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Sample records for outcomes including dose-volume

  1. Methodological issues in radiation dose-volume outcome analyses: Summary of a joint AAPM/NIH workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Herbert, Donald; Yan, Di; Jackson, Andrew; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Langer, Mark; Sapareto, Steve

    2002-01-01

    This report represents a summary of presentations at a joint workshop of the National Institutes of Health and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Current methodological issues in dose-volume modeling are addressed here from several different perspectives. Areas of emphasis include (a) basic modeling issues including the equivalent uniform dose framework and the bootstrap method, (b) issues in the valid use of statistics, including the need for meta-analysis, (c) issues in dealing with organ deformation and its effects on treatment response, (d) evidence for volume effects for rectal complications, (e) the use of volume effect data in liver and lung as a basis for dose escalation studies, and (f) implications of uncertainties in volume effect knowledge on optimized treatment planning. Taken together, these approaches to studying volume effects describe many implications for the development and use of this information in radiation oncology practice. Areas of significant interest for further research include the meta-analysis of clinical data; interinstitutional pooled data analyses of volume effects; analyses of the uncertainties in outcome prediction models, minimal parameter number outcome models for ranking treatment plans (e.g., equivalent uniform dose); incorporation of the effect of motion in the outcome prediction; dose-escalation/isorisk protocols based on outcome models; the use of functional imaging to study radio-response; and the need for further small animal tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability studies

  2. SU-E-T-72: A Retrospective Correlation Analysis On Dose-Volume Control Points and Treatment Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, A; Nohadani, O [Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Refaat, T; Bacchus, I; Cutright, D; Sathiaseelan, V; Mittal, B [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify correlation between dose-volume control points and treatment outcomes. Specifically, two outcomes are analyzed: occurrence of radiation induced dysphagia and target complications. The results inform the treatment planning process when competing dose-volume criteria requires relaxations. Methods: 32 patients, treated with whole-field sequential intensity modulated radiation therapy during 2009–2010 period, are considered for this study. Acute dysphagia that is categorized into 3 grades is observed on all patients. 3 patients are observed in grade 1, 17 patients in grade 2, and 12 patients in grade 3. Ordinal logistic regression is employed to establish correlations between grades of dysphagia and dose to cervico-thoracic esophagus. Particularly, minimum (Dmin), mean (Dmean), and maximum (Dmax) dose control points are analyzed. Additionally, target complication, which includes local-regional recurrence and/or distant metastasis, is observed on 4 patients. Binary logistic regression is used to quantify correlation between target complication and four dose control points. Namely, ICRU recommended dose control points, D2, D50, D95, and D98 are analyzed. Results: For correlation with dysphagia, Dmin on cervico-thoracic esophagus is statistically significant (p-value = 0.005). Additionally, Dmean on cervico-thoracic esophagus is also significant in association with dysphagia (p-value = 0.012). However, no correlation was observed between Dmax and dysphagia (p-value = 0.263). For target complications, D50 on the target is a statistically significant dose control point (p-value = 0.032). No correlations were observed between treatment complications and D2 (p-value = 0.866), D95 (p-value = 0.750), and D98 (p-value = 0.710) on the target. Conclusion: Significant correlations are observed between radiation induced dysphagia and Dmean (and Dmin) to cervico-thoracic esophagus. Additionally, correlation between target complications and median dose to target

  3. SU-E-T-72: A Retrospective Correlation Analysis On Dose-Volume Control Points and Treatment Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A; Nohadani, O; Refaat, T; Bacchus, I; Cutright, D; Sathiaseelan, V; Mittal, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify correlation between dose-volume control points and treatment outcomes. Specifically, two outcomes are analyzed: occurrence of radiation induced dysphagia and target complications. The results inform the treatment planning process when competing dose-volume criteria requires relaxations. Methods: 32 patients, treated with whole-field sequential intensity modulated radiation therapy during 2009–2010 period, are considered for this study. Acute dysphagia that is categorized into 3 grades is observed on all patients. 3 patients are observed in grade 1, 17 patients in grade 2, and 12 patients in grade 3. Ordinal logistic regression is employed to establish correlations between grades of dysphagia and dose to cervico-thoracic esophagus. Particularly, minimum (Dmin), mean (Dmean), and maximum (Dmax) dose control points are analyzed. Additionally, target complication, which includes local-regional recurrence and/or distant metastasis, is observed on 4 patients. Binary logistic regression is used to quantify correlation between target complication and four dose control points. Namely, ICRU recommended dose control points, D2, D50, D95, and D98 are analyzed. Results: For correlation with dysphagia, Dmin on cervico-thoracic esophagus is statistically significant (p-value = 0.005). Additionally, Dmean on cervico-thoracic esophagus is also significant in association with dysphagia (p-value = 0.012). However, no correlation was observed between Dmax and dysphagia (p-value = 0.263). For target complications, D50 on the target is a statistically significant dose control point (p-value = 0.032). No correlations were observed between treatment complications and D2 (p-value = 0.866), D95 (p-value = 0.750), and D98 (p-value = 0.710) on the target. Conclusion: Significant correlations are observed between radiation induced dysphagia and Dmean (and Dmin) to cervico-thoracic esophagus. Additionally, correlation between target complications and median dose to target

  4. Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Azusa; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Mizota, Atsushi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the tolerance dose for retention of visual acuity in patients with head-and-neck tumors treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From June 1994 to March 2000, 163 patients with tumors in the head and neck or skull base region were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Analysis was performed on 54 optic nerves (ONs) corresponding to 30 patients whose ONs had been included in the irradiated volume. These patients showed no evidence of visual impairment due to other factors and had a follow-up period of >4 years. All patients had been informed of the possibility of visual impairment before treatment. We evaluated the dose-complication probability and the prognostic factors for the retention of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy, using dose-volume histograms and multivariate analysis. Results: The median age of 30 patients (14 men, 16 women) was 57.2 years. Median prescribed total dose was 56.0 gray equivalents (GyE) at 3.0-4.0 GyE per fraction per day (range, 48-64 GyE; 16-18 fractions; 4-6 weeks). Of 54 ONs that were analyzed, 35 had been irradiated with max ]) resulting in no visual loss. Conversely, 11 of the 19 ONs (58%) irradiated with >57 GyE (D max ) suffered a decrease of visual acuity. In all of these cases, the ONs had been involved in the tumor before carbon ion radiotherapy. In the multivariate analysis, a dose of 20% of the volume of the ON (D 2 ) was significantly associated with visual loss. Conclusions: The occurrence of visual loss seems to be correlated with a delivery of >60 GyE to 20% of the volume of the ON

  5. The Effect of Dose-Volume Parameters and Interfraction Interval on Cosmetic Outcome and Toxicity After 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Kara Lynne; Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Dipetrillo, Thomas A.; Price, Lori Lyn; Wazer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dose-volume parameters and the interfraction interval (IFI) as they relate to cosmetic outcome and normal tissue effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients were treated by the use of 3D-CRT to deliver APBI at our institutions from 2003-2010 in strict accordance with the specified dose-volume constraints outlined in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 (NSABP-B39/RTOG 0413) protocol. The prescribed dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions delivered twice daily. Patients underwent follow-up with assessment for recurrence, late toxicity, and overall cosmetic outcome. Tests for association between toxicity endpoints and dosimetric parameters were performed with the chi-square test. Univariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of interfraction interval (IFI) with these outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up time of 32 months, grade 2-4 and grade 3-4 subcutaneous fibrosis occurred in 31% and 7.5% of patients, respectively. Subcutaneous fibrosis improved in 5 patients (6%) with extended follow-up. Fat necrosis developed in 11% of women, and cosmetic outcome was fair/poor in 19%. The relative volume of breast tissue receiving 5%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 100% (V5-V100) of the prescribed dose was associated with risk of subcutaneous fibrosis, and the volume receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% (V50-V100) was associated with fair/poor cosmesis. The mean IFI was 6.9 hours, and the minimum IFI was 6.2 hours. The mean and minimum IFI values were not significantly associated with late toxicity. Conclusions: The incidence of moderate to severe late toxicity, particularly subcutaneous fibrosis and fat necrosis and resulting fair/poor cosmesis, remains high with continued follow-up. These toxicity endpoints are associated with several dose-volume parameters. Minimum and mean IFI values were

  6. Effect of tumor dose, volume and overall treatment time on local control after radiochemotherapy including MRI guided brachytherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Sturdza, Alina

    2016-01-01

    -center patient series (retroEMBRACE). Materials and methods This study analyzed 488 locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy combined with IGABT. Brachytherapy contouring and reporting was according to ICRU/GEC-ESTRO recommendations. The Cox Proportional...... Hazards model was applied to analyze the effect on local control of dose-volume metrics as well as overall treatment time (OTT), dose rate, chemotherapy, and tumor histology. Results With a median follow up of 46 months, 43 local failures were observed. Dose (D90) to the High Risk Clinical Target Volume...

  7. WE-AB-207B-12: Prospective Study of the Relationship Between Dose-Volume Clinical Toxicity and Patient Reported Outcomes in Lung Cancer Patients Treated with SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, E; Vance, S; Brown, S; Liu, J; Kim, J; Zhen, S; Devpura, S; Ajlouni, M; Salim, S; Chetty, I; Movsas, B [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine in a prospective study, the correlation between radiation dose/volume, clinical toxicities and patient-reported, quality of life (QOL) resulting from lung SBRT. Methods: For 106 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving SBRT (12 Gy × 4), symptoms including cough, dyspnea, fatigue and pneumonitis were measured at baseline (before treatment), after treatment and 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment. Toxicity was graded from zero to five. Dosimetric parameters such as the MLD, D10%, D20%, and lung subvolumes (V10 and V20) were obtained from the treatment plan. Dosimetric parameters and number of patients demonstrating toxicity ≥ grade 2 were tabulated. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate correlations between MLD and D10, D20, V10 and V20. Results: The percentages of patients with > grade 2 pneumonitis, fatigue, cough, and dyspnea over 3 to 12 months increased from 0.0% to 3.5%, 3.2% to 10.5%, 4.3% to 8.3%, and 10.8% to 18.8%, respectively. Computed dose indices D10%, D20% were 7.9±4.8 Gy and 3.0±2.3 Gy, respectively. MLD ranged from 0.34 Gy up to 9.9 Gy with overall average 3.0±1.7 Gy. The averages of the subvolumes V10 and V20 were respectively 8.9±5.3% and 3.0±2.4%. The linear regression analysis showed that V10 and D10 demonstrated the strongest correlation to MLD; R2= 0.92 and 0.87, respectively. V20, and D20 were also strongly correlated with MLD; R2 = 0.81 and 0.84 respectively. A correlation was also found to exist between MLD > 2 Gy and ≥ grade 2 cough and dyspnea. Subvolume values for 2Gy MLD were 5.3% for V10 and 2% for V20. Conclusion: Dosimetric indices: MLD ≥ 2Gy, D10 ≥ 5Gy and V10 ≥ 5% of the total lung volume were predictive of > grade 2 cough and dyspnea QOL data. The QOL results are a novel component of this work. acknowledgement of the Varian grant support.

  8. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent nedaplatin-based chemotherapy after radical hysterectomy for uterine cervical cancer: comparison of outcomes, complications, and dose-volume histogram parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Mabuchi, Seiji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Tamari, Keisuke; Yamashita, Michiko; Unno, Hikari; Kinose, Yasuto; Kozasa, Katsumi; Sumida, Iori; Otani, Yuki; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report our clinical outcomes using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer, compared with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), in terms of tumor control, complications and dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Between March 2008 and February 2014, 62 patients were treated with concurrent nedaplatin-based chemotherapy and whole-pelvic external beam radiation therapy (RT). Of these patients, 32 (52 %) received 3DCRT and 30 (48 %) received IMRT. The median follow-up periods were 40 months (range 2–74 months). The 3-year overall survival rate (OS), locoregional control rate (LRC) and progression-free survival rate (PFS) were 92, 95 and 92 % in the IMRT group, and 85, 82 and 70 % in the 3DCRT group, respectively. A comparison of OS, LRC and PFS showed no significant differences between IMRT and 3DCRT. The 3-year cumulative incidences of grade 2 or higher chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications were significantly lower with IMRT compared to 3DCRT (3 % vs. 45 %, p < .02) and in patients with V40 of the small bowel loops of ≤340 mL compared to those with >340 mL (3 % vs. 45 %, p < .001). Patients treated with IMRT had a higher incidence of grade 3 acute hematologic complications (p < .05). V40 and V45 of the small bowel loops or bowel bag were predictive for development of both acute and chronic GI complications. Our results suggest that IMRT for adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer is useful for decreasing GI complications without worsening outcomes

  9. Dose-Volume Constraints to Reduce Rectal Side Effects From Prostate Radiotherapy: Evidence From MRC RT01 Trial ISRCTN 47772397

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Foo, Kerwyn; Morgan, Rachel C.; Aird, Edwin G.; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Critchley, Helen; Evans, Philip M. D.Phil.; Gianolini, Stefano; Mayles, W. Philip; Moore, A. Rollo; Sanchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R. C.Stat; Webb, Steve; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer is effective but dose limited because of the proximity of normal tissues. Comprehensive dose-volume analysis of the incidence of clinically relevant late rectal toxicities could indicate how the dose to the rectum should be constrained. Previous emphasis has been on constraining the mid-to-high dose range (≥50 Gy). Evidence is emerging that lower doses could also be important. Methods and Materials: Data from a large multicenter randomized trial were used to investigate the correlation between seven clinically relevant rectal toxicity endpoints (including patient- and clinician-reported outcomes) and an absolute 5% increase in the volume of rectum receiving the specified doses. The results were quantified using odds ratios. Rectal dose-volume constraints were applied retrospectively to investigate the association of constraints with the incidence of late rectal toxicity. Results: A statistically significant dose-volume response was observed for six of the seven endpoints for at least one of the dose levels tested in the range of 30-70 Gy. Statistically significant reductions in the incidence of these late rectal toxicities were observed for the group of patients whose treatment plans met specific proposed dose-volume constraints. The incidence of moderate/severe toxicity (any endpoint) decreased incrementally for patients whose treatment plans met increasing numbers of dose-volume constraints from the set of V30≤80%, V40≤65%, V50≤55%, V60≤40%, V65≤30%, V70≤15%, and V75≤3%. Conclusion: Considering the entire dose distribution to the rectum by applying dose-volume constraints such as those tested here in the present will reduce the incidence of late rectal toxicity.

  10. Inclusion of functional information from perfusion SPECT improves predictive value of dose-volume parameters in lung toxicity outcome after radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Kallehauge, Jesper F; Møller, Ditte S

    2015-01-01

    for corresponding standard parameters, but they were not significantly different from each other. CONCLUSION: SPECT-based functional parameters were better to predict the risk of RP compared to standard CT-based dose-volume parameters. Functional parameters may be useful to guide radiotherapy planning in order...

  11. Conformal irradiation of the prostate: estimating long-term rectal bleeding risk using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, Alan C.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Adams, Judith A.; Urie, Marcia M.; Shipley, William U.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) may be very useful tools for estimating probability of normal tissue complications (NTCP), but there is not yet an agreed upon method for their analysis. This study introduces a statistical method of aggregating and analyzing primary data from DVHs and associated outcomes. It explores the dose-volume relationship for NTCP of the rectum, using long-term data on rectal wall bleeding following prostatic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Previously published data were reviewed and updated on 41 patients with Stages T3 and T4 prostatic carcinoma treated with photons followed by perineal proton boost, including dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient's anterior rectal wall and data on the occurrence of postirradiation rectal bleeding (minimum FU > 4 years). Logistic regression was used to test whether some individual combination of dose and volume irradiated might best separate the DVHs into categories of high or low risk for rectal bleeding. Further analysis explored whether a group of such dose-volume combinations might be superior in predicting complication risk. These results were compared with results of the 'critical volume model', a mathematical model based on assumptions of underlying radiobiological interactions. Results: Ten of the 128 tested dose-volume combinations proved to be 'statistically significant combinations' (SSCs) distinguishing between bleeders (14 out of 41) and nonbleeders (27 out of 41), ranging contiguously between 60 CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent) to 70% of the anterior rectal wall and 75 CGE to 30%. Calculated odds ratios for each SSC were not significantly different across the individual SSCs; however, analysis combining SSCs allowed segregation of DVHs into three risk groups: low, moderate, and high. Estimates of probabilities of normal tissue complications (NTCPs) based on these risk groups correlated strongly with observed data (p = 0.003) and with biomathematical model-generated NTCPs

  12. Decomposition analysis of differential dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvel, Frank van den

    2006-01-01

    Dose volume histograms are a common tool to assess the value of a treatment plan for various forms of radiation therapy treatment. The purpose of this work is to introduce, validate, and apply a set of tools to analyze differential dose volume histograms by decomposing them into physically and clinically meaningful normal distributions. A weighted sum of the decomposed normal distributions (e.g., weighted dose) is proposed as a new measure of target dose, rather than the more unstable point dose. The method and its theory are presented and validated using simulated distributions. Additional validation is performed by analyzing simple four field box techniques encompassing a predefined target, using different treatment energies inside a water phantom. Furthermore, two clinical situations are analyzed using this methodology to illustrate practical usefulness. A comparison of a treatment plan for a breast patient using a tangential field setup with wedges is compared to a comparable geometry using dose compensators. Finally, a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculation is refined using this decomposition. The NTCP calculation is performed on a liver as organ at risk in a treatment of a mesothelioma patient with involvement of the right lung. The comparison of the wedged breast treatment versus the compensator technique yields comparable classical dose parameters (e.g., conformity index ≅1 and equal dose at the ICRU dose point). The methodology proposed here shows a 4% difference in weighted dose outlining the difference in treatment using a single parameter instead of at least two in a classical analysis (e.g., mean dose, and maximal dose, or total dose variance). NTCP-calculations for the mesothelioma case are generated automatically and show a 3% decrease with respect to the classical calculation. The decrease is slightly dependant on the fractionation and on the α/β-value utilized. In conclusion, this method is able to distinguish clinically

  13. Treatment plan evaluation using dose-volume histogram (DVH) and spatial dose-volume histogram (zDVH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-W.; Das, Indra J.

    1999-01-01

    37% of the bladder wall and 43% of the rectal wall. The zDVHs of the bladder revealed that the hot-spot region was superior to the central axis. The zDVHs of the rectum showed that the high-dose region was an 8-cm segment mostly superior to the central axis. The serial array-like of the rectum warrants a closer attention with regard to the complication probability of the organ. Conclusions: Although DVH provides an averaged dose-volume information, zDVH provides differential dose-volume information with respect to the CT slice position. zDVH is a 2D analog of a 3D DVH and, in some situations, more superior. It provides additional information on plan evaluation that otherwise could not be appreciated. The zDVH may be used along with DVH for plan evaluation and for the correlation of radiation outcome

  14. Dose-volume considerations in stereotaxic brain radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houdek, P.V.; Schwade, J.G.; Pisciotta, V.J.; Medina, A.J.; Lewin, A.A.; Abitbol, A.A.; Serago, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Although brain radiation therapy experience suggests that a gain in the therapeutic ratio may be achieved by optimizing the dose-volume relationship, no practical system for quantitative assessment of dose-volume data has been developed. This presentation describes the rationale for using the integral dose function for this purpose and demonstrates that with the use of a conventional treatment planning computer and a series of computed tomographic scans, first-order optimization of the dose-volume function can be accomplished in two steps: first, high-dose volume is minimized by selecting an appropriate treatment technique and tumor margin, and then dosage is maximized by calculating the brain tolerance dose as a function of the irradiated volume

  15. Influence of dosing volume on the neurotoxicity of bifenthrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolansky, M J; McDaniel, K L; Moser, V C; Crofton, K M

    2007-01-01

    Pyrethroids are pesticides with high insecticidal activity and relatively low potency in mammals. The influence of dosing volume on the neurobehavioral syndrome following oral acute exposure to the Type-I pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin in corn oil was evaluated in adult male Long Evans rats. We tested bifenthrin effects at 1 and 5 ml/kg, two commonly used dose volumes in toxicological studies. Two testing times (4 and 7 h) were used in motor activity and functional observational battery (FOB) assessments. Four to eight doses were examined at either dosing condition (up to 20 or 26 mg/kg, at 1 and 5 ml/kg, respectively). Acute oral bifenthrin exposure produced toxic signs typical of Type I pyrethroids, with dose-related increases in fine tremor, decreased motor activity and grip strength, and increased pawing, head shaking, click response, and body temperature. Bifenthrin effects on motor activity and pyrethroid-specific clinical signs were approximately 2-fold more potent at 1 ml/kg than 5 ml/kg. This difference was clearly evident at 4 h and slightly attenuated at 7 h post-dosing. Benchmark dose (BMD) modeling estimated similar 2-fold potency differences in motor activity and pyrethroid-specific FOB data. These findings demonstrate that dose volume, in studies using corn oil as the vehicle influences bifenthrin potency. Further, these data suggest that inconsistent estimates of pyrethroid potency between laboratories are at least partially due to differences in dosing volume.

  16. Temporal Evolution and Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Visual Acuity After Proton Beam Radiation Therapy of Uveal Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polishchuk, Alexei L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Mishra, Kavita K., E-mail: Kavita.Mishra@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian; Daftari, Inder K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Nguyen, Jacqueline M.; Cole, Tia B. [Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States); Quivey, Jeanne M.; Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Char, Devron H. [Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To perform an in-depth temporal analysis of visual acuity (VA) outcomes after proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) in a large, uniformly treated cohort of uveal melanoma (UM) patients, to determine trends in VA evolution depending on pretreatment and temporally defined posttreatment VA measurements; and to investigate the relevance of specific patient, tumor and dose-volume parameters to posttreatment vision loss. Methods and Materials: Uveal melanoma patients receiving PBRT were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Included patients (n=645) received 56 GyE in 4 fractions, had pretreatment best corrected VA (BCVA) in the affected eye of count fingers (CF) or better, with posttreatment VA assessment at specified post-PBRT time point(s). Patients were grouped according to the pretreatment BCVA into favorable (≥20/40) or unfavorable (20/50-20/400) and poor (CF) strata. Temporal analysis of BCVA changes was described, and univariate and forward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors for VA loss. Results: Median VA follow-up was 53 months (range, 3-213 months). At 60-month follow up, among evaluable treated eyes with favorable pretreatment BCVA, 45% retained BCVA ≥20/40, whereas among evaluable treated eyes with initially unfavorable/poor BCVA, 21% had vision ≥20/100. Among those with a favorable initial BCVA, attaining BCVA of ≥20/40 at any posttreatment time point was associated with subsequent maintenance of excellent BCVA. Multivariate analysis identified volume of the macula receiving 28GyE (P<.0001) and optic nerve (P=.0004) as independent dose-volume histogram predictors of 48-month post-PBRT vision loss among initially favorable treated eyes. Conclusions: Approximately half of PBRT-treated UM eyes with excellent pretreatment BCVA assessed at 5 years after treatment will retain excellent long-term vision. 28GyE macula and optic nerve dose-volume histogram parameters allow for

  17. Retrospective Reconstructions of Active Bone Marrow Dose-Volume Histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veres, Cristina; Allodji, Rodrigue S.; Llanas, Damien; Vu Bezin, Jérémi; Chavaudra, Jean; Mège, Jean Pierre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Quiniou, Eric; Deutsh, Eric; Vathaire, Florent de; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a method for calculating dose-volume histograms (DVH's) to the active bone marrow (ABM) of patients who had undergone radiation therapy (RT) and subsequently developed leukemia. Methods and Materials: The study focuses on 15 patients treated between 1961 and 1996. Whole-body RT planning computed tomographic (CT) data were not available. We therefore generated representative whole-body CTs similar to patient anatomy. In addition, we developed a method enabling us to obtain information on the density distribution of ABM all over the skeleton. Dose could then be calculated in a series of points distributed all over the skeleton in such a way that their local density reflected age-specific data for ABM distribution. Dose to particular regions and dose-volume histograms of the entire ABM were estimated for all patients. Results: Depending on patient age, the total number of dose calculation points generated ranged from 1,190,970 to 4,108,524. The average dose to ABM ranged from 0.3 to 16.4 Gy. Dose-volume histograms analysis showed that the median doses (D 50% ) ranged from 0.06 to 12.8 Gy. We also evaluated the inhomogeneity of individual patient ABM dose distribution according to clinical situation. It was evident that the coefficient of variation of the dose for the whole ABM ranged from 1.0 to 5.7, which means that the standard deviation could be more than 5 times higher than the mean. Conclusions: For patients with available long-term follow-up data, our method provides reconstruction of dose-volume data comparable to detailed dose calculations, which have become standard in modern CT-based 3-dimensional RT planning. Our strategy of using dose-volume histograms offers new perspectives to retrospective epidemiological studies

  18. WE-B-304-02: Treatment Planning Evaluation and Optimization Should Be Biologically and Not Dose/volume Based

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deasy, J.

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of radiotherapy treatment planning is to find a treatment that will yield a high tumor control probability (TCP) with an acceptable normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Yet most treatment planning today is not based upon optimization of TCPs and NTCPs, but rather upon meeting physical dose and volume constraints defined by the planner. It has been suggested that treatment planning evaluation and optimization would be more effective if they were biologically and not dose/volume based, and this is the claim debated in this month’s Point/Counterpoint. After a brief overview of biologically and DVH based treatment planning by the Moderator Colin Orton, Joseph Deasy (for biological planning) and Charles Mayo (against biological planning) will begin the debate. Some of the arguments in support of biological planning include: this will result in more effective dose distributions for many patients DVH-based measures of plan quality are known to have little predictive value there is little evidence that either D95 or D98 of the PTV is a good predictor of tumor control sufficient validated outcome prediction models are now becoming available and should be used to drive planning and optimization Some of the arguments against biological planning include: several decades of experience with DVH-based planning should not be discarded we do not know enough about the reliability and errors associated with biological models the radiotherapy community in general has little direct experience with side by side comparisons of DVH vs biological metrics and outcomes it is unlikely that a clinician would accept extremely cold regions in a CTV or hot regions in a PTV, despite having acceptable TCP values Learning Objectives: To understand dose/volume based treatment planning and its potential limitations To understand biological metrics such as EUD, TCP, and NTCP To understand biologically based treatment planning and its potential limitations

  19. Systematic review of dose-volume parameters in the prediction of esophagitis in thoracic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Jim; Rodrigues, George; Yaremko, Brian; Lock, Michael; D'Souza, David

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: With dose escalation and increasing use of concurrent chemoradiotherapy, radiation esophagitis (RE) remains a common treatment-limiting acute side effect in the treatment of thoracic malignancies. The advent of 3DCT planning has enabled investigators to study esophageal dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters as predictors of RE. The purpose of this study was to assess published dosimetric parameters and toxicity data systematically in order to define reproducible predictors of RE, both for potential clinical use, and to provide recommendations for future research in the field. Materials and methods: We performed a systematic literature review of published studies addressing RE in the treatment of lung cancer and thymoma. Our search strategy included a variety of electronic medical databases, textbooks and bibliographies. Both prospective and retrospective clinical studies were included. Information relating to the relationship among measured dosimetric parameters, patient demographics, tumor characteristics, chemotherapy and RE was extracted and analyzed. Results: Eighteen published studies were suitable for analysis. Eleven of these assessed acute RE, while the remainder assessed both acute and chronic RE together. Heterogeneity of esophageal contouring practices, individual differences in information reporting and variability of RE outcome definitions were assessed. Well-described clinical and logistic modeling directly related V 35Gy , V 60Gy and SA 55Gy to clinically significant RE. Conclusions: Several reproducible dosimetric parameters exist in the literature, and these may be potentially relevant in the prediction of RE in the radiotherapy of thoracic malignancies. Further clarification of the predictive relationship between such standardized dosimetric parameters and observed RE outcomes is essential to develop efficient radiation treatment planning in locally advanced NSCLC in the modern concurrent chemotherapy and image-guided IMRT era.

  20. Mechanistic simulation of normal-tissue damage in radiotherapy-implications for dose-volume analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowska, Eva; Baker, Colin; Nahum, Alan

    2010-01-01

    A radiobiologically based 3D model of normal tissue has been developed in which complications are generated when 'irradiated'. The aim is to provide insight into the connection between dose-distribution characteristics, different organ architectures and complication rates beyond that obtainable with simple DVH-based analytical NTCP models. In this model the organ consists of a large number of functional subunits (FSUs), populated by stem cells which are killed according to the LQ model. A complication is triggered if the density of FSUs in any 'critical functioning volume' (CFV) falls below some threshold. The (fractional) CFV determines the organ architecture and can be varied continuously from small (series-like behaviour) to large (parallel-like). A key feature of the model is its ability to account for the spatial dependence of dose distributions. Simulations were carried out to investigate correlations between dose-volume parameters and the incidence of 'complications' using different pseudo-clinical dose distributions. Correlations between dose-volume parameters and outcome depended on characteristics of the dose distributions and on organ architecture. As anticipated, the mean dose and V 20 correlated most strongly with outcome for a parallel organ, and the maximum dose for a serial organ. Interestingly better correlation was obtained between the 3D computer model and the LKB model with dose distributions typical for serial organs than with those typical for parallel organs. This work links the results of dose-volume analyses to dataset characteristics typical for serial and parallel organs and it may help investigators interpret the results from clinical studies.

  1. Reliability of dose volume constraint inference from clinical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutz, C M; Møller, D S; Hoffmann, L

    2017-01-01

    Dose volume histogram points (DVHPs) frequently serve as dose constraints in radiotherapy treatment planning. An experiment was designed to investigate the reliability of DVHP inference from clinical data for multiple cohort sizes and complication incidence rates. The experimental background...... was radiation pneumonitis in non-small cell lung cancer and the DVHP inference method was based on logistic regression. From 102 NSCLC real-life dose distributions and a postulated DVHP model, an 'ideal' cohort was generated where the most predictive model was equal to the postulated model. A bootstrap...

  2. Dose volume relationships for intraoperatively irradiated saphenous nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.; Powers, B.E.; Gillette, S.M.; Thames, H.D.; Childs, G.; Vujaskovic, Z.; LaRue, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is used to deliver high single doses of radiation to the tumor bed following surgical removal of various abdominal malignancies. The advantage of IORT is the ability to remove sensitive normal tissues from the treatment field and to limit the volume of normal tissue irradiated. The purpose of this study was to determine dose-volume relationships for retroperitoneal tissues. Materials and methods: 134 adult beagle dogs were irradiated to the surgically exposed paraaortic area. Normal tissues included in the treatment field were aorta, peripheral nerve, ureter, bone and muscle. Groups of 4 - 8 dogs were irradiated to doses ranging from 18 - 54 Gy for a 2x5 cm field, from 12 - 46 Gy for a 4x5 cm field, and 12 - 42 Gy to an 8x5 cm field. The radiations were done using 6 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. Dogs were observed for three years after radiation. Electrophysiologic procedures were done prior to irradiation and annually following irradiation. The procedures included electromyography of the pelvic limb and paralumbar muscles supplied by the L1 to S1 spinal nerves to determine presence and degree of motor unit disease. Motor nerve conduction velocities of the proximal and distal sciatic nerves were determined. Sensory nerve conduction velocities of the saphenous nerve were also determined. Evoked lumbosacral and thoraco-lumbar spinal cord potentials were evaluated following stimulation of the left sciatic nerve. In addition to electrophysiologic studies, neurologic examinations were done prior to treatment and at six month intervals for the three year observation period. At the three year time period, dogs were euthanatized, sections of peripheral nerve taken, routinely processed, stained with Masson's trichrome and evaluated histomorphometrically using point count techniques. Results: Twenty-two dogs were euthanatized prior to the three year observation period due to peripheral nerve damage

  3. Do pigeons prefer alternatives that include near-hit outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagner, Jessica P; Case, Jacob P; Sticklen, Mary F; Duncan, Amanda K; Zentall, Thomas R

    2015-07-01

    Pigeons show suboptimal choice on a gambling-like task similar to that shown by humans. Humans also show a preference for gambles in which there are near hits (losses that come close to winning). In the present research, we asked if pigeons would show a preference for alternatives with near-hit-like trials. In Experiment 1, we included an alternative that presented a near hit, in which a stimulus associated with reinforcement (a presumed conditioned reinforcer) changed to a stimulus associated with the absence of reinforcement (a presumed conditioned inhibitor). The pigeons tended to avoid this alternative. In Experiment 2, we varied the duration of the presumed conditioned reinforcer (2 vs. 8 s) that changed to a presumed conditioned inhibitor (8 vs. 2 s) and found that the longer the conditioned reinforcer was presented, the more the pigeons avoided it. In Experiment 3, the near-hit alternative involved an ambiguous stimulus for 8 s that changed to a presumed conditioned reinforcer (or a presumed conditioned inhibitor) for 2 s, but the pigeons still avoided it. In Experiment 4, we controlled for the duration of the conditioned reinforcer by presenting it first for 2 s followed by the ambiguous stimulus for 8 s. Once again, the pigeons avoided the alternative with the near-hit trials. In all 4 experiments, the pigeons tended to avoid alternatives that provided near-hit-like trials. We concluded that humans may be attracted to near-hit trials because near-hit trials give them the illusion of control, whereas this does not appear to be a factor for pigeons. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Comments on 'Reconsidering the definition of a dose-volume histogram'-dose-mass histogram (DMH) versus dose-volume histogram (DVH) for predicting radiation-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Plataniotis, Georgios A; Gorka, Magdalena Adamus; Lind, Bengt K

    2006-01-01

    In a recently published paper (Nioutsikou et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 L17) the authors showed that the use of the dose-mass histogram (DMH) concept is a more accurate descriptor of the dose delivered to lung than the traditionally used dose-volume histogram (DVH) concept. Furthermore, they state that if a functional imaging modality could also be registered to the anatomical imaging modality providing a functional weighting across the organ (functional mass) then the more general and realistic concept of the dose-functioning mass histogram (D[F]MH) could be an even more appropriate descriptor. The comments of the present letter to the editor are in line with the basic arguments of that work since their general conclusions appear to be supported by the comparison of the DMH and DVH concepts using radiobiological measures. In this study, it is examined whether the dose-mass histogram (DMH) concept deviated significantly from the widely used dose-volume histogram (DVH) concept regarding the expected lung complications and if there are clinical indications supporting these results. The problem was investigated theoretically by applying two hypothetical dose distributions (Gaussian and semi-Gaussian shaped) on two lungs of uniform and varying densities. The influence of the deviation between DVHs and DMHs on the treatment outcome was estimated by using the relative seriality and LKB models using the Gagliardi et al (2000 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 46 373) and Seppenwoolde et al (2003 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 55 724) parameter sets for radiation pneumonitis, respectively. Furthermore, the biological equivalent of their difference was estimated by the biologically effective uniform dose (D-bar) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) concepts, respectively. It is shown that the relation between the DVHs and DMHs varies depending on the underlying cell density distribution and the applied dose distribution. However, the range of their deviation in terms of

  5. A theoretical approach to the problem of dose-volume constraint estimation and their impact on the dose-volume histogram selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinkel, Colleen; Stavrev, Pavel; Stavreva, Nadia; Fallone, B. Gino

    2006-01-01

    This paper outlines a theoretical approach to the problem of estimating and choosing dose-volume constraints. Following this approach, a method of choosing dose-volume constraints based on biological criteria is proposed. This method is called ''reverse normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) mapping into dose-volume space'' and may be used as a general guidance to the problem of dose-volume constraint estimation. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) are randomly simulated, and those resulting in clinically acceptable levels of complication, such as NTCP of 5±0.5%, are selected and averaged producing a mean DVH that is proven to result in the same level of NTCP. The points from the averaged DVH are proposed to serve as physical dose-volume constraints. The population-based critical volume and Lyman NTCP models with parameter sets taken from literature sources were used for the NTCP estimation. The impact of the prescribed value of the maximum dose to the organ, D max , on the averaged DVH and the dose-volume constraint points is investigated. Constraint points for 16 organs are calculated. The impact of the number of constraints to be fulfilled based on the likelihood that a DVH satisfying them will result in an acceptable NTCP is also investigated. It is theoretically proven that the radiation treatment optimization based on physical objective functions can sufficiently well restrict the dose to the organs at risk, resulting in sufficiently low NTCP values through the employment of several appropriate dose-volume constraints. At the same time, the pure physical approach to optimization is self-restrictive due to the preassignment of acceptable NTCP levels thus excluding possible better solutions to the problem

  6. A model to incorporate organ deformation in the evaluation of dose/volume relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, D.; Jaffray, D.; Wong, J.; Brabbins, D.; Martinez, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists during the course of radiation treatment. However, a model to evaluate the resultant dose delivered to a daily deformed organ remains a difficult challenge. Current methods which model such organ deformation as rigid body motion in the dose calculation for treatment planning evaluation are incorrect and misleading. In this study, a new model for treatment planning evaluation is introduced which incorporates patient specific information of daily organ deformation and setup variation. The model was also used to retrospectively analyze the actual treatment data measured using daily CT scans for 5 patients with prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: The model assumes that for each patient, the organ of interest can be measured during the first few treatment days. First, the volume of each organ is delineated from each of the daily measurements and cumulated in a 3D bit-map. A tissue occupancy distribution is then constructed with the 50% isodensity representing the mean, or effective, organ volume. During the course of treatment, each voxel in the effective organ volume is assumed to move inside a local 3D neighborhood with a specific distribution function. The neighborhood and the distribution function are deduced from the positions and shapes of the organ in the first few measurements using the biomechanics model of viscoelastic body. For each voxel, the local distribution function is then convolved with the spatial dose distribution. The latter includes also the variation in dose due to daily setup error. As a result, the cumulative dose to the voxel incorporates the effects of daily setup variation and organ deformation. A ''variation adjusted'' dose volume histogram, aDVH, for the effective organ volume can then be constructed for the purpose of treatment evaluation and optimization. Up to 20 daily CT scans and daily portal images for 5 patients with prostate

  7. Reliability of dose volume constraint inference from clinical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, C. M.; Møller, D. S.; Hoffmann, L.; Knap, M. M.; Alber, M.

    2017-04-01

    Dose volume histogram points (DVHPs) frequently serve as dose constraints in radiotherapy treatment planning. An experiment was designed to investigate the reliability of DVHP inference from clinical data for multiple cohort sizes and complication incidence rates. The experimental background was radiation pneumonitis in non-small cell lung cancer and the DVHP inference method was based on logistic regression. From 102 NSCLC real-life dose distributions and a postulated DVHP model, an ‘ideal’ cohort was generated where the most predictive model was equal to the postulated model. A bootstrap and a Cohort Replication Monte Carlo (CoRepMC) approach were applied to create 1000 equally sized populations each. The cohorts were then analyzed to establish inference frequency distributions. This was applied to nine scenarios for cohort sizes of 102 (1), 500 (2) to 2000 (3) patients (by sampling with replacement) and three postulated DVHP models. The Bootstrap was repeated for a ‘non-ideal’ cohort, where the most predictive model did not coincide with the postulated model. The Bootstrap produced chaotic results for all models of cohort size 1 for both the ideal and non-ideal cohorts. For cohort size 2 and 3, the distributions for all populations were more concentrated around the postulated DVHP. For the CoRepMC, the inference frequency increased with cohort size and incidence rate. Correct inference rates  >85 % were only achieved by cohorts with more than 500 patients. Both Bootstrap and CoRepMC indicate that inference of the correct or approximate DVHP for typical cohort sizes is highly uncertain. CoRepMC results were less spurious than Bootstrap results, demonstrating the large influence that randomness in dose-response has on the statistical analysis.

  8. Dose-volume histogram analysis as predictor of radiation pneumonitis in primary lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, Michael; Tan, Alex; Fisher, Richard; Mac Manus, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between various parameters derived from lung dose-volume histogram analysis and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients undergoing radical radiotherapy for primary lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 156 patients with lung cancer who had been treated with radical radiotherapy (≥45 Gy) and for whom dose-volume histogram data were available were reviewed. The incidence of symptomatic RP was correlated with a variety of parameters derived from the dose-volume histogram data, including the volume of lung receiving 10 Gy (V 10 ) through 50 Gy (V 50 ) and the mean lung dose (MLD). Results: The rate of RP at 6 months was 15% (95% confidence interval 9-22%). On univariate analysis, only V 30 (p = 0.036) and MLD (p = 0.043) were statistically significantly related to RP. V 30 correlated highly positively with MLD (r = 0.96, p 30 and MLD can be used to predict the risk of RP in lung cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy

  9. Fluence map optimization (FMO) with dose-volume constraints in IMRT using the geometric distance sorting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yihua; Li, Cunhua; Ren, Haozheng; Zhang, Yong; Min, Zhifang

    2012-10-21

    A new heuristic algorithm based on the so-called geometric distance sorting technique is proposed for solving the fluence map optimization with dose-volume constraints which is one of the most essential tasks for inverse planning in IMRT. The framework of the proposed method is basically an iterative process which begins with a simple linear constrained quadratic optimization model without considering any dose-volume constraints, and then the dose constraints for the voxels violating the dose-volume constraints are gradually added into the quadratic optimization model step by step until all the dose-volume constraints are satisfied. In each iteration step, an interior point method is adopted to solve each new linear constrained quadratic programming. For choosing the proper candidate voxels for the current dose constraint adding, a so-called geometric distance defined in the transformed standard quadratic form of the fluence map optimization model was used to guide the selection of the voxels. The new geometric distance sorting technique can mostly reduce the unexpected increase of the objective function value caused inevitably by the constraint adding. It can be regarded as an upgrading to the traditional dose sorting technique. The geometry explanation for the proposed method is also given and a proposition is proved to support our heuristic idea. In addition, a smart constraint adding/deleting strategy is designed to ensure a stable iteration convergence. The new algorithm is tested on four cases including head-neck, a prostate, a lung and an oropharyngeal, and compared with the algorithm based on the traditional dose sorting technique. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is more suitable for guiding the selection of new constraints than the traditional dose sorting method, especially for the cases whose target regions are in non-convex shapes. It is a more efficient optimization technique to some extent for choosing constraints than the dose

  10. Dose-volume histograms for optimization of treatment plans illustrated by the example of oesophagus carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.; Huenig, R.; Huegli, C.

    1995-01-01

    Using the example of oesophagus carcinoma, dose-volume histograms for diverse treatment techniques are calculated and judged by means of multiplanar isodose representations. The selected treatment plans are ranked with the aid of the dose-volume histograms. We distinguish the tissue inside and outside of the target volume. The description of the spatial dose distribution in dependence of the different volumes and the respective fractions of the tumor dose therein with the help of dose-volume histograms brings about a correlation between the physical parameters and the biological effects. In addition one has to bear in mind the consequences of measures that influence the reaction and the side-effects of radiotherapy (e.g. chemotherapy), i.e. the recuperation of the tissues that were irradiated intentionally or inevitably. Taking all that into account it is evident that the dose-volume histograms are a powerful tool for assessing the quality of treatment plans. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Multiple local minima in IMRT optimization based on dose-volume criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-01-01

    Multiple local minima traps are known to exist in dose-volume and dose-response objective functions. Nevertheless, their presence and consequences are not considered impediments in finding satisfactory solutions in routine optimization of IMRT plans using gradient methods. However, there is often a concern that a significantly superior solution may exist unbeknownst to the planner and that the optimization process may not be able to reach it. We have investigated the soundness of the assumption that the presence of multiple minima traps can be ignored. To find local minima, we start the optimization process a large number of times with random initial intensities. We investigated whether the occurrence of local minima depends upon the choice of the objective function parameters and the number of variables and whether their existence is an impediment in finding a satisfactory solution. To learn about the behavior of multiple minima, we first used a symmetric cubic phantom containing a cubic target and an organ-at-risk surrounding it to optimize the beam weights of two pairs of parallel-opposed beams using a gradient technique. The phantom studies also served to test our software. Objective function parameters were chosen to ensure that multiple minima would exist. Data for 500 plans, optimized with random initial beam weights, were analyzed. The search process did succeed in finding the local minima and showed that the number of minima depends on the parameters of the objective functions. It was also found that the consequences of local minima depended on the number of beams. We further searched for the multiple minima in intensity-modulated treatment plans for a head-and-neck case and a lung case. In addition to the treatment plan scores and the dose-volume histograms, we examined the dose distributions and intensity patterns. We did not find any evidence that multiple local minima affect the outcome of optimization using gradient techniques in any clinically

  12. Dose-Volume Analysis of Radiation Nephropathy in Children: Preliminary Report of the Risk Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boelling, Tobias; Ernst, Iris; Pape, Hildegard; Martini, Carmen; Ruebe, Christian; Timmermann, Beate; Fischedick, Karin; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Willich, Normann

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize kidney function in children and adolescents who had undergone radiation treatment that included parts of the kidney. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving radiotherapy during childhood or adolescence were prospectively registered in Germany's Registry for the Evaluation of Side Effects after Radiation in Childhood and Adolescence (RiSK). Detailed information was recorded regarding radiation doses at the organs at risk since 2001 all over Germany. Toxicity evaluation was performed according to standardized Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Results: Up to May 2009, 1086 patients from 62 centers were recruited, including 126 patients (median age, 10.2 years) who underwent radiotherapy to parts of the kidneys. Maximal late toxicity (median follow-up 28.5 months in 74 patients) was characterized as Grade 0 (n = 65), 1 (n = 7) or 2 (n = 2). All patients with late effects had received potentially nephrotoxic chemotherapy. A statistically significant difference between patients with and without Grade 1 toxicity, revealing higher exposed kidney volumes in patients with toxicity, was seen for the kidney volume exposed to 20 Gy (V20; p = 0.031) and 30 Gy (V30; p = 0.003). Conclusions: Preliminary data indicate that radiation-induced kidney function impairment is rare in current pediatric multimodal treatment approaches. In the future, RiSK will be able to provide further detailed data regarding dose-volume effect relationships of radiation-associated side effects in pediatric oncology patients.

  13. Pilot study in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma with 3D image-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy using modified Heyman packing: Clinical experience and dose-volume histogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitmann, Hajo Dirk; Poetter, Richard; Waldhaeusl, Claudia; Nechvile, Elisabeth; Kirisits, Christian; Knocke, Tomas Hendrik

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate dose distribution within uterus (clinical target volume [CTV]) and tumor (gross tumor volume [GTV]) and the resulting clinical outcome based on systematic three-dimensional treatment planning with dose-volume adaptation. Dose-volume assessment and adaptation in organs at risk and its impact on side effects were investigated in parallel. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with either locally confined endometrial carcinoma (n = 15) or adenocarcinoma of uterus and ovaries after bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (n = 1) were included. Heyman packing was performed with mean 11 Norman-Simon applicators (3-18). Three-dimensional treatment planning based on computed tomography (n = 29) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 18) was done in all patients with contouring of CTV, GTV, and organs at risk. Dose-volume adaptation was achieved by dwell location and time variation (intensity modulation). Twelve patients treated with curative intent received five to seven fractions of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (7 Gy per fraction) corresponding to a total dose of 60 Gy (2 Gy per fraction and α/β of 10 Gy) to the CTV. Four patients had additional external beam radiotherapy (range, 10-40 Gy). One patient had salvage brachytherapy and 3 patients were treated with palliative intent. A dose-volume histogram analysis was performed in all patients. On average, 68% of the CTV and 92% of the GTV were encompassed by the 60 Gy reference volume. Median minimum dose to 90% of CTV and GTV (D90) was 35.3 Gy and 74 Gy, respectively. Results: All patients treated with curative intent had complete remission (12/12). After a median follow-up of 47 months, 5 patients are alive without tumor. Seven patients died without tumor from intercurrent disease after median 22 months. The patient with salvage treatment had a second local recurrence after 27 months and died of endometrial carcinoma after 57 months. In patients treated with palliative intent

  14. Dose-volume modeling of salivary function in patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Angel I.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; El Naqa, Issam; Franklin, Gregg E.; Zakarian, Konstantin; Vicic, Milos; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the factors that affect salivary function after head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT), including parotid gland dose-volume effects, potential compensation by less-irradiated gland tissue, and functional recovery over time. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients with head-and-neck tumors were enrolled in a prospective salivary function study. RT was delivered using intensity-modulated RT (n = 45), forward-planning three-dimensional conformal RT (n = 14), or three-dimensional conformal RT with an intensity-modulated RT boost (n = 6). Whole salivary flow was measured before therapy and at 6 months (n = 61) and 12 months (n = 31) after RT. A wide variety of dose-volume models to predict post-RT salivary function were tested. Xerostomia was defined according to the subjective, objective, management, analytic (SOMA) criteria as occurring when posttreatment salivary function was s ] = 0.46, p s = 0.73), stimulated saliva flow at 12 months (R s = 0.54), and quality-of-life score at 6 months (R s = 0.35) after RT. Conclusion: Stimulated parotid salivary gland dose-volume models strongly correlated with both stimulated salivary function and quality-of-life scores at 6 months after RT. The mean stimulated saliva flow rates improved from 6 to 12 months after RT. Salivary function, in each gland, appeared to be lost exponentially at a rate of approximately 5%/1 Gy of mean dose. Additional research is necessary to distinguish among the models for use in treatment planning. The incidence of xerostomia was significantly decreased when the mean dose of at least one parotid gland was kept to <25.8 Gy with conventional fractionation. However, even lower mean doses imply increased late salivary function

  15. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Yaacov Richard; Li, X. Allen; El Naqa, Issam; Hahn, Carol A.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2010-01-01

    We have reviewed the published data regarding radiotherapy (RT)-induced brain injury. Radiation necrosis appears a median of 1-2 years after RT; however, cognitive decline develops over many years. The incidence and severity is dose and volume dependent and can also be increased by chemotherapy, age, diabetes, and spatial factors. For fractionated RT with a fraction size of 80 Gy. For large fraction sizes (≥2.5 Gy), the incidence and severity of toxicity is unpredictable. For single fraction radiosurgery, a clear correlation has been demonstrated between the target size and the risk of adverse events. Substantial variation among different centers' reported outcomes have prevented us from making toxicity-risk predictions. Cognitive dysfunction in children is largely seen for whole brain doses of ≥18 Gy. No substantial evidence has shown that RT induces irreversible cognitive decline in adults within 4 years of RT.

  16. A novel method for the evaluation of uncertainty in dose-volume histogram computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, Francisco Cutanda; Castrillón, Silvia Vargas

    2008-03-15

    Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) are a useful tool in state-of-the-art radiotherapy treatment planning, and it is essential to recognize their limitations. Even after a specific dose-calculation model is optimized, dose distributions computed by using treatment-planning systems are affected by several sources of uncertainty, such as algorithm limitations, measurement uncertainty in the data used to model the beam, and residual differences between measured and computed dose. This report presents a novel method to take them into account. To take into account the effect of associated uncertainties, a probabilistic approach using a new kind of histogram, a dose-expected volume histogram, is introduced. The expected value of the volume in the region of interest receiving an absorbed dose equal to or greater than a certain value is found by using the probability distribution of the dose at each point. A rectangular probability distribution is assumed for this point dose, and a formulation that accounts for uncertainties associated with point dose is presented for practical computations. This method is applied to a set of DVHs for different regions of interest, including 6 brain patients, 8 lung patients, 8 pelvis patients, and 6 prostate patients planned for intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Results show a greater effect on planning target volume coverage than in organs at risk. In cases of steep DVH gradients, such as planning target volumes, this new method shows the largest differences with the corresponding DVH; thus, the effect of the uncertainty is larger.

  17. First impressions of 3D visual tools and dose volume histograms for plan evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rattray, G.; Simitcioglu, A.; Parkinson, M.; Biggs, J.

    1999-01-01

    Converting from 2D to 3D treatment planning offers numerous challenges. The practices that have evolved in the 2D environment may not be applicable when translated into the 3D environment. One such practice is the methods used to evaluate a plan. In 2D planning a plane by plane comparison method is generally practiced. This type of evaluation method would not be appropriate for plans produced by a 3D planning system. To this end 3D dose displays and Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) have been developed to facilitate the evaluation of such plans. A survey was conducted to determine the impressions of Radiation Therapists as they used these tools for the first time. The survey involved comparing a number of plans for a small group of patients and selecting the best plan for each patient. Three evaluation methods were assessed. These included the traditional plane by plane, 3D dose display, and DVHs. Those surveyed found the DVH to be the easiest of the three methods to use, with the 3D display being the next easiest. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Single-dose volume regulation algorithm for a gas-compensated intrathecal infusion pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Kim, Kwang Gi; Sung, Mun Hyun; Choi, Seong Wook; Kim, Dae Hyun; Jo, Yung Ho

    2011-01-01

    The internal pressures of medication reservoirs of gas-compensated intrathecal medication infusion pumps decrease when medication is discharged, and these discharge-induced pressure drops can decrease the volume of medication discharged. To prevent these reductions, the volumes discharged must be adjusted to maintain the required dosage levels. In this study, the authors developed an automatic control algorithm for an intrathecal infusion pump developed by the Korean National Cancer Center that regulates single-dose volumes. The proposed algorithm estimates the amount of medication remaining and adjusts control parameters automatically to maintain single-dose volumes at predetermined levels. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed algorithm can regulate mean single-dose volumes with a variation of 98%. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2010, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Modeling radiation dosimetry to predict cognitive outcomes in pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors including medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Kiehna, Erin N.; Li Chenghong; Shukla, Hemant; Sengupta, Saikat; Xiong Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Model the effects of radiation dosimetry on IQ among pediatric patients with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors (n = 39) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before and after treatment with postoperative, risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation (CSI) and conformal primary-site irradiation, followed by chemotherapy. Differential dose-volume data for 5 brain volumes (total brain, supratentorial brain, infratentorial brain, and left and right temporal lobes) were correlated with IQ after surgery and at follow-up by use of linear regression. Results: When the dose distribution was partitioned into 2 levels, both had a significantly negative effect on longitudinal IQ across all 5 brain volumes. When the dose distribution was partitioned into 3 levels (low, medium, and high), exposure to the supratentorial brain appeared to have the most significant impact. For most models, each Gy of exposure had a similar effect on IQ decline, regardless of dose level. Conclusions: Our results suggest that radiation dosimetry data from 5 brain volumes can be used to predict decline in longitudinal IQ. Despite measures to reduce radiation dose and treatment volume, the volume that receives the highest dose continues to have the greatest effect, which supports current volume-reduction efforts

  20. Including Emotional Intelligence in Pharmacy Curricula to Help Achieve CAPE Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael H; Fierke, Kerry K; Sucher, Brandon J; Janke, Kristin K

    2015-05-25

    The importance of emotional intelligence (EI) for effective teamwork and leadership within the workplace is increasingly apparent. As suggested by the 2013 CAPE Outcomes, we recommend that colleges and schools of pharmacy consider EI-related competencies to build self-awareness and professionalism among students. In this Statement, we provide two examples of the introduction of EI into pharmacy curricula. In addition, we provide a 4-phase process based on recommendations developed by EI experts for structuring and planning EI development. Finally, we make 9 recommendations' to inform the process of including EI in pharmacy curricula.

  1. Dose-volume complication analysis for visual pathway structures of patients with advanced paranasal sinus tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, Mary Kaye; Sandler, Howard M.; Cornblath, Wayne T.; Marsh, Lon H.; Hazuka, Mark B.; Roa, Wilson H.; Fraass, Benedict A.; Lichter, Allen S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present work was to relate dose and volume information to complication data for visual pathway structures in patients with advanced paranasal sinus tumors. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions for chiasm, optic nerve, and retina were calculated and analyzed for 20 patients with advanced paranasal sinus malignant tumors. 3D treatment planning with beam's eye view capability was used to design beam and block arrangements, striving to spare the contralateral orbit (to lessen the chance of unilateral blindness) and frequently the ipsilateral orbit (to help prevent bilateral blindness). Point doses, dose-volume histogram analysis, and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were performed. Published tolerance doses that indicate significant risk of complications were used as guidelines for analysis of the 3D dose distributions. Results: Point doses, percent volume exceeding a specified published tolerance dose, and NTCP calculations are given in detail for patients with complications versus patients without complications. Two optic nerves receiving maximum doses below the published tolerance dose sustained damage (mild vision loss). Three patients (of 13) without optic nerve sparing and/or chiasm sparing had moderate or severe vision loss. Complication data, including individual patient analysis to estimate overall risk for loss of vision, are given. Conclusion: 3D treatment planning techniques were used successfully to provide bilateral sparing of the globe for most patients. It was more difficult to spare the optic nerves, especially on the ipsilateral side, when prescription dose exceeded the normal tissue tolerance doses. NTCP calculations may be useful in assessing complication risk better than point dose tolerance criteria for the chiasm, optic nerve, and retina. It is important to assess the overall risk of blindness for the patient in addition to the risk for individual visual pathway

  2. Conducting Accessible Research: Including People With Disabilities in Public Health, Epidemiological, and Outcomes Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Dianne; Magasi, Susan; Novak, Catherine; Harniss, Mark

    2016-12-01

    People with disabilities are largely absent from mainstream health research. Exclusion of people with disabilities may be explicit, attributable to poorly justified exclusion criteria, or implicit, attributable to inaccessible study documents, interventions, or research measures. Meanwhile, people with disabilities experience poorer health, greater incidence of chronic conditions, and higher health care expenditure than people without disabilities. We outline our approach to "accessible research design"-research accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities. We describe a model that includes 3 tiers: universal design, accommodations, and modifications. Through our work on several large-scale research studies, we provide pragmatic examples of accessible research design. Making efforts to include people with disabilities in public health, epidemiological, and outcomes studies will enhance the interpretability of findings for a significant patient population.

