycrystalline platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Hernandez-Fernandez, Patricia; Stephens, Ifan E.L.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ammonium ions on the catalysis of hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction is studied by means of rotating ring-disk electrode experiments on polycrystalline platinum in perchloric acid. While ammonium does not affect the hydrogen oxidation reaction, the oxygen reduction reaction...

  3. Cost and Performance Assessment of In-situ Chemical Oxidation for Intermittent and Continuous Oxidant Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, U.; Parker, J.; Borden, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a popular remediation technology that involves injection of chemical oxidant into groundwater to destroy dissolved and non-aqueous liquid phase contaminants. Depending on site conditions, oxidant can be injected into the contaminated subsurface periodically (intermittently) or continuously. A common approach is to intermittently inject oxidant into a network of wells over a period long enough to emplace oxidant over a target treatment volume (referred to ISCO-int). The injection phase is followed by a passive phase when the oxidant is allowed to react with contaminants and natural oxygen demand (NOD) and to migrate under natural hydraulic gradients. This process may be repeated multiple times until termination criteria are met. Recently, some practitioners have adopted an alternative approach in which oxidant is injected continuously with extraction wells recovering unreacted oxidant to recycle with additional makeup oxidant to maintain its constant concentration (referred to ISCO-cont). Each method has certain advantages and disadvantages. This study numerically evaluates those two ISCO practices in terms of remediation costs and performance based on multiple equi-probable parameter sets. Stochastic cost optimization toolbox (SCOToolkit) is used for this purpose. SCOToolkit is an integrated semi-analytical model for contaminant transport and remediation (e.g., thermal source treatment, ISCO, electron donor injections, permeable reactive barriers) enabling inverse solution and Monte Carlo simulations. Four different aquifer settings, slow and fast Darcy velocities combined with low and high NOD conditions, are used for the evaluation. Preliminary results showed that ISCO-cont is effective for a full scale application without large investment while ISCO-int is more efficient to utilize oxidant in well-characterized sites. Pros and cons of each approach are discussed for the practical use of ISCO for various site conditions.

  4. CuO reduction induced formation of CuO/Cu2O hybrid oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lu; Yin, Qiyue; Wang, Yiqian; Zhou, Guangwen

    2013-12-01

    Reduction of CuO nanowires results in the formation of a unique hierarchical hybrid nanostructure, in which the parent oxide phase (CuO) works as the skeleton while the lower oxide (Cu2O) resulting from the reduction reaction forms as partially embedded nanoparticles that decorate the skeleton of the parent oxide. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy observations of the reduction process of CuO nanowires, we demonstrate that the formation of such a hierarchical hybrid oxide structure is induced by topotactic nucleation and growth of Cu2O islands on the parent CuO nanowires.

  5. A fast chemical route for the synthesis of TBHQ functionalized reduced graphene oxide and its electrochemical performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, Subhasis; Sen, Pintu, E-mail: psen@vecc.gov.in; Bandyopadhyay, S.K.

    2016-02-01

    A fast chemical route for the synthesis of tertiary butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (FRGO) and their application as high performance electrode materials for supercapacitors have been reported. Reductions of chemically exfoliated graphene oxides (GO) in the presence of small amount of TBHQ (1–2 wt % with respect to GO) at various time periods were investigated through XRD, FTIR and Raman studies. Reappearance of broad diffraction peak close to graphite peak (002) reveals an efficient method of reduction of different oxygen containing functional groups present in GO/FGO resulting in a decrease of interlayer d-spacing (∼3.5 Å). Absence of the absorption peaks in FTIR for –C=O, t-O–H, epoxide and alkoxy groups supports the complete reduction of GO to FRGO by hydrazine hydrate within a short time period of 4 h reduction under reflux condition. A large red shift in UV spectrum of FRGO – 4 h (270 nm) reveals the complete reduction of graphene oxide. The average crystallite sp{sup 2} domains sizes have been estimated through Raman spectroscopy. Plausible mechanism of TBHQ assisted fast chemical reduction of FGO has been enumerated. 1.5 wt % TBHQ in FRGO shows the best electrochemical performance where TBHQ not only acts as a reducing agent during functionalization, but also plays as an active redox molecule for enhanced capacitance of 200 F/g. - Highlights: • A fast chemical route has been adopted for the synthesis of TBHQ functionalized RGO. • The kinetics of chemical reduction becomes faster in the presence of TBHQ. • The FTIR spectrum of functionalized RGO supports the complete reduction process. • TBHQ also plays a vital role for enhancing capacitance of functionalized RGO.

  6. Chemical solution route to self-assembled epitaxial oxide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradors, X; Puig, T; Gibert, M; Queraltó, A; Zabaleta, J; Mestres, N

    2014-04-07

    Self-assembly of oxides as a bottom-up approach to functional nanostructures goes beyond the conventional nanostructure formation based on lithographic techniques. Particularly, chemical solution deposition (CSD) is an ex situ growth approach very promising for high throughput nanofabrication at low cost. Whereas strain engineering as a strategy to define nanostructures with tight control of size, shape and orientation has been widely used in metals and semiconductors, it has been rarely explored in the emergent field of functional complex oxides. Here we will show that thermodynamic modeling can be very useful to understand the principles controlling the growth of oxide nanostructures by CSD, and some attractive kinetic features will also be presented. The methodology of strain engineering is applied in a high degree of detail to form different sorts of nanostructures (nanodots, nanowires) of the oxide CeO2 with fluorite structure which then is used as a model system to identify the principles controlling self-assembly and self-organization in CSD grown oxides. We also present, more briefly, the application of these ideas to other oxides such as manganites or BaZrO3. We will show that the nucleation and growth steps are essentially understood and manipulated while the kinetic phenomena underlying the evolution of the self-organized networks are still less widely explored, even if very appealing effects have been already observed. Overall, our investigation based on a CSD approach has opened a new strategy towards a general use of self-assembly and self-organization which can now be widely spread to many functional oxide materials.

  7. Acid Rock Drainage or Not—Oxidative vs. Reductive Biofilms—A Microbial Question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarete Kalin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Measures to counteract Acid Rock Drainage (ARD generation need to start at the mineral surface, inhibiting mineral-oxidizing, acidophilic microbes. Laboratory and long-term field tests with pyrite-containing mining wastes—where carbonaceous phosphate mining waste (CPMW was added—resulted in low acidity and near neutral drainage. The effect was reproducible and confirmed by several independent research groups. The improved drainage was shown to involve an organic coating, likely a biofilm. The biofilm formation was confirmed when CPMW was added to lignite coal waste with an initial pH of 1. Forty-five days after the addition, the coal waste was dominated by heterotrophic microorganisms in biofilms. Reviewing the scientific literature provides ample support that CPMW has physical and chemical characteristics which can induce a strong inhibitory effect on sulphide oxidation by triggering the formation of an organic coating, a biofilm, over the mineral surface. CPMW characteristics provide the cornerstone of a new technology which might lead to reduction of sulphide oxidation in mine wastes. A hypothesis for testing this technology is presented. The use of such a technology could result in an economical and sustainable approach to mine waste and water management.

  8. Lithium-Vanadium bronzes as model catalysts for the selective reduction of nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.; Bongers, Annemie; Enoch, Gert; Snel, Ruud; Ross, Julian R.H.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of alkali metals on the selective reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia has been studied on bulk iron oxide and bulk vanadium oxide. The influence of additions of LiOH, NaOH and KOH on the activity was screened by pulse experiments carried out in the absence of gaseous oxygen; FTIR

  9. Biotechnological aspects of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulepas, R.J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reduction (SR) can be used for the removal and recovery of metals and oxidized sulfur compounds from waste streams. Sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce oxidized sulfur compounds to sulfide. Subsequently, sulfide can precipitate dissolved metals or can be oxidized to elemental sulfur. Both metal

  10. Iron oxide reduction in methane-rich deep Baltic Sea sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egger, Matthias; Hagens, Mathilde; Sapart, Celia J.

    2017-01-01

    /L transition. Our results reveal a complex interplay between production, oxidation and transport of methane showing that besides organoclastic Fe reduction, oxidation of downward migrating methane with Fe oxides may also explain the elevated concentrations of dissolved ferrous Fe in deep Baltic Sea sediments...... profiles and numerical modeling, we propose that a potential coupling between Fe oxide reduction and methane oxidation likely affects deep Fe cycling and related biogeochemical processes, such as burial of phosphorus, in systems subject to changes in organic matter loading or bottom water salinity....

  11. In situ chemical synthesis of ruthenium oxide/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for electrochemical capacitor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Kwang-Heon; Yoon, Seung-Beom; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Park, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2013-08-07

    An in situ chemical synthesis approach has been developed to prepare ruthenium oxide/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposites. It is found that as the C/O ratio increases, the number density of RuO2 nanoparticles decreases, because the chemical interaction between the Ru ions and the oxygen-containing functional groups provides anchoring sites where the nucleation of particles takes place. For electrochemical capacitor applications, the microwave-hydrothermal process was carried out to improve the conductivity of RGO in RuO2/RGO nanocomposites. The significant improvement in capacitance and high rate capability might result from the RuO2 nanoparticles used as spacers that make the interior layers of the reduced graphene oxide electrode available for electrolyte access.

  12. Reduction of a thin chromium oxide film on Inconel surface upon treatment with hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesel, Alenka, E-mail: alenka.vesel@guest.arnes.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mozetic, Miran [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Balat-Pichelin, Marianne [PROMES-CNRS Laboratory, 7 Rue du four solaire, 66120 Font Romeu Odeillo (France)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Oxidized Inconel alloy was exposed to hydrogen at temperatures up to 1500 K. • Oxide reduction in hydrogen plasma started at approximately 1300 K. • AES depth profiling revealed complete reduction of oxides in plasma. • Oxides were not reduced, if the sample was heated just in hydrogen atmosphere. • Surface of reduced Inconel preserved the same composition as the bulk material. - Abstract: Inconel samples with a surface oxide film composed of solely chromium oxide with a thickness of approximately 700 nm were exposed to low-pressure hydrogen plasma at elevated temperatures to determine the suitable parameters for reduction of the oxide film. The hydrogen pressure during treatment was set to 60 Pa. Plasma was created by a surfaguide microwave discharge in a quartz glass tube to allow for a high dissociation fraction of hydrogen molecules. Auger electron depth profiling (AES) was used to determine the decay of the oxygen in the surface film and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to measure structural modifications. During hydrogen plasma treatment, the oxidized Inconel samples were heated to elevated temperatures. The reduction of the oxide film started at temperatures of approximately 1300 K (considering the emissivity of 0.85) and the oxide was reduced in about 10 s of treatment as revealed by AES. The XRD showed sharper substrate peaks after the reduction. Samples treated in hydrogen atmosphere under the same conditions have not been reduced up to approximately 1500 K indicating usefulness of plasma treatment.

  13. Study on emission characteristics and reduction strategy of nitrous oxide during wastewater treatment by different processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shichang; Bao, Zhiyuan; Sun, Dezhi

    2015-03-01

    Given the inexorable increase in global wastewater treatment, increasing amounts of nitrous oxide are expected to be emitted from wastewater treatment plants and released to the atmosphere. It has become imperative to study the emission and control of nitrous oxide in the various wastewater treatment processes currently in use. In the present investigation, the emission characteristics and the factors affecting the release of nitrous oxide were studied via full- and pilot-scale experiments in anoxic-oxic, sequencing batch reactor and oxidation ditch processes. We propose an optimal treatment process and relative strategy for nitrous oxide reduction. Our results show that both the bio-nitrifying and bio-denitrifying treatment units in wastewater treatment plants are the predominant sites for nitrous oxide production in each process, while the aerated treatment units are the critical sources for nitrous oxide emission. Compared with the emission of nitrous oxide from the anoxic-oxic (1.37% of N-influent) and sequencing batch reactor (2.69% of N-influent) processes, much less nitrous oxide (0.25% of N-influent) is emitted from the oxidation ditch process, which we determined as the optimal wastewater treatment process for nitrous oxide reduction, given the current technologies. Nitrous oxide emissions differed with various operating parameters. Controlling the dissolved oxygen concentration at a proper level during nitrification and denitrification and enhancing the utilization rate of organic carbon in the influent for denitrification are the two critical methods for nitrous oxide reduction in the various processes considered.

  14. The chemical energy unit partial oxidation reactor operation simulation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrakin, A. N.; Selivanov, A. A.; Batrakov, P. A.; Sotnikov, D. G.

    2018-01-01

    The chemical energy unit scheme for synthesis gas, electric and heat energy production which is possible to be used both for the chemical industry on-site facilities and under field conditions is represented in the paper. The partial oxidation reactor gasification process mathematical model is described and reaction products composition and temperature determining algorithm flow diagram is shown. The developed software product verification showed good convergence of the experimental values and calculations according to the other programmes: the temperature determining relative discrepancy amounted from 4 to 5 %, while the absolute composition discrepancy ranged from 1 to 3%. The synthesis gas composition was found out practically not to depend on the supplied into the partial oxidation reactor (POR) water vapour enthalpy and compressor air pressure increase ratio. Moreover, air consumption coefficient α increase from 0.7 to 0.9 was found out to decrease synthesis gas target components (carbon and hydrogen oxides) specific yield by nearly 2 times and synthesis gas target components required ratio was revealed to be seen in the water vapour specific consumption area (from 5 to 6 kg/kg of fuel).

  15. Effects of electromechanical resonance on photocatalytic reduction of the free-hanging graphene oxide sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostovari, F.; Abdi, Y.; Darbari, S.; Ghasemi, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this report we present a simple, low-temperature method which is compatible with standard technology, to achieve graphene-based devices in large quantity. In this approach we take advantage of photocatalytic behavior of TiO 2 to achieve photocatalytic reduction of chemically synthesized graphene oxide (GO) sheets. TiO 2 nanoparticles have been deposited on GO sheets hanging from Au/SiO 2 /Si interdigital electrodes to realize TiO 2 /GO heterostructures. We investigated photocatalytic activity of TiO 2 nanoparticles in the presence of UV-illumination, to reduce the GO sheets. Based on the Raman spectroscopy, the photocatalytic activity of TiO 2 nanoparticles resulted in a decrease in the number of C–O bonds. Electrical measurements show that graphene sheets with the controlled electrical conductivity were obtained, so that higher illumination time led to higher conductivity and better reduction of GO sheets. Also, strain-induced photocatalytic reduction of the GO sheets has been investigated by their electrical characteristics. It has been shown for the first time that the electromechanical-induced strain enhances the photocatalytic behavior of the fabricated TiO 2 /GO heterostructure significantly.

  16. Effects of electromechanical resonance on photocatalytic reduction of the free-hanging graphene oxide sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostovari, F.; Abdi, Y., E-mail: y.abdi@ut.ac.ir [University of Tehran, Nano-Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Darbari, S. [Tarbiat Modarres University (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghasemi, F. [University of Tehran, Nano-Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    In this report we present a simple, low-temperature method which is compatible with standard technology, to achieve graphene-based devices in large quantity. In this approach we take advantage of photocatalytic behavior of TiO{sub 2} to achieve photocatalytic reduction of chemically synthesized graphene oxide (GO) sheets. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles have been deposited on GO sheets hanging from Au/SiO{sub 2}/Si interdigital electrodes to realize TiO{sub 2}/GO heterostructures. We investigated photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in the presence of UV-illumination, to reduce the GO sheets. Based on the Raman spectroscopy, the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles resulted in a decrease in the number of C-O bonds. Electrical measurements show that graphene sheets with the controlled electrical conductivity were obtained, so that higher illumination time led to higher conductivity and better reduction of GO sheets. Also, strain-induced photocatalytic reduction of the GO sheets has been investigated by their electrical characteristics. It has been shown for the first time that the electromechanical-induced strain enhances the photocatalytic behavior of the fabricated TiO{sub 2}/GO heterostructure significantly.

  17. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in a whey fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moresi, M; Colicchio, A; Sansovini, F; Sebastiani, E

    1980-01-01

    The efficiency of COD reduction in the fermentation of whey by Kluyveromyces fragilis IMAT 1872 was studied at various temperatures, lactose concentrations, air dilution ratios, and stirring speeds. Two different optimal sets of these variables were found according to whether the objective was the production of cell mass or the reduction of COD. The 2 sets were then compared to establish a strategy for the industrial development of this fermentation process. The experimental efficiencies of COD removal were submitted to analysis in a composite design. Only the O2 transfer coefficient factor and the stripping factor were significant. Therefore, the observations were fitted with a quadratic expression by using only these factors: the mean std. error was <6%. The yield of cells varied in this fermentation, but this parameter may be particularly useful for analyzing and optimizing any fermentation process when the culture medium is a mixture of carbohydrates or the main substrate is fully utilized during the initial stages of fermentation.

  18. Improved Understanding of In Situ Chemical Oxidation. Technical Objective I: Contaminant Oxidation Kinetics Contaminant Oxidation Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    methyl tert butyl ether NAPL non-aqueous phase liquid NOD natural oxidant demand •OH hydroxide radical Ox oxidant O3 ozone PCE...and persulfate; and Technical Objective 2, assess how soil properties (e.g., soil mineralogy , natural carbon content) affect oxidant mobility and...to develop a general description of kobs vs. T because there are many reactions that can contribute to the concentration of the reactive intermediate

  19. Artificial electron acceptors decouple archaeal methane oxidation from sulfate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Silvan; Yu, Hang; Chadwick, Grayson L; McGlynn, Shawn E; Orphan, Victoria J

    2016-02-12

    The oxidation of methane with sulfate is an important microbial metabolism in the global carbon cycle. In marine methane seeps, this process is mediated by consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) that live in syntrophy with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The underlying interdependencies within this uncultured symbiotic partnership are poorly understood. We used a combination of rate measurements and single-cell stable isotope probing to demonstrate that ANME in deep-sea sediments can be catabolically and anabolically decoupled from their syntrophic SRB partners using soluble artificial oxidants. The ANME still sustain high rates of methane oxidation in the absence of sulfate as the terminal oxidant, lending support to the hypothesis that interspecies extracellular electron transfer is the syntrophic mechanism for the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Design of High Quality Chemical XOR Gates with Noise Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Mackenna L; Domanskyi, Sergii; Privman, Vladimir

    2017-07-05

    We describe a chemical XOR gate design that realizes gate-response function with filtering properties. Such gate-response function is flat (has small gradients) at and in the vicinity of all the four binary-input logic points, resulting in analog noise suppression. The gate functioning involves cross-reaction of the inputs represented by pairs of chemicals to produce a practically zero output when both are present and nearly equal. This cross-reaction processing step is also designed to result in filtering at low output intensities by canceling out the inputs if one of the latter has low intensity compared with the other. The remaining inputs, which were not reacted away, are processed to produce the output XOR signal by chemical steps that result in filtering at large output signal intensities. We analyze the tradeoff resulting from filtering, which involves loss of signal intensity. We also discuss practical aspects of realizations of such XOR gates. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Coupled Metal/Oxide Catalysts with Tunable Product Selectivity for Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Shengjuan; Weng, Zhe; Wu, Zishan; Zhong, Yiren; Wu, Yueshen; Fang, Jianhui; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-08-30

    One major challenge to the electrochemical conversion of CO 2 to useful fuels and chemical products is the lack of efficient catalysts that can selectively direct the reaction to one desirable product and avoid the other possible side products. Making use of strong metal/oxide interactions has recently been demonstrated to be effective in enhancing electrocatalysis in the liquid phase. Here, we report one of the first systematic studies on composition-dependent influences of metal/oxide interactions on electrocatalytic CO 2 reduction, utilizing Cu/SnO x heterostructured nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a model catalyst system. By adjusting the Cu/Sn ratio in the catalyst material structure, we can tune the products of the CO 2 electrocatalytic reduction reaction from hydrocarbon-favorable to CO-selective to formic acid-dominant. In the Cu-rich regime, SnO x dramatically alters the catalytic behavior of Cu. The Cu/SnO x -CNT catalyst containing 6.2% of SnO x converts CO 2 to CO with a high faradaic efficiency (FE) of 89% and a j CO of 11.3 mA·cm -2 at -0.99 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode, in stark contrast to the Cu-CNT catalyst on which ethylene and methane are the main products for CO 2 reduction. In the Sn-rich regime, Cu modifies the catalytic properties of SnO x . The Cu/SnO x -CNT catalyst containing 30.2% of SnO x reduces CO 2 to formic acid with an FE of 77% and a j HCOOH of 4.0 mA·cm -2 at -0.99 V, outperforming the SnO x -CNT catalyst which only converts CO 2 to formic acid in an FE of 48%.

  2. Reversible solid oxide fuel cells (R-SOFCs) with chemically stable proton-conducting oxides

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Proton-conducting oxides offer a promising way of lowering the working temperature of solid oxide cells to the intermediate temperate range (500 to 700. °C) due to their better ionic conductivity. In addition, the application of proton-conducting oxides in both solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and sold oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) provides unique advantages compared with the use of conventional oxygen-ion conducting conductors, including the formation of water at the air electrode site. Since the discovery of proton conduction in some oxides about 30. years ago, the development of proton-conducting oxides in SOFCs and SOECs (the reverse mode of SOFCs) has gained increased attention. This paper briefly summarizes the development in the recent years of R-SOFCs with proton-conducting electrolytes, focusing on discussing the importance of adopting chemically stable materials in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes. The development of electrode materials for proton-conducting R-SOFCs is also discussed. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Operating mechanisms of electrolytes in magnesium ion batteries: chemical equilibrium, magnesium deposition, and electrolyte oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Young; Lim, Younhee; Roy, Basab; Ryu, Young-Gyoon; Lee, Seok-Soo

    2014-12-21

    Since the early nineties there have been a number of reports on the experimental development of Mg electrolytes based on organo/amide-magnesium chlorides and their transmetalations. However, there are no theoretical papers describing the underlying operating mechanisms of Mg electrolytes, and there is no clear understanding of these mechanisms. We have therefore attempted to clarify the operating mechanisms of Mg electrolytes by studying the characteristics of Mg complexes, solvation, chemical equilibrium, Mg-deposition processes, electrolyte-oxidation processes, and oxidative degradation mechanism of RMgCl-based electrolytes, using ab initio calculations. The formation and solvation energies of Mg complexes highly depend on the characteristics of R groups. Thus, changes in R groups of RMgCl lead to changes in the equilibrium position and the electrochemical reduction and oxidation pathways and energies. We first provide a methodological scheme for calculating Mg reduction potential values in non-aqueous electrolytes and electrochemical windows. We also describe a strategy for designing Mg electrolytes to maximize the electrochemical windows and oxidative stabilities. These results will be useful not only for designing improved Mg electrolytes, but also for developing new electrolytes in the future.

  4. Effect of hydrogen peroxide and camellia sinensis extract on reduction of oxygen level in graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celina Selvakumari, J.; Dhanalakshmi, J.; Pathinettam Padiyan, D.

    2016-10-01

    The intention of this work is to reduce the oxygen level in graphene oxide. The reduction process was initiated while preparing graphene oxide using modified Hummer’s method. In this new method, increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration during the preparation process results in the oxygen content reduction. Adding green tea (camellia sinensis) extract with increased hydrogen peroxide results in further reduction of oxygen content and changed the graphene oxide to reduced graphene oxide. The structural and optical properties of the new found reduced graphene oxide was analysed using XRD, FTIR, TEM, Raman and UV-vis spectra. The overall observation reflects that the sp3 carbon network of graphene oxide changed into sp2 carbon lattice of graphene which is very handful in supercapacitor and biosensor fields.

  5. Kinetics of oxidation of H2 and reduction of H2O in Ni-YSZ based solid oxide cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of H2O and oxidation of H2 was studied in a Ni-YSZ electrode supported Solid Oxide Cells produced at DTU Energy conversion (former Risø DTU). Polarisation (i-V) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic characterisation show that the kinetics for reduction of H 2O is slower compared...... to oxidation of H2. The kinetic differences cannot be explained by the reaction mechanisms which are similar in the two cases but are rather an effect of the thermodynamics. The preliminary analysis performed in this study show that the slow kinetic for reduction is partly related to the endothermic nature...... of the reaction, cooling the active electrode, thereby leading to slower kinetics at low current densities. Likewise, the increased kinetic for oxidation was found to be related to the exothermic nature of the reaction, heating the active electrode, and thereby leading to faster kinetics. At higher current...

  6. Electrochemically reduced graphene-oxide supported bimetallic nanoparticles highly efficient for oxygen reduction reaction with excellent methanol tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Sabina; Cho, Sung; Jeon, Seungwon

    2018-03-01

    We report a simple and facile method for the fabrication of bimetallic nanoparticles on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ErGO) for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. First, reduced graphene oxide supported palladium and manganese oxide nanoparticle (rGO/Pd-Mn2O3) catalyst was synthesized via a simple chemical method at room temperature; then, it was electrochemically reduced for oxidation reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The chemical composition and morphological properties of ErGO/Pd-Mn2O3 was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The TEM images reveals that, nano-sized Pd and Mn2O3 particles were disperse on the ErGO sheet without aggregation. The as-prepared ErGO/Pd-Mn2O3 was employed for ORR in alkaline media which shows higher ORR activity with more positive onset and half-wave potential, respectively. Remarkably, ErGO/Pd-Mn2O3 reduced oxygen via four-electron transfer pathway with negligible amount of intermediate peroxide species (HO2-). Furthermore, the higher stability and excellent methanol tolerance of the ErGO/Pd-Mn2O3 compared to commercial Pt/C (20 wt%) catalyst, indicating its suitability for fuel cells.

  7. GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN ALTERNATIVES ARE REVEALED USING THE WASTE REDUCTION DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (WAR DSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Waste Reduction Decision Support System (WAR DSS) is a Java-based software product providing comprehensive modeling of potential adverse environmental impacts (PEI) predicted to result from newly designed or redesigned chemical manufacturing processes. The purpose of this so...

  8. Dissolution of synthetic uranium dibutyl phosphate deposits in oxidizing and reducing chemical formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufus, A.L.; Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Velmurugan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: SEM of the U-DBP coated stainless steel coupon before and after exposure to chemical formulation containing acid permanganate at 80 °C. -- Highlights: •Combination of oxidation and reduction processes efficiently dissolves U-DBP deposits. •NP and NAC formulations are compatible with SS-304. •Dissolved uranium and added chemicals are effectively removed via ion exchangers. -- Abstract: Permanganate and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) based dilute chemical formulations were evaluated for the dissolution of uranium dibutyl phosphate (U-DBP), a compound that deposits over the surfaces of nuclear reprocessing plants and waste storage tanks. A combination of an acidic, oxidizing treatment (nitric acid with permanganate) followed by reducing treatment (NTA based formulation) efficiently dissolved the U-DBP deposits. The dissolution isotherm of U-DBP in its as precipitated form followed a logarithmic fit. The same chemical treatment was also effective in dissolving U-DBP coated on the surface of 304-stainless steel, while resulting in minimal corrosion of the stainless steel substrate material. Investigation of uranium recovery from the resulting decontamination solutions by ion exchange with a bed of mixed anion and cation resins showed quantitative removal of uranium

  9. Dissolution of synthetic uranium dibutyl phosphate deposits in oxidizing and reducing chemical formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rufus, A.L.; Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Velmurugan, S., E-mail: svelu@igcar.gov.in

    2013-06-15

    Graphical abstract: SEM of the U-DBP coated stainless steel coupon before and after exposure to chemical formulation containing acid permanganate at 80 °C. -- Highlights: •Combination of oxidation and reduction processes efficiently dissolves U-DBP deposits. •NP and NAC formulations are compatible with SS-304. •Dissolved uranium and added chemicals are effectively removed via ion exchangers. -- Abstract: Permanganate and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) based dilute chemical formulations were evaluated for the dissolution of uranium dibutyl phosphate (U-DBP), a compound that deposits over the surfaces of nuclear reprocessing plants and waste storage tanks. A combination of an acidic, oxidizing treatment (nitric acid with permanganate) followed by reducing treatment (NTA based formulation) efficiently dissolved the U-DBP deposits. The dissolution isotherm of U-DBP in its as precipitated form followed a logarithmic fit. The same chemical treatment was also effective in dissolving U-DBP coated on the surface of 304-stainless steel, while resulting in minimal corrosion of the stainless steel substrate material. Investigation of uranium recovery from the resulting decontamination solutions by ion exchange with a bed of mixed anion and cation resins showed quantitative removal of uranium.

  10. Unusual nonlinear absorption response of graphene oxide in the presence of a reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimzadeh, Rouhollah; Arandian, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear absorption responses of graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide are investigated using the Z-scan technique and laser beams at 405, 532 and 635 nm in a continuous wave regime. Results show that graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide do not show any open Z-scan signals at wavelengths of 532 and 635 nm. At the same time, fresh graphene oxide suspension is found to exhibit a nonlinear absorption process in the case of a laser light at 405 nm. Moreover, it can be observed that the reduction of graphene oxide by 405 nm laser irradiation decreases its nonlinear absorption value significantly. These findings highlight the important role of the reduction process on the nonlinear absorption performance of graphene oxide. (letter)

  11. Chemical derivatization to enhance chemical/oxidative stability of resorcinol-formaldehyde resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubler, T.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The goal of this task is to develop modified resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin to improve the chemical/oxidative stability of the resin. R-F resin is a regenerable organic ion-exchange resin that is selective for cesium ion in highly alkaline, high ionic-strength solutions. R-F resin tends to undergo chemical degradation, reducing its ability to remove cesium ion from waste solutions; the mechanistic details of these decomposition reactions are currently unknown. The approach used for this task is chemical modification of the resin structure, particularly the resorcinol ring unit of the polymer resin. This approach is based on prior characterization studies conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that indicated the facile chemical degradation of the resin is oxidation of the resorcinol ring to the para-quinone structure, with subsequent loss of ion-exchange sites for cesium ion. R-F resin represents an important alternative to current radiocesium remediation technology for tank wastes at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites, particularly if regenerable resins are needed.

  12. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M.; Wells, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO−2) to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO−2 to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO−2, NH2OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build

  13. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions and novel technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSchreiber

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH or the reduction of nitrite (NO2- to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO2- to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO2-, NH2OH and nitroxyl (HNO. Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser based absorption spectroscopy. In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build-up.

  14. Chemical dosimetry of linac electron pulse with nitrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanba, Hideki; Shinsaka, Kyoji; Hatano, Yoshihiko; Yagi, Masuo; Shiokawa, Takanobu.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption dose, dose rate and the reproducibility of intensity in each pulse of the electron beam pulses from a Linac (42 MeV, 3μsec) have been determined by applying nitrous oxide chemical dosimetry, in order to obtain the fundamental data required for radiation chemistry researches with the Linac. Nitrous oxide is used as a chemical dosimeter because it is known that it decomposed through radiation ensures easy detection and the determination of quantity of the decomposed product, nitrogen, which is stable, and presents linear relationship between absorption dose and produced quantity over the wide dose-rate range. Irradiation cells used for the experiment were cylindrical ones made of hard molybdenum glass. Irradiated samples were fractionated with liquid nitrogen, and separated and determined with a gas chromatograph. Details on the experimental results and their examination are described at the end. They include absorption dose of 1x10 16 eV/g per pulse, dose rate of 3x10 21 eV/g, sec and intensity reproducibility of +- 20%. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  15. Biomineralization associated with microbial reduction of Fe3+ and oxidation of Fe2+ in solid minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G.; Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Kukkadapu, R.K.; Kim, J.; Eberl, D.; Xu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Iron-reducing and oxidizing microorganisms gain energy through reduction or oxidation of iron, and by doing so play an important role in the geochemical cycling of iron. This study was undertaken to investigate mineral transformations associated with microbial reduction of Fe3+ and oxidation of Fe2+ in solid minerals. A fluid sample from the 2450 m depth of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling project was collected, and Fe3+-reducing and Fe2+-oxidizing microorganisms were enriched. The enrichment cultures displayed reduction of Fe3+ in nontronite and ferric citrate, and oxidation of Fe2+ in vivianite, siderite, and monosulfide (FeS). Additional experiments verified that the iron reduction and oxidation was biological. Oxidation of FeS resulted in the formation of goethite, lepidocrocite, and ferrihydrite as products. Although our molecular microbiological analyses detected Thermoan-aerobacter ethanolicus as a predominant organism in the enrichment culture, Fe3+ reduction and Fe2+ oxidation may be accomplished by a consortia of organisms. Our results have important environmental and ecological implications for iron redox cycling in solid minerals in natural environments, where iron mineral transformations may be related to the mobility and solubility of inorganic and organic contaminants.

  16. Capturing Labile Sulfenamide and Sulfinamide Serum Albumin Adducts of Carcinogenic Arylamines by Chemical Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lijuan; Turesky, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic amines and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are a class of structurally related carcinogens that are formed during the combustion of tobacco or during the high temperature cooking of meats. These procarcinogens undergo metabolic activation by N-oxidation of the exocyclic amine group to produce N-hydroxylated metabolites, which are critical intermediates implicated in toxicity and DNA damage. The arylhydroxylamines and their oxidized arylnitroso derivatives can also react with cysteine (Cys) residues of glutathione or proteins to form, respectively, sulfenamide and sulfinamide adducts. However, sulfur-nitrogen linked adducted proteins are often difficult to detect because they are unstable and undergo hydrolysis during proteolytic digestion. Synthetic N-oxidized intermediates of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), a carcinogenic HAA produced in cooked meats, and 4-aminobiphenyl, a carcinogenic aromatic amine present in tobacco smoke were reacted with human serum albumin (SA) and formed labile sulfenamide or sulfinamide adducts at the Cys34 residue. Oxidation of the carcinogen-modified SA with m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid (m-CPBA) produced the arylsulfonamide adducts, which were stable to heat and the chemical reduction conditions employed to denature SA. The sulfonamide adducts of PhIP and 4-ABP were identified, by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, in proteolytic digests of denatured SA. Thus, selective oxidation of arylamine-modified SA produces stable arylsulfonamide-SA adducts, which may serve as biomarkers of these tobacco and dietary carcinogens. PMID:23240913

  17. A comprehensive skeletal mechanism for the oxidation of n-heptane generated by chemistry-guided reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeuch, Thomas [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Tammannstrasse 6, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Moreac, Gladys [Renault, 1, avenue du Golf, 78288 Guyancourt cedex (France); Ahmed, Syed Sayeed; Mauss, Fabian [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik und Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, Sielower Strasse 12, 03044 Cottbus (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Applied to the primary reference fuel n-heptane, we present the chemistry-guided reduction (CGR) formalism for generating kinetic hydrocarbon oxidation models. The approach is based on chemical lumping and species removal with the necessity analysis method, a combined reaction flow and sensitivity analysis. Independent of the fuel size, the CGR formalism generates very compact submodels for the alkane low-temperature oxidation and provides a general concept for the development of compact oxidation models for large model fuel components such as n-decane and n-tetradecane. A defined sequence of simplification steps, consisting of the compilation of a compact detailed chemical model, the application of linear chemical lumping, and finally species removal based on species necessity values, allows a significantly increased degree of reduction compared to the simple application of the necessity analysis, previously published species, or reaction removal methods. The skeletal model derived by this procedure consists of 110 species and 1170 forward and backward reactions and is validated against the full range of combustion conditions including low and high temperatures, fuel-lean and fuel-rich mixtures, pressures between 1 and 40 bar, and local (species concentration profiles in flames, plug flow and jet-stirred reactors, and reaction sensitivity coefficients) and global parameters (ignition delay times in shock tube experiments, ignition timing in a HCCI engine, and flame speeds). The species removal is based on calculations using a minimum number of parameter configurations, but complemented by a very broad parameter variation in the process of compiling the kinetic input data. We further demonstrate that the inclusion of sensitivity coefficients in the validation process allows efficient control of the reduction process. Additionally, a compact high-temperature n-heptane oxidation model of 47 species and 468 reactions was generated by the application of necessity

  18. Trace methane oxidation and the methane dependency of sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J.W.

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of labeled methane (CH4) and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction in three types of anaerobic granular sludge. In all samples, 13C-labeled CH4 was anaerobically oxidized to 13C-labeled CO2, while net endogenous CH4 production was observed. Labeled-CH4 oxidation rates followed CH4 production rates, and the presence of sulfate hampered both labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis. Labeled-CH4 oxidation was therefore linked to methanogenesis. This process is referred to as trace CH4 oxidation and has been demonstrated in methanogenic pure cultures. This study shows that the ratio between labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis is positively affected by the CH4 partial pressure and that this ratio is in methanogenic granular sludge more than 40 times higher than that in pure cultures of methanogens. The CH4 partial pressure also positively affected sulfate reduction and negatively affected methanogenesis: a repression of methanogenesis at elevated CH4 partial pressures confers an advantage to sulfate reducers that compete with methanogens for common substrates, formed from endogenous material. The oxidation of labeled CH 4 and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction are thus not necessarily evidence of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 coupled to sulfate reduction. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  19. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min; Fukushima, Shoji; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P 450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate

  20. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  1. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, Shoji [Japan Bioassay Research Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, 2445 Hirasawa, Hadano, Kanagawa 257-0015 (Japan); Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2013-10-28

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P{sub 450} inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  2. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Wanibuchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, a-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  3. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    weeks. Additionally, Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing microbial enrichment cultures were obtained from aquifer sediments. Growth experiments with the cultures sequentially produced nitrite and nitrous oxide from nitrate while simultaneously oxidizing Fe(II). Field and culture results suggest that nitrogen oxide reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in the aquifer are a complex interaction of coupled biotic and abiotic reactions. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that anoxic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation can occur in groundwater; that it could control iron speciation; and that the process can impact the mobility of other chemical species (e.g., phosphate and arsenic) not directly involved in the oxidation–reduction reaction.