  3. Evaluation of dose-volume histograms after prostate seed implantation. 4-year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoinkis, C.; Lehmann, D.; Winkler, C.; Herrmann, T.; Hakenberg, O.W.; Wirth, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: permanent interstitial brachytherapy by seed implantation is a treatment alternative for low-volume low-risk prostate cancer and a complex interdisciplinary treatment with a learning curve. Dose-volume histograms are used to assess postimplant quality. The authors evaluated their learning curve based on dose-volume histograms and analyzed factors influencing implantation quality. Patients and methods: since 1999, 38 patients with a minimum follow-up of 6 months were treated at the authors' institution with seed implantation using palladium-103 or iodine-125, initially using the preplan method and later real-time planning. Postimplant CT was performed after 4 weeks. The dose-volume indices D90, V100, V150, the D max of pre- and postplans, and the size and position of the volume receiving the prescribed dose (high-dose volume) of the postplans were evaluated. In six patients, postplan imaging both by CT and MRI was used and prostate volumes were compared with preimplant transrectal ultrasound volumes. The first five patients were treated under external supervision. Results: patients were divided into three consecutive groups for analysis of the learning curve (group 1: n = 5 patients treated under external supervision; group 2: n = 13 patients; group 3: n = 20 patients). D90 post for the three groups were 79.3%, 74.2%, and 99.9%, the V100 post were 78.6%, 73.5%, and 88.2%, respectively. The relationship between high-dose volume and prostate volume showed a similar increase as the D90, while the relationship between high-dose volume lying outside the prostate and prostate volume remained constant. The ratio between prostate volumes from transrectal ultrasound and CT imaging decreased with increasing D90 post , while the preplanning D90 and V100 remained constant. The different isotopes used, the method of planning, and the implanted activity per prostate volume did not influence results. Conclusion: a learning curve characterized by an increase

  4. Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Kaori [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitake, Tadamasa [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohnishi, Kayoko [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirata, Hideki [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

  5. Satisfactory patient-based outcomes after surgical treatment for idiopathic clubfoot: includes surgeon's individualized technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Susan T; Spencer, Samantha A; Kasser, James R

    2014-09-01

    Treatment of idiopathic clubfoot has shifted towards Ponseti technique, but previously surgical management was standard. Outcomes of surgery have varied, with many authors reporting discouraging results. Our purpose was to evaluate a single surgeon's series of children with idiopathic clubfoot treated with a la carte posteromedial and lateral releases using the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. A total of 148 patients with idiopathic clubfoot treated surgically by a single surgeon over 15 years were identified, and mailed PODCI questionnaires. Fifty percent of the patients were located and responded, resulting in 74 complete questionnaires. Median age at surgery was 10 months (range, 5.3 to 84.7 mo), male sex 53/74 (71.6%), bilateral surgery 31/74 (41.9%), and average follow-up of 9.7 years. PODCI responses were compared with previously published normal healthy controls using t test for each separate category. Included in the methods is the individual surgeon's operative technique. In PODCIs where a parent reports for their child or adolescent, there was no difference between our data and the healthy controls in any of the 5 categories. In PODCI where an adolescent self-reports, there was no difference in 4 of 5 categories; significant difference was only found between our data (mean = 95.2; SD = 7.427) and normal controls (mean = 86.3; SD = 12.5) in Happiness Scale (P = 0.0031). In this group of idiopathic clubfoot patients, treated with judicious posteromedial release by a single surgeon, primarily when surgery was treatment of choice for clubfoot, patient-based outcomes are not different from their normal healthy peers through childhood and adolescence. While Ponseti treatment has since become the treatment of choice for clubfoot, surgical treatment, in some hands, has led to satisfactory results. Level III.

  6. Measuring Outcomes in Adult Weight Loss Studies That Include Diet and Physical Activity: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A. Millstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Measuring success of obesity interventions is critical. Several methods measure weight loss outcomes but there is no consensus on best practices. This systematic review evaluates relevant outcomes (weight loss, BMI, % body fat, and fat mass to determine which might be the best indicator(s of success. Methods. Eligible articles described adult weight loss interventions that included diet and physical activity and a measure of weight or BMI change and body composition change. Results. 28 full-text articles met inclusion criteria. Subjects, settings, intervention lengths, and intensities varied. All studies measured body weight (−2.9 to −17.3 kg, 9 studies measured BMI (−1.1 to −5.1 kg/m2, 20 studies measured % body fat (−0.7 to −10.2%, and 22 studies measured fat mass (−0.9 to −14.9 kg. All studies found agreement between weight or BMI and body fat mass or body fat % decreases, though there were discrepancies in degree of significance between measures. Conclusions. Nearly all weight or BMI and body composition measures agreed. Since body fat is the most metabolically harmful tissue type, it may be a more meaningful measure of health change. Future studies should consider primarily measuring % body fat, rather than or in addition to weight or BMI.

  7. Association of oesophageal radiation dose volume metrics, neutropenia and acute radiation oesophagitis in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everitt, Sarah; Duffy, Mary; Bressel, Mathias; McInnes, Belinda; Russell, Christine; Sevitt, Tim; Ball, David

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between oesophageal radiation dose volume metrics and dysphagia in patients having chemoradiation (CRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is well established. There is also some evidence that neutropenia is a factor contributing to the severity of oesophagitis. We retrospectively analysed acute radiation oesophagitis (ARO) rates and severity in patients with NSCLC who received concurrent chemotherapy and high dose radiation therapy (CRT). We investigated if there was an association between grade of ARO, neutropenia and radiation dose volume metrics. Patients with NSCLC having concurrent CRT who had RT dose and toxicity data available were eligible. Exclusion criteria included previous thoracic RT, treatment interruptions and non-standard dose regimens. RT dosimetrics included maximum and mean oesophageal dose, oesophagus dose volume and length data. Fifty four patients were eligible for analysis. 42 (78 %) patients received 60 Gy. Forty four (81 %) patients received carboplatin based chemotherapy. Forty eight (89 %) patients experienced ARO ≥ grade 1 (95 % CI: 78 % to 95 %). ARO grade was associated with mean dose (r s = 0.27, p = 0.049), V20 (r s = 0.31, p = 0.024) and whole oesophageal circumference receiving 20 Gy (r s = 0.32 p = 0.019). In patients who received these doses, V20 (n = 51, r s = 0.36, p = 0.011), V35 (n = 43, r s = 0.34, p = 0.027) and V60 (n = 25, r s = 0.59, P = 0.002) were associated with RO grade. Eleven of 25 (44 %) patients with ARO ≥ grade 2 also had ≥ grade 2 acute neutropenia compared with 5 of 29 (17 %) patients with RO grade 0 or 1 (p = 0.035). In addition to oesophageal dose-volume metrics, neutropenia may also be a risk factor for higher grades of ARO

  8. Tumor dose-volume response in image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeron, Renaud; Castelnau-Marchand, Pauline; Escande, Alexandre; Rivin Del Campo, Eleonor; Maroun, Pierre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Chargari, Cyrus; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided adaptive brachytherapy is a high precision technique that allows dose escalation and adaptation to tumor response. Two monocentric studies reported continuous dose-volume response relationships, however, burdened by large confidence intervals. The aim was to refine these estimations by performing a meta-regression analysis based on published series. Eligibility was limited to series reporting dosimetric parameters according to the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European SocieTy for Radiation Oncology recommendations. The local control rates reported at 2-3 years were confronted to the mean D90 clinical target volume (CTV) in 2-Gy equivalent using the probit model. The impact of each series on the relationships was pondered according to the number of patients reported. An exhaustive literature search retrieved 13 series reporting on 1299 patients. D90 high-risk CTV ranged from 70.9 to 93.1 Gy. The probit model showed a significant correlation between the D90 and the probability of achieving local control (p < 0.0001). The D90 associated to a 90% probability of achieving local control was 81.4 Gy (78.3-83.8 Gy). The planning aim of 90 Gy corresponded to a 95.0% probability (92.8-96.3%). For the intermediate-risk CTV, less data were available, with 873 patients from eight institutions. Reported mean D90 intermediate-risk CTV ranged from 61.7 to 69.1 Gy. A significant dose-volume effect was observed (p = 0.009). The D90 of 60 Gy was associated to a 79.4% (60.2-86.0%) local control probability. Based on published data from a high number of patients, significant dose-volume effect relationships were confirmed and refined between the D90 of both CTV and the probability of achieving local control. Further studies based on individual data are required to develop nomograms including nondosimetric prognostic criteria. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A prospective evaluation of hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory deficits following cranial irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting Martin; Grimm, Jimm; McIntyre, Riley; Anderson-Keightly, Heather; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Hales, Russell K; Moore, Joseph; Vannorsdall, Tracy; Redmond, Kristin J

    2017-11-01

    To prospectively evaluate hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory decline following cranial irradiation. Effects of hippocampal radiation over a wide range of doses were investigated by combining data from three prospective studies. In one, adults with small cell lung cancer received hippocampal-avoidance prophylactic cranial irradiation. In the other two, adults with glioblastoma multiforme received neural progenitor cell sparing radiation or no sparing with extra dose delivered to subventricular zone. Memory was measured by the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Delayed Recall (HVLT-R DR) at 6 months after radiation. Dose-volume histograms were generated and dose-response data were fitted to a nonlinear model. Of 60 patients enrolled, 30 were analyzable based on HVLT-R DR testing completion status, baseline HVLT-R DR and intracranial metastasis/recurrence or prior hippocampal resection status. We observed a dose-response of radiation to the hippocampus with regard to decline in HVLT-R DR. D50% of the bilateral hippocampi of 22.1 Gy is associated with 20% risk of decline. This prospective study demonstrates an association between hippocampal dose volume effects and memory decline measured by HVLT-R DR over a wide dose range. These data support a potential benefit of hippocampal sparing and encourage continued trial enrollment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The dose-volume constraint satisfaction problem for inverse treatment planning with field segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, Darek; Xiao, Ying; Censor, Yair; Galvin, James M

    2004-01-01

    The prescribed goals of radiation treatment planning are often expressed in terms of dose-volume constraints. We present a novel formulation of a dose-volume constraint satisfaction search for the discretized radiation therapy model. This approach does not rely on any explicit cost function. Inverse treatment planning uses the aperture-based approach with predefined, according to geometric rules, segmental fields. The solver utilizes the simultaneous version of the cyclic subgradient projection algorithm. This is a deterministic iterative method designed for solving the convex feasibility problems. A prescription is expressed with the set of inequalities imposed on the dose at the voxel resolution. Additional constraint functions control the compliance with selected points of the expected cumulative dose-volume histograms. The performance of this method is tested on prostate and head-and-neck cases. The relationships with other models and algorithms of similar conceptual origin are discussed. The demonstrated advantages of the method are: the equivalence of the algorithmic and prescription parameters, the intuitive setup of free parameters, and the improved speed of the method as compared to similar iterative as well as other techniques. The technique reported here will deliver approximate solutions for inconsistent prescriptions

  11. The dose-volume relationship of acute small bowel toxicity from concurrent 5-FU-based chemotherapy and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglan, Kathy L.; Frazier, Robert C.; Yan Di; Huang, Raywin R.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Robertson, John M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: A direct relationship between the volume of small bowel irradiated and the degree of acute small bowel toxicity experienced during concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiotherapy for rectal carcinoma is well recognized but poorly quantified. This study uses three-dimensional treatment-planning tools to more precisely quantify this dose-volume relationship. Methods and Materials: Forty patients receiving concurrent 5-FU-based chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation for rectal carcinoma had treatment-planning CT scans with small bowel contrast. A median isocentric dose of 50.4 Gy was delivered using a posterior-anterior and opposed lateral field arrangement. Bowel exclusion techniques were routinely used, including prone treatment position on a vacuum bag cradle to allow anterior displacement of the abdominal contents and bladder distension. Individual loops of small bowel were contoured on each slice of the planning CT scan, and a small bowel dose-volume histogram was generated for the initial pelvis field receiving 45 Gy. The volume of small bowel receiving each dose between 5 and 40 Gy was recorded at 5-Gy intervals. Results: Ten patients (25%) experienced Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity. A highly statistically significant association between the development of Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity and the volume of small bowel irradiated was found at each dose level. Specific dose-volume threshold levels were found, below which no Grade 3+ toxicity occurred and above which 50-60% of patients developed Grade 3+ toxicity. The volume of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V 15 ) was strongly associated with the degree of toxicity. Univariate analysis of patient and treatment-related factors revealed no other significant predictors of severe toxicity. Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists for the development of Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity in patients receiving concurrent 5-FU-based chemoradiotherapy

  12. Evaluation of different set-up error corrections on dose-volume metrics in prostate IMRT using CBCT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Yoshinori; Tomita, Tsuneyuki; Kitsuda, Kenji; Notogawa, Takuya; Miki, Katsuhito; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Kiyonao; Ishigaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different set-up error corrections on dose-volume metrics in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer under different planning target volume (PTV) margin settings using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. A total of 30 consecutive patients who underwent IMRT for prostate cancer were retrospectively analysed, and 7-14 CBCT datasets were acquired per patient. Interfractional variations in dose-volume metrics were evaluated under six different set-up error corrections, including tattoo, bony anatomy, and four different target matching groups. Set-up errors were incorporated into planning the isocenter position, and dose distributions were recalculated on CBCT images. These processes were repeated under two different PTV margin settings. In the on-line bony anatomy matching groups, systematic error (Σ) was 0.3 mm, 1.4 mm, and 0.3 mm in the left-right, anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Σ in three successive off-line target matchings was finally comparable with that in the on-line bony anatomy matching in the AP direction. Although doses to the rectum and bladder wall were reduced for a small PTV margin, averaged reductions in the volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose from planning were within 2.5% under all PTV margin settings for all correction groups, with the exception of the tattoo set-up error correction only (≥ 5.0%). Analysis of variance showed no significant difference between on-line bony anatomy matching and target matching. While variations between the planned and delivered doses were smallest when target matching was applied, the use of bony anatomy matching still ensured the planned doses. (author)

  13. Dose-volume histograms based on serial intravascular ultrasound: a calculation model for radioactive stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisits, Christian; Wexberg, Paul; Gottsauner-Wolf, Michael; Pokrajac, Boris; Ortmann, Elisabeth; Aiginger, Hannes; Glogar, Dietmar; Poetter, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radioactive stents are under investigation for reduction of coronary restenosis. However, the actual dose delivered to specific parts of the coronary artery wall based on the individual vessel anatomy has not been determined so far. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) permit an estimation of the actual dose absorbed by the target volume. We present a method to calculate DVHs based on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measurements to determine the dose distribution within the vessel wall. Materials and methods: Ten patients were studied by intravascular ultrasound after radioactive stenting (BX Stent, P-32, 15-mm length) to obtain tomographic cross-sections of the treated segments. We developed a computer algorithm using the actual dose distribution of the stent to calculate differential and cumulative DVHs. The minimal target dose, the mean target dose, the minimal doses delivered to 10 and 90% of the adventitia (DV10, DV90), and the percentage of volume receiving a reference dose at 0.5 mm from the stent surface cumulated over 28 days were derived from the DVH plots. Results were expressed as mean±SD. Results: The mean activity of the stents was 438±140 kBq at implantation. The mean reference dose was 111±35 Gy, whereas the calculated mean target dose within the adventitia along the stent was 68±20 Gy. On average, DV90 and DV10 were 33±9 Gy and 117±41 Gy, respectively. Expanding the target volume to include 2.5-mm-long segments at the proximal and distal ends of the stent, the calculated mean target dose decreased to 55±17 Gy, and DV 90 and DV 10 were 6.4±2.4 Gy and 107±36 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: The assessment of DVHs seems in principle to be a valuable tool for both prospective and retrospective analysis of dose-distribution of radioactive stents. It may provide the basis to adapt treatment planning in coronary brachytherapy to the common standards of radiotherapy

  14. IMRT: Improvement in treatment planning efficiency using NTCP calculation independent of the dose-volume-histogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigorov, Grigor N.; Chow, James C.L.; Grigorov, Lenko; Jiang, Runqing; Barnett, Rob B.

    2006-01-01

    The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) is a predictor of radiobiological effect for organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the NTCP is based on the dose-volume-histogram (DVH) which is generated by the treatment planning system after calculation of the 3D dose distribution. Including the NTCP in the objective function for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan optimization would make the planning more effective in reducing the postradiation effects. However, doing so would lengthen the total planning time. The purpose of this work is to establish a method for NTCP determination, independent of a DVH calculation, as a quality assurance check and also as a mean of improving the treatment planning efficiency. In the study, the CTs of ten randomly selected prostate patients were used. IMRT optimization was performed with a PINNACLE3 V 6.2b planning system, using planning target volume (PTV) with margins in the range of 2 to 10 mm. The DVH control points of the PTV and OAR were adapted from the prescriptions of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol P-0126 for an escalated prescribed dose of 82 Gy. This paper presents a new model for the determination of the rectal NTCP ( R NTCP). The method uses a special function, named GVN (from Gy, Volume, NTCP), which describes the R NTCP if 1 cm 3 of the volume of intersection of the PTV and rectum (R int ) is irradiated uniformly by a dose of 1 Gy. The function was 'geometrically' normalized using a prostate-prostate ratio (PPR) of the patients' prostates. A correction of the R NTCP for different prescribed doses, ranging from 70 to 82 Gy, was employed in our model. The argument of the normalized function is the R int , and parameters are the prescribed dose, prostate volume, PTV margin, and PPR. The R NTCPs of another group of patients were calculated by the new method and the resulting difference was <±5% in comparison to the NTCP calculated by the PINNACLE3 software where Kutcher's dose

  15. Theoretical Framework to Extend Adverse Outcome Pathways to Include Pharmacokinetic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) have generated intense interest for their utility in linking known population outcomes to a molecular initiating event (MIE) that can be quantified using in vitro methods. While there are tens of thousands of chemicals in commercial use, biology h...

  16. Effects of first-dose volume and exercise on the efficacy and tolerability of bowel preparations for colonoscopy in Chinese people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Y

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ying Qin, Wei Liu, Songbai Lin, Xiangfeng Li International Medical Services, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Aim: This study was designed to compare the efficacy and tolerability of bowel preparations with and without the higher first-dose volume of polyethylene glycol (PEG solution or exercise after drinking PEG solution in Chinese people. Methods: A total of 330 participants who had a colonoscopy done in Peking Union Medical College Hospital were randomly and evenly assigned to three groups. Participants in Group A ingested 1 L PEG solution and then ingested 2 L PEG solution at a rate of 250 mL every 15 minutes. Participants in Group B ingested 3 L PEG solution at a rate of 250 mL every 15 minutes and then exercised more than 10 minutes after ingesting each liter of PEG solution. Participants in Group C ingested 3 L PEG solution at a rate of 250 mL every 15 minutes. Experienced gastrointestinal endoscopists rated the efficacy of bowel preparations based on the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale score. A questionnaire regarding participants’ symptoms associated with bowel preparations was administered to evaluate participants’ tolerability. Results: The three groups had insignificant difference in the percentages of participants’ symptoms including dizziness, nausea, stomach ache, bloating, and asthenia. However, the percentages of participants having hunger sensation, sleep disturbance, and anal discomfort were significantly higher in groups with the higher first-dose volume of PEG solution or exercise after drinking PEG solution than without them. The three groups had insignificant difference in the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale score. Conclusion: Whether to add the higher first-dose volume of PEG solution and exercise after drinking PEG solution or not, all participants achieved a similar quality of bowel preparations. Bowel preparations without the additional first-dose volume of PEG

  17. SU-F-T-378: Evaluation of Dose-Volume Variability and Parameters Between Prostate IMRT and VMAT Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, J [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jiang, R [Grand River Regional Cancer Centre, Kitchener, ON (Canada); Kiciak, A [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study compared the rectal dose-volume consistency, equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) in prostate intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: For forty prostate IMRT and fifty VMAT patients treated using the same dose prescription (78 Gy/39 fraction) and dose-volume criteria in inverse planning optimization, the rectal EUD and NTCP were calculated for each patient. The rectal dose-volume consistency, showing the variability of dose-volume histogram (DVH) among patients, was defined and calculated based on the deviation between the mean and corresponding rectal DVH. Results: From both the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans, the rectal EUD and NTCP were found decreasing with the rectal volume. The decrease rates for the IMRT plans (EUD = 0.47 × 10{sup −3} Gy cm{sup −3} and NTCP = 3.94 × 10{sup −2} % cm{sup −3}) were higher than those for the VMAT (EUD = 0.28 × 10{sup −3} Gy cm{sup −3} and NTCP = 2.61 × 10{sup −2} % cm{sup −3}). In addition, the dependences of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the dose-volume consistency were found very similar between the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans. This shows that both delivery techniques have similar variations of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the dose-volume consistency. Conclusion: Dependences of the dose-volume consistency on the rectal EUD and NTCP were compared between the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans. It is concluded that both rectal EUD and NTCP decreased with an increase of the rectal volume. The variation rates of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the rectal volume were higher for the IMRT plans than VMAT. However, variations of the rectal dose-volume consistency on the rectal EUD and NTCP were found not significant for both delivery techniques.

  18. Absence of multiple local minima effects in intensity modulated optimization with dose-volume constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llacer, Jorge [EC Engineering Consultants, LLC 130, Forest Hill Drive, Los Gatos, CA (United States); Deasy, Joseph O [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bortfeld, Thomas R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 30 Fruit Street, Boston, MA (United States); Solberg, Timothy D [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Promberger, Claus [BrainLAB AG, Ammerthalstrasse 8, 85551 Heimstetten (Germany)

    2003-01-21

    This paper reports on the analysis of intensity modulated radiation treatment optimization problems in the presence of non-convex feasible parameter spaces caused by the specification of dose-volume constraints for the organs-at-risk (OARs). The main aim was to determine whether the presence of those non-convex spaces affects the optimization of clinical cases in any significant way. This was done in two phases: (1) Using a carefully designed two-dimensional mathematical phantom that exhibits two controllable minima and with randomly initialized beamlet weights, we developed a methodology for exploring the nature of the convergence characteristics of quadratic cost function optimizations (deterministic or stochastic). The methodology is based on observing the statistical behaviour of the residual cost at the end of optimizations in which the stopping criterion is progressively more demanding and carrying out those optimizations to very small error changes per iteration. (2) Seven clinical cases were then analysed with dose-volume constraints that are stronger than originally used in the clinic. The clinical cases are two prostate cases differently posed, a meningioma case, two head-and-neck cases, a spleen case and a spine case. Of the 14 different sets of optimizations (with and without the specification of maximum doses allowed for the OARs), 12 fail to show any effect due to the existence of non-convex feasible spaces. The remaining two sets of optimizations show evidence of multiple minima in the solutions, but those minima are very close to each other in cost and the resulting treatment plans are practically identical, as measured by the quality of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). We discuss the differences between fluence maps resulting from those similar treatment plans. We provide a possible reason for the observed results and conclude that, although the study is necessarily limited, the annealing characteristics of a simulated annealing method may not be

  19. BEDVH--A method for evaluating biologically effective dose volume histograms: Application to eye plaque brachytherapy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, Nolan L.; Leonard, Kara L.; Huber, Kathryn E.; Mignano, John E.; Duker, Jay S.; Laver, Nora V.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A method is introduced to examine the influence of implant duration T, radionuclide, and radiobiological parameters on the biologically effective dose (BED) throughout the entire volume of regions of interest for episcleral brachytherapy using available radionuclides. This method is employed to evaluate a particular eye plaque brachytherapy implant in a radiobiological context. Methods: A reference eye geometry and 16 mm COMS eye plaque loaded with 103 Pd, 125 I, or 131 Cs sources were examined with dose distributions accounting for plaque heterogeneities. For a standardized 7 day implant, doses to 90% of the tumor volume ( TUMOR D 90 ) and 10% of the organ at risk volumes ( OAR D 10 ) were calculated. The BED equation from Dale and Jones and published α/β and μ parameters were incorporated with dose volume histograms (DVHs) for various T values such as T = 7 days (i.e., TUMOR 7 BED 10 and OAR 7 BED 10 ). By calculating BED throughout the volumes, biologically effective dose volume histograms (BEDVHs) were developed for tumor and OARs. Influence of T, radionuclide choice, and radiobiological parameters on TUMOR BEDVH and OAR BEDVH were examined. The nominal dose was scaled for shorter implants to achieve biological equivalence. Results: TUMOR D 90 values were 102, 112, and 110 Gy for 103 Pd, 125 I, and 131 Cs, respectively. Corresponding TUMOR 7 BED 10 values were 124, 140, and 138 Gy, respectively. As T decreased from 7 to 0.01 days, the isobiologically effective prescription dose decreased by a factor of three. As expected, TUMOR 7 BEDVH did not significantly change as a function of radionuclide half-life but varied by 10% due to radionuclide dose distribution. Variations in reported radiobiological parameters caused TUMOR 7 BED 10 to deviate by up to 46%. Over the range of OAR α/β values, OAR 7 BED 10 varied by up to 41%, 3.1%, and 1.4% for the lens, optic nerve, and lacrimal gland, respectively. Conclusions: BEDVH permits evaluation of the

  20. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tho, Lye Mun; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V 5 , V 1 , etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p 5 and V 15 . Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further investigation

  1. Predictability of psychic outcome for exercise training and exercise training including relaxation therapy after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); J. van Dixhoorn (J.)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Predictability of the psychic outcome for two cardiac rehabilitation programmes was investigated in 119 myocardial infarction patients. They were randomly assigned to either a five-week daily exercise training or to an identical training in combination with six sessions

  2. Including Emotional Intelligence in Pharmacy Curricula to Help Achieve CAPE Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Michael H.; Fierke, Kerry K.; Sucher, Brandon J.; Janke, Kristin K.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of emotional intelligence (EI) for effective teamwork and leadership within the workplace is increasingly apparent. As suggested by the 2013 CAPE Outcomes, we recommend that colleges and schools of pharmacy consider EI-related competencies to build self-awareness and professionalism among students. In this Statement, we provide two examples of the introduction of EI into pharmacy curricula. In addition, we provide a 4-phase process based on recommendations developed by EI exper...

  3. Late rectal toxicity: dose-volume effects of conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene H.; Pollack, Alan; Levy, Larry; Starkschall, George; Lei Dong; Rosen, Isaac; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms and clinical records of 163 Stage T1b-T3c prostate cancer patients treated between 1992 and 1999 with 3D-CRT, to a total isocenter dose of 74-78 Gy at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The median follow-up was 62 months (range 24-102). All late rectal complications were scored using modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. The 6-year toxicity rate was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log-rank test. A univariate proportional hazards regression model was used to test the correlation between Grade 2 or higher toxicity and the dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors. In a multivariate regression model, clinical factors were added to the dosimetric and anatomic variables to determine whether they significantly altered the risk of developing late toxicity. Results: At 6 years, the rate of developing Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity was 25%. A significant volume effect was observed at rectal doses of 60, 70, 75.6, and 78 Gy, and the risk of developing rectal complications increased exponentially as greater volumes were irradiated. Although the percentage of rectal volume treated correlated significantly with the incidence of rectal complications at all dose levels (p 3 of the rectum. Of the clinical variables tested, only a history of hemorrhoids correlated with rectal toxicity (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that the addition of hemorrhoids increased the risk of toxicity for each dosimetric variable found to be significant on univariate analysis (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analyses clearly indicated a volume effect on the probability of developing late rectal complications

  4. A comparison of dose-volume constraints derived using peak and longitudinal definitions of late rectal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R.; Andreyev, Jervoise; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Accurate reporting of complications following radiotherapy is an important part of the feedback loop to improve radiotherapy techniques. The definition of toxicity is normally regarded as the maximum or peak (P) grade of toxicity reported over the follow-up period. An alternative definition (integrated longitudinal toxicity (ILT)) is proposed which takes into account both the severity and the duration of the complication. Methods and materials: In this work, both definitions of toxicity were used to derive dose-volume constraints for six specific endpoints of late rectal toxicity from a cohort of patients who received prostate radiotherapy in the MRC RT01 trial. The dose-volume constraints were derived using ROC analysis for 30, 40, 50, 60, 65 and 70 Gy. Results: Statistically significant dose-volume constraints were not derived for all dose levels tested for each endpoint and toxicity definition. However, where both definitions produced constraints, there was generally good agreement. Variation in the derived dose-volume constraints was observed to be larger between endpoints than between the two definitions of toxicity. For one endpoint (stool frequency (LENT/SOM)) statistically significant dose-volume constraints were only derived using ILT. Conclusions: The longitudinal definition of toxicity (ILT) produced results consistent with those derived using peak toxicity and in some cases provided additional information which was not seen by analysing peak toxicity alone.

  5. Inverse optimization of objective function weights for treatment planning using clinical dose-volume histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babier, Aaron; Boutilier, Justin J.; Sharpe, Michael B.; McNiven, Andrea L.; Chan, Timothy C. Y.

    2018-05-01

    We developed and evaluated a novel inverse optimization (IO) model to estimate objective function weights from clinical dose-volume histograms (DVHs). These weights were used to solve a treatment planning problem to generate ‘inverse plans’ that had similar DVHs to the original clinical DVHs. Our methodology was applied to 217 clinical head and neck cancer treatment plans that were previously delivered at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Canada. Inverse plan DVHs were compared to the clinical DVHs using objective function values, dose-volume differences, and frequency of clinical planning criteria satisfaction. Median differences between the clinical and inverse DVHs were within 1.1 Gy. For most structures, the difference in clinical planning criteria satisfaction between the clinical and inverse plans was at most 1.4%. For structures where the two plans differed by more than 1.4% in planning criteria satisfaction, the difference in average criterion violation was less than 0.5 Gy. Overall, the inverse plans were very similar to the clinical plans. Compared with a previous inverse optimization method from the literature, our new inverse plans typically satisfied the same or more clinical criteria, and had consistently lower fluence heterogeneity. Overall, this paper demonstrates that DVHs, which are essentially summary statistics, provide sufficient information to estimate objective function weights that result in high quality treatment plans. However, as with any summary statistic that compresses three-dimensional dose information, care must be taken to avoid generating plans with undesirable features such as hotspots; our computational results suggest that such undesirable spatial features were uncommon. Our IO-based approach can be integrated into the current clinical planning paradigm to better initialize the planning process and improve planning efficiency. It could also be embedded in a knowledge-based planning or adaptive radiation therapy framework to

  6. Calculation of complication probability of pion treatment at PSI using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Keiichi; Akanuma, Atsuo; Aoki, Yukimasa

    1991-01-01

    In the conformation technique a target volume is irradiated uniformly as in conventional radiations, whereas surrounding tissue and organs are nonuniformly irradiated. Clinical data on radiation injuries that accumulate with conventional radiation are not applicable without appropriate compensation. Recently a putative solution of this problem was proposed by Lyman using dose-volume histograms. This histogram reduction method reduces a given dose-volume histogram of an organ to a single step which corresponds to the equivalent complication probability by interpolation. As a result it converts nonuniform radiation into a unique dose to the whole organ which has the equivalent likelihood of radiation injury. This method is based on low LET radiation with conventional fractionation schedules. When it is applied to high LET radiation such as negative pion treatment, a high LET dose should be converted to an equivalent photon dose using an appropriate value of RBE. In the present study the histogram reduction method was applied to actual patients treated by the negative pion conformation technique at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Out of evaluable 90 cases of pelvic tumors, 16 developed grade III-IV bladder injury, and 7 developed grade III-IV rectal injury. The 90 cases were divided into roughly equal groups according to the equivalent doses to the entire bladder and rectum. Complication rates and equivalent doses to the full organs in these groups could be represented by a sigmoid dose-effect relation. When RBE from a pion dose to a photon dose is assumed to be 2.1 for bladder injury, the rates of bladder complications fit best to the theoretical complication curve. When the RBE value was 2.3, the rates of rectal injury fit the theoretical curve best. These values are close to the conversion factor of 2.0 that is used in clinical practice at PSI. This agreement suggests the clinical feasibility of the histogram reduction method in conformation radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord after proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijl, Hendrik P.; Vuijk, Peter van; Coppes, Rob P.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord with protons. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with a single fraction of unmodulated protons (150-190 MeV) using the shoot through method, which employs the plateau of the depth-dose profile rather than the Bragg peak. Four different lengths of the spinal cord (2, 4, 8, and 20 mm) were irradiated with variable doses. The endpoint for estimating dose-volume effects was paralysis of fore or hind limbs. Results: The results obtained with a high-precision proton beam showed a marginal increase of ED 50 when decreasing the irradiated cord length from 20 mm (ED 50 = 20.4 Gy) to 8 mm (ED 50 = 24.9 Gy), but a steep increase in ED 50 when further decreasing the length to 4 mm (ED 50 = 53.7 Gy) and 2 mm (ED 50 = 87.8 Gy). These results generally confirm data obtained previously in a limited series with 4-6-MV photons, and for the first time it was possible to construct complete dose-response curves down to lengths of 2 mm. At higher ED 50 values and shorter lengths irradiated, the latent period to paralysis decreased from 125 to 60 days. Conclusions: Irradiation of variable lengths of rat cervical spinal cord with protons showed steeply increasing ED 50 values for lengths of less than 8 mm. These results suggest the presence of a critical migration distance of 2-3 mm for cells involved in regeneration processes

  8. Re-Examination of the BEST Trial Using Composite Outcomes, Including Emergency Department Visits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Li; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Mogensen, Ulrik M.

    2017-01-01

    that included emergency department (ED) visits. We also undertook an analysis of recurrent events primarily using the Lin, Wei, Ying, and Yang model. Results Overall, 448 (33%) patients on placebo and 411 (30%) patients on bucindolol died (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78 to 1.02; p...... = 0.11). A total of 730 (54%) patients experienced CVD/HFH on placebo and 624 (46%) on bucindolol (HR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.72 to 0.89; p 0.90; p

  9. Dose-volume analysis for quality assurance of interstitial brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Jaffray, David A.; Wong, John W.; Kini, Vijay R.; Chen, Peter Y.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The use of brachytherapy in the management of breast cancer has increased significantly over the past several years. Unfortunately, few techniques have been developed to compare dosimetric quality and target volume coverage concurrently. We present a new method of implant evaluation that incorporates computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D) dose-volume analysis with traditional measures of brachytherapy quality. Analyses performed in this fashion will be needed to ultimately assist in determining the efficacy of breast implants. Methods and Materials: Since March of 1993, brachytherapy has been used as the sole radiation modality after lumpectomy in selected protocol patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Eight patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy who had surgical clips outlining the lumpectomy cavity and underwent computed tomography (CT) scanning after implant placement were selected for this study. For each patient, the postimplant CT dataset was transferred to a 3D treatment planning system. The lumpectomy cavity, target volume (lumpectomy cavity plus a 1-cm margin), and entire breast were outlined on each axial slice. Once all volumes were entered, the programmed HDR brachytherapy source positions and dwell times were imported into the 3D planning system. Using the tools provided by the 3D planning system, the implant dataset was then registered to the visible implant template in the CT dataset. The distribution of the implant dose was analyzed with respect to defined volumes via dose-volume histograms (DVH). Isodose surfaces, the dose homogeneity index, and dosimetric coverage of the defined volumes were calculated and contrasted. All patients received 32 Gy to the entire implanted volume in 8 fractions of 4 Gy over 4 days. Results: Three-plane implants were used for 7 patients and a two-plane implant for 1 patient. The median number of needles per implant was 16.5 (range

  10. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F.; Segars, Paul W.; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  11. Calculation of normal tissue complication probability and dose-volume histogram reduction schemes for tissues with a critical element architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemierko, Andrzej; Goitein, Michael

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate a model of normal tissue complication probability for tissues that may be represented by a critical element architecture. They derive formulas for complication probability that apply to both a partial volume irradiation and to an arbitrary inhomogeneous dose distribution. The dose-volume isoeffect relationship which is a consequence of a critical element architecture is discussed and compared to the empirical power law relationship. A dose-volume histogram reduction scheme for a 'pure' critical element model is derived. In addition, a point-based algorithm which does not require precomputation of a dose-volume histogram is derived. The existing published dose-volume histogram reduction algorithms are analyzed. The authors show that the existing algorithms, developed empirically without an explicit biophysical model, have a close relationship to the critical element model at low levels of complication probability. However, it is also showed that they have aspects which are not compatible with a critical element model and the authors propose a modification to one of them to circumvent its restriction to low complication probabilities. (author). 26 refs.; 7 figs

  12. Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: HoA1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary

  13. Correlation of Acute and Late Brainstem Toxicities With Dose-Volume Data for Pediatric Patients With Posterior Fossa Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Ronica H., E-mail: rhazari@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University College of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Ganju, Rohit G.; Schreibmann, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University College of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chen, Zhengjia; Zhang, Chao [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Shared Resource, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Jegadeesh, Naresh; Cassidy, Richard; Deng, Claudia; Eaton, Bree R.; Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University College of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced brainstem toxicity after treatment of pediatric posterior fossa malignancies is incompletely understood, especially in the era of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The rates of, and predictive factors for, brainstem toxicity after photon RT for posterior fossa tumors were examined. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval, 60 pediatric patients treated at our institution for nonmetastatic infratentorial ependymoma and medulloblastoma with IMRT were included in the present analysis. Dosimetric variables, including the mean and maximum dose to the brainstem, the dose to 10% to 90% of the brainstem (in 10% increments), and the volume of the brainstem receiving 40, 45, 50, and 55 Gy were recorded for each patient. Acute (onset within 3 months) and late (>3 months of RT completion) RT-induced brainstem toxicities with clinical and radiographic correlates were scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Results: Patients aged 1.4 to 21.8 years underwent IMRT or volumetric arc therapy postoperatively to the posterior fossa or tumor bed. At a median clinical follow-up period of 2.8 years, 14 patients had developed symptomatic brainstem toxicity (crude incidence 23.3%). No correlation was found between the dosimetric variables examined and brainstem toxicity. Vascular injury or ischemia showed a strong trend toward predicting brainstem toxicity (P=.054). Patients with grade 3 to 5 brainstem toxicity had undergone treatment to significant volumes of the posterior fossa. Conclusion: The results of the present series demonstrate a low, but not negligible, risk of brainstem radiation necrosis for pediatric patients with posterior fossa malignancies treated with IMRT. No specific dose-volume correlations were identified; however, modern treatment volumes might help limit the incidence of severe toxicity. Additional work investigating inherent biologic sensitivity might also provide

  14. Dose Volume Histogram analysis for rectum and urethral reaction of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Takeshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinically relevant parameters for rectum and urethral reaction using DVH (dose volume histogram) in carbon ion radiotherapy of prostate cancer. In this year, we studied the urinary reaction mainly. 35 patients with prostate cancer were treated with carbon ion beams between June 1995 and December 1997. The applied dose was escalated from 54.0 GyE to 72.0 GyE in fixed 20 fractions. Clinical urinary reaction and rectum reaction were reviewed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system for acute reactions, RTOG/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) scoring system for late reactions. Taking the ROI (region of interest) for DVH of urethra, we used surrogate one that was derived from the observation of MR images. 35 patients were analyzed for acute urinary reaction and 34 for late urinary reaction in the study of this year. DVH analysis suggested difference among the grades for acute and late reactions. These analysis appears to be a useful tool for predicting the urinary reactions. (author)

  15. Towards the elimination of Monte Carlo statistical fluctuation from dose volume histograms for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sempau, J.; Bielajew, A.F.

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo calculation of dose for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes introduces unavoidable statistical noise into the prediction of dose in a given volume element (voxel). When the doses in these voxels are summed to produce dose volume histograms (DVHs), this noise translates into a broadening of differential DVHs and correspondingly flatter DVHs. A brute force approach would entail calculating dose for long periods of time - enough to ensure that the DVHs had converged. In this paper we introduce an approach for deconvolving the statistical noise from DVHs, thereby obtaining estimates for converged DVHs obtained about 100 times faster than the brute force approach described above. There are two important implications of this work: (a) decisions based upon DVHs may be made much more economically using the new approach and (b) inverse treatment planning or optimization methods may employ Monte Carlo dose calculations at all stages of the iterative procedure since the prohibitive cost of Monte Carlo calculations at the intermediate calculation steps can be practically eliminated. (author)

  16. Equivalent uniform dose concept evaluated by theoretical dose volume histograms for thoracic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, J L; Lorchel, F; Perrot, Y; Aletti, P; Noel, A; Wolf, D; Courvoisier, P; Bosset, J F

    2007-03-01

    The goal of our study was to quantify the limits of the EUD models for use in score functions in inverse planning software, and for clinical application. We focused on oesophagus cancer irradiation. Our evaluation was based on theoretical dose volume histograms (DVH), and we analyzed them using volumetric and linear quadratic EUD models, average and maximum dose concepts, the linear quadratic model and the differential area between each DVH. We evaluated our models using theoretical and more complex DVHs for the above regions of interest. We studied three types of DVH for the target volume: the first followed the ICRU dose homogeneity recommendations; the second was built out of the first requirements and the same average dose was built in for all cases; the third was truncated by a small dose hole. We also built theoretical DVHs for the organs at risk, in order to evaluate the limits of, and the ways to use both EUD(1) and EUD/LQ models, comparing them to the traditional ways of scoring a treatment plan. For each volume of interest we built theoretical treatment plans with differences in the fractionation. We concluded that both volumetric and linear quadratic EUDs should be used. Volumetric EUD(1) takes into account neither hot-cold spot compensation nor the differences in fractionation, but it is more sensitive to the increase of the irradiated volume. With linear quadratic EUD/LQ, a volumetric analysis of fractionation variation effort can be performed.

  17. Incidence of radiation pneumonitis after thoracic irradiation: Dose-volume correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schallenkamp, John M.; Miller, Robert C.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Foote, Tyler; Garces, Yolanda I.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To define clinical and dosimetric parameters correlated with the risk of clinically relevant radiation pneumonitis (RP) after thoracic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records of consecutive patients treated with definitive thoracic radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of RP of Grade 2 or greater by the Common Toxicity Criteria. Dose-volume histograms using total lung volume (TL) and TL minus gross tumor volume (TL-G) were created with and without heterogeneity corrections. Mean lung dose (MLD), effective lung volume (V eff ), and percentage of TL or TL-G receiving greater than or equal to 10, 13, 15, 20, and 30 Gy (V10-V30, respectively) were analyzed by logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to estimate RP predictive values. Results: Twelve cases of RP were identified in 92 eligible patients. Mean lung dose, V10, V13, V15, V20, and V eff were significantly correlated to RP. Combinations of MLD, V eff , V20, and V30 lost significance using TL-G and heterogeneity corrections. Receiver operating characteristic analysis determined V10 and V13 as the best predictors of RP risk, with a decrease in predictive value above those volumes. Conclusions: Intrathoracic radiotherapy should be planned with caution when using radiotherapy techniques delivering doses of 10 to 15 Gy to large lung volumes

  18. Brachytherapy dose-volume histogram computations using optimized stratified sampling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karouzakis, K.; Lahanas, M.; Milickovic, N.; Giannouli, S.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N.

    2002-01-01

    A stratified sampling method for the efficient repeated computation of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in brachytherapy is presented as used for anatomy based brachytherapy optimization methods. The aim of the method is to reduce the number of sampling points required for the calculation of DVHs for the body and the PTV. From the DVHs are derived the quantities such as Conformity Index COIN and COIN integrals. This is achieved by using partial uniform distributed sampling points with a density in each region obtained from a survey of the gradients or the variance of the dose distribution in these regions. The shape of the sampling regions is adapted to the patient anatomy and the shape and size of the implant. For the application of this method a single preprocessing step is necessary which requires only a few seconds. Ten clinical implants were used to study the appropriate number of sampling points, given a required accuracy for quantities such as cumulative DVHs, COIN indices and COIN integrals. We found that DVHs of very large tissue volumes surrounding the PTV, and also COIN distributions, can be obtained using a factor of 5-10 times smaller the number of sampling points in comparison with uniform distributed points

  19. Isobio software: biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram from physical dose conversion using linear-quadratic-linear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaikuna, Tanwiwat; Khadsiri, Phatchareewan; Chawapun, Nisa; Saekho, Suwit; Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit

    2017-02-01

    To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model. The Isobio software was developed using MATLAB version 2014b to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histograms. The physical dose from each voxel in treatment planning was extracted through Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), and the accuracy was verified by the differentiation between the dose volume histogram from CERR and the treatment planning system. An equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD 2 ) was calculated using biological effective dose (BED) based on the LQL model. The software calculation and the manual calculation were compared for EQD 2 verification with pair t -test statistical analysis using IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (64-bit). Two and three-dimensional biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram were displayed correctly by the Isobio software. Different physical doses were found between CERR and treatment planning system (TPS) in Oncentra, with 3.33% in high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) determined by D 90% , 0.56% in the bladder, 1.74% in the rectum when determined by D 2cc , and less than 1% in Pinnacle. The difference in the EQD 2 between the software calculation and the manual calculation was not significantly different with 0.00% at p -values 0.820, 0.095, and 0.593 for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and 0.240, 0.320, and 0.849 for brachytherapy (BT) in HR-CTV, bladder, and rectum, respectively. The Isobio software is a feasible tool to generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram for treatment plan evaluation in both EBRT and BT.

  20. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: rigid compliance to dose-volume constraints as a warranty of acceptable toxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Michael J; Nadalin, Wladmir; Weltman, Eduardo; Hanriot, Rodrigo M; Luz, Fábio P; Cecílio, Paulo J; Cruz, José C da; Moreira, Frederico R; Santos, Adriana S; Martins, Lidiane C

    2007-01-01

    To report the toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with localized prostate cancer, as a sole treatment or after radical prostatectomy. Between August 2001 and December 2003, 132 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT and 125 were evaluable to acute and late toxicity analysis, after a minimum follow-up time of one year. Clinical and treatment data, including normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints, were reviewed. Gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) signs and symptoms were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scales. Median prescribed dose was 76 Gy. Median follow-up time was of 26.1 months. From the 125 patients, 73 (58.4%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GI and 97 (77.2%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GU toxicity. Grade 3 GI acute toxicity occurred in only 2 patients (1.6%) and Grade 3 GU acute toxicity in only 3 patients (2.4%). Regarding Grade 1 and 2 late toxicity, 26 patients (20.8%) and 21 patients (16.8%) presented GI and GU toxicity, respectively. Grade 2 GI late toxicity occurred in 6 patients (4.8%) and Grade 2 GU late toxicity in 4 patients (3.2%). None patient presented any Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Non-conformity to DVH constraints occurred in only 11.2% of treatment plans. On univariate analysis, no significant risk factor was identified for Grade 2 GI late toxicity, but mean dose delivered to the PTV was associated to higher Grade 2 GU late toxicity (p = 0.042). IMRT is a well tolerable technique for routine treatment of localized prostate cancer, with short and medium-term acceptable toxicity profiles. According to the data presented here, rigid compliance to DHV constraints might prevent higher incidences of normal tissue complication

  1. Effect of various methods for rectum delineation on relative and absolute dose-volume histograms for prostate IMRT treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusumoto, Chiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ohira, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita (Japan); Miyazaki, Masayoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Isono, Masaru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki, E-mail: teshima-te@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Several reports have dealt with correlations of late rectal toxicity with rectal dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for high dose levels. There are 2 techniques to assess rectal volume for reception of a specific dose: relative-DVH (R-DVH, %) that indicates relative volume for a vertical axis, and absolute-DVH (A-DVH, cc) with its vertical axis showing absolute volume of the rectum. The parameters of DVH vary depending on the rectum delineation method, but the literature does not present any standardization of such methods. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different delineation methods on rectal DVHs. The enrollment for this study comprised 28 patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer, who had undergone intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the prescription dose of 78 Gy. The rectum was contoured with 4 different methods using 2 lengths, short (Sh) and long (Lg), and 2 cross sections, rectum (Rec) and rectal wall (Rw). Sh means the length from 1 cm above the seminal vesicles to 1 cm below the prostate and Lg the length from the rectosigmoid junction to the anus. Rec represents the entire rectal volume including the rectal contents and Rw the rectal volume of the area with a wall thickness of 4 mm. We compared dose-volume parameters by using 4 rectal contour methods for the same plan with the R-DVHs as well as the A-DVHs. For the high dose levels, the R-DVH parameters varied widely. The mean of V{sub 70} for Sh-Rw was the highest (19.4%) and nearly twice as high as that for Lg-Rec (10.4%). On the contrary, only small variations were observed in the A-DVH parameters (4.3, 4.3, 5.5, and 5.5 cc for Sh-Rw, Lg-Rw, Sh-Rec, and Lg-Rec, respectively). As for R-DVHs, the parameters of V{sub 70} varied depending on the rectal lengths (Sh-Rec vs Lg-Rec: R = 0.76; Sh-Rw vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.85) and cross sections (Sh-Rec vs Sh-Rw: R = 0.49; Lg-Rec vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.65). For A-DVHs, however, the parameters of Sh rectal A-DVHs hardly changed

  2. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in tangential field irradiation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Fowble, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Radiation pneumonitis and cardiac effects are directly related to the irradiated lung and heart volumes in the treatment fields. The central lung distance (CLD) from a tangential breast radiograph is shown to be a significant indicator of ipsilateral irradiated lung volume based on empirically derived functions which accuracy depends on the actual measured volume in treatment position. A simple and accurate linear relationship with CLD and retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose volume of lung and heart is presented with actual volume data from a CT simulator in the treatment of breast cancer. Materials and Methods: The heart and lung volumes in the tangential treatment fields were analyzed in 45 consecutive (22 left and 23 right breast) patients referred for CT simulation of the cone down treatment. All patients in this study were immobilized and placed on an inclined breast board in actual treatment setup. Both arms were stretched over head uniformly to avoid collision with the scanner aperture. Radiopaque marks were placed on the medial and lateral borders of the tangential fields. All patients were scanned in spiral mode with slice width and thickness of 3 mm each, respectively. The lung and heart structures as well as irradiated areas were delineated on each slice and respective volumes were accurately measured. The treatment beam parameters were recorded and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for the CLD and analysis. Results: Table 1 shows the volume statistics of patients in this study. There is a large variation in the lung and heart volumes among patients. Due to differences in the shape of right and left lungs the percent irradiated volume (PIV) are different. The PIV data have shown to correlate with CLD with 2nd and 3rd degree polynomials; however, in this study a simple straight line regression is used to provide better confidence than the higher order polynomial. The regression lines for the left and right

  3. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in radiation treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Freedman, Gary; Fowble, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis and cardiac effects are directly related to the irradiated lung and heart volumes in the treatment fields. The central lung distance (CLD) from a tangential breast radiograph is shown to be a significant indicator of ipsilateral irradiated lung volume. Retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose volume of lung and heart with actual volume data from a CT simulator in the treatment of breast cancer is presented with respect to CLD. Methods and Materials: The heart and lung volumes in the tangential treatment fields were analyzed in 108 consecutive cases (52 left and 56 right breast) referred for CT simulation. All patients in this study were immobilized and placed on an inclined breast board in actual treatment setup. Both arms were stretched over head to avoid collision with the scanner aperture. Radiopaque marks were placed on the medial and lateral borders of the tangential fields. All patients were scanned in spiral mode with slice width and thickness of 3 mm each, respectively. The lung and heart structures as well as irradiated areas were delineated on each slice and respective volumes were accurately measured. The treatment beam parameters were recorded and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for the measurement of the CLD and analysis. Results: Using CT data the mean volume and standard deviation of left and right lungs were 1307.7 ± 297.7 cm 3 and 1529.6 ± 298.5 cm 3 , respectively. The magnitude of irradiated volume in left and right lung is nearly equal for the same CLD that produces different percent irradiated volumes (PIV). The left and right PIV lungs are 8.3 ± 4.7% and 6.6 ± 3.7%, respectively. The PIV data have shown to correlate with CLD with second- and third-degree polynomials; however, in this study a simple straight line regression is used to provide better confidence than the higher order polynomials. The regression lines for the left and right breasts are very different based on

  4. Dose-Volume Histogram Analysis of the Safety of Proton Beam Therapy for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nakachi, Kohei; Nishio, Teiji; Mitsunaga, Shuichi; Ikeda, Masafumi; Konishi, Masaru; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Gotohda, Naoto; Arahira, Satoko; Zenda, Sadamoto; Ogino, Takashi; Kinoshita, Taira

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of radiotherapy using proton beam (PRT) for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Sixty consecutive patients who underwent PRT between May 1999 and July 2007 were analyzed. There were 42 males and 18 females, with a median age of 70 years (48-92 years). All but 1 patient had a single lesion with a median diameter of 45 mm (20-100 mm). Total PRT dose/fractionation was 76-cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE)/20 fractions in 46 patients, 65 CGE/26 fractions in 11 patients, and 60 CGE/10 fractions in 3 patients. The risk of developing proton-induced hepatic insufficiency (PHI) was estimated using dose-volume histograms and an indocyanine-green retention rate at 15 minutes (ICG R15). Results: None of the 20 patients with ICG R15 of less than 20% developed PHI, whereas 6 of 8 patients with ICG R15 values of 50% or higher developed PHI. Among 32 patients whose ICG R15 ranged from 20% to 49.9%, PHI was observed only in patients who had received 30 CGE (V30) to more than 25% of the noncancerous parts of the liver (n = 5) Local progression-free and overall survival rates at 3 years were 90% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80-99%) and 56% (95% CI, 43-69%), respectively. A gastrointestinal toxicity of Grade ≥2 was observed in 3 patients. Conclusions: ICG R15 and V30 are recommended as useful predictors for the risk of developing PHI, which should be incorporated into multidisciplinary treatment plans for patients with this disease.

  5. Hippocampal dose volume histogram predicts Hopkins Verbal Learning Test scores after brain irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Okoukoni, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Radiation-induced cognitive decline is relatively common after treatment for primary and metastatic brain tumors; however, identifying dosimetric parameters that are predictive of radiation-induced cognitive decline is difficult due to the heterogeneity of patient characteristics. The memory function is especially susceptible to radiation effects after treatment. The objective of this study is to correlate volumetric radiation doses received by critical neuroanatomic structures to post–radiation therapy (RT memory impairment. Methods and materials: Between 2008 and 2011, 53 patients with primary brain malignancies were treated with conventionally fractionated RT in prospectively accrued clinical trials performed at our institution. Dose-volume histogram analysis was performed for the hippocampus, parahippocampus, amygdala, and fusiform gyrus. Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised scores were obtained at least 6 months after RT. Impairment was defined as an immediate recall score ≤15. For each anatomic region, serial regression was performed to correlate volume receiving a given dose (VD(Gy with memory impairment. Results: Hippocampal V53.4Gy to V60.9Gy significantly predicted post-RT memory impairment (P < .05. Within this range, the hippocampal V55Gy was the most significant predictor (P = .004. Hippocampal V55Gy of 0%, 25%, and 50% was associated with tumor-induced impairment rates of 14.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.2%-28.7%, 45.9% (95% CI, 24.7%-68.6%, and 80.6% (95% CI, 39.2%-96.4%, respectively. Conclusions: The hippocampal V55Gy is a significant predictor for impairment, and a limiting dose below 55 Gy may minimize radiation-induced cognitive impairment.

  6. Dose volume assessment of high dose rate 192IR endobronchial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B. Saw; Korb, Leroy J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Wu, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dose distributions of high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial implants using the dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR) and three volumetric irradiation indices. Methods and Materials: Multiple implants were configured by allowing a single HDR 192 Ir source to step through a length of 6 cm along an endobronchial catheter. Dwell times were computed to deliver a dose of 5 Gy to points 1 cm away from the catheter axis. Five sets of source configurations, each with different dwell position spacings from 0.5 to 3.0 cm, were evaluated. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions were then generated for each source configuration. Differential and cumulative dose-volume curves were generated to quantify the degree of target volume coverage, dose nonuniformity within the target volume, and irradiation of tissues outside the target volume. Evaluation of the implants were made using the DNR and three volumetric irradiation indices. Results: The observed isodose distributions were not able to satisfy all the dose constraints. The ability to optimally satisfy the dose constraints depended on the choice of dwell position spacing and the specification of the dose constraint points. The DNR and irradiation indices suggest that small dwell position spacing does not result in a more homogeneous dose distribution for the implant. This study supports the existence of a relationship between the dwell position spacing and the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points. Better dose homogeneity for an implant can be obtained if the spacing of the dwell positions are about twice the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points

  7. A randomized controlled trial of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for perfectionism including an investigation of outcome predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozental, Alexander; Shafran, Roz; Wade, Tracey; Egan, Sarah; Nordgren, Lise Bergman; Carlbring, Per; Landström, Andreas; Roos, Stina; Skoglund, Malin; Thelander, Elisabet; Trosell, Linnéa; Örtenholm, Alexander; Andersson, Gerhard

    2017-08-01

    Being highly attentive to details can be a positive feature. However, for some individuals, perfectionism can lead to distress and is associated with many psychiatric disorders. Cognitive behavior therapy has been shown to yield many benefits for those experiencing problems with perfectionism, but the access to evidence-based care is limited. The current study investigated the efficacy of guided Internet-based Cognitive Behavior Therapy (ICBT) and predictors of treatment outcome. In total, 156 individuals were included and randomized to an eight-week treatment or wait-list control. Self-report measures of perfectionism, depression, anxiety, self-criticism, self-compassion, and quality of life were distributed during screening and at post-treatment. Intention-to-treat were used for all statistical analyses. Moderate to large between-group effect sizes were obtained for the primary outcome measures, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, subscales Concerns over Mistakes and Personal Standards, Cohen's d = 0.68-1.00, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [0.36-1.33], with 35 (44.9%) of the patients in treatment being improved. Predictors were also explored, but none were related to treatment outcome. In sum, guided ICBT can be helpful for addressing problems with clinical perfectionism, but research of its long-term benefits is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk of Late Urinary Complications Following Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Refining Bladder Dose-Volume Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Elena; Escande, Alexandre; Bockel, Sophie; Khettab, Mohamed; Dumas, Isabelle; Lazarescu, Ioana; Fumagalli, Ingrid; Morice, Philippe; Deutsch, Eric; Haie-Meder, Christine; Chargari, Cyrus

    2018-06-01

    To study correlations between dose-volume parameters of the whole bladder and bladder trigone and late urinary toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy. Patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy from 2004 to 2015 were included. Cumulative dose-volume parameters of the whole bladder and bladder trigone were converted into 2-Gy/fraction equivalents (EQD2, with α/β = 3 Gy); these parameters, as well as clinical factors, were analyzed as predictors of toxicity in patients without local relapse. A total of 297 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The median follow-up period was 4.9 years (95% confidence interval 4.5-5.3 years). In patients without local relapse (n = 251), the Kaplan-Meier estimated grade 2 or higher urinary toxicity rates at 3 years and 5 years were 25.4% and 32.1%, respectively. Minimal dose to the most exposed 2 cm 3 of the whole bladder [Formula: see text] , bladder International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements (ICRU) (B ICRU ) dose, and trigone dose-volume parameters correlated with grade 2 or higher toxicity. At 3 years, the cumulative incidence of grade 2 or higher complications was 22.8% (standard error, 2.9%) for bladder [Formula: see text]   60 Gy EQD2 was significant for grade 2 or higher toxicity (P = .027). The probability of grade 3 or higher toxicities increased with bladder [Formula: see text]  > 80 Gy EQD2 (16.7% vs 1.6%; hazard ratio [HR], 5.77; P = .039), B ICRU dose > 65 Gy EQD2 (4.9% vs 1.3%; HR, 6.36; P = .018), and trigone D 50%  > 60 Gy EQD2 (3.1% vs 1.2%; HR, 6.29; P = .028). Pearson correlation coefficients showed a moderate correlation between bladder [Formula: see text] , B ICRU dose, and bladder trigone D 50% (P < .0001). These data suggest that [Formula: see text]  ≤ 80 Gy EQD2 should be advised for minimizing the risk of severe urinary

  9. The Dose-Volume Relationship of Small Bowel Irradiation and Acute Grade 3 Diarrhea During Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, John M.; Lockman, David; Yan Di; Wallace, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Previous work has found a highly significant relationship between the irradiated small-bowel volume and development of Grade 3 small-bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer. This study tested the previously defined parameters in a much larger group of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 96 consecutive patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy for rectal cancer had treatment planning computed tomographic scans with small-bowel contrast that allowed the small bowel to be outlined with calculation of a small-bowel dose-volume histogram for the initial intended pelvic treatment to 45 Gy. Patients with at least one parameter above the previously determined dose-volume parameters were considered high risk, whereas those with all parameters below these levels were low risk. The grade of diarrhea and presence of liquid stool was determined prospectively. Results: There was a highly significant association with small-bowel dose-volume and Grade 3 diarrhea (p ≤ 0.008). The high-risk and low-risk parameters were predictive with Grade 3 diarrhea in 16 of 51 high-risk patients and in 4 of 45 low-risk patients (p = 0.01). Patients who had undergone irradiation preoperatively had a lower incidence of Grade 3 diarrhea than those treated postoperatively (18% vs. 28%; p = 0.31); however, the predictive ability of the high-risk/low-risk parameters was better for preoperatively (p = 0.03) than for postoperatively treated patients (p = 0.15). Revised risk parameters were derived that improved the overall predictive ability (p = 0.004). Conclusions: The highly significant dose-volume relationship and validity of the high-risk and low-risk parameters were confirmed in a large group of patients. The risk parameters provided better modeling for the preoperative patients than for the postoperative patients

  10. Relationships Between Rectal Wall Dose-Volume Constraints and Radiobiologic Indices of Toxicity for Patients With Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzi, Simona; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Saracino, Bianca; Petrongari, Maria G.; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Landoni, Valeria; Soriani, Antonella; Benassi, Marcello

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to investigate how exceeding specified rectal wall dose-volume constraints impacts on the risk of late rectal bleeding by using radiobiologic calculations. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the rectal wall of 250 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. All patients were treated by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, receiving mean target doses of 80 Gy. To study the main features of the patient population, the average and the standard deviation of the distribution of DVHs were generated. The mean dose , generalized equivalent uniform dose formulation (gEUD), modified equivalent uniform dose formulation (mEUD) 0 , and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) distributions were also produced. The DVHs set was then binned into eight classes on the basis of the exceeding or the fulfilling of three dose-volume constraints: V 40 = 60%, V 50 = 50%, and V 70 = 25%. Comparisons were made between them by , gEUD, mEUD 0 , and NTCP. Results: The radiobiologic calculations suggest that late rectal toxicity is mostly influenced by V 70 . The gEUD and mEUD 0 are risk factors of toxicity always concordant with NTCP, inside each DVH class. The mean dose, although a reliable index, may be misleading in critical situations. Conclusions: Both in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and particularly in intensity-modulated radiation therapy, it should be known what the relative importance of each specified dose-volume constraint is for each organ at risk. This requires a greater awareness of radiobiologic properties of tissues and radiobiologic indices may help to gradually become aware of this issue

  11. Dose-volume histogram analysis of hepatic toxicity related to carbon ion radiation therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Shigeo; Kato, Hirotoshi; Tsujii, Hitohiko; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the correlation of hepatic toxicity with dose-volume factors of carbon ion radiotherapy in the liver. Forty-nine patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy delivered in 4 fractions over 4 to 7 days. Six patients received a total dose of 48 GyE and 43 received 52.8 GyE. The correlation of various blood biochemistry data with dose-volume histogram (DVH) data in non-cancerous liver were evaluated. The strongest significant correlation was seen between percent volume of non-cancerous liver with radiation dose more than 11 GyE (V 11 GyE ) and elevation of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) level as early adverse response after carbon ion beam radiation therapy (p=0.0003). In addition, significant correlation between DVH data and change of several other blood biochemistry data were also revealed in early phase. In late phase after carbon ion radiotherapy, the strongest significant correlation was seen between decrease of platelet count and V 26GyE (p=0.015). There was no significant correlation between other blood biochemistry data and DVH data in the late phase. It was suggested that dose-volume factors of carbon ion radiotherapy influenced only transient aggravation of liver function, which improved in the long term after irradiation. (author)

  12. Gastrointestinal toxicity of vorinostat: reanalysis of phase 1 study results with emphasis on dose-volume effects of pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratland, Åse; Dueland, Svein; Hollywood, Donal; Flatmark, Kjersti; Ree, Anne H

    2011-01-01

    In early-phase studies with targeted therapeutics and radiotherapy, it may be difficult to decide whether an adverse event should be considered a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of the investigational systemic agent, as acute normal tissue toxicity is frequently encountered with radiation alone. We have reanalyzed the toxicity data from a recently conducted phase 1 study on vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with pelvic palliative radiotherapy, with emphasis on the dose distribution within the irradiated bowel volume to the development of DLT. Of 14 eligible patients, three individuals experienced Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events grade 3 gastrointestinal and related toxicities, representing a toxicity profile vorinostat has in common with radiotherapy to pelvic target volumes. For each study patient, the relative volumes of small bowel receiving radiation doses between 6 Gy and 30 Gy at 6-Gy intervals (V6-V30) were determined from the treatment-planning computed tomography scans. The single patient that experienced a DLT at the second highest dose level of vorinostat, which was determined as the maximum-tolerated dose, had V6-V30 dose-volume estimates that were considerably higher than any other study patient. This patient may have experienced an adverse radiation dose-volume effect rather than a toxic effect of the investigational drug. When reporting early-phase trial results on the tolerability of a systemic targeted therapeutic used as potential radiosensitizing agent, radiation dose-volume effects should be quantified to enable full interpretation of the study toxicity profile.

  13. Comparing Outcomes and Cost of 3 Surgical Treatments for Sagittal Synostosis: A Retrospective Study Including Procedure-Related Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Sarah T; Karsy, Michael; Kestle, John R W; Siddiqi, Faizi; Spanos, Stephen P; Riva-Cambrin, Jay

    2017-10-01

    Neurosurgical techniques for repair of sagittal synostosis include total cranial vault (TCV) reconstruction, open sagittal strip (OSS) craniectomy, and endoscopic strip (ES) craniectomy. To evaluate outcomes and cost associated with these 3 techniques. Via retrospective chart review with waiver of informed consent, the last consecutive 100 patients with sagittal synostosis who underwent each of the 3 surgical correction techniques before June 30, 2013, were identified. Clinical, operative, and process of care variables and their associated specific charges were analyzed along with overall charge. The study included 300 total patients. ES patients had fewer transfusion requirements (13% vs 83%, P cost savings compared with the TCV reconstruction. The charges were similar to those incurred with OSS craniectomy, but patients had a shorter length of stay and fewer revisions. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  14. Estimation of pneumonitis risk in three-dimensional treatment planning using dose-volume histogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oetzel, Dieter; Schraube, Peter; Hensley, Frank; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Menke, Markus; Flentje, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Investigations to study correlations between the estimations of biophysical models in three dimensional (3D) treatment planning and clinical observations are scarce. The development of clinically symptomatic pneumonitis in the radiotherapy of thoracic malignomas was chosen to test the predictive power of Lyman's normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the assessment of side effects for nonuniform irradiation. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective analysis individual computed-tomography-based 3D dose distributions of a random sample of (46(20)) patients with lung/esophageal cancer were reconstructed. All patients received tumor doses between 50 and 60 Gy in a conventional treatment schedule. Biological isoeffective dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were used for the calculation of complication probabilities after applying Lyman's and Kutcher's DVH-reduction algorithm. Lung dose statistics were performed for single lung (involved ipsilateral and contralateral) and for the lung as a paired organ. Results: In the lung cancer group, about 20% of the patients (9 out of 46) developed pneumonitis 3-12 (median 7.5) weeks after completion of radiotherapy. For the majority of these lung cancer patients, the involved ipsilateral lung received a much higher dose than the contralateral lung, and the pneumonitis patients had on average a higher lung exposure with a doubling of the predicted complication risk (38% vs. 20%). The lower lung exposure for the esophagus patients resulted in a mean lung dose of 13.2 Gy (lung cancer: 20.5 Gy) averaged over all patients in correlation with an almost zero complication risk and only one observed case of pneumonitis (1 out of 20). To compare the pneumonitis risk estimations with observed complication rates, the patients were ranked into bins of mean ipsilateral lung dose. Particularly, in the bins with the highest patient numbers, a good correlation was achieved. Agreement was not reached for the lung functioning as

  15. SU-F-T-340: Direct Editing of Dose Volume Histograms: Algorithms and a Unified Convex Formulation for Treatment Planning with Dose Constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungun, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Fu, A; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Boyd, S [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a procedure for including dose constraints in convex programming-based approaches to treatment planning, and to support dynamic modification of such constraints during planning. Methods: We present a mathematical approach that allows mean dose, maximum dose, minimum dose and dose volume (i.e., percentile) constraints to be appended to any convex formulation of an inverse planning problem. The first three constraint types are convex and readily incorporated. Dose volume constraints are not convex, however, so we introduce a convex restriction that is related to CVaR-based approaches previously proposed in the literature. To compensate for the conservatism of this restriction, we propose a new two-pass algorithm that solves the restricted problem on a first pass and uses this solution to form exact constraints on a second pass. In another variant, we introduce slack variables for each dose constraint to prevent the problem from becoming infeasible when the user specifies an incompatible set of constraints. We implement the proposed methods in Python using the convex programming package cvxpy in conjunction with the open source convex solvers SCS and ECOS. Results: We show, for several cases taken from the clinic, that our proposed method meets specified constraints (often with margin) when they are feasible. Constraints are met exactly when we use the two-pass method, and infeasible constraints are replaced with the nearest feasible constraint when slacks are used. Finally, we introduce ConRad, a Python-embedded free software package for convex radiation therapy planning. ConRad implements the methods described above and offers a simple interface for specifying prescriptions and dose constraints. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of using modifiable dose constraints in a convex formulation, making it practical to guide the treatment planning process with interactively specified dose constraints. This work was supported by the

  16. Weekly Dose-Volume Parameters of Mucosa and Constrictor Muscles Predict the Use of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy During Exclusive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Gunn, G. Brandon; Parker, Brent C.; Endres, Eugene J.; Zeng Jing; Fiorino, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To define predictors of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) use during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Data for 59 consecutive patients treated with exclusive IMRT at a single institution were recovered. Of 59 patients, 25 were treated with hyperfractionation (78 Gy, 1.3 Gy per fraction, twice daily; 'HYPER'); and 34 of 59 were treated with a once-daily fractionation schedule (66 Gy, 2.2 Gy per fraction, or 70 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction; 'no-HYPER'). On the basis of symptoms during treatment, a PEG tube could have been placed as appropriate. A number of clinical/dosimetric factors, including the weekly dose-volume histogram of oral mucosa (OM DVHw) and weekly mean dose to constrictors and larynx, were considered. The OM DVHw of patients with and without PEG were compared to assess the most predictive dose-volume combinations. Results: Of 59 patients, 22 needed a PEG tube during treatment (for 15 of 22, ≥3 months). The best cutoff values for OM DVHw were V9.5 Gy/week 3 and V10 Gy/week 3 . At univariate analysis, fractionation, mean weekly dose to OM and superior and middle constrictors, and OM DVHw were strongly correlated with the risk of PEG use. In a stepwise multivariate logistic analysis, OM V9.5 Gy/week (≥64 vs. 3 ) was the most predictive parameter (odds ratio 30.8, 95% confidence interval 3.7-254.2, p = 0.0015), confirmed even in the no-HYPER subgroup (odds ratio 21, 95% CI 2.1 confidence interval 210.1, p = 0.01). Conclusions: The risk of PEG use is drastically reduced when OM V9.5-V10 Gy/week is 3 . These data warrant prospective validation.

  17. SU-F-T-340: Direct Editing of Dose Volume Histograms: Algorithms and a Unified Convex Formulation for Treatment Planning with Dose Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungun, B; Fu, A; Xing, L; Boyd, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a procedure for including dose constraints in convex programming-based approaches to treatment planning, and to support dynamic modification of such constraints during planning. Methods: We present a mathematical approach that allows mean dose, maximum dose, minimum dose and dose volume (i.e., percentile) constraints to be appended to any convex formulation of an inverse planning problem. The first three constraint types are convex and readily incorporated. Dose volume constraints are not convex, however, so we introduce a convex restriction that is related to CVaR-based approaches previously proposed in the literature. To compensate for the conservatism of this restriction, we propose a new two-pass algorithm that solves the restricted problem on a first pass and uses this solution to form exact constraints on a second pass. In another variant, we introduce slack variables for each dose constraint to prevent the problem from becoming infeasible when the user specifies an incompatible set of constraints. We implement the proposed methods in Python using the convex programming package cvxpy in conjunction with the open source convex solvers SCS and ECOS. Results: We show, for several cases taken from the clinic, that our proposed method meets specified constraints (often with margin) when they are feasible. Constraints are met exactly when we use the two-pass method, and infeasible constraints are replaced with the nearest feasible constraint when slacks are used. Finally, we introduce ConRad, a Python-embedded free software package for convex radiation therapy planning. ConRad implements the methods described above and offers a simple interface for specifying prescriptions and dose constraints. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of using modifiable dose constraints in a convex formulation, making it practical to guide the treatment planning process with interactively specified dose constraints. This work was supported by the

  18. Dose-volume analysis of predictors for chronic rectal toxicity after treatment of prostate cancer with adaptive image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Martinez, Alvaro; Kestin, Larry L.; Yan Di; Grills, Inga; Brabbins, Donald S.; Lockman, David M.; Liang Jian; Gustafson, Gary S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Vicini, Frank A.; Wong, John W.

    2005-01-01

    of rectum or rectal wall radiated to ≥50 Gy was a strong predictor for chronic rectal toxicity. Nonpredictive factors: Rectal solid/wall absolute or relative volumes irradiated to ≤40 Gy, dose level, and use of androgen deprivation were not found predictive. Conclusions In our ART dose escalation study, rectal wall or rectum relative ≥V50 are closely predictive for chronic rectal toxicity. If rectal dose-volume histogram constraints are used to select the dose level, the risk of chronic rectal toxicity will reflect the risk of toxicity of the selected constraint rather than the dose selected as found in our study using an adaptive process. To select the prescribed dose, different dose-volume histogram constraints may be used including the rectal wall V70. Patients experiencing acute rectal toxicity are more likely to experience chronic toxicity

  19. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S; Van Duyse, B; Schelfhout, J; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  20. Dose-Volume Relationships for Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Pelvic Nodal Irradiation for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Perna, Lucia; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Cozzarini, Cesare; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To find correlation between dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the intestinal cavity (IC) and moderate-severe acute bowel toxicity in men with prostate cancer treated with pelvic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 191 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent whole-pelvis radiotherapy with radical or adjuvant/salvage intent during January 2004 to November 2007. Complete planning/clinical data were available in 175 of these men, 91 of whom were treated with a conventional four-field technique (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) and 84 of whom were treated with IMRT using conventional Linac (n = 26, 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) or Helical TomoTherapy (n = 58, 50-54 Gy, 1.8-2 Gy/fraction). The IC outside the planning target volume (PTV) was contoured and the DVH for the first 6 weeks of treatment was recovered in all patients. The correlation between a number of clinical and DVH (V10-V55) variables and toxicity was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses. The correlation between DVHs for the IC outside the PTV and DVHs for the whole IC was also assessed. Results: Twenty-two patients experienced toxicity (3/22 in the IMRT/tomotherapy group). Univariate analyses showed a significant correlation between V20-V50 and toxicity (p = 0.0002-0.001), with a higher predictive value observed for V40-V50. Previous prostatectomy (p = 0.066) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.12) also correlated with toxicity. Multivariate analysis that included V45, abdominal/pelvic surgery, and prostatectomy showed that the most predictive parameters were V45 (p = 0.002) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.05, HR = 2.4) Conclusions: Our avoidance IMRT approach drastically reduces the incidence of acute bowel toxicity. V40-V50 of IC and, secondarily, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery were the main predictors of acute bowel toxicity.

  1. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Danielle; Siegbahn, E. Albert; Fallone, B. Gino; Serduc, Raphael; Warkentin, Brad

    2012-05-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2-49 (mouse) and 2-46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2-87% and 33-96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this study

  2. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Danielle; Fallone, B Gino; Warkentin, Brad; Siegbahn, E Albert; Serduc, Raphael

    2012-01-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm 2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm 2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm 2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2–49 (mouse) and 2–46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2–87% and 33–96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this

  3. Gender, renal function, and outcomes on the liver transplant waiting list: assessment of revised MELD including estimated glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Robert P; Shaheen, Abdel Aziz M; Aspinall, Alexander I; Quinn, Robert R; Burak, Kelly W

    2011-03-01

    The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) allocation system for liver transplantation (LT) may present a disadvantage for women by including serum creatinine, which is typically lower in females. Our objectives were to investigate gender disparities in outcomes among LT candidates and to assess a revised MELD, including estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), for predicting waiting list mortality. Adults registered for LT between 2002 and 2007 were identified using the UNOS database. We compared components of MELD, MDRD-derived eGFR, and the 3-month probability of LT and death between genders. Discrimination of MELD, MELDNa, and revised models including eGFR for mortality were compared using c-statistics. A total of 40,393 patients (36% female) met the inclusion criteria; 9% died and 24% underwent LT within 3 months of listing. Compared with men, women had lower median serum creatinine (0.9 vs. 1.0 mg/dl), eGFR (72 vs. 83 ml/min/1.73 m(2)), and mean MELD (16.5 vs. 17.2; all p discrimination for 3-month mortality (c-statistics: MELD 0.896, MELD-eGFR 0.894, MELDNa 0.911, MELDNa-eGFR 0.905). Women are disadvantaged under MELD potentially due to its inclusion of creatinine. However, since including eGFR in MELD does not improve mortality prediction, alternative refinements are necessary. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gastrointestinal toxicity of vorinostat: reanalysis of phase 1 study results with emphasis on dose-volume effects of pelvic radiotherapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bratland, Ase

    2011-04-08

    Abstract Background In early-phase studies with targeted therapeutics and radiotherapy, it may be difficult to decide whether an adverse event should be considered a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of the investigational systemic agent, as acute normal tissue toxicity is frequently encountered with radiation alone. We have reanalyzed the toxicity data from a recently conducted phase 1 study on vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with pelvic palliative radiotherapy, with emphasis on the dose distribution within the irradiated bowel volume to the development of DLT. Findings Of 14 eligible patients, three individuals experienced Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events grade 3 gastrointestinal and related toxicities, representing a toxicity profile vorinostat has in common with radiotherapy to pelvic target volumes. For each study patient, the relative volumes of small bowel receiving radiation doses between 6 Gy and 30 Gy at 6-Gy intervals (V6-V30) were determined from the treatment-planning computed tomography scans. The single patient that experienced a DLT at the second highest dose level of vorinostat, which was determined as the maximum-tolerated dose, had V6-V30 dose-volume estimates that were considerably higher than any other study patient. This patient may have experienced an adverse radiation dose-volume effect rather than a toxic effect of the investigational drug. Conclusions When reporting early-phase trial results on the tolerability of a systemic targeted therapeutic used as potential radiosensitizing agent, radiation dose-volume effects should be quantified to enable full interpretation of the study toxicity profile. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00455351

  5. Survey indicated that core outcome set development is increasingly including patients, being conducted internationally and using Delphi surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggane, Alice M; Brading, Lucy; Ravaud, Philippe; Young, Bridget; Williamson, Paula R

    2018-02-17

    There are numerous challenges in including patients in a core outcome set (COS) study, these can vary depending on the patient group. This study describes current efforts to include patients in the development of COS, with the aim of identifying areas for further improvement and study. Using the COMET database, corresponding authors of COS projects registered or published from 1 January 2013 to 2 February 2017 were invited via a personalised email to participate in a short online survey. The survey and emails were constructed to maximise the response rate by following the academic literature on enhancing survey responses. Personalised reminder emails were sent to non-responders. This survey explored the frequency of patient input in COS studies, who was involved, what methods were used and whether or not the COS development was international. One hundred and ninety-two COS developers were sent the survey. Responses were collected from 21 February 2017 until 7 May 2017. One hundred and forty-six unique developers responded, yielding a 76% response rate and data in relation to 195 unique COSs (as some developers had worked on multiple COSs). Of focus here are their responses regarding 162 COSs at the published, completed or ongoing stages of development. Inclusion of patient participants was indicated in 87% (141/162) of COSs in the published completed or ongoing stages and over 94% (65/69) of ongoing COS projects. Nearly half (65/135) of COSs included patient participants from two or more countries and 22% (30/135) included patient participants from five or more countries. The Delphi survey was reported as being used singularly or in combination with other methods in 85% (119/140) of projects. Almost a quarter (16/65) of ongoing studies reported using a combination of qualitative interviews, Delphi survey and consensus meeting. These findings indicated that the Delphi survey is the most popular method of facilitating patient participation, while the combination of

  6. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  7. The role of three dimensional functional lung imaging in radiation treatment planning: the functional dose-volume histogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Spencer, David P.; Sherouse, George W.; Bentel, Gunilla; Clough, Robert; Vann, Karen; Jaszczak, Ronald; Coleman, R. Edward; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: During thoracic irradiation (XRT), treatment fields are usually designed to minimize the volume of nontumor-containing lung included. Generally, functional heterogeneities within the lung are not considered. The three dimensional (3D) functional information provided by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion scans might be useful in designing beams that minimize incidental irradiation of functioning lung tissue. We herein review the pretreatment SPECT scans in 86 patients (56 with lung cancer) to determine which are likely to benefit from this technology. Methods and Materials: Prior to thoracic XRT, SPECT lung perfusion scans were obtained following the intravenous injection of ∼4 mCi of 99m Tc-labeled macro-aggregated albumin. The presence of areas of decreased perfusion, their location relative to the tumor, and the potential clinical usefulness of their recognition, were scored. Patients were grouped and compared (two-tailed chi-square) based on clinical factors. Conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and functional DVHs (DV F Hs) are calculated based on the dose distribution throughout the computed tomography (CT)-defined lung and SPECT-defined perfused lung, respectively. Results: Among 56 lung cancer patients, decreases in perfusion were observed at the tumor, adjacent to the tumor, and separate from the tumor in 94%, 74%, and 42% of patients, respectively. Perfusion defects adjacent to the tumor were often large with centrally placed tumors. Hypoperfusion in regions separate from the tumor were statistically most common in patients with relatively poor pulmonary function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Considering all SPECT defects adjacent to and separate from the tumor, corresponding CT abnormalities were seen in only ∼50% and 20% of patients, respectively, and were generally not as impressive. Following XRT, hypoperfusion at and separate from the tumor persisted, while defects adjacent to the

  8. Relationship between dose-volume parameters and pulmonary complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shigeo; Shibata, Toru [Kagawa University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kagawa (Japan); Go, Tetsuhiko; Kasai, Yoshitaka; Yokomise, Hiroyasu [Kagawa University, Department of General Thoracic, Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    This study evaluated the relationship between dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters and pulmonary complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) followed by surgery for lung cancer. We also examined a new DVH parameter, because the unresected lung should be more spared than the later resected lung. Data from 43 non-small cell lung cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed. The DVH parameters of the lung were calculated from the total bilateral lung volume minus (1) the gross tumor volume (DVHg) or (2) the later resected lung volume (DVHr). Radiation pneumonitis (RP) and fistula, including bronchopleural and pulmonary fistula, were graded as the pulmonary complications. Factors affecting the incidences of grade 2 or higher RP (≥G2 RP) and fistula were analyzed. Sixteen patients (37 %) experienced ≥G2 RP and a V20 value of the total lung minus the later resected lung (V20r) ≥ 12 % was a significant factor affecting the incidence of ≥G2 RP (p = 0.032). Six patients (14 %) developed a fistula and a V35 value of the total lung minus the gross tumor (V35g) ≥ 19 % and a V40g ≥ 16 % were significant factors affecting the incidence of fistula (p = 0.002 and 0.009, respectively). These DVH parameters may be related to the incidences of ≥G2 RP and fistula. (orig.) [German] In dieser Studie wurde die Beziehung zwischen Dosis-Volumen-Histogramm-(DVH-)Parametern und pulmonalen Komplikationen nach neoadjuvanter Radiochemotherapie (NARCT) und nachfolgender Operation beim Lungenkarzinom untersucht. Zudem wurde ein neuer DVH-Parameter untersucht, da das nichtresezierte Lungengewebe mehr geschont werden sollte als reseziertes Gewebe. Daten von 43 Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom wurden retrospektiv analysiert. Die DVH-Parameter der Lunge wurden aus dem gesamten beidseitigen Lungenvolumen minus (1) das makroskopische Tumorvolumen (DVHg) oder (2) das resezierte Lungenvolumen (DVHr) ermittelt. Strahlenpneumonitis (RP) und Fisteln

  9. Dose-volume histogram analysis for risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, Ayae

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiation-induced rib fracture has been reported as a late complication after external radiotherapy to the chest. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics and risk factors of rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT). Material and methods: The retrospective study comprised 67 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were treated using PBT of 66 Cobalt-Gray-equivalents [Gy (RBE)] in 10 fractions. We analyzed the patients' characteristics and determined dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the irradiated ribs, and then estimated relationships between risk of fracture and several dose-volume parameters. An irradiated rib was defined to be any rib included in the area irradiated by PBT as determined by treatment-planning computed tomography. Results. Among the 67 patients, a total of 310 ribs were identified as irradiated ribs. Twenty-seven (8.7%) of the irradiated ribs developed fractures in 11 patients (16.4%). No significant relationships were seen between incidence of fracture and characteristics of patients, including sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, and follow-up period (p ≥ 0.05). The results of receiver operating characteristic curve analysis using DVH parameters demonstrated that the largest area under the curve (AUC) was observed for the volume of rib receiving a biologically effective dose of more than 60 Gy 3 (RBE) (V60) [The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2); 36 Gy 3 ] and the AUCs of V30 to V120 (EQD2; 18-72 Gy 3 ) and D max to D 1 0 cm 3 were similar to that of V60. No significant relationships were seen for DVH parameters and intervals from PBT to incidence of fracture. Conclusion. DVH parameters are useful in predicting late adverse events of rib irradiation. This study identified that V60 was a most statistically significant parameter, and V30 to V120 and D max to D 1 0 cm 3 were also significant and clinically useful for estimating the risk of rib fracture after hypofractionated PBT

  10. Dose-volume histogram analysis for risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanemoto, Ayae [Proton Medical Research Center and Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)], e-mail: ayaek@pmrc.tsukuba.ac.jp [and others

    2013-04-15

    Background: Radiation-induced rib fracture has been reported as a late complication after external radiotherapy to the chest. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics and risk factors of rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT). Material and methods: The retrospective study comprised 67 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were treated using PBT of 66 Cobalt-Gray-equivalents [Gy (RBE)] in 10 fractions. We analyzed the patients' characteristics and determined dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the irradiated ribs, and then estimated relationships between risk of fracture and several dose-volume parameters. An irradiated rib was defined to be any rib included in the area irradiated by PBT as determined by treatment-planning computed tomography. Results. Among the 67 patients, a total of 310 ribs were identified as irradiated ribs. Twenty-seven (8.7%) of the irradiated ribs developed fractures in 11 patients (16.4%). No significant relationships were seen between incidence of fracture and characteristics of patients, including sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, and follow-up period (p {>=} 0.05). The results of receiver operating characteristic curve analysis using DVH parameters demonstrated that the largest area under the curve (AUC) was observed for the volume of rib receiving a biologically effective dose of more than 60 Gy{sub 3} (RBE) (V60) [The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2); 36 Gy{sub 3}] and the AUCs of V30 to V120 (EQD2; 18-72 Gy{sub 3}) and D{sub max} to D{sub 1}0{sub cm}{sup 3} were similar to that of V60. No significant relationships were seen for DVH parameters and intervals from PBT to incidence of fracture. Conclusion. DVH parameters are useful in predicting late adverse events of rib irradiation. This study identified that V60 was a most statistically significant parameter, and V30 to V120 and D{sub max} to D{sub 1}0{sub cm}{sup 3} were also significant and clinically useful for estimating

  11. An improved distance-to-dose correlation for predicting bladder and rectum dose-volumes in knowledge-based VMAT planning for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Phillip D. H.; Carver, Robert L.; Fontenot, Jonas D.

    2018-01-01

    The overlap volume histogram (OVH) is an anatomical metric commonly used to quantify the geometric relationship between an organ at risk (OAR) and target volume when predicting expected dose-volumes in knowledge-based planning (KBP). This work investigated the influence of additional variables contributing to variations in the assumed linear DVH-OVH correlation for the bladder and rectum in VMAT plans of prostate patients, with the goal of increasing prediction accuracy and achievability of knowledge-based planning methods. VMAT plans were retrospectively generated for 124 prostate patients using multi-criteria optimization. DVHs quantified patient dosimetric data while OVHs quantified patient anatomical information. The DVH-OVH correlations were calculated for fractional bladder and rectum volumes of 30, 50, 65, and 80%. Correlations between potential influencing factors and dose were quantified using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (R). Factors analyzed included the derivative of the OVH, prescribed dose, PTV volume, bladder volume, rectum volume, and in-field OAR volume. Out of the selected factors, only the in-field bladder volume (mean R  =  0.86) showed a strong correlation with bladder doses. Similarly, only the in-field rectal volume (mean R  =  0.76) showed a strong correlation with rectal doses. Therefore, an OVH formalism accounting for in-field OAR volumes was developed to determine the extent to which it improved the DVH-OVH correlation. Including the in-field factor improved the DVH-OVH correlation, with the mean R values over the fractional volumes studied improving from  -0.79 to  -0.85 and  -0.82 to  -0.86 for the bladder and rectum, respectively. A re-planning study was performed on 31 randomly selected database patients to verify the increased accuracy of KBP dose predictions by accounting for bladder and rectum volume within treatment fields. The in-field OVH led to significantly more precise

  12. Center-size as a predictor of weight-loss outcome in multicenter trials including a low-calorie diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasteyger, Christoph Rolf; Christensen, Robin; Larsen, Thomas Meinert

    2010-01-01

    weight loss. This is a post hoc analysis of an existing database: 701 obese subjects (77% women, 23% men, mean BMI: 38.9 kg/m(2)) were enrolled at 22 sites (4-85 subjects/site) in five countries to follow a LCD providing 800-1,000 kcal/day during 8 weeks. The main outcome measure was the percentage...

  13. Learning Process and Learning Outcomes of Video Podcasts Including the Instructor and PPT Slides: A Chinese Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Zhongling; Hong, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Video podcasts have become one of the fastest developing trends in learning and teaching. The study explored the effect of the presenting mode of educational video podcasts on the learning process and learning outcomes. Prior to viewing a video podcast, the 94 Chinese undergraduates participating in the study completed a demographic questionnaire…

  14. SU-F-J-217: Accurate Dose Volume Parameters Calculation for Revealing Rectum Dose-Toxicity Effect Using Deformable Registration in Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, X; Chen, H; Liao, Y; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Hrycushko, B; Albuquerque, K; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of employing deformable registration methods for accurate rectum dose volume parameters calculation and their potentials in revealing rectum dose-toxicity between complication and non-complication cervical cancer patients with brachytherapy treatment. Method and Materials: Data from 60 patients treated with BT including planning images, treatment plans, and follow-up clinical exam were retrospectively collected. Among them, 12 patients complained about hematochezia were further examined with colonoscopy and scored as Grade 1–3 complication (CP). Meanwhile, another 12 non-complication (NCP) patients were selected as a reference group. To seek for potential gains in rectum toxicity prediction when fractional anatomical deformations are account for, the rectum dose volume parameters D0.1/1/2cc of the selected patients were retrospectively computed by three different approaches: the simple “worstcase scenario” (WS) addition method, an intensity-based deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm-Demons, and a more accurate, recent developed local topology preserved non-rigid point matching algorithm (TOP). Statistical significance of the differences between rectum doses of the CP group and the NCP group were tested by a two-tailed t-test and results were considered to be statistically significant if p < 0.05. Results: For the D0.1cc, no statistical differences are found between the CP and NCP group in all three methods. For the D1cc, dose difference is not detected by the WS method, however, statistical differences between the two groups are observed by both Demons and TOP, and more evident in TOP. For the D2cc, the CP and NCP cases are statistically significance of the difference for all three methods but more pronounced with TOP. Conclusion: In this study, we calculated the rectum D0.1/1/2cc by simple WS addition and two DIR methods and seek for gains in rectum toxicity prediction. The results favor the claim that accurate dose

  15. A dose-volume histogram based decision-support system for dosimetric comparison of radiotherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, J. C. L.; Herrero, M. A.; Núñez, L.

    2015-01-01

    The choice of any radiotherapy treatment plan is usually made after the evaluation of a few preliminary isodose distributions obtained from different beam configurations. Despite considerable advances in planning techniques, such final decision remains a challenging task that would greatly benefit from efficient and reliable assessment tools. For any dosimetric plan considered, data on dose-volume histograms supplied by treatment planning systems are used to provide estimates on planning target coverage as well as on sparing of organs at risk and the remaining healthy tissue. These partial metrics are then combined into a dose distribution index (DDI), which provides a unified, easy-to-read score for each competing radiotherapy plan. To assess the performance of the proposed scoring system, DDI figures for fifty brain cancer patients were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided in three groups depending on tumor location and malignancy. For each patient, three tentative plans were designed and recorded during planning, one of which was eventually selected for treatment. We thus were able to compare the plans with better DDI scores and those actually delivered. When planning target coverage and organs at risk sparing are considered as equally important, the tentative plan with the highest DDI score is shown to coincide with that actually delivered in 32 of the 50 patients considered. In 15 (respectively 3) of the remaining 18 cases, the plan with highest DDI value still coincides with that actually selected, provided that organs at risk sparing is given higher priority (respectively, lower priority) than target coverage. DDI provides a straightforward and non-subjective tool for dosimetric comparison of tentative radiotherapy plans. In particular, DDI readily quantifies differences among competing plans with similar-looking dose-volume histograms and can be easily implemented for any tumor type and localization, irrespective of the planning system and

  16. Including a range of outcome targets offers a broader view of fibromyalgia treatment outcome: results from a retrospective review of multidisciplinary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl D; Haq, Adeel; Breuer, Paula

    2014-06-01

    Fibromyalgia is associated with substantial functional disability. Current drug and non-drug treatments result in statistically significant but numerically small improvements in typical numeric measures of pain severity and fibromyalgia impact. The aim of the present study was to evaluate additional measures of pain severity and functional outcome that might be affected by fibromyalgia treatment. This retrospective review evaluated outcomes from 274 adults with fibromyalgia who participated in a six-week, multidisciplinary treatment programme. Pain and function were evaluated on the first and final treatment visit. Pain was evaluated using an 11-point numerical scale to determine clinically meaningful pain reduction (decrease ≥ 2 points) and from a pain drawing. Function was evaluated by measuring active range of motion (ROM), walking distance and speed, upper extremity exercise repetitions, and self-reports of daily activities. Numerical rating scores for pain decreased by 10-13% (p Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores decreased by 20% (p fibromyalgia treatment effectiveness. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Clinical evaluation of dose-volume-effect relationship in radiation injury of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Mari

    1990-01-01

    Radiation brain injury, including functional disturbances or morphological changes (brain atrophy, periventricular lucencies or ventricular dilatation), were studied by CT in patients with primary intracranial neoplasms who were followed-up for at least 5 months after receiving radiotherapy. Each of 33 patients with medulloblastoma, pinealregion tumor or malignant lymphoma received a total dose of 40-61 Gy by conventional fractionation using a whole brain irradiation field boosted by a localized field. Of these patients, 19 (58%) developed radiation brain injury. It was concluded that the volume-dose was one of the most important factors influencing the development of radiation brain injury. Age at the time of radiotherapy and time of follow-up after the treatment were also considered to be important factors. (author)

  18. The Impact of Heart Irradiation on Dose-Volume Effects in the Rat Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luijk, Peter van; Faber, Hette; Meertens, Harm; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Kampinga, Harm H.; Coppes, Robert P. Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that heart irradiation increases the risk of a symptomatic radiation-induced loss of lung function (SRILF) and that this can be well-described as a modulation of the functional reserve of the lung. Methods and Materials: Rats were irradiated with 150-MeV protons. Dose-response curves were obtained for a significant increase in breathing frequency after irradiation of 100%, 75%, 50%, or 25% of the total lung volume, either including or excluding the heart from the irradiation field. A significant increase in the mean respiratory rate after 6-12 weeks compared with 0-4 weeks was defined as SRILF, based on biweekly measurements of the respiratory rate. The critical volume (CV) model was used to describe the risk of SRILF. Fits were done using a maximum likelihood method. Consistency between model and data was tested using a previously developed goodness-of-fit test. Results: The CV model could be fitted consistently to the data for lung irradiation only. However, this fitted model failed to predict the data that also included heart irradiation. Even refitting the model to all data resulted in a significant difference between model and data. These results imply that, although the CV model describes the risk of SRILF when the heart is spared, the model needs to be modified to account for the impact of dose to the heart on the risk of SRILF. Finally, a modified CV model is described that is consistent to all data. Conclusions: The detrimental effect of dose to the heart on the incidence of SRILF can be described by a dose dependent decrease in functional reserve of the lung

  19. Dose-volume based ranking of incident beam direction and its utility in facilitating IMRT beam placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Xing Lei

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is computationally intensive, and various single beam ranking techniques have been proposed to reduce the search space. Up to this point, none of the existing ranking techniques considers the clinically important dose-volume effects of the involved structures, which may lead to clinically irrelevant angular ranking. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically sensible angular ranking model with incorporation of dose-volume effects and to show its utility for IMRT beam placement. Methods and Materials: The general consideration in constructing this angular ranking function is that a beamlet/beam is preferable if it can deliver a higher dose to the target without exceeding the tolerance of the sensitive structures located on the path of the beamlet/beam. In the previously proposed dose-based approach, the beamlets are treated independently and, to compute the maximally deliverable dose to the target volume, the intensity of each beamlet is pushed to its maximum intensity without considering the values of other beamlets. When volumetric structures are involved, the complication arises from the fact that there are numerous dose distributions corresponding to the same dose-volume tolerance. In this situation, the beamlets are not independent and an optimization algorithm is required to find the intensity profile that delivers the maximum target dose while satisfying the volumetric constraints. In this study, the behavior of a volumetric organ was modeled by using the equivalent uniform dose (EUD). A constrained sequential quadratic programming algorithm (CFSQP) was used to find the beam profile that delivers the maximum dose to the target volume without violating the EUD constraint or constraints. To assess the utility of the proposed technique, we planned a head-and-neck and abdominal case with and without the guidance of the angular ranking information. The qualities of the

  20. A reanalysis of a behavioral intervention to prevent incident HIV infections: Including indirect effects in modeling outcomes of Project EXPLORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Lisa A.; Kalichman, Seth C.; Kenny, David A.; Harel, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Background Project EXPLORE -- a large-scale, behavioral intervention tested among men who have sex with men (MSM) at-risk for HIV infection --was generally deemed as ineffective in reducing HIV incidence. Using novel and more precise data analytic techniques we reanalyzed Project EXPLORE by including both direct and indirect paths of intervention effects. Methods Data from 4,296 HIV negative MSM who participated in Project EXPLORE, which included ten sessions of behavioral risk reduction counseling completed from 1999-2005, were included in the analysis. We reanalyzed the data to include parameters that estimate the overtime effects of the intervention on unprotected anal sex and the over-time effects of the intervention on HIV status mediated by unprotected anal sex simultaneously in a single model. Results We found the indirect effect of intervention on HIV infection through unprotected anal sex to be statistically significant up through 12 months post-intervention, OR=.83, 95% CI=.72-.95. Furthermore, the intervention significantly reduced unprotected anal sex up through 18 months post-intervention, OR=.79, 95% CI=.63-.99. Discussion Our results reveal effects not tested in the original model that offer new insight into the effectiveness of a behavioral intervention for reducing HIV incidence. Project EXPLORE demonstrated that when tested against an evidence-based, effective control condition can result in reductions in rates of HIV acquisition at one year follow-up. Findings highlight the critical role of addressing behavioral risk reduction counseling in HIV prevention. PMID:23245226

  1. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Uncertainty assessment for deposited material and external doses. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Boardman, J. [AEA Technology (United Kingdom); Jones, J.A. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA deposited material and external dose models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on deposited material and external doses, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

  2. Optimization of stereotactically-guided conformal treatment planning of sellar and parasellar tumors, based on normal brain dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perks, Julian R.; Jalali, Rakesh; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Adams, Elizabeth J.; Shepherd, Stephen F.; Warrington, Alan P.; Brada, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the optimal treatment plan for stereo tactically-guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) of sellar and parasellar lesions, with respect to sparing normal brain tissue, in the context of routine treatment delivery, based on dose volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT) data sets for 8 patients with sellar- and parasellar-based tumors (6 pituitary adenomas and 2 meningiomas) have been used in this study. Treatment plans were prepared for 3-coplanar and 3-, 4-, 6-, and 30-noncoplanar-field arrangements to obtain 95% isodose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) for each plan. Conformal shaping was achieved by customized blocks generated with the beams eye view (BEV) facility. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for the normal brain (excluding the PTV), and comparisons made for normal tissue sparing for all treatment plans at ≥80%, ≥60%, and ≥40% of the prescribed dose. Results: The mean volume of normal brain receiving ≥80% and ≥60% of the prescribed dose decreased by 22.3% (range 14.8-35.1%, standard deviation σ = 7.5%) and 47.6% (range 25.8-69.1%, σ 13.2%), respectively, with a 4-field noncoplanar technique when compared with a conventional 3-field coplanar technique. Adding 2 further fields, from 4-noncoplanar to 6-noncoplanar fields reduced the mean normal brain volume receiving ≥80% of the prescribed dose by a further 4.1% (range -6.5-11.8%, σ = 6.4%), and the volume receiving ≥60% by 3.3% (range -5.5-12.2%, σ = 5.4%), neither of which were statistically significant. Each case must be considered individually however, as a wide range is seen in the volume spared when increasing the number of fields from 4 to 6. Comparing the 4- and 6-field noncoplanar techniques to a 30-field conformal field approach (simulating a dynamic arc plan) revealed near-equivalent normal tissue sparing. Conclusion: Four to six widely spaced, fixed-conformal fields provide the optimum class solution

  3. Sensitivity of volumetric modulated arc therapy patient specific QA results to multileaf collimator errors and correlation to dose volume histogram based metrics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coleman, Linda

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the impact of systematic multileaf collimator (MLC) positional errors on gamma analysis results used for quality assurance (QA) of Rapidarc treatments. In addition, this study evaluates the relationship of these gamma analysis results and clinical dose volume histogram metrics (DVH) for Rapidarc treatment plans.

  4. Prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in radiotherapy for prostate cancer with full and empty bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Eble, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in prostate radiotherapy with full bladder (FB) and empty bladder (EB). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients underwent planning computed tomography scans in a supine position with FB and EB before and after 4 and 8 weeks of radiation therapy. The scans were matched by alignment of pelvic bones. Displacements of the prostate/seminal vesicle organ borders and center of mass were determined. Treatment plans (FB vs. EB) were compared. Results: Compared with the primary scan, FB volume varied more than EB volume (standard deviation, 106 cm 3 vs. 47 cm 3 ), but the prostate/seminal vesicle center of mass position variability was the same (>3 mm deviation in right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions in 0, 41%, and 33%, respectively, with FB vs. 0, 44%, and 33% with EB). The bladder volume treated with 90% of the prescription dose was significantly larger with EB (39% ± 14% vs. 22% ± 10%; p < 0.01). Bowel loops received ≥90% of prescription dose in 37% (3% with FB; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite the larger variability of bladder filling, prostate position stability was the same with FB compared with EB. An increased amount of bladder volume in the high-dose region and a higher dose to bowel loops result from treatment plans with EB

  5. Dysphagia after definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Correlation of dose-volume parameters of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deantonio, L.; Masini, L. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Radiotherapy; Brambilla, M. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Medical Physics; Pia, F. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Otolaryngology; University of ' Piemonte Orientale' , Novara (Italy). Dept. of Medical Sciences; Krengli, M. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Radiotherapy; University of ' Piemonte Orientale' , Novara (Italy). Dept. of Translational Medicine and BRMA

    2013-03-15

    Background: Dysphagia is a complication of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). We analysed frequency and severity of swallowing dysfunction and correlated these findings with dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles. Methods: A total of 50 patients treated by radical RT were enrolled. DVHs of constrictor muscles were correlated with acute and late dysphagia and with the items of three quality of life questionnaires. Results: Mean dose to superior and middle constrictor muscles (SCM, MCM), partial volume of SCM and MCM receiving a dose {>=} 50 Gy dose to the whole constrictor muscles {>=} 60 Gy and tumour location were associated to late dysphagia at univariate analysis. Mean dose to the MCM was the only statistically significant predictor of late dysphagia at the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: The study shows a significant relationship between long-term dysphagia and mean doses to SCM, MCM, whole constrictor muscles, and oropharyngeal tumour. This finding suggests a potential advantage in reducing the RT dose to swallowing structures to avoid severe dysphagia. (orig.)

  6. Normal tissue complication probabilities: dependence on choice of biological model and dose-volume histogram reduction scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose-volume histogram (DVH) reduction schemes and models of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) on ranking of radiation treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Data for liver complications in humans and for spinal cord in rats were used to derive input parameters of four different NTCP models. DVH reduction was performed using two schemes: 'effective volume' and 'preferred Lyman'. DVHs for competing treatment plans were derived from a sample DVH by varying dose uniformity in a high dose region so that the obtained cumulative DVHs intersected. Treatment plans were ranked according to the calculated NTCP values. Results: Whenever the preferred Lyman scheme was used to reduce the DVH, competing plans were indistinguishable as long as the mean dose was constant. The effective volume DVH reduction scheme did allow us to distinguish between these competing treatment plans. However, plan ranking depended on the radiobiological model used and its input parameters. Conclusions: Dose escalation will be a significant part of radiation treatment planning using new technologies, such as 3-D conformal radiotherapy and tomotherapy. Such dose escalation will depend on how the dose distributions in organs at risk are interpreted in terms of expected complication probabilities. The present study indicates considerable variability in predicted NTCP values because of the methods used for DVH reduction and radiobiological models and their input parameters. Animal studies and collection of standardized clinical data are needed to ascertain the effects of non-uniform dose distributions and to test the validity of the models currently in use

  7. Dysphagia after definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Correlation of dose-volume parameters of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deantonio, L.; Masini, L.; Brambilla, M.; Pia, F.; University of 'Piemonte Orientale', Novara; Krengli, M.; University of 'Piemonte Orientale', Novara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is a complication of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). We analysed frequency and severity of swallowing dysfunction and correlated these findings with dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles. Methods: A total of 50 patients treated by radical RT were enrolled. DVHs of constrictor muscles were correlated with acute and late dysphagia and with the items of three quality of life questionnaires. Results: Mean dose to superior and middle constrictor muscles (SCM, MCM), partial volume of SCM and MCM receiving a dose ≥ 50 Gy dose to the whole constrictor muscles ≥ 60 Gy and tumour location were associated to late dysphagia at univariate analysis. Mean dose to the MCM was the only statistically significant predictor of late dysphagia at the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: The study shows a significant relationship between long-term dysphagia and mean doses to SCM, MCM, whole constrictor muscles, and oropharyngeal tumour. This finding suggests a potential advantage in reducing the RT dose to swallowing structures to avoid severe dysphagia. (orig.)

  8. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  9. Impact of intra-arterial administration of boron compounds on dose-volume histograms in boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head-and-neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kenji; Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira; Kato, Ituro; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Imahori, Yoshio

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of head-and-neck tumors treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and to determine the advantage of the intra-arterial (IA) route over the intravenous (IV) route as a drug delivery system for BNCT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen BNCTs for 12 patients with recurrent head-and-neck tumors were included in the present study. Eight irradiations were done after IV administration of boronophenylalanine and seven after IA administration. The maximal, mean, and minimal doses given to the gross tumor volume were assessed using a BNCT planning system. Results: The results are reported as median values with the interquartile range. In the IA group, the maximal, mean, and minimal dose given to the gross tumor volume was 68.7 Gy-Eq (range, 38.8-79.9), 45.0 Gy-Eq (range, 25.1-51.0), and 13.8 Gy-Eq (range, 4.8-25.3), respectively. In the IV group, the maximal, mean, and minimal dose given to the gross tumor volume was 24.2 Gy-Eq (range, 21.5-29.9), 16.4 Gy-Eq (range, 14.5-20.2), and 7.8 Gy-Eq (range, 6.8-9.5), respectively. Within 1-3 months after BNCT, the responses were assessed. Of the 6 patients in the IV group, 2 had a partial response, 3 no change, and 1 had progressive disease. Of 4 patients in the IA group, 1 achieved a complete response and 3 a partial response. Conclusion: Intra-arterial administration of boronophenylalanine is a promising drug delivery system for head-and-neck BNCT

  10. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord: incidence and dose-volume relationship of symptomatic and asymptomatic late effects following high dose irradiation of paraspinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mitchell C.C.; Munzenrider, John E.; Finkelstein, Dianne; Liebsch, Norbert; Adams, Judy; Hug, Eugen B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Low grade chordomas and chondrosarcomas require high radiation doses for effective, lasting tumor control. Fractionated, 3-D planned, conformal proton radiation therapy has been used for lesions along the base of skull and spine to deliver high target doses, while respecting constraints of critical, normal tissues. In this study, we sought to determine the incidence of myelopathy after high dose radiotherapy to the cervical spine and investigated the influence of various treatment parameters, including dose-volume relationship. Methods and Materials: Between December 1980 and March 1996, 78 patients were treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory for primary or recurrent chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the cervical spine using combined proton and photon radiation therapy. In general, the tumor dose given was between 64.5 to 79.2 CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent). The guidelines for maximum permissible doses to spinal cord were: ≤ 64 CGE to the spinal cord surface and ≤ 53 CGE to the spinal cord center. Dose volume histograms of the spinal cord were analyzed to investigate a possible dose and volume relationship. Results: With a mean follow-up period of 46.6 months (range: 3 - 157 months), 4 of 78 patients (5.1%) developed high-grade (RTOG Grade 3 and 4) late toxicity: 3 patients (3.8%) experienced sensory deficits without motor deficits, none had any limitations of daily activities. One patient (1.2%) developed motor deficit with loss of motor function of one upper extremity. The only patient, who developed permanent motor damage had received additional prior radiation treatment and therefore received a cumulative spinal cord dose higher than the treatment guidelines. No patient treated within the guidelines experienced any motor impairment. Six patients (7.7%) experienced transient Lhermitt's syndrome and 1 patient (1.2%) developed asymptomatic radiographic MR findings only. Time to onset of symptoms of radiographic

  11. Postimplantation Analysis Enables Improvement of Dose-Volume Histograms and Reduction of Toxicity for Permanent Seed Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wust, Peter; Postrach, Johanna; Kahmann, Frank; Henkel, Thomas; Graf, Reinhold; Cho, Chie Hee; Budach, Volker; Boehmer, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate how postimplantation analysis is useful for improving permanent seed implantation and reducing toxicity. Patients and Methods: We evaluated 197 questionnaires completed by patients after permanent seed implantation (monotherapy between 1999 and 2003). For 70% of these patients, a computed tomography was available to perform postimplantation analysis. The index doses and volumes of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were determined and categorized with respect to the date of implantation. Differences in symptom scores relative to pretherapeutic status were analyzed with regard to follow-up times and DVH descriptors. Acute and subacute toxicities in a control group of 117 patients from an earlier study (June 1999 to September 2001) by Wust et al. (2004) were compared with a matched subgroup from this study equaling 110 patients treated between October 2001 and August 2003. Results: Improved performance, identifying a characteristic time dependency of DVH parameters (after implantation) and toxicity scores, was demonstrated. Although coverage (volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose of the prostate) increased slightly, high-dose regions decreased with the growing experience of the users. Improvement in the DVH and a reduction of toxicities were found in the patient group implanted in the later period. A decline in symptoms with follow-up time counteracts this gain of experience and must be considered. Urinary and sexual discomfort was enhanced by dose heterogeneities (e.g., dose covering 10% of the prostate volume, volume covered by 200% of prescription dose). In contrast, rectal toxicities correlated with exposed rectal volumes, especially the rectal volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The typical side effects occurring after permanent seed implantation can be reduced by improving the dose distributions. An improvement in dose distributions and a reduction of toxicities were identified with elapsed time between

  12. Principal Component Analysis-Based Pattern Analysis of Dose-Volume Histograms and Influence on Rectal Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soehn, Matthias; Alber, Markus; Yan Di

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The variability of dose-volume histogram (DVH) shapes in a patient population can be quantified using principal component analysis (PCA). We applied this to rectal DVHs of prostate cancer patients and investigated the correlation of the PCA parameters with late bleeding. Methods and Materials: PCA was applied to the rectal wall DVHs of 262 patients, who had been treated with a four-field box, conformal adaptive radiotherapy technique. The correlated changes in the DVH pattern were revealed as 'eigenmodes,' which were ordered by their importance to represent data set variability. Each DVH is uniquely characterized by its principal components (PCs). The correlation of the first three PCs and chronic rectal bleeding of Grade 2 or greater was investigated with uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Rectal wall DVHs in four-field conformal RT can primarily be represented by the first two or three PCs, which describe ∼94% or 96% of the DVH shape variability, respectively. The first eigenmode models the total irradiated rectal volume; thus, PC1 correlates to the mean dose. Mode 2 describes the interpatient differences of the relative rectal volume in the two- or four-field overlap region. Mode 3 reveals correlations of volumes with intermediate doses (∼40-45 Gy) and volumes with doses >70 Gy; thus, PC3 is associated with the maximal dose. According to univariate logistic regression analysis, only PC2 correlated significantly with toxicity. However, multivariate logistic regression analysis with the first two or three PCs revealed an increased probability of bleeding for DVHs with more than one large PC. Conclusions: PCA can reveal the correlation structure of DVHs for a patient population as imposed by the treatment technique and provide information about its relationship to toxicity. It proves useful for augmenting normal tissue complication probability modeling approaches

  13. Rectal toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Which rectal dose volume constraints should we use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonteyne, Valérie; Ost, Piet; Vanpachtenbeke, Frank; Colman, Roos; Sadeghi, Simin; Villeirs, Geert; Decaestecker, Karel; De Meerleer, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Background: To define rectal dose volume constraints (DVC) to prevent ⩾grade2 late rectal toxicity (LRT) after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods: Six hundred thirty-seven PC patients were treated with primary (prostate median dose: 78 Gy) or postoperative (prostatic bed median dose: 74 Gy (adjuvant)–76 Gy (salvage)) IMRT while restricting the rectal dose to 76 Gy, 72 Gy and 74 Gy respectively. The impact of patient characteristics and rectal volume parameters on ⩾grade2 LRT was determined. DVC were defined to estimate the 5% and 10% risk of developing ⩾grade2 LRT. Results: The 5-year probability of being free from ⩾grade2 LRT, non-rectal blood loss and persisting symptoms is 88.8% (95% CI: 85.8–91.1%), 93.4% (95% CI: 91.0–95.1%) and 94.3% (95% CI: 92.0–95.9%) respectively. There was no correlation with patient characteristics. All volume parameters, except rectal volume receiving ⩾70 Gy (R70), were significantly correlated with ⩾grade2 LRT. To avoid 10% and 5% risk of ⩾grade2 LRT following DVC were derived: R40, R50, R60 and R65 <64–35%, 52–22%, 38–14% and 5% respectively. Conclusion: Applying existing rectal volume constraints resulted in a 5-year estimated risk of developing late ⩾grade2 LRT of 11.2%. New rectal DVC for primary and postoperative IMRT planning of PC patients are proposed. A prospective evaluation is needed

  14. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Clinical Factors Associated With Pleural Effusion After Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Katsuyuki; Tamaki, Yoshio; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Murata, Kazutoshi; Satoh, Yumi; Higuchi, Keiko; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical factors as predictors of pleural effusion in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Forty-three esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT from January 2001 to March 2007 were reviewed retrospectively on the basis of the following criteria: pathologically confirmed esophageal cancer, available computed tomography scan for treatment planning, 6-month follow-up after CRT, and radiation dose ≥50 Gy. Exclusion criteria were lung metastasis, malignant pleural effusion, and surgery. Mean heart dose, mean total lung dose, and percentages of heart or total lung volume receiving ≥10-60 Gy (Heart-V 10 to V 60 and Lung-V 10 to V 60 , respectively) were analyzed in relation to pleural effusion. Results: The median follow-up time was 26.9 months (range, 6.7-70.2) after CRT. Of the 43 patients, 15 (35%) developed pleural effusion. By univariate analysis, mean heart dose, Heart-V 10 to V 60 , and Lung-V 50 to V 60 were significantly associated with pleural effusion. Poor performance status, primary tumor of the distal esophagus, and age ≥65 years were significantly related with pleural effusion. Multivariate analysis identified Heart-V 50 as the strongest predictive factor for pleural effusion (p = 0.01). Patients with Heart-V 50 50 50 ≥40% had 6%, 44%, and 64% of pleural effusion, respectively (p 50 is a useful parameter for assessing the risk of pleural effusion and should be reduced to avoid pleural effusion.