  4. Studies toward the oxidative and reductive activation of C-S bonds in 2'-S-aryl-2'-thiouridine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayala, Ramanjaneyulu; Giuglio-Tonolo, Alain; Broggi, Julie; Terme, Thierry; Vanelle, Patrice; Theard, Patricia; Médebielle, Maurice; Wnuk, Stanislaw F

    2016-04-21

    Studies directed toward the oxidative and reductive desulfurization of readily available 2'- S -aryl-2'-thiouridine derivatives were investigated with the prospect to functionalize the C2'-position of nucleosides. The oxidative desulfurization-difluorination strategy was successful on 2-(arylthio)alkanoate surrogates, while extension of the combination of oxidants and fluoride sources was not an efficient fluorination protocol when applied to 2'- S -aryl-2'-thiouridine derivatives, resulting mainly in C5-halogenation of the pyrimidine ring and C2'-monofluorination without desulfurization. Cyclic voltammetry of 2'-arylsulfonyl-2'-deoxyuridines and their 2'-fluorinated analogues showed that cleavage of the arylsulfone moiety could occur, although at relatively high cathodic potentials. While reductive-desulfonylation of 2'-arylsulfonyl-2'-deoxyuridines with organic electron donors (OEDs) gave predominantly base-induced furan type products, chemical (OED) and electrochemical reductive-desulfonylation of the α-fluorosulfone derivatives yielded the 2'-deoxy-2'-fluorouridine and 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxy-2'-fluorouridine derivatives. These results provided good evidence of the generation of a C2'-anion through carbon-sulfur bond cleavage, opening new horizons for the reductive-functionalization approaches in nucleosides.

  5. Studies toward the oxidative and reductive activation of C-S bonds in 2'-S-aryl-2'-thiouridine derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayala, Ramanjaneyulu; Giuglio-Tonolo, Alain; Broggi, Julie; Terme, Thierry; Vanelle, Patrice; Theard, Patricia; Médebielle, Maurice; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.

    2016-01-01

    Studies directed toward the oxidative and reductive desulfurization of readily available 2'-S-aryl-2'-thiouridine derivatives were investigated with the prospect to functionalize the C2'-position of nucleosides. The oxidative desulfurization-difluorination strategy was successful on 2-(arylthio)alkanoate surrogates, while extension of the combination of oxidants and fluoride sources was not an efficient fluorination protocol when applied to 2'-S-aryl-2'-thiouridine derivatives, resulting mainly in C5-halogenation of the pyrimidine ring and C2'-monofluorination without desulfurization. Cyclic voltammetry of 2'-arylsulfonyl-2'-deoxyuridines and their 2'-fluorinated analogues showed that cleavage of the arylsulfone moiety could occur, although at relatively high cathodic potentials. While reductive-desulfonylation of 2'-arylsulfonyl-2'-deoxyuridines with organic electron donors (OEDs) gave predominantly base-induced furan type products, chemical (OED) and electrochemical reductive-desulfonylation of the α-fluorosulfone derivatives yielded the 2'-deoxy-2'-fluorouridine and 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxy-2'-fluorouridine derivatives. These results provided good evidence of the generation of a C2'-anion through carbon-sulfur bond cleavage, opening new horizons for the reductive-functionalization approaches in nucleosides. PMID:27019535

  6. Reduction of Oxidative Melt Loss of Aluminum and Its Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Subodh K. Das; Shridas Ningileri

    2006-03-17

    This project led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms of dross formation. The microstructural evolution in industrial dross samples was determined. Results suggested that dross that forms in layers with structure and composition determined by the local magnesium concentration alone. This finding is supported by fundamental studies of molten metal surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data revealed that only magnesium segregates to the molten aluminum alloy surface and reacts to form a growing oxide layer. X-ray diffraction techniques that were using to investigate an oxidizing molten aluminum alloy surface confirmed for the first time that magnesium oxide is the initial crystalline phase that forms during metal oxidation. The analytical techniques developed in this project are now available to investigate other molten metal surfaces. Based on the improved understanding of dross initiation, formation and growth, technology was developed to minimize melt loss. The concept is based on covering the molten metal surface with a reusable physical barrier. Tests in a laboratory-scale reverberatory furnace confirmed the results of bench-scale tests. The main highlights of the work done include: A clear understanding of the kinetics of dross formation and the effect of different alloying elements on dross formation was obtained. It was determined that the dross evolves in similar ways regardless of the aluminum alloy being melted and the results showed that amorphous aluminum nitride forms first, followed by amorphous magnesium oxide and crystalline magnesium oxide in all alloys that contain magnesium. Evaluation of the molten aluminum alloy surface during melting and holding indicated that magnesium oxide is the first crystalline phase to form during oxidation of a clean aluminum alloy surface. Based on dross evaluation and melt tests it became clear that the major contributing factor to aluminum alloy dross was in the alloys with Mg content. Mg was

  7. Limitations in Using Chemical Oxidative Potential to Understand Oxidative Stress from Particulate Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, A. W. H.; Wang, S.; Wang, X.; Kohl, L.; Chow, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) in the atmosphere is known to cause adverse cardiorespiratory health effects. It has been suggested that the ability of PM to generate oxidative stress leads to a proinflammatory response. In this work, we study the biological relevance of using a chemical oxidative potential (OP) assay to evaluate proinflammatory response in airway epithelial cells. Here we study the OPs of laboratory secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and metal mixtures, ambient PM from India, ash from the 2016 Alberta wildfires, and diesel exhaust particles. We use SOA derived from naphthalene and from monoterpenes as model systems for SOA. We measure OP using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay, and cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in BEAS-2B cell culture was measured using CellROX assay. We found that both SOA and copper show high OPs individually, but the OP of the combined SOA/copper mixture, which is more atmospherically relevant, was lower than either of the individual OPs. The reduced activity is attributed to chelation between metals and organic compounds using proton nuclear magnetic resonance. There is reasonable association between DTT activity and cellular ROS production within each particle type, but weak association across different particle types, suggesting that particle composition plays an important role in distinguishing between antioxidant consumption and ROS production. Our results highlight that while oxidative potential is a useful metric of PM's ability to generate oxidative stress, the chemical composition and cellular environment should be considered in understanding health impacts of PM.

  8. Safety analysis of switching between reductive and oxidative conditions in a reaction coupling reverse flow reactor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2001-01-01

    A new reverse flow reactor is developed where endothermic reactants (propane dehydrogenation) and exothermic reactants (fuel combustion) are fed sequentially to a monolithic catalyst, while periodically alternating the inlet and outlet positions. Upon switching from reductive to oxidative conditions

  9. Electrochemical reduction of nitrous oxide on La1-xSrxFeO3 perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrous oxide and oxygen has been studied on cone-shaped electrodes of La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites in an all solid state cell, using cyclic voltammetry. It was shown that the activity of the La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites for the electrochemical reduction...... of nitrous oxide mainly depends on the amount of Fe(III) and oxide ion vacancies. The activity of the La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites towards the electrochemical reduction of nitrous oxide is much lower than the activity of the La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites towards the electrochemical reduction of oxygen...

  10. The Eco Logic gas-phase chemical reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallett, D.J.; Campbell, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1986, Eco Logic has conducted research with the aim of developing a new technology for destroying aqueous organic wastes, such as contaminated harbor sediments, landfill soil and leachates, and lagoon sludges. The goal was a commercially-viable chemical process that could deal with these watery wastes and also process stored wastes. The process described in this paper was developed with a view to avoiding the expense and technical drawbacks of incinerators, while still providing high destruction efficiencies and waste volume capabilities. A lab-scale process unit was constructed in 1988 and tested extensively. Based on the results of these tests, it was decided to construct a mobile pilot-scale unit that could be used for further testing and ultimately for small commercial waste processing operations. It was taken through a preliminary round of tests at Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, where the waste processed was coal-tar-contaminated harbor sediment. In 1992, the same unit was taken through a second round of tests in Bay City, Michigan. In this test program, the pilot-scale unit processed PCBs in aqueous, organic and soil matrices. This paper describes the process reactions and the pilot-scale process unit, and presents the results of pilot-scale testing thus far

  11. In Situ Spectroscopic Analysis of the Carbothermal Reduction Process of Iron Oxides during Microwave Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Fukushima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of microwave plasma induction and reduction on the promotion of the carbothermal reduction of iron oxides (α-Fe2O3, γ-Fe2O3, and Fe3O4 are investigated using in situ emission spectroscopy measurements during 2.45 GHz microwave processing, and the plasma discharge (such as CN and N2 is measured during microwave E-field irradiation. It is shown that CN gas or excited CN molecules contribute to the iron oxide reduction reactions, as well as to the thermal reduction. On the other hand, no plasma is generated during microwave H-field irradiation, resulting in thermal reduction. Magnetite strongly interacts with the microwave H-field, and the reduction reaction is clearly promoted by microwave H-field irradiation, as well as thermal reduction reaction.

  12. Oxidation and Reduction of Liquid SnPb (60/40) under Ambient and Vacuum Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhmann, Jochen Friedrich; Maly, K.; Preuss, A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most straightforward approaches to fluxless solder bonding is using vacuum conditions to prevent further oxidation and, where needed, to reduce solder oxides by the use of molecular hydrogen (H-2).(1-3) This study On oxidation and reduction of solder oxides on SnPb (60/40) is aimed...... to provide a better understanding for fluxless solder bonding applications under controlled atmospheric conditions; By means of scanning Auger spectroscopy it is shown, that growth of oxide films on metallic SnPb above the eutectic temperature can be significantly reduced by decreasing the O-2 partial...

  13. Bacterial Oxidation and Reduction of Iron in the Processes of Creation and Treatment of Acid Mining Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kupka

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainages (AMDs arise at the weathering of sulphidic minerals. The occurrence of acidic streams is commonly associated with the human mining activities. Due to the disruption and excavation of sulphide deposits, the oxidation processes have initiated. Acidic products of sulphide oxidation accelerate the degradation of accompanying minerals. AMDs typically contain high concentrations of sulfuric acid and soluble metals and cause serious ecological problems due to the water pollution and the devastation of adjacent country. Microbial life in these extremely acidic environments may be considerably diverse. AMDs are abundant in bacteria capable to oxidize and/or to reduce iron. The rate of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron released from pyrite surfaces is up to one million times faster than the chemical oxidation rate at low pH. Bacterial regeneration of ferric iron maintains the continuity of pyrite oxidation and the production of AMDs. Another group of microorganisms living in these environments are acidophilic ferric iron reducing bacteria. This group of microorganisms has been discovered only relatively recently. Acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria reduce ferric iron in either soluble or solid forms to ferrous iron. The reductive dissolution of ferric iron minerals brings about a mobilization of iron as well as associated heavy metals. The Bacterial oxidation and reduction of iron play an important role in the transformation of either crystalline or amorphous iron-containing minerals, including sulphides, oxides, hydroxysulfates, carbonates and silicates. This work discusses the role of acidophilic bacteria in the natural iron cycling and the genesis of acidic effluents. The possibilities of application of iron bacteria in the remediation of AMDs are also considered.

  14. A study for an electrolytic reduction of tantalum oxide in a LiCl-Li2O molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Bin; Park, Byung Heung; Seo, Chung Seok; Kang, Dae Seung; Kwon, Seon Gil; Park, Seong Won

    2005-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed the Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) to be an innovative technology for handling the PWR spent fuel. As part of ACP, the electrolytic reduction process (ER process) is the electrochemical reduction process of uranium oxide to uranium metal in a molten salt. The ER process has advantages in a technical stability, an economic potential and a good proliferation resistance. KAERI has reported on the good experimental results of an electrochemical reduction of the uranium oxide in a 20 kg HM/batch lab-scale. The ER process can be applicable to the reduction of other metal oxides. Metal tantalum powder has attracted attention for a variety of applications. A tantalum capacitor made from superfine and pliable tantalum powders is very small in size and it has a higher-capacitance part, therefore it is useful for microelectronic devices. By the ER process the metal tantalum can be obtained from tantalum pentoxide. In this work, a 40 g Ta 2 O 5 /batch electrochemical reactor was used for the synthesis of the metal tantalum. From the results of the cyclic voltammograms for the Ta 2 O 5 -LiCl-Li 2 O system, the mechanism of the tantalum reduction in a molten LiCl-Li 2 O salt system was investigated. Tantalum pentoxide is chemically reduced to tantalum metal by the lithium metal which is electrochemically deposited into an integrated cathode assembly in the LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt. The experiments for the tantalum reduction were performed with a chronopotentiometry in the reactor cell, the reduced products were analyzed from an analysis of the X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX). From the results, the electrolytic reduction process is applicable to the synthesis of metal tantalum

  15. Translation Effects in Fluorine Doped Tin Oxide Thin Film Properties by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Afzaal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the impact of translation rates in fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO thin films using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD were studied. We demonstrated that by adjusting the translation speeds of the susceptor, the growth rates of the FTO films varied and hence many of the film properties were modified. X-ray powder diffraction showed an increased preferred orientation along the (200 plane at higher translation rates, although with no actual change in the particle sizes. A reduction in dopant level resulted in decreased particle sizes and a much greater degree of (200 preferred orientation. For low dopant concentration levels, atomic force microscope (AFM studies showed a reduction in roughness (and lower optical haze with increased translation rate and decreased growth rates. Electrical measurements concluded that the resistivity, carrier concentration, and mobility of films were dependent on the level of fluorine dopant, the translation rate and hence the growth rates of the deposited films.

  16. Microfluidic photoinduced chemical oxidation for Ru(bpy)33 + chemiluminescence - A comprehensive experimental comparison with on-chip direct chemical oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadavilpparampu, Afsal Mohammed; Al Lawati, Haider A. J.; Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O.

    2017-08-01

    For the first time, the analytical figures of merit in detection capabilities of the very less explored photoinduced chemical oxidation method for Ru(bpy)32 + CL has been investigated in detail using 32 structurally different analytes. It was carried out on-chip using peroxydisulphate and visible light and compared with well-known direct chemical oxidation approaches using Ce(IV). The analytes belong to various chemical classes such as tertiary amine, secondary amine, sulphonamide, betalactam, thiol and benzothiadiazine. Influence of detection environment on CL emission with respect to method of oxidation was evaluated by changing the buffers and pH. The photoinduced chemical oxidation exhibited more universal nature for Ru(bpy)32 + CL in detection towards selected analytes. No additional enhancers, reagents, or modification in instrumental configuration were required. Wide detectability and enhanced emission has been observed for analytes from all the chemical classes when photoinduced chemical oxidation was employed. Some of these analytes are reported for the first time under photoinduced chemical oxidation like compounds from sulphonamide, betalactam, thiol and benzothiadiazine class. On the other hand, many of the selected analytes including tertiary and secondary amines such as cetirizine, azithromycin fexofenadine and proline did not produced any analytically useful CL signal (S/N = 3 or above for 1 μgmL- 1 analyte) under chemical oxidation. The most fascinating observations was in the detection limits; for example ofloxacin was 15 times more intense with a detection limit of 5.81 × 10- 10 M compared to most lowest ever reported 6 × 10- 9 M. Earlier, penicillamine was detected at 0.1 μg mL- 1 after derivatization using photoinduced chemical oxidation, but in this study, we improved it to 5.82 ng mL- 1 without any prior derivatization. The detection limits of many other analytes were also found to be improved by several orders of magnitude under

  17. Evidence for Single Metal Two Electron Oxidative Addition and Reductive Elimination at Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Benedict M; Kefalidis, Christos E; Lu, Erli; Patel, Dipti; Mcinnes, Eric; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley; Maron, Laurent; Liddle, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Reversible single-metal two-electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination are common fundamental reactions for transition metals that underpin major catalytic transformations. However, these reactions have never been observed together in the f-block because these metals exhibit irreversible one- or multi-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. Here, we report that azobenzene oxidises sterically and electronically unsaturated uranium(III) complexes to afford a uranium(V)-imido compl...

  18. Bacterial Disproportionation of Elemental Sulfur Coupled to Chemical Reduction of Iron or Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler; Bak, Friedhelm

    1993-01-01

    A new chemolithotrophic bacterial metabolism was discovered in anaerobic marine enrichment cultures. Cultures in defined medium with elemental sulfur (S0) and amorphous ferric hydroxide (FeOOH) as sole substrates showed intense formation of sulfate. Furthermore, precipitation of ferrous sulfide and pyrite was observed. The transformations were accompanied by growth of slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria. The quantification of the products revealed that S0 was microbially disproportionated to sulfate and sulfide, as follows: 4S0 + 4H2O → SO42- + 3H2S + 2H+. Subsequent chemical reactions between the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO3. Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO2, instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant reduction of MnO2 to Mn2+. Growth of small rod-shaped bacteria was observed. When incubated without MnO2, the culture did not grow but produced small amounts of SO42- and H2S at a ratio of 1:3, indicating again a disproportionation of S0. The observed microbial disproportionation of S0 only proceeds significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S0 disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO2 was high, > 104 cm-3 in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic sulfide oxidation to sulfate in anoxic sediments. PMID:16348835

  19. Application of nonliner reduction techniques in chemical process modeling: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhaimin, Z; Aziz, N.; Abd Shukor, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    Model reduction techniques have been used widely in engineering fields for electrical, mechanical as well as chemical engineering. The basic idea of reduction technique is to replace the original system by an approximating system with much smaller state-space dimension. A reduced order model is more beneficial to process and industrial field in terms of control purposes. This paper is to provide a review on application of nonlinear reduction techniques in chemical processes. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique reviewed are also highlighted

  20. Nanoscale reduction of graphene oxide thin films and its characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Lorenzoni, M.; Giugni, Andrea; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Pé rez-Murano, Francesc; Mescola, A.; Torre, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a method to reduce thin films of graphene oxide (GO) to a spatial resolution better than 100 nm over several tens of micrometers by means of an electrochemical scanning probe based lithography. In situ tip

  1. Stepwise Reduction of Immobilized Mono layer Graphene Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren; He, Yudong; Lang, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    to the pronounced aggregation that accompanies deoxygenation of GO in solution. Surface immobilization of monolayered graphene oxide (mGO) in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films was investigated as a method to circumvent this problem. Two types of LB films with different density of mGO flakes were prepared, i.e., diluted...

  2. Measurement and reduction of nitrous oxide in operating rooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuyt, H. C.; Verberk, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    In a program designed to lower exposure to anesthetic gases, nitrous oxide in the breathing zone of anesthesiologists was continuously monitored by means of a direct reading apparatus and a specially designed collar. Initially, the average concentration during anesthesia in intubated patients,

  3. Deposition of silver nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by chemical reduction process and their antimicrobial effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, Adawiya J., E-mail: adawiyahaider@yahoo.com [Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Research Center, University of Technology, Baghdad, Republic of Iraq, 10066 (Iraq); Thamir, Amin D. [Production and Metallurgy department, University of Technology, University of Technology, Baghdad, Republic of Iraq, 10066 (Iraq); Ahmed, Duha S.; Mohammad, M. R. [Applied Physics department, University of Technology, University of Technology, Baghdad, Republic, of Iraq, 10066 (Iraq)

    2016-07-25

    In this paper, the functionalization of raw-MWCNTs involves oxidation reaction using concentrated acid mixture of HNO{sub 3}:H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (1:3), via ultrasonic bath (170 W, 50 kHz) to obtain functional groups. Then Ag nanoparticles are decorated the outside over the surface of functionalized MWCNTs using a chemical reduction process resulting in the formation of(Ag/ MWCNTs) hybrid material. The results showed that outer diameter functionalized F-MWCNTs andAg nanoparticles size was about (11-80) nm and (10 to 25) nm, respectively using TEM and HRTEM. The crystallographic structure of MWCNTs using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis proved diffraction peaks at 38.1°, 44.3°, 64.7° and 77.4° degrees namely, Ag (111), Ag (200), Ag (220), and Ag (311) of the face-centered cubic lattice of Ag, respectively, excepting the peak at 2θ =25.6°, which correspond to the (0 0 2) reflection of the MWNTs are corresponding to Ag/MWNTs. The antimicrobial activities of Ag/MWCNTs hybrid using plate count method showed that decreasing a large number of bacteria colonies of E. coli and S. aureu with increasing the hybrid concentrations after incubation for 24 h in shaker incubator with percentage of inhibition approaching 100%.

  4. Deposition of silver nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by chemical reduction process and their antimicrobial effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adawiya J.; Thamir, Amin D.; Ahmed, Duha S.; Mohammad, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the functionalization of raw-MWCNTs involves oxidation reaction using concentrated acid mixture of HNO3:H2SO4 (1:3), via ultrasonic bath (170 W, 50 kHz) to obtain functional groups. Then Ag nanoparticles are decorated the outside over the surface of functionalized MWCNTs using a chemical reduction process resulting in the formation of(Ag/ MWCNTs) hybrid material. The results showed that outer diameter functionalized F-MWCNTs andAg nanoparticles size was about (11-80) nm and (10 to 25) nm, respectively using TEM and HRTEM. The crystallographic structure of MWCNTs using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis proved diffraction peaks at 38.1°, 44.3°, 64.7° and 77.4° degrees namely, Ag (111), Ag (200), Ag (220), and Ag (311) of the face-centered cubic lattice of Ag, respectively, excepting the peak at 2θ =25.6°, which correspond to the (0 0 2) reflection of the MWNTs are corresponding to Ag/MWNTs. The antimicrobial activities of Ag/MWCNTs hybrid using plate count method showed that decreasing a large number of bacteria colonies of E. coli and S. aureu with increasing the hybrid concentrations after incubation for 24h in shaker incubator with percentage of inhibition approaching 100%.

  5. Advanced Experimental Analysis of Controls on Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction - Final Report - 09/16/1996 - 03/16/2001; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2001-01-01

    Considering the broad influence that microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction can have on subsurface metal/organic contaminant biogeochemistry, understanding the mechanisms that control this process is critical for predicting the behavior and fate of these contaminants in anaerobic subsurface environments. Knowledge of the factors that influence the rates of growth and activity of Fe(III) oxide-reducing bacteria is critical for predicting (i.e., modeling) the long-term influence of these organisms on the fate of contaminants in the subsurface, and for effectively utilizing Fe(III) oxide reduction and associated geochemical affects for the purpose of subsurface metal/organic contamination bioremediation. This research project will refine existing models for microbiological and geochemical controls on Fe(III) oxide reduction, using laboratory reactor systems that mimic, to varying degrees, the physical and chemical conditions of the subsurface. Novel experimental methods for studying the kinetics of microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and measuring growth rates of Fe(III) oxide-reducing bacteria will be developed. These new methodologies will be directly applicable to studies on subsurface contaminant transformations directly coupled to or influenced by microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction

  6. Trace methane oxidation and the methane dependency of sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J.W.; Jagersma, Christian G.; Zhang, Yu; Petrillo, Michele; Cai, Hengzhe; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Stams, Alfons J.M.; Lens, Piet N.L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of labeled methane (CH4) and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction in three types of anaerobic granular sludge. In all samples, 13C-labeled CH4 was anaerobically oxidized to 13C-labeled CO2, while net

  7. Generalized kinetic model of reduction of molecular oxidant by metal containing redox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Present work is devoted to kinetics of reduction of molecular oxidant by metal containing redox. Constructed generalized kinetic model of redox process in the system solid redox - reagent solution allows to perform the general theoretical approach to research and to obtain new results on kinetics and mechanism of interaction of redox with oxidants.

  8. Dual passivation of intrinsic defects at the compound semiconductor/oxide interface using an oxidant and a reductant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Tyler; Chagarov, Evgeniy; Edmonds, Mary; Droopad, Ravi; Kummel, Andrew C

    2015-05-26

    Studies have shown that metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated utilizing compound semiconductors as the channel are limited in their electrical performance. This is attributed to imperfections at the semiconductor/oxide interface which cause electronic trap states, resulting in inefficient modulation of the Fermi level. The physical origin of these states is still debated mainly because of the difficulty in assigning a particular electronic state to a specific physical defect. To gain insight into the exact source of the electronic trap states, density functional theory was employed to model the intrinsic physical defects on the InGaAs (2 × 4) surface and to model the effective passivation of these defects by utilizing both an oxidant and a reductant to eliminate metallic bonds and dangling-bond-induced strain at the interface. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy were employed to experimentally determine the physical and electronic defects and to verify the effectiveness of dual passivation with an oxidant and a reductant. While subsurface chemisorption of oxidants on compound semiconductor substrates can be detrimental, it has been shown theoretically and experimentally that oxidants are critical to removing metallic defects at oxide/compound semiconductor interfaces present in nanoscale channels, oxides, and other nanostructures.

  9. Catalytic Reduction of Nitrous Oxide with Carbon Monoxide over Calcined Co–Mn–Al Hydrotalcite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pacultová, K.; Obalová, L.; Kovanda, F.; Jirátová, Květa

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 137, 2-4 (2008), s. 358-389 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/05/0366 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nitrous oxide * carbon monoxide * mixed oxide catalysts Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.004, year: 2008

  10. Oxidation state analyses of uranium with emphasis on chemical speciation in geological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ervanne, H.

    2004-01-01

    , linearity, repeatability and comparability of methods were examined. Both Nd-coprecipitation and ion exchange were found to be valid and reliable methods. Both are suitable tools for studying oxidation/reduction mechanisms in geochemical processes. The oxidation state analyses of uranium in different geological materials gave new information on the chemical speciation and behaviour of uranium. (orig.)

  11. Remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of aluminum oxide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volintiru, I.; Creatore, M.; Hemmen, van J.L.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum oxide films were deposited using remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from oxygen/trimethylaluminum mixtures. Initial studies by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry demonstrated that the aluminum oxide films deposited at temperatures

  12. Simultaneous reduction and nitrogen functionalization of graphene oxide using lemon for metal-free oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Halima; Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; Cho, Sung; Jeon, Seungwon

    2017-12-01

    Inspire by the vision of finding a simple and green method for simultaneous reduction and nitrogen (N)-functionalization of graphene oxide (GO), a N-rich reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has been synthesized through a facile and ecofriendly hydrothermal strategy while most of the existing methods are involving with multiple steps and highly toxic reducing agents that are harmful to human health and environment. In this paper, the simultaneous reduction and N-functionalization of GO using as available lemon juice (denoted as Lem-rGO) for metal-free electrocatalysis towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is described. The proposed method is based on the reduction of GO using of the reducing and the N-precursor capability of ascorbic acid and citric acid as well as the nitrogenous compounds, respectively, that containing in lemon juice. The resultant Lem-rGO has higher reduction degree, higher specific surface area and better crystalline nature with N-incorporation than that of well investigated ascorbic acid and citric acid treated rGO. As a result, it shows better ORR electrocatalytic activity in respect to the improved onset potential, electron transfer rate and kinetics than those typical rGO catalysts. Moreover, it shows a significant tolerance to the anodic fuels and durability than the Pt/C during ORR.

  13. General considerations on the oxide fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascard, R.

    1977-01-01

    Since the very first experimental irradiations in thermal reactors, performed in view of the future Rapsodie fuel general study, corrosion cladding anomalies were observed. After 10 years of Rapsodie and more than two years of Phenix, performance brought definite confirmation of the chemical reactions between the irradiated fuel and cladding. That is the reason for which the fuel designers express an urgent need for determining the corrosion rates. Semi-empirical laws and mechanisms describing corrosion processes are proposed. Erratic conditions for appearance of the oxide-cladding corrosion are stressed upon. Obviously such a problem can be fully appreciated only by a statistical approach based on a large number of observations on the true LMFBR fuel pins

  14. Evolution of thermal stress and failure probability during reduction and re-oxidation of solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Jiang, Wenchun; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Yucai; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2017-12-01

    The reduction and re-oxidation of anode have significant effects on the integrity of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sealed by the glass-ceramic (GC). The mechanical failure is mainly controlled by the stress distribution. Therefore, a three dimensional model of SOFC is established to investigate the stress evolution during the reduction and re-oxidation by finite element method (FEM) in this paper, and the failure probability is calculated using the Weibull method. The results demonstrate that the reduction of anode can decrease the thermal stresses and reduce the failure probability due to the volumetric contraction and porosity increasing. The re-oxidation can result in a remarkable increase of the thermal stresses, and the failure probabilities of anode, cathode, electrolyte and GC all increase to 1, which is mainly due to the large linear strain rather than the porosity decreasing. The cathode and electrolyte fail as soon as the linear strains are about 0.03% and 0.07%. Therefore, the re-oxidation should be controlled to ensure the integrity, and a lower re-oxidation temperature can decrease the stress and failure probability.

  15. Effects of manganese oxide on arsenic reduction and leaching from contaminated floodplain soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, Katrin; Mikutta, Christian; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Reductive release of the potentially toxic metalloid As from Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides has been identified as an important process leading to elevated As porewater concentrations in soils and sediments. Despite the ubiquitous presence of Mn oxides in soils and their oxidizing power toward As.......7) on As speciation and release from an As-contaminated floodplain soil (214 mg As/kg) under anoxic conditions. Our results show that birnessite additions significantly decreased As leaching. The reduction of both As and Fe was delayed, and As(III) accumulated in birnessite-rich column parts, indicating...

  16. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory--Chemical Management: A Method for Waste Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Stanley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods for reducing or eliminating waste disposal problems in the chemistry laboratory, considering both economic and environmental aspects of the problems. Proposes inventory control, shared use, solvent recycling, zero effluent, and various means of disposing of chemicals. (JM)

  17. The chemical transformation of copper in aluminium oxide during heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Y-L; Wang, H-C; Yang, Y-W; Lee, J-F

    2004-01-01

    Thermal treatment has recently been emerging as a promising environmental technology to stabilize heavy metal-containing industrial sludge. This study used x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the species of copper contaminant contained in aluminium oxide that is one of the main compositions of sludge and soil. Results indicate that the originally loaded copper nitrate was transformed into Cu(OH) 2 after its dissolution in the aluminium oxide slurry. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) fitting indicates that the main copper species in the 105 deg. C dried Cu(NO 3 ) 2 -loaded aluminium oxide is Cu(OH) 2 which accounts for ca. 75% of the loaded copper. After thermal treatment at 500 deg. C for 1 h, both x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and EXAFS fitting results show that CuO became the prevailing copper species (about 85%); the rest of the copper consisted of ∼ 15% Cu(OH) 2 and a negligible amount of Cu(NO 3 ) 2 . It was found that most Cu(OH) 2 and Cu(NO 3 ) 2 decomposed into CuO at 500 deg. C. Further increase of the heating temperature from 500 to 900 deg. C resulted in more decomposition of Cu(OH) 2 and Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ; therefore CuO remained as the main copper species. However, it was suggested that about 15% of the loaded copper formed CuAl 2 O 4 through the chemical reaction between CuO and Al 2 O 3 at 900 deg. C

  18. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes. Unraveling the Relationship Between Structure, Surface Chemistry and Oxygen Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalan, Srikanth [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2013-03-31

    In this work we have considered oxygen reduction reaction on LSM and LSCF cathode materials. In particular we have used various spectroscopic techniques to explore the surface composition, transition metal oxidation state, and the bonding environment of oxygen to understand the changes that occur to the surface during the oxygen reduction process. In a parallel study we have employed patterned cathodes of both LSM and LSCF cathodes to extract transport and kinetic parameters associated with the oxygen reduction process.

  19. In Vitro Enzymatic Reduction Kinetics of Mineral Oxides by Membrane Fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebush, S.; Icopini, G.; Brantley, S.; Tien, M.

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  20. Descriptors and Thermodynamic Limitations of Electrocatalytic Carbon Dioxide Reduction on Rutile Oxide Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhowmik, Arghya; Vegge, Tejs; Hansen, Heine Anton

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the electrochemical reduction of CO2 into liquid fuels on rutile metal oxide surfaces is developed by using DFT calculations. We consider oxide overlayer structures on RuO2(1 1 0) surfaces as model catalysts to elucidate the trends and limitations in the CO2 reduction...... and it defines the left leg of the activity volcano for CO2RR. HCOOH* is a key intermediate for products formed through further reduction, for example, methanediol, methanol, and methane. The surfaces that do not bind HCOOH* are selective towards formic acid (HCOOH) production, but hydrogen evolution limits...

  1. Nitric oxide reduction over a synthetic coal char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Pevida; A. Arenillas; F. Rubiera; J.J. Pis [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    In the present work, the mechanisms involved in the NO heterogeneous reduction have been investigated. A synthetic coal char was used as the carbon source. This synthetic coal was made from a mixture of model compounds and provides well-known functionalities, including nitrogenated ones, similar to those found in a high volatile bituminous coal. The char was obtained by pyrolysis of the synthetic coal, up to 1123 K, under helium atmosphere in a fixed bed reactor. Char texture and structure were characterised by N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at 77 and 273 K, respectively, X-ray diffraction, immersion calorimetry in C{sub 6}H{sub 6} and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Temperature programmed reactions (TPR) were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyser using 400 ppm NO diluted in Ar as the reactant gas. The char was heated at 15 K min{sup -1} from room temperature to 1273 K. Gaseous products were simultaneously analysed by mass spectrometry (MS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The influence of nitrogen in the solid phase on the reduction mechanism was evaluated by comparing the results for chars with and without nitrogen in their composition. The results of this preliminary study showed that the presence of nitrogen in the chars composition did not favour the heterogeneous NO reduction. In addition, low temperature NO chemisorption on the carbon surface creates complexes that take an active part in the subsequent reactions with NO. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Uranium reduction by carbon oxide during ore formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyash, I.V.; Gavrusevich, I.B.; Pasal'skaya, L.F.; Shcherba, D.I.

    1981-01-01

    Using the method of gas chromatography the gas content in Pre-Cambrian granitoils of various types and in natrometasomatites associted with them is studied. It is established that granites associated with ore-bearing albitites have sharply elevated amounts of CO as compared with granites, which do not include mineralization. Simultaneously in ore samples the absence or sharply low amounts of CO as compared with ore-free samples is observed, that is reverse dependence of CO and ore components. Carbon oxide is the reducing agent of uranium mineralization and alongside with other reducing agents can be a geochemical barrier in the process of ore formation [ru

  3. The Application of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing miniature chemical sensors for a variety of applications including fire detection, emissions monitoring, fuel leak detection, and environmental monitoring. Smart Lick and Stick sensor technology which integrates a sensor array, electronics, telemetry, and power into one microsystem are being developed. These microsystems require low power consumption for long-term aerospace applications. One approach to decreasing power consumption is the use of nanotechnology. Nanocrystalline tin oxide (SnO2) carbon monoxide (CO) sensors developed previously by this group have been successfully used for fire detection and emissions monitoring. This presentation will briefly review the overall NASA GRC chemical sensor program and discuss our further effort in nanotechnology applications. New carbon dioxide (CO2) sensing material using doped nanocrystalline SnO2 will be discussed. Nanocrystalline SnO2 coated solid electrolyte CO2 sensors and SnO2 nanorod and nanofiber hydrogen (H2) sensors operated at reduced or room temperatures will also be discussed.

  4. Indium tin oxide films prepared via wet chemical route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legnani, C.; Lima, S.A.M.; Oliveira, H.H.S.; Quirino, W.G.; Machado, R.; Santos, R.M.B.; Davolos, M.R.; Achete, C.A.; Cremona, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, indium tin oxide (ITO) films were prepared using a wet chemical route, the Pechini method. This consists of a polyesterification reaction between an α-hydroxicarboxylate complex (indium citrate and tin citrate) with a polyalcohol (ethylene glycol) followed by a post annealing at 500 deg. C. A 10 at.% of doping of Sn 4+ ions into an In 2 O 3 matrix was successfully achieved through this method. In order to characterize the structure, the morphology as well as the optical and electrical properties of the produced ITO films, they were analyzed using different experimental techniques. The obtained films are highly transparent, exhibiting transmittance of about 85% at 550 nm. They are crystalline with a preferred orientation of [222]. Microscopy discloses that the films are composed of grains of 30 nm average size and 0.63 nm RMS roughness. The films' measured resistivity, mobility and charge carrier concentration were 5.8 x 10 -3 Ω cm, 2.9 cm 2 /V s and - 3.5 x 10 20 /cm 3 , respectively. While the low mobility value can be related to the small grain size, the charge carrier concentration value can be explained in terms of the high oxygen concentration level resulting from the thermal treatment process performed in air. The experimental conditions are being refined to improve the electrical characteristics of the films while good optical, chemical, structural and morphological qualities already achieved are maintained

  5. Enzymatically and chemically oxidized lignin nanoparticles for biomaterial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattinen, Maija-Liisa; Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Leskinen, Timo; Anttila, Tuomas; Riviere, Guillaume; Sipponen, Mika; Paananen, Arja; Lintinen, Kalle; Kostiainen, Mauri; Österberg, Monika

    2018-04-01

    Cross-linked and decolorized lignin nanoparticles (LNPs) were prepared enzymatically and chemically from softwood Kraft lignin. Colloidal lignin particles (CLPs, ca. 200 nm) in a non-malodorous aqueous dispersion could be dried and redispersed in tetrahydrofuran (THF) or in water retaining their stability i.e. spherical shape and size. Two fungal laccases, Trametes hirsuta (ThL) and Melanocarpus albomyces (MaL) were used in the cross-linking reactions. Reactivity of ThL and MaL on Lignoboost™ lignin and LNPs was confirmed by high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and oxygen consumption measurements with simultaneous detection of red-brown color due to the formation of quinones. Zeta potential measurements verified oxidation of LNPs via formation of surface-oriented carboxylic acid groups. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed minor changes in the particle size distributions of LNPs after laccase catalyzed radicalization, indicating preferably covalent intraparticular cross-linking over polymerization. Changes in the surface morphology of laccase treated LNPs were imaged by atomic force (AFM) and transmission emission (TEM) microscopy. Furthermore, decolorization of LNPs without degradation was obtained using ultrasonication with H 2 O 2 in alkaline reaction conditions. The research results have high impact for the utilization of Kraft lignin as nanosized colloidal particles in advanced bionanomaterial applications in medicine, foods and cosmetics including different sectors from chemical industry. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels: An overview of oxide reduction in pyroprocessing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Choi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical reduction process has been used to reduce spent oxide fuel to a metallic form using pyroprocessing technology for a closed fuel cycle in combination with a metal-fuel fast reactor. In the electrochemical reduction process, oxides fuels are loaded at the cathode basket in molten Li2O–LiCl salt and electrochemically reduced to the metal form. Various approaches based on thermodynamic calculations and experimental studies have been used to understand the electrode reaction and efficiently treat spent fuels. The factors that affect the speed of the electrochemical reduction have been determined to optimize the process and scale-up the electrolysis cell. In addition, demonstrations of the integrated series of processes (electrorefining and salt distillation with the electrochemical reduction have been conducted to realize the oxide fuel cycle. This overview provides insight into the current status of and issues related to the electrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels.

  7. Carbothermic reduction of electric arc furnace dust and calcination of waelz oxide by semi-pilot scale rotary furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcali M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives a common outline about the known recycling techniques from electric arc furnace dusts and describes an investigation of a pyrometallurgical process for the recovery of zinc and iron from electric arc furnace dusts (EAFD. In the waelz process, the reduction of zinc and iron from the waste oxides using solid carbon (lignite coal was studied. In the reduction experiments; temperature, time and charge type (powder and pellet were investigated in detail. It was demonstrated that zinc and iron recovery (% increases with increasing temperature as well as time. Pelletizing was found to be a better method than using the powder as received for the zinc recovery and iron conversion (. In the calcination (roasting process, crude zinc oxide, which evaporated from non-ferric metals were collected as condensed product (crude waelz oxide, was heated in air atmosphere. Lead, cadmium as well as chlorine and other impurities were successfully removed from crude waelz oxide by this method. In the calcination experiments; temperature and time are investigated in detail. It was demonstrated that zinc purification (% increases with increasing temperature. The highest zinc refining (% was obtained at 1200°C for 120 minutes. A kinetic study was also undertaken to determine the activation energy of the process. Activation energies were 242.77 kJ/mol for the zinc recovery with powder forms, 261.99 kJ/mol for the zinc recovery with pellet forms respectively. It was found that, initially, the reaction was chemically controlled.

  8. Self-propagating solar light reduction of graphite oxide in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorova, N.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Boukos, N.; Vermisoglou, E. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 41 Attikis (Greece); Lekakou, C. [Division of Mechanical, Medical, and Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Trapalis, C., E-mail: c.trapalis@inn.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 41 Attikis (Greece)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphite oxide was partially reduced by solar light irradiation in water media. • No addition of catalysts nor reductive agent were used for the reduction. • Specific capacitance increased stepwise with increase of irradiation time. • Self-propagating reduction of graphene oxide by solar light is suggested. - Abstract: Graphite Oxide (GtO) is commonly used as an intermediate material for preparation of graphene in the form of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Being a semiconductor with tunable band gap rGO is often coupled with various photocatalysts to enhance their visible light activity. The behavior of such rGO-based composites could be affected after prolonged exposure to solar light. In the present work, the alteration of the GtO properties under solar light irradiation is investigated. Water dispersions of GtO manufactured by oxidation of natural graphite via Hummers method were irradiated into solar light simulator for different periods of time without addition of catalysts or reductive agent. The FT-IR analysis of the treated dispersions revealed gradual reduction of the GtO with the increase of the irradiation time. The XRD, FT-IR and XPS analyses of the obtained solid materials confirmed the transition of GtO to rGO under solar light irradiation. The reduction of the GtO was also manifested by the CV measurements that revealed stepwise increase of the specific capacitance connected with the restoration of the sp{sup 2} domains. Photothermal self-propagating reduction of graphene oxide in aqueous media under solar light irradiation is suggested as a possible mechanism. The self-photoreduction of GtO utilizing solar light provides a green, sustainable route towards preparation of reduced graphene oxide. However, the instability of the GtO and partially reduced GO under irradiation should be considered when choosing the field of its application.

  9. Effects of oxidation reduction potential in the bypass micro-aerobic sludge zone on sludge reduction for a modified oxic-settling-anaerobic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kexun; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhongpin; Liu, Dongfang

    2014-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to determine the effect of oxidation reduction potential (ORP) on sludge reduction in a bypass micro-aerobic sludge reduction system. The system was composed of a modified oxic-settling-anaerobic process with a sludge holding tank in the sludge recycle loop. The ORPs in the micro-aerobic tanks were set at approximately +350, -90, -150, -200 and -250 mV, by varying the length of aeration time for the tanks. The results show that lower ORP result in greater sludge volume reduction, and the sludge production was reduced by 60% at the lowest ORP. In addition, low ORP caused extracellular polymer substances dissociation and slightly reduced sludge activity. Comparing the sludge backflow characteristics of the micro-aerobic tank's ORP controlled at -250 mV with that of +350 mV, the average soluble chemical oxygen (SCOD), TN and TP increased by 7, 0.4 and 2 times, median particle diameter decreased by 8.5 μm and the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) decreased by 0.0043 milligram O2 per gram suspended solids per minute. For the effluent, SCOD and TN and TP fluctuated around 30, 8.7 and 0.66 mg/L, respectively. Therefore, the effective assignment of ORP in the micro-aerobic tank can remarkably reduce sludge volume and does not affect final effluent quality.

  10. Electrochemical reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by single sheet iron oxide coated electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-Zhi, E-mail: lizhi@plen.ku.dk [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK–1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Hansen, Hans Christian B. [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK–1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Bjerrum, Morten Jannik [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK–2100 København Ø (Denmark)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Composite layers of single sheet iron oxides were coated on indium tin oxide electrodes. • Single sheet iron oxide is an electro-catalyst for reduction of nitroaromatic compounds in aqueous solution. • The reduction is well explained by a diffusion layer model. • The charge properties of the nitrophenols have an important influence on reduction. • Low-cost iron oxide based materials are promising electro-catalyst for water treatment. - Abstract: Nitroaromatic compounds are substantial hazard to the environment and to the supply of clean drinking water. We report here the successful reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by use of iron oxide coated electrodes, and demonstrate that single sheet iron oxides formed from layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides have unusual electrocatalytic reactivity. Electrodes were produced by coating of single sheet iron oxides on indium tin oxide electrodes. A reduction current density of 10 to 30 μA cm{sup −2} was observed in stirred aqueous solution at pH 7 with concentrations of 25 to 400 μM of the nitroaromatic compound at a potential of −0.7 V vs. SHE. Fast mass transfer favors the initial reduction of the nitroaromatic compound which is well explained by a diffusion layer model. Reduction was found to comprise two consecutive reactions: a fast four-electron first-order reduction of the nitro-group to the hydroxylamine-intermediate (rate constant = 0.28 h{sup −1}) followed by a slower two-electron zero-order reduction resulting in the final amino product (rate constant = 6.9 μM h{sup −1}). The zero-order of the latter reduction was attributed to saturation of the electrode surface with hydroxylamine-intermediates which have a more negative half-wave potential than the parent compound. For reduction of nitroaromatic compounds, the SSI electrode is found superior to metal electrodes due to low cost and high stability, and superior to carbon-based electrodes in terms of high coulombic efficiency and

  11. Suppression of nitrogen oxides emission by carbonaceous reductants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present status of NO x emission from power stations and automobiles is first summarized, and the controlling regulations in respective areas are reviewed. In spite of much progress, we have to further reduce the NO x emission in all the areas. In order to develop more effective technology, the fundamental understanding of the relevant reactions is essential. The heterogeneous reactions, like NO x and N 2 O formation from coal char, NO x and N 2 O reduction with carbon, and NO x reduction with hydrocarbon gases over heterogeneous catalysts are not well understood yet. This paper briefly summarizes our recent studies on the heterogeneous reactions of NO x formation and destruction. The importance of surface nitrogen species is emphasized in all the reaction systems. The presence of such surface species plays a very important role, not only in NO x destruction on carbon surfaces, but also in the NO x release during coal char combustion. Finally, future research areas are identified, where we need to understand what actually happens under high-temperature reaction conditions

  12. Photochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to fuels and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Eisenberg, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Fujita, E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Photochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} represents a potentially useful approach to developing a sustainable source of carbon-based chemicals, fuels, and materials. In this report the present status of photochemical CO{sub 2} reduction is assessed, areas that need to be better understood for advancement are identified, and approaches to overcoming barriers are suggested. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this field, assessments of three closely interrelated areas are given including integrated photochemical systems for catalytic CO{sub 2} reduction, thermal catalytic CO{sub 2} reactions, and electrochemical CO{sub 2} reduction. The report concludes with a summary and assessment of potential impacts of this area on chemical and energy technologies.

  13. Relationship between chemical composition and oxidative potential of secondary organic aerosol from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunyao; Ye, Jianhuai; Soong, Ronald; Wu, Bing; Yu, Legeng; Simpson, André J.; Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2018-03-01

    Owing to the complex nature and dynamic behaviors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), its ability to cause oxidative stress (known as oxidative potential, or OP) and adverse health outcomes remains poorly understood. In this work, we probed the linkages between the chemical composition of SOA and its OP, and investigated impacts from various SOA evolution pathways, including atmospheric oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation, and mixing with metal. SOA formed from photooxidation of the two most common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene and phenanthrene) were studied as model systems. OP was evaluated using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. The oligomer-rich fraction separated by liquid chromatography dominates DTT activity in both SOA systems (52 ± 10 % for naphthalene SOA (NSOA), and 56 ± 5 % for phenanthrene SOA (PSOA)). Heterogeneous ozonolysis of NSOA was found to enhance its OP, which is consistent with the trend observed in selected individual oxidation products. DTT activities from redox-active organic compounds and metals were found to be not additive. When mixing with highly redox-active metal (Cu), OP of the mixture decreased significantly for 1,2-naphthoquinone (42 ± 7 %), 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene (35 ± 1 %), NSOA (50 ± 6 %), and PSOA (43 ± 4 %). Evidence from proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy illustrates that such OP reduction upon mixing can be ascribed to metal-organic binding interactions. Our results highlight the role of aerosol chemical composition under atmospheric aging processes in determining the OP of SOA, which is needed for more accurate and explicit prediction of the toxicological impacts from particulate matter.

  14. A device for reduction of metal oxides generated in electrokinetic separation equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Kim, Il-Gook; Jeong, Jung-Whan; Choi, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    For a reduction of waste electrolyte volume and metal oxide volume, the reuse period of the waste electrolyte in the electrokinetic decontamination experiment and the method of a reduction of metal oxide volume in the cathode chamber were drawn out through several experiments with the manufactured 1.2 ton electrokinetic decontamination equipment. The optimum pH of electrolyte in cathode chamber for a reduction of volume of metal oxides was below 2.35. Indoor electrokinetic decontamination equipment for treatment of 1.2 tons of the contaminated soil per batch was manufactured to remove uranium from soil with high removal efficiency during a short time. For a reduction of waste electrolyte volume and metal oxide volume, the reuse period of waste electrolyte in the electrokinetic decontamination experiment and the method of a reduction of metal oxide volume in the cathode chamber were drawn out through several experiments with the manufactured electrokinetic equipment. Indoor electrokinetic decontamination equipment for treatment of 1.2 tons of the contaminated soil was manufactured to remove uranium from soil during a short time

  15. Direct electrochemical reduction of solid uranium oxide in molten fluoride salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibilaro, Mathieu; Cassayre, Laurent; Lemoine, Olivier; Massot, Laurent; Dugne, Olivier; Malmbeck, Rikard; Chamelot, Pierre

    2011-07-01

    The direct electrochemical reduction of UO 2 solid pellets was carried out in LiF-CaF 2 (+2 mass.% Li 2O) at 850 °C. An inert gold anode was used instead of the usual reactive sacrificial carbon anode. In this case, oxidation of oxide ions present in the melt yields O 2 gas evolution on the anode. Electrochemical characterisations of UO 2 pellets were performed by linear sweep voltammetry at 10 mV/s and reduction waves associated to oxide direct reduction were observed at a potential 150 mV more positive in comparison to the solvent reduction. Subsequent, galvanostatic electrolyses runs were carried out and products were characterised by SEM-EDX, EPMA/WDS, XRD and microhardness measurements. In one of the runs, uranium oxide was partially reduced and three phases were observed: nonreduced UO 2 in the centre, pure metallic uranium on the external layer and an intermediate phase representing the initial stage of reduction taking place at the grain boundaries. In another run, the UO 2 sample was fully reduced. Due to oxygen removal, the U matrix had a typical coral-like structure which is characteristic of the pattern observed after the electroreduction of solid oxides.

  16. A device for reduction of metal oxides generated in electrokinetic separation equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Kim, Il-Gook; Jeong, Jung-Whan; Choi, Jong-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    For a reduction of waste electrolyte volume and metal oxide volume, the reuse period of the waste electrolyte in the electrokinetic decontamination experiment and the method of a reduction of metal oxide volume in the cathode chamber were drawn out through several experiments with the manufactured 1.2 ton electrokinetic decontamination equipment. The optimum pH of electrolyte in cathode chamber for a reduction of volume of metal oxides was below 2.35. Indoor electrokinetic decontamination equipment for treatment of 1.2 tons of the contaminated soil per batch was manufactured to remove uranium from soil with high removal efficiency during a short time. For a reduction of waste electrolyte volume and metal oxide volume, the reuse period of waste electrolyte in the electrokinetic decontamination experiment and the method of a reduction of metal oxide volume in the cathode chamber were drawn out through several experiments with the manufactured electrokinetic equipment. Indoor electrokinetic decontamination equipment for treatment of 1.2 tons of the contaminated soil was manufactured to remove uranium from soil during a short time.

  17. Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides using zeolite catalysts exchanged with cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia M, E.A.; Bustamante L, F.; Montes de C, C.

    1999-01-01

    The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx by methane in excess oxygen was studied over several zeolite catalysts; namely cobalt loaded mordenite, ferrierite, SM-5 and the corresponding acid forms. When NO2 predominated n the NOx mixture the acid forms showed the highest N2 formation rates under dry conditions. Mordenite supported catalysts were the most active ones followed by ferrierite and ZSM-5. The most active Co-Mordenite catalyst was tested using a NOx mixture, containing mostly NO, under dry conditions and in the presence of water and SO2. The addition of 8 % water to the reaction mixture lead to a reversible deactivation, mainly at low temperatures. When the reaction mixture contained 60 ppm SO2, the N2 formation rate decreased about a half likely due to SO2 poisoning

  18. Studies Of Oxidation And Thermal Reduction Of The Cu(100) Surface Using Positron Annihilation Induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazleev, N. G.; Nadesalingam, M. P.; Maddox, W.; Weiss, A. H.

    2011-06-01

    Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) measurements from the surface of an oxidized Cu(100) single crystal show a large increase in the intensity of the annihilation induced Cu M2,3VV Auger peak as the sample is subjected to a series of isochronal anneals in vacuum up to annealing temperature 300 °C. The PAES intensity then decreases monotonically as the annealing temperature is increased to ˜550 °C. Experimental positron annihilation probabilities with Cu 3p and O 1s core electrons are estimated from the measured intensities of the positron annihilation induced Cu M2,3VV and O KLL Auger transitions. PAES results are analyzed by performing calculations of positron surface states and annihilation probabilities of the surface-trapped positrons with relevant core electrons taking into account the charge redistribution at the surface and various surface structures associated with low and high oxygen coverages. The variations in atomic structure and chemical composition of the topmost layers of the oxidized Cu(100) surface are found to affect localization and spatial extent of the positron surface state wave function. The computed positron binding energy and annihilation characteristics reveal their sensitivity to charge transfer effects, atomic structure and chemical composition of the topmost layers of the oxidized Cu(100) surface. Theoretical positron annihilation probabilities with Cu 3p and O 1s core electrons computed for the oxidized Cu(100) surface are compared with experimental ones. The obtained results provide a demonstration of thermal reduction of the copper oxide surface after annealing at 300 °C followed by re-oxidation of the Cu(100) surface at higher annealing temperatures presumably due to diffusion of subsurface oxygen to the surface.

  19. Studies Of Oxidation And Thermal Reduction Of The Cu(100) Surface Using Positron Annihilation Induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazleev, N. G.; Nadesalingam, M. P.; Maddox, W.; Weiss, A. H.

    2011-01-01

    Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) measurements from the surface of an oxidized Cu(100) single crystal show a large increase in the intensity of the annihilation induced Cu M2,3VV Auger peak as the sample is subjected to a series of isochronal anneals in vacuum up to annealing temperature 300 deg. C. The PAES intensity then decreases monotonically as the annealing temperature is increased to ∼550 deg. C. Experimental positron annihilation probabilities with Cu 3p and O 1s core electrons are estimated from the measured intensities of the positron annihilation induced Cu M 2,3 VV and O KLL Auger transitions. PAES results are analyzed by performing calculations of positron surface states and annihilation probabilities of the surface-trapped positrons with relevant core electrons taking into account the charge redistribution at the surface and various surface structures associated with low and high oxygen coverages. The variations in atomic structure and chemical composition of the topmost layers of the oxidized Cu(100) surface are found to affect localization and spatial extent of the positron surface state wave function. The computed positron binding energy and annihilation characteristics reveal their sensitivity to charge transfer effects, atomic structure and chemical composition of the topmost layers of the oxidized Cu(100) surface. Theoretical positron annihilation probabilities with Cu 3p and O 1s core electrons computed for the oxidized Cu(100) surface are compared with experimental ones. The obtained results provide a demonstration of thermal reduction of the copper oxide surface after annealing at 300 deg. C followed by re-oxidation of the Cu(100) surface at higher annealing temperatures presumably due to diffusion of subsurface oxygen to the surface.

  20. Complementation of biotransformations with chemical C-H oxidation: copper-catalyzed oxidation of tertiary amines in complex pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovino, Julien; Lütz, Stephan; Sames, Dalibor; Touré, B Barry

    2013-08-21

    The isolation, quantitation, and characterization of drug metabolites in biological fluids remain challenging. Rapid access to oxidized drugs could facilitate metabolite identification and enable early pharmacology and toxicity studies. Herein, we compared biotransformations to classical and new chemical C-H oxidation methods using oxcarbazepine, naproxen, and an early compound hit (phthalazine 1). These studies illustrated the low preparative efficacy of biotransformations and the inability of chemical methods to oxidize complex pharmaceuticals. We also disclose an aerobic catalytic protocole (CuI/air) to oxidize tertiary amines and benzylic CH's in drugs. The reaction tolerates a broad range of functionalities and displays a high level of chemoselectivity, which is not generally explained by the strength of the C-H bonds but by the individual structural chemotype. This study represents a first step toward establishing a chemical toolkit (chemotransformations) that can selectively oxidize C-H bonds in complex pharmaceuticals and rapidly deliver drug metabolites.

  1. I.C. Engine emission reduction by copper oxide catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, S. P.; Shubham Uday, Desai; Karan Hemant, Borana; Rajarshi Kushwanth Goud, Kagita; Lakshmana Kumar, G.; Pavan Kumar, K.

    2017-05-01

    The toxic gases emitted from diesel engines are more than petrol engines. Predicting the use of diesel engines, even more in future, this system is developed and can be used to minimize the harmful gases. Toxic gases include NOX, CO, HC and Smoke which are harmful to the atmosphere as well as to the human beings. The main aim of this work is to fabricate system, where the level of intensity of toxic gases is controlled through chemical reaction to more agreeable level. This system acts itself as an exhaust system; hence there is no needs to fit separate the silencer. The whole assembly is fitted in the exhaust pipe from engine. In this work, catalytic converter with copper oxide as a catalyst, by replacing noble catalysts such as platinum, palladium and rhodium is fabricated and fitted in the engine exhaust. With and without catalytic converter, the experimentations are carried out at different loads such as 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximum rated load. From the experimental results it is found that the maximum reduction is 32%, 61% and 21% for HC, NOx and CO respectively at 100% of maximum rated load when compared to that of without catalytic converter. This catalytic converter system is cash effective and more economical than the existing catalytic converter.

  2. Recovery of microbial diversity and activity during bioremediation following chemical oxidation of diesel contaminated soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutton, N.B.; Langenhoff, A.A.M.; Hidalgo Lasso, D.; Zaan, van der B.M.; Gaans, van P.; Maphosa, F.; Smidt, H.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    To improve the coupling of in situ chemical oxidation and in situ bioremediation, a systematic analysis was performed of the effect of chemical oxidation with Fenton's reagent, modified Fenton's reagent, permanganate, or persulfate, on microbial diversity and activity during 8 weeks of incubation in

  3. Microbial dynamics during and after in situ chemical oxidation of chlorinated solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutton, N.B.; Atashgahi, S.; Wal, van der J.; Wijn, G.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Smidt, H.; Rijnaarts, H.

    2015-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) followed by a bioremediation step is increasingly being considered as an effective biphasic technology. Information on the impact of chemical oxidants on organohalide respiring bacteria (OHRB), however, is largely lacking. Therefore, we used quantitative PCR (qPCR)

  4. Transformation of Leaf-like Zinc Dendrite in Oxidation and Reduction Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Akiyoshi; Murayama, Haruno; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Yamane, Tomokazu; Arai, Hajime; Hirai, Toshiro; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Yamaki, Jun-ichi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Leaf-like zinc dendrites change to leaf-like residual oxides at high oxidation current density (10 mA cm −2 ) whereas it completely dissolves at low oxidation current density (1 mA cm −2 ). • Leaf-like residual oxide products is transformed to zinc deposits with particulate morphology, resulting in good rechargeability. • The residual zinc oxide provides sufficient zincate on its reduction, preventing the diffusion-limited condition that causes leaf-like dendrite formation. - Abstract: Zinc is a promising negative electrode material for aqueous battery systems whereas it shows insufficient rechargeability for use in secondary batteries. It has been reported that leaf-like dendrite deposits are often the origin of cell-failure, however, their nature and behavior on discharge (oxidation) - charge (reduction) cycling have been only poorly understood. Here we investigate the transformation of the leaf-like zinc dendrites using ex-situ scanning electron microscopy, X-ray computational tomography and in-situ X-ray diffraction. It is shown that the leaf-like zinc dendrites obtained under diffusion-limited conditions are nearly completely dissolved at a low oxidation current density of 1 mA cm −2 and cause re-evolution of the zinc dendrites. Oxidation at a high current density of 10 mA cm −2 leads to the formation of leaf-like zinc oxide residual products that result in particulate zinc deposits in the following reduction process, enabling good rechargeability. The reaction behavior of this oxide residue is detailed and discussed for the development of long-life zinc electrodes

  5. Actinide removal from molten salts by chemical oxidation and salt distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeese, J.A.; Garcia, E.; Dole, V.R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Actinide removal from molten salts can be accomplished by a two step process where the actinide is first oxidized to the oxide using a chemical oxidant such as calcium carbonate or sodium carbonate. After the actinide is precipitated as an oxide the molten salt is distilled away from the actinide oxides leaving a oxide powder heel and an actinide free distilled salt that can be recycled back into the processing stream. This paper discusses the chemistry of the oxidation process and the physical conditions required to accomplish a salt distillation. Possible application of an analogous process sequence for a proposed accelerator driven transmutation molten salt process is also discussed.

  6. Actinide removal from molten salts by chemical oxidation and salt distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeese, James A.; Garcia, Eduardo; Dole, Vonda R.; Griego, Walter J.

    1995-01-01

    Actinide removal from molten salts can be accomplished by a two step process where the actinide is first oxidized to the oxide using a chemical oxidant such as calcium carbonate or sodium carbonate. After the actinide is precipitated as an oxide the molten salt is distilled away from the actinide oxides leaving a oxide powder heel and an actinide free distilled salt that can be recycled back into the processing stream. This paper discusses the chemistry of the oxidation process and the physical conditions required to accomplish a salt distillation. Possible application of an analogous process sequence for a proposed accelerator driven transmutation molten salt process is also discussed

  7. Potential rates of ammonium oxidation, nitrite oxidation, nitrate reduction and denitrification in the young barley rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Ole; Binnerup, S. J.; Sørensen, Jan

    1996-01-01

    Potential activities (enzyme contents) of ammonium (NH4+) oxidizing, nitrite (NO2-) oxidizing, nitrate (NO3-) reducing and denitrifying bacteria were measured in bulk and rhizosphere soil obtained from young barley plants in the field. The activities as well as pools of inorganic N (NH4+, NO2...

  8. Effect of Ca-Fe oxides additives on NOx reduction in iron ore sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-yuan Yu; Xiao-hui Fan; Min Gan; Xu-ling Chen

    2017-01-01

    As the emission control regulations get stricter, the NOx reduction in the sintering process becomes an important environmental concern owing to its role in the formation of photochemical smog and acid rain. The NOx emissions from the sintering machine account for 48% of total amount from the iron and steel industry.Thus, it is essential to reduce NOx emissions from the sintering machine, for the achievement of clean production of sinter.Ca-Fe oxides, serving as the main binding phase in the sinter, are therefore used as additives into the sintering mixture to reduce NOx emissions.The results show that the NOx re-duction ratio achieves 27.76% with 8% Ca-Fe oxides additives since the Ca-Fe oxides can advance the ig-nition and inhibit the nitrogen oxidation compared with the conventional condition.Meanwhile, the exist-ence of Ca-Fe oxides was beneficial to the sinter quality since they were typical low melting point com-pounds.The optimal mass fraction of Ca-Fe oxides additives should be less than 8% since the permeability of sintering bed was significantly decreased with a further increase of the Ca-Fe oxides fines, inhibiting the mineralization reaction of sintering mixture.Additionally, the appropriate particle size can be obtained when mixing an equal amount of Ca-Fe oxides additives of -0.5 mm and 0.5-3.0 mm in size.

  9. Oxidation-reduction conditions of the plants with reference to their gas resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasinskii, N P

    1944-01-01

    The object of this work was to see if there is any relation between the oxidation-reduction conditions existing in a plant, and its ability to grow successfully in the cities where air contains H/sub 2/S. Oxidation-reduction potential, capacity for its water-soluble and insoluble matter to be oxidized with KMnO/sub 4/ before and after treatment with H/sub 2/S, and finally the effect of the age of the plant were determined for different spp. of several common families of plants. In the majority of the families it was found that in various spp. of the same family these characteristics vary within a narrow and different range. Oxidation with KMnO/sub 4/ of the water-insoluble matter was found to be the best criterion of the sensitivity of a plant to H/sub 2/S.

  10. Localized conductive patterning via focused electron beam reduction of graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Kulkarni, Dhaval D.; Zackowski, Paul; Jang, Seung Soon; Tsukruk, Vladimir V. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Fedorov, Andrei G., E-mail: agf@gatech.edu [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    We report on a method for “direct-write” conductive patterning via reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) of carbon. FEBID treatment of the intrinsically dielectric graphene oxide between two metal terminals opens up the conduction channel, thus enabling a unique capability for nanoscale conductive domain patterning in GO. An increase in FEBID electron dose results in a significant increase of the domain electrical conductivity with improving linearity of drain-source current vs. voltage dependence, indicative of a change of graphene oxide electronic properties from insulating to semiconducting. Density functional theory calculations suggest a possible mechanism underlying this experimentally observed phenomenon, as localized reduction of graphene oxide layers via interactions with highly reactive intermediates of electron-beam-assisted dissociation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. These findings establish an unusual route for using FEBID as nanoscale lithography and patterning technique for engineering carbon-based nanomaterials and devices with locally tailored electronic properties.

  11. Reduction of uranium and plutonium oxides by aluminum. Application to the recycling of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallay, J.

    1968-01-01

    A process for treating plutonium oxide calcined at high temperatures (1000 to 2000 deg. C) with a view to recovering the metal consists in the reduction of this oxide dissolved in a mixture of aluminium, sodium and calcium fluorides by aluminium at about 1180 deg. C. The first part of the report presents the results of reduction tests carried out on the uranium oxides UO 2 and U 3 O 8 ; these are in agreement with the thermodynamic calculations of the exchange reaction at equilibrium. The second part describes the application of this method to plutonium oxides. The Pu-Al alloy obtained (60 per cent Pu) is then recycled in an aqueous medium. (author) [fr

  12. Evaluation and Development of Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Reduction Scheme for Biodiesel and Diesel Fuel Surrogates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Hiew Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the existing chemical kinetic mechanism reduction techniques. From here, an appropriate reduction scheme was developed to create compact yet comprehensive surrogate models for both diesel and biodiesel fuels for diesel engine applications. The reduction...... techniques applied here were Directed Relation Graph (DRG), DRG with Error Propagation, DRG-aided Sensitivity Analysis, and DRG with Error Propagation and Sensitivity Analysis. Nonetheless, the reduced mechanisms generated via these techniques were not sufficiently small for application in multi......-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study. A new reduction scheme was therefore formulated. A 68-species mechanism for biodiesel surrogate and a 49-species mechanism for diesel surrogate were successfully derived from the respective detailed mechanisms. An overall 97% reduction in species number...

  13. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of In-Situ Chemical Oxidation ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot-scale in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) demonstration, involving subsurface injections of sodium permanganate (NaMnO4), was performed at the US Marine Corp Recruit Depot (MCRD), site 45 (Parris Island (PI), SC). The ground water was originally contaminated with perchloroethylene (PCE) (also known as tetrachloroethylene), a chlorinated solvent used in dry cleaner operations. High resolution site characterization involved multiple iterations of soil core sampling and analysis. Nested micro-wells and conventional wells were also used to sample and analyze ground water for PCE and decomposition products (i.e., trichloroethyelene (TCE), dichloroethylene (c-DCE, t-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC)), collectively referred to as chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOC). This characterization methodology was used to develop and refine the conceptual site model and the ISCO design, not only by identifying CVOC contamination but also by eliminating uncontaminated portions of the aquifer from further ISCO consideration. Direct-push injection was selected as the main method of NaMnO4 delivery due to its flexibility and low initial capital cost. Site impediments to ISCO activities in the source area involved subsurface utilities, including a high pressure water main, a high voltage power line, a communication line, and sanitary and stormwater sewer lines. Utility markings were used in conjunction with careful planning and judicious selection of injection locations. A

  14. Chemical modifications of therapeutic proteins induced by residual ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Louise; Sloey, Christopher; Zhang, Zhongqi; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Kim, Hyojin; Ren, Da; Kanapuram, Sekhar

    2015-02-01

    Ethylene oxide (EtO) is widely used in sterilization of drug product primary containers and medical devices. The impact of residual EtO on protein therapeutics is of significant interest in the biopharmaceutical industry. The potential for EtO to modify individual amino acids in proteins has been previously reported. However, specific identification of EtO adducts in proteins and the effect of residual EtO on the stability of therapeutic proteins has not been reported to date. This paper describes studies of residual EtO with two therapeutic proteins, a PEGylated form of the recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Peg-GCSF) and recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) formulated with human serum albumin (HSA). Peg-GCSF was filled in an EtO sterilized delivery device and incubated at accelerated stress conditions. Glu-C peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO reacted with Peg-GCSF and resulted in EtO modifications at two methionine residues (Met-127 and Met-138). In addition, tryptic peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO in plastic vials reacted with HSA in EPO formulation at Met-328 and Cys-34. This paper details the work conducted to understand the effects of residual EtO on the chemical stability of protein therapeutics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  15. Biochemical and chemical characterization of pink-pigmented oxidative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, P L; Hollis, D G; Weaver, R E; Moss, C W

    1990-04-01

    The biochemical and chemical characteristics were determined for 156 clinical isolates of pink-pigmented bacteria that are similar to but distinct from Methylobacterium extorquens (synonymous with Pseudomonas mesophilica). These isolates were gram-negative, nonfermentative, usually nonvacuolated, coccoid rods; all grew at 35 degrees C and were catalase and urease positive; the majority grew on MacConkey agar and were variable for oxidase production and motility. On the basis of oxidation of xylose and mannitol and hydrolysis of esculin, these 156 strains were subdivided into four groups that were designated "pink coccoid" groups I, II, III, and IV. Groups I, II, and III are similar to an unnamed taxon described by Gilardi and Faur in 1984; only strains of group IV hydrolyze esculin. The cellular fatty acid compositions of strains of groups I, II, and III were essentially identical and differed from strains of group IV by the absence of 3-OH-C14:0 and the presence of C19:0 delta and 2-OH-C19:0 delta. The fatty acid composition of group IV strains was most similar to that of M. extorquens but differed by the presence of small amounts of two C17:1 acids, 3-OH-C16:0, and 2-OH-C18:1.

  16. Chemical vapour deposition of vanadium oxide thermochromic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, Clara

    Thermochromic materials change optical properties, such as transmittance or reflectance, with a variation in temperature. An ideal intelligent (smart) material will allow solar radiation in through a window in cold conditions, but reflect that radiation in warmer conditions. The variation in the properties is often associated with a phase change, which takes place at a definite temperature, and is normally reversible. Such materials are usually applied to window glass as thin films. This thesis presents the work on the development of thermochromic vanadium (IV) oxide (VO2) thin films - both undoped and doped with tungsten, niobium and gold nanoparticles - which could be employed as solar control coatings. The films were deposited using Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD), using improved Atmospheric Pressure (APCVD), novel Aerosol Assisted (AACVD) and novel hybrid AP/AACVD techniques. The effects of dopants on the metalto- semiconductor transition temperature and transmittance/reflectance characteristics were also investigated. This work significantly increased the understanding of the mechanisms behind thermochromic behaviour, and resulted in thermochromic materials based on VO2 with greatly improved properties.