  15. Spinal cord tolerance to single-session uniform irradiation in pigs: Implications for a dose-volume effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Sayre, James W.; McBride, William H.; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was performed to test the hypothesis that spinal cord radiosensitivity is significantly modified by uniform versus laterally non-uniform dose distributions. Materials and methods: A uniform dose distribution was delivered to a 4.5–7.0 cm length of cervical spinal cord in 22 mature Yucatan minipigs for comparison with a companion study in which a laterally non-uniform dose was given [1]. Pigs were allocated into four dose groups with mean maximum spinal cord doses of 17.5 ± 0.1 Gy (n = 7), 19.5 ± 0.2 Gy (n = 6), 22.0 ± 0.1 Gy (n = 5), and 24.1 ± 0.2 Gy (n = 4). The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit determined by a change in gait within one year. Spinal cord sections were stained with a Luxol fast blue/periodic acid Schiff combination. Results: Dose–response curves for uniform versus non-uniform spinal cord irradiation were nearly identical with ED 50 ’s (95% confidence interval) of 20.2 Gy (19.1–25.8) and 20.0 Gy (18.3–21.7), respectively. No neurologic change was observed for either dose distribution when the maximum spinal cord dose was ⩽17.8 Gy while all animals experienced deficits at doses ⩾21.8 Gy. Conclusion: No dose-volume effect was observed in pigs for the dose distributions studied and the endpoint of motor neurologic deficit; however, partial spinal cord irradiation resulted in less debilitating neurologic morbidity and histopathology

  16. Impact of image denoising on image quality, quantitative parameters and sensitivity of ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, Ahmed E.; Brockmann, Carolin; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikoubashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A.; Wiesmann, Martin; Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2016-01-01

    To examine the impact of denoising on ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT (ULD-VPCT) imaging in acute stroke. Simulated ULD-VPCT data sets at 20 % dose rate were generated from perfusion data sets of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kVp/180 mAs. Four data sets were generated from each ULD-VPCT data set: not-denoised (ND); denoised using spatiotemporal filter (D1); denoised using quanta-stream diffusion technique (D2); combination of both methods (D1 + D2). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was measured in the resulting 100 data sets. Image quality, presence/absence of ischemic lesions, CBV and CBF scores according to a modified ASPECTS score were assessed by two blinded readers. SNR and qualitative scores were highest for D1 + D2 and lowest for ND (all p ≤ 0.001). In 25 % of the patients, ND maps were not assessable and therefore excluded from further analyses. Compared to original data sets, in D2 and D1 + D2, readers correctly identified all patients with ischemic lesions (sensitivity 1.0, kappa 1.0). Lesion size was most accurately estimated for D1 + D2 with a sensitivity of 1.0 (CBV) and 0.94 (CBF) and an inter-rater agreement of 1.0 and 0.92, respectively. An appropriate combination of denoising techniques applied in ULD-VPCT produces diagnostically sufficient perfusion maps at substantially reduced dose rates as low as 20 % of the normal scan. (orig.)

  17. CT-guided intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer: Comparison of conventional point A plan with clinical target volume-based three-dimensional plan using dose-volume parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Tae Hyun; Cho, Jung Keun; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Chie, Eui Kyu; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2006-01-01

    2.15, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the conformal index and external volume index improved significantly with the CTV plan, and this improvement was more marked in Group 1. The mean values of the bladder and rectal point doses and volume fractions receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% of the reference dose did not differ between plans for all patients. The reduction in the mean rectal and bladder point doses and irradiated volumes for the CTV plan was statistically significant in Group 1. Conclusion: Computed tomography-guided CTV planning of ICR is superior to conventional point A planning in terms of conformity of target coverage and avoidance of overdosed normal tissue volume. To ascertain the potential benefit of treatment outcome, ICR with image-guided three-dimensional plans will be pursued and correlated with the dose-volume parameters

  18. The rank-heat plot is a novel way to present the results from a network meta-analysis including multiple outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veroniki, Areti Angeliki; Straus, Sharon E; Fyraridis, Alexandros; Tricco, Andrea C

    2016-08-01

    To present a novel and simple graphical approach to improve the presentation of the treatment ranking in a network meta-analysis (NMA) including multiple outcomes. NMA simultaneously compares many relevant interventions for a clinical condition from a network of trials, and allows ranking of the effectiveness and/or safety of each intervention. There are numerous ways to present the NMA results, which can challenge their interpretation by research users. The rank-heat plot is a novel graph that can be used to quickly recognize which interventions are most likely the best or worst interventions with respect to their effectiveness and/or safety for a single or multiple outcome(s) and may increase interpretability. Using empirical NMAs, we show that the need for a concise and informative presentation of results is imperative, particularly as the number of competing treatments and outcomes in an NMA increases. The rank-heat plot is an efficient way to present the results of ranking statistics, particularly when a large amount of data is available, and it is targeted to users from various backgrounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Retrospective analysis of factors associated with outcome of proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis in 82 horses including Warmblood and Thoroughbred sport horses and Quarter Horses (1992-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herthel, T D; Rick, M C; Judy, C E; Cohen, N D; Herthel, D J

    2016-09-01

    Outcomes associated with arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint in Quarter Horses used for Western performance activities are well documented but little is known regarding outcomes for other types of horses. To identify factors associated with outcomes, including breed and activity, after arthrodesis of the PIP joint in Warmbloods, Thoroughbreds and Quarter Horses. Retrospective case series. Surgical case records of 82 Quarter Horses principally engaged in Western performance and Thoroughbred or Warmblood breeds principally engaged in showing, showjumping and dressage, with arthrodesis of the PIP joint were reviewed. Arthrodesis was performed with either 3 transarticular cortex bone screws placed in lag fashion, a dynamic compression plate (DCP) with 2 transarticular cortex bone screws placed in lag fashion, or a locking compression plate (LCP) with 2 transarticular cortex bone screws placed in lag fashion. Demographic data, clinical presentation, radiographic findings, surgical technique, post operative treatment and complications were recorded. Long-term follow-up was obtained for all 82 horses. Osteoarthritis of the PIP joint was the most common presenting condition requiring arthrodesis, which was performed with either the 3 screw technique (n = 41), DCP fixation (n = 22), or LCP fixation (n = 19). Post operatively, 23/31 (74%) Warmbloods/Thoroughbreds and 44/51 (87%) Quarter Horses achieved successful outcomes. Thirteen of 23 (57%) Warmbloods/Thoroughbreds and 24 of 38 (63%) Quarter Horses, used for athletic performance, returned to successful competition. Within this subgroup of horses engaged in high-level activity, regardless of breed type, horses undergoing hindlimb arthrodesis were significantly more likely to return to successful competition (73%; 33/45) than those with forelimb arthrodesis (25%; 4/16, P = 0.002). Arthrodesis of the PIP joint in Warmbloods/Thoroughbreds and Quarter Horses results in a favourable outcome for return to

  20. Converging stereotactic radiotherapy using kilovoltage X-rays: experimental irradiation of normal rabbit lung and dose-volume analysis with Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  1. Variant mannose-binding lectin alleles are not associated with susceptibility to or outcome of invasive pneumococcal infection in randomly included patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Weis, Nina; Madsen, Hans O

    2002-01-01

    for pneumococcal infections. To assess the influence of MBL genotypes on the course and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease, clinical data for 141 adult patients were collected prospectively and their genotypes were determined. All patients included had positive blood cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae....... The distribution of variant MBL alleles related to low MBL serum concentrations was similar among the patients and healthy individuals, and MBL genotype was not associated with infection outcome. Thus, in a random adult population with invasive pneumococcal infection, MBL does not seem to play a role......Invasive pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that primarily affects very young children and elderly or immunocompromised individuals but also affects previously healthy people. Variant mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles are associated with recurrent infections and may be a risk factor...

  2. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. Materials/Methods T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ≥ 12 months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), ), masseter (MM), Buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Results Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving ≥69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). Conclusion In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. PMID:26897515

  3. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: Dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ⩾12months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), masseter (MM), buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving⩾69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Systematic review with meta-analysis: online psychological interventions for mental and physical health outcomes in gastrointestinal disorders including irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, I; Hewitt, C; Bell, K; Phillips, A; Mikocka-Walus, A

    2018-06-14

    Online psychotherapy has been successfully used as supportive treatment in many chronic illnesses. However, there is a lack of evidence on its role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. To examine whether online psychological interventions improve mental and physical outcomes in gastrointestinal diseases. We searched CINAHL Plus, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Health Management Information Consortium, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, Cochrane Library, a specialised register of the IBD/FBD Cochrane Group, MEDLINE (PubMed) WHO International Clinical Trial Registry, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists of all papers included in the review. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess internal validity. Where possible, data were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. We identified 11 publications (encompassing nine studies) meeting inclusion criteria. One study had a high risk of selection bias (allocation concealment), all studies had a high risk of performance and detection bias. Eight studies were included in the meta-analyses (6 on irritable bowel syndrome [IBS] and two on inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]). Online cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was shown to significantly improve gastrointestinal symptom-specific anxiety (MD: -8.51, 95% CI -12.99 to -4.04, P = 0.0002) and lessen symptom-induced disability (MD: -2.78, 95% CI -5.43 to -0.12, P = 0.04) in IBS post intervention. There was no significant effect of online CBT on any other outcomes in IBS. No significant effect of online psychotherapy was demonstrated in IBD. There is insufficient evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of online CBT to manage mental and physical outcomes in gastrointestinal diseases. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and clinical outcomes among young adults reporting high-risk sexual behavior, including men who have sex with men, in coastal Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Susan M; Mugo, Peter; Gichuru, Evanson; Thiong'o, Alexander; Macharia, Michael; Okuku, Haile S; van der Elst, Elise; Price, Matthew A; Muraguri, Nicholas; Sanders, Eduard J

    2013-05-01

    African men who have sex with men (MSM) face significant stigma and barriers to care. We investigated antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among high-risk adults, including MSM, participating in a clinic-based cohort. Survival analysis was used to compare attrition across patient groups. Differences in adherence, weight gain, and CD4 counts after ART initiation were assessed. Among 250 HIV-1-seropositive adults, including 108 MSM, 15 heterosexual men, and 127 women, patient group was not associated with attrition. Among 58 participants who were followed on ART, 40 % of MSM had less than 95 % adherence, versus 28.6 % of heterosexual men and 11.5 % of women. Although MSM gained less weight after ART initiation than women (adjusted difference -3.5 kg/year), CD4 counts did not differ. More data are needed on barriers to adherence and clinical outcomes among African MSM, to ensure that MSM can access care and derive treatment and prevention benefits from ART.

  6. Do psychopathic traits assessed in mid-adolescence predict mental health, psychosocial, and antisocial, including criminal outcomes, over the subsequent 5 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphälä, Malin; Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether psychopathic traits assessed in mid-adolescence predicted mental health, psychosocial, and antisocial (including criminal) outcomes 5 years later and would thereby provide advantages over diagnosing conduct disorder (CD). Eighty-six women and 61 men were assessed in mid-adolescence when they first contacted a clinic for substance misuse and were reassessed 5 years later. Assessments in adolescence include the Psychopathy Checklist-Youth Version (PCL-YV), and depending on their age, either the Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Aged Children or the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (SCID). Assessments in early adulthood included the SCID, self-reports of psychosocial functioning, aggressive behaviour, and criminality and official criminal records. The antisocial facet score positively predicted the number of anxiety symptoms and likelihood of receiving treatment for substance use disorders (SUDs). Lifestyle and antisocial facet scores negatively predicted Global Assessment of Functioning scores. By contrast, the interpersonal score and male sex independently and positively predicted the number of months worked or studied, as did the interaction of Lifestyle × Sex indicating that among men, but not women, an increase in lifestyle facet score was associated with less time worked or studied. Interpersonal and antisocial scores positively predicted school drop-out. Antisocial facet scores predicted the number of symptoms of antisocial personality disorder, alcohol and SUDs, and violent and nonviolent criminality but much more strongly among males than females. Predictions from numbers of CD symptoms were similar. Psychopathic traits among adolescents who misuse substances predict an array of outcomes over the subsequent 5 years. Information on the levels of these traits may be useful for planning treatment.

  7. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): Concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Limbergen, Erik van; Barillot, Isabelle; Brabandere, Marisol De; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    . Recommendations from Gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO Working Group (I): concepts and terms in 3D image-based 3D treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy with emphasis on MRI assessment of GTV and CTV. Radiother Oncol 2005;74:235-245]). It is expected that the therapeutic ratio including target coverage and sparing of organs at risk can be significantly improved, if radiation dose is prescribed to a 3D image-based CTV taking into account dose volume constraints for OAR. However, prospective use of these recommendations in the clinical context is warranted, to further explore and develop the potential of 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy

  8. Modifying the Sleep Treatment Education Program for Students to include technology use (STEPS-TECH): Intervention effects on objective and subjective sleep outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larissa K; Cucalon, Maria S

    2017-12-01

    University students often have sleep issues that arise from poor sleep hygiene practices and technology use patterns. Yet, technology-related behaviors are often neglected in sleep hygiene education. This study examined whether the Sleep Treatment Education Program for Students-modified to include information regarding managing technology use (STEPS-TECH)-helps improve both subjective and objective sleep outcomes among university students. Results of an experimental study among 78 university students showed improvements in objective indicators of sleep quantity (total sleep time) and sleep quality (less awakenings) during the subsequent week for students in the STEPS-TECH intervention group compared to a control group. Exploratory analyses indicated that effects were driven by improvements in weekend days immediately following the intervention. There were also no intervention effects on subjective sleep quality or quantity outcomes. In terms of self-reported behavioral responses to educational content in the intervention, there were no group differences in sleep hygiene practices or technology use before bedtime. However, the intervention group reported less technology use during sleep periods than the control group. These preliminary findings suggest that STEPS-TECH may be a useful educational tool to help improve objective sleep and reduce technology use during sleep periods among university students. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Comparison of dose-volume histograms for Tomo therapy, linear accelerator-based 3D conformal radiation therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Youn-Sang; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Kim, Chang-Bok; Choi, Seong-Kwan; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lee, Jong-Woong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Evaluation of DVH from 3D CRT, IMRT and Tomo therapy was conducted for tumor therapy. → The doses of GTV and CTV were compared using DVHs from 3D CRT, IMRT and Tomo therapy. → The GTV was higher when Tomo therapy was used, while the doses of critical organ were low. → They said that Tomo therapy satisfied the goal of radiation therapy more than the others. - Abstract: Evaluation of dose-volume histograms from three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and Tomo therapy was conducted. These three modalities are among the diverse treatment systems available for tumor therapy. Three patients who received tumor therapy for a malignant oligodendroglioma in the cranium, nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the cervical neck, and prostate cancer in the pelvis were selected as study subjects. Therapy plans were made for the three patients before dose-volume histograms were obtained. The doses of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were compared using the dose-volume histograms obtained from the LINAC-based 3D CRT, IMRT planning station (Varian Eclipse-Varian, version 8.1), and Tomo therapy planning station. In addition, the doses of critical organs in the cranium, cervix, and pelvis that should be protected were compared. The GTV was higher when Tomo therapy was used compared to 3D CRT and the LINAC-based IMRT, while the doses of critical organ tissues that required protection were low. These results demonstrated that Tomo therapy satisfied the ultimate goal of radiation therapy more than the other therapies.

  10. Dose-Volume Parameters of the Corpora Cavernosa Do Not Correlate With Erectile Dysfunction After External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Dohle, Gert R.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Incrocci, Luca

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between dose-volume parameters of the corpora cavernosa and erectile dysfunction (ED) after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy was conducted. Patients at our institute were asked to participate in an additional part of the trial evaluating sexual function. After exclusion of patients with less than 2 years of follow-up, ED at baseline, or treatment with hormonal therapy, 96 patients were eligible. The proximal corpora cavernosa (crura), the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, and the penile bulb were contoured on the planning computed tomography scan and dose-volume parameters were calculated. Results: Two years after EBRT, 35 of the 96 patients had developed ED. No statistically significant correlations between ED 2 years after EBRT and dose-volume parameters of the crura, the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, or the penile bulb were found. The few patients using potency aids typically indicated to have ED. Conclusion: No correlation was found between ED after EBRT for prostate cancer and radiation dose to the crura or penile bulb. The present study is the largest study evaluating the correlation between ED and radiation dose to the corpora cavernosa after EBRT for prostate cancer. Until there is clear evidence that sparing the penile bulb or crura will reduce ED after EBRT, we advise to be careful in sparing these structures, especially when this involves reducing treatment margins

  11. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  12. Experimental validation of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged CT images in stereotactic body radiotherapy for moving tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Matsuo, Yukinori; Kamomae, Takeshi; Nakata, Manabu; Yano, Shinsuke; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the validity of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged computed tomography (RACT) images in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for moving tumors. Four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data were acquired while a dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a solitary target moved. Motion pattern was based on cos (t) with a constant respiration period of 4.0 sec along the longitudinal axis of the CT couch. The extent of motion (A 1 ) was set in the range of 0.0–12.0 mm at 3.0-mm intervals. Treatment planning with the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription was designed on RACT images. A new commercially available Monte Carlo algorithm of well-commissioned 6-MV photon beam was used for dose calculation. Dosimetric effects of intrafractional tumor motion were then investigated experimentally under the same conditions as 4D CT simulation using the dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom, films, and an ionization chamber. The passing rate of γ index was 98.18%, with the criteria of 3 mm/3%. The dose error between the planned and the measured isocenter dose in moving condition was within ± 0.7%. From the dose area histograms on the film, the mean ± standard deviation of the dose covering 100% of the cross section of the target was 102.32 ± 1.20% (range, 100.59–103.49%). By contrast, the irradiated areas receiving more than 95% dose for A 1 = 12 mm were 1.46 and 1.33 times larger than those for A 1 = 0 mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. This phantom study demonstrated that the cross section of the target received 100% dose under moving conditions in both the coronal and sagittal planes, suggesting that the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on RACT images is acceptable in SBRT for moving tumors.

  13. A dose-volume comparison of prostate cancer (PC) radiotherapy (RT) techniques for penile-structures (PNS) - a neglected critical organ in PC RT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, Jolanta; Myrianthopoulos, Leon; Nguyen, Ai; Chen, George; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Three-dimensional conformal RT(3DCRT) is revolutionizing the use of RT in PC. Rectum and bladder, and in some studies femoral heads are included as critical structures (CS) in comparing rival plans in 3DCRT. Although RT-induced impotence is a major complication of conventional RT, with 30-50% incidence, to date no study has included PNS as a CS. This study is an attempt to remedy this deficiency in the 3DCRT planning in PC. Materials and Methods: After immobilization with Aquaplast, computed-tomography (CT) scans were obtained in supine treatment position from top of lumbar-3 vertebra to lesser-trochanter of the femora with 5-8mm slice-thicknesses; IV contrast was used in all patients. Prostate, seminal vesicles (GTV), and CSs were outlined, including PNS. Corpora cavernosa and bulbous spongiosum together were identified as PNS. Appropriate margins for CTV and PTV were used; total margin to the block from GTV was 2cm. Tumor-minimum doses were prescribed to the 100% isodose line. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained to compare three different techniques: 1. Conventional 4 field box technique (4FC) with equal weighting; 2. Six field (2 laterals and 4 obliques [45 degrees from midline] (6FO), with 50% dose delivery from the laterals; and 3. Four equally weighted, non-axial fields [2 laterals and 2 inferior anterior obliques at 45 degree couch and gantry rotations] (4FN). Results: A total of 12 patients are included in the study. The mean and range of percentage volume of PNS receiving more than 30, 60, and 90% of the prescribed dose are shown in the table below: Box plots, such as the example shown above, were used to compare techniques overall. The 6-field coplanar technique treated the least PNS volume beyond a given dose, followed by 4FC and 4FN techniques. The order of least to maximum percent of PNS treated in most individual patients also followed the same trend. In the majority, 6FO and 4FN delivered relatively comparable doses to

  14. Self-Reported Health Experiences of Children Living with Congenital Heart Defects: Including Patient-Reported Outcomes in a National Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Rachel Louise; Tadic, Valerija; Hogan, Ailbhe; Bull, Catherine; Rahi, Jugnoo Sangeeta; Dezateux, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Understanding children's views about living with congenital heart defects (CHDs) is fundamental to supporting their successful participation in daily life, school and peer relationships. As an adjunct to a health and quality of life outcomes questionnaire, we asked school-age children who survived infant heart procedures to describe their experiences of living with CHDs. In a UK-wide cohort study, children aged 10 to 14 years with CHDs self-completed postal questionnaires that included an open question about having a 'heart problem'. We compared the characteristics of children with more and less severe cardiac diagnoses and, through collaborative inductive content analysis, investigated the subjective experiences and coping strategies described by children in both clinical severity groups. Text and/or drawings were returned by 436 children (246 boys [56%], mean age 12.1 years [SD 1.0; range 10-14]); 313 had less severe (LS) and 123 more severe (MS) cardiac diagnoses. At the most recent hospital visit, a higher proportion of the MS group were underweight (more than two standard deviations below the mean for age) or cyanosed (underweight: MS 20.0%, LS 9.9%; cyanosed: MS 26.2%, LS 3.5%). Children in the MS group described concerns about social isolation and feeling 'different', whereas children with less severe diagnoses often characterised their CHD as 'not a big thing'. Some coping strategies were common to both severity groups, including managing health information to avoid social exclusion, however only children in the LS group considered their CHD 'in the past' or experienced a sense of survivorship. Children's reported experiences were not dependent on their cardiac diagnosis, although there were clear qualitative differences by clinical severity group. Children's concerns emphasised social participation and our findings imply a need to shift the clinical focus from monitoring cardiac function to optimising participation. We highlight the potential for informing

  15. Finding dose-volume constraints to reduce late rectal toxicity following 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco, Carlo; Mazzetta, Chiara; Cattani, Federica; Tosi, Giampiero; Castiglioni, Simona; Fodor, Andrei; Orecchia, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The rectum is known to display a dose-volume effect following high-dose 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The aim of the study is to search for significant dose-volume combinations with the specific treatment technique and patient set-up currently used in our institution. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of 135 patients with stage T1b-T3b prostate cancer treated consecutively with 3D-CRT between 1996 and 2000 to a total dose of 76 Gy. The median follow-up was 28 months (range 12-62). All late rectal complications were scored using RTOG criteria. Time to late toxicity was assessed using the Kaplan-Meyer method. The association between variables at baseline and ≥2 rectal toxicity was tested using χ 2 test or Fisher's exact test. A multivariate analysis using logistic regression was performed. Results: Late rectal toxicity grade ≥2 was observed in 24 of the 135 patients (17.8%). A 'grey area' of increased risk has been identified. Average DVHs of the bleeding and non-bleeding patients were generated. The area under the percent volume DVH for the rectum of the bleeding patients was significantly higher than that of patients without late rectal toxicity. On multivariate analysis the correlation between the high risk DVHs and late rectal bleeding was confirmed. Conclusions: The present analysis confirms the role of the rectal DVH as a tool to discriminate patients undergoing high-dose 3D-CRT into a low and a high risk of developing late rectal bleeding. Based on our own results and taking into account the data published in the literature, we have been able to establish new dose-volume constraints for treatment planning: if possible, the percentage of rectal volume exposed to 40, 50, 60, 72 and 76 Gy should be limited to 60, 50, 25, 15 and 5%, respectively

  16. Using patient reported outcome measures in health services: A qualitative study on including people with low literacy skills and learning disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahagirdar Deepa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs are self-report measures of health status increasingly promoted for use in healthcare quality improvement. However people with low literacy skills or learning disabilities may find PROMs hard to complete. Our study investigated stakeholder views on the accessibility and use of PROMs to develop suggestions for more inclusive practice. Methods Taking PROMs recommended for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD as an example, we conducted 8 interviews with people with low literacy skills and/or learning disabilities, and 4 focus groups with 20 health professionals and people with COPD. Discussions covered the format and delivery of PROMs using the EQ-5D and St George Respiratory Questionnaire as prompts. Thematic framework analysis focused on three main themes: Accessibility, Ease of Use, and Contextual factors. Results Accessibility included issues concerning the questionnaire format, and suggestions for improvement included larger font sizes and more white space. Ease of Use included discussion about PROMs’ administration. While health professionals suggested PROMs could be completed in waiting rooms, patients preferred settings with more privacy and where they could access help from people they know. Contextual Factors included other challenges and wider issues associated with completing PROMs. While health professionals highlighted difficulties created by the system in managing patients with low literacy/learning disabilities, patient participants stressed that understanding the purpose of PROMs was important to reduce intimidation. Conclusions Adjusting PROMs’ format, giving an explicit choice of where patients can complete them, and clearly conveying PROMs’ purpose and benefit to patients may help to prevent inequality when using PROMs in health services.

  17. Olfactory neuroblastoma: the long-term outcome and late toxicity of multimodal therapy including radiotherapy based on treatment planning using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takashi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Yasuda, Koichi; Hatakeyama, Hiromitsu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Homma, Akihiro; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare tumor originating from olfactory epithelium. Here we retrospectively analyzed the long-term treatment outcomes and toxicity of radiotherapy for ONB patients for whom computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional treatment planning was conducted to reappraise the role of radiotherapy in the light of recent advanced technology and chemotherapy. Seventeen patients with ONB treated between July 1992 and June 2013 were included. Three patients were Kadish stage B and 14 were stage C. All patients were treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery or chemotherapy. The radiation dose was distributed from 50 Gy to 66 Gy except for one patient who received 40 Gy preoperatively. The median follow-up time was 95 months (range 8–173 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rates were estimated at 88% and 74%, respectively. Five patients with stage C disease had recurrence with the median time to recurrence of 59 months (range 7–115 months). Late adverse events equal to or above Grade 2 in CTCAE v4.03 were observed in three patients. Multimodal therapy including radiotherapy with precise treatment planning based on CT simulation achieved an excellent local control rate with acceptable toxicity and reasonable overall survival for patients with ONB

  18. Quantitative dose-volume response analysis of changes in parotid gland function after radiotherapy in the head-and-neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesink, Judith M.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Battermann, Jan J.; Hordijk, Gerrit Jan; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To study the radiation tolerance of the parotid glands as a function of dose and volume irradiated. Methods and Materials: One hundred eight patients treated with primary or postoperative radiotherapy for various malignancies in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Stimulated parotid flow rate was measured before radiotherapy and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy. Parotid gland dose-volume histograms were derived from CT-based treatment planning. The normal tissue complication probability model proposed by Lyman was fit to the data. A complication was defined as stimulated parotid flow rate 50 (the dose to the whole organ leading to a complication probability of 50%) was found to be 31, 35, and 39 Gy at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year postradiotherapy, respectively. The volume dependency parameter n was around 1, which means that the mean parotid dose correlates best with the observed complications. There was no steep dose-response curve (m=0.45 at 1 year postradiotherapy). Conclusions: This study on dose/volume/parotid gland function relationships revealed a linear correlation between postradiotherapy flow ratio and parotid gland dose and a strong volume dependency. No threshold dose was found. Recovery of parotid gland function was shown at 6 months and 1 year after radiotherapy. In radiation planning, attempts should be made to achieve a mean parotid gland dose at least below 39 Gy (leading to a complication probability of 50%)

  19. Percutaneous Image-Guided Screw Fixation of Bone Lesions in Cancer Patients: Double-Centre Analysis of Outcomes including Local Evolution of the Treated Focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Buy, Xavier, E-mail: x.buy@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Ramamurthy, Nitin, E-mail: nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: georgia.tsoumakidou@chru-strasbourg.fr; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Catena, Vittorio, E-mail: v.catena@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juleiengarnon@gmail.com [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: j.palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France)

    2016-10-15

    AimTo review outcomes and local evolution of treated lesions following percutaneous image-guided screw fixation (PIGSF) of pathological/insufficiency fractures (PF/InF) and impeding fractures (ImF) in cancer patients at two tertiary centres.Materials and methodsThirty-two consecutive patients (mean age 67.5 years; range 33–86 years) with a range of tumours and prognoses underwent PIGSF for non/minimally displaced PF/InF and ImF. Screws were placed under CT/fluoroscopy or cone-beam CT guidance, with or without cementoplasty. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a simple 4-point scale (1 = worse; 2 = stable; 3 = improved; 4 = significantly improved). Local evolution was reviewed on most recent follow-up imaging. Technical success, complications, and overall survival were evaluated.ResultsThirty-six lesions were treated with 74 screws mainly in the pelvis and femoral neck (58.2 %); including 47.2 % PF, 13.9 % InF, and 38.9 % ImF. Cementoplasty was performed in 63.9 % of the cases. Technical success was 91.6 %. Hospital stay was ≤3 days; 87.1 % of lesions were improved at 1-month follow-up; three major complications (early screw-impingement radiculopathy; accelerated coxarthrosis; late coxofemoral septic arthritis) and one minor complication were observed. Unfavourable local evolution at imaging occurred in 3/24 lesions (12.5 %) at mean 8.7-month follow-up, including poor consolidation (one case) and screw loosening (two cases, at least 1 symptomatic). There were no cases of secondary fractures.ConclusionsPIGSF is feasible for a wide range of oncologic patients, offering good short-term efficacy, acceptable complication rates, and rapid recovery. Unfavourable local evolution at imaging may be relatively frequent, and requires close clinico-radiological surveillance.

  20. The Microbiome and Metabolome of Preterm Infant Stool Are Personalized and Not Driven by Health Outcomes, Including Necrotizing Enterocolitis and Late-Onset Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandro, Stephen; Osborne, Stephanie; Enriquez, Claudia; Bixby, Christine; Arrieta, Antonio; Whiteson, Katrine

    2018-06-27

    The assembly and development of the gut microbiome in infants have important consequences for immediate and long-term health. Preterm infants represent an abnormal case for bacterial colonization because of early exposure to bacteria and frequent use of antibiotics. To better understand the assembly of the gut microbiota in preterm infants, fecal samples were collected from 32 very low birth weight preterm infants over the first 6 weeks of life. Infant health outcomes included health, late-onset sepsis, and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We characterized bacterial compositions by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and metabolomes by untargeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Preterm infant fecal samples lacked beneficial Bifidobacterium spp. and were dominated by Enterobacteriaceae , Enterococcus , and Staphylococcus organisms due to nearly uniform antibiotic administration. Most of the variance between the microbial community compositions could be attributed to the baby from which the sample derived (permutational multivariate analysis of variance [PERMANOVA] R 2 = 0.48, P PERMANOVA R 2 = 0.43, P < 0.001) and weakly associated with bacterial composition (Mantel statistic r = 0.23 ± 0.05, P < 0.05). No measured metabolites were found to be associated with necrotizing enterocolitis, late-onset sepsis, or a healthy outcome. Overall, preterm infant gut microbial communities were personalized and reflected antibiotic usage. IMPORTANCE Preterm infants face health problems likely related to microbial exposures, including sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis. However, the role of the gut microbiome in preterm infant health is poorly understood. Microbial colonization differs from that of healthy term babies because it occurs in the NICU and is often perturbed by antibiotics. We measured bacterial compositions and metabolomic profiles of 77 fecal samples from 32 preterm infants to investigate the differences between microbiomes in health and disease. Rather than finding

  1. The effect of weight management interventions that include a diet component on weight-related outcomes in pregnant and postpartum women: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Lisa; Rollo, Megan; Hauck, Yvonne; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Wood, Lisa; Hutchesson, Melinda; Giglia, Roslyn; Smith, Roger; Collins, Clare

    2015-01-01

    What are the effects of weight management interventions that include a diet component on weight-related outcomes in pregnant and postpartum women?The primary objective of this systematic review is to evaluate the effectiveness of weight management interventions which include a diet component and are aimed at limiting gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention in women.The second objective of this systematic review is to investigate included intervention components with respect to effect on weight-related outcomes. This may include, but is not limited to: length of intervention, use of face-to-face counselling, group or individual consultations, use of other interventions components including exercise, use of goals and use of support tools like food diaries, coaching, including email or text message support. Around half of all women of reproductive age are either overweight or obese, with women aged 25-34 years having a greater risk of substantial weight gain compared with men of all ages. Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) and postpartum weight retention (PPWR) may play a significant role in long term obesity. Having one child doubles the five- and 10-year obesity incidence for women, with many women who gain excessive weight during pregnancy remaining obese permanently. Excessive GWG and/or PPWR can also significantly contribute to short- and long-term adverse health outcomes for mother, baby and future pregnancies.Maternal obesity increases the risk of pregnancy related complications such as pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, stillbirth and the rate of caesarean section. Childhood obesity is a further long term complication of maternal obesity for offspring, which may persist in to adulthood. Excess GWG is also a risk factor for PPWR both in the short and long-term. Nehring et al. conducted a meta-analysis with over 65,000 women showing that, compared to women who gained weight within recommendations during pregnancy, women with GWG

  2. Absolute and relative dose-surface and dose-volume histograms of the bladder: which one is the most representative for the actual treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogeman, Mischa S; Peeters, Stephanie T H; Bois, Josien de; Lebesque, Joos V

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify to what extent relative and absolute bladder dose-volume and dose-surface histograms of the planning CT scan were representative for the actual treatment. We used data of 17 patients, who each received 11 repeat CT scans and a planning CT scan. The repeat CT scans were matched on the planning CT scan by the bony anatomy. Clinical treatment plans were used to evaluate the impact of bladder filling changes on the four histogram types. The impact was quantified by calculating for this patient group the correlation coefficient between the planning histogram and the treatment histogram. We found that the absolute dose-surface histogram was the most representative one for the actual treatment

  3. Diurnal variations in incidence and outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest including prior comorbidity and pharmacotherapy: a nationwide study in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Lena I M; Wissenberg, Mads; Fosbøl, Emil L; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Lippert, Freddy K; Bagai, Akshay; McNally, Bryan; Granger, Christopher B; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Folke, Fredrik; Rajan, Shahzleen; Weeke, Peter; Nielsen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2014-09-01

    To investigate diurnal variations in incidence and outcomes following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). OHCA of presumed cardiac etiology were identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry (2001-2010). Time of day was divided into three time periods: daytime 07.00-14.59; evening 15.00-22.59; and nighttime 23.00-06.59. We identified 18,929 OHCA patients, aged ≥18 years. The median age was 72 years (IQR 62-80) and the majority were male (67.5%). OHCA occurrence varied across time periods, with 43.9%, 35.7% and 20.6% occurring during daytime, evening and nighttime, respectively. Nighttime patients were more likely to have: severe comorbidity (i.e. COPD), arrest in private home (87.2% vs. 69.0% and 73.0% daytime and evening, respectively), non-witnessed arrest (51.2% vs. 48.4% and 43.7%), no bystander CPR (75.9% vs. 68.4% and 66.1%), longer time interval from recognition of OHCA to rhythm analysis (12 min vs. 11 min and 11 min), and non-shockable heart rhythm (80.1% vs. 70.3% and 69.4%), all p<0.0001. Nighttime patients were less likely to achieve return of spontaneous circulation on arrival at the hospital (7.5% vs. 14.8% and 15.1%) and 1-year survival (2.8% vs. 7.2% and 7.1%), p<0.0001. Overall, the lower 1-year survival rate persisted after adjusting for patient-related and cardiac-arrest related characteristics mentioned above (OR 0.47, 95%CI 0.37-0.59; OR 0.51, 95%CI 0.40-0.65, compared to daytime and evening, respectively). We found nighttime patients to have a lower survival compared to daytime and evening that persisted when adjusting for patient-related and cardiac-arrest related characteristics including comorbidities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparisons of dose-volume histograms for proton-beam versus 3-D conformal X-ray therapy in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changlu; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Sakae, Takeji; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were reviewed to determine if there is an advantage of the two modalities when treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 24 stage I NSCLC patients who underwent proton-beam therapy (PBT) from June 2003 to May 2007 were included in this study. Based on the same clinical target volumes (CTVs), treatment planning was made to cover CTV within 90% isodose lines. Each patient was evaluated by two sets of DVHs, one for PBT and the other for three-dimensional conformal X-ray therapy (3D-CRT). For all patients, the 95% isodose line covered 86.4% of the CTV for PBT, and 43.2% for 3D-CRT. PBT was associated with significantly lower mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, total lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord than 3D-CRT. PBT offered reduced radiation doses to the lung when evaluated in terms of percentage lung volumes receiving ≥ 5 Gy (V 5 ), ≥ 10 Gy (V 10 ), and ≥ 20 Gy (V 20 ) when compared to 3D-CRT. PBT is advantageous over 3D-CRT in reducing doses to the lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord in treating stage I NSCLC. (orig.)

  5. Using patient reported outcome measures in health services: A qualitative study on including people with low literacy skills and learning disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jahagirdar, D.; Kroll, T.; Ritchie, K.; Wyke, S.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are self-report measures of health status increasingly promoted for use in healthcare quality improvement. However people with low literacy skills or learning disabilities may find PROMs hard to complete. Our study investigated

  6. Treatment outcome and prognostic factor analysis in transplant-eligible Chinese myeloma patients receiving bortezomib-based induction regimens including the staged approach, PAD or VTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chim Chor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have reported promising outcomes using a staged approach, in which bortezomib/thalidomide/dexamethasone was used only in 14 patients with suboptimal response to VAD (vincristine/adriamycin/dexamethasone before autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT. Here we compared the outcomes of the staged approach with frontline PAD (bortezomib/doxorubicin/dexamethasone or VTD (bortezomib/thalidomide/dexamethasone induction, and analysed prognostic factors for outcome. Patients and methods Ninety-one transplant-eligible Chinese patients received three induction regimens prior to ASCT [staged approach (N = 25, PAD (N = 31, VTD (N = 35]. and received thalidomide maintenance for 2 years post-ASCT. Results 43 (47.3% patients had International Staging System (ISS III disease. By an intention-to-treat analysis, the overall CR/nCR rate were 37.4% post-induction, and 62.6% post-ASCT. Five-year overall (OS and event-free (EFS survivals were 66% and 45.1%. There was no difference of the post-induction CR/nCR rate, EFS or OS between patients induced by these three regimens. Moreover, ISS III disease did not affect CR/nCR rates. Multivariate analysis showed that ISS and post-ASCT CR/nCR impacted OS while ISS and post-induction CR/nCR impacted EFS. Conclusions These three induction regimens produced comparable and favorable outcomes in myeloma. The unfavorable outcome of ISS stage III persisted despite upfront/early use of bortezomib. CR/nCR predicted favorable survivals.

  7. Response to Therapy and Outcomes in Oropharyngeal Cancer Are Associated With Biomarkers Including Human Papillomavirus, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, Gender, and Smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Bhavna; Cordell, Kitrina G.; Lee, Julia S.; Prince, Mark E.; Tran, Huong H.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Urba, Susan G.; Worden, Francis P.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Tsien, Christina I.; Taylor, Jeremy; D'Silva, Nisha J.; Yang, Kun; Kurnit, David M.; Bradford, Carol R.

    2007-01-01

    Induction chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiation for responders or immediate surgery for non-responders is an effective treatment strategy head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) of the larynx and oropharynx. Biomarkers that predict outcome would be valuable in selecting patients for therapy. In this study, the presence and titer of high risk human papilloma virus (HPV) and expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in pre-treatment biopsies, as well as smoking and gender were examined in oropharynx cancer patients enrolled in an organ sparing trial. HPV16 copy number was positively associated with response to therapy and with overall and disease specific survival, whereas EGFR expression, current or former smoking behavior, and female gender (in this cohort) were associated with poor response and poor survival in multivariate analysis. Smoking cessation and strategies to target EGFR may be useful adjuncts for therapy to improve outcome in the cases with the poorest biomarker profile

  8. Dose-volume effects for pelvic bone marrow in predicting hematological toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy with pelvic node irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sini, Carla; Fiorino, Claudio; Perna, Lucia; Noris Chiorda, Barbara; Deantoni, Chiara Lucrezia; Bianchi, Marco; Sacco, Vincenzo; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzarini, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    To prospectively identify clinical/dosimetric predictors of acute/late hematologic toxicity (HT) in chemo-naÏve patients treated with whole-pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) for prostate cancer. Data of 121 patients treated with adjuvant/salvage WPRT were analyzed (static-field IMRT n=19; VMAT/Rapidarc n=57; Tomotherapy n=45). Pelvic bone marrow (BM) was delineated as ilium (IL), lumbosacral, lower and whole pelvis (WP), and the relative DVHs were calculated. HT was graded both according to CTCAE v4.03 and as variation in percentage relative to baseline. Logistic regression was used to analyze association between HT and clinical/DVHs factors. Significant differences (p<0.005) in the DVH of BM volumes between different techniques were found: Tomotherapy was associated with larger volumes receiving low doses (3-20 Gy) and smaller receiving 40-50 Gy. Lower baseline absolute values of WBC, neutrophils and lymphocytes (ALC) predicted acute/late HT (p ⩽ 0.001). Higher BM V40 was associated with higher risk of acute Grade3 (OR=1.018) or late Grade2 lymphopenia (OR=1.005). Two models predicting lymphopenia were developed, both including baseline ALC, and BM WP-V40 (AUC=0.73) and IL-V40+smoking (AUC=0.904) for acute/late respectively. Specific regions of pelvic BM predicting acute/late lymphopenia, a risk factor for viral infections, were identified. The 2-variable models including specific constraints to BM may help reduce HT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients included in four consecutive risk-adapted trials by the PETHEMA Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriol, Albert; Vives, Susana; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Rivas, Concepción; Bethencourt, Concepción; Moscardó, Federico; Bueno, Javier; Grande, Carlos; del Potro, Eloy; Guardia, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Bergua, Juan; Bernal, Teresa; Moreno, Maria-José; Calvo, Carlota; Bastida, Pilar; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-04-01

    About one half of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are not cured of the disease and ultimately die. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the outcome of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We analyzed the characteristics, the outcome and the prognostic factors for survival after first relapse in a series of 263 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (excluding those with mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) prospectively enrolled in four consecutive risk-adapted PETHEMA trials. The median overall survival after relapse was 4.5 months (95% CI, 4-5 months) with a 5-year overall survival of 10% (95% CI, 8%-12%); 45% of patients receiving intensive second-line treatment achieved a second complete remission and 22% (95% CI, 14%-30%) of them remained disease free at 5 years. Factors predicting a good outcome after rescue therapy were age less than 30 years (2-year overall survival of 21% versus 10% for those over 30 years old; P<0.022) and a first remission lasting more than 2 years (2-year overall survival of 36% versus 17% among those with a shorter first remission; P<0.001). Patients under 30 years old whose first complete remission lasted longer than 2 years had a 5-year overall survival of 38% (95% CI, 23%-53%) and a 5-year disease-free survival of 53% (95% CI, 34%-72%). The prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse is poor. Those aged less than 30 years with a first complete remission lasting longer than 2 years have reasonable possibilities of becoming long-term survivors while patients over this age or those who relapse early cannot be successfully rescued using the therapies currently available.

  10. Late Toxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Exploration of Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters to Limit Genitourinary and Gastrointestinal Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, Aaron W.; Fricano, Janine; Correa, David; Pelizzari, Charles A. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and propose dose-volume histogram (DVH) guidelines to limit late treatment-related toxicity. Methods and Materials: In this study 296 consecutive men were treated with IMRT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Most patients received treatment to the prostate with or without proximal seminal vesicles (90%), to a median dose of 76 Gy. Concurrent androgen deprivation therapy was given to 150 men (51%) for a median of 4 months. Late toxicity was defined by Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 as greater than 3 months after radiation therapy completion. Four groupings of DVH parameters were defined, based on the percentage of rectal or bladder tissue receiving 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), 65 Gy (V{sub 65}), and 40 Gy (V{sub 40}). These DVH groupings, as well as clinical and treatment characteristics, were correlated to maximal Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 41 months, the 4-year freedom from maximal Grade 2+ late toxicity was 81% and 91% for GU and GI systems, respectively, and by last follow-up, the rates of Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity were 9% and 5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, whole-pelvic IMRT was associated with Grade 2+ GU toxicity and age was associated with Grade 2+ GI toxicity. Freedom from Grade 2+ GI toxicity at 4 years was 100% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}10%, V{sub 65} {<=}20%, and V{sub 40} {<=}40%; 92% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}20%, V{sub 65} {<=}40%, and V{sub 40} {<=}80%; and 85% for men exceeding these criteria (p = 0.13). These criteria were more highly associated with GI toxicity in men aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.07). No bladder dose-volume relationships were associated with the risk of GU toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with low rates of severe GU or GI toxicity after treatment for prostate cancer. Rectal dose constraints

  11. Estimation of the incidence of late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Brink, Mandy van den; Bruce, Allison M.; Shouman, Tarek; Gras, Luuk; Velde, Annet te; Lebesque, Joos V.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (>6 months) GI and GU complications was classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. In addition, GI complications were divided in nonsevere and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments or blood transfusions) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 24 months. We investigated whether rectal and bladder wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels, correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI and GU complications, using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH, the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cutoff levels. The impact of the total radiation dose, and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: The actuarial incidence at 2 years for GI complications ≥Grade II was 14% (RTOG/EORTC) or 20% (SOMA/LENT); for GU complications ≥Grade III 8% (RTOG/EORTC) or 21% (SOMA/LENT). Neither for GI complications ≥Grade II (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), nor for GU complications ≥Grade III (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), was a significant correlation found between any of the DVH parameters and the actuarial incidence of complications. For severe rectal bleeding (actuarial incidence at 2 years 3%), four consecutive volume cutoff levels were found, which significantly discriminated between high and low risk. A trend was observed that a total radiation dose ≥ 74 Gy (or a maximum radiation dose in the rectal wall >75 Gy) resulted in a higher incidence of severe rectal bleeding (p

  12. Early life status epilepticus and stress have distinct and sex-specific effects on learning, subsequent seizure outcomes, including anticonvulsant response to phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ozlem; Moshé, Solomon L; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2015-02-01

    Neonatal status epilepticus (SE) is often associated with adverse cognitive and epilepsy outcomes. We investigate the effects of three episodes of kainic acid-induced SE (3KA-SE) and maternal separation in immature rats on subsequent learning, seizure susceptibility, and consequences, and the anticonvulsant effects of phenobarbital, according to sex, type, and age at early life (EL) event. 3KA-SE or maternal separation was induced on postnatal days (PN) 4-6 or 14-16. Rats were tested on Barnes maze (PN16-19), or lithium-pilocarpine SE (PN19) or flurothyl seizures (PN32). The anticonvulsant effects of phenobarbital (20 or 40 mg/kg/rat, intraperitoneally) pretreatment were tested on flurothyl seizures. FluoroJadeB staining assessed hippocampal injury. 3KA-SE or separation on PN4-6 caused more transient learning delays in males and did not alter lithium-pilocarpine SE latencies, but aggravated its outcomes in females. Anticonvulsant effects of phenobarbital were preserved and potentiated in specific groups depending on sex, type, and age at EL event. Early life 3KA-SE and maternal separation cause more but transient cognitive deficits in males but aggravate the consequences of subsequent lithium-pilocarpine SE in females. In contrast, on flurothyl seizures, EL events showed either beneficial or no effect, depending on gender, type, and age at EL events. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Use of benchmark dose-volume histograms for selection of the optimal technique between three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Chunhui; Yang, Claus Chunli; Narayan, Samir; Stern, Robin L.; Perks, Julian; Goldberg, Zelanna; Ryu, Janice; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop and validate our own benchmark dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of bladder and rectum for both conventional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and to evaluate quantitatively the benefits of using IMRT vs. 3D-CRT in treating localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation of IMRT for prostate cancer, our policy was to plan each patient with both 3D-CRT and IMRT. This study included 31 patients with T1b to T2c localized prostate cancer, for whom we completed double-planning using both 3D-CRT and IMRT techniques. The target volumes included prostate, either with or without proximal seminal vesicles. Bladder and rectum DVH data were summarized to obtain an average DVH for each technique and then compared using two-tailed paired t test analysis. Results: For 3D-CRT our bladder doses were as follows: mean 28.8 Gy, v60 16.4%, v70 10.9%; rectal doses were: mean 39.3 Gy, v60 21.8%, v70 13.6%. IMRT plans resulted in similar mean dose values: bladder 26.4 Gy, rectum 34.9 Gy, but lower values of v70 for the bladder (7.8%) and rectum (9.3%). These benchmark DVHs have resulted in a critical evaluation of our 3D-CRT techniques over time. Conclusion: Our institution has developed benchmark DVHs for bladder and rectum based on our clinical experience with 3D-CRT and IMRT. We use these standards as well as differences in individual cases to make decisions on whether patients may benefit from IMRT treatment rather than 3D-CRT

  14. High-dose preoperative chemoradiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients does not increase postoperative pulmonary complications: Correlation with dose-volume histogram parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurmuzlu, Meysan; Ovrebo, Kjell; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Viste, Asgaut; Smaaland, Rune

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of high-dose preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of lungs with incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications and to identify predictive clinical factors of pulmonary complications. Methods: Data of 65 patients were collected retrospectively. Thirty-five patients underwent transthoracic esophagectomy (TTE) alone and 30 received cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, concomitant with radiotherapy, median dose 66 Gy, and followed by TTE. From the DVH for each lung alone and for both lungs together as one organ we generated total lung volume, mean radiotherapy dose, relative and absolute volumes receiving more than a threshold dose, and relative and absolute volumes receiving less than a threshold dose. Postoperative pulmonary complications were defined as pneumonia or respiratory failure. Results: Sixty percent of the patients in the TTE alone group had postoperative pulmonary complications versus 63% in the CRT + TTE group. Postoperative mortality was 8.6% and 16.7% in the respective patient groups (p = NS). None of the DVH parameters was associated with postoperative pulmonary complications. Squamous cell carcinoma was an adverse factor related to increased postoperative pulmonary complications. Conclusion: High-dose preoperative CRT was not associated with increased postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort of esophageal cancer patients.

  15. The minimum knowledge base for predicting organ-at-risk dose-volume levels and plan-related complications in IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hao H; D'Souza, Warren D; Meyer, Robert R; Shi Leyuan

    2010-01-01

    IMRT treatment planning requires consideration of two competing objectives: achieving the required amount of radiation for the planning target volume and minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to all other tissues. It is important for planners to understand the tradeoff between competing factors so that the time-consuming human interaction loop (plan-evaluate-modify) can be eliminated. Treatment-plan-surface models have been proposed as a decision support tool to aid treatment planners and clinicians in choosing between rival treatment plans in a multi-plan environment. In this paper, an empirical approach is introduced to determine the minimum number of treatment plans (minimum knowledge base) required to build accurate representations of the IMRT plan surface in order to predict organ-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume (DV) levels and complications as a function of input DV constraint settings corresponding to all involved OARs in the plan. We have tested our approach on five head and neck patients and five whole pelvis/prostate patients. Our results suggest that approximately 30 plans were sufficient to predict DV levels with less than 3% relative error in both head and neck and whole pelvis/prostate cases. In addition, approximately 30-60 plans were sufficient to predict saliva flow rate with less than 2% relative error and to classify rectal bleeding with an accuracy of 90%.

  16. The analysis of correlation between changes of myocardial enzymes level in serum before and after radiation and dose-volume histogram parameters of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xiuping; Li Hongjun; Li Baosheng; Wang Dongqing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the correlation between the changes of myocardial enzyme level in serum before and after radiotherapy and dose - volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the heart. Methods: A total of 102 patients with 68 cases of lung cancer and 34 cases of esophageal cancer were recruited. All patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with the radiation beams passing through the heart. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase isozyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), α-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (α-HBDH) were determined in the serum before and after radiotherapy. All the enzyme levels before and after radiotherapy were compared through paired t-test. Independent sample t-test was conducted between sub-groups. And the dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the heart were calculated (the volume percentage of heart receiving dose equal to or exceeding x Gy (V x ). The correlation between myocardial enzyme level and DVH parameters was analyzed through Pearson method. Results: Serum AST, CK-MB, LDH, α-HBDH levels increased significantly after radiotherapy (19.42: 27.89, 14.72:19.57, 178.80 : 217.57, 140.32 : 176.25, t =-3.39 - -6.92, all P=0.000). In Group IMRT, significant correlations between the increase of myocardial enzyme concentration and DVH parameters of the heart are found, AST with V 20 , V 25 , V 30 of heart ( r=0.302 - 0.431, P =0.039 - 0.003), CK with V 30 of heart (r=0.345, P=0.013), and CK-MB, LDH, α-HBDH with V 25 , V 30 (r=0.465 -0.376, P=0.001-0.005). In Group CRT, there are significant correlations between changes of CK-MB, LDH level and V 30 of heart (r =0.330, 0.274, P=0.014, 0.033), α-HBDH and V 25 , V 30 , and V 35 of heart (r=0.270-0.331, P=0.046-0.014). When the irradiation dose was more than 50 Gy, significant correlations were found between the concentration changes of AST, LDH, α-HBDH and V 25 , V 30 of heart (r=0

  17. Parotid gland tumors: A comparison of postoperative radiotherapy techniques using three dimensional (3D) dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Fontenla, Doracy P.; Tyerech, Sangeeta K.; Boselli, Lucia R.; Beitler, Jonathan J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To compare different treatment techniques for unilateral treatment of parotid gland tumors. Methods and Materials: The CT-scans of a representative parotid patient were used. The field size was 9 x 11 cm, the separation was 15.5 cm, and the prescription depth was 4.5 cm. Using 3D dose distributions, tissue inhomogeneity corrections, scatter integration (for photons) and pencil beam (for electrons) algorithms and dose-volume histogram (DVH), nine treatment techniques were compared. [1] unilateral 6 MV photons [2] unilateral 12 MeV electrons [3] unilateral 16 MeV electrons [4] an ipsilateral wedge pair technique using 6 MV photons [5] a 3-field AP (wedged), PA (wedged) and lateral portal technique using 6 MV photons [6] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 12 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting) [7] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 16 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting) [8] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (2:3 weighting) [9] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (1:1 weighting). Results: Using dose-volume histograms to evaluate the dose to the contralateral parotid gland, the percentage of contralateral parotid volume receiving ≥ 30% of the prescribed dose was 100% for techniques [1], [8] and [9], and < 5% for techniques [2] through [7]. Evaluating the 'hottest' 5 cc of the ipsilateral mandible and temporal lobes, the hot spots were: 152% and 150% for technique [2], 132% and 130% for technique [6]. Comparing the exit doses, techniques [1], [8] and [9] contributed to ≥ 50% of the prescribed dose to the contralateral mandible and the temporal lobes. Only techniques [2] and [6] kept the highest point doses to both the brain stem and the spinal cord below 50% of the prescribed dose. Conclusion: The single photon lateral field [1] and the mixed electron-photon beams [8] and [9] are not recommended treatment techniques for unilateral parotid irradiation because of high doses delivered to the

  18. Analysis of dose volume histogram parameters to estimate late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, L.J.; Brink, M. van den; Bruce, A.; Gras, L.; Velde, A. te; Lebesque, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to examine the effect of using different morbidity scoring systems on the results of these analyses. Materials and Methods: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications was scored based on questionnaires and classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. Moreover, patients were classified as being a rectal bleeder or no rectal bleeder and a distinction was made between non-severe and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 22 months. It was investigated whether the relative and absolute rectal wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels (≥ 60 Gy, ≥ 65 Gy, ≥ 70 Gy and ≥ 75 Gy) were correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI complications. First, the analysis was performed using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cut-off levels. Twenty cut-off levels were tested on their ability to discriminate between high and low risk for developing GI complications (Fig.). The relationship between bladder wall volumes irradiated to various dose levels and observed actuarial GU complications was investigated using the absolute bladder wall volumes, measured as a continuous variable. For both GI and GU complications, the role of the prescribed radiation dose and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: None of the DVH parameters of the rectal wall was significantly correlated with the actuarial incidences of

  19. Ten-year outcome including patterns of failure and toxicity for adjuvant whole abdominopelvic irradiation in high-risk and poor histologic feature patients with endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Kimberly D.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Weiner, Sheldon; Podratz, Karl; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Schray, Mark; Mitchell, Christina; Sherman, Alfred; Chen, Peter; Brabbins, Donald A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term results of treatment using adjuvant whole abdominal irradiation (WAPI) with a pelvic/vaginal boost in patients with Stage I-III endometrial carcinoma at high risk of intra-abdominopelvic recurrence, including clear cell (CC) and serous-papillary (SP) histologic features. Methods and Materials: In a prospective nonrandomized trial, 119 patients were treated with adjuvant WAPI between November 1981 and April 2000. All patients were analyzed, including those who did not complete therapy. The mean age at diagnosis was 66 years (range 39-88). Thirty-eight patients (32%) had 1989 FIGO Stage I-II disease and 81 (68%) had Stage III. The pathologic features included the following: 64 (54%) with deep myometrial invasion, 48 (40%) with positive peritoneal cytologic findings, 69 (58%) with high-grade lesions, 21 (18%) with positive pelvic/para-aortic lymph nodes, and 44 (37%) with SP or CC histologic findings. Results: The mean follow-up was 5.8 years (range 0.2-14.7). For the entire group, the 5- and 10-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rate was 75% and 69% and the disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 58% and 48%, respectively. When stratified by histologic features, the 5- and 10-year CSS rate for adenocarcinoma was 76% and 71%, and for serous papillary/CC subtypes, it was 74% and 63%, respectively (p=0.917). The 5- and 10-year DFS rate for adenocarcinoma was 60% and 50% and was 54% and 37% serous papillary/CC subtypes, respectively (p=0.498). For surgical Stage I-II, the 5-year CSS rate was 82% for adenocarcinoma and 87% for SP/CC features (p=0.480). For Stage III, it was 75% and 57%, respectively (p=0.129). Thirty-seven patients had a relapse, with the first site of failure the abdomen/pelvis in 14 (38%), lung in 8 (22%), extraabdominal lymph nodes in 7 (19%), vagina in 6 (16%), and other in 2 (5%). When stratified by histologic variant, 32% of patients with adenocarcinoma and 30% with the SP/CC subtype developed recurrent disease. Most

  20. Differences in the dose-volume metrics with heterogeneity correction status and its influence on local control in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueki, Nami; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Shibuya, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dose-volume metrics under different heterogeneity corrections and the factors associated with local recurrence (LR) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighty-three patients who underwent SBRT for pathologically proven stage I NSCLC were reviewed retrospectively. The prescribed dose was 48 Gy in four fractions at the isocenter (IC) under heterogeneity correction with the Batho power law (BPL). The clinical plans were recalculated with Eclipse (Varian) for the same monitor units under the BPL and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and with no heterogeneity correction (NC). The dose at the IC, dose that covers 95% of the volume (D95), minimum dose (Min), and mean dose (Mean) of the planning target volume (PTV) were compared under each algorithm and between patients with local lesion control (LC) and LR. The IC doses under NC were significantly lower than those under the BPL and AAA. Under the BPL, the mean PTV D95, Min and Mean were 8.0, 9.4 and 7.4% higher than those under the AAA, and 9.6, 9.2 and 4.6% higher than those under NC, respectively. Under the AAA, all dose-volumetric parameters were significantly lower in T1a patients than in those with T1b and T2a. With a median follow-up of 35.9 months, LR occurred in 18 patients. Between the LC and LR groups, no significant differences were observed for any of the metrics. Even after stratification according to T-stage, no significant difference was observed between LC and LR. (author)

  1. Association of anorectal dose-volume histograms and impaired fecal continence after 3D conformal radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk; Schwab, Michael; Ness-Dourdoumas, Rhea; Sailer, Marco; Flentje, Michael; Koelbl, Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The late toxicity of fecal incontinence after pelvic radiotherapy is now frequently recognized but the etiology poorly understood. We therefore investigated associations between dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the rectum and the anal canal with fecal continence as measured by an established 10-item questionnaire. Methods and materials: Forty-four patients treated for carcinoma of the prostate with 58-72 Gy of 3D conformal radiotherapy between 1995 and 1999 who completed the questionnaire formed the study population. Total continence scores of treated patients obtained 1.5 years (median) after radiotherapy were compared to a control group of 30 patients before radiotherapy. Median, mean, minimum and maximum doses as well as the volume (% and ml) treated to 40, 50, 60 and 70 Gy were determined separately for anal canal and rectum. DVH parameters were correlated with total continence score (Spearman rank test) and patients grouped according to observed continence were compared regarding DVH values (Mann-Whitney U-test). Results: Median fecal continence scores were significantly worse in the irradiated than in the control group (31 vs. 35 of a maximum 36 points). In treated patients, 59%/27%/14% were classified as fully continent, slightly incontinent and severely incontinent. Continence was similar in the 58-to-62-Gy, 66-Gy and 68-to-72-Gy dose groups. No DVH parameter was significantly correlated with total continence score, but severely incontinent patients had a significantly higher minimum dose to the anal canal than fully continent/slightly incontinent, accompanied by portals extending significantly further inferiorly with respect to the ischial tuberosities. Conclusions: Excluding the inferior part of the anal canal from the treated volume in 3D conformal therapy for carcinoma of the prostate appears to be a promising strategy to prevent radiation-induced fecal incontinence

  2. A Dose-Volume Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Aided High-Dose-Rate Image-Based Interstitial Brachytherapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Takenaka, Tadashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Furuya, Seiichi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Uegaki, Tadaaki; Kuriyama, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of our novel image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for uterine cervical cancer, we evaluated the dose-volume histogram (DVH) according to the recommendations of the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group for image-based intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and June 2007, 18 previously untreated cervical cancer patients were enrolled. We implanted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-available plastic applicators by our unique ambulatory technique. Total treatment doses were 30-36 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Treatment plans were created based on planning computed tomography with MRI as a reference. DVHs of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR CTV), and the bladder and rectum were calculated. Dose values were biologically normalized to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD 2 ). Results: The median D90 (HR CTV) and D90 (IR CTV) per fraction were 6.8 Gy (range, 5.5-7.5) and 5.4 Gy (range, 4.2-6.3), respectively. The median V100 (HR CTV) and V100 (IR CTV) were 98.4% (range, 83-100) and 81.8% (range, 64-93.8), respectively. When the dose of EBRT was added, the median D90 and D100 of HR CTV were 80.6 Gy (range, 65.5-96.6) and 62.4 Gy (range, 49-83.2). The D 2cc of the bladder was 62 Gy (range, 51.4-89) and of the rectum was 65.9 Gy (range, 48.9-76). Conclusions: Although the targets were advanced and difficult to treat effectively by ICBT, MRI-aided image-based ISBT showed favorable results for CTV and organs at risk compared with previously reported image-based ICBT results.