  17. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  18. The use of quantum chemically derived descriptors for QSAR modelling of reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rorije E; Richter J; Peijnenburg WJGM; ECO; IHE Delft

    1994-01-01

    In this study, quantum-chemically derived parameters are developed for a limited number of halogenated aromatic compounds to model the anaerobic reductive dehalogenation reaction rate constants of these compounds. It is shown that due to the heterogeneity of the set of compounds used, no single

  19. Photochemical modeling in California with two chemical mechanisms: model intercomparison and response to emission reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxia; Kelly, James T; Avise, Jeremy C; Kaduwela, Ajith P; Stockwell, William R

    2011-05-01

    An updated version of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC) chemical mechanism (SAPRC07C) was implemented into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.6. CMAQ simulations using SAPRC07C and the previously released version, SAPRC99, were performed and compared for an episode during July-August, 2000. Ozone (O3) predictions of the SAPRC07C simulation are generally lower than those of the SAPRC99 simulation in the key areas of central and southern California, especially in areas where modeled concentrations are greater than the federal 8-hr O3 standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) and/or when the volatile organic compound (VOC)/nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratio is less than 13. The relative changes of ozone production efficiency (OPE) against the VOC/NOx ratio at 46 sites indicate that the OPE is reduced in SAPRC07C compared with SAPRC99 at most sites by as much as approximately 22%. The SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C mechanisms respond similarly to 20% reductions in anthropogenic VOC emissions. The response of the mechanisms to 20% NOx emissions reductions can be grouped into three cases. In case 1, in which both mechanisms show a decrease in daily maximum 8-hr O3 concentration with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 decrease in SAPRC07C is smaller. In case 2, in which both mechanisms show an increase in O3 with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 increase is larger in SAPRC07C. In case 3, SAPRC07C simulates an increase in O3 in response to reduced NOx emissions whereas SAPRC99 simulates a decrease in O3 for the same region. As a result, the areas where NOx controls would be disbeneficial are spatially expanded in SAPRC07C. Although the results presented here are valuable for understanding differences in predictions and model response for SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C, the study did not evaluate the impact of mechanism differences in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for using numerical models in demonstrating air quality attainment

  20. Development of metallic uranium recovery technology from uranium oxide by Li reduction and electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Kawabe, Akihiro; Yuda, Ryouichi; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Reiko; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Yahata, Hidetsugu

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop technology for pre-treatment of oxide fuel reprocessing through pyroprocess. In the pre-treatment process, it is necessary to reduce actinide oxide to metallic form. This paper outlines some experimental results of uranium oxide reduction and recovery of refined metallic uranium in electrorefining. Both uranium oxide granules and pellets were used for the experiments. Uranium oxide granules was completely reduced by lithium in several hours at 650degC. Reduced uranium pellets by about 70% provided a simulation of partial reduction for the process flow design. Almost all adherent residues of Li and Li 2 O were successfully washed out with fresh LiCl salt. During electrorefining, metallic uranium deposited on the iron cathode as expected. The recovery efficiencies of metallic uranium from reduced uranium oxide granules and from pellets were about 90% and 50%, respectively. The mass balance data provided the technical bases of Li reduction and refining process flow for design. (author)

  1. Reduction of graphene oxide by aniline with its concomitant oxidative polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li Qun; Liu, Yi Liang; Neoh, Koon-Gee; Kang, En-Tang; Fu, Guo Dong

    2011-04-19

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets are readily reduced by aniline above room temperature in an aqueous acid medium, with the aniline simultaneously undergoing oxidative polymerization to produce the reduced graphene oxide-polyaniline nanofiber (RGO-PANi) composites. The resulting RGO-PANi composites and RGO (after dissolution of PANi) were characterized by XPS, XRD analysis, TGA, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, and TEM. It was also found that the RGO-PANi composites exhibit good specific capacitance during galvanostatic charging-discharging when used as capacitor electrodes. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Interface-modulated approach toward multilevel metal oxide nanotubes for lithium-ion batteries and oxygen reduction reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiashen Meng; Chaojiang Niu; Xiong Liu; Ziang Liu; Hongliang Chen; Xuanpeng Wang; Jiantao Li

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxide hollow structures with multilevel interiors are of great interest for potential applications such as catalysis,chemical sensing,drug delivery,and energy storage.However,the controlled synthesis of multilevel nanotubes remains a great challenge.Here we develop a facile interface-modulated approach toward the synthesis of complex metal oxide multilevel nanotubes with tunable interior structures through electrospinning followed by controlled heat treatment.This versatile strategy can be effectively applied to fabricate wire-in-tube and tubein-tube nanotubes of various metal oxides.These multilevel nanotubes possess a large specific surface area,fast mass transport,good strain accommodation,and high packing density,which are advantageous for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs)and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR).Specifically,shrinkable CoMn2O4 tube-in-tube nanotubes as a lithium-ion battery anode deliver a high discharge capacity of ~565 mAh.g-1 at a high rate of 2 A.g-1,maintaining 89% of the latter after 500 cycles.Further,as an oxygen reduction reaction catalyst,these nanotubes also exhibit excellent stability with about 92% current retention after 30,000 s,which is higher than that of commercial Pt/C (81%).Therefore,this feasible method may push the rapid development of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials.These multifunctional nanotubes have great potential in many frontier fields.

  3. Effects of Muscle-Specific Oxidative Stress on Cytochrome c Release and Oxidation-Reduction Potential Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yiling; Mitacek, Rachel M; Abraham, Anupam; Mafi, Gretchen G; VanOverbeke, Deborah L; DeSilva, Udaya; Ramanathan, Ranjith

    2017-09-06

    Mitochondria play a significant role in beef color. However, the role of oxidative stress in cytochrome c release and mitochondrial degradation is not clear. The objective was to determine the effects of display time on cytochrome c content and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of beef longissimus lumborum (LL) and psoas major (PM) muscles. PM discolored by day 3 compared with LL. On day 0, mitochondrial content and mitochondrial oxygen consumption were greater in PM than LL. However, mitochondrial content and oxygen consumption were lower (P stress can affect cytochrome c release and ORP changes.

  4. Microfluidic photoinduced chemical oxidation for Ru(bpy)33+ chemiluminescence - A comprehensive experimental comparison with on-chip direct chemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadavilpparampu, Afsal Mohammed; Al Lawati, Haider A J; Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O

    2017-08-05

    For the first time, the analytical figures of merit in detection capabilities of the very less explored photoinduced chemical oxidation method for Ru(bpy) 3 2+ CL has been investigated in detail using 32 structurally different analytes. It was carried out on-chip using peroxydisulphate and visible light and compared with well-known direct chemical oxidation approaches using Ce(IV). The analytes belong to various chemical classes such as tertiary amine, secondary amine, sulphonamide, betalactam, thiol and benzothiadiazine. Influence of detection environment on CL emission with respect to method of oxidation was evaluated by changing the buffers and pH. The photoinduced chemical oxidation exhibited more universal nature for Ru(bpy) 3 2+ CL in detection towards selected analytes. No additional enhancers, reagents, or modification in instrumental configuration were required. Wide detectability and enhanced emission has been observed for analytes from all the chemical classes when photoinduced chemical oxidation was employed. Some of these analytes are reported for the first time under photoinduced chemical oxidation like compounds from sulphonamide, betalactam, thiol and benzothiadiazine class. On the other hand, many of the selected analytes including tertiary and secondary amines such as cetirizine, azithromycin fexofenadine and proline did not produced any analytically useful CL signal (S/N=3 or above for 1μgmL -1 analyte) under chemical oxidation. The most fascinating observations was in the detection limits; for example ofloxacin was 15 times more intense with a detection limit of 5.81×10 -10 M compared to most lowest ever reported 6×10 -9 M. Earlier, penicillamine was detected at 0.1μgmL -1 after derivatization using photoinduced chemical oxidation, but in this study, we improved it to 5.82ngmL -1 without any prior derivatization. The detection limits of many other analytes were also found to be improved by several orders of magnitude under photoinduced

  5. Ammonia Oxidation and Nitrite Reduction in the Verrucomicrobial Methanotroph Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepehr S. Mohammadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Solfatara volcano near Naples (Italy, the origin of the recently discovered verrucomicrobial methanotroph Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV was shown to contain ammonium (NH4+ at concentrations ranging from 1 to 28 mM. Ammonia (NH3 can be converted to toxic hydroxylamine (NH2OH by the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO, the first enzyme of the methane (CH4 oxidation pathway. Methanotrophs rapidly detoxify the intermediate NH2OH. Here, we show that strain SolV performs ammonium oxidation to nitrite at a rate of 48.2 nmol NO2-.h−1.mg DW−1 under O2 limitation in a continuous culture grown on hydrogen (H2 as an electron donor. In addition, strain SolV carries out nitrite reduction at a rate of 74.4 nmol NO2-.h−1.mg DW−1 under anoxic condition at pH 5–6. This range of pH was selected to minimize the chemical conversion of nitrite (NO2- potentially occurring at more acidic pH values. Furthermore, at pH 6, we showed that the affinity constants (Ks of the cells for NH3 vary from 5 to 270 μM in the batch incubations with 0.5–8% (v/v CH4, respectively. Detailed kinetic analysis showed competitive substrate inhibition between CH4 and NH3. Using transcriptome analysis, we showed up-regulation of the gene encoding hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (haoA cells grown on H2/NH4+ compared to the cells grown on CH4/NO3- which do not have to cope with reactive N-compounds. The denitrifying genes nirk and norC showed high expression in H2/NH4+ and CH4/NO3- grown cells compared to cells growing at μmax (with no limitation while the norB gene showed downregulation in CH4/NO3- grown cells. These cells showed a strong upregulation of the genes in nitrate/nitrite assimilation. Our results demonstrate that strain SolV can perform ammonium oxidation producing nitrite. At high concentrations of ammonium this may results in toxic effects. However, at low oxygen concentrations strain SolV is able to reduce nitrite to N2O to cope with this toxicity.

  6. Photochemical modelling of photo-oxidant levels over the Swiss plateau and emission reduction scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosselet, C.M.; Kerr, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    During summertime high pressure conditions, high photo-oxidant (O 3 , H 2 O 2 , PAN and others) levels are frequently observed in the planetary boundary layer in central Europe. It is well known that close to the earth's surface ozone is formed by complex reactions involving VOC, NO x , and sunlight. Substantial reductions of both precursors are needed to reduce photo-oxidant levels. In this context the reductions of the abundance of the precursors and the variation of their ratios is of great importance. Here we report model calculations from the Harwell Photochemical Trajectory Model of the levels of O 3 , H 2 O 2 and PAN along a trajectory over the Swiss Plateau from Lake Constance to Lake Geneva. These calculations are in satisfactory agreement with measurements made during the intensive observation period of the research program POLLUMET (Pollution and Meteorology in Switzerland). Sensitivity calculations of emission reduction scenarios indicate that on the Swiss Plateau the ozone production may be mainly NO x -limited; under conditions where the CO levels are closer to the upper limit within the range (120-600 ppbv). The calculated peak ozone level reduction caused by an exclusive NO x -emission reduction is about three times larger than that caused by an exclusive VOC reduction. The combined reduction of all precursor compounds is the most efficient strategy, although it is only marginally more efficient than the NO x -reduction scenario alone. (author) figs., tabs., 75 refs

  7. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction in mixed-oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, L.A.; Weber, J.W.; Devary, J.L.

    1978-10-01

    The character and extent of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) was established for UO 2 -25 wt% PuO 2 clad with 20% cold worked Type 316 stainless steel irradiated at high cladding temperatures to peak burnups greater than 8 atom %. The data base consists of 153 data sets from fuel pins irradiated in EBR-II with peak burnups to 9.5 atom %, local cladding inner surface temperatures to 725 0 C, and exposure times to 415 equivalent full power days. As-fabricated oxygen-to-metal ratios (O/M) ranged from 1.938 to 1.984 with the bulk of the data in the range 1.96 to 1.98. HEDL P-15 pins provided data at low heat rates, approx. 200 W/cm, and P-23 series pins provided data at higher heat rates, approx. 400 W/cm. A design practice for breeder reactors is to consider an initial reduction of 50 microns in cladding thickness to compensate for possible FCCI. This approach was considered to be a conservative approximation in the absence of a comprehensive design correlation for extent of interaction. This work provides to the designer a statistically based correlation for depth of FCCI which reflects the influences of the major fuel and operating parameters on FCCI

  8. Anaerobic baffled reactor coupled with chemical precipitation for treatment and toxicity reduction of industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohaprapanona, Sawanya; Marquesa, Marcia; Hogland, William

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the reduction of soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs) and the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), formaldehyde (FA) and nitrogen from highly polluted wastewater generated during cleaning procedures in wood floor manufacturing using a laboratory-scale biological anaerobic baffled reactor followed by chemical precipitation using MgCI2 .6H20 + Na2HPO4. By increasing the hydraulic retention time from 2.5 to 3.7 and 5 days, the reduction rates of FA, DOC and CODs of nearly 100%, 90% and 83%, respectively, were achieved. When the Mg:N:P molar ratio in the chemical treatment was changed from 1:1:1 to 1.3:1:1.3 at pH 8, the NH4+ removal rate increased from 80% to 98%. Biologically and chemically treated wastewater had no toxic effects on Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina whereas chemically treated wastewater inhibited germination of Lactuca sativa owing to a high salt content. Regardless of the high conductivity of the treated wastewater, combined biological and chemical treatment was found to be effective for the removal of the organic load and nitrogen, and to be simple to operate and to maintain. A combined process such as that investigated could be useful for on-site treatment of low volumes of highly polluted wastewater generated by the wood floor and wood furniture industries, for which there is no suitable on-site treatment option available today.

  9. Energy density enhancement of chemical heat storage material for magnesium oxide/water chemical heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myagmarjav, Odtsetseg; Zamengo, Massimiliano; Ryu, Junichi; Kato, Yukitaka

    2015-01-01

    A novel candidate chemical heat storage material having higher reaction performance and higher thermal conductivity used for magnesium oxide/water chemical heat pump was developed in this study. The material, called EML, was obtained by mixing pure Mg(OH)_2 with expanded graphite (EG) and lithium bromide (LiBr), which offer higher thermal conductivity and reactivity, respectively. With the aim to achieve a high energy density, the EML composite was compressed into figure of the EML tablet (ϕ7.1 mm × thickness 3.5 mm). The compression force did not degrade the reaction conversion, and furthermore it enabled us to achieve best heat storage and output performances. The EML tablet could store heat of 815.4 MJ m_t_a_b"−"3 at 300 °C within 120 min, which corresponded to almost 4.4 times higher the heat output of the EML composite, and therefore, the EML tablet is the solution which releases more heat in a shorter time. A relatively larger volumetric gross heat output was also recorded for the EML tablet, which was greater than one attained for the EML composite at certain temperatures. As a consequence, it is expected that the EML tablet could respond more quickly to sudden demand of heat from users. It was concluded that the EML tablet demonstrated superior performances. - Highlights: • A new chemical heat storage material, donated as EML, was developed. • EML composite made from pure Mg(OH)_2, expanded graphite and lithium bromide. • EML tablet was demonstrated by compressing the EML composite. • Compression force did not degrade the conversion in dehydration and hydration. • EML tablet demonstrated superior heat storage and output performances.

  10. Technology Roadmap: Energy and GHG reductions in the chemical industry via catalytic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    The chemical industry is a large energy user; but chemical products and technologies also are used in a wide array of energy saving and/or renewable energy applications so the industry has also an energy saving role. The chemical and petrochemical sector is by far the largest industrial energy user, accounting for roughly 10% of total worldwide final energy demand and 7% of global GHG emissions. The International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) has partnered with the IEA and DECHEMA (Society for Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology) to describe the path toward further improvements in energy efficiency and GHG reductions in the chemical sector. The roadmap looks at measures needed from the chemical industry, policymakers, investors and academia to press on with catalysis technology and unleash its potential around the globe. The report uncovers findings and best practice opportunities that illustrate how continuous improvements and breakthrough technology options can cut energy use and bring down greenhouse gas (GHG) emission rates. Around 90% of chemical processes involve the use of catalysts – such as added substances that increase the rate of reaction without being consumed by it – and related processes to enhance production efficiency and reduce energy use, thereby curtailing GHG emission levels. This work shows an energy savings potential approaching 13 exajoules (EJ) by 2050 – equivalent to the current annual primary energy use of Germany.

  11. DNAPL remediation with in situ chemical oxidation using potassium permanganate - Part I. Mineralogy of Mn oxide and its dissolution in organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. David; Schwartz, Franklin W.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies on in situ chemical oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) with potassium permanganate indicated that the solid reaction product, Mn oxide, could reduce the permeability of the porous medium and impact the success of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) removal. In order to address the issue of permeability reduction caused by precipitation, this study investigated the mineralogy of Mn oxides and the possibilities of removing the solid precipitates by dissolution. The solid reaction product from the oxidation of TCE by permanganate is semi-amorphous potassium-rich birnessite, which has a layered mineral structure with an interlayer spacing of 7.3 Å. The chemical formula is K 0.854Mn 1.786O 4·1.55H 2O. It has a relatively small specific surface area at 23.6±0.82 m 2/g. Its point of zero charge (pzc) was measured as 3.7±0.4. This birnessite is a relatively active species and could participate in various reactions with existing organic and inorganic matter. The dissolution kinetics of Mn oxide was evaluated in batch experiments using solutions of citric acid, oxalic acid, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Initial dissolution rates were determined to be 0.126 mM/m 2/h for citric acid, 1.35 mM/m 2/h for oxalic acid, and 5.176 mM/m 2/h for EDTA. These rates compare with 0.0025 mM/m 2/h for nitric acid at pH=2. Organic acids dissolve Mn oxide quickly. Reaction rates increase with acid concentration, as tested with citric acid. The dissolution mechanism likely involves proton and ligand-promoted dissolution and reductive dissolution. Citric and oxalic acid can induce ligand-promoted dissolution, while EDTA can induce ligand-promoted and reductive dissolutions. At low pH, proton-promoted dissolution seems to occur with all the acids tested, but this process is not dominant. Reductive dissolution appears to be the most effective process in dissolving the solid, followed by ligand-promoted dissolution. These experiments indicate the significant

  12. Nanostructured palladium tailored via carbonyl chemical route towards oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y.; Mora-Hernández, J.M.; Estudillo-Wong, L.A.; Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Alonso-Vante, N.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical Abstract: Mass-depending morphologies of nanostructured Palladium obtained via the carbonyl chemical route. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Mass-depending morphology was observed in nanostructured palladium supported on carbon prepared by the carbonyl chemical route. •The Morphological effect of carbon supported Pd was investigated towards ORR. -- Abstract: Carbon supported palladium nanostructures were synthesized via the carbonyl chemical route. Compared with nanostructured platinum, prepared via carbonyl chemical route, Pd nanomaterials showed mass-loading morphology, whereas particle size and morphology of Pt nanostructures was constant. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on nanostructured Pd, with different morphology in both acid and alkaline medium was investigated. A relationship, based on X-ray diffraction structural analysis pattern, transmission electron microscope, with the Pd morphological effect on ORR activity was identified

  13. Development Of Chemical Reduction And Air Stripping Processes To Remove Mercury From Wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Looney, Brian B.; Craig, Robert R.; Thompson, Martha C.; Kmetz, Thomas F.

    2013-07-10

    This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

  14. Performance of two swine manure treatment systems on chemical composition and on the reduction of pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viancelli, A; Kunz, A; Steinmetz, R L R; Kich, J D; Souza, C K; Canal, C W; Coldebella, A; Esteves, P A; Barardi, C R M

    2013-01-01

    Swine effluents must be correctly handled to avoid negative environmental impacts. In this study, the profiles of two swine manure treatment systems were evaluated: a solid-liquid separation step, followed by an anaerobic reactor, and an aerobic step (System 1); and a biodigester followed by serial lagoons (System 2). Both systems were described by the assessment of chemical, bacterial and viral parameters. The results showed that in System 1, there was reduction of chemicals (COD, phosphorus, total Kjeldhal nitrogen - TKN - and NH(3)), total coliforms and Escherichia coli; however, the same reduction was not observed for Salmonella sp. Viral particles were significantly reduced but not totally eliminated from the effluent. In System 2, there was a reduction of chemicals, bacteria and viruses with no detection of Salmonella sp., circovirus, parvovirus, and torque teno virus in the effluent. The chemical results indicate that the treated effluent can be reused for cleaning swine facilities. However, the microbiological results show a need of additional treatment to achieve a complete inactivation for cases when direct contact with animals is required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of NOx Reduction by Low Temperature Oxidation Using Ozone Produced by Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen; Irimiea, Cornelia; Salewski, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    NOx reduction by low temperature oxidation using ozone produced by a dielectric barrier discharge generator is investigated for different process parameters in a 6m long reactor in serpentine arrangement using synthetic dry flue gas with NOx levels below 500 ppm, flows up to 50 slm and temperatures...

  16. The Simulation of an Oxidation-Reduction Titration Curve with Computer Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Richard V., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Although the simulation of an oxidation/reduction titration curve is an important exercise in an undergraduate course in quantitative analysis, that exercise is frequently simplified to accommodate computational limitations. With the use of readily available computer algebra systems, however, such curves for complicated systems can be generated…

  17. ANAEROBIC DDT BIOTRANSFORMATION: ENHANCEMENT BY APPLICATION OF SURFACTANTS AND LOW OXIDATION REDUCTION POTENTIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enhancement of anaerobic DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane) biotransformation by mixed cultures was studied with application of surfactants and oxidation reduction potential reducing agents. Without amendments, DDT transformation resulted mainly in the pr...

  18. Probing the Active Surface Sites for CO Reduction on Oxide-Derived Copper Electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Li, Christina W.; Johansson, Tobias Peter

    2015-01-01

    CO electroreduction activity on oxide-derived Cu (OD-Cu) was found to correlate with metastable surface features that bind CO strongly. OD-Cu electrodes prepared by H-2 reduction of Cu2O precursors reduce CO to acetate and ethanol with nearly 50% Faradaic efficiency at moderate overpotential. Tem...

  19. Au/iron oxide catalysts: temperature programmed reduction and X-ray diffraction characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, G.; Visco, A.M.; Galvagno, S.; Donato, A.; Panzalorto, M.

    1999-01-01

    Gold on iron oxides catalysts have been characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). The influence of preparation method, gold loading and pretreatment conditions on the reducibility of iron oxides have been investigated. On the impregnated Au/iron oxide catalysts as well as on the support alone the partial reduction of Fe(III) oxy(hydroxides) to Fe 3 O 4 starts in the 550 and 700 K temperature range. On the coprecipitated samples, the temperature of formation of Fe 3 O 4 is strongly dependent on the presence of gold. The reduction temperature is lowered as the gold loading is increased. The reduction of Fe 3 O 4 to FeO occurs at about 900 K and is not dependent on the presence of gold and the preparation method. It is suggested that the effect of gold on the reducibility of the iron oxides is related to an increase of the structural defects and/or of the surface hydroxyl groups. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. Primary oxidation and reduction products in x-irradiated aspartic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.M.; Budzinski, E.E.; Box, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    The primary reduction products identified by ESR--ENDOR spectroscopy in single crystals of DL-aspartic acid hydrochloride irradiated at 4.2degreeK are anions formed by addition of an electron to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of the carboxylic acid groups. The main consequence of the oxidation process is to produce a hole centered mainly on atomic chlorine

  1. Reduction of nitric oxide catalyzed by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase from an anammox bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisa, Tatsuya; Hira, Daisuke; Furukawa, Kenji; Fujii, Takao

    2014-12-01

    The hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) from the anammox bacterium, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis has been reported to catalyze the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) to nitric oxide (NO) by using bovine cytochrome c as an oxidant. In contrast, we investigated whether the HAO from anammox bacterium strain KSU-1 could catalyze the reduction of NO with reduced benzyl viologen (BVred) and the NO-releasing reagent, NOC 7. The reduction proceeded, resulting in the formation of NH2OH as a product. The oxidation rate of BVred was proportional to the concentration of BVred itself for a short period in each experiment, a situation that was termed quasi-steady state. The analyses of the states at various concentrations of HAO allowed us to determine the rate constant for the catalytic reaction, (2.85 ± 0.19) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), governing NO reduction by BVred and HAO, which was comparable to that reported for the HAO from the ammonium oxidizer, Nitrosomonas with reduced methyl viologen. These results suggest that the anammox HAO functions to adjust anammox by inter-conversion of NO and NH2OH depending on the redox potential of the physiological electron transfer protein in anammox bacteria. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Isothermal Oxidation of Magnetite to Hematite in Air and Cyclic Reduction/Oxidation Under Carbon Looping Combustion Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Tegan; Hayes, Peter C.

    2017-12-01

    In the carbon looping combustion process the oxygen carrier is regenerated through oxidation in air; this process has been simulated by the oxidation of dense synthetic magnetite for selected temperatures and times. The oxidation of magnetite in air is shown to occur through the formation of dense hematite layers on the particle surface. This dense hematite forms through lath type shear transformations or solid-state diffusion through the product layer. Cyclic reduction in CO-CO2/oxidation in air of hematite single crystals has been carried out under controlled laboratory conditions at 1173 K (900 °C). It has been shown that the initial reduction step is critical to determining the product microstructure, which consists of gas pore dendrites in the magnetite matrix with blocky hematite formed on the pore surfaces. The progressive growth of the magnetite layer with the application of subsequent cycles appears to continue until no original hematite remains, after which physical disintegration of the particles takes place.

  3. Performance of in situ chemical oxidation field demonstrations at DOE sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, S.R.; West, O.R.; Siegrist, R.L.; Holden, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been investigating the use of in situ chemical oxidation to remediate organic contaminants (VOCs, SVOCs, and PCBs) in soils and groundwater at the laboratory and field scales. Field scale design parameters (e.g., oxidant loading rates and oxidant delivery techniques) are often dictated by site conditions (e.g., soil properties and initial contaminant concentrations). Chemical destruction of organic compounds can be accomplished using a variety of oxidants. Recent research has involved field scale in situ chemical oxidation demonstrations using H 2 O 2 and KMnO 4 in conjunction with soil mixing as the oxidant delivery mechanism. A description of some of these fields activities and future field-scale work is presented here

  4. In situ oxidation and reduction of triangular nickel nanoplates via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    LAGROW, A.P.; AlYami, Noktan; LLOYD, D.C.; Bakr, Osman; BOYES, E.D.; GAI, P.L.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the oxidation and reduction mechanisms of transition metals, such as nickel (Ni), is important for their use in industrial applications of catalysis. A powerful technique for investigating the redox reactive species is in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), where oxidation and reduction can be tracked in real time. One particular difficulty in understanding the underlying reactions is understanding the underlying morphology of the starting structure in a reaction, in particular the defects contained in the material, and the exposed surface facets. Here-in, we use a colloidal nanoparticle synthesis in a continuous flow reactor to form nanoplates of nickel coated with oleylamine as a capping agent. We utilise an in situ heating procedure at 300 °C in vacuum to remove the oleylamine ligands, and then oxidise the Ni nanoparticles at 25 °C with 2 Pa oxygen, and follow the nanoparticles initial oxidation. After that, the nanoparticles are oxidised at 200 and 300 °C, making the size of the oxide shell increase to ∼4 nm. The oxide shell could be reduced under 2 Pa hydrogen at 500 °C to its initial size of ∼1 nm. High temperature oxidation encouraged the nanoparticles to form pure NiO nanoparticles, which occurred via the Kirkendall effect leading to hollowing and void formation.

  5. Bacteria-mediated arsenic oxidation and reduction in the growth media of arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; de Oliveira, Letuzia Maria; Guilherme, Luiz R G; Ma, Lena Q

    2012-10-16

    Microbes play an important role in arsenic transformation and cycling in the environment. Microbial arsenic oxidation and reduction were demonstrated in the growth media of arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. All arsenite (AsIII) at 0.1 mM in the media was oxidized after 48 h incubation. Oxidation was largely inhibited by antibiotics, indicating that bacteria played a dominant role. To identify AsIII oxidizing bacteria, degenerate primers were used to amplify ∼500 bp of the AsIII oxidase gene aioA (aroA) using DNA extracted from the media. One aioA (aroA)-like sequence (MG-1, tentatively identified as Acinetobacter sp.) was amplified, exhibiting 82% and 91% identity in terms of gene and deduced protein sequence to those from Acinetobacter sp. 33. In addition, four bacterial strains with different arsenic tolerance were isolated and identified as Comamonas sp.C-1, Flavobacterium sp. C-2, Staphylococcus sp. C-3, and Pseudomonas sp. C-4 using carbon utilization, fatty acid profiles, and/or sequencing 16s rRNA gene. These isolates exhibited dual capacity for both AsV reduction and AsIII oxidation under ambient conditions. Arsenic-resistant bacteria with strong AsIII oxidizing ability may have potential to improve bioremediation of AsIII-contaminated water using P. vittata and/or other biochemical strategies.

  6. In situ oxidation and reduction of triangular nickel nanoplates via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    LAGROW, A.P.

    2017-08-29

    Understanding the oxidation and reduction mechanisms of transition metals, such as nickel (Ni), is important for their use in industrial applications of catalysis. A powerful technique for investigating the redox reactive species is in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), where oxidation and reduction can be tracked in real time. One particular difficulty in understanding the underlying reactions is understanding the underlying morphology of the starting structure in a reaction, in particular the defects contained in the material, and the exposed surface facets. Here-in, we use a colloidal nanoparticle synthesis in a continuous flow reactor to form nanoplates of nickel coated with oleylamine as a capping agent. We utilise an in situ heating procedure at 300 °C in vacuum to remove the oleylamine ligands, and then oxidise the Ni nanoparticles at 25 °C with 2 Pa oxygen, and follow the nanoparticles initial oxidation. After that, the nanoparticles are oxidised at 200 and 300 °C, making the size of the oxide shell increase to ∼4 nm. The oxide shell could be reduced under 2 Pa hydrogen at 500 °C to its initial size of ∼1 nm. High temperature oxidation encouraged the nanoparticles to form pure NiO nanoparticles, which occurred via the Kirkendall effect leading to hollowing and void formation.

  7. Dominance of sulfur-fueled iron oxide reduction in low-sulfate freshwater sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Colleen M; Lentini, Chris J; Tang, Yuanzhi; Johnston, David T; Wankel, Scott D; Jardine, Philip M

    2015-11-01

    A central tenant in microbial biogeochemistry is that microbial metabolisms follow a predictable sequence of terminal electron acceptors based on the energetic yield for the reaction. It is thereby oftentimes assumed that microbial respiration of ferric iron outcompetes sulfate in all but high-sulfate systems, and thus sulfide has little influence on freshwater or terrestrial iron cycling. Observations of sulfate reduction in low-sulfate environments have been attributed to the presumed presence of highly crystalline iron oxides allowing sulfate reduction to be more energetically favored. Here we identified the iron-reducing processes under low-sulfate conditions within columns containing freshwater sediments amended with structurally diverse iron oxides and fermentation products that fuel anaerobic respiration. We show that despite low sulfate concentrations and regardless of iron oxide substrate (ferrihydrite, Al-ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite), sulfidization was a dominant pathway in iron reduction. This process was mediated by (re)cycling of sulfur upon reaction of sulfide and iron oxides to support continued sulfur-based respiration--a cryptic sulfur cycle involving generation and consumption of sulfur intermediates. Although canonical iron respiration was not observed in the sediments amended with the more crystalline iron oxides, iron respiration did become dominant in the presence of ferrihydrite once sulfate was consumed. Thus, despite more favorable energetics, ferrihydrite reduction did not precede sulfate reduction and instead an inverse redox zonation was observed. These findings indicate that sulfur (re)cycling is a dominant force in iron cycling even in low-sulfate systems and in a manner difficult to predict using the classical thermodynamic ladder.

  8. Hetero- and homogeneous three-dimensional hierarchical tungsten oxide nanostructures by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houweling, Z.S., E-mail: Silvester.Houweling@asml.com [Utrecht University, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics—Physics of Devices, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands); Harks, P.-P.R.M.L.; Kuang, Y.; Werf, C.H.M. van der [Utrecht University, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics—Physics of Devices, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands); Geus, J.W. [Utrecht University, Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics—Physics of Devices, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-30

    We present the synthesis of three-dimensional tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3−x}) nanostructures, called nanocacti, using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. The growth of the nanocacti is controlled through a succession of oxidation, reduction and re-oxidation processes. By using only a resistively heated W filament, a flow of ambient air and hydrogen at subatmospheric pressure, and a substrate heated to about 700 °C, branched nanostructures are deposited. We report three varieties of simple synthesis approaches to obtain hierarchical homo- and heterogeneous nanocacti. Furthermore, by using catalyst nanoparticles site-selection for the growth is demonstrated. The atomic, morphological and crystallographic compositions of the nanocacti are determined using a combination of electron microscopy techniques, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction. - Highlights: • Continuous upscalable hot-wire CVD of 3D hierarchical nanocacti • Controllable deposition of homo- and heterogeneous WO{sub 3−x}/WO{sub 3−y} nanocacti • Introduction of three synthesis routes comprising oxidation, reduction and re-oxidation processes • Growth of periodic arrays of hetero- and homogeneous hierarchical 3D nanocacti.

  9. Reduction of uranyl carbonate and hydroxyl complexes and neptunyl carbonate complexes studied with chemical-electrochemical methods and rixs spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butorin, Sergei; Nordgren, Joseph; Ollila, Kaija; Albinsson, Yngve; Werme, Lars

    2003-10-01

    actinides have been mobilised through oxidation, they can migrate away from this potentially oxidising region and will encounter an oxygen free, reducing environment caused by the anaerobic corrosion of the cast iron insert. The actinyl species are no longer thermodynamically stable and reduction to the tetravalent state will be possible. There is, however, an open question whether the reduction kinetics will be sufficiently high to cause reduction in solution and if sorption onto the corroding iron surface will be accompanied by an electron transfer sufficiently rapid to reduce the actinide back to the tetravalent state. This report contains the results of experimental studies of uranium reduction-depletion from water solutions in the presence of corroding iron and spectroscopic studies of the oxidation state of uranium and neptunium sorbed/precipitated onto iron under oxygen free conditions using resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopy. The RIXS measurements show that at least partial reduction of both uranyl carbonate complexes and neptunyl carbonate complexes take place on the corroding iron surface. The chemical/electrochemical measurements indicate that reduction of uranyl carbonate complexes also take place in solution in a system containing corroding iron, i.e. sorption onto the iron/iron oxide surface may not be necessary in order for reduction to take place. Reduction of uranyl hydroxyl complexes was also found to take place in solution, but at a rate that was noticeably lower than for the uranyl carbonate complexes

  10. Evaluation of Biofuel Cells with Hemoglobin as Cathodic Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Peroxide Reduction on Bare Indium-Tin-Oxide Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ayato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A biofuel cell (BFC cathode has been developed based on direct electron transfer (DET of hemoglobin (Hb molecules with an indium-tin-oxide (ITO electrode and their electrocatalysis for reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. In this study, the ITO-coated glass plates or porous glasses were prepared by using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD method and examined the electrochemical characteristics of the formed ITO in pH 7.4 of phosphate buffered saline (PBS solutions containing and not containing Hb. In half-cell measurements, the reduction current of H2O2 due to the electrocatalytic activity of Hb increased with decreasing electrode potential from around 0.1 V versus Ag|AgCl|KCl(satd. in the PBS solution. The practical open-circuit voltage (OCV on BFCs utilizing H2O2 reduction at the Hb-ITO cathode with a hydrogen (H2 oxidation anode at a platinum (Pt electrode was expected to be at least 0.74 V from the theoretical H2 oxidation potential of −0.64 V versus Ag|AgCl|KCl(satd. in pH 7.4. The assembled single cell using the ITO-coated glass plate showed the OCV of 0.72 V and the maximum power density of 3.1 µW cm−2. The maximum power per single cell was recorded at 21.5 µW by using the ITO-coated porous glass.

  11. Effect of chemical modification on reduction and sorptive properties of chars from hydropyrolysis of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanczyk, K.; Miga, K.; Fabis, G.; Jastrzab, K. [Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Gliwice (Poland)

    1998-01-01

    Hydropyrolysis of bituminous coal and lignite as way of synthesis of adsorbents has been applied. Chemical modification of chars based on simultaneous carbonization of coal and plastics containing sulfur and nitrogen has been carried out. It was stated that modified chars exhibit better reduction and sorptive properties than non-modified and that modified adsorbents made of lignite exceed commercial ones. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Re-establishing filtering capabilities of machined porous beryllium via chemical reduction and cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    Porous beryllium is furnished in sheets of varying sizes and thickness; it is therefore necessary that it be machined into specified sizes. A chemical reduction and cleaning procedure was devised to remove the disrupted surface, open the sealed pores of the material, and clean entrapped contaminates from the internal structure. Dimensional stability can be closely controlled and material size is of no consequence. (U.S.)

  13. The chemical oxidation of lignin found in Sappi Saiccor dissolving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-11

    Jan 11, 2011 ... Oxygen oxidation has previously been shown to produce aldehyde-type compounds, and in this work has produced good yields of both vanillin and syringaldehyde compared to previous oxygen oxidation reac- tions. Hydrogen peroxide is a strong oxidising agent that tends to over-oxidise the lignin during ...

  14. Quantum Chemical Calculations and Experimental Investigations of Molecular Actinide Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovács, Attila; Konings, Rudy J. M.; Gibson, John K.; Infante, Ivan; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The available experimental and theoretical information on gaseous actinide oxides covering both the neutral and the ionic species are reviewed. The ground-state electronic structures of the oxides of An = Th-Cm have been obtained by the well-tested SOCASPT2 method, and therefore they are very likely

  15. Copper Oxidation through Nucleation Sites of Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Birong; Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf; Shivayogimath, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the nucleation defect-triggered oxidation of Cu covered by CVD graphene during postannealing in air. The results reveal that different growth conditions may induce imperfect nucleation of graphene, and cause creation of defects near the nucleation point such as pin holes...... and amorphous carbon. These defects would serve as a pathway for the diffusion of 02 during thermal annealing, allowing oxidation of Cu to progress gradually from the nucleation center toward the growth edge. The oxidation process follows the graphene morphology closely; the shape of the oxidized area of Cu has...... a striking resemblance to that of the graphene flakes. Our work demonstrates that inferior graphene nucleation in CVD processes can compromise the oxidation resistance of a graphene-coated Cu substrate, and indirectly reveal the structure and integrity of graphene, which is of fundamental importance...

  16. Revisiting the effects of organic solvents on the thermal reduction of graphite oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso-Bujans, Fabienne; Fierro, José Luis G.; Alegría, Angel; Colmenero, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Retention of organic solvent on graphite oxide interlayer space. ► Decreasing exfoliation temperature. ► Close link between structure and thermal behavior of solvent treated graphite oxide. ► Restacking inhibition of thermally reduced graphite oxide sheets. ► Changes in kinetic mechanisms of thermal reduction. - Abstract: Treatment of graphite oxide (GO) with organic solvents via sorption from either liquid or gas phase, and subsequent desorption, induces profound changes in the layered GO structure: loss of stacking order, retention of trace amounts of solvents and decreasing decomposition temperature. This study presents new evidences of the effect of organic solvents on the thermal reduction of GO by means of thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results reveal a relative higher decrease of the oxygen amounts in solvent-treated GO as compared to untreated GO and the restacking inhibition of the thermally reduced GO sheets upon slow heating. The kinetic experiments evidence changes occurring in the reduction mechanisms of the solvent-treated GO, which support the close link between GO structure and thermal properties.

  17. In-situ sequential laser transfer and laser reduction of graphene oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, S.; Petridis, C.; Kymakis, E.; Kennou, S.; Raptis, Y. S.; Chatzandroulis, S.; Zergioti, I.

    2018-04-01

    Achieving high quality transfer of graphene on selected substrates is a priority in device fabrication, especially where drop-on-demand applications are involved. In this work, we report an in-situ, fast, simple, and one step process that resulted in the reduction, transfer, and fabrication of reduced graphene oxide-based humidity sensors, using picosecond laser pulses. By tuning the laser illumination parameters, we managed to implement the sequential printing and reduction of graphene oxide flakes. The overall process lasted only a few seconds compared to a few hours that our group has previously published. DC current measurements, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Raman Spectroscopy were employed in order to assess the efficiency of our approach. To demonstrate the applicability and the potential of the technique, laser printed reduced graphene oxide humidity sensors with a limit of detection of 1700 ppm are presented. The results demonstrated in this work provide a selective, rapid, and low-cost approach for sequential transfer and photochemical reduction of graphene oxide micro-patterns onto various substrates for flexible electronics and sensor applications.

  18. A catalytic wet oxidation process for mixed waste volume reduction/recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, Patrick M.

    1992-01-01

    Mixed wastes have presented a challenge to treatment and destruction technologies. A recently developed catalytic wet oxidation method has promising characteristics for volume reduction and recycling of mixed wastes. The process utilizes iron (III) as an oxidant in the presence of homogeneous cocatalysts which increase organics' oxidation rates and the rate of oxidation of iron (II) by oxygen. The reaction is conducted in an aqueous mineral acid solution at temperatures of 373 - 573 deg K. The mineral acid should solvate a number of heavy metals, including U and Pu. Studies of reaction rates show that the process can oxidize a wide range of organic compounds including aromatics and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Rate constants in the range of 10 -7 to 10 -4 sec -1 , depending on the cocatalyst, acidity, type of anions, type of organic, temperature, and time. Activation energies ranged from 25. to 32. KJ/mole. Preliminary measurements of the extent of oxidation which could be obtained ranged from 80% for trichloroethylene to 99.8% for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene; evidence was obtained that absorption by the fluorocarbon liners of the reaction bombs allowed some of the organics to escape exposure to the catalyst solution. The results indicate that complete oxidation of the organics used here, and presumably many others, can be achieved. (author)

  19. Ultralow Level Mercury Treatment Using Chemical Reduction and Air Stripping: Scoping Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.B.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected during the first stage of a Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Strategic Research and Development Project confirmed the efficacy of chemical reduction and air stripping/sparging as an ultralow level mercury treatment concept for waters containing Hg(II). The process consists of dosing the water with low levels of stannous chloride to convert the mercury to Hg. This form of mercury can easily be removed from the water by air stripping or sparging. Samples of Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater containing approximately 130 ng/L of total mercury (as Hg(II)) were used for the study. In undosed samples, sparging removed 0 percent of the initial mercury. In the dosed samples, all of the removals were greater than 94 percent, except in one water type at one dose. This sample, which was saturated with dissolved oxygen, showed a 63 percent reduction in mercury following treatment at the lowest dose. Following dosing at minimally effective levels and sparging, treated water contained less than 10 ng/L total mercury. In general, the data indicate that the reduction of mercury is highly favored and that stannous chloride reagent efficiently targets the Hg(II) contaminant in the presence of competing reactions. Based on the results, the authors estimated that the costs of implementing and operating an ultralow level mercury treatment process based on chemical reduction and stripping/sparging are 10 percent to 20 percent of traditional treatment technologies

  20. Reduced graphene oxide supported gold nanoparticles for electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquib, Mohammad; Halder, Aditi

    2018-02-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide is one of the methods which have the capability to recycle CO2 into valuable products for energy and industrial applications. This research article describes about a new electrocatalyst "reduced graphene oxide supported gold nanoparticles" for selective electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. The main aim for conversion of CO2 to CO lies in the fact that the latter is an important component of syn gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), which is then converted into liquid fuel via well-known industrial process called Fischer-Tropsch process. In this work, we have synthesized different composites of the gold nanoparticles supported on defective reduced graphene oxide to evaluate the catalytic activity of reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-supported gold nanoparticles and the role of defective RGO support towards the electrochemical reduction of CO2. Electrochemical and impedance measurements demonstrate that higher concentration of gold nanoparticles on the graphene support led to remarkable decrease in the onset potential of 240 mV and increase in the current density for CO2 reduction. Lower impedance and Tafel slope values also clearly support our findings for the better performance of RGOAu than bare Au for CO2 reduction.

  1. Comparison of descriptive sensory analysis and chemical analysis for oxidative changes in milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, R V; Kristensen, D; Nielsen, Jacob Holm

    2006-01-01

    and lipolytic changes occurring in the milk during chill storage for 4 d. Sensory analysis and chemical analysis showed high correlation between the typical descriptors for oxidation such as cardboard, metallic taste, and boiled milk and specific chemical markers for oxidation such as hexanal. Notably, primary......Oxidation in 3 types of bovine milk with different fatty acid profiles obtained through manipulation of feed was evaluated by analytical methods quantifying the content of potential antioxidants, the tendency of formation of free radicals, and the accumulation of primary and secondary oxidation...... products. The milk samples were evaluated in parallel by descriptive sensory analysis by a trained panel, and the correlation between the chemical analysis and the descriptive sensory analysis was evaluated. The fatty acid composition of the 3 types of milk was found to influence the oxidative...

  2. A New Approach to Joining Dissimilar Ceramic Oxides for Chemical Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuiykov, Serge

    2009-01-01

    Conventional joining of dissimilar oxides for sensing electrodes (SE) of chemical sensors has been pivotal to the development of various sensors and is vital to their further development. However, it is shown that the uncertainty (of a fundamental nature) in the properties of dissimilar oxides in SE causes the determination of their sensing characteristics to be ambiguous. Characteristics are different for such controlled parameters as pyrolysis temperature, crystal structure, particle's morphology and size, chemical and phase composition, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), surface architecture, the bulk and surface stoichiometry and type and conductivity of additives. Here, we provide an alternative approach for joining dissimilar metal-oxides for chemical sensors SE. The approach relies on the development of at least one transient liquid oxide phase on the ceramic-SE interface. These results constitute key points relevant to selection oxides for joining, sintering temperatures and heating/cooling temperature rates.

  3. Comparison of descriptive sensory analysis and chemical analysis for oxidative changes in milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg; Kristensen, D.; Nielsen, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    products. The milk samples were evaluated in parallel by descriptive sensory analysis by a trained panel, and the correlation between the chemical analysis and the descriptive sensory analysis was evaluated. The fatty acid composition of the 3 types of milk was found to influence the oxidative...... and lipolytic changes occurring in the milk during chill storage for 4 d. Sensory analysis and chemical analysis showed high correlation between the typical descriptors for oxidation such as cardboard, metallic taste, and boiled milk and specific chemical markers for oxidation such as hexanal. Notably, primary...... oxidation products (i.e., lipid hydroperoxides) and even the tendency of formation of radicals as measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy were also highly correlated to the sensory descriptors for oxidation. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy should accordingly be further explored as a routine...

  4. Cerium oxide for the destruction of chemical warfare agents: A comparison of synthetic routes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janos, P.; Henych, Jiří; Pelant, O.; Pilařová, V.; Vrtoch, L.; Kormunda, M.; Mazanec, K.; Štengl, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 304, MAR (2016), s. 259-268 ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Cerium oxide * Chemical warfare agents * Organophosphate compounds * Decontamination Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 6.065, year: 2016

  5. Electromechanical Behavior of Chemically Reduced Graphene Oxide and Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchirouf, Abderrahmane; Müller, Christian; Kanoun, Olfa

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose strain-sensitive thin films based on chemically reduced graphene oxide (GO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) without adding any further surfactants. In spite of the insulating properties of the thin-film-based GO due to the presence functional groups such as hydroxyl, epoxy, and carbonyl groups in its atomic structure, a significant enhancement of the film conductivity was reached by chemical reduction with hydro-iodic acid. By optimizing the MWCNT content, a significant improvement of electrical and mechanical thin film sensitivity is realized. The optical properties and the morphology of the prepared thin films were studied using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The UV-Vis spectra showed the ability to tune the band gap of the GO by changing the MWCNT content, whereas the SEM indicated that the MWCNTs were well dissolved and coated by the GO. Investigations of the piezoresistive properties of the hybrid nanocomposite material under mechanical load show a linear trend between the electrical resistance and the applied strain. A relatively high gauge factor of 8.5 is reached compared to the commercial metallic strain gauges. The self-assembled hybrid films exhibit outstanding properties in electric conductivity, mechanical strength, and strain sensitivity, which provide a high potential for use in strain-sensing applications.

  6. Mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase is inactivated upon oxidation and reactivated by thioredoxin-dependent reduction in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke eYoshida

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of mitochondrial metabolism is essential for ensuring cellular growth and maintenance in plants. Based on redox-proteomics analysis, several proteins involved in diverse mitochondrial reactions have been identified as potential redox-regulated proteins. NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, is one such candidate. In this study, we investigated the redox regulation mechanisms of IDH by biochemical procedures. In contrast to mammalian and yeast counterparts reported to date, recombinant IDH in Arabidopsis mitochondria did not show adenylate-dependent changes in enzymatic activity. Instead, IDH was inactivated by oxidation treatment and partially reactivated by subsequent reduction. Functional IDH forms a heterodimer comprising regulatory (IDH-r and catalytic (IDH-c subunits. IDH-r was determined to be the target of oxidative modifications forming an oligomer via intermolecular disulfide bonds. Mass spectrometric analysis combined with tryptic digestion of IDH-r indicated that Cys128 and Cys216 are involved in intermolecular disulfide bond formation. Furthermore, we showed that mitochondria-localized o-type thioredoxin (Trx-o promotes the reduction of oxidized IDH-r. These results suggest that IDH-r is susceptible to oxidative stress, and Trx-o serves to convert oxidized IDH-r to the reduced form that is necessary for active IDH complex.

  7. Synthesis of reduced carbon nitride at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharlamov, Alexey [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science of NASU, Krzhyzhanovsky St. 3, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Bondarenko, Marina, E-mail: mebondarenko@ukr.net [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science of NASU, Krzhyzhanovsky St. 3, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Kharlamova, Ganna [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, Volodymyrs' ka St. 64, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Fomenko, Veniamin [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science of NASU, Krzhyzhanovsky St. 3, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2016-09-15

    For the first time at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O reduced carbon nitride (or reduced multi-layer azagraphene) is obtained. It is differed from usually synthesized carbon nitride by a significantly large (on 0.09 nm) interplanar distance is. At the same time, the chemical bonds between atoms in a heteroatomic plane of reduced carbon nitride correspond to the bonds in a synthesized g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The samples of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide were synthesized under the special reactionary conditions of a pyrolysis of melamine and urea. We believe that reduced carbon nitride consists of weakly connected carbon-nitrogen monosheets (azagraphene sheets) as well as reduced (from graphene oxide) graphene contains weakly connected graphene sheets. - Graphical abstract: XRD pattern and schematic atomic model of one layer of reduced carbon nitride, carbon nitride oxide and synthesized carbon nitride. For the first time at the reduction by hydroquinone of the water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O is obtained the reduced carbon nitride (or reduced multi-layer azagraphene). Display Omitted - Highlights: • First the reduced carbon nitride (RCN) at the reduction of the carbon nitride oxide was obtained. • Water-soluble carbon nitride oxide was reduced by hydroquinone. • The chemical bonds in a heteroatomic plane of RCN correspond to the bonds in a synthesized g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • Reduced carbon nitride consists of poorly connected heteroatomic azagraphene layers.

  8. Complete relaxation of residual stresses during reduction of solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2015-01-01

    reduce significantly over minutes. In this work the stresses are measured in-situ before and after the reduction by use of XRD. The phenomenon of accelerated creep has to be considered both in the production of stacks and in the analysis of the stress field in a stack based on anode supported SOFCs.......To asses the reliability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks during operation, the stress field in the stack must be known. During operation the stress field will depend on time as creep processes relax stresses. This work reports further details on a newly discovered creep phenomenon......, accelerated creep, taking place during the reduction of the anode. This relaxes stresses at a much higher rate (~×104) than creep during operation. The phenomenon has previously been studied by simultaneous loading and reduction. With the recorded high creep rates, the stresses at the time of reduction should...

  9. Oxidative polymerization of 5-hydroxytryptamine to physically and chemically immobilize glucose oxidase for electrochemical biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting; Liu, Zaichun; Li, Yunlong; Li, Yanqiu; Chao, Long; Chen, Chao; Tan, Yueming; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo; Wu, Yuping

    2018-07-12

    Poly(5-hydroxytryptamine) (poly(5-HT)) is exploited as a new and efficient enzyme-immobilization matrix for amperometric and biofuel cell (BFC)-based biosensing. A GOx-poly(5-HT)-Pd nanoparticles (PdNPs) bionanocomposite is prepared by Na 2 PdCl 4 -initiated oxidized polymerization of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in a neutral aqueous solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx), and this bionanocomposite and then chitosan (CS) are cast-coated on a Pd-plated Au electrode to yield a CS/GOx-poly(5-HT)-PdNPs/Pd plate /Au enzyme electrode. Scanning/transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis spectrophotometry and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance are employed for material characterization and/or process monitoring. Under optimized conditions, the amperometric response of the enzyme electrode is linear with glucose concentration from 2.0 μM to 6.66 mM with a sensitivity of 110 μA mM -1  cm -2 , a limit of detection of 0.2 μM, and excellent operation/storage stability in the first-generation biosensing mode. The sensitivity is larger than those of some conventional electrodes under identical conditions. The enzyme electrode also works well in the second-generation biosensing mode. By using the enzyme electrode as the anode for glucose oxidation and a Pd plate /Au electrode as the cathode for KMnO 4 reduction, a monopolar BFC is constructed as a self-powered biosensor, the current response of which is linear with glucose concentration from 50 μM to 34.5 mM. Experiments also show that poly(5-HT) is a physical and chemical dual-immobilization matrix of enzyme, since the abundant amino groups in poly(5-HT) can be used for chemical bonding of GOx. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. On the chemical constitution of a molten oxide core of a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodkin, D.J.; Potter, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    A knowledge of the chemical constitution of a molten oxide fast reactor core is of great importance in the assessment of heat transfer from a cooling molten pool of debris and in the selection of materials for the construction of sacrificial beds for core containment. In this paper we describe some thermodynamic assessments of the likely chemical constitution of a molten oxide core, and then support our assessments by experimental observations

  11. In Situ Chemical Oxidation Using Potassium Permanganate. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The In Situ Chemical Oxidation Using Potassium Permanganate [KMnO4] treats soils or groundwater contaminated with a range of organic chemicals, including trichlorethylene. Potential application to metal and radionuclide contaminants, including oxidation/immobilization of uranium, is being investigated. This technology is designed for use with efficient delivery systems, such as the Multi-Point Injection System and Deep Soil Mixing, to treat contaminants in low permeability soils

  12. Catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia over transition metal ion-exchanged Y zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciyama, T; Arakawa, T; Matsuda, T; Yamazoe, N; Takita, Y

    1975-01-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia was studied over transition metal ion-exchanged Y zeolite (Me-Y) catalysts. The reaction products are nitrogen, nitrous oxide, and water in all cases. Selectivities to N/sub 2/ are 60 to 80% on all the cation exchanged zeolite catalysts exhibiting a relatively minor variation with the cationic species exchanged. The copper (II)-Y catalyst exhibits low temperature activity and has an unusual catalytic activity-temperature profile with a maximum at 120/sup 0/C. The catalytic activity is enhanced considerably when a second cation, especially cobalt (II) or iron (III) is coexchanged together with Cu (II) in Y zeolite.

  13. Solid-phase electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide films in alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basirun, Wan J.; Sookhakian, Mehran; Baradaran, Saeid; Mahmoudian, Mohammad R.; Ebadi, Mehdi

    2013-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) film was evaporated onto graphite and used as an electrode to produce electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) films by electrochemical reduction in 6 M KOH solution through voltammetric cycling. Fourier transformed infrared and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of ERGO. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characterization of ERGO and GO films in ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox couple with 0.1 M KCl supporting electrolyte gave results that are in accordance with previous reports. Based on the EIS results, ERGO shows higher capacitance and lower charge transfer resistance compared to GO.

  14. Thermogravimetric study of the reduction of oxides of nickel and chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbell, T. P.

    1973-01-01

    The effectiveness of hydrogen, carbon and hydrogen-carbon in reducing NiO, Cr2O3, mixed NiO-Cr2O3 and oxidized Ni-20Cr was evaluated by thermogravimetry. NiO was effectively reduced by all three atmospheres, Cr2O3 only by hydrogen-carbon, NiO-Cr2O3 by hydrogen and hydrogen-carbon and oxidized Ni-20Cr by hydrogen, hydrogen-carbon and partially by carbon alone. The results indicate that nickel and carbon promote the reduction of Cr2O3.

  15. Aluminum Oxide Formation On Fecral Catalyst Support By Electro-Chemical Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang H.S.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available FeCrAl is comprised essentially of Fe, Cr, Al and generally considered as metallic substrates for catalyst support because of its advantage in the high-temperature corrosion resistance, high mechanical strength, and ductility. Oxidation film and its adhesion on FeCrAl surface with aluminum are important for catalyst life. Therefore various appropriate surface treatments such as thermal oxidation, Sol, PVD, CVD has studied. In this research, PEO (plasma electrolytic oxidation process was applied to form the aluminum oxide on FeCrAl surface, and the formed oxide particle according to process conditions such as electric energy and oxidation time were investigated. Microstructure and aluminum oxide particle on FeCrAl surface after PEO process was observed by FE-SEM and EDS with element mapping analysis. The study presents possibility of aluminum oxide formation by electro-chemical coating process without any pretreatment of FeCrAl.

  16. Are high rates of sulphate reduction associated with anaerobic oxidation of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devol, A H; Ahmed, S I

    1981-01-01

    Classical models of sulphur diagenesis in marine sediments are based on the assumption that the rate of sulphate reduction is first order with respect to oxidizable particulate organic carbon (POC). This assumption requires that oxidizable POC, sulphate concentration and the sulphate reduction rate be highest at the top of the sulphate reduction zone and decrease exponentially with increasing sediment depth. However, to explain recent observations of concave upwards methane distributions, the anaerobic consumption of methane has been proposed. Furthermore, it has been proposed that this consumption takes place near the bottom of the sulphate reducing zone where sulphate concentrations are low. Thus, if sulphate reducing bacteria are associated with the anaerobic oxidation of methane, a peak in sulphate reduction rate might be expected in this deep consumption zone. The importance of the process in sedimentary sulphur diagenesis is indicated by calculations estimating that 30 to 75% of the downward sulphate flux at depth may be consumed by methane oxidation within this zone. We present here profiles of sulphate reduction rate in anoxic sediments that show distinct local maxima at the depth where the anaerobic oxidation of methane would be expected. Our measurements were made during July and August 1978 in Saanich Inlet, an anoxic fjord located on the south-east of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. The inlet has a shallow sill (approx 70 m) which restricts circulation of the deeper water (maximum depth 225 m) inside the basin to the extent that for about 8 months of the year the bottom waters contain hydrogen sulphide, the inlet is an ideal location for studying sedimentary sulphate reduction because reactions with oxygen and the effects of burrowing organisms can be neglected.

  17. Recovery of microbial diversity and activity during bioremediation following chemical oxidation of diesel contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Nora B; Langenhoff, Alette A M; Lasso, Daniel Hidalgo; van der Zaan, Bas; van Gaans, Pauline; Maphosa, Farai; Smidt, Hauke; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2014-03-01

    To improve the coupling of in situ chemical oxidation and in situ bioremediation, a systematic analysis was performed of the effect of chemical oxidation with Fenton's reagent, modified Fenton's reagent, permanganate, or persulfate, on microbial diversity and activity during 8 weeks of incubation in two diesel-contaminated soils (peat and fill). Chemical oxidant and soil type affected the microbial community diversity and biodegradation activity; however, this was only observed following treatment with Fenton's reagent and modified Fenton's reagent, and in the biotic control without oxidation. Differences in the highest overall removal efficiencies of 69 % for peat (biotic control) and 59 % for fill (Fenton's reagent) were partially explained by changes in contaminant soil properties upon oxidation. Molecular analysis of 16S rRNA and alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene abundances indicated that oxidation with Fenton's reagent and modified Fenton's reagent negatively affected microbial abundance. However, regeneration occurred, and final relative alkB abundances were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher in chemically treated microcosms than in the biotic control. 16S rRNA gene fragment fingerprinting with DGGE and prominent band sequencing illuminated microbial community composition and diversity differences between treatments and identified a variety of phylotypes within Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria. Understanding microbial community dynamics during coupled chemical oxidation and bioremediation is integral to improved biphasic field application.

  18. Analysis of Chemical Reaction Kinetics Behavior of Nitrogen Oxide During Air-staged Combustion in Pulverized Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Xia Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Because the air-staged combustion technology is one of the key technologies with low investment running costs and high emission reduction efficiency for the pulverized boiler, it is important to reveal the chemical reaction kinetics mechanism for developing various technologies of nitrogen oxide reduction emissions. At the present work, a three-dimensional mesh model of the large-scale four corner tangentially fired boiler furnace is established with the GAMBIT pre-processing of the FLUENT software. The partial turbulent premixed and diffusion flame was simulated for the air-staged combustion processing. Parameters distributions for the air-staged and no the air-staged were obtained, including in-furnace flow field, temperature field and nitrogen oxide concentration field. The results show that the air-staged has more regular velocity field, higher velocity of flue gas, higher turbulence intensity and more uniform temperature of flue gas. In addition, a lower negative pressure zone and lower O2 concentration zone is formed in the main combustion zone, which is conducive to the NO of fuel type reduced to N2, enhanced the effect of NOx reduction. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 5th November 2015; Revised: 14th January 2016; Accepted: 16th January 2016  How to Cite: Zhang, J.X., Zhang, J.F. (2016. Analysis of Chemical Reaction Kinetics Behavior of Nitrogen Oxide During Air-staged Combustion in Pulverized Boiler. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (1: 100-108. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.1.431.100-108 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.1.431.100-108

  19. Constructive nanolithography and nanochemistry : local probe oxidation and chemical modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, D.; Schubert, U.S.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility to prepare and use submicrometer-sized patterns in successive functionalization reactions with quaternary ammonium salts and (functional) chlorosilanes, as well as cationic gold nanoparticles, is presented. Submicrometer-sized structures were prepared by local probe oxidation of

  20. Chemical oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine transformation products in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abilev, M.; Kenessov, B.N.; Batyrbekova, S.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) during a water treatment has several disadvantages including formation of stable toxic byproducts. Effectiveness of treatment methods in relation to UDMH transformation products is currently poorly studied. This work considers the effectiveness of

  1. Rapid mixing chemical oxidative polymerization: an easy route to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    (SDCNTs)/PANI nanofibres (NFs) has been prepared using an easy in situ rapid mixing chemical ... SDCNTs thin film was obtained using thermal chemical vapour deposition method in ... In the next step, 250 mL of aqueous HCl was taken in a.

  2. Nitric oxide reduction in coal combustion: role of char surface complexes in heterogeneous reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J.J. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2002-12-15

    Nitrogen oxides are one of the major environmental problems arising from fossil fuel combustion. Coal char is relatively rich in nitrogen, and so this is an important source of nitrogen oxides during coal combustion. However, due to its carbonaceous nature, char can also reduce NO through heterogeneous reduction. The objectives of this work were on one hand to compare NO emissions from coal combustion in two different types of equipment and on the other hand to study the influence of char surface chemistry on NO reduction. A series of combustion tests were carried out in two different scale devices: a thermogravimetric analyzer coupled to a mass spectrometer and an FTIR (TG-MS-FTIR) and a fluidized bed reactor with on-line battery of analyzers. According to the results obtained, it can be said that the TG-MS-FTIR system provides valuable information about NO heterogeneous reduction and it can give good trends of the behaviour in other combustion equipments, i.e. fluidized bed combustors. It has been also pointed out that NO-char interaction depends to a large extent on temperature. In the low-temperature range NO heterogeneous reduction seems to be controlled by the evolution of surface complexes. In the high-temperature range a different mechanism is involved in NO heterogeneous reduction, the nature of the carbon matrix being a key factor. 27 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Nitric oxide reduction in coal combustion: role of char surface complexes in heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Ana; Rubiera, Fernando; Pis, José J

    2002-12-15

    Nitrogen oxides are one of the major environmental problems arising from fossil fuel combustion. Coal char is relatively rich in nitrogen, and so this is an important source of nitrogen oxides during coal combustion. However, due to its carbonaceous nature, char can also reduce NO through heterogeneous reduction. The objectives of this work were on one hand to compare NO emissions from coal combustion in two different types of equipment and on the other hand to study the influence of char surface chemistry on NO reduction. A series of combustion tests were carried out in two different scale devices: a thermogravimetric analyzer coupled to a mass spectrometer and an FTIR (TG-MS-FTIR) and a fluidized bed reactor with an on line battery of analyzers. The TG-MS-FTIR system was also used to perform a specific study on NO heterogeneous reduction reactions using chars with different surface chemistry. According to the results obtained, it can be said that the TG-MS-FTIR system provides valuable information about NO heterogeneous reduction and it can give good trends of the behavior in other combustion equipments (i.e., fluidized bed combustors). It has been also pointed out that NO-char interaction depends to a large extent on temperature. In the low-temperature range (800 degrees C), a different mechanism is involved in NO heterogeneous reduction, the nature of the carbon matrix being a key factor.

  4. Some major aspects of the chemical behavior of rare earth oxides: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, S.; Blanco, G.; Calvino, J.J.; Omil, J.A. Perez; Pintado, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical behavior of sesquioxides and higher rare earth oxides is briefly reviewed. In the first case processes implying no change in the lanthanoid oxidation state are considered, whereas in the second one the analysis is focused on their redox behavior

  5. The kinetics of nonequilibrium chain plasma-chemical oxidation in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deminskii, M.A.; Potapkin, B.V.; Rusanov, V.D.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of low-impurity components in air mixtures under heterogeneous conditions was studied. The principal kinetic features of the process were determined on the basis of theoretical analysis of plasma-chemical oxidation in heterogeneous media. The analysis also showed that low concentrations of impurities in liquid aerosol particles can be efficiently oxidized via a chain process induced by reactive species formed in the gas

  6. A Study on Electrochemical Reduction of Rare Earth Oxides in Molten LiCl-Li{sub 2}O Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Woo; Jeong, Sang Mun; Lee, See Hoon [Chungbook National University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Jung Min [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the electrochemical reduction of RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE = Nd or Ce) has been conducted via co-reduction NiO to increase the reduction degree of the rare earth oxides in molten molten LiCl containing 1wt% Li{sub 2}O. The electrochemical reduction behavior of the mixed RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NiO oxide has been investigated and the reduction path of RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been proposed. An electorchemical spent fuel processing technology, pyroprocessing, has been developed for recycling of spent fuel to be applied to a sodium-cooled fast reactor. The spent fuel is reduced in the oxide reduction process. It is well known that the rare earth oxides are hardly reduced due to their electrochemical and thermodynamic stability. The rare earth oxides unreduced in the reduction process can cause problems via reaction with UCl{sub 3} in the electrorefiner. To tackle those problems, the electrochemical reduction of rare earth oxide has been conducted via co-reduction of NiO in LiCl molten salt containing 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O. The reduction of the oxide mixture starts from the reduction of NiO to Ni, followed by that of RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the produced Ni to form intermetallic RENi{sub 5}. The mixed oxide pellets were successfully reduced to the RENi5 alloy by constant electrolysis at 3.0 V at 650 .deg. C. The crucial aspect to these results is that the thermodynamically stable rare-earth oxide, Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was successfully converted to the metal in the presence of NiO.

  7. A Study on Electrochemical Reduction of Rare Earth Oxides in Molten LiCl-Li2O Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Woo; Jeong, Sang Mun; Lee, See Hoon; Sohn, Jung Min

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the electrochemical reduction of RE 2 O 3 (RE = Nd or Ce) has been conducted via co-reduction NiO to increase the reduction degree of the rare earth oxides in molten molten LiCl containing 1wt% Li 2 O. The electrochemical reduction behavior of the mixed RE 2 O 3 -NiO oxide has been investigated and the reduction path of RE 2 O 3 has been proposed. An electorchemical spent fuel processing technology, pyroprocessing, has been developed for recycling of spent fuel to be applied to a sodium-cooled fast reactor. The spent fuel is reduced in the oxide reduction process. It is well known that the rare earth oxides are hardly reduced due to their electrochemical and thermodynamic stability. The rare earth oxides unreduced in the reduction process can cause problems via reaction with UCl 3 in the electrorefiner. To tackle those problems, the electrochemical reduction of rare earth oxide has been conducted via co-reduction of NiO in LiCl molten salt containing 1 wt% Li 2 O. The reduction of the oxide mixture starts from the reduction of NiO to Ni, followed by that of RE 2 O 3 on the produced Ni to form intermetallic RENi 5 . The mixed oxide pellets were successfully reduced to the RENi5 alloy by constant electrolysis at 3.0 V at 650 .deg. C. The crucial aspect to these results is that the thermodynamically stable rare-earth oxide, Nd 2 O 3 was successfully converted to the metal in the presence of NiO.

  8. Identifying active surface phases for metal oxide electrocatalysts: a study of manganese oxide bi-functional catalysts for oxygen reduction and water oxidation catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Hai-Yan; Gorlin, Yelena; Man, Isabela Costinela

    2012-01-01

    Progress in the field of electrocatalysis is often hampered by the difficulty in identifying the active site on an electrode surface. Herein we combine theoretical analysis and electrochemical methods to identify the active surfaces in a manganese oxide bi-functional catalyst for the oxygen...... reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). First, we electrochemically characterize the nanostructured α-Mn2O3 and find that it undergoes oxidation in two potential regions: initially, between 0.5 V and 0.8 V, a potential region relevant to the ORR and, subsequently, between 0.8 V...

  9. Oxidation of mercury across selective catalytic reduction catalysts in coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constance L. Senior [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2006-01-15

    A kinetic model for predicting the amount of mercury (Hg) oxidation across selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems in coal-fired power plants was developed and tested. The model incorporated the effects of diffusion within the porous SCR catalyst and the competition between ammonia and Hg for active sites on the catalyst. Laboratory data on Hg oxidation in simulated flue gas and slipstream data on Hg oxidation in flue gas from power plants were modeled. The model provided good fits to the data for eight different catalysts, both plate and monolith, across a temperature range of 280-420{sup o}C, with space velocities varying from 1900 to 5000 hr{sup -1}. Space velocity, temperature, hydrochloric acid content of the flue gas, ratio of ammonia to nitric oxide, and catalyst design all affected Hg oxidation across the SCR catalyst. The model can be used to predict the impact of coal properties, catalyst design, and operating conditions on Hg oxidation across SCRs. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Electrochemical treatment of wastewater: A case study of reduction of DNT and oxidation of chlorinated phenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, J.D.; Bunce, N.J.; Jedral, W.

    1999-07-01

    Electrochemical treatment is under consideration as a treatment option for several recalcitrant compounds. In this work the authors investigate the oxidation of chlorophenols and the reduction of nitroaromatics. In the case of chlorinated phenols, they explore the problem of anode fouling which has hampered electrolytic treatment of phenolic compounds by examining phenols differing in the extent of chlorination, according to the mechanism of oxidation at different electrode types. Linear sweep voltammograms at a Pt anode were interpreted in terms of deposition of oligomers on the anode surface. Passivation increased in parallel with the uncompensated resistance of the solution and occurred only at potentials at which water is oxidized, suggesting that the formation of the oligomer film involves attack of hydroxyl radicals on electrochemically oxidized substrate. Relative reactivities of congeners were anode-dependent, due to different mechanisms of oxidation: direct electron transfer oxidation at PbO{sub 2} and hydroxyl radical attack at SnO{sub 2} and IrO{sub 2}. Voltammetry of 2,6-dinitrotoluene (DNT) was consistent with literature values. DNT was reduced at several cathodes with the most promising result at Ni-plated Ni wire. At current densities {lt} 0.1 mA cm{sup {minus}2}, current efficiencies {gt} 50% could be achieved with 4-chlorophenol at all three anodes and for 2,6-DNT at Ni-plated Ni wire.

  11. Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to thiosulfate reduction in a biotrickling filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassarini, Chiara; Rene, Eldon R; Bhattarai, Susma; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2017-09-01

    Microorganisms from an anaerobic methane oxidizing sediment were enriched with methane gas as the substrate in a biotrickling filter (BTF) using thiosulfate as electron acceptor for 213days. Thiosulfate disproportionation to sulfate and sulfide were the dominating sulfur conversion process in the BTF and the sulfide production rate was 0.5mmoll -1 day -1 . A specific group of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), belonging to the Desulforsarcina/Desulfococcus group, was enriched in the BTF. The BTF biomass showed maximum sulfate reduction rate (0.38mmoll -1 day -1 ) with methane as sole electron donor, measured in the absence of thiosulfate in the BTF. Therefore, a BTF fed with thiosulfate as electron acceptor can be used to enrich SRB of the DSS group and activate the inoculum for anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Standard test method for measurement of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of soil

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure and related test equipment for measuring oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of soil samples removed from the ground. 1.2 The procedure in Section 9 is appropriate for field and laboratory measurements. 1.3 Accurate measurement of oxidation-reduction potential aids in the analysis of soil corrosivity and its impact on buried metallic structure corrosion rates. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Oxidation-reduction processes in ground water at Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S.A.; Braun, Christopher L.; Lee, Roger W.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of trichloroethene in ground water at the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant in Dallas, Texas, indicate three source areas of chlorinated solvents?building 1, building 6, and an off-site source west of the facility. The presence of daughter products of reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene, which were not used at the facility, south and southwest of the source areas are evidence that reductive dechlorination is occurring. In places south of the source areas, dissolved oxygen concentrations indicated that reduction of oxygen could be the dominant process, particularly south of building 6; but elevated dissolved oxygen concentrations south of building 6 might be caused by a leaking water or sewer pipe. The nitrite data indicate that denitrification is occurring in places; however, dissolved hydrogen concentrations indicate that iron reduction is the dominant process south of building 6. The distributions of ferrous iron indicate that iron reduction is occurring in places south-southwest of buildings 6 and 1; dissolved hydrogen concentrations generally support the interpretation that iron reduction is the dominant process in those places. The generally low concentrations of sulfide indicate that sulfate reduction is not a key process in most sampled areas, an interpretation that is supported by dissolved hydrogen concentrations. Ferrous iron and dissolved hydrogen concentrations indicate that ferric iron reduction is the primary oxidation-reduction process. Application of mean first-order decay rates in iron-reducing conditions for trichloroethene, dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride yielded half-lives for those solvents of 231, 347, and 2.67 days, respectively. Decay rates, and thus half-lives, at the facility are expected to be similar to those computed. A weighted scoring method to indicate sites where reductive dechlorination might be likely to occur indicated strong evidence for anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents at six sites

  14. Spectrum analysis of the reduction degree of two-step reduced graphene oxide (GO) and the polymer/r-GO composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She, Xilin, E-mail: xlshe@qdu.edu.cn [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Liu, Tongchao; Wu, Nan [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Xu, Xijin [School of Physics and Technology, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Li, Jianjiang [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Yang, Dongjiang, E-mail: d.yang@qdu.edu.cn [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Frost, Ray [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia)

    2013-12-16

    In this paper, the reduction degree of graphene oxide (GO) reduced using chemical reduction and thermal reduction methods was characterized by spectrum analysis. The optimized conditions of reducing GO were determined that the hydrazine hydrate is the best reducing agent and the appropriate thermal reduction temperature is at 240 °C. The obtained GO solution was mixed with polystyrene (PS) solution to prepare PS/r-GO composites by using two-step reduction technique under the optimized conditions. The structure and micro-morphology of GO, r-GO and PS/r-GO composites were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) respectively. It is also observed that the two-step reduction pathway is more effective than one-step reduction for improving the reduction degree of GO. Accordingly, the electric conductivity of PS/r-GO composites prepared by two-step reduction technique is as high as 21.45 S m{sup −1}, which is much higher than that of composites fabricated by one-step reduction method. The spectrum techniques will highlight new opportunities for investigating the reduction degree of GO in polymer composites. - Highlights: • Spectrum analysis on the reduction degree of GO reduced by different methods. • Determine the optimized reduction conditions of GO and polymer/r-GO composites. • The two-step reduction is more effective than one-step reduction.