  3. A dose-volume analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-aided high-dose-rate image-based interstitial brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Takenaka, Tadashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Furuya, Seiichi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Uegaki, Tadaaki; Kuriyama, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of our novel image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for uterine cervical cancer, we evaluated the dose-volume histogram (DVH) according to the recommendations of the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group for image-based intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). Between June 2005 and June 2007, 18 previously untreated cervical cancer patients were enrolled. We implanted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-available plastic applicators by our unique ambulatory technique. Total treatment doses were 30-36 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Treatment plans were created based on planning computed tomography with MRI as a reference. DVHs of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR CTV), and the bladder and rectum were calculated. Dose values were biologically normalized to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD(2)). The median D90 (HR CTV) and D90 (IR CTV) per fraction were 6.8 Gy (range, 5.5-7.5) and 5.4 Gy (range, 4.2-6.3), respectively. The median V100 (HR CTV) and V100 (IR CTV) were 98.4% (range, 83-100) and 81.8% (range, 64-93.8), respectively. When the dose of EBRT was added, the median D90 and D100 of HR CTV were 80.6 Gy (range, 65.5-96.6) and 62.4 Gy (range, 49-83.2). The D(2cc) of the bladder was 62 Gy (range, 51.4-89) and of the rectum was 65.9 Gy (range, 48.9-76). Although the targets were advanced and difficult to treat effectively by ICBT, MRI-aided image-based ISBT showed favorable results for CTV and organs at risk compared with previously reported image-based ICBT results. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SU-F-T-359: Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram Prediction Into Auto-Planning for Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K; Chen, X; Wang, J; Lu, S; Chen, Y; Hu, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To incorporate dose volume histogram (DVH) prediction into Auto-Planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning and investigate the benefit of this new technique for rectal cancer. Methods: Ninety clinically accepted VMAT plans for patients with rectal cancer were selected and trained in the RapidPlan for DVH prediction. Both internal and external validations were performed before implementing the prediction model. A new VMAT planning method (hybrid-VMAT) was created with combining the DVH prediction and Auto-Planning. For each new patient, the DVH will be predicted and individual DVH constrains will be obtained and were exported as the original optimization parameters to the Auto-Planning (Pinnacle3 treatment planning system, v9.10) for planning. A total of 20 rectal cancer patients previously treated with manual VMAT (manual-VMAT) plans were replanned using this new method. Dosimetric comparisons were performed between manual VMAT and new method plans. Results: Hybrid-VMAT shows similar PTV coverage to manual-VMAT in D2%, D98% and HI (p>0.05) and superior coverage in CI (p=0.000). For the bladder, the means of V40 and mean dose are 36.0% and 35.6Gy for hybrid-VMAT and 42% and 38.0Gy for the manual-VMAT. For the left (right) femur, the means of V30 and mean dose are 10.6% (11.6%) and 17.9Gy (19.2Gy) for the hybrid-VMAT and 25.6% (24.1%) and 27.3Gy (26.2Gy) for the manual-VMAT. The hybrid-VMAT has significantly improved the organs at risk sparing. Conclusion: The integration of DVH prediction and Auto-Planning significantly improve the VMAT plan quality in the rectal cancer radiotherapy. Our results show the benefit of the new method and will be further investigated in other tumor sites.

  5. Dose-volume histogram comparison between static 5-field IMRT with 18-MV X-rays and helical tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hattori, Yukiko; Tamura, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Michio; Otsuka, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We treated prostate cancer patients with static 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using linac 18-MV X-rays or tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays. As X-ray energies differ, we hypothesized that 18-MV photon IMRT may be better for large patients and tomotherapy may be more suitable for small patients. Thus, we compared dose-volume parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) in 59 patients with T1-3 N0M0 prostate cancer who had been treated using 5-field IMRT. For these same patients, tomotherapy plans were also prepared for comparison. In addition, plans of 18 patients who were actually treated with tomotherapy were analyzed. The evaluated parameters were homogeneity indicies and a conformity index for the PTVs, and D2 (dose received by 2% of the PTV in Gy), D98, Dmean and V10-70 Gy (%) for OARs. To evaluate differences by body size, patients with a known body mass index were grouped by that index ( 25 kg/m(2)). For the PTV, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans compared with the 5-field IMRT plans. For the rectum, V10 Gy and V60 Gy were higher, whereas V20 Gy and V30 Gy were lower in the tomotherapy plans. For the bladder, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans. However, both plans were considered clinically acceptable. Similar trends were observed in 18 patients treated with tomotherapy. Obvious trends were not observed for body size. Tomotherapy provides equivalent dose distributions for PTVs and OARs compared with 18-MV 5-field IMRT. Tomotherapy could be used as a substitute for high-energy photon IMRT for prostate cancer regardless of body size. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  6. SU-F-T-359: Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram Prediction Into Auto-Planning for Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy in Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K; Chen, X; Wang, J; Lu, S; Chen, Y; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To incorporate dose volume histogram (DVH) prediction into Auto-Planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning and investigate the benefit of this new technique for rectal cancer. Methods: Ninety clinically accepted VMAT plans for patients with rectal cancer were selected and trained in the RapidPlan for DVH prediction. Both internal and external validations were performed before implementing the prediction model. A new VMAT planning method (hybrid-VMAT) was created with combining the DVH prediction and Auto-Planning. For each new patient, the DVH will be predicted and individual DVH constrains will be obtained and were exported as the original optimization parameters to the Auto-Planning (Pinnacle3 treatment planning system, v9.10) for planning. A total of 20 rectal cancer patients previously treated with manual VMAT (manual-VMAT) plans were replanned using this new method. Dosimetric comparisons were performed between manual VMAT and new method plans. Results: Hybrid-VMAT shows similar PTV coverage to manual-VMAT in D2%, D98% and HI (p>0.05) and superior coverage in CI (p=0.000). For the bladder, the means of V40 and mean dose are 36.0% and 35.6Gy for hybrid-VMAT and 42% and 38.0Gy for the manual-VMAT. For the left (right) femur, the means of V30 and mean dose are 10.6% (11.6%) and 17.9Gy (19.2Gy) for the hybrid-VMAT and 25.6% (24.1%) and 27.3Gy (26.2Gy) for the manual-VMAT. The hybrid-VMAT has significantly improved the organs at risk sparing. Conclusion: The integration of DVH prediction and Auto-Planning significantly improve the VMAT plan quality in the rectal cancer radiotherapy. Our results show the benefit of the new method and will be further investigated in other tumor sites.

  7. SU-G-BRC-08: Evaluation of Dose Mass Histogram as a More Representative Dose Description Method Than Dose Volume Histogram in Lung Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J; Eldib, A; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, M [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States); Li, J [Cyber Medical Inc, Xian, Shaanxi (China); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) is widely used for plan evaluation in radiation treatment. The concept of dose-mass-histogram (DMH) is expected to provide a more representative description as it accounts for heterogeneity in tissue density. This study is intended to assess the difference between DVH and DMH for evaluating treatment planning quality. Methods: 12 lung cancer treatment plans were exported from the treatment planning system. DVHs for the planning target volume (PTV), the normal lung and other structures of interest were calculated. DMHs were calculated in a similar way as DVHs expect that the voxel density converted from the CT number was used in tallying the dose histogram bins. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was calculated based on voxel volume and mass, respectively. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) in relation to the EUD was calculated for the normal lung to provide quantitative comparison of DVHs and DMHs for evaluating the radiobiological effect. Results: Large differences were observed between DVHs and DMHs for lungs and PTVs. For PTVs with dense tumor cores, DMHs are higher than DVHs due to larger mass weighing in the high dose conformal core regions. For the normal lungs, DMHs can either be higher or lower than DVHs depending on the target location within the lung. When the target is close to the lower lung, DMHs show higher values than DVHs because the lower lung has higher density than the central portion or the upper lung. DMHs are lower than DVHs for targets in the upper lung. The calculated NTCPs showed a large range of difference between DVHs and DMHs. Conclusion: The heterogeneity of lung can be well considered using DMH for evaluating target coverage and normal lung pneumonitis. Further studies are warranted to quantify the benefits of DMH over DVH for plan quality evaluation.

  8. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin for stage-III and -IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Long-term results including functional outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, P.; Glanzmann, C.; Taussky, D.; Luetolf, U.M.; Schmid, S.; Moe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate, the probability of local control, the patterns of relapse and late sequelae including self-reported quality of life in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous CDDP chemotherapy for stage-III to stage-IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods: From 1988 to 1994, 64 patients (median age 55.5 years) with carcinomas of different subsites, excluding the nasopharynx, were treated in a pilot study with 1.2 Gy bid (6 h interval; total dose 74.4 Gy) and simultaneous CDDP (20 mg/m 2 daily, 5 days in week 1 and 5) and followed at regular intervals. Overall survival and local control, as well as the rates of late toxicity, were estimated using the actuarial method. Median follow-up was 3.3 years for all and 5.2 years for surviving patients. To assess the quality of life, the EORTC QLQ-C 30 questionnaire and the H and N35 module questionnaire were sent to the patients surviving with no evidence of disease or second primary tumors; they were answered by 15/23 (67%). Results: Overall survival was 37% at 5 years, whereas disease-specific survival was 59%. Twenty-three patients died from uncontrolled head and neck cancer. Second primary tumors were observed in 13 patients, most frequently in the lung. Local control without salvage surgery was 74% at 5 years for all subsites and stages, and loco-regional disease-free survival was 72%. Eleven patients developed distant metastases, which was the only site of failure in 6 cases. Salvage surgery was successful in 2 cases. The actuarial estimates of ≥grade-3 late toxicity was 4% for the mandibular bone and 23% for dysphagia, and 50% of the patients experienced a permanent xerostomy. Self-reported global quality of life in surviving patients was good (mean 68 points on a scale 0 to 100); consequences of impaired salivary function had most impact on nutritional and social aspects. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated RT with concomitant CDDP is well tolerated and highly

  9. Five-year examination of utilization and drug cost outcomes associated with benefit design changes including reference pricing for proton pump inhibitors in a state employee health plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jill T; Neill, Kathryn K; Davis, Dwight A

    2011-04-01

    The Arkansas State Employee Benefits Division (EBD) is a self-insured program comprising public school and other state employees, their spouses, and dependents. Previous research published in JMCP (2006) showed drug cost savings of $2.20 per member per month (PMPM; 37.6%) or annualized savings of $3.4 million associated with a benefit design change and coverage of the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) omeprazole over-the-counter (OTC) beginning in March 2004. On May 1, 2005, brand esomeprazole was excluded from coverage, with current users grandfathered for 4 months until September 2005. Reference pricing for PPIs, including esomeprazole but excluding generic omeprazole, was implemented on September 1, 2005, and the beneficiary cost share for all PPIs except generic omeprazole was determined from comparison of the PPI actual price to the $0.90 omeprazole OTC reference price per unit. To examine PPI utilization and drug costs before and after (a) excluding esomeprazole from coverage (with grandfathering current users) and (b) implementing a therapeutic maximum allowable cost (TMAC), or reference-pricing benefit design, for the PPI class in a large state employee health plan with fairly stable enrollment of approximately 127,500 members in 2005 through 2008 and approximately 128,000 members in 2009 Q1. The pharmacy claims database for the EBD was used to examine utilization and cost data for PPIs in a longitudinal analysis for the 61-month period from March 1, 2004, through March 31, 2009. Pharmacy claims data were compared for the period 14 months prior to esomeprazole exclusion (preperiod), 4 months during the esomeprazole exclusion (postperiod 1), and the ensuing 43 months of PPI reference pricing (postperiod 2). PPI cost and utilization data for the intervention group of approximately 127,500 beneficiaries were compared with a group of 122 self-insured employers with a total of nearly 1 million beneficiaries whose pharmacy benefits did not include reference pricing for

  10. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin for stage-III and -IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Long-term results including functional outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguenin, P.; Glanzmann, C.; Taussky, D.; Luetolf, U.M. [Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Radiation Oncology Dept.; Schmid, S.; Moe, K. [Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery

    1998-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate, the probability of local control, the patterns of relapse and late sequelae including self-reported quality of life in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous CDDP chemotherapy for stage-III to stage-IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods: From 1988 to 1994, 64 patients (median age 55.5 years) with carcinomas of different subsites, excluding the nasopharynx, were treated in a pilot study with 1.2 Gy bid (6 h interval; total dose 74.4 Gy) and simultaneous CDDP (20 mg/m{sup 2} daily, 5 days in week 1 and 5) and followed at regular intervals. Overall survival and local control, as well as the rates of late toxicity, were estimated using the actuarial method. Median follow-up was 3.3 years for all and 5.2 years for surviving patients. To assess the quality of life, the EORTC QLQ-C 30 questionnaire and the H and N35 module questionnaire were sent to the patients surviving with no evidence of disease or second primary tumors; they were answered by 15/23 (67%). Results: Overall survival was 37% at 5 years, whereas disease-specific survival was 59%. Twenty-three patients died from uncontrolled head and neck cancer. Second primary tumors were observed in 13 patients, most frequently in the lung. Local control without salvage surgery was 74% at 5 years for all subsites and stages, and loco-regional disease-free survival was 72%. Eleven patients developed distant metastases, which was the only site of failure in 6 cases. Salvage surgery was successful in 2 cases. The actuarial estimates of {>=}grade-3 late toxicity was 4% for the mandibular bone and 23% for dysphagia, and 50% of the patients experienced a permanent xerostomy. Self-reported global quality of life in surviving patients was good (mean 68 points on a scale 0 to 100); consequences of impaired salivary function had most impact on nutritional and social aspects. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated RT with concomitant CDDP is well tolerated and

  11. Does prostate brachytherapy treat the seminal vesicles? A dose-volume histogram analysis of seminal vesicles in patients undergoing combined PD-103 prostate implantation and external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Richard G.; Lo, Yeh-Chi; Gaildon, Mohamoud; Stone, Nelson N.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Combined brachytherapy of the prostate and external beam irradiation (EBRT) of the prostate and seminal vesicles (SV) is becoming a popular treatment for high-risk prostate cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis of the SV in patients undergoing this treatment was performed to determine the dose distribution to the SV and the adequacy of this treatment in patients with potential SV involvement. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five consecutive patients were treated with a Pd-103 implant of the prostate alone and 45 Gy of EBRT to the prostate and SV. Attempts were not made to implant the SV but seeds were routinely placed at the junction of the prostate and SV. All patients underwent CT-based post implant dosimetric analysis 1 month after implantation. As part of this analysis, DVH were generated for the prostate and total SV volume (SVT). In addition, the SV was divided into 6-mm-thick volumes identified as SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 starting from the junction of the prostate and SV and extending distally. DVH were also generated for these structures. Delivered dose was defined as the D90 (dose delivered to 90% of the organ on DVH). Results: The median volumes in cc of the prostate, SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 were 34.33, 9.75, 2.7, 3.48, 2.92, 3.18, and 1.96 respectively. The SVT contained from 0-9 seeds (median 2). There was little dose delivered to the SVT and SV volumes from the implanted prostate. The median D90 values for the prostate, SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 were 8615 cGy, 675 cGy, 3100 cGy, 1329 cGy, 553 cGy, 246 cGy, and 67 cGy, respectively. The dose delivered to the prostate covered small percentages of SV. The percents of SV volumes covered by the prostate D90 were 11, 35, 3.3, 0, 0, and 0 for SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5, respectively. Conclusions: DVH analysis of the SV reveals that dose generated from an implanted prostate contributes little to the SV. Those patients at high risk for SV involvement may be under treated

  12. SU-F-T-347: An Absolute Dose-Volume Constraint Based Deterministic Optimization Framework for Multi-Co60 Source Focused Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, B; Liu, B; Li, Y; Guo, B; Xu, X; Wei, R; Zhou, F [Beihang University, Beijing, Beijing (China); Wu, Q [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treatment plan optimization in multi-Co60 source focused radiotherapy with multiple isocenters is challenging, because dose distribution is normalized to maximum dose during optimization and evaluation. The objective functions are traditionally defined based on relative dosimetric distribution. This study presents an alternative absolute dose-volume constraint (ADC) based deterministic optimization framework (ADC-DOF). Methods: The initial isocenters are placed on the eroded target surface. Collimator size is chosen based on the area of 2D contour on corresponding axial slice. The isocenter spacing is determined by adjacent collimator sizes. The weights are optimized by minimizing the deviation from ADCs using the steepest descent technique. An iterative procedure is developed to reduce the number of isocenters, where the isocenter with lowest weight is removed without affecting plan quality. The ADC-DOF is compared with the genetic algorithm (GA) using the same arbitrary shaped target (254cc), with a 15mm margin ring structure representing normal tissues. Results: For ADC-DOF, the ADCs imposed on target and ring are (D100>10Gy, D50,10, 0<12Gy, 15Gy and 20Gy) and (D40<10Gy). The resulting D100, 50, 10, 0 and D40 are (9.9Gy, 12.0Gy, 14.1Gy and 16.2Gy) and (10.2Gy). The objectives of GA are to maximize 50% isodose target coverage (TC) while minimize the dose delivered to the ring structure, which results in 97% TC and 47.2% average dose in ring structure. For ADC-DOF (GA) techniques, 20 out of 38 (10 out of 12) initial isocenters are used in the final plan, and the computation time is 8.7s (412.2s) on an i5 computer. Conclusion: We have developed a new optimization technique using ADC and deterministic optimization. Compared with GA, ADC-DOF uses more isocenters but is faster and more robust, and achieves a better conformity. For future work, we will focus on developing a more effective mechanism for initial isocenter determination.

  13. Biological-effective versus conventional dose volume histograms correlated with late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: a matched pair analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeske John C

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether the dose-volume histograms (DVH's for the rectum and bladder constructed using biological-effective dose (BED-DVH's better correlate with late gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicity after treatment with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer than conventional DVH's (C-DVH's. Methods The charts of 190 patients treated with external beam radiotherapy with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were reviewed. Six patients (3.2% were found to have RTOG grade 3 GI toxicity, and similarly 6 patients (3.2% were found to have RTOG grade 3 GU toxicity. Average late C-DVH's and BED-DVH's of the bladder and rectum were computed for these patients as well as for matched-pair control patients. For each matched pair the following measures of normalized difference in the DVH's were computed: (a δAUC = (Area Under Curve [AUC] in grade 3 patient – AUC in grade 0 patient/(AUC in grade 0 patient and (b δV60 = (Percent volume receiving = 60 Gy [V60] in grade 3 patient – V60 in grade 0 patient/(V60 in grade 0 patient. Results As expected, the grade 3 curve is to the right of and above the grade 0 curve for all four sets of average DVH's – suggesting that both the C-DVH and the BED-DVH can be used for predicting late toxicity. δAUC was higher for the BED-DVH's than for the C-DVH's – 0.27 vs 0.23 (p = 0.036 for the rectum and 0.24 vs 0.20 (p = 0.065 for the bladder. δV60 was also higher for the BED-DVH's than for the C-DVH's – 2.73 vs 1.49 for the rectum (p = 0.021 and 1.64 vs 0.71 (p = 0.021 for the bladder. Conclusions When considering well-established dosimetric endpoints used in evaluating treatment plans, BED-DVH's for the rectum and bladder correlate better with late toxicity than C-DVH's and should be considered when attempting to minimize late GI and GU toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  14. The value of regional nodal radiotherapy (dose/volume) in the treatment of unresectable non-small cell lung cancer: an RTOG analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emami, Bahman; Scott, Charles; Byhardt, Roger; Graham, Mary V.; Andras, E. James; John, Madhu; Herskovic, Arnold; Urtasun, Raul C.; Asbell, Sucha O.; Perez, Carlos A.; Cox, James

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether or not the traditional practice of including all thoracic regional nodal areas in the radiotherapy volume in the treatment of unresectable lung cancer is of any therapeutic benefit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1,705 patients from four large RTOG trials (78-11, 79-17, 83-11, 84-07) were analyzed for this purpose. Each of these trials had data on dose delivered to the nodal regions and assessment of nodal borders. The nodes were separated into mediastinal, contralateral hilar, ipsilateral hilar, and supraclavicular. Each node site was assessed for progression, defined as in-field or out-of-field, at the node site. In patients with adequate nodal field borders, the results were also analyzed according to the dose delivered. RESULTS: The majority (74%) of patients were between the age of 55 to 75. Forty-six percent of patients had KPS of 60 to 80 and 52% KPS of 90 to 100. Sixty percent of patients had a weight loss of less than 5%, and 40% had a weight loss of over 5% six months prior to diagnosis. Major variations from protocol in defining field borders (unacceptable field borders) were lowest for ipsilateral hilum ((42(727))) and the highest for mediastinal borders ((158(743))). Three groups had statistically significant differences in outcome (progression) between the per protocol and the unacceptable per protocol: ipsilateral hilar nodes (field borders), 14% versus 26% (p = 0.03); dose to mediastinal nodes in CALGB eligible patients, 9% versus 19% (p = 0.02); and ipsilateral hilar nodes (field borders) for high-dose patients assigned to greater than or equal to 69.6 Gy, 14% versus 31% (p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that inclusion of the ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal nodes affect outcome in unresectable non-small cell lung cancer. Exclusion of the other thoracic lymph node regions did not affect outcome in this study. These findings have important implications for combined modality therapy and three

  15. Parotid gland tumors: a comparison of postoperative radiotherapy techniques using three dimensional (3-D) dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, R.; Tyerech, S.K.; Boselli, L.R.; Fontenla, D.P.; Beitler, J.J.; Vikram, B.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare different treatment techniques for unilateral treatment of parotid gland tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients previously treated postoperatively for parotid gland tumors were retrospectively reviewed. Average field size was 9 x 11 cm, average separation was 15.5 cm, and the average prescription depth was 4.5 cm. Using 3-D dose distributions, tissue inhomogeneity corrections, scatter integration (for photons) and pencil beam (for electrons) algorithms and DVH, nine treatment techniques were compared using a representative patient. The treatment techniques investigated were: [1] unilateral 6 MV photons. [2] unilateral 12 MeV electrons. [3] unilateral 16 MeV electrons. [4] a ipsilateral wedge pair technique using 6 MV photons and a 45-degree wedge. [5] a 3-field AP (wedged), PA (wedged) and lateral portal technique using 6 MV photons. [6] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 12 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting). [7] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 16 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting). [8] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (2:3 weighting). [9] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (1:1 weighting). Results: Using dose-volume histograms to evaluate the dose to the contralateral parotid gland, the percentage of contralateral parotid volume receiving ≥30% of the prescribed dose was 100% for techniques [1], [8] and [9], and <5% for techniques [2] through [7]. Evaluating the 'hottest' 5 cc of the ipsilateral mandible and temporal lobes, the hot spots were: 152% and 150% for technique [2], 132% and 130% for technique [6]. Comparing the exit doses, techniques [1] and [8] contributed to ≥50% of the prescribed dose to the contralateral mandible and the temporal lobes. Only techniques [2] and [6] kept the highest point doses to both the brain stem and the spinal cord below 50% of the prescribed dose. Conclusion: The single photon lateral field [1] and the mixed

  16. Real-time beam monitoring for error detection in IMRT plans and impact on dose-volume histograms. A multi-center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrazzo, Livia; Arilli, Chiara; Casati, Marta [Careggi University Hospital, Medical Physic Unit, Florence (Italy); Pasler, Marlies [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center, Singen-Friedrichshafen (Germany); Kusters, Martijn; Canters, Richard [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Fedeli, Luca; Calusi, Silvia [University of Florence, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences ' ' Mario Serio' ' , Florence (Italy); Talamonti, Cinzia; Pallotta, Stefania [Careggi University Hospital, Medical Physic Unit, Florence (Italy); University of Florence, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences ' ' Mario Serio' ' , Florence (Italy); Simontacchi, Gabriele [Careggi University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Unit, Florence (Italy); Livi, Lorenzo [University of Florence, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences ' ' Mario Serio' ' , Florence (Italy); Careggi University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Unit, Florence (Italy)

    2018-03-15

    This study aimed to test the sensitivity of a transmission detector for online dose monitoring of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for detecting small delivery errors. Furthermore, the correlation of changes in detector output induced by small delivery errors with other metrics commonly employed to quantify the deviations between calculated and delivered dose distributions was investigated. Transmission detector measurements were performed at three institutions. Seven types of errors were induced in nine clinical step-and-shoot (S and S) IMRT plans by modifying the number of monitor units (MU) and introducing small deviations in leaf positions. Signal reproducibility was investigated for short- and long-term stability. Calculated dose distributions were compared in terms of γ passing rates and dose-volume histogram (DVH) metrics (e.g., D{sub mean}, D{sub x%}, V{sub x%}). The correlation between detector signal variations, γ passing rates, and DVH parameters was investigated. Both short- and long-term reproducibility was within 1%. Dose variations down to 1 MU (∇signal 1.1 ± 0.4%) as well as changes in field size and positions down to 1 mm (∇signal 2.6 ± 1.0%) were detected, thus indicating high error-detection sensitivity. A moderate correlation of detector signal was observed with γ passing rates (R{sup 2} = 0.57-0.70), while a good correlation was observed with DVH metrics (R{sup 2} = 0.75-0.98). The detector is capable of detecting small delivery errors in MU and leaf positions, and is thus a highly sensitive dose monitoring device for S and S IMRT for clinical practice. The results of this study indicate a good correlation of detector signal with DVH metrics; therefore, clinical action levels can be defined based on the presented data. (orig.) [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde die Sensitivitaet bezueglich der Fehlererkennung eines Transmissionsdetektors fuer die Online-Dosisueberwachung von intensitaetsmodulierter Strahlentherapie (IMRT

  17. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Mara W. [Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States); Kato, Catherine M. [Macalester College, St. Paul, MN (United States); Carson, Kelly M.P. [The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Matsunaga, Nathan M. [Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Arao, Robert F. [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Doss, Emily J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States); McCracken, Charles L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Meng, Lu Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Yiyi [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Tanyi, James A., E-mail: tanyij@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R{sub 50} (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D{sub 2} {sub cm} (D{sub max} at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} were computed. Chest wall (CW) D{sub max} and absolute V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, as well as contralateral CW D{sub max} and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (all p < 0.001). Nominal reductions of D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p < 0.001). The respective measures for esophageal doses were significantly lower with sectored planning (p < 0.001). Despite comparable dose conformality, irrespective of planning configuration, R{sub 50} significantly improved with IMRT

  18. J-pouch vs. side-to-end anastomosis after hand-assisted laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer: A prospective randomized trial on short and long term outcomes including life quality and functional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkabaz, Nuri; Haksal, Mustafa; Atici, Ali Emre; Altuntas, Yunus Emre; Gundogan, Ersin; Gezen, Fazli Cem; Oncel, Mustafa

    2017-11-01

    To analyze the outcomes of j-pouch and side-to-end anastomosis in rectal cancer patients treated with laparoscopic hand-assisted low anterior resection. Prospective trial on cases randomized to have a colonic j-pouch or a side-to-end anastomosis after low anterior resection. Demographics, characteristics of disease and treatment, perioperative results, and functional outcomes and life quality were compared between the groups. Seventy four patients were randomized. Reservoir creation was withdrawn in 17 (23%) patients, mostly related to reach problem (n = 11, 64.7%). Anastomotic leakage rate was significantly higher in j-pouch group (8 [27.6%] vs. 0, p = 0.004). Stoma closure could not be achieved in 16 (28.1%) patients. Life quality and functional outcomes, measured 4, 8 and 12 months after the stoma reversal, were similar. Colonic j-pouch and side-to-end anastomosis are similar regarding perioperative measures including operation time, rates of postoperative complications, reoperation and 30-day mortality, and hospitalization period except anastomotic leak rate, which is higher in j-pouch group. Postoperative aspects are not different in patients receiving either technique including functional outcomes and life quality for the first year after stoma closure. In our opinion, both techniques may be preferred during the daily practice while performing laparoscopic surgery; but surgeons may be aware of a possibly higher anastomotic leak rate in case of a j-pouch. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Saskatchewan resources. [including uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The production of chemicals and minerals for the chemical industry in Saskatchewan are featured, with some discussion of resource taxation. The commodities mentioned include potash, fatty amines, uranium, heavy oil, sodium sulfate, chlorine, sodium hydroxide, sodium chlorate and bentonite. Following the successful outcome of the Cluff Lake inquiry, the uranium industry is booming. Some developments and production figures for Gulf Minerals, Amok, Cenex and Eldorado are mentioned.

  20. Incidence of late rectal bleeding in high-dose conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer using equivalent uniform dose-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soehn, Matthias; Yan Di; Liang Jian; Meldolesi, Elisa; Vargas, Carlos; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of rectal complications based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) data are necessary to allow safe dose escalation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. We applied different equivalent uniform dose (EUD)-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models to rectal wall DVHs and follow-up data for 319 prostate cancer patients to identify the dosimetric factors most predictive for Grade ≥ 2 rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: Data for 319 patients treated at the William Beaumont Hospital with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol were used for this study. The following models were considered: (1) Lyman model and (2) logit-formula with DVH reduced to generalized EUD (3) serial reconstruction unit (RU) model (4) Poisson-EUD model, and (5) mean dose- and (6) cutoff dose-logistic regression model. The parameters and their confidence intervals were determined using maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Of the patients, 51 (16.0%) showed Grade 2 or higher bleeding. As assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, the Lyman- and Logit-EUD, serial RU, and Poisson-EUD model fitted the data very well. Rectal wall mean dose did not correlate to Grade 2 or higher bleeding. For the cutoff dose model, the volume receiving > 73.7 Gy showed most significant correlation to bleeding. However, this model fitted the data more poorly than the EUD-based models. Conclusions: Our study clearly confirms a volume effect for late rectal bleeding. This can be described very well by the EUD-like models, of which the serial RU- and Poisson-EUD model can describe the data with only two parameters. Dose-volume-based cutoff-dose models performed worse

  1. Implant rehabilitation of the atrophic edentulous maxilla including immediate fixed provisional restoration without the use of bone grafting: a review of 1-year outcome data from a long-term prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toljanic, Joseph A; Baer, Russell A; Ekstrand, Karl; Thor, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The literature suggests that predictable integration can be achieved when dental implant placement is combined with immediate fixed provisional restoration in a variety of clinical situations. Fewer data are available, however, regarding outcomes for immediate provisional restoration of implants in the edentulous maxilla. This report presents 1-year data acquired from a long-term prospective clinical trial designed to assess outcomes following the immediate provisional fixed restoration of implants in the atrophic edentulous maxilla without the use of bone augmentation. Fifty-one subjects diagnosed with an atrophic edentulous maxilla received a total of 306 implants (six implants per subject) followed by fixed provisional restoration within 24 hours of implant placement. No subjects underwent grafting to enhance bone volume in preparation for implant treatment. Data acquired included bone quantity and quality, implant dimensions, implant locations, and implant placement stability. Subjects returned for 1-year follow-up examinations to assess implant integration and restoration function. Periapical radiographs were obtained and compared to baseline images to assess marginal bone height maintenance. At the 3-month follow-up examination, 294 of 306 implants placed in 51 subjects were found to be integrated. This represents a cumulative implant survival rate of 96%. At the 1-year follow-up examination, mean marginal bone loss of 0.5 mm was noted, with no further loss of implants. These results support the contention that predictable long-term outcomes may be obtained for the atrophic edentulous maxilla when treated with an implant rehabilitation protocol that includes immediate fixed provisional restoration without the use of bone grafting. This strategy offers a promising treatment alternative for the patient with an atrophic edentulous maxilla.

  2. Use of artificial neural networks to predict biological outcomes for patients receiving radical radiotherapy of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Webb, Steve; Rowbottom, Carl G.; Corne, David W.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: This paper discusses the application of artificial neural networks (ANN) in predicting biological outcomes following prostate radiotherapy. A number of model-based methods have been developed to correlate the dose distributions calculated for a patient receiving radiotherapy and the radiobiological effect this will produce. Most widely used are the normal tissue complication probability and tumour control probability models. An alternative method for predicting specific examples of tumour control and normal tissue complications is to use an ANN. One of the advantages of this method is that there is no need for a priori information regarding the relationship between the data being correlated. Patients and methods: A set of retrospective clinical data from patients who received radical prostate radiotherapy was used to train ANNs to predict specific biological outcomes by learning the relationship between the treatment plan prescription, dose distribution and the corresponding biological effect. The dose and volume were included as a differential dose-volume histogram in order to provide a holistic description of the available data. Results: It was shown that the ANNs were able to predict biochemical control and specific bladder and rectum complications with sensitivity and specificity of above 55% when the outcomes were dichotomised. It was also possible to analyse information from the ANNs to investigate the effect of individual treatment parameters on the outcome. Conclusion: ANNs have been shown to learn something of the complex relationship between treatment parameters and outcome which, if developed further, may prove to be a useful tool in predicting biological outcomes

  3. Long-Term Follow-Up Study of Young Adults Treated for Unilateral Complete Cleft Lip, Alveolus, and Palate by a Treatment Protocol Including Two-Stage Palatoplasty: Speech Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittermann, Dirk; Janssen, Laura; Bittermann, Gerhard Koendert Pieter; Boonacker, Chantal; Haverkamp, Sarah; de Wilde, Hester; Van Der Heul, Marise; Specken, Tom FJMC; Koole, Ron; Kon, Moshe; Breugem, Corstiaan Cornelis; Mink van der Molen, Aebele Barber

    2017-01-01

    Background No consensus exists on the optimal treatment protocol for orofacial clefts or the optimal timing of cleft palate closure. This study investigated factors influencing speech outcomes after two-stage palate repair in adults with a non-syndromal complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). Methods This was a retrospective analysis of adult patients with a UCLP who underwent two-stage palate closure and were treated at our tertiary cleft centre. Patients ≥17 years of age were invited for a final speech assessment. Their medical history was obtained from their medical files, and speech outcomes were assessed by a speech pathologist during the follow-up consultation. Results Forty-eight patients were included in the analysis, with a mean age of 21 years (standard deviation, 3.4 years). Their mean age at the time of hard and soft palate closure was 3 years and 8.0 months, respectively. In 40% of the patients, a pharyngoplasty was performed. On a 5-point intelligibility scale, 84.4% received a score of 1 or 2; meaning that their speech was intelligible. We observed a significant correlation between intelligibility scores and the incidence of articulation errors (P<0.001). In total, 36% showed mild to moderate hypernasality during the speech assessment, and 11%–17% of the patients exhibited increased nasalance scores, assessed through nasometry. Conclusions The present study describes long-term speech outcomes after two-stage palatoplasty with hard palate closure at a mean age of 3 years old. We observed moderate long-term intelligibility scores, a relatively high incidence of persistent hypernasality, and a high pharyngoplasty incidence. PMID:28573094

  4. Long-Term Follow-Up Study of Young Adults Treated for Unilateral Complete Cleft Lip, Alveolus, and Palate by a Treatment Protocol Including Two-Stage Palatoplasty: Speech Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Francisca Petronella Maria Kappen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNo consensus exists on the optimal treatment protocol for orofacial clefts or the optimal timing of cleft palate closure. This study investigated factors influencing speech outcomes after two-stage palate repair in adults with a non-syndromal complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP.MethodsThis was a retrospective analysis of adult patients with a UCLP who underwent two-stage palate closure and were treated at our tertiary cleft centre. Patients ≥17 years of age were invited for a final speech assessment. Their medical history was obtained from their medical files, and speech outcomes were assessed by a speech pathologist during the follow-up consultation.ResultsForty-eight patients were included in the analysis, with a mean age of 21 years (standard deviation, 3.4 years. Their mean age at the time of hard and soft palate closure was 3 years and 8.0 months, respectively. In 40% of the patients, a pharyngoplasty was performed. On a 5-point intelligibility scale, 84.4% received a score of 1 or 2; meaning that their speech was intelligible. We observed a significant correlation between intelligibility scores and the incidence of articulation errors (P<0.001. In total, 36% showed mild to moderate hypernasality during the speech assessment, and 11%–17% of the patients exhibited increased nasalance scores, assessed through nasometry.ConclusionsThe present study describes long-term speech outcomes after two-stage palatoplasty with hard palate closure at a mean age of 3 years old. We observed moderate long-term intelligibility scores, a relatively high incidence of persistent hypernasality, and a high pharyngoplasty incidence.

  5. Long-Term Follow-Up Study of Young Adults Treated for Unilateral Complete Cleft Lip, Alveolus, and Palate by a Treatment Protocol Including Two-Stage Palatoplasty: Speech Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappen, Isabelle Francisca Petronella Maria; Bittermann, Dirk; Janssen, Laura; Bittermann, Gerhard Koendert Pieter; Boonacker, Chantal; Haverkamp, Sarah; de Wilde, Hester; Van Der Heul, Marise; Specken, Tom Fjmc; Koole, Ron; Kon, Moshe; Breugem, Corstiaan Cornelis; Mink van der Molen, Aebele Barber

    2017-05-01

    No consensus exists on the optimal treatment protocol for orofacial clefts or the optimal timing of cleft palate closure. This study investigated factors influencing speech outcomes after two-stage palate repair in adults with a non-syndromal complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). This was a retrospective analysis of adult patients with a UCLP who underwent two-stage palate closure and were treated at our tertiary cleft centre. Patients ≥17 years of age were invited for a final speech assessment. Their medical history was obtained from their medical files, and speech outcomes were assessed by a speech pathologist during the follow-up consultation. Forty-eight patients were included in the analysis, with a mean age of 21 years (standard deviation, 3.4 years). Their mean age at the time of hard and soft palate closure was 3 years and 8.0 months, respectively. In 40% of the patients, a pharyngoplasty was performed. On a 5-point intelligibility scale, 84.4% received a score of 1 or 2; meaning that their speech was intelligible. We observed a significant correlation between intelligibility scores and the incidence of articulation errors (Pspeech assessment, and 11%-17% of the patients exhibited increased nasalance scores, assessed through nasometry. The present study describes long-term speech outcomes after two-stage palatoplasty with hard palate closure at a mean age of 3 years old. We observed moderate long-term intelligibility scores, a relatively high incidence of persistent hypernasality, and a high pharyngoplasty incidence.

  6. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu; Guo, Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-09-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent™ x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  7. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  8. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Cheng, Chih-Yao

    2010-01-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V 100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  9. WE-G-9A-01: Radiation Oncology Outcomes Informatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, C; Miller, R; Sloan, J; Wu, Q; Howell, R

    2014-01-01

    The construction of databases and support software to enable routine and systematic aggregation, analysis and reporting of patient outcomes data is emerging as an important area. “How have results for our patients been affected by the improvements we have made in our practice and in the technologies we use?” To answer this type of fundamental question about the overall pattern of efficacy observed, it is necessary to systematically gather and analyze data on all patients treated within a clinic. Clinical trials answer, in great depth and detail, questions about outcomes for the subsets of patients enrolled in a given trial. However, routine aggregation and analysis of key treatment parameter data and outcomes information for all patients is necessary to recognize emergent patterns that would be of interest from a public health or practice perspective and could better inform design of clinical trials or the evolution of best practice principals. To address these questions, Radiation Oncology outcomes databases need to be constructed to enable combination essential data from a broad group of data types including: diagnosis and staging, dose volume histogram metrics, patient reported outcomes, toxicity metrics, performance status, treatment plan parameters, demographics, DICOM data and demographics. Developing viable solutions to automate aggregation and analysis of this data requires multidisciplinary efforts to define nomenclatures, modify clinical processes and develop software and database tools requires detailed understanding of both clinical and technical issues. This session will cover the developing area of Radiation Oncology Outcomes Informatics. Learning Objectives: Audience will be able to speak to the technical requirements (software, database, web services) which must be considered in designing an outcomes database. Audience will be able to understand the content and the role of patient reported outcomes as compared to traditional toxicity measures

  10. WE-G-9A-01: Radiation Oncology Outcomes Informatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayo, C; Miller, R; Sloan, J [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Wu, Q [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Howell, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The construction of databases and support software to enable routine and systematic aggregation, analysis and reporting of patient outcomes data is emerging as an important area. “How have results for our patients been affected by the improvements we have made in our practice and in the technologies we use?” To answer this type of fundamental question about the overall pattern of efficacy observed, it is necessary to systematically gather and analyze data on all patients treated within a clinic. Clinical trials answer, in great depth and detail, questions about outcomes for the subsets of patients enrolled in a given trial. However, routine aggregation and analysis of key treatment parameter data and outcomes information for all patients is necessary to recognize emergent patterns that would be of interest from a public health or practice perspective and could better inform design of clinical trials or the evolution of best practice principals. To address these questions, Radiation Oncology outcomes databases need to be constructed to enable combination essential data from a broad group of data types including: diagnosis and staging, dose volume histogram metrics, patient reported outcomes, toxicity metrics, performance status, treatment plan parameters, demographics, DICOM data and demographics. Developing viable solutions to automate aggregation and analysis of this data requires multidisciplinary efforts to define nomenclatures, modify clinical processes and develop software and database tools requires detailed understanding of both clinical and technical issues. This session will cover the developing area of Radiation Oncology Outcomes Informatics. Learning Objectives: Audience will be able to speak to the technical requirements (software, database, web services) which must be considered in designing an outcomes database. Audience will be able to understand the content and the role of patient reported outcomes as compared to traditional toxicity measures

  11. WE-AB-BRA-02: Development of Biomechanical Models to Describe Dose-Volume Response to Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, M; Polan, D; Feng, M; Lawrence, T; Haken, R Ten; Brock, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that radiotherapy treatment for liver metastases causes marked liver hypertrophy in areas receiving low dose and atrophy/fibrosis in areas receiving high dose. The purpose of this work is to develop and evaluate a biomechanical model-based dose-response model to describe these liver responses to SBRT. Methods: In this retrospective study, a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm, Morfeus, was expanded to include dose-based boundary conditions. Liver and tumor volumes were contoured on the planning images and CT/MR images three months post-RT and converted to finite element models. A thermal expansion-based relationship correlating the delivered dose and volume response was generated from 22 patients previously treated. This coefficient, combined with the planned dose, was applied as an additional boundary condition to describe the volumetric response of the liver of an additional cohort of metastatic liver patients treated with SBRT. The accuracy of the model was evaluated based on overall volumetric liver comparisons and the target registration error (TRE) using the average deviations in positions of identified vascular bifurcations on each set of registered images, with a target accuracy of the 2.5mm isotropic dose grid (vector dimension 4.3mm). Results: The thermal expansion coefficient models the volumetric change of the liver to within 3%. The accuracy of Morfeus with dose-expansion boundary conditions a TRE of 5.7±2.8mm compared to 11.2±3.7mm using rigid registration and 8.9±0.28mm using Morfeus with only spatial boundary conditions. Conclusion: A biomechanical model has been developed to describe the volumetric and spatial response of the liver to SBRT. This work will enable the improvement of correlating functional imaging with delivered dose, the mapping of the delivered dose from one treatment onto the planning images for a subsequent treatment, and will further provide information to assist

  12. Behavioral outcome including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder/hyperactivity disorder and minor neurological signs in perinatal high-risk newborns at 4-6 years of age with relation to risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masuko; Aotani, Hirofumi; Hattori, Ritsuko; Funato, Masahisa

    2004-06-01

    Diagnostic problems with the criteria of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual, 4th edn, have been identified. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the minor neurological signs test (MNT) the authors had previously reported was a predictor for the criteria of ADHD or hyperactivity disorder (HD) in perinatal risk children at 4-6 years of age and what kind of risk factors related to MNT. A total of 136 children discharged from neonatal intensive care units were examined at the age of 4-6 years by a developmental neuropediatrician using both MNT and diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV ADHD/ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, 10th edn) HD. SPSS base and professional were used for statistical analysis. On comparison of diagnostic criteria between ADHD (11.0%) and HD (27.5%), the incidence in the same subjects showed significant difference. MNT scores showed significant correlation with criteria of ADHD (P Apgar 5 in the NLBW group and toxemia of pregnancy and small for gestational age (SGA) in VLBW group were highly correlated with behavioral outcome. Minor neurological signs test score was a significant predictor for criteria of ADHD and HD. High incidences of positive MNT were suspected in not only VLBW children but also NLBW children and Apgar 5 in NLBW children and toxemia of pregnancy and SGA in VLBW children influenced behavioral outcome.

  13. Impact of violence against women on severe acute maternal morbidity in the intensive care unit, including neonatal outcomes: a case-control study protocol in a tertiary healthcare facility in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Quintanilla, Beatriz Paulina; Pollock, Wendy E; McDonald, Susan J; Taft, Angela J

    2018-03-14

    Preventing and reducing violence against women (VAW) and maternal mortality are Sustainable Development Goals. Worldwide, the maternal mortality ratio has fallen about 44% in the last 25 years, and for one maternal death there are many women affected by severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM) requiring management in the intensive care unit (ICU). These women represent the most critically ill obstetric patients of the maternal morbidity spectrum and should be studied to complement the review of maternal mortality. VAW has been associated with all-cause maternal deaths, and since many women (30%) endure violence usually exerted by their intimate partners and this abuse can be severe during pregnancy, it is important to determine whether it impacts SAMM. Thus, this study aims to investigate the impact of VAW on SAMM in the ICU. This will be a prospective case-control study undertaken in a tertiary healthcare facility in Lima-Peru, with a sample size of 109 cases (obstetric patients admitted to the ICU) and 109 controls (obstetric patients not admitted to the ICU selected by systematic random sampling). Data on social determinants, medical and obstetric characteristics, VAW, pregnancy and neonatal outcome will be collected through interviews and by extracting information from the medical records using a pretested form. Main outcome will be VAW rate and neonatal mortality rate between cases and controls. VAW will be assessed by using the WHO instrument. Binary logistic followed by stepwise multivariate regression and goodness of fit test will assess any association between VAW and SAMM. Ethical approval has been granted by the La Trobe University, Melbourne-Australia and the tertiary healthcare facility in Lima-Peru. This research follows the WHO ethical and safety recommendations for research on VAW. Findings will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  14. Impact of violence against women on severe acute maternal morbidity in the intensive care unit, including neonatal outcomes: a case–control study protocol in a tertiary healthcare facility in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Quintanilla, Beatriz Paulina; Pollock, Wendy E; McDonald, Susan J; Taft, Angela J

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Preventing and reducing violence against women (VAW) and maternal mortality are Sustainable Development Goals. Worldwide, the maternal mortality ratio has fallen about 44% in the last 25 years, and for one maternal death there are many women affected by severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM) requiring management in the intensive care unit (ICU). These women represent the most critically ill obstetric patients of the maternal morbidity spectrum and should be studied to complement the review of maternal mortality. VAW has been associated with all-cause maternal deaths, and since many women (30%) endure violence usually exerted by their intimate partners and this abuse can be severe during pregnancy, it is important to determine whether it impacts SAMM. Thus, this study aims to investigate the impact of VAW on SAMM in the ICU. Methods and analysis This will be a prospective case-control study undertaken in a tertiary healthcare facility in Lima-Peru, with a sample size of 109 cases (obstetric patients admitted to the ICU) and 109 controls (obstetric patients not admitted to the ICU selected by systematic random sampling). Data on social determinants, medical and obstetric characteristics, VAW, pregnancy and neonatal outcome will be collected through interviews and by extracting information from the medical records using a pretested form. Main outcome will be VAW rate and neonatal mortality rate between cases and controls. VAW will be assessed by using the WHO instrument. Binary logistic followed by stepwise multivariate regression and goodness of fit test will assess any association between VAW and SAMM. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been granted by the La Trobe University, Melbourne-Australia and the tertiary healthcare facility in Lima-Peru. This research follows the WHO ethical and safety recommendations for research on VAW. Findings will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. PMID:29540421

  15. Comparison of different contouring definitions of the rectum as organ at risk (OAR) and dose-volume parameters predicting rectal inflammation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer: which definition to use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Mirko; Brannath, Werner; Brückner, Matthias; Wagner, Dirk; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Temme, Nils; Hermann, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this retrospective planning study was to find a contouring definition for the rectum as an organ at risk (OAR) in curative three-dimensional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer (PCa) with a predictive correlation between the dose-volume histogram (DVH) and rectal toxicity. In a pre-study, the planning CT scans of 23 patients with PCa receiving definitive EBRT were analyzed. The rectum was contoured according to 13 different definitions, and the dose distribution was correlated with the respective rectal volumes by generating DVH curves. Three definitions were identified to represent the most distinct differences in the shapes of the DVH curves: one anatomical definition recommended by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and two functional definitions based on the target volume. In the main study, the correlation between different relative DVH parameters derived from these three contouring definitions and the occurrence of rectal toxicity during and after EBRT was studied in two consecutive collectives. The first cohort consisted of 97 patients receiving primary curative EBRT and the second cohort consisted of 66 patients treated for biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy. Rectal toxicity was investigated by clinical investigation and scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Candidate parameters were the volume of the rectum, mean dose, maximal dose, volume receiving at least 60 Gy (V 60 ), area under the DVH curve up to 25 Gy and area under the DVH curve up to 75 Gy in dependence of each chosen rectum definition. Multivariable logistic regression considered other clinical factors such as pelvine lymphatics vs local target volume, diabetes, prior rectal surgery, anticoagulation or haemorrhoids too. In Cohort 1 (primary EBRT), the mean rectal volumes for definitions "RTOG", planning target volume "(PTV)-based" and "PTV-linked" were 100 cm 3 [standard deviation (SD) 43 cm 3 ], 60

  16. Application of Dempster-Shafer theory in dose response outcome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenzhou; Cui, Yunfeng; He, Yanyan; Yu, Yan; Galvin, James; Hussaini, Yousuff M.; Xiao, Ying

    2012-09-01

    The Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) reviews summarize the currently available three-dimensional dose/volume/outcome data from multi-institutions and numerous articles to update and refine the normal tissue dose/volume tolerance guidelines. As pointed out in the review, the data have limitations and even some inconsistency. However, with the help of new physical and statistical techniques, the information in the review could be updated so that patient care can be continually improved. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the application of a mathematical theory, the Dempster-Shafer theory, in dose/volume/outcome data analysis. We applied this theory to the original data obtained from published clinical studies describing dose response for radiation pneumonitis. Belief and plausibility concepts were introduced for dose response evaluation. We were also able to consider the uncertainty and inconsistency of the data from these studies with Yager's combination rule, a special methodology of Dempster-Shafer theory, to fuse the data at several specific doses. The values of belief and plausibility functions were obtained at the corresponding doses. Then we applied the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model to fit these values and a belief-plausibility range was obtained. This range could be considered as a probability range to assist physicians and treatment planners in determining acceptable dose-volume constraints. Finally, the parameters obtained from the LKB model fitting were compared with those in Emami and Burman's papers and those from other frequentist statistics methods. We found that Emami and Burman's parameters are within the belief-plausibility range we calculated by the Dempster-Shafer theory.

  17. SU-F-T-348: The Impact of Model Library Population On RapidPlan Based Dose-Volume Histograms (DVHs) Prediction for Rectal Cancer Patients Treated with Volumetric-Modulated Radiotherapy (VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K; Zhou, L; Chen, Z; Peng, J; Hu, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: RapidPlan uses a library consisting of expert plans from different patients to create a model that can predict achievable dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for new patients. The goal of this study is to investigate the impacts of model library population (plan numbers) on the DVH prediction for rectal cancer patients treated with volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (VMAT) Methods: Ninety clinically accepted rectal cancer patients’ VMAT plans were selected to establish 3 models, named as Model30, Model60 and Model90, with 30,60, and 90 plans in the model training. All plans had sufficient target coverage and bladder and femora sparings. Additional 10 patients were enrolled to test the DVH prediction differences with these 3 models. The predicted DVHs from these 3 models were compared and analyzed. Results: Predicted V40 (Vx, percent of volume that received x Gy for the organs at risk) and Dmean (mean dose, cGy) of the bladder were 39.84±13.38 and 2029.4±141.6 for the Model30,37.52±16.00 and 2012.5±152.2 for the Model60, and 36.33±18.35 and 2066.5±174.3 for the Model90. Predicted V30 and Dmean of the left femur were 23.33±9.96 and 1443.3±114.5 for the Model30, 21.83±5.75 and 1436.6±61.9 for the Model60, and 20.31±4.6 and 1415.0±52.4 for the Model90.There were no significant differences among the 3 models for the bladder and left femur predictions. Predicted V40 and Dmean of the right femur were 19.86±10.00 and 1403.6±115.6 (Model30),18.97±6.19 and 1401.9±68.78 (Model60), and 21.08±7.82 and 1424.0±85.3 (Model90). Although a slight lower DVH prediction of the right femur was found on the Model60, the mean differences for V30 and mean dose were less than 2% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: There were no significant differences among Model30, Model60 and Model90 for predicting DVHs on rectal patients treated with VMAT. The impact of plan numbers for model library might be limited for cancers with similar target shape.