  15. Spectrum analysis of the reduction degree of two-step reduced graphene oxide (GO) and the polymer/r-GO composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    She, Xilin; Liu, Tongchao; Wu, Nan; Xu, Xijin; Li, Jianjiang; Yang, Dongjiang; Frost, Ray

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the reduction degree of graphene oxide (GO) reduced using chemical reduction and thermal reduction methods was characterized by spectrum analysis. The optimized conditions of reducing GO were determined that the hydrazine hydrate is the best reducing agent and the appropriate thermal reduction temperature is at 240 °C. The obtained GO solution was mixed with polystyrene (PS) solution to prepare PS/r-GO composites by using two-step reduction technique under the optimized conditions. The structure and micro-morphology of GO, r-GO and PS/r-GO composites were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) respectively. It is also observed that the two-step reduction pathway is more effective than one-step reduction for improving the reduction degree of GO. Accordingly, the electric conductivity of PS/r-GO composites prepared by two-step reduction technique is as high as 21.45 S m −1 , which is much higher than that of composites fabricated by one-step reduction method. The spectrum techniques will highlight new opportunities for investigating the reduction degree of GO in polymer composites. - Highlights: • Spectrum analysis on the reduction degree of GO reduced by different methods. • Determine the optimized reduction conditions of GO and polymer/r-GO composites. • The two-step reduction is more effective than one-step reduction

  16. The Effect of Metal and Oxide Additions on the Reduction of Chalcocite by Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Balsalobre Casares, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Copper is widely known as a very important material due to its applications in our daily life, such as electrical devices and heating appliances. It is not so common knowledge that copper is not found in its metallic form, but mixed with other metals and elements like sulphur and oxygen. The process to obtain pure copper nowadays implies a strong impact on the environment. Regarding copper sulphides, its reduction to metallic copper is based in the oxidation of the ore products which forms...

  17. Correlating microstructure and activity for polysulfide reduction and oxidation at WS2 electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephens, Ifan E.L.; Ducati, Caterina; Fray, Derek J.

    2013-01-01

    The polysulfide reduction and oxidation activity of WS2 electrocatalysts was studied. This was undertaken with a specific view to improve the efficiency of the polysulfide-bromine redox flow battery, for large scale energy storage. Using data from the literature, it is estimated that the catalysts.......47 and 1 M NaOH, simulating the operating conditions of a half-charged polysulfide-bromine redox flow battery. The catalyst activity increased in the following order: IF-WS2

  18. Interim glycol flowsheet reduction/oxidation (redox) model for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Zamecnik, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-08

    Control of the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of glasses containing high concentrations of transition metals, such as High Level Waste (HLW) glasses, is critical in order to eliminate processing difficulties caused by overly reduced or overly oxidized melts. Operation of a HLW melter at Fe+2/ΣFe ratios of between 0.09 and 0.33, a range which is not overly oxidizing or overly reducing, helps retain radionuclides in the melt, i.e. long-lived radioactive 99Tc species in the less volatile reduced Tc4+ state, 104Ru in the melt as reduced Ru+4 state as insoluble RuO2, and hazardous volatile Cr6+ in the less soluble and less volatile Cr+3 state in the glass. The melter REDOX control balances the oxidants and reductants from the feed and from processing additives such as antifoam. Currently, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is running a formic acid-nitric acid (FN) flowsheet where formic acid is the main reductant and nitric acid is the main oxidant. During decomposition formate and formic acid releases H2 gas which requires close control of the melter vapor space flammability. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (GN) flowsheet is desired as the glycolic acid flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing. Development of an EE term for glycolic acid in the GN flowsheet is documented in this study.

  19. Laser induced self-propagating reduction and exfoliation of graphite oxide as an electrode material for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dewei; Min, Yonggang; Yu, Youhai; Peng, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Few layers graphene was obtained by laser induced self-propagating reduction. • The process is ultrafast without assistance of any high temperate/vacuum environment. • The as-prepared graphene exhibits excellent electrochemical performance. • The superior capacitive behavior is owing to its unique structures. - Abstract: Focused laser beam induced self-propagating reaction has been developed for fabrication of graphene rapidly and efficiently through simultaneous reduction and exfoliation of graphite oxide (GO) process. This chemical-free approach can realize the reduction and exfoliation at room temperature without assistance of any high temperature/vacuum environment. We found that the small sized spot can trigger an ultrafast and highly thermal transferred process by self-propagating reaction at ambient conditions. Benefiting from its high surface area and unique structure, the laser induced self-propagating reaction reduced graphene (LIG) shows excellent capacitive performance. Considering that the cost-effective and feasible process, this facile technique presented here will not only provide a promising method for production of graphene on an industrial scale, but also put forward the application graphene materials in energy storage and conversion

  20. Low-temperature thermal reduction of graphene oxide: In situ correlative structural, thermal desorption, and electrical transport measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, Alexey; Guinel, Maxime J.-F.; Muratov, Dmitry S.; Vanyushin, Vladislav O.; Wilson, Peter M.; Kolmakov, Andrei; Sinitskii, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Elucidation of the structural transformations in graphene oxide (GO) upon reduction remains an active and important area of research. We report the results of in situ heating experiments, during which electrical, mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements were carried out correlatively. The simultaneous electrical and temperature programmed desorption measurements allowed us to correlate the onset of the increase in the electrical conductivity of GO by five orders of magnitude at about 150 °C with the maxima of the rates of desorption of H2O, CO, and CO2. Interestingly, this large conductivity change happens at an intermediate level of the reduction of GO, which likely corresponds to the point when the graphitic domains become large enough to enable percolative electronic transport. We demonstrate that the gas desorption is intimately related to (i) the changes in the chemical structure of GO detected by XPS and Raman spectroscopy and (ii) the formation of nanoscopic holes in GO sheets revealed by TEM. These in situ observations provide a better understanding of the mechanism of the GO thermal reduction.

  1. Electrocatalytic Reduction-oxidation of Chlorinated Phenols using a Nanostructured Pd-Fe Modified Graphene Catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Qin; Wang, Hui; Liu, Shaolei; Pang, Lei; Bian, Zhaoyong

    2015-01-01

    A Pd-Fe modified graphene (Pd-Fe/G) catalyst was prepared by the Hummers oxidation method and bimetallic co-deposition method. The catalyst was then characterized by various characterization techniques and its electrochemical property toward the electrocatalytic reduction-oxidation of chlorinated phenols was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The results of the characterization show that the Pd-Fe/G catalyst in which the weight proportion of Pd and Fe is 1:1 has an optimal surface performance. The diameter of the Pd-Fe particles is approximately 5.2 ± 0.3 nm, with a uniform distribution on the supporting graphene. This is smaller than the Pd particles of a Pd-modified graphene (Pd/G) catalyst. The Pd-Fe/G catalyst shows a higher electrocatalytic activity than the Pd/G catalyst for reductive dechlorination when feeding with hydrogen gas. The reductive peak potentials of −0.188 V, −0.836 V and −0.956 V in the DPV curves are attributed to the dechlorination of ortho-Cl, meta-Cl, and para-Cl in 2-chlorophenol, 3-chlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol, respectively. In accordance with an analysis of the frontier orbital theory, the order of ease of dechlorination with Pd-Fe/G catalyst is 2-chlorophenol > 3-chlorophenol > 4-chlorophenol. The Pd-Fe/G catalyst has a greater activity than the Pd/G catalyst in accelerating the two-electron reduction of O_2 to H_2O_2, which is attributed to the higher current of the reduction peak at approximately −0.40 V when feeding with oxygen gas. Therefore, the Pd-Fe/G catalyst exhibits a higher electrocatalytic activity than the Pd/G catalyst for the reductive dechlorination and acceleration of the two-electron reduction of O_2 to H_2O_2.

  2. Guidelines for active spreading during in situ chemical oxidation to remediate contaminated groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of in situ chemical oxidation to remediate contaminated aquifers depends on the extent and duration of contact between the injected treatment chemical and the groundwater contaminant (the reactants). Techniques that inject and extract in the aquifer to ‘ac...

  3. Study on Oxidation or Reduction Behavior of Cs-Te-O System with Gas Conditions of Voloxidation Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Heung

    2013-01-01

    Pyroprocessing has been developed for the purpose of resolving the current spent nuclear fuel management issue and enhancing the recycle of valuable resources. Pyroprocessing has been developed with the dry technologies which are performed under high temperature conditions excluding any aqueous processes. Pyro-processes which are based on the electrochemical principles require pretreatment processes and a voloxidation process is considered as a pretreatment step for an electrolytic reduction process. Various kinds of gas conditions are applicable to the voloxidation process and the understanding of Cs behavior during the process is of importance for the analyses of waste characteristics and heat load on the overall pyroprocessing. In this study, the changes of chemical compounds with the gas conditions were calculated by analyzing gas-solid reaction behavior based on the chemical equilibria on a Cs-Te-O system. Cs 2 TeO 3 and Cs 2 TeO 4 were selected after a Tpp diagram analysis and it was confirmed that they are relatively stable under oxidizing atmospheres while it was shown that Cs and Te would be removed by volatilization under reducing atmosphere at a high temperature. This work provided basic data for predicting Cs behavior during the voloxidation process at which compounds are chemically distributed as the first stage in the pyroprocessing and it is expected that the results would be used for setting up material balances and related purposes

  4. Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James H; Schutte, Erick J; Rolfe, Sara L

    2013-05-07

    Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, and/or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01Ba, Ca, La, or K; 0.02oxides.

  5. Topotactic reduction yielding black titanium oxide nanostructures as metallic electronic conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaka, Satoshi

    2012-10-01

    Detailed analyses of reduced, single crystal, rutile-type TiO(2) via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are reported which reveal that the reduction proceeds topotactically via interstitial diffusion of Ti ions at low temperature, around 350 °C. This important finding encouraged the production of various nanostructured reduced titanium oxides from TiO(2) precursors with morphology retention, and in the process, the synthesis of black titanium oxide nanorods using TiO(2) nanorods was demonstrated. Interestingly, as opposed to the semiconductive behavior of Ti(2)O(3) synthesized at high temperature, topotactically synthesized Ti(2)O(3) exhibits metallic electrical resistance, and the value at room temperature is quite low (topotactically synthesized Ti(2)O(3). This work shows that topotactically reduced titanium oxides can have fascinating properties as well as nanostructures.

  6. Pilot-scale equipment development for lithium-based reduction of spent oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, S. D.

    1998-01-01

    An integral function of the electrometallurgical conditioning of DOE spent nuclear fuel is the standardization of waste forms. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed and is presently demonstrating the electrometallurgical conditioning of sodium-bonded metal fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor II, resulting in uranium, ceramic waste, and metal waste forms. Engineering studies are underway at ANL in support of pilot-scale equipment development, which would precondition irradiated oxide fuel and likewise demonstrate the application of electrometallurgical conditioning to such non-metallic fuels. This paper highlights the integration of proposed spent oxide fuel conditioning with existing electrometallurgical processes. Additionally, technical bases for engineering activities to support a scale up of an oxide reduction process are described

  7. Reduction of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by advanced oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju, E-mail: jjgeng@nju.edu.cn; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Ke; Ding, Lili

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the reduction of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), intI1 and 16S rRNA genes, by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely Fenton oxidation (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process. The ARGs include sul1, tetX, and tetG from municipal wastewater effluent. The results indicated that the Fenton oxidation and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process could reduce selected ARGs effectively. Oxidation by the Fenton process was slightly better than that of the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} method. Particularly, for the Fenton oxidation, under the optimal condition wherein Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} had a molar ratio of 0.1 and a H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 0.01 mol L{sup −1} with a pH of 3.0 and reaction time of 2 h, 2.58–3.79 logs of target genes were removed. Under the initial effluent pH condition (pH = 7.0), the removal was 2.26–3.35 logs. For the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process, when the pH was 3.5 with a H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 0.01 mol L{sup −1} accompanied by 30 min of UV irradiation, all ARGs could achieve a reduction of 2.8–3.5 logs, and 1.55–2.32 logs at a pH of 7.0. The Fenton oxidation and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process followed the first-order reaction kinetic model. The removal of target genes was affected by many parameters, including initial Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molar ratios, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, solution pH, and reaction time. Among these factors, reagent concentrations and pH values are the most important factors during AOPs. - Highlights: • AOPs including Fenton oxidation and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process could reduce ARGs effectively. • Fenton oxidation is slightly more effective than UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process in ARG reduction. • Removal of ARGs by AOPs follows the first-order reaction kinetic model. • Selected ARGs and 16S rRNA genes exhibit similar change trends during AOPs.

  8. Reduction of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by advanced oxidation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Ke; Ding, Lili

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the reduction of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), intI1 and 16S rRNA genes, by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely Fenton oxidation (Fe"2"+/H_2O_2) and UV/H_2O_2 process. The ARGs include sul1, tetX, and tetG from municipal wastewater effluent. The results indicated that the Fenton oxidation and UV/H_2O_2 process could reduce selected ARGs effectively. Oxidation by the Fenton process was slightly better than that of the UV/H_2O_2 method. Particularly, for the Fenton oxidation, under the optimal condition wherein Fe"2"+/H_2O_2 had a molar ratio of 0.1 and a H_2O_2 concentration of 0.01 mol L"−"1 with a pH of 3.0 and reaction time of 2 h, 2.58–3.79 logs of target genes were removed. Under the initial effluent pH condition (pH = 7.0), the removal was 2.26–3.35 logs. For the UV/H_2O_2 process, when the pH was 3.5 with a H_2O_2 concentration of 0.01 mol L"−"1 accompanied by 30 min of UV irradiation, all ARGs could achieve a reduction of 2.8–3.5 logs, and 1.55–2.32 logs at a pH of 7.0. The Fenton oxidation and UV/H_2O_2 process followed the first-order reaction kinetic model. The removal of target genes was affected by many parameters, including initial Fe"2"+/H_2O_2 molar ratios, H_2O_2 concentration, solution pH, and reaction time. Among these factors, reagent concentrations and pH values are the most important factors during AOPs. - Highlights: • AOPs including Fenton oxidation and UV/H_2O_2 process could reduce ARGs effectively. • Fenton oxidation is slightly more effective than UV/H_2O_2 process in ARG reduction. • Removal of ARGs by AOPs follows the first-order reaction kinetic model. • Selected ARGs and 16S rRNA genes exhibit similar change trends during AOPs.

  9. Self-Driven Bioelectrochemical Mineralization of Azobenzene by Coupling Cathodic Reduction with Anodic Intermediate Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Rong-Hua; Li, Wen-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Azobenzene was reduced to aniline at the cathode of an acetate-fueled MFC. • Aniline was degraded at the bioanode of a single-chamber MFC. • Cathodic reduction of azobenzene was coupled with anodic oxidation of aniline. • Self-driven, complete mineralization of azobenzene in an MFC was accomplished. - Abstract: Bioelectrochemical systems have been intensively studied as a promising technology for wastewater treatment and environment remediation. Coupling of the anodic and cathodic electrochemical reactions allows an enhanced degradation of recalcitrant organics, but external power supply is usually needed to overcome the thermodynamic barrier. In this work, we report a self-driven degradation of azobenzene in a microbial fuel cell (MFC), where the cathodic reduction of azobenzene was effectively coupled with the anodic oxidation of its reduction degradation intermediate (i.e., aniline). The anodic degradation rate of aniline, as the sole carbon source, was significantly higher than that under open-circuit conditions, suggesting a considerable bioelectrochemical oxidation of aniline. Output voltages up to 8 mV were obtained in the MFC. However, a shift of cathodic electron acceptor from oxygen to azobenzene resulted in a decreased aniline degradation rate and output voltage. The present work may provide valuable implications for development of sustainable bioelectrochemical technologies for environmental remediation

  10. Effect of plasma power on reduction of printable graphene oxide thin films on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Indrani; Mahapatra, Santosh K.; Pal, Chandana; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Ray, Asim K.

    2018-05-01

    Room temperature hydrogen plasma treatment on solution processed 300 nm graphene oxide (GO) films on flexible indium tin oxide (ITO) coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates has been performed by varying the plasma power between 20 W and 60 W at a constant exposure time of 30 min with a view to examining the effect of plasma power on reduction of GO. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic studies show that high energy hydrogen species generated in the plasma assist fast exfoliation of the oxygenated functional groups present in the GO samples. Significant decrease in the optical band gap is observed from 4.1 eV for untreated samples to 0.5 eV for 60 W plasma treated samples. The conductivity of the films treated with 60 W plasma power is estimated to be six orders of magnitude greater than untreated GO films and this enhancement of conductivity on plasma reduction has been interpreted in terms of UV-visible absorption spectra and density functional based first principle computational calculations. Plasma reduction of GO/ITO/PET structures can be used for efficiently tuning the electrical and optical properties of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) for flexible electronics applications.

  11. Evidence for single metal two electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination at uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Benedict M; Kefalidis, Christos E; Lu, Erli; Patel, Dipti; McInnes, Eric J L; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley J; Maron, Laurent; Liddle, Stephen T

    2017-12-01

    Reversible single-metal two-electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination are common fundamental reactions for transition metals that underpin major catalytic transformations. However, these reactions have never been observed together in the f-block because these metals exhibit irreversible one- or multi-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. Here we report that azobenzene oxidises sterically and electronically unsaturated uranium(III) complexes to afford a uranium(V)-imido complex in a reaction that satisfies all criteria of a single-metal two-electron oxidative addition. Thermolysis of this complex promotes extrusion of azobenzene, where H-/D-isotopic labelling finds no isotopomer cross-over and the non-reactivity of a nitrene-trap suggests that nitrenes are not generated and thus a reductive elimination has occurred. Though not optimally balanced in this case, this work presents evidence that classical d-block redox chemistry can be performed reversibly by f-block metals, and that uranium can thus mimic elementary transition metal reactivity, which may lead to the discovery of new f-block catalysis.

  12. Study on the oxidation and reduction of tungsten surface for sub-50 nm patterning process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Sung Il; Jhon, Myung S.; Min, Kyung Suk; Kim, Chan Kyu; Jung, Ho Bum; Yeom, Geun Young [Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711, South Korea and Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    The oxidation characteristics of tungsten line pattern during the carbon-based mask-layer removal process using oxygen plasmas have been investigated for sub-50 nm patterning processes, in addition to the reduction characteristics of the WO{sub x} layer formed on the tungsten line surface using hydrogen plasmas. The surface oxidation of tungsten lines during the mask layer removal process could be minimized by using low-temperature (300 K) plasma processing for the removal of the carbon-based material. Using this technique, the thickness of WO{sub x} on the tungsten line could be decreased to 25% compared to results from high-temperature processing. The WO{sub x} layer could also be completely removed at a low temperature of 300 K using a hydrogen plasma by supplying bias power to the tungsten substrate to provide a activation energy for the reduction. When this oxidation and reduction technique was applied to actual 40-nm-CD device processing, the complete removal of WO{sub x} formed on the sidewall of tungsten line could be observed.

  13. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane Coupled to Nitrite Reduction by Halophilic Marine NC10 Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chaoyang; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Yan; Pan, Yawei; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua; Hu, Baolan

    2015-08-15

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to nitrite reduction is a novel AOM process that is mediated by denitrifying methanotrophs. To date, enrichments of these denitrifying methanotrophs have been confined to freshwater systems; however, the recent findings of 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences in marine sediments suggest a possible occurrence of AOM coupled to nitrite reduction in marine systems. In this research, a marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was obtained after 20 months of enrichment. Activity testing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis were then conducted and showed that the methane oxidation activity and the number of NC10 bacteria increased correlatively during the enrichment period. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that only bacteria in group A of the NC10 phylum were enriched and responsible for the resulting methane oxidation activity, although a diverse community of NC10 bacteria was harbored in the inoculum. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that NC10 bacteria were dominant in the enrichment culture after 20 months. The effect of salinity on the marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was investigated, and the apparent optimal salinity was 20.5‰, which suggested that halophilic bacterial AOM coupled to nitrite reduction was obtained. Moreover, the apparent substrate affinity coefficients of the halophilic denitrifying methanotrophs were determined to be 9.8 ± 2.2 μM for methane and 8.7 ± 1.5 μM for nitrite. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Selective catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons as a challenge to the chemical engineer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emig, G [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Technische Chemie 1

    1977-11-01

    In the conversion of the most important chemical raw materials, natural oil and natural gas, to intermediate or end products, selective catalytic oxidation plays an increasing role. This method makes it possible in many cases to use more economical, single-step processes instead of the older multi-step processes. Using the typical example of propylene oxidation or ammonoxidation, the problems encountered by chemical engineers in the development of a heterogeneous-catalytic method of oxidation are demonstrated. The importance of systematic catalyst development is stressed. General aspects of the development of novel processes or the improvement of existing catalytic processes are discussed.

  15. Biological versus mineralogical chromium reduction: potential for reoxidation by manganese oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Elizabeth C; Chen, Lixia; Hansel, Colleen M; Krumholz, Lee R; Elwood Madden, Andrew S; Lan, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(vi), present predominantly as CrO4(2-) in water at neutral pH) is a common ground water pollutant, and reductive immobilization is a frequent remediation alternative. The Cr(iii) that forms upon microbial or abiotic reduction often co-precipitates with naturally present or added iron (Fe), and the stability of the resulting Fe-Cr precipitate is a function of its mineral properties. In this study, Fe-Cr solids were formed by microbial Cr(vi) reduction using Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain RCH1 in the presence of the Fe-bearing minerals hematite, aluminum substituted goethite (Al-goethite), and nontronite (NAu-2, Clay Minerals Society), or by abiotic Cr(vi) reduction by dithionite reduced NAu-2 or iron sulfide (FeS). The properties of the resulting Fe-Cr solids and their behavior upon exposure to the oxidant manganese (Mn) oxide (birnessite) differed significantly. In microcosms containing strain RCH1 and hematite or Al-goethite, there was significant initial loss of Cr(vi) in a pattern consistent with adsorption, and significant Cr(vi) was found in the resulting solids. The solid formed when Cr(vi) was reduced by FeS contained a high proportion of Cr(iii) and was poorly crystalline. In microcosms with strain RCH1 and hematite, Cr precipitates appeared to be concentrated in organic biofilms. Reaction between birnessite and the abiotically formed Cr(iii) solids led to production of significant dissolved Cr(vi) compared to the no-birnessite controls. This pattern was not observed in the solids generated by microbial Cr(vi) reduction, possibly due to re-reduction of any Cr(vi) generated upon oxidation by birnessite by active bacteria or microbial enzymes. The results of this study suggest that Fe-Cr precipitates formed in groundwater remediation may remain stable only in the presence of active anaerobic microbial reduction. If exposed to environmentally common Mn oxides such as birnessite in the absence of microbial activity, there is the potential

  16. Reduction of titanium dioxide and other metal oxides by electro-deoxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fray, Derek J.

    2003-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and other reactive metal compounds are reduced by more reactive metals to form pure metals. These, are expensive and time consuming processes which makes these metals very expensive. Many of these metals and alloys have excellent properties, high strength, low density and very good corrosion resistance, but their use is restricted by its high cost. Electro-deoxidation is a very simple technique where an oxide is made cathodic in a fused salt of an alkaline earth chloride. By applying a voltage, below the decomposition potential of the salt, it has been found that the cathodic reaction is the ionization of oxygen from the oxide to leave a pure metal, rather than the reduction of the ion alkaline earth ion element. Laboratory experiments have shown that this approach can be applied to the reduction of a large number of metal oxides. Another important observation is that when a mixture of oxides is used as the cathode, the product is an alloy of uniform composition. This is a considerable advantage for many alloys that are difficult to prepare using conventional technology. (Original)

  17. A New Direction for Biomining: Extraction of Metals by Reductive Dissolution of Oxidized Ores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin B. Hallberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomining, the biotechnology that uses microorganisms to extract metals from ores and concentrates, is currently used exclusively for processing reduced ores and mine wastes. Metals of economic value also occur extensively in oxidized ores, such as nickel laterites. While these are not amenable to oxidative dissolution, the ferric iron minerals they contain can, in theory, be disrupted by iron reduction, causing associated metals to be released. We have harnessed the ability of the facultatively anaerobic, acidophilic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferroooxidans to couple the oxidation of elemental sulphur to the reduction of ferric iron in the goethite fraction of a limonitic nickel ore at 30 °C. Nickel and other metals (Co, Cr and Mn were effectively solubilised and maintained in solution due to the low pH (1.8 of the leach liquor. The results highlight the potential for the bioprocessing of oxidized, iron-rich ores using an approach that is energy-saving and environmentally-benign compared with metallurgical processes currently applied to the extraction of Ni from lateritic ores.

  18. Regulation of Ca2+ release from mitochondria by the oxidation-reduction state of pyridine nucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, Albert L.; Vercesi, Anibal; Bababunmi, Enitan A.

    1978-01-01

    Mitochondria from normal rat liver and heart, and also Ehrlich tumor cells, respiring on succinate as energy source in the presence of rotenone (to prevent net electron flow to oxygen from the endogenous pyridine nucleotides), rapidly take up Ca2+ and retain it so long as the pyridine nucleotides are kept in the reduced state. When acetoacetate is added to bring the pyridine nucleotides into a more oxidized state, Ca2+ is released to the medium. A subsequent addition of a reductant of the pyridine nucleotides such as β-hydroxybutyrate, glutamate, or isocitrate causes reuptake of the released Ca2+. Successive cycles of Ca2+ release and uptake can be induced by shifting the redox state of the pyridine nucleotides to more oxidized and more reduced states, respectively. Similar observations were made when succinate oxidation was replaced as energy source by ascorbate oxidation or by the hydrolysis of ATP. These and other observations form the basis of a hypothesis for feedback regulation of Ca2+-dependent substrate- or energy-mobilizing enzymatic reactions by the uptake or release of mitochondrial Ca2+, mediated by the cytosolic phosphate potential and the ATP-dependent reduction of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides by reversal of electron transport. Images PMID:25436

  19. Isolation of microorganisms involved in reduction of crystalline iron(III) oxides in natural environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Tomoyuki; Aoyagi, Tomo; Itoh, Hideomi; Narihiro, Takashi; Oikawa, Azusa; Suzuki, Kiyofumi; Ogata, Atsushi; Friedrich, Michael W; Conrad, Ralf; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of crystalline Fe(III) oxides is one of the most important electron sinks for organic compound oxidation in natural environments. Yet the limited number of isolates makes it difficult to understand the physiology and ecological impact of the microorganisms involved. Here, two-stage cultivation was implemented to selectively enrich and isolate crystalline iron(III) oxide reducing microorganisms in soils and sediments. Firstly, iron reducers were enriched and other untargeted eutrophs were depleted by 2-years successive culture on a crystalline ferric iron oxide (i.e., goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, or magnetite) as electron acceptor. Fifty-eight out of 136 incubation conditions allowed the continued existence of microorganisms as confirmed by PCR amplification. High-throughput Illumina sequencing and clone library analysis based on 16S rRNA genes revealed that the enrichment cultures on each of the ferric iron oxides contained bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria (mainly Geobacteraceae), followed by Firmicutes and Chloroflexi, which also comprised most of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified. Venn diagrams indicated that the core OTUs enriched with all of the iron oxides were dominant in the Geobacteraceae while each type of iron oxides supplemented selectively enriched specific OTUs in the other phylogenetic groups. Secondly, 38 enrichment cultures including novel microorganisms were transferred to soluble-iron(III) containing media in order to stimulate the proliferation of the enriched iron reducers. Through extinction dilution-culture and single colony isolation, six strains within the Deltaproteobacteria were finally obtained; five strains belonged to the genus Geobacter and one strain to Pelobacter. The 16S rRNA genes of these isolates were 94.8-98.1% identical in sequence to cultured relatives. All the isolates were able to grow on acetate and ferric iron but their physiological characteristics differed considerably in

  20. Reversible solid oxide fuel cells (R-SOFCs) with chemically stable proton-conducting oxides

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei; Boulfrad, Samir; Traversa, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Proton-conducting oxides offer a promising way of lowering the working temperature of solid oxide cells to the intermediate temperate range (500 to 700. °C) due to their better ionic conductivity. In addition, the application of proton

  1. Nitrate reduction to nitrite, nitric oxide and ammonia by gut bacteria under physiological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Tiso

    Full Text Available The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in

  2. Reduction of mixed Mn-Zr oxides: in situ XPS and XRD studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulavchenko, O A; Vinokurov, Z S; Afonasenko, T N; Tsyrul'nikov, P G; Tsybulya, S V; Saraev, A A; Kaichev, V V

    2015-09-21

    A series of mixed Mn-Zr oxides with different molar ratios Mn/Zr (0.1-9) have been prepared by coprecipitation of manganese and zirconium nitrates and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and BET methods. It has been found that at concentrations of Mn below 30 at%, the samples are single-phase solid solutions (MnxZr1-xO2-δ) based on a ZrO2 structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that manganese in these solutions exists mainly in the Mn(4+) state on the surface. An increase in Mn content mostly leads to an increase in the number of Mn cations in the structure of solid solutions; however, a part of the manganese cations form Mn2O3 and Mn3O4 in the crystalline and amorphous states. The reduction of these oxides with hydrogen was studied by a temperature-programmed reduction technique, in situ XRD, and near ambient pressure XPS in the temperature range from 100 to 650 °C. It was shown that the reduction of the solid solutions MnxZr1-xO2-δ proceeds via two stages. During the first stage, at temperatures between 100 and 500 °C, the Mn cations incorporated into the solid solutions MnxZr1-xO2-δ undergo partial reduction. During the second stage, at temperatures between 500 and 700 °C, Mn cations segregate on the surface of the solid solution. In the samples with more than 30 at% Mn, the reduction of manganese oxides was observed: Mn2O3 → Mn3O4 → MnO.

  3. Nitrate Reduction to Nitrite, Nitric Oxide and Ammonia by Gut Bacteria under Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiso, Mauro; Schechter, Alan N.

    2015-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in which the microbiome

  4. Effects of Oxygen Partial Pressure on Oxidation Behavior of CMnSi TRIP Steel in an Oxidation-Reduction Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong-Hwan; Huh, Joo-Youl [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Soo; Kim, Jong-Sang [POSCO Technical Research Laboratories, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    An oxidation-reduction scheme is an alternative approach for improving the galvanizability of advanced high-strength steel in the continuous hot-dip galvanizing process. Here, we investigated the effect of oxygen partial pressure (Po{sub 2}) on the oxidation behavior of a transformation-induced plasticity steel containing 1.5 wt% Si and 1.6 wt% Mn during heating to and holding for 60 s at 700 ℃ under atmospheres with various Po{sub 2} values. Irrespective of Po{sub 2}, a thin amorphous Si-rich layer of Si-Mn-O was formed underneath the Fe oxide scale (a Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} bilayer) in the heating stage. In contrast to Si, Mn tended to segregate at the scale surface as (Fe,Mn){sub 2}O{sub 3}. The multilayered structure of (Fe,Mn){sub 2}O{sub 3}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/amorphous Si-Mn-O remained even after extended oxidizing at 700 ℃ for 60 s. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was the dominantly growing oxide phase in the scale. The enhanced growth rate of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with increasing Po{sub 2} resulted in the formation of more Kirkendall voids in the amorphous Si-rich layer and a less Mn segregation at the scale surface. The mechanisms underlying the absence of FeO and the formation of Kirkendall voids are discussed.

  5. Morphology evolution and nanostructure of chemical looping transition metal oxide materials upon redox processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Lang; Cheng, Zhuo; Guo, Mengqing; Fan, Jonathan A.; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2017-01-01

    Transition metal are heavily used in chemical looping technologies because of their high oxygen carrying capacity and high thermal reactivity. These oxygen activities result in the oxide formation and oxygen vacancy formation that affect the nanoscale crystal phase and morphology within these materials and their subsequent bulk chemical behavior. In this study, two selected earlier transition metals manganese and cobalt as well as two selected later transition metals copper and nickel that are important to chemical looping reactions are investigated when they undergo cyclic redox reactions. We found Co microparticles exhibited increased CoO impurity presence when oxidized to Co_3O_4 upon cyclic oxidation; CuO redox cycles prefer to be limited to a reduced form of Cu_2O and an oxidized form of CuO; Mn microparticles were oxidized to a mixed phases of MnO and Mn_3O_4, which causes delamination during oxidation. For Ni microparticles, a dense surface were observed during the redox reaction. The atomistic thermodynamics methods and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out to elucidate the effect of oxygen dissociation and migration on the morphological evolution of nanostructures during the redox processes. Our results indicate that the earlier transition metals (Mn and Co) tend to have stronger interaction with O_2 than the later transition metals (Ni and Cu). Also, our modified Brønsted−Evans−Polanyi (BEP) relationship for reaction energies and total reaction barriers reveals that reactions of earlier transition metals are more exergonic and have lower oxygen dissociation barriers than those of later transition metals. In addition, it was found that for these transition metal oxides the oxygen vacancy formation energies increase with the depth. The oxide in the higher oxidation state of transition metal has lower vacancy formation energy, which can facilitate forming the defective nanostructures. The fundamental understanding of these metal

  6. Fractionation of sulfur isotopes in the chemical and biochemical oxidation of sulfide to sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maass, I.; Wetzel, K.; Weise, G.; Heyer, J.

    1983-01-01

    The behaviour of sulfur isotopes in the chemical and biochemical oxidation of marcasite (FeS 2 ) to sulfate has been investigated in rest and shaker cultures at 30 0 C. The microbiological oxidation was carried out using a mixed culture of Thiobacillus. The results show a considerably faster formation of sulfate in the biochemical oxidation in comparison with the chemical oxidation. Isotope analyses of the formed sulfates indicate no or only very small isotope fractionations depending on experimental conditions. The highest enrichment of 32 S in the sulfate is 1.7 per mille. In accordance with the results of other authors it is concluded that in both chemical and biochemical weathering of sedimentary sulfides resulting in the formation of sulfates isotope effects are not of importance. (author)

  7. Determination of kinetics and stoichiometry of chemical sulfide oxidation in wastewater of sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2003-01-01

    A method for determination of kinetics and stoichiometry of chemical sulfide oxidation by dissolved oxygen (DO) in wastewater is presented. The method was particularly developed to investigate chemical sulfide oxidation in wastewater of sewer networks at low DO concentrations. The method is based...... be considered constant during the course of the experiments although intermediates accumulated. This was explained by an apparent slow oxidation rate of the intermediates. The method was capable of determining kinetics and stoichiometry of chemical sulfide oxidation at DO concentrations lower than 1 g of O2 m...... on continuous measurement of the reactants allowing the kinetics to be determined at varying reactant concentrations during the course of the experiment. The kinetics determined was simulated by a rate equation. The precision of the method was assessed in terms of the standard deviation of the kinetic...

  8. Infrared reduction, an efficient method to control the non-linear optical property of graphene oxide in femtosecond regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Maiti, R.; Saha, S.; Das, A. C.; Mondal, S.; Ray, S. K.; Bhaktha, S. B. N.; Datta, P. K.

    2016-04-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) has been prepared by modified Hummers method and it has been reduced using an IR bulb (800-2000 nm). Both as grown GO and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) have been characterized using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Raman spectra shows well documented Dband and G-band for both the samples while blue shift of G-band confirms chemical functionalization of graphene with different oxygen functional group. The XPS result shows that the as-prepared GO contains 52% of sp2 hybridized carbon due to the C=C bonds and 33% of carbon atoms due to the C-O bonds. As for RGO, increment of the atomic % of the sp2 hybridized carbon atom to 83% and rapid decrease in atomic % of C=O bonds confirm an efficient reduction with infrared radiation. UV-Visible absorption spectrum also confirms increment of conjugation with increased reduction. Non-linear optical properties of both GO and RGO are measured using single beam open aperture Z-Scan technique in femtosecond regime. Intensity dependent nonlinear phenomena are observed. Depending upon the intensity, both saturable absorption and two photon absorption contribute to the non-linearity of both the samples. Saturation dominates at low intensity (~ 127 GW/cm2) while two photon absorption become prominent at higher intensities (from 217 GW/cm2 to 302 GW/cm2). We have calculated the two-photon absorption co-efficient and saturation intensity for both the samples. The value of two photon absorption co-efficient (for GO~ 0.0022-0.0037 cm/GW and for RGO~ 0.0128-0.0143 cm/GW) and the saturation intensity (for GO~57 GW/cm2 and for RGO~ 194GW/cm2) is increased with reduction. Increase in two photon absorption coefficient with increasing intensity can also suggest that there may be multi-photon absorption is taking place.

  9. Reduction of excess sludge production in sequencing batch reactor through incorporation of chlorine dioxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Guanghua [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration area, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Guangzhou municipal engineering design and research institute, Guangzhou, 510060 (China); Sui Jun [Guangzhou municipal engineering design and research institute, Guangzhou, 510060 (China); Shen Huishan; Liang Shukun [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration area, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China); He Xiangming; Zhang Minju; Xie Yizhong; Li Lingyun [Nanhai Limited Liability Development Company, Foshan, 528200 (China); Hu Yongyou, E-mail: ppyyhu@scut.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration area, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China) and State Key Lab of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology; Guangzhou, 510640 (China)

    2011-08-15

    In this study, chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) instead of chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) was proposed to minimize the formation of chlorine-based by-products and was incorporated into a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for excess sludge reduction. The results showed that the sludge disintegrability of ClO{sub 2} was excellent. The waste activated sludge at an initial concentration of 15 g MLSS/L was rapidly reduced by 36% using ClO{sub 2} doses of 10 mg ClO{sub 2}/g dry sludge which was much lower than that obtained using Cl{sub 2} based on similar sludge reduction efficiency. Maximum sludge disintegration was achieved at 10 mg ClO{sub 2}/g dry sludge for 40 min. ClO{sub 2} oxidation can be successfully incorporated into a SBR for excess sludge reduction without significantly harming the bioreactor performance. The incorporation of ClO{sub 2} oxidation resulted in a 58% reduction in excess sludge production, and the quality of the effluent was not significantly affected.

  10. Reduction of excess sludge production in sequencing batch reactor through incorporation of chlorine dioxide oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghua; Sui Jun; Shen Huishan; Liang Shukun; He Xiangming; Zhang Minju; Xie Yizhong; Li Lingyun; Hu Yongyou

    2011-01-01

    In this study, chlorine dioxide (ClO 2 ) instead of chlorine (Cl 2 ) was proposed to minimize the formation of chlorine-based by-products and was incorporated into a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for excess sludge reduction. The results showed that the sludge disintegrability of ClO 2 was excellent. The waste activated sludge at an initial concentration of 15 g MLSS/L was rapidly reduced by 36% using ClO 2 doses of 10 mg ClO 2 /g dry sludge which was much lower than that obtained using Cl 2 based on similar sludge reduction efficiency. Maximum sludge disintegration was achieved at 10 mg ClO 2 /g dry sludge for 40 min. ClO 2 oxidation can be successfully incorporated into a SBR for excess sludge reduction without significantly harming the bioreactor performance. The incorporation of ClO 2 oxidation resulted in a 58% reduction in excess sludge production, and the quality of the effluent was not significantly affected.

  11. VOC removal and deodorization of effluent gases from an industrial plant by photo-oxidation, chemical oxidation, and ozonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domeño, Celia; Rodríguez-Lafuente, Angel; Martos, J M; Bilbao, Rafael; Nerín, Cristina

    2010-04-01

    The efficiency of photo-oxidation, chemical oxidation by sodium hypochlorite, and ozonization for the industrial-scale removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and odors from gaseous emissions was studied by applying these treatments (in an experimental system) to substances passing through an emission stack of a factory producing maize derivatives. Absorption and ozonization were the most efficient treatment, removing 75% and 98% of VOCs, respectively, while photo-oxidation only removed about 59%. The emitted chemical compounds and odors were identified and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (in full-scan mode). In addition to presenting the results, their implications for selecting optimal processes for treating volatile emissions are discussed.

  12. Accelerated creep in solid oxide fuel cell anode supports during reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Makowska, Malgorzata Grazyna; Greco, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks during operation, the stress field in the stack must be known. During operation the stress field will depend on time as creep processes relax stresses. The creep of reduced Ni-YSZ anode support at operating conditions has been...... studied previously. In this work a newly discovered creep phenomenon taking place during the reduction is reported. This relaxes stresses at a much higher rate (∼ x104) than creep during operation. The phenomenon was studied both in three-point bending and uniaxial tension. Differences between the two...... measurements could be explained by newly observed stress promoted reduction. Finally, samples exposed to a small tensile stress (∼ 0.004 MPa) were observed to expand during reduction, which is in contradiction to previous literature. These observations suggest that release of internal residual stresses between...

  13. Studies on the Production of NdFeB Alloy by Calciothermic Reduction of Neodymium Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charoensri, Apisara

    2003-06-01

    Neodymium-Iron-Boron (NdFeB) is a class of permanent magnets having the highest energy product (BH max ). It has been used in various electronic devices of small size and light weight. This research is to study the preparation of Neodymium-Iron-Boron alloy by calciothermic reduction of neodymium oxide mixed with iron and iron-boron. The reduction process essentially involves the compaction of the charge mixture with calcium metal and then heating at 900-1200οC in argon atmosphere. The results show that charge blend compaction, temperature and time of reaction are important parameters of the process. It is found that at proper conditions, magnetic phase structure of Neodymium-Iron-Boron alloy can be prepared satisfactory although the alloy produced from the reduction contains higher impurities of oxygen and calcium than the alloy produced from the conventional method using Nd metal

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of tin oxide: fundamentals and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, A.M.B. van; Chae, Y.; McDaniel, A.H.; Allendorf, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Tin oxide thin layers have very beneficial properties such as a high transparency for visible light and electrical conductivity making these coatings suitable for a wide variety of applications, such as solar cells, and low-emissivity coatings for architectural glass windows. Each application

  15. Direct Partial Oxidation of Natural Gas to Liquid Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Lund

    2007-01-01

    Direkte delvis oxidation af naturgas til flydende kemikalier er en attraktiv industriel proces, hvor naturgas omdannes til stoffer; primært methanol (CH3OH) som let kan transporteres over store afstande. Omdannelsen sker i en simpel et-trinsproces under højt tryk, lave forbrændingstemperaturer, s...

  16. Effects of Low-temperature Pre-oxidation on the Titanomagnetite Ore Structure and Reduction Behaviors in a Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetoro, Ajala Adewole; Sun, Haoyan; He, Shengyi; Zhu, Qingshan; Li, Hongzhong

    2018-04-01

    With respect to high efficient utilization of low-grade iron ore resource, the behavior of low-temperature "973 K to 1123 K (700 °C to 850 °C)" oxidation, on the phase transition of SA TTM ore (South African titanomagnetite), and its effect on subsequent reduction was investigated. The results showed that hematite and rutile are the oxidation product below 1048 K (775 °C), while pseudobrookite is the stable phase above 1073 K (800 °C). With the increase in temperature and oxidation time, there is a competitive relationship between the amount of hematite and pseudobrookite generated. The reduction efficiency of SA TTM was significantly improved by oxidation pretreatment, primarily due to the dissociation of titania-ferrous oxides to more easily reducible hematite. But the generation of pseudobrookite phase decreases the amount of free hematite available for reduction, which weakens the improvement effect of pre-oxidation. The equilibrium relationship between the metallization degree and the gas reduction potential for TTM ore with pre-oxidation treatment has been built. Finally, the reduction metallization degree for the first and second step can be improved averagely by 16.67 and 3.45 pct, respectively, for sample pre-oxidized at 1098 K (825 °C) for 15 and 90 minutes, while 26.96 and 7.4 pct, improvement is achieved for sample pre-oxidized at a lower temperature of 1048 K (775 °C) for 120 minutes.

  17. Synthesis of Nickel and Nickel Hydroxide Nano powders by Simplified Chemical Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tientong, J.; Garcia, S.; Thurber, C.R.; Golden, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    Nickel nano powders were synthesized by a chemical reduction of nickel ions with hydrazine hydrate at ph ∼ 12.5. Sonication of the solutions created a temperature of 54-65 °C to activate the reduction reaction of nickel nanoparticles. The solution ph affected the composition of the resulting nanoparticles. Nickel hydroxide nanoparticles were formed from an alkaline solution (ph ∼10) of nickel-hydrazine complexed by dropwise titration. X-ray diffraction of the powder and the analysis of the resulting Williamson-Hall plots revealed that the particle size of the powders ranged from 12 to 14 nm. Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone into the synthesis decreased the nickel nanoparticle size to approximately 7 nm. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the particles were in the nanometer range. The structure of the synthesized nickel and nickel hydroxide nanoparticles was identified by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  18. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of gold nanobipyramids prepared by a chemical reduction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Vo Ke Thanh; Huynh, Trong Phat; Nguyen, Dang Giang; Nguyen, Hoang Phuong Uyen; Lam, Quang Vinh; Huynh, Thanh Dat

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanobipyramids (NBPs) have attracted much attention because they have potential for applications in smart sensing devices, such as medical diagnostic equippments. This is due to the fact that they show more advantageous plasmonic properties than other gold nanostructures. We describe a chemical reduction method for synthesizing NBPs using conventional heating with ascorbic acid reduction and cetyltrimethylamonium bromide (CTAB) + AgNO_3 as capping agents. The product was characterized by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results showed that gold nanoparticles were formed with bipyramid shape (tip-to-tip distance of 88.4 ± 9.4 nm and base length of 29.9 ± 3.2 nm) and face-centered-cubic crystalline structure. Optimum parameters for preparation of NBPs are also found. (paper)

  19. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of gold nanobipyramids prepared by a chemical reduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Ngo, Vo Ke; Phat Huynh, Trong; Giang Nguyen, Dang; Phuong Uyen Nguyen, Hoang; Lam, Quang Vinh; Dat Huynh, Thanh

    2015-12-01

    Gold nanobipyramids (NBPs) have attracted much attention because they have potential for applications in smart sensing devices, such as medical diagnostic equippments. This is due to the fact that they show more advantageous plasmonic properties than other gold nanostructures. We describe a chemical reduction method for synthesizing NBPs using conventional heating with ascorbic acid reduction and cetyltrimethylamonium bromide (CTAB) + AgNO3 as capping agents. The product was characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results showed that gold nanoparticles were formed with bipyramid shape (tip-to-tip distance of 88.4 ± 9.4 nm and base length of 29.9 ± 3.2 nm) and face-centered-cubic crystalline structure. Optimum parameters for preparation of NBPs are also found.

  20. Development and Validation of Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Reduction Scheme for Large-Scale Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Hiew Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin

    2014-01-01

    This work is an extension to a previously reported work on chemical kinetic mechanism reduction scheme for large-scale mechanisms. Here, Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) was added as a criterion of data source for mechanism reduction instead of using only auto-ignition condition. As a result......) simulations were performed to study the spray combustion phenomena within a constant volume bomb. Both non-reacting and reacting conditions were applied in this study. Liquid and vapor penetration lengths were replicated for non-reacting diesel spray. For reacting diesel spray, both ignition delay and lift......-off length were simulated. The simulation results were then compared to the experimental data of Sandia National Laboratories and No. 2 Diesel Fuel (D2) was designated as the reference fuel. Both liquid and vapor penetrations for non-reacting condition were well-matched, while ignition delay was advanced...

  1. Recovery of calcium from the effluent of direct oxide reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, P.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Moore, J.J.; Averill, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the production of plutonium by Direct Oxide Reduction [DOR] process using calcium generates significant amount of contaminated waste as calcium oxide saturated calcium chloride salt mix with calcium oxide content of up to 15 wt. pct. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated slat mix [CaCl 2 + 15 wt. pct. CaO] is being carried out to election calcium, which can be recycled to the DOR rector along with the calcium chloride salt or may be used in-situ in an combined DOR and electrowinning process. The technology will resolve a major contaminated waste disposal problem, besides improving the cost and process efficiency in radioactive metal production. The process is being optimized in terms of the calcium solubility, cell temperature, current density and cell design to maximize the current efficiency. Scattered information is available regarding the solubility of calcium in calcium chloride salt in the present of calcium oxide. The solubility has also been found to depend on the use of graphite as the anode material. A porous ceramic sheath is being used around the anode to prevent the dissolution of electrowon calcium as oxide or carbonate and to prevent the contamination of salt by the anodic carbon. The electrode reactions are affected by the electrolyte composition and its viscosity which varies with time in this process and, therefore, electrochemical impedance is being measured to understand this time-dependent mechanisms

  2. The Semireduced Mechanism for Nitric Oxide Reduction by Non-Heme Diiron Complexes: Modeling Flavodiiron Nitric Oxide Reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Corey J; Speelman, Amy L; Kupper, Claudia; Demeshko, Serhiy; Meyer, Franc; Shanahan, James P; Alp, E Ercan; Hu, Michael; Zhao, Jiyong; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2018-02-21

    Flavodiiron nitric oxide reductases (FNORs) are a subclass of flavodiiron proteins (FDPs) capable of preferential binding and subsequent reduction of NO to N 2 O. FNORs are found in certain pathogenic bacteria, equipping them with resistance to nitrosative stress, generated as a part of the immune defense in humans, and allowing them to proliferate. Here, we report the spectroscopic characterization and detailed reactivity studies of the diiron dinitrosyl model complex [Fe 2 (BPMP)(OPr)(NO) 2 ](OTf) 2 for the FNOR active site that is capable of reducing NO to N 2 O [Zheng et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 4902-4905]. Using UV-vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and spectro-electrochemistry, we show that one reductive equivalent is in fact sufficient for the quantitative generation of N 2 O, following a semireduced reaction mechanism. This reaction is very efficient and produces N 2 O with a first-order rate constant k > 10 2 s -1 . Further isotope labeling studies confirm an intramolecular N-N coupling mechanism, consistent with the rapid time scale of the reduction and a very low barrier for N-N bond formation. Accordingly, the reaction proceeds at -80 °C, allowing for the direct observation of the mixed-valent product of the reaction. At higher temperatures, the initial reaction product is unstable and decays, ultimately generating the diferrous complex [Fe 2 (BPMP)(OPr) 2 ](OTf) and an unidentified ferric product. These results combined offer deep insight into the mechanism of NO reduction by the relevant model complex [Fe 2 (BPMP)(OPr)(NO) 2 ] 2+ and provide direct evidence that the semireduced mechanism would constitute a highly efficient pathway to accomplish NO reduction to N 2 O in FNORs and in synthetic catalysts.

  3. Production and reduction of nitrous oxide in agricultural and forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K; Chen, G; Struwe, S; Kjøller, A

    2000-06-01

    A soil-water slurry experiment was conducted to study the potentials of N2O production and reduction in denitrification of agricultural and beech forest soils in Denmark. The effects of nitrate and ammonium additions on denitrification were also investigated. The forest soil showed a higher denitrification potential than the agricultural soil. However, N2O reduction potential of the agricultural soil was higher than the beech forest soil, shown by the ratio of N2O/N2 approximately 0.11 and 3.65 in the agricultural and the beech forest soils, respectively. Both nitrate and ammonium additions stimulated the N2O production in the two soils, but reduced the N2O reduction rates in the agricultural soil slurries. In contrast to the effect on the agricultural soil, nitrate reduced the N2O reduction rate in the beech forest soil, while ammonium showed a stimulating effect on the N2O reduction activity. After one week incubation, all of the N2O produced was reduced to N2 in the agricultural soil when nitrate was still present. Nitrous oxide reduction in the beech forest soil occurred only when nitrate almost disappeared. The different nitrate inhibitory effect on the N2O reduction activity in the two soils was due to the difference in soil pH. Inhibition of nitrate on N2O reduction was significant under acidic condition. Consequently, soil could serve as a sink of atmospheric N2O under the conditions of anaerobic, pH near neutral and low nitrate content.

  4. Flexible graphene/carbon nanotube hybrid papers chemical-reduction-tailored by gallic acid for high-performance electrochemical capacitive energy storages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Zhou, Chao; Hu, Nantao; Hu, Jing; Hong, Min; Zhang, Liying; Zhang, Yafei

    2018-03-01

    Mechanically robust graphene papers with both high gravimetric and volumetric capacitances are desired for high-performance energy storages. However, it's still a challenge to tailor the structure of graphene papers in order to meet this requirement. In this work, a kind of chemical-reduction-tailored mechanically-robust reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrid paper has been reported for high-performance electrochemical capacitive energy storages. Gallic acid (GA), as an excellent reducing agent, was used to reduce graphene oxide. Through vacuum filtration of gallic acid reduced graphene oxide (GA-rGO) and carboxylic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) aqueous suspensions, mechanically robust GA-rGO/MWCNTs hybrid papers were obtained. The resultant hybrid papers showed high gravimetric capacitance of 337.6 F g-1 (0.5 A g-1) and volumetric capacitance of 151.2 F cm-3 (0.25 A cm-3). In addition, the assembled symmetric device based on the hybrid papers exhibited high gravimetric capacitance of 291.6 F g-1 (0.5 A g-1) and volumetric capacitance of 136.6 F cm-3 (0.25 A cm-3). Meanwhile, it exhibited excellent rate capability and cycling stability. Above all, this chemical reduction tailoring technique and the resultant high-performance GA-rGO/MWCNTs hybrid papers give an insight for designing high-performance electrodes and hold a great potential in the field of energy storages.

  5. Nitric-glycolic flowsheet reduction/oxidation (redox) model for the defense waste processing facility (DWPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Trivelpiece, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ramsey, W. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-14

    Control of the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of glasses containing high concentrations of transition metals, such as High Level Waste (HLW) glasses, is critical in order to eliminate processing difficulties caused by overly reduced or overly oxidized melts. Operation of a HLW melter at Fe+2/ΣFe ratios of between 0.09 and 0.33, retains radionuclides in the melt and thus the final glass. Specifically, long-lived radioactive 99Tc species are less volatile in the reduced Tc4+ state as TcO2 than as NaTcO4 or Tc2O7, and ruthenium radionuclides in the reduced Ru4+ state are insoluble RuO2 in the melt which are not as volatile as NaRuO4 where the Ru is in the +7 oxidation state. Similarly, hazardous volatile Cr6+ occurs in oxidized melt pools as Na2CrO4 or Na2Cr2O7, while the Cr+3 state is less volatile and remains in the melt as NaCrO2 or precipitates as chrome rich spinels. The melter REDOX control balances the oxidants and reductants from the feed and from processing additives such as antifoam.

  6. Chemical nature of catalysts of oxide nanoparticles in environment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    alloy or cobalt nanoparticles having fcc structure, but the rate of reduction is relatively less in ... dissociation of H2 on the metallic clusters once their size is .... 20 wt.% substitution of cobalt/nickel by copper in the aque- ous saturated solution of ...

  7. Recycling and Resistance of Petrogenic Particulate Organic Carbon: Implications from A Chemical Oxidation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Li, G.; Ji, J.

    2013-12-01

    Petrogenic particulate organic carbon (OCpetro) represents a small fraction of photosynthetic carbon which escapes pedogenic-petrogenic degradation and gets trapped in the lithosphere. Exhumation and recycling of OCpetro are of significant importance in the global carbon cycle because OCpetro oxidation represents a substantial carbon source to the atmosphere while the re-burial of OCpetro in sediment deposits has no net effect. Though studies have investigated various behaviors of OCpetro in the surface environments (e.g., riverine mobilization, marine deposition, and microbial remineralization), less attention has been paid to the reaction kinetics and structural transformations during OCpetro oxidation. Here we assess the OCpetro-oxidation process based on a chemical oxidation method adopted from soil studies. The employed chemical oxidation method is considered an effective simulation of natural oxidation in highly oxidative environments, and has been widely used in soil studies to isolate the inert soil carbon pool. We applied this chemical method to the OCpetro-enriched black shale samples from the middle-lower Yangtze (Changjiang) basin, China, and performed comprehensive instrumental analyses (element analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum, and Raman spectrum). We also conducted step-oxidizing experiments following fixed time series and monitored the reaction process in rigorously controlled lab conditions. In this work, we present our experiment results and discuss the implications for the recycling and properties of OCpetro. Particulate organic carbon concentration of black shale samples before and after oxidation helps to quantify the oxidability of OCpetro and constrain the preservation efficiency of OCpetro during fluvial erosion over large river basin scales. FTIR and Raman analyses reveal clear structural variations on atomic and molecular levels. Results from the step-oxidizing experiments provide detailed information about the reaction

  8. Improved Understanding of In Situ Chemical Oxidation Soil Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    followed by a mixture of nitric and perchloric acids . This sequence uses precise heat ramping and holding cycles which takes the sample to dryness...release different kinds of products (e.g., benzenepolycarboxylic acids , phenolic acids , and fatty acids ) with varying resistance to the attack of... oxalate might be the only organic product in the oxidation of humic and non-humic soils by permanganate or even hydrogen peroxide (Harada and Inoko

  9. Chemical oxidation of cable insulating oil contaminated soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinlan Xu,; Pancras, T.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.

    2011-01-01

    Leaking cable insulating oil is a common source of soil contamination of high-voltage underground electricity cables in many European countries. In situ remediation of these contaminations is very difficult, due to the nature of the contamination and the high concentrations present. Chemical

  10. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO 2 (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO 2+x . Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  11. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  12. The Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Produced by Chemical Reduction of Silver Salt Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Budi Harmani; Dewi Sondari; Agus Haryono

    2008-01-01

    Described in this research are the synthesis of silver nanoparticle produced by chemical reduction of silver salt (silver nitrate AgNO 3 ) solution. As a reducer, sodium citrate (C 6 H 5 O 7 Na 3 ) was used. Preparation of silver colloid is done by using chemical reduction method. In typical experiment 150 ml of 1.10 -3 M AgNO 3 solution was heated with temperature variation such as 90, 100, 110 degree of Celsius. To this solution 15 ml of 1 % trisodium citrate was added into solution drop by drop during heating. During the process, solution was mixed vigorously. Solution was heated until colour's change is evident (pale yellow solution is formed). Then it was removed from the heating element and stirred until cooled to room temperature. Experimental result showed that diameter of silver nanoparticles in colloid solution is about 28.3 nm (Ag colloid, 90 o C); 19.9 nm (Ag colloid, 100 o C)and 26.4 nm (Ag colloid, 110 o C). Characterization of the silver nanoparticle colloid conducted by using UV-Vis Spectroscopy, Particles Size Analyzer (PSA) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) indicate the produced structures of silver nanoparticles. (author)

  13. Reduction Dynamics of Doped Ceria, Nickel Oxide, and Cermet Composites Probed Using In Situ Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Robert C; Shearing, Paul R; Brightman, Edward; Brett, Dan J L; Brandon, Nigel P; Cohen, Lesley F

    2016-01-01

    The redox properties of gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) and nickel oxide (NiO) composite cermets underpin the operation of solid oxide electrochemical cells. Although these systems have been widely studied, a full comprehension of the reaction dynamics at the interface of these materials is lacking. Here, in situ Raman spectroscopic monitoring of the redox cycle is used to investigate the interplay between the dynamic and competing processes of hydrogen spillover and water dissociation on the doped ceria surface. In order to elucidate these mechanisms, the redox process in pure CGO and NiO is studied when exposed to wet and dry hydrogen and is compared to the cermet behavior. In dry hydrogen, CGO reduces relatively rapidly via a series of intermediate phases, while NiO reduces via a single-step process. In wet reducing atmospheres, however, the oxidation state of pure CGO is initially stabilized due to the dissociation of water by reduced Ce(III) and subsequent incorporation of oxygen into the structure. In the reduction process involving the composite cermet, the close proximity of the NiO improves the efficiency and speed of the composite reduction process. Although NiO is already incorporated into working cells, these observations suggest direct routes to further improve cell performance.

  14. Production of SmCo5 alloy by calciothermic reduction of samarium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, T.S.; Gupta, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    Among the established permanent magnets, SmCo 5 magnet occupies the foremost position as it offers a unique combination of high energy product, coercivity and curie temperature. The SmCo 5 magnets are thus extensively used for high field applications. These are also best suited for use in environments where high demagnetizing field and high temperature are operative. Also, for applications where high performance and miniaturization are the over-riding considerations, the choice again falls on SmCo 5 magnets. The main deterrent to the widespread use of SmCo 5 magnet is its high cost. Both samarium and cobalt metals are high priced, and the magnets prepared from their directly melted alloy are thus naturally very expensive. An alternate process involving calcium reduction of their oxide intermediates has, therefore, been studied and the alloy prepared by this process has been evaluated and found satisfactory for magnet production. The process essentially involves compaction of the charge mix containing samarium oxide, cobalt oxide (or metal) and calcium metal and reduction of the charge compact at 1000-1300 degrees C in hydrogen atmosphere, followed by water and acid leaching, drying and classification

  15. Simultaneous Fe(III) reduction and ammonia oxidation process in Anammox sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Huang, Yong; Liu, Heng-Wei; Wu, Chuan; Bi, Wei; Yuan, Yi; Liu, Xin

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, there have been a number of reports on the phenomenon in which ferric iron (Fe(III)) is reduced to ferrous iron [Fe(II)] in anaerobic environments, accompanied by simultaneous oxidation of ammonia to NO 2 - , NO 3 - , or N 2. However, studies on the relevant reaction characteristics and mechanisms are rare. Recently, in research on the effect of Fe(III) on the activity of Anammox sludge, excess ammonia oxidization has also been found. Hence, in the present study, Fe(III) was used to serve as the electron acceptor instead of NO 2 - , and the feasibility and characteristics of Anammox coupled to Fe(III) reduction (termed Feammox) were investigated. After 160days of cultivation, the conversion rate of ammonia in the reactor was above 80%, accompanied by the production of a large amount of NO 3 - and a small amount of NO 2 - . The total nitrogen removal rate was up to 71.8%. Furthermore, quantities of Fe(II) were detected in the sludge fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and denaturated gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses further revealed that in the sludge, some Anammox bacteria were retained, and some microbes were enriched during the acclimatization process. We thus deduced that in Anammox sludge, Fe(III) reduction takes place together with ammonia oxidation to NO 2 - and NO 3 - along with the Anammox process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Photoactivity of N-doped ZnO nanoparticles in oxidative and reductive reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jéssica A.; Nogueira, André E.; Gonçalves, Maria C. P.; Paris, Elaine C.; Ribeiro, Caue; Poirier, Gael Y.; Giraldi, Tania R.

    2018-03-01

    N-doped ZnO is a prospective material for photocatalytic reactions. However, only oxidative paths are well investigated in the literature. This paper describes a comparative study about ZnO and ZnO:N potential for oxidative and reductive reactions, probed by rhodamine B dye photodegradation and CO2 photoreduction. The materials were prepared by the polymeric precursor method, using urea as a nitrogen source, and different heat treatments were used to observe their effects on surface decontamination, crystallinity, particle sizes and shapes, and photocatalytic performance. ZnO and ZnO:N presented a wurtzite crystalline structure and nanometric-scale particles. Samples submitted to higher temperatures showed lower specific surface areas, but higher crystallinity and lower contents of species adsorbed on their surfaces. On the other hand, the photocatalysts annealed in shorter times presented smaller crystallite sizes and lower crystallinity. These factors influenced the photoactivity in both conditions, i.e., oxidation and reduction reactions, under the ultraviolet and visible light, indicating that structural factors influenced the adequate charge separation and consequent photocatalytic activity since the as-synthesized samples were versatile photocatalysts in both redox reactions.

  17. Small cell experiments for electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides to uranium metal using fluoride salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Adcock, P.W.; Coroneos, A.C.; Hendrix, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide was proposed for the preparation of uranium metal feed for the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. A laboratory cell of 25-cm ID was operated to obtain additional information in areas important to design and operation of a pilot plant cell. Reproducible test results and useful operating and control procedures were demonstrated. About 20 kg of uranium metal of acceptable purity were prepared. A good supply of dissolved UO 2 feed at the anode is the most important controlling requirement for efficient cell operation. A large fraction of the cell current is nonproductive in that it does not produce a metal product nor consume carbon anodes. All useful test conditions gave some reduction of UF 4 to produce CF 4 in addition to the reduction of UO 2 , but the fraction of metal from the reduction of UF 4 can be decreased by increasing the concentration of dissolved UO 2 . Operation of large continuous cells would probably be limited to current efficiencies of less than 60 pct, and more than 20 pct of the metal would result from the reduction of UF 4

  18. Enhanced In Situ Chemical Oxidation Using Surfactants and Shear Thinning Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, S.; Sadeghi, S.; Cerda, C. C.; Espinoza, I.; Schultz, P. B.; Miller, C. T.

    2017-12-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is an attractive approach for the remediation of recalcitrant contaminants, due to the fact that target compounds are degraded in place, precluding the need for ex situ treatment or disposal. However, field applications of ISCO approaches have been plagued by "rebound" of contaminant concentrations in groundwater weeks to months after treatment. The cause of rebound at a given site may vary, but is typically associated with back-diffusion from finer grained, low permeability units or the presence of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) that are incompletely degraded during treatment. Modifications to traditional ISCO methods have been proposed to overcome these challenges, including the use of shear-thinning polymers to improve delivery of oxidants to low permeability units and the addition of surfactants to improve dissolution of contaminants from NAPLs. In this work, we investigate the application of these approaches to the oxidation of manufactured gas plant (MGP) tars—NAPLs composed primarily of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We conducted experiments to determine the mutual impact of each chemical component on the physical and chemical properties of the overall system. Specifically, experiments were designed to: determine the kinetics and overall effectiveness of contaminant-oxidant reactions for multiple oxidant-activator combinations; screen several common surfactants in terms of their ability to increase MGP tar solubility and their compatibility with oxidant systems; measure the impact of oxidants and surfactants on the rheology of several common polymer additives; and assess the effect of surfactants and polymers on the consumption of oxidants/activators and on the kinetics of contaminant-oxidant reactions. The results of this work provide insight into the chemical and physical mechanisms associated with enhanced ISCO approaches and an improved basis with which to model and design ISCO applications at both the lab

  19. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  20. Chemical synthesis, characterization and evaluation of antimicrobial properties of Cu and its oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshalagae Motlatle, Abesach, E-mail: AMotlatle@csir.co.za; Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani, E-mail: skpillai@csir.co.za; Rudolf Scriba, Manfred, E-mail: MRscriba@csir.co.za; Sinha Ray, Suprakas, E-mail: Rsuprakas@csir.co.za [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, DST/CSIR Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials (South Africa)

    2016-10-15

    Cu nanoparticles were synthesized using low-temperature aqueous reduction method at pH 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 in presence of ascorbic acid and polyvinylpyrrolidone. The nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction techniques. Results demonstrated a strong dependence of synthesis pH on the size, shape, chemical composition and structure of Cu nanoparticles. While lower pH conditions of 3 and 5 produced Cu{sup 0}, higher pH levels (more than 7) led to the formation of Cu{sub 2}O/CuO nanoparticles. The reducing capacity of ascorbic acid, capping efficiency of PVP and the resulting particle sizes were strongly affected by solution pH. The results of in vitro disk diffusion tests showed excellent antimicrobial activity of Cu{sub 2}O/CuO nanoparticles against a mixture of bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), indicating that the size as well as oxidation state of Cu contributes to the antibacterial efficacy. The results indicate that varying synthesis pH is a strategy to tailor the composition, structure and properties of Cu nanoparticles.

  1. Retention and chemical speciation of uranium in an oxidized wetland sediment from the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dien; Seaman, John C.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Jiang, De-Tong; Chen, Ning; Lin, Jinru; Arthur, Zachary; Pan, Yuanming; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2014-05-01

    Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH <4 and pH >8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

  2. Reduction and Immobilization of Potassium Permanganate on Iron Oxide Catalyst by Fluidized-Bed Crystallization Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Xia Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A manganese immobilization technology in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR was developed by using a waste iron oxide (i.e., BT-3 as catalyst which is a by-product from the fluidized-bed Fenton reaction (FBR-Fenton. It was found that BT-3 could easily reduce potassium permanganate (KMnO4 to MnO2. Furthermore, MnO2 could accumulate on the surface of BT-3 catalyst to form a new Fe-Mn oxide. Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the KMnO4-reduction mechanism, including the effect of KMnO4 concentration, BT-3 dosage, and operational solution pH. The results showed that the pH solution was a significant factor in the reduction of KMnO4. At the optimum level, pHf 6, KMnO4 was virtually reduced in 10 min. A pseudo-first order reaction was employed to describe the reduction rate of KMnO4.

  3. Reduction of nitric oxide level enhances the radiosensitivity of hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, Wael; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Mobaraki, Abdulelah; Yoshida, Yukari; Noda, Shinei; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (E-TKI) resistance has emerged as an important clinical issue. To overcome this resistance, researchers have examined different modalities, either for use as a monotherapy or in combination with E-TKI therapy. In the present study, we investigated whether a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) levels affects the radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. A549 and H3255 NSCLC cells were examined. They were subjected to hypoxic conditions and monotherapy, or combined therapy using radiation and N G -monomethyl- L -arginine, monoacetate (LNMMA). Reductions in nitric oxide levels enhanced the radiosensitivity of both cell lines and significantly reduced the expression of both hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and EGFR in H3255 cells compared to A549 cells. Since NO is significantly associated with cell metabolism, we measured the levels of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 (PDK-1), reactive oxygen species, and oxygen and observed that the expression of PDK-1 was significantly reduced. This reduction was seen simultaneously after the silencing of HIF-1α; however, not following LNMMA treatment. The oxygen concentration was significantly increased in the treated cells, and their viability decreased in parallel. Reactive oxygen species were decreased after LNMMA and radiation treatment. Adding EGFR-TKI to cells with reduced NO levels further suppressed cell viability when combined with radiation. This study suggests that a reduction in the NO level might substantially overcome the radioresistance of mutant NSCLC cells. (author)

  4. Using glucosamine as a reductant to prepare reduced graphene oxide and its nanocomposites with metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chuanbao; Wang Xingrui; Liu Yu; Wang Wei; Wynn, Jeanne; Gao Jianping

    2012-01-01

    A green and facile approach of producing reduced graphene oxide (RGO) by the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) with a monosaccharide medicine glucosamine (GL) was developed. The effect of several factors on the GO reduction, including pH, the weight ratio of GL/GO, and the reaction temperature was studied. The deoxygenation process was monitored with UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy, and the reducing degree of GO was determined with X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Au nanoparticles (about 3.3–4.2 nm) (AuNPs)/RGO and Ag nanoparticles (about 6 nm) (AgNPs)/RGO materials were prepared in two different ways using the above reduction method. They were then used to catalyze the Suzuki–Miyaura coupling reaction of phenyl halide and phenylboronic acid to produce biphenyl, and the highest yield of biphenyl for AuNPs/RGO was 99 %. In addition, the AgNPs/RGO materials exhibited a surface-enhanced Raman scattering effect, and some RGO peaks were enhanced. This approach opens up a new, practical, and green reducing method to prepare RGO for large-scale practical application.

  5. Metal porphyrin intercalated reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite utilized for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyan Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report a simple and facile self-assembly method to successfully fabricate cationic metal porphyrin –MtTMPyP (Mt= Cobalt (II, Manganese (III, or Iron (III; TMPyP = 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (N-methylpyridinium-4-yl porphyrin intercalated into the layer of graphene oxide (GO by the cooperative effects of electrostatic and π–π stacking interaction between positively charged metal porphyrin and negatively charged GO sheets. Followed by reduction with hydrazine vapor, a series of novel 2D MtTMPyP/rGOn were fabricated. The as-prepared 2D hybrids were fully characterized and tested as non-noble metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR in an alkaline medium. The MtTMPyP/rGOn hybrids, especially CoTMPyP/rGO5, demonstrated an improved electrocatalytic activity for ORR and a number of exchanged electrons close to 4-electron reaction, increased stability and excellent tolerance to methanol, showing a potential alternative catalyst for ORR in fuel cells and air batteries. Keywords: Metal porphyrin, Reduced graphene oxide, Intercalation, Oxygen reduction reaction, Catalyst

  6. Oxidative Addition and Reductive Elimination at Main-Group Element Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Terry; Nikonov, Georgii I

    2018-04-11

    Oxidative addition and reductive elimination are key steps in a wide variety of catalytic reactions mediated by transition-metal complexes. Historically, this reactivity has been considered to be the exclusive domain of d-block elements. However, this paradigm has changed in recent years with the demonstration of transition-metal-like reactivity by main-group compounds. This Review highlights the substantial progress achieved in the past decade for the activation of robust single bonds by main-group compounds and the more recently realized activation of multiple bonds by these elements. We also discuss the significant discovery of reversible activation of single bonds and distinct examples of reductive elimination at main-group element centers. The review consists of three major parts, starting with oxidative addition of single bonds, proceeding to cleavage of multiple bonds, and culminated by the discussion of reversible bond activation and reductive elimination. Within each subsection, the discussion is arranged according to the type of bond being cleaved or formed and considers elements from the left to the right of each period and down each group of the periodic table. The majority of results discussed in this Review come from the past decade; however, earlier reports are also included to ensure completeness.