  18. SU-F-T-348: The Impact of Model Library Population On RapidPlan Based Dose-Volume Histograms (DVHs) Prediction for Rectal Cancer Patients Treated with Volumetric-Modulated Radiotherapy (VMAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K; Zhou, L; Chen, Z; Peng, J; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: RapidPlan uses a library consisting of expert plans from different patients to create a model that can predict achievable dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for new patients. The goal of this study is to investigate the impacts of model library population (plan numbers) on the DVH prediction for rectal cancer patients treated with volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (VMAT) Methods: Ninety clinically accepted rectal cancer patients’ VMAT plans were selected to establish 3 models, named as Model30, Model60 and Model90, with 30,60, and 90 plans in the model training. All plans had sufficient target coverage and bladder and femora sparings. Additional 10 patients were enrolled to test the DVH prediction differences with these 3 models. The predicted DVHs from these 3 models were compared and analyzed. Results: Predicted V40 (Vx, percent of volume that received x Gy for the organs at risk) and Dmean (mean dose, cGy) of the bladder were 39.84±13.38 and 2029.4±141.6 for the Model30,37.52±16.00 and 2012.5±152.2 for the Model60, and 36.33±18.35 and 2066.5±174.3 for the Model90. Predicted V30 and Dmean of the left femur were 23.33±9.96 and 1443.3±114.5 for the Model30, 21.83±5.75 and 1436.6±61.9 for the Model60, and 20.31±4.6 and 1415.0±52.4 for the Model90.There were no significant differences among the 3 models for the bladder and left femur predictions. Predicted V40 and Dmean of the right femur were 19.86±10.00 and 1403.6±115.6 (Model30),18.97±6.19 and 1401.9±68.78 (Model60), and 21.08±7.82 and 1424.0±85.3 (Model90). Although a slight lower DVH prediction of the right femur was found on the Model60, the mean differences for V30 and mean dose were less than 2% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: There were no significant differences among Model30, Model60 and Model90 for predicting DVHs on rectal patients treated with VMAT. The impact of plan numbers for model library might be limited for cancers with similar target shape.

  19. Intraoperative real-time planned conformal prostate brachytherapy: Post-implantation dosimetric outcome and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Sharma, Neha; Shippy, Alison M.; Fridman, David; Zaider, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the dosimetric outcome of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with I-125 permanent implantation using an intraoperative real-time conformal planning technique. Methods and materials: Five hundred and sixty-two patients with prostate cancer were treated with I-125 permanent interstitial implantation using a transrectal ultrasound-guided approach. Real-time intraoperative treatment planning software that incorporates inverse planning optimization was used. Dose-volume constraints for this inverse-planning system included: prostate V100 ≥95%, maximal urethral dose ≤120%, and average rectal dose 3 of the rectum was exposed to the prescription dose, the incidence of late grade 2 toxicity rectal toxicity was 9% compared to 4% for smaller volumes of the rectum exposed to similar doses (p = 0.003). No dosimetric parameter in these patients with tight dose confines for the urethra influenced acute or late urinary toxicity. Conclusion: Real-time intraoperative planning was associated with a 90% consistency of achieving the planned intraoperative dose constraints for target coverage and maintaining planned urethral and rectal constraints in a high percentage of implants. Rectal volumes of ≥2.5 cm 3 exposed to the prescription doses were associated with an increased incidence of grade 2 rectal bleeding. Further enhancements in imaging guidance for optimal seed deposition are needed to guarantee optimal dose distribution for all patients. Whether such improvements lead to further reduction in acute and late morbidities associated with therapy requires further study

  20. New seismograph includes filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-02

    The new Nimbus ES-1210 multichannel signal enhancement seismograph from EG and G geometrics has recently been redesigned to include multimode signal fillers on each amplifier. The ES-1210F is a shallow exploration seismograph for near subsurface exploration such as in depth-to-bedrock, geological hazard location, mineral exploration, and landslide investigations.

  1. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Totero Gongora, Juan Sebastian; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cuda, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  2. High-dose (70-78 GY) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer; the relation between observed late bladder and rectum complications and parameters derived from the dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebesque, J.V.; Bruce, A.; Boersma, L.J.; Velde, A. te

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to investigate the relation between these observed incidences and parameters derived from the Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) of rectum and bladder wall. Patients and Methods: Hundred and thirty patients with T 2-4 G 1-3 N 0 M 0 prostate cancer were treated with conformal radiotherapy with the simultaneous boost technique in a dose-escalating protocol; 78 patients received a total dose of 70 Gy, 11 patients 74 - 76 Gy and 41 patients 78 Gy, each with a dose of 2 Gy per fraction. DVHs of the rectal wall were used to calculate NTCPs according to the model of Kutcher et al. with the estimated parameter values (n = 0.12, m = 0.15, TD 50 = 80 Gy) according to Burman et al. The median follow-up was 17 months (range 6 - 72 months). The crude and actuarial incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications were determined using the RTOG/EORTC morbidity scoring system (Grade I to IV). Results: Neither for late GI nor for GU complaints, a grade IV complication was observed. GU complaints occurred in 90 patients (69%): 54 patients (42%) only experienced grade I toxicity, 26 patients (20%) had grade II toxicity, and 10 patients (8%) had grade III complications, of which 8 patients (6%) developed a urethral (7 pts) or ureteric stenosis (1 pt). The actuarial incidence of grade III GU complications was 10% at 2 years. Since bladder wall DVHs are unreliable and most grade III complications were not related to the bladder, the grade II and/or III complications were analyzed in terms of the total prescribed dose only, but no correlation could be demonstrated. GI complications occurred in 71 patients (55%): 59 patients (45%) developed a grade I complication, 11 a grade II complication and only 1 patient required laser treatment twice and blood transfusion because of rectal bleeding (grade III). The actuarial incidence of GI

  3. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... community politics. On the one hand, their mobility and decision-making powers decrease with the increase in the labor mobility of men and their newly gained education is politically devalued when compared to the informal education that men gain through mobility, but on the other hand, schooling strengthens...

  4. Measuring Population Health Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Parrish, R. Gibson

    2010-01-01

    An ideal population health outcome metric should reflect a population's dynamic state of physical, mental, and social well-being. Positive health outcomes include being alive; functioning well mentally, physically, and socially; and having a sense of well-being. Negative outcomes include death, loss of function, and lack of well-being. In contrast to these health outcomes, diseases and injuries are intermediate factors that influence the likelihood of achieving a state of health. On the basis...

  5. Application of Dempster–Shafer theory in dose response outcome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenzhou; Cui Yunfeng; Yu Yan; Galvin, James; Xiao Ying; He Yanyan; Hussaini, Yousuff M

    2012-01-01

    The Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) reviews summarize the currently available three-dimensional dose/volume/outcome data from multi-institutions and numerous articles to update and refine the normal tissue dose/volume tolerance guidelines. As pointed out in the review, the data have limitations and even some inconsistency. However, with the help of new physical and statistical techniques, the information in the review could be updated so that patient care can be continually improved. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the application of a mathematical theory, the Dempster–Shafer theory, in dose/volume/outcome data analysis. We applied this theory to the original data obtained from published clinical studies describing dose response for radiation pneumonitis. Belief and plausibility concepts were introduced for dose response evaluation. We were also able to consider the uncertainty and inconsistency of the data from these studies with Yager's combination rule, a special methodology of Dempster–Shafer theory, to fuse the data at several specific doses. The values of belief and plausibility functions were obtained at the corresponding doses. Then we applied the Lyman–Kutcher–Burman (LKB) model to fit these values and a belief–plausibility range was obtained. This range could be considered as a probability range to assist physicians and treatment planners in determining acceptable dose–volume constraints. Finally, the parameters obtained from the LKB model fitting were compared with those in Emami and Burman's papers and those from other frequentist statistics methods. We found that Emami and Burman's parameters are within the belief–plausibility range we calculated by the Dempster–Shafer theory. (paper)

  6. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...... surgical techniques and better outcome after peripheral nerve injury. Decision making in peripheral nerve surgery continues to be a complex challenge, where the mechanism of injury, repeated clinical evaluation, neuroradiological and neurophysiological examination, and detailed knowledge of the peripheral...... nervous system response to injury are prerequisite to obtain the best possible outcome. Surgery continues to be the primary treatment modality for peripheral nerve tumors and advances in adjuvant oncological treatment has improved outcome after malignant peripheral nerve tumors. The present chapter...

  7. MO-A-BRD-09: A Data-Mining Algorithm for Large Scale Analysis of Dose-Outcome Relationships in a Database of Irradiated Head-And-Neck (HN) Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, SP; Quon, H; Kiess, AP; Moore, JA; Yang, W; Cheng, Z; Sharabi, A; McNutt, TR [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for automatic extraction of clinically meaningful dosimetric-outcome relationships from an in-house, analytic oncology database. Methods: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) and clinical outcome-related structured data elements have been routinely stored to our database for 513 HN cancer patients treated from 2007 to 2014. SQL queries were developed to extract outcomes that had been assessed for at least 100 patients, as well as DVH curves for organs-at-risk (OAR) that were contoured for at least 100 patients. DVH curves for paired OAR (e.g., left and right parotids) were automatically combined and included as additional structures for analysis. For each OAR-outcome combination, DVH dose points, D(V{sub t}), at a series of normalized volume thresholds, V{sub t}=[0.01,0.99], were stratified into two groups based on outcomes after treatment completion. The probability, P[D(V{sub t})], of an outcome was modeled at each V{sub t} by logistic regression. Notable combinations, defined as having P[D(V{sub t})] increase by at least 5% per Gy (p<0.05), were further evaluated for clinical relevance using a custom graphical interface. Results: A total of 57 individual and combined structures and 115 outcomes were queried, resulting in over 6,500 combinations for analysis. Of these, 528 combinations met the 5%/Gy requirement, with further manual inspection revealing a number of reasonable models based on either reported literature or proximity between neighboring OAR. The data mining algorithm confirmed the following well-known toxicity/outcome relationships: dysphagia/larynx, voice changes/larynx, esophagitis/esophagus, xerostomia/combined parotids, and mucositis/oral mucosa. Other notable relationships included dysphagia/pharyngeal constrictors, nausea/brainstem, nausea/spinal cord, weight-loss/mandible, and weight-loss/combined parotids. Conclusion: Our database platform has enabled large-scale analysis of dose-outcome relationships. The current data

  8. Factors Influencing Neurocognitive Outcomes in Young Patients With Benign and Low-Grade Brain Tumors Treated With Stereotactic Conformal Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Rakesh; Mallick, Indranil; Dutta, Debnarayan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present the effect of radiotherapy doses to different volumes of normal structures on neurocognitive outcomes in young patients with benign and low-grade brain tumors treated prospectively with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients (median age, 13 years) with residual/progressive brain tumors (10 craniopharyngioma, 8 cerebellar astrocytoma, 6 optic pathway glioma and 4 cerebral low-grade glioma) were treated with SCRT to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks. Prospective neuropsychological assessments were done at baseline before RT and at subsequent follow-up examinations. The change in intelligence quotient (IQ) scores was correlated with various factors, including dose-volume to normal structures. Results: Although the overall mean full-scale IQ (FSIQ) at baseline before RT remained unchanged at 2-year follow-up after SCRT, one third of patients did show a >10% decline in FSIQ as compared with baseline. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that patients aged 10% drop in FSIQ than older patients (53% vs. 10%, p = 0.03). Dosimetric comparison in patients showing a >10% decline vs. patients showing a 43.2 Gy to >13% of volume of the left temporal lobe were the ones to show a significant drop in FSIQ (p = 0.048). Radiotherapy doses to other normal structures, including supratentorial brain, right temporal lobe, and frontal lobes, did not reveal any significant correlation. Conclusion: Our prospectively collected dosimetric data show younger age and radiotherapy doses to left temporal lobe to be predictors of neurocognitive decline, and may well be used as possible dose constraints for high-precision radiotherapy planning.

  9. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  10. Geometrical considerations in dose volume analysis in intracavitary treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, D.D.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Pradhan, A.S.; Viswanathan, P.S.; Dinshaw, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    The present work was aimed at to study the relationship between the volume enclosed by reference iodose surface and various geometrical parameters of the intracavitary applicator in treatment of carcinoma of cervix. Pearshape volume of the reference isodose derived from the Total Reference Air Kerma (TRAK) and the product of its dimensions, height H, width W and thickness T which is dependent on the applicator geometry, were estimated for 100 intracavitary applications treated by Selectron LDR machine. Orthogonal radiographs taken for each patient were used for measurement of actual geometric dimensions of the applicator and carrying out the dosimetry on TP-11 treatment planning system. The dimensions H, W and T of reference isodose surface (60 Gy) were also noted. Ratio of the product HWT and the pearshape volume was found mainly to be a function of colpostat separation and not of other geometrical parameters like maximum vertical and anterio-posterior dimension of the applicator. The ratio remained almost constant for a particular combination of uterine tandem and colpostat. Variation in the ratios were attributed to the non-standard geometry. The ratio of the volume of reference isodose surface to the product of its dimensions in the applicator depends upon the colpostat separation. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Theory including future not excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagao, K.; Nielsen, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    We study a complex action theory (CAT) whose path runs over not only past but also future. We show that, if we regard a matrix element defined in terms of the future state at time T and the past state at time TA as an expectation value in the CAT, then we are allowed to have the Heisenberg equation......, Ehrenfest's theorem, and the conserved probability current density. In addition,we showthat the expectation value at the present time t of a future-included theory for large T - t and large t - T corresponds to that of a future-not-included theory with a proper inner product for large t - T. Hence, the CAT...

  12. Device including a contact detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    arms (12) may extend from the supporting body in co-planar relationship with the first surface. The plurality of cantilever arms (12) may extend substantially parallel to each other and each of the plurality of cantilever arms (12) may include an electrical conductive tip for contacting the area......The present invention relates to a probe for determining an electrical property of an area of a surface of a test sample, the probe is intended to be in a specific orientation relative to the test sample. The probe may comprise a supporting body defining a first surface. A plurality of cantilever...... of the test sample by movement of the probe relative to the surface of the test sample into the specific orientation.; The probe may further comprise a contact detector (14) extending from the supporting body arranged so as to contact the surface of the test sample prior to any one of the plurality...

  13. Neoclassical transport including collisional nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, J; Belli, E A

    2011-06-10

    In the standard δf theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction δf is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlüter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  14. Musculoskeletal ultrasound including definitions for ultrasonographic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakefield, RJ; Balint, PV; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has great potential as an outcome in rheumatoid arthritis trials for detecting bone erosions, synovitis, tendon disease, and enthesopathy. It has a number of distinct advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including good patient tolerability and ability to scan multiple joints...... in a short period of time. However, there are scarce data regarding its validity, reproducibility, and responsiveness to change, making interpretation and comparison of studies difficult. In particular, there are limited data describing standardized scanning methodology and standardized definitions of US...... pathologies. This article presents the first report from the OMERACT ultrasound special interest group, which has compared US against the criteria of the OMERACT filter. Also proposed for the first time are consensus US definitions for common pathological lesions seen in patients with inflammatory arthritis....

  15. Outcome after re-irradiation of head and neck cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platteaux, Nele; Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Nuyts, Sandra [University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg (Belgium). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively report the outcome of head and neck cancer patients following re-irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 51 patients with recurrent or second primary head and neck cancer received re-irradiation at Leuven University Hospital. Survival and locoregional control were calculated. Doses to organs at risk were retrieved from dose-volume histograms. Radiation-related toxicities were reported. Results: The 2-year actuarial overall survival rate was 30%. On univariate analysis, surgery before re-irradiation and high radiation dose were associated with superior survival. Grade 3 acute and grade 3 or more late toxicity occurred in respectively 29.4% and 35.3% of the patients. Conclusion: Re-irradiation in head and neck cancer patients is feasible with acceptable late toxicity, although the survival remains poor. (orig.)

  16. Addressing Stillbirth in India Must Include Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lisa; Montgomery, Susanne; Ganesh, Gayatri; Kaur, Harinder Pal; Singh, Ratan

    2017-07-01

    Millennium Development Goal 4, to reduce child mortality, can only be achieved by reducing stillbirths globally. A confluence of medical and sociocultural factors contribute to the high stillbirth rates in India. The psychosocial aftermath of stillbirth is a well-documented public health problem, though less is known of the experience for men, particularly outside of the Western context. Therefore, men's perceptions and knowledge regarding reproductive health, as well as maternal-child health are important. Key informant interviews (n = 5) were analyzed and 28 structured interviews were conducted using a survey based on qualitative themes. Qualitative themes included men's dual burden and right to medical and reproductive decision making power. Wives were discouraged from expressing grief and pushed to conceive again. If not successful, particularly if a son was not conceived, a second wife was considered a solution. Quantitative data revealed that men with a history of stillbirths had greater anxiety and depression, perceived less social support, but had more egalitarian views towards women than men without stillbirth experience. At the same time fathers of stillbirths were more likely to be emotionally or physically abusive. Predictors of mental health, attitudes towards women, and perceived support are discussed. Patriarchal societal values, son preference, deficient women's autonomy, and sex-selective abortion perpetuate the risk for future poor infant outcomes, including stillbirth, and compounds the already higher risk of stillbirth for males. Grief interventions should explore and take into account men's perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors towards reproductive decision making.

  17. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreelatha OK

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Omana Kesary Sreelatha,1 Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu Ramesh2 1Ophthalmology Department, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman; 2Department of Optometry, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, India Abstract: Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD, and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time

  18. MO-G-304-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION: Expanding the Knowledge Base for Data-Driven Treatment Planning: Incorporating Patient Outcome Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, SP; Quon, H; Cheng, Z; Moore, JA; Bowers, M; McNutt, TR

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To extend the capabilities of knowledge-based treatment planning beyond simple dose queries by incorporating validated patient outcome models. Methods: From an analytic, relational database of 684 head and neck cancer patients, 372 patients were identified having dose data for both left and right parotid glands as well as baseline and follow-up xerostomia assessments. For each existing patient, knowledge-based treatment planning was simulated for by querying the dose-volume histograms and geometric shape relationships (overlap volume histograms) for all other patients. Dose predictions were captured at normalized volume thresholds (NVT) of 0%, 10%, 20, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 85% and were compared with the actual achieved doses using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Next, a logistic regression model was used to predict the maximum severity of xerostomia up to three months following radiotherapy. Baseline xerostomia scores were subtracted from follow-up assessments and were also included in the model. The relative risks from predicted doses and actual doses were computed and compared. Results: The predicted doses for both parotid glands were significantly less than the achieved doses (p < 0.0001), with differences ranging from 830 cGy ± 1270 cGy (0% NVT) to 1673 cGy ± 1197 cGy (30% NVT). The modelled risk of xerostomia ranged from 54% to 64% for achieved doses and from 33% to 51% for the dose predictions. Relative risks varied from 1.24 to 1.87, with maximum relative risk occurring at 85% NVT. Conclusions: Data-driven generation of treatment planning objectives without consideration of the underlying normal tissue complication probability may Result in inferior plans, even if quality metrics indicate otherwise. Inclusion of complication models in knowledge-based treatment planning is necessary in order to close the feedback loop between radiotherapy treatments and patient outcomes. Future work includes advancing and validating complication models in the context

  19. MO-G-304-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION: Expanding the Knowledge Base for Data-Driven Treatment Planning: Incorporating Patient Outcome Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, SP; Quon, H; Cheng, Z; Moore, JA; Bowers, M; McNutt, TR [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To extend the capabilities of knowledge-based treatment planning beyond simple dose queries by incorporating validated patient outcome models. Methods: From an analytic, relational database of 684 head and neck cancer patients, 372 patients were identified having dose data for both left and right parotid glands as well as baseline and follow-up xerostomia assessments. For each existing patient, knowledge-based treatment planning was simulated for by querying the dose-volume histograms and geometric shape relationships (overlap volume histograms) for all other patients. Dose predictions were captured at normalized volume thresholds (NVT) of 0%, 10%, 20, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 85% and were compared with the actual achieved doses using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Next, a logistic regression model was used to predict the maximum severity of xerostomia up to three months following radiotherapy. Baseline xerostomia scores were subtracted from follow-up assessments and were also included in the model. The relative risks from predicted doses and actual doses were computed and compared. Results: The predicted doses for both parotid glands were significantly less than the achieved doses (p < 0.0001), with differences ranging from 830 cGy ± 1270 cGy (0% NVT) to 1673 cGy ± 1197 cGy (30% NVT). The modelled risk of xerostomia ranged from 54% to 64% for achieved doses and from 33% to 51% for the dose predictions. Relative risks varied from 1.24 to 1.87, with maximum relative risk occurring at 85% NVT. Conclusions: Data-driven generation of treatment planning objectives without consideration of the underlying normal tissue complication probability may Result in inferior plans, even if quality metrics indicate otherwise. Inclusion of complication models in knowledge-based treatment planning is necessary in order to close the feedback loop between radiotherapy treatments and patient outcomes. Future work includes advancing and validating complication models in the context

  20. Cognitive outcome of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Anne; Jambaqué, Isabelle; Lassonde, Maryse

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is now widely accepted as an effective therapeutic option for carefully selected children with medically refractory epilepsy. The surgical procedure may cause cognitive deficits or exacerbate existing impairments, but it may also improve cognitive abilities by the restoration of functions located in adjacent or contralateral areas that had been secondarily affected by the epilepsy or the underlying pathology. Compared to adults, better cognitive outcome has been reported in children, a finding probably due to the developing state of the brain, which possesses considerable structural and functional plasticity. More extensive and effective surgery such as hemispherectomy is more commonly used in the pediatric population, and this must also influence surgical outcome. However, studies related to cognitive outcome of epilepsy surgery in children are limited, and controversial results are often reported. In this chapter, we provide a current overview of the literature on cognitive outcomes in children who undergo different types of epilepsy surgery, including focal resections as well as corpus callosotomy and hemispherectomy. Early surgical intervention appears to be a rational option for the treatment of childhood epilepsy since many cognitive deficits are linked to the epileptic process and may disappear when seizures are controlled. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Unfavourable outcomes in orthognathic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanthaya, Krishnamurthy; Anantanarayanan, P.

    2013-01-01

    Unfavourable outcomes are part and parcel of performing surgeries of any kind. Unfavourable outcomes are results of such work, which the patient and or the clinician does not like. This is an attempt to review various causes for unfavorable outcomes in orthognathic surgery and discuss them in detail. All causes for unfavorable outcomes may be classified as belonging to one of the following periods A) Pre- Treatment B) During treatment Pre-Treatment: In orthognathic surgery- as in any other discipline of surgery- which involves changes in both aesthetics and function, the patient motivation for seeking treatment is a very important input which may decide, whether the outcome is going to be favorable or not. Also, inputs in diagnosis and plan for treatment and its sequencing, involving the team of the surgeon and the orthodontist, will play a very important role in determining whether the outcome will be favorable. In other words, an unfavorable outcome may be predetermined even before the actual treatment process starts. During Treatment: Good treatment planning itself does not guarantee favorable results. The execution of the correct plan could go wrong at various stages which include, Pre-Surgical orthodontics, Intra and Post-Operative periods. A large number of these unfavorable outcomes are preventable, if attention is paid to detail while carrying out the treatment plan itself. Unfavorable outcomes in orthognathic surgery may be minimized If pitfalls are avoided both, at the time of treatment planning and execution. PMID:24501454

  2. Unfavourable outcomes in orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy Bonanthaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unfavourable outcomes are part and parcel of performing surgeries of any kind. Unfavourable outcomes are results of such work, which the patient and or the clinician does not like. This is an attempt to review various causes for unfavorable outcomes in orthognathic surgery and discuss them in detail. All causes for unfavorable outcomes may be classified as belonging to one of the following periods A Pre- Treatment B During treatment Pre-Treatment: In orthognathic surgery- as in any other discipline of surgery- which involves changes in both aesthetics and function, the patient motivation for seeking treatment is a very important input which may decide, whether the outcome is going to be favorable or not. Also, inputs in diagnosis and plan for treatment and its sequencing, involving the team of the surgeon and the orthodontist, will play a very important role in determining whether the outcome will be favorable. In other words, an unfavorable outcome may be predetermined even before the actual treatment process starts. During Treatment: Good treatment planning itself does not guarantee favorable results. The execution of the correct plan could go wrong at various stages which include, Pre-Surgical orthodontics, Intra and Post-Operative periods. A large number of these unfavorable outcomes are preventable, if attention is paid to detail while carrying out the treatment plan itself. Unfavorable outcomes in orthognathic surgery may be minimized If pitfalls are avoided both, at the time of treatment planning and execution.

  3. Unfavourable outcomes in orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanthaya, Krishnamurthy; Anantanarayanan, P

    2013-05-01

    Unfavourable outcomes are part and parcel of performing surgeries of any kind. Unfavourable outcomes are results of such work, which the patient and or the clinician does not like. This is an attempt to review various causes for unfavorable outcomes in orthognathic surgery and discuss them in detail. All causes for unfavorable outcomes may be classified as belonging to one of the following periods A) Pre- Treatment B) During treatment Pre-Treatment: In orthognathic surgery- as in any other discipline of surgery- which involves changes in both aesthetics and function, the patient motivation for seeking treatment is a very important input which may decide, whether the outcome is going to be favorable or not. Also, inputs in diagnosis and plan for treatment and its sequencing, involving the team of the surgeon and the orthodontist, will play a very important role in determining whether the outcome will be favorable. In other words, an unfavorable outcome may be predetermined even before the actual treatment process starts. During Treatment: Good treatment planning itself does not guarantee favorable results. The execution of the correct plan could go wrong at various stages which include, Pre-Surgical orthodontics, Intra and Post-Operative periods. A large number of these unfavorable outcomes are preventable, if attention is paid to detail while carrying out the treatment plan itself. Unfavorable outcomes in orthognathic surgery may be minimized If pitfalls are avoided both, at the time of treatment planning and execution.

  4. SU-F-J-86: Method to Include Tissue Dose Response Effect in Deformable Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J; Liang, J; Chen, S; Qin, A; Yan, D [Beaumont Health Systeml, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Organ changes shape and size during radiation treatment due to both mechanical stress and radiation dose response. However, the dose response induced deformation has not been considered in conventional deformable image registration (DIR). A novel DIR approach is proposed to include both tissue elasticity and radiation dose induced organ deformation. Methods: Assuming that organ sub-volume shrinkage was proportional to the radiation dose induced cell killing/absorption, the dose induced organ volume change was simulated applying virtual temperature on each sub-volume. Hence, both stress and heterogeneity temperature induced organ deformation. Thermal stress finite element method with organ surface boundary condition was used to solve deformation. Initial boundary correspondence on organ surface was created from conventional DIR. Boundary condition was updated by an iterative optimization scheme to minimize elastic deformation energy. The registration was validated on a numerical phantom. Treatment dose was constructed applying both the conventional DIR and the proposed method using daily CBCT image obtained from HN treatment. Results: Phantom study showed 2.7% maximal discrepancy with respect to the actual displacement. Compared with conventional DIR, subvolume displacement difference in a right parotid had the mean±SD (Min, Max) to be 1.1±0.9(−0.4∼4.8), −0.1±0.9(−2.9∼2.4) and −0.1±0.9(−3.4∼1.9)mm in RL/PA/SI directions respectively. Mean parotid dose and V30 constructed including the dose response induced shrinkage were 6.3% and 12.0% higher than those from the conventional DIR. Conclusion: Heterogeneous dose distribution in normal organ causes non-uniform sub-volume shrinkage. Sub-volume in high dose region has a larger shrinkage than the one in low dose region, therefore causing more sub-volumes to move into the high dose area during the treatment course. This leads to an unfavorable dose-volume relationship for the normal organ

  5. Uncertainties in model-based outcome predictions for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Markman, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Model-based treatment-plan-specific outcome predictions (such as normal tissue complication probability [NTCP] or the relative reduction in salivary function) are typically presented without reference to underlying uncertainties. We provide a method to assess the reliability of treatment-plan-specific dose-volume outcome model predictions. Methods and Materials: A practical method is proposed for evaluating model prediction based on the original input data together with bootstrap-based estimates of parameter uncertainties. The general framework is applicable to continuous variable predictions (e.g., prediction of long-term salivary function) and dichotomous variable predictions (e.g., tumor control probability [TCP] or NTCP). Using bootstrap resampling, a histogram of the likelihood of alternative parameter values is generated. For a given patient and treatment plan we generate a histogram of alternative model results by computing the model predicted outcome for each parameter set in the bootstrap list. Residual uncertainty ('noise') is accounted for by adding a random component to the computed outcome values. The residual noise distribution is estimated from the original fit between model predictions and patient data. Results: The method is demonstrated using a continuous-endpoint model to predict long-term salivary function for head-and-neck cancer patients. Histograms represent the probabilities for the level of posttreatment salivary function based on the input clinical data, the salivary function model, and the three-dimensional dose distribution. For some patients there is significant uncertainty in the prediction of xerostomia, whereas for other patients the predictions are expected to be more reliable. In contrast, TCP and NTCP endpoints are dichotomous, and parameter uncertainties should be folded directly into the estimated probabilities, thereby improving the accuracy of the estimates. Using bootstrap parameter estimates, competing treatment

  6. Functional Outcomes for Clinical Evaluation of Implant Restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassi, Francesco; Carr, Alan B.; Chang, Ting-Ling; Estafanous, Emad W.; Garrett, Neal R.; Happonen, Risto-Pekka; Koka, Sreenivas; Laine, Juhani; Osswald, Martin; Reintsema, Harry; Rieger, Jana; Roumanas, Eleni; Salinas, Thomas J.; Stanford, Clark M.; Wolfaardt, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The functional outcomes related to treating patients afflicted with tooth loss are an important hallmark in substantiating prosthodontic intervention. The Oral Rehabilitation Outcomes Network (ORONet) conducted two international workshops to develop a core set of outcome measures, including a

  7. Examining the Outcomes of Including Students with Disabilities in a Bullying/Victimization Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Emily C.; Vinoski, Erin; Black, Mary; Varjas, Kris; Henrich, Christopher; Meyers, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Students with disabilities are bullied at rates disproportionate to their typically developing peers, yet we know little about effective interventions to reduce the rates of victimization among students with disabilities across all disability categories. This study examined the effectiveness of the inclusive Bullying/Victimization Intervention…

  8. Early lymphocyte recovery as a predictor of outcome, including relapse, after hematopoieticstem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Morando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite advances in the treatment of acute leukemia, many patients need to undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Recent studies show that early lymphocyte recovery may be a predictor of relapse and survival in these patients. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the influence of lymphocyte recovery on Days +30 and +100 post-transplant on the occurrence of relapse and survival. METHODS: A descriptive, retrospective study was performed of 137 under 21-year-old patients who were submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute leukemia between 1995 and 2008. A lymphocyte count 0.3 x 10(9/L were considered adequate. Lymphocyte recovery was also analyzed on Day +100 with < 0.75 x 10(9/Land < 0.75 x 10(9/L being considered inadequate and adequate lymphocyte recovery, respectively. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the occurrence of relapse between patients with inadequate and adequate lymphocyte recovery on Day +30 post-transplant. However, the transplant-related mortality was significantly higher in patients with inadequate recovery on Day +30. Patients with inadequate lymphocyte recovery on Day +30 had worse overall survival and relapse-free survival than patients with adequate recovery. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of infections and acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease. Patients with inadequate lymphocyte recovery on Day +100 had worse overall survival and relapse-free survival and a higher cumulative incidence of relapse. CONCLUSION: The evaluation of lymphocyte recovery on Day +30 is not a good predictor of relapse after transplant however patients with inadequate lymphocyte recovery had worse overall survival and relapse-free survival. Inadequate lymphocyte recovery on Day +100 is correlated with higher cumulative relapse as well as lower overall survival and relapse-free survival.

  9. Incorporating outcome uncertainty and prior outcome beliefs in stated preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundhede, Thomas; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Hanley, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Stated preference studies tell respondents that policies create environmental changes with varying levels of uncertainty. However, respondents may include their own a priori assessments of uncertainty when making choices among policy options. Using a choice experiment eliciting respondents......’ preferences for conservation policies under climate change, we find that higher outcome uncertainty reduces utility. When accounting for endogeneity, we find that prior beliefs play a significant role in this cost of uncertainty. Thus, merely stating “objective” levels of outcome uncertainty...

  10. Pediatric hydrocephalus outcomes: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinchon Matthieu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The outcome of pediatric hydrocephalus, including surgical complications, neurological sequelae and academic achievement, has been the matter of many studies. However, much uncertainty remains, regarding the very long-term and social outcome, and the determinants of complications and clinical outcome. In this paper, we review the different facets of outcome, including surgical outcome (shunt failure, infection and independence, and complications of endoscopy, clinical outcome (neurological, sensory, cognitive sequels, epilepsy, schooling and social integration. We then provide a brief review of the English-language literature and highlighting selected studies that provide information on the outcome and sequelae of pediatric hydrocephalus, and the impact of predictive variables on outcome. Mortality caused by hydrocephalus and its treatments is between 0 and 3%, depending on the duration of follow-up. Shunt event-free survival (EFS is about 70% at one year and 40% at ten years. The EFS after endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV appears better but likely benefits from selection bias and long-term figures are not available. Shunt infection affects between 5 and 8% of surgeries, and 15 to 30% of patients according to the duration of follow-up. Shunt independence can be achieved in 3 to 9% of patients, but the definition of this varies. Broad variations in the prevalence of cognitive sequelae, affecting 12 to 50% of children, and difficulties at school, affecting between 20 and 60%, attest of disparities among studies in their clinical evaluation. Epilepsy, affecting 6 to 30% of patients, has a serious impact on outcome. In adulthood, social integration is poor in a substantial number of patients but data are sparse. Few controlled prospective studies exist regarding hydrocephalus outcomes; in their absence, largely retrospective studies must be used to evaluate the long-term consequences of hydrocephalus and its treatments. This review

  11. WE-F-304-02: Recurrent HNC Treated with SBRT: TCP-Based Outcome Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clump, D. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) was introduced clinically more than twenty years ago, and many subsequent publications have reported safety and efficacy data. The AAPM Working Group on Biological Effects of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy/SBRT (WGSBRT) extracted published treatment outcomes data from extensive literature searches to summarize and construct tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session, we present the WGSBRT’s work for cranial sites, and recurrent head and neck cancer. From literature-based data and associated models, guidelines to aid with safe and effective hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment are being determined. Further, the ability of existing and proposed radiobiological models to fit these data is considered as to the ability to distinguish between the linear-quadratic and alternative radiobiological models such as secondary cell death from vascular damage, immunogenic, or bystander effects. Where appropriate, specific model parameters are estimated. As described in “The lessons of QUANTEC,” (1), lack of adequate reporting standards continues to limit the amount of useful quantitative information that can be extracted from peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations regarding reporting standards are considered, to enable such reviews to achieve more complete characterization of clinical outcomes. 1 Jackson A, Marks LB, Bentzen SM, Eisbruch A, Yorke ED, Ten Haken RK, Constine LS, Deasy JO. The lessons of QUANTEC: recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Mar 1;76(3 Suppl):S155–60. Learning Objectives: Describe the techniques, types of cancer and dose schedules used in treating recurrent H&N cancers with SBRT List the radiobiological models that compete with the linear-quadratic model

  12. WE-F-304-00: Outcomes of Hypofractionated Treatments - Results of the WGSBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) was introduced clinically more than twenty years ago, and many subsequent publications have reported safety and efficacy data. The AAPM Working Group on Biological Effects of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy/SBRT (WGSBRT) extracted published treatment outcomes data from extensive literature searches to summarize and construct tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session, we present the WGSBRT’s work for cranial sites, and recurrent head and neck cancer. From literature-based data and associated models, guidelines to aid with safe and effective hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment are being determined. Further, the ability of existing and proposed radiobiological models to fit these data is considered as to the ability to distinguish between the linear-quadratic and alternative radiobiological models such as secondary cell death from vascular damage, immunogenic, or bystander effects. Where appropriate, specific model parameters are estimated. As described in “The lessons of QUANTEC,” (1), lack of adequate reporting standards continues to limit the amount of useful quantitative information that can be extracted from peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations regarding reporting standards are considered, to enable such reviews to achieve more complete characterization of clinical outcomes. 1 Jackson A, Marks LB, Bentzen SM, Eisbruch A, Yorke ED, Ten Haken RK, Constine LS, Deasy JO. The lessons of QUANTEC: recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Mar 1;76(3 Suppl):S155–60. Learning Objectives: Describe the techniques, types of cancer and dose schedules used in treating recurrent H&N cancers with SBRT List the radiobiological models that compete with the linear-quadratic model

  13. WE-F-304-00: Outcomes of Hypofractionated Treatments - Results of the WGSBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) was introduced clinically more than twenty years ago, and many subsequent publications have reported safety and efficacy data. The AAPM Working Group on Biological Effects of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy/SBRT (WGSBRT) extracted published treatment outcomes data from extensive literature searches to summarize and construct tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session, we present the WGSBRT’s work for cranial sites, and recurrent head and neck cancer. From literature-based data and associated models, guidelines to aid with safe and effective hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment are being determined. Further, the ability of existing and proposed radiobiological models to fit these data is considered as to the ability to distinguish between the linear-quadratic and alternative radiobiological models such as secondary cell death from vascular damage, immunogenic, or bystander effects. Where appropriate, specific model parameters are estimated. As described in “The lessons of QUANTEC,” (1), lack of adequate reporting standards continues to limit the amount of useful quantitative information that can be extracted from peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations regarding reporting standards are considered, to enable such reviews to achieve more complete characterization of clinical outcomes. 1 Jackson A, Marks LB, Bentzen SM, Eisbruch A, Yorke ED, Ten Haken RK, Constine LS, Deasy JO. The lessons of QUANTEC: recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Mar 1;76(3 Suppl):S155–60. Learning Objectives: Describe the techniques, types of cancer and dose schedules used in treating recurrent H&N cancers with SBRT List the radiobiological models that compete with the linear-quadratic model

  14. WE-F-304-02: Recurrent HNC Treated with SBRT: TCP-Based Outcome Estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clump, D.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) was introduced clinically more than twenty years ago, and many subsequent publications have reported safety and efficacy data. The AAPM Working Group on Biological Effects of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy/SBRT (WGSBRT) extracted published treatment outcomes data from extensive literature searches to summarize and construct tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session, we present the WGSBRT’s work for cranial sites, and recurrent head and neck cancer. From literature-based data and associated models, guidelines to aid with safe and effective hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment are being determined. Further, the ability of existing and proposed radiobiological models to fit these data is considered as to the ability to distinguish between the linear-quadratic and alternative radiobiological models such as secondary cell death from vascular damage, immunogenic, or bystander effects. Where appropriate, specific model parameters are estimated. As described in “The lessons of QUANTEC,” (1), lack of adequate reporting standards continues to limit the amount of useful quantitative information that can be extracted from peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations regarding reporting standards are considered, to enable such reviews to achieve more complete characterization of clinical outcomes. 1 Jackson A, Marks LB, Bentzen SM, Eisbruch A, Yorke ED, Ten Haken RK, Constine LS, Deasy JO. The lessons of QUANTEC: recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Mar 1;76(3 Suppl):S155–60. Learning Objectives: Describe the techniques, types of cancer and dose schedules used in treating recurrent H&N cancers with SBRT List the radiobiological models that compete with the linear-quadratic model

  15. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... service; however, maintenance therapy itself is not covered as part of these services. (c) Occupational... increase respiratory function, such as graded activity services; these services include physiologic... rehabilitation plan of treatment, including physical therapy services, occupational therapy services, speech...

  16. Static, Lightweight Includes Resolution for PHP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hills (Mark); P. Klint (Paul); J.J. Vinju (Jurgen)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractDynamic languages include a number of features that are challenging to model properly in static analysis tools. In PHP, one of these features is the include expression, where an arbitrary expression provides the path of the file to include at runtime. In this paper we present two

  17. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  18. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  19. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  20. Predicting outcome of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, M; Kalss, G; Rohracher, A; Pilz, G; Novak, H; Höfler, J; Deak, I; Kuchukhidze, G; Dobesberger, J; Wakonig, A; Trinka, E

    2015-08-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a frequent neurological emergency complicated by high mortality and often poor functional outcome in survivors. The aim of this study was to review available clinical scores to predict outcome. Literature review. PubMed Search terms were "score", "outcome", and "status epilepticus" (April 9th 2015). Publications with abstracts available in English, no other language restrictions, or any restrictions concerning investigated patients were included. Two scores were identified: "Status Epilepticus Severity Score--STESS" and "Epidemiology based Mortality score in SE--EMSE". A comprehensive comparison of test parameters concerning performance, options, and limitations was performed. Epidemiology based Mortality score in SE allows detailed individualization of risk factors and is significantly superior to STESS in a retrospective explorative study. In particular, EMSE is very good at detection of good and bad outcome, whereas STESS detecting bad outcome is limited by a ceiling effect and uncertainty of correct cutoff value. Epidemiology based Mortality score in SE can be adapted to different regions in the world and to advances in medicine, as new data emerge. In addition, we designed a reporting standard for status epilepticus to enhance acquisition and communication of outcome relevant data. A data acquisition sheet used from patient admission in emergency room, from the EEG lab to intensive care unit, is provided for optimized data collection. Status Epilepticus Severity Score is easy to perform and predicts bad outcome, but has a low predictive value for good outcomes. Epidemiology based Mortality score in SE is superior to STESS in predicting good or bad outcome but needs marginally more time to perform. Epidemiology based Mortality score in SE may prove very useful for risk stratification in interventional studies and is recommended for individual outcome prediction. Prospective validation in different cohorts is needed for EMSE, whereas

  1. Poster — Thur Eve — 74: Distributed, asynchronous, reactive dosimetric and outcomes analysis using DICOMautomaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Haley; Wu, Jonn; Moiseenko, Vitali; Thomas, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Many have speculated about the future of computational technology in clinical radiation oncology. It has been advocated that the next generation of computational infrastructure will improve on the current generation by incorporating richer aspects of automation, more heavily and seamlessly featuring distributed and parallel computation, and providing more flexibility toward aggregate data analysis. In this report we describe how a recently created — but currently existing — analysis framework (DICOMautomaton) incorporates these aspects. DICOMautomaton supports a variety of use cases but is especially suited for dosimetric outcomes correlation analysis, investigation and comparison of radiotherapy treatment efficacy, and dose-volume computation. We describe: how it overcomes computational bottlenecks by distributing workload across a network of machines; how modern, asynchronous computational techniques are used to reduce blocking and avoid unnecessary computation; and how issues of out-of-date data are addressed using reactive programming techniques and data dependency chains. We describe internal architecture of the software and give a detailed demonstration of how DICOMautomaton could be used to search for correlations between dosimetric and outcomes data

  2. Maternal nutrition and birth outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saad, Kathleen; Fraser, Drora

    2010-01-01

    In this review, the authors summarize current knowledge on maternal nutritional requirements during pregnancy, with a focus on the nutrients that have been most commonly investigated in association with birth outcomes. Data sourcing and extraction included searches of the primary resources establishing maternal nutrient requirements during pregnancy (e.g., Dietary Reference Intakes), and searches of Medline for "maternal nutrition"/[specific nutrient of interest] and "birth/pregnancy outcomes," focusing mainly on the less extensively reviewed evidence from observational studies of maternal dietary intake and birth outcomes. The authors used a conceptual framework which took both primary and secondary factors (e.g., baseline maternal nutritional status, socioeconomic status of the study populations, timing and methods of assessing maternal nutritional variables) into account when interpreting study findings. The authors conclude that maternal nutrition is a modifiable risk factor of public health importance that can be integrated into efforts to prevent adverse birth outcomes, particularly among economically developing/low-income populations.

  3. Births and deaths including fetal deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Access to a variety of United States birth and death files including fetal deaths: Birth Files, 1968-2009; 1995-2005; Fetal death file, 1982-2005; Mortality files,...

  4. Including Indigenous Minorities in Decision-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand......Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand...

  5. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  6. Objectives and Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segalman, D.J.

    1998-11-30

    a significant exposure to biomedical topics and the integration of those topics with chemical (electrical or mechanical) engineering. o We shall provide unique opportunities for our students to work with clinicians and researchers in hospitals and other medical institutions. combined criteria a-k of ABET and 1-6 of AICHE (or IEEE or ASME) in some sensible manner. Here I have just estimated the number of distinct criteria that would be extracted from the AICHE paragraphs. These criteria are necessarily included because of the objective to producing chemical (electrical or mechanical) engineers. every student who desires an internship or independent study at a medical institution will be placed. a majority of our students will take either the FE exam or the M-CAT exam. demonstrating a commitment to professionalism and to life-long learning. a majority of our students will go on to graduate school or other post-graduate school. (I do not assert that this sort of outcome is appropriate to all excellent schools. In the case of this hypothetical school though, this outcome might be a reasonable expectation.) medical schools will rank our school as among the best from which to admit

  7. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  8. Electrochemical cell structure including an ionomeric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Hibbs, Michael

    2017-06-20

    An apparatus includes an electrochemical half-cell comprising: an electrolyte, an anode; and an ionomeric barrier positioned between the electrolyte and the anode. The anode may comprise a multi-electron vanadium phosphorous alloy, such as VP.sub.x, wherein x is 1-5. The electrochemical half-cell is configured to oxidize the vanadium and phosphorous alloy to release electrons. A method of mitigating corrosion in an electrochemical cell includes disposing an ionomeric barrier in a path of electrolyte or ion flow to an anode and mitigating anion accumulation on the surface of the anode.

  9. Isolators Including Main Spring Linear Guide Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Ryan (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Ruebsamen, Dale Thomas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of isolators, such as three parameter isolators, including a main spring linear guide system are provided. In one embodiment, the isolator includes first and second opposing end portions, a main spring mechanically coupled between the first and second end portions, and a linear guide system extending from the first end portion, across the main spring, and toward the second end portion. The linear guide system expands and contracts in conjunction with deflection of the main spring along the working axis, while restricting displacement and rotation of the main spring along first and second axes orthogonal to the working axis.

  10. The impact of positron emission tomography on primary tumour delineation and dosimetric outcome in intensity modulated radiotherapy of early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Vincent W. C.; Leung, Wan-shun; Wong, Kwun-lam; Chan, Ying-kit; Law, Wing-lam; Leung, Wing-kwan; Yu, Yat-long

    2016-01-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), accurate delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is important. Image registration of CT and MRI has been routinely used in treatment planning. With recent development of positron emission tomography (PET), the aims of this study were to evaluate the impact of PET on GTV delineation and dosimetric outcome in IMRT of early stage NPC patients. Twenty NPC patients with T1 or T2 disease treated by IMRT were recruited. For each patient, 2 sets of NP GTVs were delineated separately, in which one set was performed using CT and MRI registration only (GTV CM ), while the other set was carried out using PET, CT and MRI information (GTV CMP ). A 9-field IMRT plan was computed based on the target volumes generated from CT and MRI (PTV CM ). To assess the geometric difference between the GTV CM and GTV CMP , GTV volumes and DICE similarity coefficient (DSC), which measured the geometrical similarity between the two GTVs, were recorded. To evaluate the dosimetric impact, the D max , D min , D mean and D 95 of PTVs were obtained from their dose volume histograms generated by the treatment planning system. The overall mean volume of GTV CMP was greater than GTV CM by 4.4 %, in which GTV CMP was slightly greater in the T1 group but lower in the T2 group. The mean DSC of the whole group was 0.79 ± 0.05. Similar mean DSC values were also obtained from the T1 and T2 groups separately. The dosimetric parameters of PTV CM fulfilled the planning requirements. When applying this plan to the PTV CMP , the average D min (56.9 Gy) and D 95 (68.6 Gy) of PTV CMP failed to meet the dose requirements and demonstrated significant differences from the PTV CM (p = 0.001 and 0.016 respectively), whereas the doses to GTV CMP did not show significant difference with the GTV CM . In IMRT of early stage NPC, PET was an important imaging modality in radiotherapy planning so as to avoid underdosing the PTV, although its

  11. The impact of positron emission tomography on primary tumour delineation and dosimetric outcome in intensity modulated radiotherapy of early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Vincent W C; Leung, Wan-Shun; Wong, Kwun-Lam; Chan, Ying-Kit; Law, Wing-Lam; Leung, Wing-Kwan; Yu, Yat-Long

    2016-08-24

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), accurate delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is important. Image registration of CT and MRI has been routinely used in treatment planning. With recent development of positron emission tomography (PET), the aims of this study were to evaluate the impact of PET on GTV delineation and dosimetric outcome in IMRT of early stage NPC patients. Twenty NPC patients with T1 or T2 disease treated by IMRT were recruited. For each patient, 2 sets of NP GTVs were delineated separately, in which one set was performed using CT and MRI registration only (GTVCM), while the other set was carried out using PET, CT and MRI information (GTVCMP). A 9-field IMRT plan was computed based on the target volumes generated from CT and MRI (PTVCM). To assess the geometric difference between the GTVCM and GTVCMP, GTV volumes and DICE similarity coefficient (DSC), which measured the geometrical similarity between the two GTVs, were recorded. To evaluate the dosimetric impact, the Dmax, Dmin, Dmean and D95 of PTVs were obtained from their dose volume histograms generated by the treatment planning system. The overall mean volume of GTVCMP was greater than GTVCM by 4.4 %, in which GTVCMP was slightly greater in the T1 group but lower in the T2 group. The mean DSC of the whole group was 0.79 ± 0.05. Similar mean DSC values were also obtained from the T1 and T2 groups separately. The dosimetric parameters of PTVCM fulfilled the planning requirements. When applying this plan to the PTVCMP, the average Dmin (56.9 Gy) and D95 (68.6 Gy) of PTVCMP failed to meet the dose requirements and demonstrated significant differences from the PTVCM (p = 0.001 and 0.016 respectively), whereas the doses to GTVCMP did not show significant difference with the GTVCM. In IMRT of early stage NPC, PET was an important imaging modality in radiotherapy planning so as to avoid underdosing the PTV, although its effect on GTV

  12. Creating an outcomes framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerge, J B

    2000-01-01

    Four constructs used to build a framework for outcomes management for a large midwestern tertiary hospital are described in this article. A system framework outlining a model of clinical integration and population management based in Steven Shortell's work is discussed. This framework includes key definitions of high-risk patients, target groups, populations and community. Roles for each level of population management and how they were implemented in the health care system are described. A point of service framework centered on seven dimensions of care is the next construct applied on each nursing unit. The third construct outlines the framework for role development. Three roles for nursing were created to implement strategies for target groups that are strategic disease categories; two of those roles are described in depth. The philosophy of nursing practice is centered on caring and existential advocacy. The final construct is the modification of the Dartmouth model as a common framework for outcomes. System applications of the scorecard and lessons learned in the 2-year process of implementation are shared

  13. Internet interventions for chronic pain including headache: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Buhrman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health problem and behavioral based treatments have been shown to be effective. However, the availability of these kinds of treatments is scarce and internet-based treatments have been shown to be promising in this area. The objective of the present systematic review is to evaluate internet-based interventions for persons with chronic pain. The specific aims are to do an updated review with a broad inclusion of different chronic pain diagnoses and to assess disability and pain and also measures of catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. A systematic search identified 891 studies and 22 trials were selected as eligible for review. Two of the selected trials included children/youth and five included individuals with chronic headache and/or migraine. The most frequently measured domain reflected in the primary outcomes was interference/disability, followed by catastrophizing. Result across the studies showed a number of beneficial effects. Twelve trials reported significant effects on disability/interference outcomes and pain intensity. Positive effects were also found on psychological variable such as catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. Several studies (n = 12 were assessed to have an unclear level of risk bias. The attrition levels ranged from 4% to 54% where the headache trials had the highest drop-out levels. However, findings suggest that internet-based treatments based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT are efficacious measured with different outcome variables. Results are in line with trials in clinical settings. Meta-analytic statistics were calculated for interference/disability, pain intensity, catastrophizing and mood ratings. Results showed that the effect size for interference/disability was Hedge's g = −0.39, for pain intensity Hedge's g = −0.33, for catastrophizing Hedge's g = −0.49 and for mood variables (depression Hedge's g = −0.26.

  14. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... vehicular manslaughter, driving under the influence of drugs or liquor, and hit and run), when unaccompanied by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records...

  15. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  16. Extending flood damage assessment methodology to include ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimal and sustainable flood plain management, including flood control, can only be achieved when the impacts of flood control measures are considered for both the man-made and natural environments, and the sociological aspects are fully considered. Until now, methods/models developed to determine the influences ...

  17. BIOLOGIC AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF INCLUDING DIFFERENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biologic and economic effects of including three agro-industrial by-products as ingredients in turkey poult diets were investigated using 48 turkey poults in a completely randomised design experiment. Diets were formulated to contain the three by-products – wheat offal, rice husk and palm kernel meal, each at 20% level ...

  18. Including Children Dependent on Ventilators in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for including ventilator-dependent children in school are offered, based on experience with six such students at a New York State school. Guidelines stress adherence to the medical management plan, the school-family partnership, roles of the social worker and psychologist, orientation, transportation, classroom issues, and steps toward…

  19. Impact of a pain protocol including hypnosis in major burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Mette M; Davadant, Maryse; Marin, Christian; Wasserfallen, Jean-Blaise; Pinget, Christophe; Maravic, Philippe; Koch, Nathalie; Raffoul, Wassim; Chiolero, René L

    2010-08-01

    Pain is a major issue after burns even when large doses of opioids are prescribed. The study focused on the impact of a pain protocol using hypnosis on pain intensity, anxiety, clinical course, and costs. All patients admitted to the ICU, aged >18 years, with an ICU stay >24h, accepting to try hypnosis, and treated according to standardized pain protocol were included. Pain was scaled on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (mean of daily multiple recordings), and basal and procedural opioid doses were recorded. Clinical outcome and economical data were retrieved from hospital charts and information system, respectively. Treated patients were matched with controls for sex, age, and the burned surface area. Forty patients were admitted from 2006 to 2007: 17 met exclusion criteria, leaving 23 patients, who were matched with 23 historical controls. Altogether patients were 36+/-14 years old and burned 27+/-15%BSA. The first hypnosis session was performed after a median of 9 days. The protocol resulted in the early delivery of higher opioid doses/24h (ppatient. A pain protocol including hypnosis reduced pain intensity, improved opioid efficiency, reduced anxiety, improved wound outcome while reducing costs. The protocol guided use of opioids improved patient care without side effects, while hypnosis had significant psychological benefits.

  20. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  1. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  2. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, C.A.; Simnad, M.T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement is described for nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux. The reactor shielding includes means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron

  3. Model for safety reports including descriptive examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Several safety reports will be produced in the process of planning and constructing the system for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Sweden. The present report gives a model, with detailed examples, of how these reports should be organized and what steps they should include. In the near future safety reports will deal with the encapsulation plant and the repository. Later reports will treat operation of the handling systems and the repository

  4. Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.M.; Migneron, R.; Narayanan, K.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional ''incoherent'' jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics

  5. Learning Outcomes Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Spoelstra, Howard; Burgoyne, Louise; O’Tuathaigh, Colm

    2018-01-01

    Aim of the study The learning outcomes study, conducted as part of WP3 of the BioApp project, has as objectives: (a) generating a comprehensive list of the learning outcomes; (b) reaching an agreement on the scope and priority of the learning outcomes, and (c) making suggestions for the further

  6. [Renal patient's diet: Can fish be included?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro González, M I; Maafs Rodríguez, A G; Galindo Gómez, C

    2012-01-01

    Medical and nutritional treatment for renal disease, now a major public health issue, is highly complicated. Nutritional therapy must seek to retard renal dysfunction, maintain an optimal nutritional status and prevent the development of underlying pathologies. To analyze ten fish species to identify those that, because of their low phosphorus content, high biological value protein and elevated n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, could be included in renal patient's diet. The following fish species (Litte tunny, Red drum, Spotted eagleray, Escolar, Swordfish, Big-scale pomfret, Cortez flounder, Largemouth blackbass, Periche mojarra, Florida Pompano) were analyzed according to the AOAC and Keller techniques to determine their protein, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, cholesterol, vitamins D(3) and E, and n-3 EPA+DHA content. These results were used to calculate relations between nutrients. The protein in the analyzed species ranged from 16.5 g/100 g of fillet (Largemouth black bass) to 27.2 g/100 g (Red drum); the lowest phosphorus value was 28.6 mg/100 g (Periche mojarra) and the highest 216.3 mg/100 g (Spotted eagle ray). 80% of the fish presented > 100 mg EPA + DHA in 100 g of fillet. By its Phosphorus/gProtein ratio, Escolar and Swordfish could not be included in the renal diet; Little tunny, Escolar, Big-scale pomfret, Largemouth black-bass, Periche mojarra and Florida Pompano presented a lower Phosphorus/EPA + DHA ratio. Florida pompano is the most recommended specie for renal patients, due to its optimal nutrient relations. However, all analyzed species, except Escolar and Swordfish, could be included in renal diets.