  7. A detailed study on the transition from the blocked to the superparamagnetic state of reduction-precipitated iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, K.; Bodnar, W.; Mix, T.; Schell, N.; Fulda, G.; Woodcock, T.G.; Burkel, E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by salt-assisted solid-state chemical precipitation method with alternating fractions of the ferric iron content. The physical properties of the precipitated nanoparticles mainly consisting of magnetite were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, high energy X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. With particle sizes ranging from 16.3 nm to 2.1 nm, a gradual transition from the blocked state to the superparamagnetic state was observed. The transition was described as a dependence of the ferric iron content used during the precipitation. Composition, mean particle size, coercivity, saturation polarisation, as well as hyperfine interaction parameters and their evolution were studied systematically over the whole series of iron oxide nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Study of superparamagnetic transition of magnetite varying ferric iron content. • Coercivity is mainly influenced by the particle size. • Saturation polarisation influenced by the goethite content and the particle size. • Number of vacancies tend to increase with increasing ferric iron content. • Fe 3 O 4 B-sites are stronger effected by the reduction of particle size than A-sites.

  8. Factors determining the activity of catalysts of various chemical types in the oxidation of hydrogen. I. Oxidation and isotope exchange of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgikh, L.Y.; Golodets, G.I.; Il'chenko, N.I.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of data on the kinetics of the reaction 2H 2 + O 2 = 2H 2 O isotope exchange H 2 + D 2 = 2HD under the conditions of oxidative catalysis, and the kinetic isotope effect, a mechanism is proposed for the oxidation of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide. At low temperatures the reaction proceeds according to a mechanism of alternating reduction-reoxidation of the surface with the participation of hydrogen adsorbed in molecular form; at increased temperature and low P 02 /P /SUB H2/ ratios, a significant contribution to the observed rate is made by a mechanism including dissociative chemisorption of hydrogen

  9. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang eShi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III] (oxy(hydroxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 has evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway for transferring electrons across the entire cell envelope to the surface of extracellular Fe(III oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt that is proposed to oxidize the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons across the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. Functioning as terminal reductases, the outer membrane and decaheme c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III oxides. MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III. Although our understanding of the Mtr pathway is still far from complete, it is the best characterized microbial pathway used for extracellular electron exchange. Characterizations of the Mtr pathway have made significant contributions to the molecular understanding of microbial reduction of Fe(III oxides.

  10. Ozonization, Amination and Photoreduction of Graphene Oxide for Triiodide Reduction Reaction: An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Hongyu; Ren, Suzhen; Shi, Yantao; Song, Xuedan; Yang, Ying; Guo, Yanan; An, Yonglin; Hao, Ce

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes a mild and environmentally-friendly approach to prepare a highly efficient functional graphene (termed as AGO-hv) using methods of ozone oxidation, solvothermal synthesis, and photoreduction. The use of ozone oxidation in the first step can effectively increase the interlaminar distance between graphite oxide sheets, and create active sites for nucleophilic attack on the epoxy carbon from ammonia. The amino groups were successfully grafted on the surface of graphene as evidenced by the amidation reaction, with a maximum nitrogen content of 10.46 wt% and a C/N molar ratio of 8.46. After further photoreduction of the aminated graphite oxide (AGO), the residual oxygen functionalities, such as C-OH, were effectively removed and the conductivity of the graphene sheet was further recovered. The dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.51% based on AGO-hv counter electrode (CE), close to that of Pt counterpart (7.79%). The experimental results indicated that the amidation and photoreduction processes were significantly facilitated by the initial ozonization of graphene oxide, and this process significantly improved the electrochemical activity and the conductivity of graphene oxide. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed that AGO-hv had the lowest ionization energy (a better electron-donating ability) and also suitable binding energy with I atoms as well. The combination of ozonization, amination and photoreduction is an efficient route to obtain electrocatalysts with desired compositional distributions and performance for triiodide reduction reaction in DSCs.

  11. Oxidation of CO and Methanol on Pd-Ni Catalysts Supported on Different Chemically-Treated Carbon Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Calderón

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, palladium-nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers were synthesized, with metal contents close to 25 wt % and Pd:Ni atomic ratios near to 1:2. These catalysts were previously studied in order to determine their activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction. Before the deposition of metals, the carbon nanofibers were chemically treated in order to generate oxygen and nitrogen groups on their surface. Transmission electron microscopy analysis (TEM images revealed particle diameters between 3 and 4 nm, overcoming the sizes observed for the nanoparticles supported on carbon black (catalyst Pd-Ni CB 1:2. From the CO oxidation at different temperatures, the activation energy Eact for this reaction was determined. These values indicated a high tolerance of the catalysts toward the CO poisoning, especially in the case of the catalysts supported on the non-chemically treated carbon nanofibers. On the other hand, apparent activation energy Eap for the methanol oxidation was also determined finding—as a rate determining step—the COads diffusion to the OHads for the catalysts supported on carbon nanofibers. The results here presented showed that the surface functional groups only play a role in the obtaining of lower particle sizes, which is an important factor in the obtaining of low CO oxidation activation energies.

  12. Progress and Perspective of Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction for Renewable Carbonaceous Fuels and Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Hu, Yi; Ma, Lianbo; Zhu, Guoyin; Wang, Yanrong; Xue, Xiaolan; Chen, Renpeng; Yang, Songyuan; Jin, Zhong

    2018-01-01

    The worldwide unrestrained emission of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) has caused serious environmental pollution and climate change issues. For the sustainable development of human civilization, it is very desirable to convert CO 2 to renewable fuels through clean and economical chemical processes. Recently, electrocatalytic CO 2 conversion is regarded as a prospective pathway for the recycling of carbon resource and the generation of sustainable fuels. In this review, recent research advances in electrocatalytic CO 2 reduction are summarized from both experimental and theoretical aspects. The referred electrocatalysts are divided into different classes, including metal-organic complexes, metals, metal alloys, inorganic metal compounds and carbon-based metal-free nanomaterials. Moreover, the selective formation processes of different reductive products, such as formic acid/formate (HCOOH/HCOO - ), monoxide carbon (CO), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane (CH 4 ), ethylene (C 2 H 4 ), methanol (CH 3 OH), ethanol (CH 3 CH 2 OH), etc. are introduced in detail, respectively. Owing to the limited energy efficiency, unmanageable selectivity, low stability, and indeterminate mechanisms of electrocatalytic CO 2 reduction, there are still many tough challenges need to be addressed. In view of this, the current research trends to overcome these obstacles in CO 2 electroreduction field are summarized. We expect that this review will provide new insights into the further technique development and practical applications of CO 2 electroreduction.

  13. Effect of different chemical modification of carbon nanotubes for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitru, Anca; Mamlouk, M.; Scott, K.

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of oxygen on chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) electrodes in 1 M KOH solution has been studied using the rotating ring disc electrode (RDE). The surface modification of CNTs has been estimated by XPS and Raman spectroscopy. The effect of different oxygen functionalities on the surface of carbon nanotube for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is considered in terms of the number of electrons (n) involved. Electrochemical studies indicate that in the case of the modification of CNTs with citric acid and diazonium salts the n values were close to two in the measured potential range, and the electrochemical reduction is limited to the production of peroxide as the final product. In the case of the modification of carbon nanotubes with peroxymonosulphuric acid, in the measured potential range, the n value is close to 4 indicating the four-electron pathway for the ORR. By correlating ORR measurements with the XPS analysis, we propose that the increase in electrocatalytic activity towards the ORR, for CNT can be attributed to the increase in C-O groups on the surface of CNTs after modification with peroxymonosulphuric acid

  14. Model reduction of multiscale chemical langevin equations: a numerical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Vassilios; Contou-Carrere, Marie-Nathalie; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2009-01-01

    Two very important characteristics of biological reaction networks need to be considered carefully when modeling these systems. First, models must account for the inherent probabilistic nature of systems far from the thermodynamic limit. Often, biological systems cannot be modeled with traditional continuous-deterministic models. Second, models must take into consideration the disparate spectrum of time scales observed in biological phenomena, such as slow transcription events and fast dimerization reactions. In the last decade, significant efforts have been expended on the development of stochastic chemical kinetics models to capture the dynamics of biomolecular systems, and on the development of robust multiscale algorithms, able to handle stiffness. In this paper, the focus is on the dynamics of reaction sets governed by stiff chemical Langevin equations, i.e., stiff stochastic differential equations. These are particularly challenging systems to model, requiring prohibitively small integration step sizes. We describe and illustrate the application of a semianalytical reduction framework for chemical Langevin equations that results in significant gains in computational cost.

  15. Imprinted Oxide and MIP/Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors †.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Adeel; Dickert, Franz L

    2018-04-20

    The oxides of transition, post-transition and rare-earth metals have a long history of robust and fast responsive recognition elements for electronic, optical, and gravimetric devices. A wide range of applications successfully utilized pristine or doped metal oxides and polymer-oxide hybrids as nanostructured recognition elements for the detection of biologically relevant molecules, harmful organic substances, and drugs as well as for the investigative process control applications. An overview of the selected recognition applications of molecularly imprinted sol-gel phases, metal oxides and hybrid nanomaterials composed of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) and metal oxides is presented herein. The formation and fabrication processes for imprinted sol-gel layers, metal oxides, MIP-coated oxide nanoparticles and other MIP/oxide nanohybrids are discussed along with their applications in monitoring bioorganic analytes and processes. The sensor characteristics such as dynamic detection range and limit of detection are compared as the performance criterion and the miniaturization and commercialization possibilities are critically discussed.

  16. Dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite in the bovine rumen: nitrous oxide production and effect of acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, H F; Tiedje, J M

    1981-03-01

    15N tracer methods and gas chromatography coupled to an electron capture detector were used to investigate dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite by the rumen microbiota of a fistulated cow. Ammonium was the only 15N-labeled end product of quantitative significance. Only traces of nitrous oxide were detected as a product of nitrate reduction; but in experiments with nitrite, up to 0.3% of the added nitrogen accumulated as nitrous oxide, but it was not further reduced. Furthermore, when 13NO3- was incubated with rumen microbiota virtually no [13N]N2 was produced. Acetylene partially inhibited the reduction of nitrite to ammonium as well as the formation of nitrous oxide. It is suggested that in the rumen ecosystem nitrous oxide is a byproduct of dissimilatory nitrite reduction to ammonium rather than a product of denitrification and that the latter process is absent from the rumen habitat.

  17. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment.

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J W; Jagersma, Christian G; Khadem, Ahmad F; Stams, Alfons J M; Lens, Piet N L

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria

  18. Reduced-graphene-oxide supported tantalum-based electrocatalysts: Controlled nitrogen doping and oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyun; Mo, Qijie; Guo, Yulin; Chen, Nana; Gao, Qingsheng

    2018-03-01

    Controlled N-doping is feasible to engineer the surface stoichiometry and the electronic configuration of metal-oxide electrocatalysts toward efficient oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). Taking reduced graphene oxide supported tantalum-oxides (TaOx/RGO) for example, this work illustrated the controlled N-doping in both metal-oxides and carbon supports, and the contribution to the improved ORR activity. The active N-doped TaOx/RGO electrocatalysts were fabricated via SiO2-assisted pyrolysis, in which the amount and kind of N-doping were tailored toward efficient electrocatalysis. The optimal nanocomposites showed a quite positive half-wave potential (0.80 V vs. RHE), the excellent long-term stability, and the outstanding tolerance to methanol crossing. The improvement in ORR was reasonably attributed to the synergy between N-doped TaOx and N-doped RGO. Elucidating the importance of controlled N-doping for electrocatalysis, this work will open up new opportunities to explore noble-metal-free materials for renewable energy applications.

  19. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrate, nitrous oxide, and ammonium by Pseudomonas putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, M O

    1985-10-01

    The influence of redox potential on dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was investigated on a marine bacterium, Pseudomonas putrefaciens. Nitrate was consumed (3.1 mmol liter-1), and ammonium was produced in cultures with glucose and without sodium thioglycolate. When sodium thioglycolate was added, nitrate was consumed at a lower rate (1.1 mmol liter-1), and no significant amounts of nitrite or ammonium were produced. No growth was detected in glucose media either with or without sodium thioglycolate. When grown on tryptic soy broth, the production of nitrous oxide paralleled growth. In the same medium, but with sodium thioglycolate, nitrous oxide was first produced during growth and then consumed. Acetylene caused the nitrous oxide to accumulate. These results and the mass balance calculations for different nitrogen components indicate that P. putrefaciens has the capacity to dissimilate nitrate to ammonium as well as to dinitrogen gas and nitrous oxide (denitrification). The dissimilatory pathway to ammonium dominates except when sodium thioglycolate is added to the medium.

  20. Reductive Stress in Inflammation-Associated Diseases and the Pro-Oxidant Effect of Antioxidant Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Pérez-Torres

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Reductive stress (RS is the counterpart oxidative stress (OS, and can occur in response to conditions that shift the redox balance of important biological redox couples, such as the NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH, and GSH/GSSG, to a more reducing state. Overexpression of antioxidant enzymatic systems leads to excess reducing equivalents that can deplete reactive oxidative species, driving the cells to RS. A feedback regulation is established in which chronic RS induces OS, which in turn, stimulates again RS. Excess reducing equivalents may regulate cellular signaling pathways, modify transcriptional activity, induce alterations in the formation of disulfide bonds in proteins, reduce mitochondrial function, decrease cellular metabolism, and thus, contribute to the development of some diseases in which NF-κB, a redox-sensitive transcription factor, participates. Here, we described the diseases in which an inflammatory condition is associated to RS, and where delayed folding, disordered transport, failed oxidation, and aggregation are found. Some of these diseases are aggregation protein cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, muscular dystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, and metabolic syndrome, among others. Moreover, chronic consumption of antioxidant supplements, such as vitamins and/or flavonoids, may have pro-oxidant effects that may alter the redox cellular equilibrium and contribute to RS, even diminishing life expectancy.

  1. Chemically synthesized metal-oxide-metal segmented nanowires with high ferroelectric response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herderick, Edward D; Padture, Nitin P [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Emergent Materials, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Polomoff, Nicholas A; Huey, Bryan D, E-mail: padture.1@osu.edu [Department of Chemical, Materials, and Biomolecular Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2010-08-20

    A chemical synthesis method is presented for the fabrication of high-definition segmented metal-oxide-metal (MOM) nanowires in two different ferroelectric oxide systems: Au-BaTiO{sub 3}-Au and Au-PbTiO{sub 3}-Au. This method entails electrodeposition of segmented nanowires of Au-TiO{sub 2}-Au inside anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, followed by topotactic hydrothermal conversion of the TiO{sub 2} segments into BaTiO{sub 3} or PbTiO{sub 3} segments. Two-terminal devices from individual MOM nanowires are fabricated, and their ferroelectric properties are measured directly, without the aid of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) methods. The MOM nanowire architecture provides high-quality end-on electrical contacts to the oxide segments, and allows direct measurement of properties of nanoscale volume, strain-free oxide segments. Unusually high ferroelectric responses, for chemically synthesized oxides, in these MOM nanowires are reported, and are attributed to the lack of residual strain in the oxides. The ability to measure directly the active properties of nanoscale volume, strain-free oxides afforded by the MOM nanowire architecture has important implications for fundamental studies of not only ferroelectric nanostructures but also nanostructures in the emerging field of multiferroics.

  2. Chemically synthesized metal-oxide-metal segmented nanowires with high ferroelectric response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herderick, Edward D; Padture, Nitin P; Polomoff, Nicholas A; Huey, Bryan D

    2010-01-01

    A chemical synthesis method is presented for the fabrication of high-definition segmented metal-oxide-metal (MOM) nanowires in two different ferroelectric oxide systems: Au-BaTiO 3 -Au and Au-PbTiO 3 -Au. This method entails electrodeposition of segmented nanowires of Au-TiO 2 -Au inside anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, followed by topotactic hydrothermal conversion of the TiO 2 segments into BaTiO 3 or PbTiO 3 segments. Two-terminal devices from individual MOM nanowires are fabricated, and their ferroelectric properties are measured directly, without the aid of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) methods. The MOM nanowire architecture provides high-quality end-on electrical contacts to the oxide segments, and allows direct measurement of properties of nanoscale volume, strain-free oxide segments. Unusually high ferroelectric responses, for chemically synthesized oxides, in these MOM nanowires are reported, and are attributed to the lack of residual strain in the oxides. The ability to measure directly the active properties of nanoscale volume, strain-free oxides afforded by the MOM nanowire architecture has important implications for fundamental studies of not only ferroelectric nanostructures but also nanostructures in the emerging field of multiferroics.

  3. Chemical linkage to injected tissues is a distinctive property of oxidized avidin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita De Santis

    Full Text Available We recently reported that the oxidized avidin, named AvidinOX®, resides for weeks within injected tissues as a consequence of the formation of Schiff's bases between its aldehyde groups and tissue protein amino groups. We also showed, in a mouse pre-clinical model, the usefulness of AvidinOX for the delivery of radiolabeled biotin to inoperable tumors. Taking into account that AvidinOX is the first oxidized glycoprotein known to chemically link to injected tissues, we tested in the mouse a panel of additional oxidized glycoproteins, with the aim of investigating the phenomenon. We produced oxidized ovalbumin and mannosylated streptavidin which share with avidin glycosylation pattern and tetrameric structure, respectively and found that neither of them linked significantly to cells in vitro nor to injected tissues in vivo, despite the presence of functional aldehyde groups. The study, extended to additional oxidized glycoproteins, showed that the in vivo chemical conjugation is a distinctive property of the oxidized avidin. Relevance of the high cationic charge of avidin into the stable linkage of AvidinOX to tissues is demonstrated as the oxidized acetylated avidin lost the property. Plasmon resonance on matrix proteins and cellular impedance analyses showed in vitro that avidin exhibits a peculiar interaction with proteins and cells that allows the formation of highly stable Schiff's bases, after oxidation.

  4. Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation of a cavity solar reactor for the reduction of cerium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villafan-Vidales, H.I.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C.A.; Dehesa-Carrasco, U. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco s/n, Col. Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Romero-Paredes, H. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No.186, Col. Vicentina, A.P. 55-534, Mexico D.F 09340 (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    Radiative heat transfer in a solar thermochemical reactor for the thermal reduction of cerium oxide is simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The directional characteristics and the power distribution of the concentrated solar radiation that enters the cavity is obtained by carrying out a Monte Carlo ray tracing of a paraboloidal concentrator. It is considered that the reactor contains a gas/particle suspension directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation. The suspension is treated as a non-isothermal, non-gray, absorbing, emitting, and anisotropically scattering medium. The transport coefficients of the particles are obtained from Mie-scattering theory by using the optical properties of cerium oxide. From the simulations, the aperture radius and the particle concentration were optimized to match the characteristics of the considered concentrator. (author)

  5. A consistent reaction scheme for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssens, Ton V.W.; Falsig, Hanne; Lundegaard, Lars Fahl

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, the standard and fast selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 are described in a complete catalytic cycle, that is able to produce the correct stoichiometry, while only allowing adsorption and desorption of stable molecules. The standard SCR reaction is a coupling of the ac...... for standard SCR. Finally, the role of a nitrate/nitrite equilibrium and the possible in uence of Cu dimers and Brønsted sites are discussed, and an explanation is offered as to how a catalyst can be effective for SCR, while being a poor catalyst for NO oxidation to NO2....... spectroscopy (FTIR). A consequence of the reaction scheme is that all intermediates in fast SCR are also part of the standard SCR cycle. The calculated activation energy by density functional theory (DFT) indicates that the oxidation of an NO molecule by O2 to a bidentate nitrate ligand is rate determining...

  6. Surface Selective Oxide Reduction During the Intercritical Annealing of Medium Mn Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Kyoung Rae; Cho, Lawrence; Oh, Jong Han; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kang, Ki Cheol; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2017-08-01

    Third generation advanced high-strength steels achieve an excellent strength-ductility balance using a cost-effective alloy composition. During the continuous annealing of medium Mn steel, the formation of an external selective oxide layer of MnO has a negative impact on the coating quality after galvanizing. A procedure to reduce the selective oxide was therefore developed. It involves annealing in the temperature range of 1073 K to 1323 K (800 °C to 1050 °C) in a HNx gas atmosphere. Annealing at higher temperatures and the use of larger H2 volume fractions are shown to make the gas atmosphere reducing with respect to MnO. The reduction of the surface MnO layer was observed by SEM, GDOES, and cross-sectional TEM analysis.

  7. In situ reduction of as-prepared γ-Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbus, Pelle Gorm; Ahlburg, Jakob; Christensen, Mogens

    -ray diffraction measurement. The as-prepared maghemite nanoparticles were synthesized by the continuous decomposition of solutes in supercritical hydrothermal flow synthesis [3, 4]. The reagent used was ferric ammonium citrate (C6H8O7•xFe(III)•yNH3) that under hydrothermal flow synthesis decomposes into the γ......-iron oxide Fe2O3. The reduction of maghemite to body centered cubic (BCC) iron does not go through a detectable intermediate state.1.Jensen, K.M., et al., Mechanisms for iron oxide formation under hydrothermal conditions: an in situ total scattering study. ACS nano, 2014. 8(10): p. 10704-10714.2.Andersen, H...

  8. High production volume chemical Amine Oxide [C8-C20] category environmental risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderson, Hans; Tibazarwa, Caritas; Greggs, William

    2009-01-01

    and personal care products. Given the lack of persistence or bioaccumulation, and the low likelihood of these chemicals partitioning to soil, the focus of the environmental assessment is on the aquatic environment. In the United States, the E-FAST model is used to estimate effluent concentrations in the United......An environmental assessment of amine oxides has been conducted under the OECD SIDS High Production Volume (HPV) Program via the Global International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) Amine Oxides Consortium. Amine oxides are primarily used in conjunction with surfactants in cleaning...... States from manufacturing facilities and from municipal facilities resulting from consumer product uses. Reasonable worst-case ratios of predicted environmental concentration (PEC) to predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) range from 0.04 to 0.003, demonstrating that these chemicals are a low risk...

  9. Development of chemically engineered porous metal oxides for phosphate removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, Paul; McManamon, Colm; Hanrahan, John P.; Copley, Mark P.; Holmes, Justin D.; Morris, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the application of ordered mesoporous silica (OMS) doped with various metal oxides (Zr, Ti, Fe and Al) were studied for the removal of (ortho) phosphate ions from water by adsorption. The materials were characterized by means of N 2 physisorption (BET), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The doped materials had surface areas between 600 and 700 m 2 g -1 and exhibited pore sizes of 44-64 A. Phosphate adsorption was determined by measurement of the aqueous concentration of orthophosphate using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy before and after extraction. The effects of different metal oxide loading ratios, initial concentration of phosphate solution, temperature and pH effects on the efficiency of phosphate removal were investigated. The doped mesoporous materials were effective adsorbents of orthophosphate and up to 100% removal was observed under appropriate conditions. 'Back extracting' the phosphate from the doped silica (following water treatment) was also investigated and shown to have little adverse effect on the adsorbent.

  10. Ni removal from aqueous solutions by chemical reduction: Impact of pH and pe in the presence of citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chi-Wang; Yu, Jui-Hsuan; Liang, Yang-Min; Chou, Yi-Hsuan; Park, Hyung-June; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Chen, Shiao-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The chemical precipitation of Ni ions from industrial wastewater at alkaline pH values creates waste chemical sludge (e.g., Ni(OH)_2). We herein focused on Ni removal via chemical reduction using dithionite, by converting Ni(II) to its elemental or other valuable forms. Without the presence of a chelator (e.g., citrate), the nickel reduction efficiency increased with increasing dithionite:Ni molar ratio, reaching 99% at ratios above 3:1. The effect of pH on Ni reduction was in agreement with the standard redox potentials (pe"0) of dithionite, which became more negative with an increase in pH leading to greater Ni reduction efficiencies. With the formation of Ni-citrate chelates, however, the Ni reduction deteriorated. Elevated pH and temperature improved nickel reduction, due to the greater reducing power of dithionite. The optimal pH value for Ni(II) reduction was found to be 8. Injecting Cu seed particles enhanced the rate and amount of Ni reduced. NiS and Ni_3S_2 were identified in the crystal of the resulting solids by X-ray crystallography, and the presence of elemental Ni was explained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemical reduction of actual printed circuit board wastewater with the dithionite:Ni(II) molar ratio dose of 12:1 retrieved 99% nickel after 30-min reaction at 40 °C.

  11. Ni removal from aqueous solutions by chemical reduction: Impact of pH and pe in the presence of citrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chi-Wang, E-mail: chiwang@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, No. 151 Yingzhuan Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 25137, Taiwan (China); Yu, Jui-Hsuan [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, No. 151 Yingzhuan Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 25137, Taiwan (China); Department of Marine Leisure and Tourism, Taipei College of Maritime Technology, No. 150, Sec. 3, Binhai Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 251, Taiwan (China); Liang, Yang-Min; Chou, Yi-Hsuan [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, No. 151 Yingzhuan Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 25137, Taiwan (China); Park, Hyung-June [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 80 Daehak-ro, Buk-gu, Daegu, 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Choo, Kwang-Ho, E-mail: chookh@knu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 80 Daehak-ro, Buk-gu, Daegu, 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Chen, Shiao-Shing [Institute of Environmental Engineering and Management, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Road, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China)

    2016-12-15

    The chemical precipitation of Ni ions from industrial wastewater at alkaline pH values creates waste chemical sludge (e.g., Ni(OH){sub 2}). We herein focused on Ni removal via chemical reduction using dithionite, by converting Ni(II) to its elemental or other valuable forms. Without the presence of a chelator (e.g., citrate), the nickel reduction efficiency increased with increasing dithionite:Ni molar ratio, reaching 99% at ratios above 3:1. The effect of pH on Ni reduction was in agreement with the standard redox potentials (pe{sup 0}) of dithionite, which became more negative with an increase in pH leading to greater Ni reduction efficiencies. With the formation of Ni-citrate chelates, however, the Ni reduction deteriorated. Elevated pH and temperature improved nickel reduction, due to the greater reducing power of dithionite. The optimal pH value for Ni(II) reduction was found to be 8. Injecting Cu seed particles enhanced the rate and amount of Ni reduced. NiS and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} were identified in the crystal of the resulting solids by X-ray crystallography, and the presence of elemental Ni was explained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemical reduction of actual printed circuit board wastewater with the dithionite:Ni(II) molar ratio dose of 12:1 retrieved 99% nickel after 30-min reaction at 40 °C.

  12. Radiation-induced destruction of organic compounds in aqueous solutions by dual oxidation/reduction mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaychiana, M.; Silverman, J.; Al-Sheikhly, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland (United States); Poster, D.; Neta, P.; Huie, R. [Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standard and Technology (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This research presents the feasibility and mechanisms of using high energy electrons for the dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in marine sediment, and hazardous organic compounds in waste water. The remediation of the organic contaminants by ionizing radiation is achieved by means of both reduction and oxidation processes. PCBs in marine sediment can be effectively dechlorinated by reduction, while toxic organic compounds in water are removed mainly by oxidation. Radiolytic degradation of aqueous suspensions of PCBs in marine sediments in the presence of isopropanol was also studied. Addition of isopropanol was necessary to enhance the radiolytic yield and the dechlorination of PCBs. Also presented are results from an examination of the oxidative and reductive effects of electron-beam irradiation on the concentrations of six organic solvents in water. The organic solvents in water were prepared to mimic a pharmaceutical waste stream. Radiation-induced destruction of benzene was also investigated using pulse radiolysis technique. Pulse radiolysis with spectrophotometric and conductometric detection was utilized to study the formation and reactions of radicals from benzene and dienes in aqueous solutions. The benzene OH adduct, {sup ●}C{sub 6}H{sub 6}OH, reacts with O{sub 2} (k = 3x10{sup 8} L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}) in a reversible reaction. The peroxyl radical, HOC{sub 6}H{sub 6}O{sub 2}{sup ●}, undergoes O{sub 2}●- elimination, bimolecular decay, and reaction with benzene to initiate a chain reaction, depending on the dose rate, benzene concentration, and pH. The occurrence of the chain reaction is demonstrated in low-dose-rate gamma radiolysis experiments where the consumption of O{sub 2} was monitored. (author)

  13. Mechanistic studies of chemical looping desulfurization of Mn-based oxides using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    König, C.F.J.; Nachtegaal, M.; Seemann, M.; Clemens, F.; Garderen, N. van; Biollaz, S.M.A.; Schildhauer, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mn sorbents remove H 2 S from hot syngas in chemical looping desulfurization process. • State of Mn followed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. • Two-step mechanism explains the formation of SO 2 under reducing conditions. - Abstract: Cleaning of producer gas from biomass gasification is required for further processing, e.g. to avoid catalyst poisoning in subsequent conversion steps. High-temperature gas cleaning, of which sulfur removal is an important part, is a promising way to improve the overall efficiency of biomass conversion. In a high temperature “chemical looping desulfurization” process, a sorbent material, here manganese oxide, is cycled between producer gas from the gasifier to remove sulfur species, and an oxidizing atmosphere, in which the sulfur species are released as SO 2 . Alternatively, the use of such material as reactive bed material could be integrated into an allothermal dual fluidized bed gasifier. In a laboratory reactor, we subjected manganese-based materials to a periodically changing gas atmosphere, simulating a “chemical looping desulfurization” reactor. The “fuel reactor” gas contained H 2 , CO, CH 4 and H 2 S, similar as in the producer gas, and the “oxidizing reactor” contained diluted O 2 . Mass spectrometry showed that most of the H 2 S is taken up by the sample in the “fuel reactor” part, while also some unwanted SO 2 is generated in the “fuel reactor” part. Most of the sulfur is released in the oxidizing reactor. Simultaneous in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Mn materials during different stages of the chemical looping desulfurization process showed that the initial Mn 3 O 4 is transformed in the presence of H 2 S to MnS via a MnO intermediate in the fuel reactor. Oxygen from the reduction of Mn 3 O 4 oxidizes some H 2 S to the undesired SO 2 in the fuel reactor. Upon exposure to O 2 , MnS is again oxidized to Mn 3 O 4 via MnO, releasing SO

  14. High rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane, ethane and propane coupled to thiosulphate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; Weijma, Jan; Timmers, Peer H A; Buisman, Cees J N

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to sulphate reduction and the use of ethane and propane as electron donors by sulphate-reducing bacteria represent new opportunities for the treatment of streams contaminated with sulphur oxyanions. However, growth of microbial sulphate-reducing populations with methane, propane or butane is extremely slow, which hampers research and development of bioprocesses based on these conversions. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the growth rate with possible alternative terminal electron acceptors such as thiosulphate and elemental sulphur may be higher, which would facilitate future research. Here, we investigate the use of these electron acceptors for oxidation of methane, ethane and propane, with marine sediment as inoculum. Mixed marine sediments originating from Aarhus Bay (Denmark) and Eckernförde Bay (Germany) were cultivated anaerobically at a pH between 7.2 and 7.8 and a temperature of 15 °C in the presence of methane, ethane and propane and various sulphur electron acceptors. The sulphide production rates in the conditions with methane, ethane and propane with sulphate were respectively 2.3, 2.2 and 1.8 μmol S L(-1) day(-1). For sulphur, no reduction was demonstrated. For thiosulphate, the sulphide production rates were up to 50 times higher compared to those of sulphate, with 86.2, 90.7 and 108.1 μmol S L(-1) day(-1) for methane, ethane and propane respectively. This sulphide production was partly due to disproportionation, 50 % for ethane but only 7 and 14 % for methane and propane respectively. The oxidation of the alkanes in the presence of thiosulphate was confirmed by carbon dioxide production. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of thiosulphate use as electron acceptor with ethane and propane as electron donors. Additionally, these results indicate that thiosulphate is a promising electron acceptor to increase start-up rates for sulphate-reducing bioprocesses coupled to short-chain alkane oxidation.

  15. Dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite in the bovine rumen: nitrous oxide production and effect of acetylene.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaspar, H F; Tiedje, J M

    1981-01-01

    15N tracer methods and gas chromatography coupled to an electron capture detector were used to investigate dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite by the rumen microbiota of a fistulated cow. Ammonium was the only 15N-labeled end product of quantitative significance. Only traces of nitrous oxide were detected as a product of nitrate reduction; but in experiments with nitrite, up to 0.3% of the added nitrogen accumulated as nitrous oxide, but it was not further reduced. Furthermore, whe...

  16. Electrochemical reduction and oxidation pathways for Reactive Black 5 dye using nickel electrodes in divided and undivided cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méndez-Martínez, Ana J.; Dávila-Jiménez, Martin M.; Ornelas-Dávila, Omar; Elizalde-González, María P.; Arroyo-Abad, Uriel; Sirés, Ignasi; Brillas, Enric

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ni electrodes were used for the mild degradation of the azo dye Reactive Black 5. ► Potentiostatic degradation was performed in undivided and divided cells. ► Degradation by-products were detected and monitored by RP-HPLC and LC–MS/MS. ► Small alkylsulfonyl phenol and isoxazole derivatives were identified. ► The cathodic and anodic degradation pathways for Reactive Black 5 were elucidated. - Abstract: The cathodic reduction and anodic ·OH-mediated oxidation of the azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) have been studied potentiostatically by using undivided and divided cells with a Ni-polyvinylchloride (Ni-PVC) composite cathode and a Ni wire mesh anode. Solutions of 50–100 cm 3 of 20–80 mg dm −3 RB5 in 0.1 mol dm −3 KOH were degraded to assess the effect of electrolysis time and electrode potentials on the infrared and absorbance spectra, as well as on the decay of the total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand. Reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with ion-pairing and diode array detection (ion pair chromatography), along with coupling to tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS), were used for the identification of the aromatic degradation by-products and monitoring their time course. These analyses revealed the progressive conversion of the RB5 dye to simpler molecules with m/z 200, 369.5 and 547 under the direct action of the electron at the cathode and the formation of polar compounds such as alkylsulfonyl phenol derivatives with m/z 201, 185 and 171 by the ·OH mediation at the anode. From these results, the electrochemical reduction and oxidation pathways for the RB5 dye were elucidated.

  17. Development of Head-end Pyrochemical Reduction Process for Advanced Oxide Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, B. H.; Seo, C. S.; Hur, J. M.; Jeong, S. M.; Hong, S. S.; Choi, I. K.; Choung, W. M.; Kwon, K. C.; Lee, I. W.

    2008-12-01

    The development of an electrolytic reduction technology for spent fuels in the form of oxide is of essence to introduce LWR SFs to a pyroprocessing. In this research, the technology was investigated to scale a reactor up, the electrochemical behaviors of FPs were studied to understand the process and a reaction rate data by using U 3 O 8 was obtained with a bench scale reactor. In a scale of 20 kgHM/batch reactor, U 3 O 8 and Simfuel were successfully reduced into metals. Electrochemical characteristics of LiBr, LiI and Li 2 Se were measured in a bench scale reactor and an electrolytic reduction cell was modeled by a computational tool

  18. Direct oxide reduction (DOR) solvent salt recycle in pyrochemical plutonium recovery operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, K.W.; Bowersox, D.F.; Davis, C.C.; McCormick, E.D.

    1987-02-01

    One method used at Los Alamos for producing plutonium metal is to reduce the oxide with calcium metal in molten CaCl 2 at 850 0 C. The solvent CaCl 2 from this reduction step is currently discarded as low-level radioactive waste because it is saturated with the reaction by-product, CaO. We have developed and demonstrated a molten salt technique for rechlorinating the CaO, thereby regenerating the CaCl 2 and incorporating solvent recycle into the batch PuO 2 reduction process. We discuss results from the process development experiments and present our plans for incorporating the technique into an advanced design for semicontinuous plutonium metal production

  19. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann Pirez, M.

    2004-12-01

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N 2 , in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO 3 , on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  20. Phosphine-functionalized graphene oxide, a high-performance electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Golbon Haghighi, Mohsen; Jafari-Asl, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    Here, a new approach for the synthesis of phosphine-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-PPh2) was developed. Using a simple method, diphenylphosphine group was linked to the hydroxyl group of OH-functionalized graphene that existing at the graphene surface. The electrochemical activity of GO-PPh2 for electrochemical oxygen reduction was checked. The results demonstrated that the new carbon hybrid material has a powerful potential for electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Moreover, GO-PPh2 as an electrocatalyst for ORR exhibited tolerance for methanol or ethanol as a result of crossover effect. In comparison with commercial Pt/C and Pt/rGO electrocatalysts, results showed that GO-PPh2 has a much higher selectivity, better durability, and much better electrochemical stability towards the ORR. The proposed method based on GO-PPh2 introduce an efficient electrocatalyst for further application in fuel cells.