  7. MOS modeling hierarchy including radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.R.; Turfler, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    A hierarchy of modeling procedures has been developed for MOS transistors, circuit blocks, and integrated circuits which include the effects of total dose radiation and photocurrent response. The models were developed for use with the SCEPTRE circuit analysis program, but the techniques are suitable for other modern computer aided analysis programs. The modeling hierarchy permits the designer or analyst to select the level of modeling complexity consistent with circuit size, parametric information, and accuracy requirements. Improvements have been made in the implementation of important second order effects in the transistor MOS model, in the definition of MOS building block models, and in the development of composite terminal models for MOS integrated circuits

  8. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.; Buttner, Ulrich; Yi, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  9. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-03-31

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  10. Energy principle with included boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1994-01-01

    Earlier comments by the author on the limitations of the classical form of the extended energy principle are supported by a complementary analysis on the potential energy change arising from free-boundary displacements of a magnetically confined plasma. In the final formulation of the extended principle, restricted displacements, satisfying pressure continuity by means of plasma volume currents in a thin boundary layer, are replaced by unrestricted (arbitrary) displacements which can give rise to induced surface currents. It is found that these currents contribute to the change in potential energy, and that their contribution is not taken into account by such a formulation. A general expression is further given for surface currents induced by arbitrary displacements. The expression is used to reformulate the energy principle for the class of displacements which satisfy all necessary boundary conditions, including that of the pressure balance. This makes a minimization procedure of the potential energy possible, for the class of all physically relevant test functions which include the constraints imposed by the boundary conditions. Such a procedure is also consistent with a corresponding variational calculus. (Author)

  11. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs

  12. Including gauge corrections to thermal leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetig, Janine

    2013-05-17

    This thesis provides the first approach of a systematic inclusion of gauge corrections to leading order to the ansatz of thermal leptogenesis. We have derived a complete expression for the integrated lepton number matrix including all resummations needed. For this purpose, a new class of diagram has been invented, namely the cylindrical diagram, which allows diverse investigations into the topic of leptogenesis such as the case of resonant leptogenesis. After a brief introduction of the topic of the baryon asymmetry in the universe and a discussion of its most promising solutions as well as their advantages and disadvantages, we have presented our framework of thermal leptogenesis. An effective model was described as well as the associated Feynman rules. The basis for using nonequilibrium quantum field theory has been built in chapter 3. At first, the main definitions have been presented for equilibrium thermal field theory, afterwards we have discussed the Kadanoff-Baym equations for systems out of equilibrium using the example of the Majorana neutrino. The equations have also been solved in the context of leptogenesis in chapter 4. Since gauge corrections play a crucial role throughout this thesis, we have also repeated the naive ansatz by replacing the free equilibrium propagator by propagators including thermal damping rates due to the Standard Model damping widths for lepton and Higgs fields. It is shown that this leads to a comparable result to the solutions of the Boltzmann equations for thermal leptogenesis. Thus it becomes obvious that Standard Model corrections are not negligible for thermal leptogenesis and therefore need to be included systematically from first principles. In order to achieve this we have started discussing the calculation of ladder rung diagrams for Majorana neutrinos using the HTL and the CTL approach in chapter 5. All gauge corrections are included in this framework and thus it has become the basis for the following considerations

  13. Including gauge corrections to thermal leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huetig, Janine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis provides the first approach of a systematic inclusion of gauge corrections to leading order to the ansatz of thermal leptogenesis. We have derived a complete expression for the integrated lepton number matrix including all resummations needed. For this purpose, a new class of diagram has been invented, namely the cylindrical diagram, which allows diverse investigations into the topic of leptogenesis such as the case of resonant leptogenesis. After a brief introduction of the topic of the baryon asymmetry in the universe and a discussion of its most promising solutions as well as their advantages and disadvantages, we have presented our framework of thermal leptogenesis. An effective model was described as well as the associated Feynman rules. The basis for using nonequilibrium quantum field theory has been built in chapter 3. At first, the main definitions have been presented for equilibrium thermal field theory, afterwards we have discussed the Kadanoff-Baym equations for systems out of equilibrium using the example of the Majorana neutrino. The equations have also been solved in the context of leptogenesis in chapter 4. Since gauge corrections play a crucial role throughout this thesis, we have also repeated the naive ansatz by replacing the free equilibrium propagator by propagators including thermal damping rates due to the Standard Model damping widths for lepton and Higgs fields. It is shown that this leads to a comparable result to the solutions of the Boltzmann equations for thermal leptogenesis. Thus it becomes obvious that Standard Model corrections are not negligible for thermal leptogenesis and therefore need to be included systematically from first principles. In order to achieve this we have started discussing the calculation of ladder rung diagrams for Majorana neutrinos using the HTL and the CTL approach in chapter 5. All gauge corrections are included in this framework and thus it has become the basis for the following considerations

  14. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L K; Allan, G L; Cresswell, R G; Ophel, T R [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S J; Day, J P [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  15. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S.J.; Day, J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  16. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course pr...

  17. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepares participants to develop test and measurement, da...

  18. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" trainings have been recently changed to include, respectively, an introduction and an expert training on the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to develop expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepare...

  19. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  20. CLIC expands to include the Southern Hemisphere

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    Australia has recently joined the CLIC collaboration: the enlargement will bring new expertise and resources to the project, and is especially welcome in the wake of CERN budget redistributions following the recent adoption of the Medium Term Plan.   The countries involved in CLIC collaboration With the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on 26 August 2010, the ACAS network (Australian Collaboration for Accelerator Science) became the 40th member of in the multilateral CLIC collaboration making Australia the 22nd country to join the collaboration. “The new MoU was signed by the ACAS network, which includes the Australian Synchrotron and the University of Melbourne”, explains Jean-Pierre Delahaye, CLIC Study Leader. “Thanks to their expertise, the Australian institutes will contribute greatly to the CLIC damping rings and the two-beam test modules." Institutes from any country wishing to join the CLIC collaboration are invited to assume responsibility o...

  1. Should Broca's area include Brodmann area 47?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Alfredo; Bernal, Byron; Rosselli, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Understanding brain organization of speech production has been a principal goal of neuroscience. Historically, brain speech production has been associated with so-called Broca’s area (Brodmann area –BA- 44 and 45), however, modern neuroimaging developments suggest speech production is associated with networks rather than with areas. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the connectivity of BA47 ( pars orbitalis) in relation to language . A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the language network in which BA47 is involved. The Brainmap database was used. Twenty papers corresponding to 29 experimental conditions with a total of 373 subjects were included. Our results suggest that BA47 participates in a “frontal language production system” (or extended Broca’s system). The BA47  connectivity found is also concordant with a minor role in language semantics. BA47 plays a central role in the language production system.

  2. Grand unified models including extra Z bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tiezhong

    1989-01-01

    The grand unified theories (GUT) of the simple Lie groups including extra Z bosons are discussed. Under authors's hypothesis there are only SU 5+m SO 6+4n and E 6 groups. The general discussion of SU 5+m is given, then the SU 6 and SU 7 are considered. In SU 6 the 15+6 * +6 * fermion representations are used, which are not same as others in fermion content, Yukawa coupling and broken scales. A conception of clans of particles, which are not families, is suggested. These clans consist of extra Z bosons and the corresponding fermions of the scale. The all of fermions in the clans are down quarks except for the standard model which consists of Z bosons and 15 fermions, therefore, the spectrum of the hadrons which are composed of these down quarks are different from hadrons at present

  3. Including climate change in energy investment decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ybema, J.R.; Boonekamp, P.G.M.; Smit, J.T.J.

    1995-08-01

    To properly take climate change into account in the analysis of energy investment decisions, it is required to apply decision analysis methods that are capable of considering the specific characteristics of climate change (large uncertainties, long term horizon). Such decision analysis methods do exist. They can explicitly include evolving uncertainties, multi-stage decisions, cumulative effects and risk averse attitudes. Various methods are considered in this report and two of these methods have been selected: hedging calculations and sensitivity analysis. These methods are applied to illustrative examples, and its limitations are discussed. The examples are (1a) space heating and hot water for new houses from a private investor perspective and (1b) as example (1a) but from a government perspective, (2) electricity production with an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (ICGCC) with or without CO 2 removal, and (3) national energy strategy to hedge for climate change. 9 figs., 21 tabs., 42 refs., 1 appendix

  4. Education Program on Fossil Resources Including Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Masahiro

    Fossil fuels including coal play a key role as crucial energies in contributing to economic development in Asia. On the other hand, its limited quantity and the environmental problems causing from its usage have become a serious global issue and a countermeasure to solve such problems is very much demanded. Along with the pursuit of sustainable development, environmentally-friendly use of highly efficient fossil resources should be therefore, accompanied. Kyushu-university‧s sophisticated research through long years of accumulated experience on the fossil resources and environmental sectors together with the advanced large-scale commercial and empirical equipments will enable us to foster cooperative research and provide internship program for the future researchers. Then, this program is executed as a consignment business from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry from 2007 fiscal year to 2009 fiscal year. The lecture that uses the textbooks developed by this program is scheduled to be started a course in fiscal year 2010.

  5. Truck Drivers And Risk Of STDs Including HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal R.K

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: Whether long distance truck drivers are at a higher risk of contracting and transmitting STDs including HIV? Objectives: i To study the degree of knowledge of HIV and AIDS among long- distance truck drivers. ii Assess their sexual behaviour including condom use. iii Explore their prevailing social influences and substance abuse patterns. iv Explore their treatment seeking bahaviour as regards STDs. v Deduce their risk of contracting and transmitting STDs including HIV. Study Design: Cross- sectional interview. Setting: Transport Nagar, Indore (M.P Participants: 210 senior drivers (First drivers and 210 junior drivers (Second drivers. Study Variables: Extra-Marital sexual intercourse, condom usage, past and present history of STDs, treatment and counseling, substance abuse, social â€" cultural milieu. Outcome Variables: Risk of contraction of STDs. Statistical Analysis: Univariate analysis. Results: 94% of the drivers were totally ignorant about AIDS. 82.9% and 43.8 % of the senior and junior drivers had a history of extra- marital sex and of these only 2 regularly used condoms. 13.8% and 3.3 % of the senior and junior drivers had a past or present history suggestive of STD infection. Alcohol and Opium were regularly used by them. Conclusion: The studied drivers are at a high risk of contracting and transmitting STDs including HIV.

  6. Pediatric pancreas transplantation, including total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondoc, Alexander J; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Nathan, Jaimie D

    2017-08-01

    Unlike other solid-organ transplants, whole pancreas transplantation in children is relatively rare, and it occurs more frequently in the context of multivisceral or composite organ transplantation. Because children only infrequently suffer severe sequelae of type 1 diabetes mellitus, pancreas transplantation is rarely indicated in the pediatric population. More commonly, pediatric pancreas transplant occurs in the setting of incapacitating acute recurrent or chronic pancreatitis, specifically islet autotransplantation after total pancreatectomy. In this clinical scenario, total pancreatectomy removes the nidus of chronic pain and debilitation, while autologous islet transplantation aims to preserve endocrine function. The published experiences with pediatric total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT) in children has demonstrated excellent outcomes including liberation from chronic opioid use, as well as improved mental and physical quality of life with good glycemic control. Given the complexity of the operation, risk of postoperative complication, and long-term physiologic changes, appropriate patient selection and comprehensive multidisciplinary care teams are critical to ensuring optimal outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  8. Achalasia: Outcome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Anell; Catto-Smith, Anthony; Crameri, Joe; Simpson, Di; Alex, George; Hardikar, Winita; Cameron, Donald; Oliver, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Oesophageal achalasia is well-recognized but relatively rare in children, occasionally appearing as the "triple A" syndrome (with adrenal insufficiency and alacrima). Treatment modalities, as in adult practice, are not curative, often needing further interventions and spurring the search for better management. The outcome for syndromic variants is unknown. We sought to define the efficacy of treatments for children with achalasia with and without triple A syndrome. We conducted a retrospective analysis of presentation and outcomes for 42 children with achalasia presenting over three decades to a major pediatric referral center. Long term impact of the diagnosis was assessed by questionnaire. We identified 42 children including six with triple A syndrome. The median overall age at diagnosis was 10.8 years and median follow-up 1593 days. Initial Heller myotomy in 17 required further interventions in 11 (65%), while initial treatment with botulinum toxin (n = 20) was ultimately followed by myotomy in 17 (85%). Ten out of 35 patients who underwent myotomy required a repeat myotomy (29%). Patients with triple A syndrome developed symptoms earlier, but had delayed diagnosis, were more underweight at diagnosis and at last follow up. Questionnaire results suggested a significant long term deleterious impact on the quality of life of children and their families. Many children with achalasia relapse after initial treatment, undergoing multiple, different procedures, despite which symptoms persist and impact on quality of life. Symptoms develop earlier in patients with triple A syndrome, but the diagnosis is delayed and this has substantial nutritional impact. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Zγ production at NNLO including anomalous couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John M.; Neumann, Tobias; Williams, Ciaran

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we present a next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD calculation of the processes pp → l + l -γ and pp\\to ν \\overline{ν}γ that we have implemented in MCFM. Our calculation includes QCD corrections at NNLO both for the Standard Model (SM) and additionally in the presence of Zγγ and ZZγ anomalous couplings. We compare our implementation, obtained using the jettiness slicing approach, with a previous SM calculation and find broad agreement. Focusing on the sensitivity of our results to the slicing parameter, we show that using our setup we are able to compute NNLO cross sections with numerical uncertainties of about 0.1%, which is small compared to residual scale uncertainties of a few percent. We study potential improvements using two different jettiness definitions and the inclusion of power corrections. At √{s}=13 TeV we present phenomenological results and consider Zγ as a background to H → Zγ production. We find that, with typical cuts, the inclusion of NNLO corrections represents a small effect and loosens the extraction of limits on anomalous couplings by about 10%.

  10. Alternating phase focussing including space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, W.H.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Longitudinal stability can be obtained in a non-relativistic drift tube accelerator by traversing each gap as the rf accelerating field rises. However, the rising accelerating field leads to a transverse defocusing force which is usually overcome by magnetic focussing inside the drift tubes. The radio frequency quadrupole is one way of providing simultaneous longitudinal and transverse focusing without the use of magnets. One can also avoid the use of magnets by traversing alternate gaps between drift tubes as the field is rising and falling, thus providing an alternation of focussing and defocusing forces in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The stable longitudinal phase space area is quite small, but recent efforts suggest that alternating phase focussing (APF) may permit low velocity acceleration of currents in the 100-300 ma range. This paper presents a study of the parameter space and a test of crude analytic predictions by adapting the code PARMILA, which includes space charge, to APF. 6 refs., 3 figs

  11. Probabilistic production simulation including CHP plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, H.V.; Palsson, H.; Ravn, H.F.

    1997-04-01

    A probabilistic production simulation method is presented for an energy system containing combined heat and power plants. The method permits incorporation of stochastic failures (forced outages) of the plants and is well suited for analysis of the dimensioning of the system, that is, for finding the appropriate types and capacities of production plants in relation to expansion planning. The method is in the tradition of similar approaches for the analysis of power systems, based on the load duration curve. The present method extends on this by considering a two-dimensional load duration curve where the two dimensions represent heat and power. The method permits the analysis of a combined heat and power system which includes all the basic relevant types of plants, viz., condensing plants, back pressure plants, extraction plants and heat plants. The focus of the method is on the situation where the heat side has priority. This implies that on the power side there may be imbalances between demand and production. The method permits quantification of the expected power overflow, the expected unserviced power demand, and the expected unserviced heat demand. It is shown that a discretization method as well as double Fourier series may be applied in algorithms based on the method. (au) 1 tab., 28 ills., 21 refs.

  12. Langevin simulations of QCD, including fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronfeld, A.S.

    1986-02-01

    We encounter critical slow down in updating when xi/a -> infinite and in matrix inversion (needed to include fermions) when msub(q)a -> 0. A simulation that purports to solve QCD numerically will encounter these limits, so to face the challenge in the title of this workshop, we must cure the disease of critical slow down. Physically, this critical slow down is due to the reluctance of changes at short distances to propagate to large distances. Numerically, the stability of an algorithm at short wavelengths requires a (moderately) small step size; critical slow down occurs when the effective long wavelength step size becomes tiny. The remedy for this disease is an algorithm that propagates signals quickly throughout the system; i.e. one whose effective step size is not reduced for the long wavelength conponents of the fields. (Here the effective ''step size'' is essentially an inverse decorrelation time.) To do so one must resolve various wavelengths of the system and modify the dynamics (in CPU time) of the simulation so that all modes evolve at roughly the same rate. This can be achieved by introducing Fourier transforms. I show how to implement Fourier acceleration for Langevin updating and for conjugate gradient matrix inversion. The crucial feature of these algorithms that lends them to Fourier acceleration is that they update the lattice globally; hence the Fourier transforms are computed once per sweep rather than once per hit. (orig./HSI)

  13. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Tsang

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  14. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  15. Culturally Sensitive and Environment-Friendly Outcome Measures in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    A systematic review of evidence on culturally sensitive and environment-friendly outcome measures in ..... which included manual grass cutting/hoeing, assuming the Islamic ... who opined that the starting point for any outcome measure is to ...

  16. Identifiable Data Files - Health Outcomes Survey (HOS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) identifiable data files are comprised of the entire national sample for a given 2-year cohort (including both respondents...

  17. Exploring Social Outcomes of Interactions between University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the context of social integration theory, this paper explores the social ... families and by extension allowing for modest cross-cultural learning's and exchanges. ... In the negative domain, the outcomes include conflicts between students and ...

  18. Health Outcomes Survey - Limited Data Set

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) limited data sets (LDS) are comprised of the entire national sample for a given 2-year cohort (including both respondents...

  19. Network meta-analysis of multiple outcome measures accounting for borrowing of information across outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achana, Felix A; Cooper, Nicola J; Bujkiewicz, Sylwia; Hubbard, Stephanie J; Kendrick, Denise; Jones, David R; Sutton, Alex J

    2014-07-21

    Network meta-analysis (NMA) enables simultaneous comparison of multiple treatments while preserving randomisation. When summarising evidence to inform an economic evaluation, it is important that the analysis accurately reflects the dependency structure within the data, as correlations between outcomes may have implication for estimating the net benefit associated with treatment. A multivariate NMA offers a framework for evaluating multiple treatments across multiple outcome measures while accounting for the correlation structure between outcomes. The standard NMA model is extended to multiple outcome settings in two stages. In the first stage, information is borrowed across outcomes as well across studies through modelling the within-study and between-study correlation structure. In the second stage, we make use of the additional assumption that intervention effects are exchangeable between outcomes to predict effect estimates for all outcomes, including effect estimates on outcomes where evidence is either sparse or the treatment had not been considered by any one of the studies included in the analysis. We apply the methods to binary outcome data from a systematic review evaluating the effectiveness of nine home safety interventions on uptake of three poisoning prevention practices (safe storage of medicines, safe storage of other household products, and possession of poison centre control telephone number) in households with children. Analyses are conducted in WinBUGS using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. Univariate and the first stage multivariate models produced broadly similar point estimates of intervention effects but the uncertainty around the multivariate estimates varied depending on the prior distribution specified for the between-study covariance structure. The second stage multivariate analyses produced more precise effect estimates while enabling intervention effects to be predicted for all outcomes, including intervention effects on

  20. Prospective outcomes of injury study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrett, S; Langley, J; Hokowhitu, B; Ameratunga, S; Hansen, P; Davie, G; Wyeth, E; Lilley, R

    2009-10-01

    In New Zealand (NZ), 20% of adults report a disability, of which one-third is caused by injury. No prospective epidemiological studies of predictors of disability following all-cause injury among New Zealanders have been undertaken. Internationally, studies have focused on a limited range of predictors or specific injuries. Although these studies provide useful insights, applicability to NZ is limited given the importance of NZ's unique macro-social factors, such as NZ's no-fault accident compensation and rehabilitation scheme, the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). (1) To quantitatively determine the injury, rehabilitation, personal, social and economic factors leading to disability outcomes following injury in NZ. (2) To qualitatively explore experiences and perceptions of injury-related outcomes in face-to-face interviews with 15 Māori and 15 other New Zealanders, 6 and 12 months after injury. Four geographical regions within NZ. Prospective cohort study with telephone interviews 1, 4 and 12 months after injury. 2500 people (including 460 Māori), aged 18-64 years, randomly selected from ACC's entitlement claims register (people likely to be off work for at least 1 week or equivalent). Telephone interviews, electronic hospital and ACC injury data. Exposures include demographic, social, economic, work-related, health status, participation and/or environmental factors. Primary: disability (including WHODAS II) and health-related quality of life (including EQ-5D). Secondary: participation (paid and unpaid activities), life satisfaction and costs. Separate regression models will be developed for each of the outcomes. Repeated measures outcomes will be modelled using general estimating equation models and generalised linear mixed models.

  1. Vaccine strategies: Optimising outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Karin; Bonanni, Paolo; King, Susan; Santos, Jose Ignacio; El-Hodhod, Mostafa; Zimet, Gregory D; Preiss, Scott

    2016-12-20

    factors that encourage success, which often include strong support from government and healthcare organisations, as well as tailored, culturally-appropriate local approaches to optimise outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Lifestyle and IVF Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstein, Mark D

    2016-12-01

    Whereas much has been written about the prognostic factors associated with outcomes of in vitro fertilization (IVF) such as female age, diagnosis, and ovarian reserve, relatively little attention has been devoted to patient-oriented lifestyles that may influence IVF outcomes. Patients are particularly interested in this topic because many patients wish to partner with their physicians and want to know specific behaviors to improve their chances of IVF success. This brief review is not intended as an exhaustive literature search of all possible lifestyles that may influence assisted reproductive outcome nor is it intended to be a comprehensive review of individual topics. It does give, however, a brief overview of a number of areas in which patient-specific behaviors may influence outcomes in assisted reproduction. Specifically, this review will look at the effects of smoking, alcohol consumption, caffeine, diet, exercise, and exposure to the reproductive toxin bisphenol A on IVF outcomes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  4. Fetomaternal outcome in triplet pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazhar, S.B.; Furukh, T; Rahim, F.

    2008-01-01

    To determine maternal outcome as antenatal and postnatal complications and neonatal outcome as birth weight, morbidity and mortality in triplet gestation. All the patients with triplet pregnancy beyond 28 weeks gestation, who delivered at the study place during above period were included in the study. The primary outcome measures were frequency of maternal complications and neonatal birth, weight and morbidity. Secondary outcome measures included the frequency of assisted conception in the studied cohart. Eighteen women had triplet pregnancy beyond 28 weeks. Nine were booked, 6 non-booked and 3 of them were referred. Mean duration of gestation was 237.8 days (33.8 weeks). The antenatal complications were preterm delivery in 50%, hypertension in 50%, anemia in 44.4% and obstetric cholestasis in 5.6%. Eight patients (44.4%) suffered postpartum hemorrhage. One patient had peripartum hysterectomy and later expired in intensive care unit after three weeks. Maternal mortality ratio was 5.6%. Fifty five percent women had induction of ovulation with Clomiphene, while none had In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) or Intracytoplasmic Insemination (ICSI) or received gonadotrophins. Fifteen sets of triplets were delivered abdominally. Mean birth weights of 1st, 2nd and 3rd triplet were 1651, 1640 and 1443 grams respectively. Five sets of triplets (27.8%) had more than 25% discordance for birth weight. The mean Apgar scores of the babies at 1 and 10 minutes after birth were 6.0 and 8.0, 5.6 and 7.5; and 5.2 and 7.0 respectively. Of the 54 infants, 18 required Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admission and 14 were admitted in nursery. Two died shortly after birth. Total perinatal mortalities were 13 including 4 cases of intra-uterine demise. Three babies suffered from jaundice, 7 had sepsis and 8 had respiratory distress syndrome. Triplet gestation had a high rate of fetomaternal complications. Majority had history of assisted conception. (author)

  5. Core Health Outcomes In Childhood Epilepsy (CHOICE): protocol for the selection of a core outcome set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher; Dunkley, Colin; Gibbon, Frances M; Currier, Janet; Roberts, Deborah; Rogers, Morwenna; Crudgington, Holly; Bray, Lucy; Carter, Bernie; Hughes, Dyfrig; Tudur Smith, Catrin; Williamson, Paula R; Gringras, Paul; Pal, Deb K

    2017-11-28

    There is increasing recognition that establishing a core set of outcomes to be evaluated and reported in trials of interventions for particular conditions will improve the usefulness of health research. There is no established core outcome set for childhood epilepsy. The aim of this work is to select a core outcome set to be used in evaluative research of interventions for children with rolandic epilepsy, as an exemplar of common childhood epilepsy syndromes. First we will identify what outcomes should be measured; then we will decide how to measure those outcomes. We will engage relevant UK charities and health professional societies as partners, and convene advisory panels for young people with epilepsy and parents of children with epilepsy. We will identify candidate outcomes from a search for trials of interventions for childhood epilepsy, statutory guidance and consultation with our advisory panels. Families, charities and health, education and neuropsychology professionals will be invited to participate in a Delphi survey following recommended practices in the development of core outcome sets. Participants will be able to recommend additional outcome domains. Over three rounds of Delphi survey participants will rate the importance of candidate outcome domains and state the rationale for their decisions. Over the three rounds we will seek consensus across and between families and health professionals on the more important outcomes. A face-to-face meeting will be convened to ratify the core outcome set. We will then review and recommend ways to measure the shortlisted outcomes using clinical assessment and/or patient-reported outcome measures. Our methodology is a proportionate and pragmatic approach to expediently produce a core outcome set for evaluative research of interventions aiming to improve the health of children with epilepsy. A number of decisions have to be made when designing a study to develop a core outcome set including defining the scope

  6. Childhood Maltreatment and Educational Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Elisa; Babchishin, Lyzon; Marquis, Robyn; Fréchette, Sabrina

    2015-10-01

    Children (0-18 years) with maltreatment histories are vulnerable to experiencing difficulties across multiple domains of functioning, including educational outcomes that encompass not only academic achievement but also mental well-being. The current literature review adopted Slade and Wissow's model to examine (1) the link between childhood maltreatment and academic achievement, (2) the link between childhood maltreatment and mental health outcomes (i.e., emotional and behavioral difficulties), and (3) the bidirectional relationship between childhood academic achievement and mental health. In addition, we reviewed variables that might influence or help explain the link between childhood maltreatment and educational outcomes, drawing on developmental perspectives and Bronfenbrenner's ecological model. Finally, whenever possible, we presented findings specific to maltreated children in out-of-home care to highlight the unique challenges experienced by this population. Results indicated that children with maltreatment histories often experience impairments in both their academic performance (e.g., special education, grade retention, lower grades) and mental well-being (e.g., anxiety, low mood, aggression, social skills deficits, poor interpersonal relationships). These impairments appeared to be particularly pronounced among maltreated children in out-of-home care. Findings, albeit sparse, also indicated that mental health difficulties are negatively associated with children's academic achievement and, similarly, that academic achievement deficits are linked with mental health problems. The link between childhood maltreatment and educational outcomes may be partly explained through the disruption of key developmental processes in children, such as attachment, emotion regulation, and sense of agency. As well, maltreatment characteristics and the functioning of various systems in which children are embedded (e.g., family, school, child welfare) can serve to positively

  7. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  8. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Nazarpour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective, case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly

  9. [Outcomes after planned home births].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blix, Ellen; Øian, Pål; Kumle, Merethe

    2008-11-06

    About 150 planned home births take place in Norway annually. Professionals have different opinions on whether such births are safe or not. The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic literature review on maternal and neonatal outcomes after planned home births. A review was performed of literature retrieved from searches in MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Cinahl and The Cochrane Library and relevant references found in the articles. The searches were limited to studies published in 1985 and later. 10 studies with data from 30 204 women who had planned and were selected to home birth at the onset of labour were included. Three of the studies had control groups including women with planned hospital births. All included studies were assessed to be of medium quality. Between 9.9 and 23.1 % of women and infants were transferred to hospital during labour or after birth. There were few caesarean sections, other interventions or complications in the studies assessed; the total perinatal mortality rate was 2.9/1000 and the intrapartum mortality rate 0.8/1000. There is no sound basis for discouraging low-risk women from planning a home birth. Results from the included studies do not directly apply to Norwegian conditions. Outcomes and transfers after planned home births should be systematically registered.

  10. Translation of research outcome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    2017-01-03

    Jan 3, 2017 ... we must act”1 - Translation of research outcome for health policy, strategy and ... others iron-out existing gaps on Health Policy .... within the broader framework of global call and ... research: defining the terrain; identifying.

  11. Launch Lock Assemblies Including Axial Gap Amplification Devices and Spacecraft Isolation Systems Including the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Young, Ken (Inventor); Davis, Torey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of a launch lock assembly are provided, as are embodiments of a spacecraft isolation system including one or more launch lock assemblies. In one embodiment, the launch lock assembly includes first and second mount pieces, a releasable clamp device, and an axial gap amplification device. The releasable clamp device normally maintains the first and second mount pieces in clamped engagement; and, when actuated, releases the first and second mount pieces from clamped engagement to allow relative axial motion there between. The axial gap amplification device normally residing in a blocking position wherein the gap amplification device obstructs relative axial motion between the first and second mount pieces. The axial gap amplification device moves into a non-blocking position when the first and second mount pieces are released from clamped engagement to increase the range of axial motion between the first and second mount pieces.

  12. Understanding type 2 diabetes: including the family member's perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological and social factors and diabetes outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes and their family members. METHODS: A total of 153 patients with type 2 diabetes were assessed at a diabetes outpatient clinic and postal questionnaires were sent to nominated family members. The measures examined were diabetes knowledge, social support, well-being, and illness perceptions. RESULTS: When compared with those with diabetes, family members reported lower positive well-being and lower levels of satisfaction with support. They also perceived diabetes as a more cyclical illness, which was controlled more by treatment than by the individual. Family members also reported that the person with diabetes was more emotionally distressed and knew more about diabetes than the patient had actually reported himself or herself. There were no differences between the family members of those in good or poor glycaemic control. CONCLUSIONS: This study reinforces the importance of understanding social context and illness beliefs in diabetes management. It also highlights the potential for including family members in discussions and education about diabetes management.

  13. Embedding Affective Learning Outcomes in Library Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellysa Stern Cahoy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available While information literacy in higher education has long been focused on cognitive learning outcomes, attention must be paid to students’ affective, emotional needs throughout the research process. This article identifies models for embedding affective learning outcomes within information literacy instruction, and provides strategies to help librarians discover, articulate, and address students’ self-efficacy, motivation, emotions and attitudes. Worksheets to assist in creating affective learning outcomes are included to bring structure to an area of learning that is often challenging to articulate and measure. Also included in the article are the results of a recent survey of instruction librarians’ familiarity and inclusion of affective learning outcomes within teaching and learning initiatives.

  14. Exploring the outcomes in studies of primary frozen shoulder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodgers, Sara; Brealey, Stephen; Jefferson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: In our study we explored the need to define a core outcome set for primary frozen shoulder. METHODS: We investigated the outcomes used by studies included in a systematic review of the management of primary frozen shoulder; surveyed which primary outcome measures health care professionals...... and 104 respondents, respectively) were most often cited by health care professionals as the primary outcome measure that should be used. Searches identified one paper that included patients' views. Outcomes of importance to patients were pain at night, general pain, reduced mobility (resulting...

  15. Electrolyte solutions including a phosphoranimine compound, and energy storage devices including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaehn, John R.; Dufek, Eric J.; Rollins, Harry W.; Harrup, Mason K.; Gering, Kevin L.

    2017-09-12

    An electrolyte solution comprising at least one phosphoranimine compound and a metal salt. The at least one phosphoranimine compound comprises a compound of the chemical structure ##STR00001## where X is an organosilyl group or a tert-butyl group and each of R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 is independently selected from the group consisting of an alkyl group, an aryl group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. An energy storage device including the electrolyte solution is also disclosed.

  16. Nitrous oxide and perioperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hanjo; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard D

    2014-06-01

    There is emerging evidence related to the effects of nitrous oxide on important perioperative patient outcomes. Proposed mechanisms include metabolic effects linked to elevated homocysteine levels and endothelial dysfunction, inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid and protein formation, and depression of chemotactic migration by monocytes. Newer large studies point to possible risks associated with the use of nitrous oxide, although data are often equivocal and inconclusive. Cardiovascular outcomes such as stroke or myocardial infarction were shown to be unchanged in previous studies, but the more recent Evaluation of Nitrous Oxide in the Gas Mixture for Anesthesia I trial shows possible associations between nitrous oxide and increased cardiovascular and pulmonary complications. There are also possible effects on postoperative wound infections and neuropsychological function, although the multifactorial nature of these complications should be considered. Teratogenicity linked to nitrous oxide use has not been firmly established. The use of nitrous oxide for routine anesthetic care may be associated with significant costs if complications such as nausea, vomiting, and wound infections are taken into consideration. Overall, definitive data regarding the effect of nitrous oxide on major perioperative outcomes are lacking. There are ongoing prospective studies that may further elucidate its role. The use of nitrous oxide in daily practice should be individualized to each patient's medical conditions and risk factors.

  17. ICU Telemedicine Program Financial Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Craig M; Motzkus, Christine; Rincon, Teresa; Cody, Shawn E; Landry, Karen; Irwin, Richard S

    2017-02-01

    ICU telemedicine improves access to high-quality critical care, has substantial costs, and can change financial outcomes. Detailed information about financial outcomes and their trends over time following ICU telemedicine implementation and after the addition of logistic center function has not been published to our knowledge. Primary data were collected for consecutive adult patients of a single academic medical center. We compared clinical and financial outcomes across three groups that differed regarding telemedicine support: a group without ICU telemedicine support (pre-ICU intervention group), a group with ICU telemedicine support (ICU telemedicine group), and an ICU telemedicine group with added logistic center functions and support for quality-care standardization (logistic center group). The primary outcome was annual direct contribution margin defined as aggregated annual case revenue minus annual case direct costs (including operating costs of ICU telemedicine and its related programs). All monetary values were adjusted to 2015 US dollars using Producer Price Index for Health-Care Facilities. Annual case volume increased from 4,752 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to 5,735 (ICU telemedicine) and 6,581 (logistic center). The annual direct contribution margin improved from $7,921,584 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to $37,668,512 (ICU telemedicine) to $60,586,397 (logistic center) due to increased case volume, higher case revenue relative to direct costs, and shorter length of stay. The ability of properly modified ICU telemedicine programs to increase case volume and access to high-quality critical care with improved annual direct contribution margins suggests that there is a financial argument to encourage the wider adoption of ICU telemedicine. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dose-volume analysis of hypothyroidism in patients irradiated to the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Te, Vuong; Liu, Mitchell C.C.; Parker, William; Curtin-Savard, Arthur J.; Clark, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if the incidence of hypothyroidism in patients who have received radiation therapy to the neck region has any relationship with the total dose to the thyroid and volume of thyroid irradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1988 to 1996, TSH levels were measured at regular intervals of every 3 to 6 months in 528 patients with head and neck cancers or lymphomas (Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin) who had received radiation therapy to the neck region. Hypothyroidism was defined by TSH of ≥ 5 (normal range: 0.5 - 4mU/L). Medical charts, radiotherapy charts, treatment planning films, dosimetry and CT scans/MRI were reviewed. Thyroid volume was determined utilizing treatment planning films and CT scans/MRI. Four hundred and six patients had normal TSH prior to radiation and sufficient information to be eligible for analysis. There were 264 (65%) male and 142 (35%) female, median age was 59 yr (range: 12 - 85). Median follow-up was 39.5 months (range: 1 - 289 months). Results: Out of the 406 eligible patients, 152 (37%) had developed hypothyroidism. The actuarial incidence of hypothyroidism at 1 yr, 3 yr and 5 yr are 9.1%, 29% and 38.5%, respectively. Analysis of volume effect and dose effect are as follows: When the radiation dose to the thyroid and the volume of thyroid irradiated are analyzed together, the group of patients who received ≥ 60Gy to half of thyroid or received ≥ 30Gy to the whole thyroid has increased risk of developing hypothyroidism as compared to those receiving <60Gy to half the thyroid or <30Gy to the whole thyroid (p=.0001). Conclusions: The actuarial incidence of hypothyroidism at 5 year in patients who had received radiation to the neck is 38.5%. Patients who received ≥ 60Gy to half the thyroid or received ≥ 30Gy to the whole thyroid are at higher risk of developing hyperthyroidism

  19. Dose-volume correlation in radiation-related late small-bowel complication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letschert, J.G.J.; Lebesque, J.V.; Boer, R.W. de; hart, A.A.M.; Barteling, H.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the volume of irradiated small bowel on late small-bowel tolerance was studied, taking into account the equivalent total dose ant type of pre-irradiation surgical procedure. A method was developed to estimate small-bowel volumes in the high-bowel volumes were measured for three-field and AP-PA pelvic treatments (165 cm 3 and 400 cm 3 , respectively), extended AP-PA treatment of para-aortic and iliac nodes (1000 cm 3 ). In a retrospective study of 111 patientst irradiated after surgery for rectal or recto-sigmoid cancer to a dose of 45-50 Gy in 5 weeks, extended AP-PA pelvic treatment (n = 27) resulted in a high incidence of severe small-bowel complications (37%), whereas for limited (three-field) pelvic treatment (n = 84) the complication rate was 6%. These complication data together with data from the literature on postoperative radiation-related small-bowel complications were analysed using the maximum likelihood method to fit the data to the logistic form of the dose-response relation, taking the volume effect into account by a power law. The analysis indicated that the incidence of radiation-related small-bowel compllications was higher after rectal surgery than after other types of surgery, which might be explained by the development of more adhesions. For both types of surgery a volume exponent of the power-law of 0.26 ± 0.05 was established. This means that if the small-bowel volume is increased by a factor of 2, the total dose has to be reduced by 17% for the same incidence of small-bowel complications. (author). 45 refs.; 6 figs.; 4 tabs

  20. Chernobyl Doses. Volume 3. Habitat and Vegetation Near the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Hordeum vulgare, Avena sativa, Fagopyrum esculentum, Beta vulgaris, Solanum tuberosum, Linum usitatissimum , Cannabis satii, Humulus lupulus, Daucus carota... USITATISSIMUM flax It is grown for fiber. Fine-quality fiber can be obtained from plants grown on podzolic and gley soils with considerable fertilizing. In the

  1. Optimization of radiation therapy, III: a method of assessing complication probabilities from dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.; Wolbarst, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    To predict the likelihood of success of a therapeutic strategy, one must be able to assess the effects of the treatment upon both diseased and healthy tissues. This paper proposes a method for determining the probability that a healthy organ that receives a non-uniform distribution of X-irradiation, heat, chemotherapy, or other agent will escape complications. Starting with any given dose distribution, a dose-cumulative-volume histogram for the organ is generated. This is then reduced by an interpolation scheme (involving the volume-weighting of complication probabilities) to a slightly different histogram that corresponds to the same overall likelihood of complications, but which contains one less step. The procedure is repeated, one step at a time, until there remains a final, single-step histogram, for which the complication probability can be determined. The formalism makes use of a complication response function C(D, V) which, for the given treatment schedule, represents the probability of complications arising when the fraction V of the organ receives dose D and the rest of the organ gets none. Although the data required to generate this function are sparse at present, it should be possible to obtain the necessary information from in vivo and clinical studies. Volume effects are taken explicitly into account in two ways: the precise shape of the patient's histogram is employed in the calculation, and the complication response function is a function of the volume

  2. SU-F-T-128: Dose-Volume Constraints for Particle Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R; Smith, W; Hendrickson, K; Meyer, J; Cao, N; Lee, E; Gopan, O; Sandison, G; Parvathaneni, U; Laramore, G [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Determine equivalent Organ at Risk (OAR) tolerance dose (TD) constraints for MV x-rays and particle therapy. Methods: Equivalent TD estimates for MV x-rays are determined from an isoeffect, regression-analysis of published and in-house constraints for various fractionation schedules (n fractions). The analysis yields an estimate of (α/β) for an OAR. To determine equivalent particle therapy constraints, the MV x-ray TD(n) values are divided by the RBE for DSB induction (RBE{sub DSB}) or cell survival (RBE{sub S}). Estimates of (RBE{sub DSB}) are computed using the Monte Carlo Damage Simulation, and estimates of RBES are computed using the Repair-Misrepair-Fixation (RMF) model. A research build of the RayStation™ treatment planning system implementing the above model is used to estimate (RBE{sub DSB}) for OARs of interest in 16 proton therapy patient plans (head and neck, thorax, prostate and brain). Results: The analysis gives an (α/β) estimate of about 20 Gy for the trachea and heart and 2–4 Gy for the esophagus, spine, and brachial plexus. Extrapolation of MV x-ray constraints (n = 1) to fast neutrons using RBE{sub DSB} = 2.7 are in excellent agreement with clinical experience (n = 10 to 20). When conventional (n > 30) x-ray treatments are used as the reference radiation, fast neutron RBE increased to a maximum of 6. For comparison to a constant RBE of 1.1, the RayStation™ analysis gave estimates of proton RBE{sub DSB} from 1.03 to 1.33 for OARs of interest. Conclusion: The presented system of models is a convenient formalism to synthesize from multiple sources of information a set of self-consistent plan constraints for MV x-ray and hadron therapy treatments. Estimates of RBE{sub DSB} from the RayStation™ analysis differ substantially from 1.1 and vary among patients and treatment sites. A treatment planning system that incorporates patient and anatomy-specific corrections in proton RBE would create opportunities to increase the therapeutic ratio. The research build of the RayStation used in the study was made available to the University of Washington free of charge. RaySearch Laboratories did not provide any monetary support for the reported studies.

  3. Clinical implementation of dose-volume histogram predictions for organs-at-risk in IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, K L; Appenzoller, L M; Tan, J; Michalski, J M; Thorstad, W L; Mutic, S

    2014-01-01

    True quality control (QC) of the planning process requires quantitative assessments of treatment plan quality itself, and QC in IMRT has been stymied by intra-patient anatomical variability and inherently complex three-dimensional dose distributions. In this work we describe the development of an automated system to reduce clinical IMRT planning variability and improve plan quality using mathematical models that predict achievable OAR DVHs based on individual patient anatomy. These models rely on the correlation of expected dose to the minimum distance from a voxel to the PTV surface, whereby a three-parameter probability distribution function (PDF) was used to model iso-distance OAR subvolume dose distributions. DVH models were obtained by fitting the evolution of the PDF with distance. Initial validation on clinical cohorts of 40 prostate and 24 head-and-neck plans demonstrated highly accurate model-based predictions for achievable DVHs in rectum, bladder, and parotid glands. By quantifying the integrated difference between candidate DVHs and predicted DVHs, the models correctly identified plans with under-spared OARs, validated by replanning all cases and correlating any realized improvements against the predicted gains. Clinical implementation of these predictive models was demonstrated in the PINNACLE treatment planning system by use of existing margin expansion utilities and the scripting functionality inherent to the system. To maintain independence from specific planning software, a system was developed in MATLAB to directly process DICOM-RT data. Both model training and patient-specific analyses were demonstrated with significant computational accelerations from parallelization.

  4. Determinants of Network Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ysa, Tamyko; Sierra, Vicenta; Esteve, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The literature on network management is extensive. However, it generally explores network structures, neglecting the impact of management strategies. In this article we assess the effect of management strategies on network outcomes, providing empirical evidence from 119 urban revitalization...... networks. We go beyond current work by testing a path model for the determinants of network outcomes and considering the interactions between the constructs: management strategies, trust, complexity, and facilitative leadership. Our results suggest that management strategies have a strong effect on network...... outcomes and that they enhance the level of trust. We also found that facilitative leadership has a positive impact on network management as well as on trust in the network. Our findings also show that complexity has a negative impact on trust. A key finding of our research is that managers may wield more...

  5. Education and Occupational Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnes, Geraint; Freguglia, Ricardo; Spricigo, Gisele

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the dynamic relationship between policies related to educational provision and both educational participation and occupational outcomes in Brazil, using PNAD and RAIS-Migra data. Design/methodology/approach: Outcomes are examined using: static...... multinomial logit analysis, and structural dynamic discrete choice modelling. The latter approach, coupled with the quality of the RAIS-Migra data source, allows the authors to evaluate the education policy impacts over time. Findings: The main results show that the education level raises the propensity...... that the individual will be in formal sector work or still in education, and reduces the probability of the other outcomes. Transition into non-manual formal sector work following education may, however, occur via a spell of manual work. Originality/value: This is the first study of occupational destination...

  6. Improving surgical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Walia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes of cataract surgery are worse than we would like them to be. Community-based studies show that up to 40% of eyes have a postoperative presenting vision of < 6/60. Eyes with intraocular lenses (IOLs do better; however, it has been shown that even in prosperous middle-income countries, such as Venezuela, in 20% of pseudophakic eyes presenting vision was < 6/60 and in 15% best corrected vision was worse than 6/60.Poor outcomes matter. Patients deserve improved vision whenever possible and poor outcomes deter prospective patients from coming for surgery and probably reduce their willingness to pay for their treatment – particularly if they have to pay in advance!In this article, we offer some suggestions for improving the quality of cataract surgery. We admit that there is little evidence base for most of these suggestions and that some of them are controversial. However, we hope to stimulate debate.

  7. Outcomes in transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, L A

    1999-07-01

    Outcomes data in medicine can be limited by subjective methodologic issues such as poor selection of end points and use of nonvalidated systems for quality adjustment. Blood transfusion analyses are further complicated by the fact that transfusion seldom is primary therapy but is usually supportive or adjunctive. Thus, much of the outcome data in transfusion medicine are either unavailable or in one of two areas. The first area is prevention of bad sequelae of various cytopenias or factor deficiencies. The second is decreasing adverse effects of transfusion itself. A different useful area for outcome and root cause approaches in individual institutions is examining preanalytical and postanalytical processes of their own. Examples are sample labeling accuracy, quality and timeliness of blood suppliers, internal delivery processes and times, and product wastage. Use review can be changed to real time from retrospective time. By reducing complaints about service to objective data, realistic change can be made in internal and external processes.

  8. Pregnancy outcome following myomectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, N; Anwary, S A; Alfazzaman, M; Sultana, P; Banu, J; Deeba, F; Mahzabin, Z; Nahar, K N

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries, abdominal myomectomy is still a modality of treatment for large and symptomatic uterine fibroid in women who wish to retain their fertility and preserve uterus. In order to assess the outcome of pregnancies after myomectomy, a prospective observational study was carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh, from July 1999 and June 2011. Study included 40 married women of reproductive age, suffering either from primary or secondary subfertility, and who had uterine fibroid and strongly wished to conceive shortly after myomectomy using microsurgical procedure with no existence of other male and female subfertility factor. These women were followed up at 3, 6, 12 and 24 month intervals over telephone and outdoor visits. Data were recorded on preformed questionnaires. Post myomectomy hysterosalpingography was done at about 16 weeks after myomectomy. Patients were advised to try for pregnancy after 16 weeks of operation. Maximum number of women belonged to age group 31-35 years (n=14, 35%); primary subfertility was 67.5% and secondary 32.5%; in maximum number of cases duration of subfertility was 2-5 years (n=22, 55%); type of fibroid were solitary (52.5%) and multiple (47.5%); type of myoma were intramural (75%), submucous (2.5%) and combined (22.5%); location of myoma were fundal (5%), anterior wall (25%), posterior wall (20%) and combined (50%); diameter of removed myoma were 8-10(20%) and >10cm (10%); uterine size before myomectomy were (in weeks) 25 (2.5%). Hysterosalpingography was done in 16(40%) cases, and the findings were both tube patent (62.5%), unilateral tubal block (31.2%) and bilateral tubal block (6.2%). Menorrhagia after myomectomy was present only in 5% cases. After uterine myomectomy, 14(35%) women conceived, common time interval between myomectomy and conception was 1-2 years (42.9%), conception was spontaneous in 71.4%. Out of 14 who

  9. International and Interdisciplinary Identification of Health Care Transition Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Cynthia; Cuttance, Jessica; Sharma, Niraj; Maslow, Gary; Wiener, Lori; Betz, Cecily; Porter, Jerlym; McLaughlin, Suzanne; Gilleland-Marchak, Jordan; Renwick, Amy; Naranjo, Diana; Jan, Sophia; Javalkar, Karina; Ferris, Maria

    2016-03-01

    There is a lack of agreement on what constitutes successful outcomes for the process of health care transition (HCT) among adolescent and young adults with special health care needs. To present HCT outcomes identified by a Delphi process with an interdisciplinary group of participants. A Delphi method involving 3 stages was deployed to refine a list of HCT outcomes. This 18-month study (from January 5, 2013, of stage 1 to July 3, 2014, of stage 3) included an initial literature search, expert interviews, and then 2 waves of a web-based survey. On this survey, 93 participants from outpatient, community-based, and primary care clinics rated the importance of the top HCT outcomes identified by the Delphi process. Analyses were performed from July 5, 2014, to December 5, 2014. Health care transition outcomes of adolescents and young adults with special health care needs. Importance ratings of identified HCT outcomes rated on a Likert scale from 1 (not important) to 9 (very important). The 2 waves of surveys included 117 and 93 participants as the list of outcomes was refined. Transition outcomes were refined by the 3 waves of the Delphi process, with quality of life being the highest-rated outcome with broad agreement. The 10 final outcomes identified included individual outcomes (quality of life, understanding the characteristics of conditions and complications, knowledge of medication, self-management, adherence to medication, and understanding health insurance), health services outcomes (attending medical appointments, having a medical home, and avoidance of unnecessary hospitalization), and a social outcome (having a social network). Participants indicated that different outcomes were likely needed for individuals with cognitive disabilities. Quality of life is an important construct relevant to HCT. Future research should identify valid measures associated with each outcome and further explore the role that quality of life plays in the HCT process. Achieving

  10. [Combined forecasting system of peritonitis outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, N V; Klimov, A E; Agrba, S B; Gaidukevich, E K

    To create a reliable system for assessing of severity and prediction of the outcome of peritonitis. Critical analysis of the systems for peritonitis severity assessment is presented. The study included outcomes of 347 patients who admitted at the Department of Faculty Surgery of Peoples' Friendship University of Russia in 2015-2016. The cause of peritonitis were destructive forms of acute appendicitis, cholecystitis, perforated gastroduodenal ulcer, various perforation of small and large intestines (including tumor). Combined forecasting system for peritonitis severity assessment is created. The system includes clinical, laboratory data, assessment of systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) and severity of organ failure (qSOFA). The authors focused on easily identifiable parameters which are available in virtually any surgical hospital. Threshold value (lethal outcome probability over 50%) is 8 scores in this system. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 93.3, 99.7 and 98.9%, respectively according to ROC-curve that exceeds those parameters of MPI and APACHE II.

  11. Economic Outcomes in Prosthodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassi, Francesco; Carr, Alan B.; Chang, Ting-Ling; Estafanous, Emad W.; Garrett, Neal R.; Happonen, Risto-Pekka; Koka, Sreenivas; Laine, Juhani; Osswald, Martin; Reintsema, Harry; Rieger, Jana; Roumanas, Eleni; Salinas, Thomas J.; Stanford, Clark M.; Wolfaardt, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A systematic literature review was conducted to identify the types of economic measures currently used in implant prosthodontics and determine the degree to which cost of care is considered in the context of any positive outcome of the care provided. Materials and Methods: A literature

  12. Provider volume and outcomes for oncological procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Oncological procedures may have better outcomes if performed by high-volume providers. METHODS: A review of the English language literature incorporating searches of the Medline, Embase and Cochrane collaboration databases was performed. Studies were included if they involved a patient cohort from 1984 onwards, were community or population based, and assessed health outcome as a dependent variable and volume as an independent variable. The studies were also scored quantifiably to assess generalizability with respect to any observed volume-outcome relationship and analysed according to organ system; numbers needed to treat were estimated where possible. RESULTS: Sixty-eight relevant studies were identified and a total of 41 were included, of which 13 were based on clinical data. All showed either an inverse relationship, of variable magnitude, between provider volume and mortality, or no volume-outcome effect. All but two clinical reports revealed a statistically significant positive relationship between volume and outcome; none demonstrated the opposite. CONCLUSION: High-volume providers have a significantly better outcome for complex cancer surgery, specifically for pancreatectomy, oesphagectomy, gastrectomy and rectal resection.

  13. Outcome following kyphoplasty or vertebral body stenting with special regard to associated complications including their treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, C.; Strohm, P.; Knöller, S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Kyphoplasty (KP) and vertebral body stenting (VBS) have been established for treatment of spine fractures in elderly people. There are a lot of studies about the short-term pain reduction in reference to the health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The aim of this study...... patient needed a spinal decompression as a sole treatment and 3 patients additionally needed a spinal decompression. There was a statistically significant difference concerning the HRQoL between patients with or without secondary intervention for the EQ-5d Index and the EQ-5d pain/discomfort survey...... of fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine remains an important problem, because the necessary surgical effort is significant. The HRQoL of patients with KP or VBS is less than that of the age-matched control sample. For patients with a secondary intervention the result is even worse. Type and reason...

  14. Optimizing winter/snow removal operations in MoDOT St. Louis district : includes outcome based evaluation of operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this project was to develop fleet location, route decision, material selection, and treatment procedures for winter snow removal operations to improve MoDOTs services and lower costs. This work uses a systematic, heuristic-based o...

  15. Optimizing outcomes with multifocal intraocular lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitansha Shreyas Sachdev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern day cataract surgery is evolving from a visual restorative to a refractive procedure. The advent of multifocal intraocular lenses (MFIOLs allows greater spectacle independence and increased quality of life postoperatively. Since the inception in 1980s, MFIOLs have undergone various technical advancements including trifocal and extended depth of vision implants more recently. A thorough preoperative workup including the patients' visual needs and inherent ocular anatomy allows us to achieve superior outcomes. This review offers a comprehensive overview of the various types of MFIOLs and principles of optimizing outcomes through a comprehensive preoperative screening and management of postoperative complications.

  16. Predicting unfavourable outcome in herpetic meningoencephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdem, Hakan; Cag, Yasemin; Karaahmetoglu, Gokhan

    BACKGROUND: Herpetic meningoencephalitis is the most frequent form of sporadic fatal encephalitis in the world and accounts for 10- 20% of all viral encephalitides. There were studies assessing the outcomes particularly by comparing the efficacies of antiviral drugs in the past. To the best of our...... knowledge, no datum exists in the literature on the mortality indicators of HME patients with definite microbiological diagnosis. Thus, our study makes use of the largest case series ever reported in the literature to provide data for the predictors of unfavorable outcome in HME cases. METHODS...... outcome in HME. Thus, it appears that both host and therapeutic parameters contribute to success in these cases. Table. Final model including independent predictors of unfavorable outcome 95% CIs OR [1] Low High p Age (years) 1.04 1.02 1.05 0.000 Glasgow coma scale 0.84 0.77 0.93 0.000 Elapsed time [2] >2...

  17. Prenatal Exposure to Organohalogens, Including Brominated Flame Retardants, Influences Motor, Cognitive, and Behavioral Performance at School Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roze, Elise; Meijer, Lisethe; Bakker, Attie; Van Braeckel, Koenraad N. J. A.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Bos, Arend F.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organohalogen compounds (OHCs) are known to have neurotoxic effects on the developing brain. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the influence of prenatal exposure to OHCs, including brominated flame retardants, on motor, cognitive, and behavioral outcome in healthy children of school age.

  18. Psychosocial determinants of outcomes in knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Olivo, Maria A; Landon, Glenn C; Siff, Sherwin J; Edelstein, David; Pak, Chong; Kallen, Michael A; Stanley, Melinda; Zhang, Hong; Robinson, Kausha C; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2011-10-01

    To identify potential psychosocial and educational barriers to clinical success following knee replacement. The authors evaluated 241 patients undergoing total knee replacement, preoperatively and 6 months after surgery. Outcomes included the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) scale and the Knee Society rating system (KSRS). Independent variables included: the medical outcome study-social support scale; depression, anxiety and stress scale; brief COPE inventory; health locus of control; arthritis self-efficacy scale and the life orientation test-revised. Multiple regression models evaluated associations of baseline demographic and psychosocial variables with outcomes at 6 months, controlling for body mass index, comorbidities and baseline outcome scores. Patients' mean age was 65 ± 9 years; 65% were women. Most patients improved outcomes after surgery. Several psychosocial variables were associated with outcomes. Regression analyses indicated lower education, less tangible support, depression, less problem-solving coping, more dysfunctional coping, lower internal locus of control were associated with worse WOMAC scores (R(2) contribution of psychosocial variables for pain 0.07; for function, 0.14). Older age, lower education, depression and less problem-solving coping were associated with poorer total KSRS scores (R(2) contribution of psychosocial variables to total KSRS model 0.09). Psychosocial variables as a set contributed from 25% to 74% of total explained variance across the models tested. Patients' level of education, tangible support, depression, problem-solving coping, dysfunctional coping and internal locus of control were associated with pain and functional outcomes after knee replacement. The findings suggest that, in addition to medical management, perioperative psychosocial evaluation and intervention are crucial in enhancing knee replacement outcomes.

  19. Refractive Surgery: Malpractice Litigation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Benjamin L; Ballard, Steven R; Carroll, Robert B; Barnes, Scott D; Justin, Grant A

    2017-10-01

    To review data on malpractice claims related to refractive surgery to identify common allegations and injuries and financial outcomes. The WestlawNext database was reviewed for all malpractice lawsuits/settlements related to refractive eye surgery. Data evaluated included patient demographics, type of operation performed, plaintiff allegation, nature of injury, and litigation outcomes. A total of 167 cases met the inclusion criteria, of which 108 cases (64.7%) were found to be favorable and 59 cases (35.3%) unfavorable to the defendant. A total of 141 cases were tried by a jury with 108 cases (76.4%) favorable and 33 cases (23.6%) unfavorable to the defendant. Laser in situ keratomileusis was performed in 127 cases (76%). The most common allegations were negligence in treatment or surgery in 127 cases (76%) and lack of informed consent in 83 cases (49.7%). For all cases, the need for future surgery (P = 0.0001) and surgery resulting in keratoconus (P = 0.05) were more likely to favor the plaintiff. In jury verdict decisions, cases in which failure to diagnose a preoperative condition was alleged favored the defendant (P = 0.03), whereas machine malfunction (P = 0.05) favored the plaintiff. After adjustment for inflation, the overall mean award was $1,287,872. Jury verdicts and settlements led to mean awards of $1,604,801 and $826,883, respectively. Malpractice litigation in refractive surgery tends to favor the defendant. However, large awards and settlements were given in cases that were favorable to the plaintiff. The need for future surgery and surgery leading to keratoconus increased the chance of an unfavorable outcome.

  20. Hepatectomy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Bile Duct Tumor Thrombus, Including Cases with Obstructive Jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orimo, Tatsuya; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Yokoo, Hideki; Wakayama, Kenji; Shimada, Shingo; Tsuruga, Yosuke; Kamachi, Hirofumi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the short- and long-term outcomes of hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with bile duct tumor thrombus (BDTT), including cases with obstructive jaundice. The study reviewed 42 HCC patients with BDTT, including six patients who needed preoperative biliary drainage due to obstructive jaundice, and 732 HCC patients without BDTT. The authors analyzed the impact of BDTT on the surgical outcomes and assessed the outcomes of hepatectomy for patients presenting with obstructive jaundice. The HCC patients with BDTT, almost all with stage 3 or 4 disease, had increased alpha-fetoprotein expression, larger tumors, and more portal vein invasion status. The survival of the HCC patients with BDTT was significantly inferior to that of the patients without BDTT (p = 0.0003). Survival did not differ significantly between the HCC patients with BDTT and those without BDTT when the two groups were matched by stage (p = 0.3366). The HCC patients with BDTT who presented with obstructive jaundice demonstrated outcomes similar to those for the HCC patients with BDTT who did not present with obstructive jaundice in terms of the overall survival rate (p = 0.5469). The perioperative outcomes for the HCC patients with BDTT did not depend on the presence or absence of preoperative jaundice. No patients in either BDTT group demonstrated 90-day mortality in this study. Hepatectomy should be considered for HCC patients with BDTT, even for patients with obstructive jaundice, because the surgical outcomes equivalent to those for HCC without BDTT can be achieved.

  1. Consequences of Parenting on Adolescent Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Hancock Hoskins

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, substantial gains have been made in our understanding of the influence of parenting behaviors and styles on adolescent emotional and behavioral outcomes. Empirical work focusing on the associations between parenting and adolescent outcomes is important because the influence of parenting during adolescence continues to affect behaviors into adulthood. Additionally, there has been considerable attention paid to the mechanisms that shape parenting that then influence adolescent outcomes. For instance, researchers have found that neighborhood conditions moderated the association between parenting and adolescent development. In this paper, several covariates and contextual effects associated with parenting and adolescent outcomes will be discussed. Also, parental behaviors, parental styles and adolescent outcomes are discussed in this literature review. This review provides an assessment of the literature on parenting and adolescent outcomes from the past decade and includes advancements in parenting research. The review concludes with a summary of major research findings, as well as a consideration of future directions and implications for practice and policy.

  2. Early neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Elizabeth E; Hintz, Susan R

    2016-12-01

    Infants born at extreme preterm gestation are at risk for both death and disability. Although rates of survival have improved for this population, and some evidence suggests a trend toward decreased neuromotor impairment over the past decades, a significant improvement in overall early neurodevelopmental outcome has not yet been realized. This review will examine the rates and types of neurodevelopmental impairment seen after extremely preterm birth, including neurosensory, motor, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes. We focus on early outcomes in the first 18-36 months of life, as the majority of large neonatal studies examining neurodevelopmental outcomes stop at this age. However, this early age is clearly just a first glimpse into lifetime outcomes; the neurodevelopmental effects of extreme prematurity may last through school age, adolescence, and beyond. Importantly, prematurity appears to be an independent risk factor for adverse development, but this population demonstrates considerable variability in the types and severity of impairments. Understanding both the nature and prevalence of neurodevelopmental impairment among extremely preterm infants is important because it can lead to targeted interventions that in turn may lead to improved outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Early Motherhood and Subsequent Life Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Joseph M.; Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John

    2008-01-01

    Background: Early motherhood has been linked with a number of adverse outcomes, including mental health difficulties and barriers to completing educational qualifications and workforce participation. The present study examined the extent to which these linkages could be explained by the influence of social, family, and background factors that were…

  4. Assessing Higher Education Learning Outcomes in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Renato H. L.; Amaral, Eliana; Knobel, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Brazil has developed an encompassing system for quality assessment of higher education, the National System of Higher Education Evaluation (SINAES), which includes a test for assessing learning outcomes at the undergraduate level, the National Exam of Student Performance (ENADE). The present system has been running since 2004, and also serves as…

  5. Perinatal Outcomes after Assisted Reproductive Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setenay Arzu Yilmaz

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize perinatal outcomes and the congenital anomaly risk of IVF pregnancies and also examine the risks of different technologies including ICSI, blastocyst culture, and cryopreservation on this topic. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 575-586

  6. Dispositional affectivity and work outcomes of expatriates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    affectivity appears to be a promising construct to explain and predict many attitudinal and behavioral outcomes in the workplace, few studies have empirically investigated dispositional affectivity and the work of expatriates. Hence, data from a net-based survey including 350 expatriates in Denmark were used...

  7. Family Structure and Children's Psychosocial Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zheng; Hou, Feng; Schimmele, Christoph M.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the influence of family structure on children's short-term psychosocial behavioral outcomes, including emotional disorder, conduct disorder, and prosocial behavior. The analysis uses five waves of data (1994-2003) from Canada's National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to model how living in a cohabitational…

  8. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Children with Periventricular Leukomalacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Imamura

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Most children with grade 2 or 3 PVL had severe neurodevelopmental delays, but attention should also be paid to the 56% of children with grade 1 PVL who presented with normal psychomotor development. Further studies of larger populations, including long-term follow-up, are necessary to evaluate the outcomes of children with PVL.

  9. Hematological outcome in neonatal alloimmune hemolytic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rath, Mirjam Eva Aafke

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on several aspects related to the hematological outcome of infants with hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to red blood cell alloimmunization, including pathogenesis and management of the disease. The presence of leukocytopenie and thrombocytopenia support the

  10. Outcomes After Diagnostic Hip Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, T Sean; Steinhaus, Michael E; Popkin, Charles A; Ahmad, Christopher S; Rosneck, James

    2016-08-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of outcomes associated with local anesthetic (LA) or LA and corticosteroid (CS) diagnostic hip injections, and how well response predicts subsequent operative success. A systematic review from database (PubMed, Medline, Scopus, Embase) inception to January 2015 for English-language articles reporting primary patient outcomes data was performed, excluding studies with >50% underlying osteoarthritis. Studies were assessed by 2 reviewers who collected pertinent data. Seven studies were included, reporting on a total 337 patients undergoing diagnostic hip injection. The mean age was 34.4 years, with 5 studies reporting 94 (35.2%) males and 173 (64.8%) females. One study examined the rate of pain relief with LA (92.5%); 2 CS studies reported relief on a scale from 0% to 100% (no to complete relief), ranging from 61% to 82.3%; and 3 studies used 10-point pain scales, with a CS study noting a pain score of 1.0, an LA study with a score of 3.03, and 1 study using either CS or LA scores of 3 to 5.6. Duration of pain relief was 9.8 (CS) and 2.35 days (LA). By pathology, greatest relief was achieved in acetabular chondral injury (93.3%) and least in cam impingement (81.6%), with clinical and imaging findings being unreliable predictors of relief. One study showed nonresponse to be a strong predictor of negative surgical outcome for femoroacetabular impingement. Diagnostic hip injections provide substantial pain relief for patients with various hip pathologies, with limited data to suggest greatest relief for those with chondral injury. Clinical and imaging findings are unreliable predictors of injection response, and nonresponse to injection is a strong negative predictor of surgical outcome. Future research should focus on elucidating differences by underlying pathology and predicting future operative success. Level IV, systematic review. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. Early Adolescent Affect Predicts Later Life Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansky, Jessica; Allen, Joseph P; Diener, Ed

    2016-07-01

    Subjective well-being as a predictor for later behavior and health has highlighted its relationship to health, work performance, and social relationships. However, the majority of such studies neglect the developmental nature of well-being in contributing to important changes across the transition to adulthood. To examine the potential role of subjective well-being as a long-term predictor of critical life outcomes, we examined indicators of positive and negative affect at age 14 as predictors of relationship, adjustment, self-worth, and career outcomes a decade later at ages 23 to 25, controlling for family income and gender. We utilised multi-informant methods including reports from the target participant, close friends, and romantic partners in a demographically diverse community sample of 184 participants. Early adolescent positive affect predicted fewer relationship problems (less self-reported and partner-reported conflict, and greater friendship attachment as rated by close peers) and healthy adjustment to adulthood (lower levels of depression, anxiety, and loneliness). It also predicted positive work functioning (higher levels of career satisfaction and job competence) and increased self-worth. Negative affect did not significantly predict any of these important life outcomes. In addition to predicting desirable mean levels of later outcomes, early positive affect predicted beneficial changes across time in many outcomes. The findings extend early research on the beneficial outcomes of subjective well-being by having an earlier assessment of well-being, including informant reports in measuring a large variety of outcome variables, and by extending the findings to a lower socioeconomic group of a diverse and younger sample. The results highlight the importance of considering positive affect as an important component of subjective well-being distinct from negative affect. © 2016 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  12. Predicting sports betting outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Flis, Borut

    2014-01-01

    We wish to build a model, which could predict the outcome of basketball games. The goal was to achieve an sufficient enough accuracy to make a profit in sports betting. One learning example is a game in the NBA regular season. Every example has multiple features, which describe the opposing teams. We tried many methods, which return the probability of the home team winning and the probability of the away team winning. These probabilities are used for risk analysis. We used the best model in h...

  13. Explaining governance outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fawcett, Paul; Daugbjerg, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    network analysis school, which has focused on the relationship between processes of interest intermediation and their impact on policy-making outcomes.We examine how each school is underpinned by important epistemological differences between positivist, interpretivist and critical realist approaches.......We argue that these differences complicate and make contestable what would otherwise seem to be an intuitively attractive argument in favour of combining these two schools. In seeking to understand better how these two schools might be combined, we adopt a critical realist approach and make a distinction...

  14. Real-world outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    -down model of feeding back research findings to subjects” (Roberts and Sarangi 2003, 340) although, arguably, making results applicable to a real-world context ought to be an essential goal of researcher-practitioner studies. This issue forms the background of the presentation, in which it will be discussed...... how the dissemination of research findings may take place to ensure the creation of real-world outcomes for practitioners (cf. e.g. Nørreklit et al. 1987; Puchta & Potter 2004). The presentation will be centered around the interview study of the discursive constructions of culture in a Danish cross...

  15. Evaluating stakeholder participation in water management: intermediary outcomes as potential indicators for future resource management outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Gemma; Bloeschl, Guenter; Loucks, Daniel Pete

    2013-04-01

    Evaluation of participation programmes, projects and activities is essential to identify whether stakeholder involvement has been successful in achieving its aims. Aims may include an improvement in water resource management such as enhanced ecological functioning, an improvement in human wellbeing and economic conditions, or overcoming a conflict between interest groups. Evaluating against "interest-based" resource management criteria requires that a desirable outcome can be identified, agreed upon and be measured at the time of evaluation. In many water management situations where collaborative approaches are applied, multiple interests and objectives are present, or stakeholders have not yet identified their own positions and priorities. Even if a resource management objective has been identified and strategy agreed upon, resource management changes tend to emerge over longer timescales and evaluation frequently takes place before they can be recognised. Evaluating against resource management criteria may lead evaluators to conclude that a programme has failed because it has not achieved a resource management objective at the time of evaluation. This presents a critical challenge to researchers assessing the effectiveness of stakeholder participation programmes. One strategy to overcome this is to conduct "goal-free" evaluation to identify what the programme is actually achieving. An evaluation framework that includes intermediary outcomes that are both tangible achievements such as innovation, creation of new organisations, and shared information and knowledge, as well as intangible achievements such as trust and network development can be applied to more broadly assess a programme's success. Analysis of case-studies in the published literature for which a resource management outcome has been achieved shows that intermediary outcomes frequently precede resource management outcomes. They seem to emerge over shorter timescales than resource management outcomes

  16. SBRT of lung tumours: Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE of dose distributions including respiratory motion and comparison with different treatment planning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Wennberg, Berit; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Amor Duch, Maria; Ginjaume, Mercè; Lax, Ingmar

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to simulate with the Monte Carlo (MC) code PENELOPE the dose distribution in lung tumours including breathing motion in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Two phantoms were modelled to simulate a pentagonal cross section with chestwall (unit density), lung (density 0.3 g cm-3) and two spherical tumours (unit density) of diameters respectively of 2 cm and 5 cm. The phase-space files (PSF) of four different SBRT field sizes of 6 MV from a Varian accelerator were calculated and used as beam sources to obtain both dose profiles and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in different volumes of interest. Dose distributions were simulated for five beams impinging on the phantom. The simulations were conducted both for the static case and including the influence of respiratory motion. To reproduce the effect of breathing motion different simulations were performed keeping the beam fixed and displacing the phantom geometry in chosen positions in the cranial and caudal and left-right directions. The final result was obtained by combining the different position with two motion patterns. The MC results were compared with those obtained with three commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs), two based on the pencil beam (PB) algorithm, the TMS-HELAX (Nucletron, Sweden) and Eclipse (Varian Medical System, Palo Alto, CA), and one based on the collapsed cone algorithm (CC), Pinnacle3 (Philips). Some calculations were also carried out with the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) in the Eclipse system. All calculations with the TPSs were performed without simulated breathing motion, according to clinical practice. In order to compare all the TPSs and MC an absolute dose calibration in Gy/MU was performed. The analysis shows that the dose (Gy/MU) in the central part of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is calculated for both tumour sizes with an accuracy of 2-3% with PB and CC algorithms, compared to MC. At the periphery of the GTV the TPSs overestimate

  17. Allograft Pancreatectomy: Indications and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, S; Powelson, J A; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Mangus, R S; Fridell, J A

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the indications, surgical techniques, and outcomes of allograft pancreatectomy based on a single center experience. Between 2003 and 2013, 47 patients developed pancreas allograft failure, excluding mortality with a functioning pancreas allograft. Early graft loss (within 14 days) occurred in 16, and late graft loss in 31. All patients with early graft loss eventually required allograft pancreatectomy. Nineteen of 31 patients (61%) with late graft loss underwent allograft pancreatectomy. The main indication for early allograft pancreatectomy included vascular thrombosis with or without severe pancreatitis, whereas one recipient required urgent allograft pancreatectomy for gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to an arterioenteric fistula. In cases of late allograft pancreatectomy, graft failure with clinical symptoms such as abdominal discomfort, pain, and nausea were the main indications (13/19 [68%]), simultaneous retransplantation without clinical symptoms in 3 (16%), and vascular catastrophes including pseudoaneurysm and enteric arterial fistula in 3 (16%). Postoperative morbidity included one case each of pulmonary embolism leading to mortality, formation of pseudoaneurysm requiring placement of covered stent, and postoperative bleeding requiring relaparotomy eventually leading to femoro-femoral bypass surgery 2 years after allograftectomy. Allograft pancreatectomy can be performed safely, does not preclude subsequent retransplantation, and may be lifesaving in certain instances. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  18. Unfavourable outcomes in orthognathic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy Bonanthaya; P Anantanarayanan

    2013-01-01

    Unfavourable outcomes are part and parcel of performing surgeries of any kind. Unfavourable outcomes are results of such work, which the patient and or the clinician does not like. This is an attempt to review various causes for unfavorable outcomes in orthognathic surgery and discuss them in detail. All causes for unfavorable outcomes may be classified as belonging to one of the following periods A) Pre- Treatment B) During treatment Pre-Treatment: In orthognathic surgery- as in any other di...

  19. Predicting outcome after appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    AIM: To validate an intraoperative appendicitis severity score (IASS) and examine outcome following emergency appendectomy. METHODS: A prospective study was undertaken, enrolling consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Data were obtained independently on preoperative Alvarado scores, IASS (0-3: 0 no inflammation, 1 engorged appendix\\/no peritonitis, 2 peritoneal reaction\\/exudate or 3 evidence of perforation\\/abscess) and postoperative outcome parameters. RESULTS: There were 149 patients identified with a mean age of 20.7 years. There was no association between Alvarado score and length of hospital stay, septic complication, patient sex or duration of symptoms (p>0.05). IASS was found to be an independent risk factor for septic complication, wound infection (p<0.05) and length of hospital stay (p<0.001). There was no correlation between preoperative duration of symptoms or time until surgery and intraoperative score. CONCLUSIONS: This simple scoring system can identify patients more likely to suffer morbidity following emergency appendicectomy. Specifically, this system identifies patients who have a high risk of sepsis and therefore could be of use when comparing healthcare performance.

  20. Outcome Controllability and Counterfactual Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roese, Neal J.; Olson, James M.

    1995-01-01

    Examined impact of outcome controllability on counterfactual thoughts (thoughts of what could have been). Two studies showed that outcome controllability affected counterfactual direction: thoughts on how things could have been better were more frequent following controllable outcomes, and thoughts on how things could have been worse followed…

  1. Outcome of Minnesota's gambling treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchfield, R; Winters, K C

    2001-01-01

    This study measured the outcome of four state-supported outpatient gambling treatment programs in Minnesota. The programs were developed specifically for the treatment of pathological gamblers and offered multiple modalities of treatment including individual, group, education, twelve-step work, family groups, and financial counseling. The therapeutic orientation was eclectic with an emphasis on the twelve steps of Gamblers Anonymous (GA) and a treatment goal of abstinence. The sample included 348 men and 220 women treated between January 1992 and January 1995. A pretest-posttest design was utilized with multidimensional assessments obtained at intake, discharge, six-months, and twelve-months post-discharge. Variables assessed included a range of clinical and outcome variables. At six month follow-up, 28% reported that they had abstained from gambling during the six months following discharge and an additional 20% had gambled less than once per month. Almost half of the sample (48%) showed clinically significant improvement in gambling frequency at six month follow-up. Outcome variables of gambling frequency, SOGS scores, amount of money gambled, number of friends who gamble, psychosocial problems, and number of financial problems, all showed statistically significant improvements from pretreatment to follow-up. The treatment programs yielded outcome results similar to those reported for alcohol and drug abuse treatment programs.

  2. Assessing outcomes of tinnitus intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Craig W; Sandridge, Sharon A; Jacobson, Gary P

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that as many as 50 million Americans do experience or have experienced tinnitus. For approximately 12 million of these individuals, tinnitus makes it impossible for them to carry out normal everyday activities without limitation. These are the patients that present to audiology clinics for assessment and management. The tinnitus evaluation includes the measurement of acoustical characteristics of tinnitus and the impact that this impairment has on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Tinnitus is a disorder that often occurs as a result of auditory system impairment. The impairment for some can impart an activity limitation and a participation restriction (i.e., tinnitus-related disability or handicap, respectively). The goal of tinnitus management is to reduce, or eliminate, activity limitations and participation restrictions by reducing or eliminating a patient's perception of tinnitus or their reaction to tinnitus. Implicit in this statement is the assumption that there exist standardized measures for quantifying the patient's tinnitus perception and their reaction to it. If there existed stable and responsive standardized tinnitus measures, then it would be possible to compare a patient's tinnitus experience at different time points (e.g., before and after treatment) to assess, for example, treatment efficacy. The purposes of the current review are to (1) describe psychometric standards used to select outcome measurement tools; (2) discuss available measurement techniques and their application to tinnitus evaluation and treatment-related assessment within the domains established by the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health; (3) list and briefly describe self-report tinnitus questionnaires; (4) describe how valuation of tinnitus treatment can be assessed using economic models of treatment effectiveness; and (5) provide future directions including the development of a tinnitus

  3. Educational Outcomes After Serving with Electronic Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    are based on a comprehensive longitudinal dataset (n = 1013) constructed from multiple official administrative registers and including a high number of covariates. Results The EM-program increases the completion rates of upper secondary education by 18 % points among program participants 3 years post......Objectives The paper explores the effects of electronic monitoring (EM) on young offenders’ educational outcomes and contributes to the evaluation of EM as a non-custodial sanction with a new outcome measure. Methods The study is based on a natural experiment exploiting a reform in Denmark in 2006...... introducing electronic monitoring to all offenders under the age of 25 with a maximum prison sentence of 3 months. Information on program participation is used to estimate instrument variable models in order to assess the causal effects of EM on young offenders’ educational outcomes. The empirical analyses...

  4. Establishing Core Outcome Domains in Hemodialysis: Report of the Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Hemodialysis (SONG-HD) Consensus Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Allison; Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Wheeler, David C; Evangelidis, Nicole; Tugwell, Peter; Crowe, Sally; Van Biesen, Wim; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; O'Donoghue, Donal; Tam-Tham, Helen; Shen, Jenny I; Pinter, Jule; Larkins, Nicholas; Youssouf, Sajeda; Mandayam, Sreedhar; Ju, Angela; Craig, Jonathan C

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-informed decision making in clinical care and policy in nephrology is undermined by trials that selectively report a large number of heterogeneous outcomes, many of which are not patient centered. The Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Hemodialysis (SONG-HD) Initiative convened an international consensus workshop on November 7, 2015, to discuss the identification and implementation of a potential core outcome set for all trials in hemodialysis. The purpose of this article is to report qualitative analyses of the workshop discussions, describing the key aspects to consider when establishing core outcomes in trials involving patients on hemodialysis therapy. Key stakeholders including 8 patients/caregivers and 47 health professionals (nephrologists, policymakers, industry, and researchers) attended the workshop. Attendees suggested that identifying core outcomes required equitable stakeholder engagement to ensure relevance across patient populations, flexibility to consider evolving priorities over time, deconstruction of language and meaning for conceptual consistency and clarity, understanding of potential overlap and associations between outcomes, and an assessment of applicability to the range of interventions in hemodialysis. For implementation, they proposed that core outcomes must have simple, inexpensive, and validated outcome measures that could be used in clinical care (quality indicators) and trials (including pragmatic trials) and endorsement by regulatory agencies. Integrating these recommendations may foster acceptance and optimize the uptake and translation of core outcomes in hemodialysis, leading to more informative research, for better treatment and improved patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Establishing Core Outcome Domains in Hemodialysis: Report of the Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology−Hemodialysis (SONG-HD) Consensus Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Allison; Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Wheeler, David C.; Evangelidis, Nicole; Tugwell, Peter; Crowe, Sally; Van Biesen, Wim; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; O’Donoghue, Donal; Tam-Tham, Helen; Shen, Jenny; Pinter, Jule; Larkins, Nicholas; Youssouf, Sajeda; Mandayam, Sreedhar; Ju, Angela; Craig, Jonathan C.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-informed decision-making in clinical care and policy in nephrology is undermined by trials that selectively report a large number of heterogeneous outcomes, many of which are not patient-centered. The Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology−Hemodialysis (SONG-HD) Initiative convened an international consensus workshop on November 7, 2015, to discuss the identification and implementation of a potential core outcome set for all trials in hemodialysis. The purpose of this article is to report qualitative analyses of the workshop discussions, describing the key aspects to consider when establishing core outcomes in trials involving patients on hemodialysis. Key stakeholders including eight patients/caregivers and 47 health professionals (nephrologists, policy makers, industry, researchers) attended the workshop. Attendees suggested that identifying core outcomes required equitable stakeholder engagement to ensure relevance across patient populations; flexibility to consider evolving priorities over time; deconstruction of language and meaning for conceptual consistency and clarity; understanding of potential overlap and associations between outcomes; and an assessment of applicability to the range of interventions in hemodialysis. For implementation, they proposed that core outcomes must have simple, inexpensive and validated outcome measures that could be used in clinical care (quality ndicators) and trials (including pragmatic trials), and endorsement by regulatory agencies. Integrating these recommendations may foster acceptance and optimize the uptake and translation of core outcomes in hemodialysis, leading to more informative research, for better treatment, and improved patient outcomes. PMID:27497527

  6. Outcomes management: incorporating and sustaining processes critical to using outcome data to guide practice improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Kay; Wotring, James R

    2012-04-01

    An outcomes management system (OMS) greatly facilitates an organization or state achieving requirements regarding accountability and use of empirically based interventions. A case example of the authors' experience with a successful and enduring OMS is presented, followed by a review of the literature and a proposed model delineating the key components and benefits of an OMS. Building capacity to measure performance requires embedding utilization of youth-specific, clinically meaningful outcome data into the organization's processes and structures. An OMS measures outcomes associated with services, facilitates implementation of evidence-based practices, informs case decision making, enables better and more efficient clinical management, and provides aggregated information used to improve services. A case-specific supervisory model based on instantaneously available information, including progress to date, helps maximize consumer outcomes. Continuous quality improvement activities, which are databased and goal-oriented, become a positive change management tool. This paper describes organizational processes that facilitate the development of a highly functional OMS.

  7. Farmacoeconomia e outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermanno Attanasio

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical products are relevant for their contribution to the medicine progress and in health peoples improvement, altough this evidence goes back to the forthy years with the reduction in mortality, morbidity and hospitalisation rates. The ambivalence of drugs, both remedy and poison, needs a careful assessment of risks and benefits. Primitive estimates of health treatments evaluation occurred in the human history but the modern concept of evaluation in health care derived from cost-benefit analysis (welfare economics and technology assessment. Then a new discipline, pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research, developed with the contribution of health economics, clinical medicine, pharmacology, statistics and epidemiology. Pharmaceutical products are also relevant because of their responsability of health expenditure growth. From 1992, in Italy, several legislative actions were made to face up the pharmaceutical expenditure. The most important one (L. 537/1993 achieved the maximum decrease of 16,8%, in 1994, and modified radically the pharmaceutical policy. Nevertheless, in the following six years the pharmaceutical expenditure grew more than 93%. New actions were made fixing the pharmaceutical expenditure to 13% of health expenditure, any excess being charged to Regions. In the new version for the current year, the excesses will be paid-back by pharmaceutical companies (60% and Regions (40%. Furtherly, the creation of Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco increases the relevance of cost-effectiveness analyses for drugs reimbursement. However, pharmacoeconomic evaluations have still many methodological problems. Economic variables should be treated in the same manner of biomedical or epidemiological data, that is, by confidence intervals and sample sizes. There would be an “economic significance” besides to clinical and statistical ones. In this way, pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research would be able to add rationality to health care

  8. International collaboration including patients is essential to develop new therapies for patients with myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Ingrid E; Vencovsky, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    To discuss the needs for international collaborations between investigators in different disciplines working with myositis and with patients with myositis. Recent advances in detection of several myositis-specific autoantibodies that are associated with distinct clinical phenotypes, will enable studies in new well defined clinically homogenous subgroups of myositis This is likely to lead to development of new information on molecular pathogenesis that might be different in different myositis subgroups. Subgrouping patients according to autoantibody profile may also be important to assess outcome, to identify prognostic biomarkers and in clinical trials. As these are rare disorders international collaboration is essential to enrol large enough cohorts of the subgroups. To facilitate such collaboration we have developed a web-based international myositis register, www.euromyositis.eu, which includes validated outcome measures and patient reported outcome measures. This register is to support research but also to support decision-making in the clinic. We welcome investigators to join the Euromyositis register. Myositis is a heterogeneous disorder with varying treatment response and outcome. There is a high unmet need for new therapies which can only be achieved by increased knowledge on molecular disease mechanisms. Subgrouping patients according to autoantibody profile may be a new way forward to get a better understanding on disease mechanisms and to develop novel therapies.

  9. Clinical outcomes research in gynecologic oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Alexander; Rauh-Hain, J Alejandro; Schorge, John O

    2017-09-01

    Clinical outcomes research seeks to understand the real-world manifestations of clinical care. In particular, outcomes research seeks to reveal the effects of pharmaceutical, procedural, and structural aspects of healthcare on patient outcomes, including mortality, disease control, toxicity, cost, and quality of life. Although outcomes research can utilize interventional study designs, insightful use of observational data is a defining feature of this field. Many questions in gynecologic oncology are not amenable to investigation in randomized clinical trials due to cost, feasibility, or ethical concerns. When a randomized trial is not practical or has not yet been conducted, well-designed observational studies have the potential to provide the best available evidence about the effects of clinical care. Such studies may use surveys, medical records, disease registries, and a variety of administrative data sources. Even when a randomized trial has been conducted, observational studies can be used to estimate the real-world effect of an intervention, which may differ from the results obtained in the controlled setting of a clinical trial. This article reviews the goals, methodologies, data sources, and limitations of clinical outcomes research, with a focus on gynecologic oncology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Nurse working conditions and patient safety outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patricia W; Mooney-Kane, Cathy; Larson, Elaine L; Horan, Teresa; Glance, Laurent G; Zwanziger, Jack; Dick, Andrew W

    2007-06-01

    System approaches, such as improving working conditions, have been advocated to improve patient safety. However, the independent effect of many working condition variables on patient outcomes is unknown. To examine effects of a comprehensive set of working conditions on elderly patient safety outcomes in intensive care units. Observational study, with patient outcome data collected using the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system protocols and Medicare files. Several measures of health status and fixed setting characteristics were used to capture distinct dimensions of patient severity of illness and risk for disease. Working condition variables included organizational climate measured by nurse survey; objective measures of staffing, overtime, and wages (derived from payroll data); and hospital profitability and magnet accreditation. The sample comprised 15,846 patients in 51 adult intensive care units in 31 hospitals depending on the outcome analyzed; 1095 nurses were surveyed. Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLBSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, 30-day mortality, and decubiti. Units with higher staffing had lower incidence of CLBSI, ventilator-associated pneumonia, 30-day mortality, and decubiti (P working conditions were associated with all outcomes measured. Improving working conditions will most likely promote patient safety. Future researchers and policymakers should consider a broad set of working condition variables.

  11. Workload and surgeon's specialty for outcome after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archampong, David; Borowski, David; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    A large body of research has focused on investigating the effects of healthcare provider volume and specialization on patient outcomes including outcomes of colorectal cancer surgery. However there is conflicting evidence about the role of such healthcare provider characteristics in the management...

  12. Culturally Sensitive and Environment-Friendly Outcome Measures in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    to review research studies on outcome measures that were developed for ... A systematic review of evidence on culturally sensitive and environment- ... Various databases including Google Scholar, PEDro and PubMed were accessed to search for relevant empirical ... utilization of disease-specific, patient-centered outcome.

  13. Workload and surgeon's specialty for outcome after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archampong, David; Borowski, David; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    A large body of research has focused on investigating the effects of healthcare provider volume and specialization on patient outcomes including outcomes of colorectal cancer surgery. However there is conflicting evidence about the role of such healthcare provider characteristics in the management...... of colorectal cancer....

  14. Environmental Outcomes in the South African Learnership System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since 1994, the published environmental goals and objectives of the South African Government include environmental education outcomes in all education and ... of manifest and latent environmental outcomes distributed across learnerships and SETAs; a strong influence of occupational health and safety legislation; and a ...

  15. Universal Preschool Programs and Long-Term Child Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrichson, Jens; Kristiansen, Ida Lykke; Viinholt Nielsen, Bjørn Christian

    2018-01-01

    This systematic review included 25 studies using natural experiments to estimate the effects of universal preschool programs for children aged 0-6 years on child outcomes measured from third grade to adulthood. Studies comparing preschool with parental, family, or other informal modes of care...... alternative types of universal preschool programs in terms of long-term outcomes....

  16. Health outcome after major trauma: what are we measuring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Karen; Cole, Elaine; Playford, E Diane; Grill, Eva; Soberg, Helene L; Brohi, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Trauma is a global disease and is among the leading causes of disability in the world. The importance of outcome beyond trauma survival has been recognised over the last decade. Despite this there is no internationally agreed approach for assessment of health outcome and rehabilitation of trauma patients. To systematically examine to what extent outcomes measures evaluate health outcomes in patients with major trauma. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL (from 2006-2012) were searched for studies evaluating health outcome after traumatic injuries. Studies of adult patients with injuries involving at least two body areas or organ systems were included. Information on study design, outcome measures used, sample size and outcomes were extracted. The World Health Organisation International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) were used to evaluate to what extent outcome measures captured health impacts. 34 studies from 755 studies were included in the review. 38 outcome measures were identified. 21 outcome measures were used only once and only five were used in three or more studies. Only 6% of all possible health impacts were captured. Concepts related to activity and participation were the most represented but still only captured 12% of all possible concepts in this domain. Measures performed very poorly in capturing concepts related to body function (5%), functional activities (11%) and environmental factors (2%). Outcome measures used in major trauma capture only a small proportion of health impacts. There is no inclusive classification for measuring disability or health outcome following trauma. The ICF may provide a useful framework for the development of a comprehensive health outcome measure for trauma care.

  17. Health outcome after major trauma: what are we measuring?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Hoffman

    Full Text Available Trauma is a global disease and is among the leading causes of disability in the world. The importance of outcome beyond trauma survival has been recognised over the last decade. Despite this there is no internationally agreed approach for assessment of health outcome and rehabilitation of trauma patients.To systematically examine to what extent outcomes measures evaluate health outcomes in patients with major trauma.MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL (from 2006-2012 were searched for studies evaluating health outcome after traumatic injuries.Studies of adult patients with injuries involving at least two body areas or organ systems were included. Information on study design, outcome measures used, sample size and outcomes were extracted. The World Health Organisation International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF were used to evaluate to what extent outcome measures captured health impacts.34 studies from 755 studies were included in the review. 38 outcome measures were identified. 21 outcome measures were used only once and only five were used in three or more studies. Only 6% of all possible health impacts were captured. Concepts related to activity and participation were the most represented but still only captured 12% of all possible concepts in this domain. Measures performed very poorly in capturing concepts related to body function (5%, functional activities (11% and environmental factors (2%.Outcome measures used in major trauma capture only a small proportion of health impacts. There is no inclusive classification for measuring disability or health outcome following trauma. The ICF may provide a useful framework for the development of a comprehensive health outcome measure for trauma care.

  18. [Chorionicity and adverse perinatal outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Isabel; Laureano, Carla; Branco, Miguel; Nordeste, Ana; Fonseca, Margarida; Pinheiro, Adelaide; Silva, Maria Isabel; Almeida, Maria Céu

    2005-01-01

    Considering the highest rate of morbidity and mortality in diamniotic monochorionic twins, the authors evaluated and compared the adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome in twin pregnancies according to chorionicity. A retrospective study was conducted in all twin deliveries that occurred in the Obstetric Unit of Maternidade Bissaya-Barreto, for a period of tree years (from the 1st of January 1999 until the 31st of December 2001). From de 140 diamniotic twin pregnancies studied, we considered two groups according to the chorionicity: monochorionic and dichorionic. We compared multiple parameters as, epidemiologic data, adverse obstetric outcome, gestacional delivery age, type of delivery and the morbidity, the mortality and the follow-up of the newborn. The statistic tests used were the X2 and the t student. From the 140 twin pregnancies included in the study, 66% (92 cases) presented dichorionic placentation and 34% (48 cases) were monochorionic. In the group of monochorionic pregnancies, we observed highly difference related to pathology of amniotic fluid (14.5% vs 2.2%), discordant fetal growth (41.6% vs 22.8%) and rate of preterm delivery (66.6% vs 32.6%). Related to the newborn we verified that they had a lower average birth weight (1988g vs 2295g), a highly rate of weight discordancy (23% vs 15.3%), intraventricular haemorrhage (2.2% vs 0%) and IUGR (6.6% vs 1.6%), statistically significant in the monochorionic group. Also the perinatal mortality rate was significantly higher in the monochorionic pregnancies (93.7 per thousand vs 21.7 per thousand). The high rate of morbidity and mortality related to the monochorionic twin pregnancies, implies the need of a correct identification of the type of chorionicity and also a high standard of prenatal surveillance in prenatal specialised health centers.

  19. FOETOMATERNAL OUTCOME OF OBSTETRIC CHOLESTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Mishra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Obstetric cholestasis is a disorder of liver function commonly occurring in the third trimester of pregnancy. Clinical characters of this disorder include unexplained maternal pruritus, most common site being palms and soles, altered liver functions (elevated serum transaminases and increased fasting serum bile acids (>10 micro mol/L in previously healthy pregnant women. The incidence is variable geographically from 0.1% to 15.6% all over the world. The aetiology of this condition is not fully understood. Its pathogenesis is related to increased sex hormone synthesis, environmental factors and genetic predisposition. Obstetric cholestasis can lead to increased foetal morbidity and mortality with regards to preterm delivery, neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, foetal distress and sudden intrauterine foetal death. Treatment of the disease focus on relieving symptoms and signs. The aim of the study is to evaluate the pregnancy and foetal outcome of pregnant women with obstetric cholestasis. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted in M.K.C.G. Medical College and Hospital, Berhampur from February 2015 to May 2017. Inclusion Criteria- All patients having pruritus during course of pregnancy with biochemical evidence of raised liver function tests attending antenatal clinic or labour room. Exclusion Criteria- 1 Pregnant women without pruritus; 2 Pregnant women having other liver diseases. RESULTS The incidence of obstetric cholestasis was 0.6%. Majority of cases were primigravida (72.9%. Positive family history was present in 11.4% of cases. Majority of cases (77.1% had normal vaginal delivery. 22.9% of cases had caesarean section. Primary postpartum haemorrhage occurred in only 2.9% of cases. CONCLUSION Obstetric cholestasis can be managed by improving the circulating bile acid level, targeting the cause of pruritus and optimising the time of delivery as a result of which we can reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  20. Assisted reproductive technology treatment outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naasan, M

    2012-05-01

    Information on the outcomes of ART treatments in Ireland is not readily available to Irish practitioners. The data for hospital affiliated clinics has been made available for many years and is included in the hospital reports. We present a 10-year analysis of the Irish ART results voluntarily reported by six out of seven IVF clinics. The data was collected from published ESHRE reports and from results (2007-8) not yet published. Data collected included: number of clinics and ART cycles, female age, clinical and multiple pregnancy rates and treatment complications. The clinical pregnancy rate per embryo transfer was 31.7% for IVF and 29.8% for ICSI. The proportion of singleton, twin and triplet deliveries for IVF and ICSI combined was 75%, 23.35% and 1.64%. The rate of ovarian hyperstimulation was 0.8%. ART practice in Ireland is safe, effective and responsible. Financial and societal savings could result from the introduction of state funded IVF with compulsory eSET where recommended.

  1. Maternal Anaemia and Neonatal Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Deswanto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aims to determine whether maternal anaemia would affect birth outcome – birth weight and length – of the baby and compare this with that of non-anaemicmothers. We used secondary data from Puskesmas Kecamatan Ciracas medical records. Alldelivery records from October – November 2012 were collected and analysed; samples weredivided into two group: Group 1 included anaemic pregnant women and Group 2 non-anaemicpregnant women. Inclusion criteria was all pregnant women 16 years and older and a singletonpregnancy with a complete medical record. All women with a past history of preterm delivery,obstetrical complications or any medical illness, except anaemia, were excluded from the study inorder to control for the confounding factors. Out of one hundred and one records, 79 non anaemicsubjects and 22 anaemic subjects, were included for the analysis. No significant difference wasfound in both groups in terms of baby’s birth weight and birth length.Keywords: maternity anaemia, birth weight, birth length

  2. A systematic review of income generation interventions, including microfinance and vocational skills training, for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Caitlin E; Fonner, Virginia A; O'Reilly, Kevin R; Sweat, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Income generation interventions, such as microfinance or vocational skills training, address structural factors associated with HIV risk. However, the effectiveness of these interventions on HIV-related outcomes in low- and middle-income countries has not been synthesized. The authors conducted a systematic review by searching electronic databases from 1990 to 2012, examining secondary references, and hand-searching key journals. Peer-reviewed studies were included in the analysis if they evaluated income generation interventions in low- or middle-income countries and provided pre-post or multi-arm measures on behavioral, psychological, social, care, or biological outcomes related to HIV prevention. Standardized forms were used to abstract study data in duplicate and study rigor was assessed. Of the 5218 unique citations identified, 12 studies met criteria for inclusion. Studies were geographically diverse, with six conducted in sub-Saharan Africa, three in South or Southeast Asia, and three in Latin America and the Caribbean. Target populations included adult women (N = 6), female sex workers/bar workers (N = 3), and youth/orphans (N = 3). All studies targeted females except two among youth/orphans. Study rigor was moderate, with two group-randomized trials and two individual-randomized trials. All interventions except three included some form of microfinance. Only a minority of studies found significant intervention effects on condom use, number of sexual partners, or other HIV-related behavioral outcomes; most studies showed no significant change, although some may have had inadequate statistical power. One trial showed a 55% reduction in intimate partner violence (adjusted risk ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.23-0.91). No studies measured incidence/prevalence of HIV or sexually transmitted infections among intervention recipients. The evidence that income generation interventions influence HIV-related behaviors and outcomes is inconclusive. However, these

  3. A systematic review of income generation interventions, including microfinance and vocational skills training, for HIV prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Caitlin E.; Fonner, Virginia A.; O'Reilly, Kevin R.; Sweat, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Income generation interventions, such as microfinance or vocational skills training, address structural factors associated with HIV risk. However, the effectiveness of these interventions on HIV-related outcomes in low- and middle-income countries has not been synthesized. We conducted a systematic review by searching electronic databases from 1990-2012, examining secondary references, and hand searching key journals. Peer-reviewed studies were included in the analysis if they evaluated income generation interventions in low- or middle-income countries and provided pre-post or multi-arm measures on behavioral, psychological, social, care or biological outcomes related to HIV prevention. Standardized forms were used to abstract study data in duplicate and study rigor was assessed. Of 5,218 unique citations identified, 12 studies met criteria for inclusion. Studies were geographically diverse, with 6 conducted in sub-Saharan Africa, 3 in South or Southeast Asia, and 3 in Latin America and the Caribbean. Target populations included adult women (N=6), female sex workers/bar workers (N=3), and youth/orphans (N=3). All studies targeted females except 2 among youth/orphans. Study rigor was moderate, with 2 group-randomized trials and 2 individual-randomized trials. All interventions except 3 included some form of microfinance. Only a minority of studies found significant intervention effects on condom use, number of sexual partners or other HIV-related behavioral outcomes; most studies showed no significant change, although some may have had inadequate statistical power. One trial showed a 55% reduction in intimate partner violence (adjusted risk ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.23-0.91). No studies measured incidence/prevalence of HIV or sexually transmitted infections among intervention recipients. The evidence that income generation interventions influence HIV-related behaviors and outcomes is inconclusive. However, these interventions may have important effects

  4. A Review of Educational Outcomes in the Children's Mental Health Treatment Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Brandt, Nicole Evangelista; Stephan, Sharon H.; Chorpita, Bruce F.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the measurement of educational outcomes related to children's mental health treatments. A total of 85 papers describing 88 randomized controlled trials that included at least one educational outcome and one mental health outcome were included in these analyses. Forty-five different measures were identified as the primary educational…

  5. Dictionary of scientific units including dimensionless numbers and scales

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jerrard, H.G; McNeill, D.B

    1992-01-01

    .... The text includes the most recently accepted values of all units. Several disciplines, which have in the past employed few scientific principles and the dictionary has been extended to include examples of these.

  6. Should Relational Aggression Be Included in DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Coyne, Claire; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2008-01-01

    The study examines whether relational aggression should be included in DSM-V disruptive behavior disorders. The results conclude that some additional information is gathered from assessing relational aggression but not enough to be included in DSM-V.

  7. Partially ionized plasmas including the third symposium on uranium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, M. [ed.

    1976-09-01

    Separate abstracts are included for 28 papers on electrically generated plasmas, fission generated plasmas, nuclear pumped lasers, gaseous fuel reactor research, and applications. Five papers have been previously abstracted and included in ERA.

  8. Periodontal disease and pregnancy outcomes: time to move on?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Sindhu K; Parry, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    Maternal periodontal disease is a highly prevalent condition that has been studied extensively in relation to adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm delivery, preeclampsia, and low birth weight. Investigators speculate that hematogenous transport of bacteria and/or pro-inflammatory mediators from sites of periodontal infection into the placenta, fetal membranes, and amniotic cavity induces pathological processes that lead to these adverse outcomes. Preliminary observational studies supported this hypothesis, but more recent work by our group and others do not demonstrate an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes among women with periodontal disease, and most randomized trials fail to demonstrate improved perinatal outcomes following treatment of periodontal disease in pregnancy.

  9. Psychological distress and in vitro fertilization outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasch, Lauri A; Gregorich, Steven E; Katz, Patricia K; Millstein, Susan G; Nachtigall, Robert D; Bleil, Maria E; Adler, Nancy E

    2012-08-01

    To examine whether psychological distress predicts IVF treatment outcome as well as whether IVF treatment outcome predicts subsequent psychological distress. Prospective cohort study over an 18-month period. Five community and academic fertility practices. Two hundred two women who initiated their first IVF cycle. Women completed interviews and questionnaires at baseline and at 4, 10, and 18 months' follow-up. IVF cycle outcome and psychological distress. In a binary logistic model including covariates (woman's age, ethnicity, income, education, parity, duration of infertility, and time interval), pretreatment depression and anxiety were not significant predictors of the outcome of the first IVF cycle. In linear regression models including covariates (woman's age, income, education, parity, duration of infertility, assessment point, time since last treatment cycle, and pre-IVF depression or anxiety), experiencing failed IVF was associated with higher post-IVF depression and anxiety. IVF failure predicts subsequent psychological distress, but pre-IVF psychological distress does not predict IVF failure. Instead of focusing efforts on psychological interventions specifically aimed at improving the chance of pregnancy, these findings suggest that attention be paid to helping patients prepare for and cope with treatment and treatment failure. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Persistent ovarian masses and pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, William A; Rincon, Monica; Bohrer, Justin; Tolosa, Jorge E; Sohaey, Roya; Riaño, Rene; Davis, James; Zalud, Ivica

    2013-07-01

    To determine if persistent ovarian masses in pregnancy are associated with increased adverse outcomes. This is a retrospective cohort of 126 pregnant women with a persistent ovarian mass measuring 5 cm or greater who delivered at two university hospitals between 2001 and 2009. Maternal outcomes included gestational age (GA) at diagnosis, delivery and surgery as well as miscarriage, preterm birth (PTB), ovarian torsion and hospital admission for pain. Neonatal outcomes included birth weight, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), intra-ventricular hemorrhage (IVH), death and sepsis. A total of 1225 ovarian masses were identified (4.9%) in 24,868 patients. A persistent ovarian mass was found in 0.7%. Average GA at diagnosis was 17.8 weeks. Miscarriage rate was 3.3%. Average GA at delivery was 37.9 weeks. Of the patients, 8.5% had ovarian torsion, 10.3% had admission for pain and 9.3% had PTBs. The mean cesarean delivery rate was 46.3%. The average neonatal weight was 3273 g. There was one neonatal death in this cohort. The rate of RDS was 2.8%, IVH 0.9% and neonatal sepsis 1.9%. The most common surgical pathologic diagnosis was dermoids (37.6%). No overt malignancies were seen. A persistent ovarian mass in pregnancy does not confer an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  11. Relationship between maternal hemoglobin and perinatal outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhtiar, U.J.; Khan, Y.; Nisar, R.

    2007-01-01

    To Study the Relationship between Maternal Hemoglobin and Perinatal outcome in a cohort of 860 pregnant women and to highlight the importance of antenatal care regarding maternal health and fetal outcome. All Singleton pregnancies delivering at Pakistan Railway Hospital Rawalpindi from January 2004 to December 2005 that fulfilled the required criteria were included. Out of the 860 patients, 402 were anemic (<11gm/dl) and 458 were non anemic. Perinatal outcome included preterm delivery, low birth weight, intrauterine growth retardation, perinatal death, low apgr scores and intrauterine fetal deaths. Risk of preterm and Low birth weight among anemic women was 3.4 and 1.8 times more than non anaemic women. The neonates of anemic woman also had 1.7 times increased risk of having low apgr scores at 1 min. Among anemic women there was 2.2 times greater risk of intrauterine fetal death than the non-anemic women. Regular antenatal care from first trimester has a vital role in assessing and managing maternal anemia timely and it directly affects the perinatal outcome. The patients with anemia have also higher risk of having low birth weight, preterm births and intra uterine fetal death. (author)

  12. 48 CFR 536.213-371 - Bids that include options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bids that include options... Contracting for Construction 536.213-371 Bids that include options. (a) Subject to the limitations in paragraph (c) of this section, you may include options in contracts if it is in the Government's interest...

  13. 29 CFR 780.616 - Operations included in raising livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operations included in raising livestock. 780.616 Section... Employment in Agriculture and Livestock Auction Operations Under the Section 13(b)(13) Exemption Requirements for Exemption § 780.616 Operations included in raising livestock. Raising livestock includes such...

  14. Outcomes after environmental hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVecchio, Frank; Pizon, Anthony F; Berrett, Christopher; Balls, Adam

    2007-05-01

    This study was conducted to describe the characteristics and outcomes of patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) with presumed environmental hyperthermia. A retrospective chart review was performed in 2 institutions with patients who were seen in the ED and had a discharge diagnosis of hyperthermia, heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Exclusion criteria were an alternative diagnosis potentially explaining the hyperthermia (pneumonia, etc). Research assistants, who were blinded to the purpose of the study, performed a systematic chart review after a structured training session. If necessary, a third reviewer acted as a tiebreaker. Data regarding patient demographics, comorbidities, vital signs, laboratory results, and short-term outcome were collected. Data were analyzed with Excel and STATA software. We enrolled 52 patients with a mean age of 42.6 years (range, 0.4-81 years) from August 1, 2003 to August 31, 2005. The mean high daily temperature was 103.6 degrees F (range, 88-118 degrees F). At presentation, the mean body temperature was 105.1 degrees F (range, 100.2-111.2 degrees F) and the Glasgow Coma Scale score was less than 14 in 36 (69.2%) patients. Laboratory results demonstrated that 21 (40.4%) patients had a creatinine level of more than 1.5 mg/dL, 35 (67.3%) patients had a creatine kinase (CK) of more than 200 U/L, 30 patients (57.7%) had a prothrombin time of more than 13 seconds, 29 (55.8%) patients had an aspartate aminotransferase (AST) of more than 45 U/L, and only 3 patients (5.7%) had a glucose of less than 60 mg/dL. Ethanol or illicit drugs were involved in 18 (34.6%) cases. The mean hospital stay was 4.7 days (range, 1-30 days), and there were 15 deaths (28.8%). A kappa score for interreviewer reliability was 0.69. Major limitations were the retrospective nature and lack of homogeneity in patient evaluation and test ordering. Hyperthermic patients with higher initial temperatures, hypotension, or low Glasgow Coma Scale

  15. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC, Candiolo (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was < 10 mm in 33 patients (53%) and > 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long

  16. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P.

    2011-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long-term results are needed to assess

  17. Outcome of teenage pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalerao A

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred consecutive cases up to 19 years of age admitted for confinement at The Nowrosjee Wadia Maternity Hospital, Bombay, were studied. Out of these 200 girls, 6 were unmarried, 51 were anaemic, 20 had toxaemia of pregnancy. Six girls (43% in the age group 15-17 years delivered prematurely as compared to only 26 girls (14% in the age group of 17-19 years. This difference is statistically significant. Also, only, 4 girls (29% in the age group of 15-17 years had full term normal delivery as compared to 113 girls (61% in the age group of 17-19 years signifying that the outcome of pregnancy becomes worst in girls below the age of 17 years. Ten babies (71% of mothers in the age group of 15-17 years were LBW as compared to 75 babies (44% of mothers in the age group of 17-19 years signifying that the incidence of LBW babies is inversely proportional to maternal age. Teenage pregnant girls needed more attention for prevention and treatment of preeclampsia eclampsia, anaemia, prematurity and LBW.

  18. Expanding Health Technology Assessments to Include Effects on the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Kevin; Ganz, Michael L; Hsu, John; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin; Gonzalez, Raquel Palomino; Lund, Niels

    2016-01-01

    There is growing awareness of the impact of human activity on the climate and the need to stem this impact. Public health care decision makers from Sweden and the United Kingdom have started examining environmental impacts when assessing new technologies. This article considers the case for incorporating environmental impacts into the health technology assessment (HTA) process and discusses the associated challenges. Two arguments favor incorporating environmental impacts into HTA: 1) environmental changes could directly affect people's health and 2) policy decision makers have broad mandates and objectives extending beyond health care. Two types of challenges hinder this process. First, the nascent evidence base is insufficient to support the accurate comparison of technologies' environmental impacts. Second, cost-utility analysis, which is favored by many HTA agencies, could capture some of the value of environmental impacts, especially those generating health impacts, but might not be suitable for addressing broader concerns. Both cost-benefit and multicriteria decision analyses are potential methods for evaluating health and environmental outcomes, but are less familiar to health care decision makers. Health care is an important and sizable sector of the economy that could warrant closer policy attention to its impact on the environment. Considerable work is needed to track decision makers' demands, augment the environmental evidence base, and develop robust methods for capturing and incorporating environmental data as part of HTA. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hyperglycemia and Clinical Outcome in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Nyika D.; Biessels, Geert Jan; de Haan, Rob J.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Coert, Bert; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Hyperglycemia may worsen outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. We performed a systematic review to investigate the relation between admission hyperglycemia and outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods-We included cohort studies or clinical trials

  20. Neonatal outcome and congenital malformations in children born after ICSI with testicular or epididymal sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedder, Jens; Loft, A; Parner, Erik Thorlund

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Does neonatal outcome including congenital malformations in children born after ICSI with epididymal and testicular sperm [testicular sperm extraction (TESE)/percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (PESA)/testicular sperm aspiration (TESA) (TPT)] differ from neonatal outcome in c...

  1. ADVERSE PREGNANCY OUTCOMES ASSOCIATED WITH MATERNAL ENALAPRIL ANTIHYPERTENSIVE TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enalapril, one of several antihypertensive drugs that act as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, is often used for treatment of hypertension in women of reproductive age. Adverse birth outcomes following the use of ACE inhibitors, including enalapril, during pregnanc...

  2. Admission Hyperglycemia and Clinical Outcome in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; Hiltunen, Sini; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Peters, Guusje M.; Silvis, Suzanne M.; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kruyt, Nyika D.; Putaala, Jukka; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Admission hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcome in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Admission hyperglycemia has not been investigated in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis. Methods-Consecutive adult patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were included

  3. Infertility trial outcomes: healthy moms and babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the primary outcome of infertility trials has been a positive pregnancy test or a clinically recognized pregnancy. However, parents desire a healthy baby that grows up to be a healthy adult, rather than a positive pregnancy test. Too often results of infertility trials are lacking in crucial obstetric details. This is problematic because treatments for infertility have the capacity to increase the risk for a variety of adverse obstetric outcomes. This review will outline important obstetric variables that should be included when reporting infertility research. The rationale for including these data, precise definitions of the variables, and cost-effective strategies for obtaining these obstetric details will be highlighted. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment and Outcomes of Aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Treatment & Outcomes Health Professionals Statistics More Resources Candidiasis Candida infections of the mouth, throat, and esophagus Vaginal candidiasis Invasive candidiasis Definition Symptoms Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis ...

  5. 76 FR 61741 - Bmc Software, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers From COMSYS ITS Including Remote Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,540] Bmc Software, Inc... November 23, 2010, applicable to workers of BMC Software, Inc., including on-site leased workers from... BMC Software, inc., including on-site leased workers from Comsys ITS, and including remote workers...

  6. Long-term outcome of craniopharyngioma in children. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, Takashi; Okada, Masaki; Miyake, Keisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    The treatment for pediatric craniopharyngioma remains challenging and controversial. Although this tumor is histologically benign, the treatments include radical surgery, conservative surgery, radiotherapy, intracystic chemotherapy and multimodality approaches. In addition, the long-term functional outcomes including visual function, endocrine function, cognitive function, hypothalamic function, and quality of life are complex and major problems among survivors. In this paper, we reviewed the recent treatments for pediatric craniopharyngioma and the long-term outcomes after treatment in literatures. (author)

  7. Occupational exposures and health outcomes among Latina hotel cleaners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin Jerrie; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Hatzudis, Kiki; Sönmez, Sevil

    2014-01-01

    The poor working conditions of Latina hotel cleaners render them particularly vulnerable to elevated occupational hazards that lead to adverse health outcomes. This article presents a comprehensive review of occupational risks (including physical, chemical, biological, and psychosocial risk factors) and health outcomes (including musculoskeletal disorders, respiratory diseases, dermatological diseases and allergies, and psychological disorders) for Latina hotel cleaners, within their unique sociocultural contexts. Preventive interventions for improving Latina hotel cleaners' work and health conditions are recommended.

  8. Pregnancy Outcomes After Myomectomy With Polytetrafluoroethylene Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Jennifer L.; Milad, Magdy P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The aim of this study was to report preliminary data on pregnancy outcomes after myomectomy with placement of an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene adhesion barrier membrane. Methods: In this retrospective case series, 68 women who underwent myomectomy with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane placement between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2009, were identified. Of these women, 15 subsequently had documented pregnancies and were included in the final dataset...

  9. Core Outcomes for Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Consensus Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus G K McNair

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment is common, and there is a great need to improve the delivery of such care. The gold standard for evaluating surgery is within well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs; however, the impact of RCTs is diminished by a lack of coordinated outcome measurement and reporting. A solution to these issues is to develop an agreed standard "core" set of outcomes to be measured in all trials to facilitate cross-study comparisons, meta-analysis, and minimize outcome reporting bias. This study defines a core outcome set for CRC surgery.The scope of this COS includes clinical effectiveness trials of surgical interventions for colorectal cancer. Excluded were nonsurgical oncological interventions. Potential outcomes of importance to patients and professionals were identified through systematic literature reviews and patient interviews. All outcomes were transcribed verbatim and categorized into domains by two independent researchers. This informed a questionnaire survey that asked stakeholders (patients and professionals from United Kingdom CRC centers to rate the importance of each domain. Respondents were resurveyed following group feedback (Delphi methods. Outcomes rated as less important were discarded after each survey round according to predefined criteria, and remaining outcomes were considered at three consensus meetings; two involving international professionals and a separate one with patients. A modified nominal group technique was used to gain the final consensus. Data sources identified 1,216 outcomes of CRC surgery that informed a 91 domain questionnaire. First round questionnaires were returned from 63 out of 81 (78% centers, including 90 professionals, and 97 out of 267 (35% patients. Second round response rates were high for all stakeholders (>80%. Analysis of responses lead to 45 and 23 outcome domains being retained after the first and

  10. Unintended outcomes evaluation approach: A plausible way to evaluate unintended outcomes of social development programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Sumera

    2018-06-01

    Social development programmes are deliberate attempts to bring about change and unintended outcomes can be considered as inherent to any such intervention. There is now a solid consensus among the international evaluation community regarding the need to consider unintended outcomes as a key aspect in any evaluative study. However, this concern often equates to nothing more than false piety. Exiting evaluation theory suffers from overlap of terminology, inadequate categorisation of unintended outcomes and lack of guidance on how to study them. To advance the knowledge of evaluation theory, methods and practice, the author has developed an evaluation approach to study unintended effects using a theory building, testing and refinement process. A comprehensive classification of unintended outcomes on the basis of knowability, value, distribution and temporality helped specify various type of unintended outcomes for programme evaluation. Corresponding to this classification, a three-step evaluation process was proposed including a) outlining programme intentions b) forecasting likely unintended effects c) mapping the anticipated and understanding unanticipated unintended outcomes. This unintended outcomes evaluation approach (UOEA) was then trialled by undertaking a multi-site and multi-method case study of a poverty alleviation programme in Pakistan and refinements were made to the approach.The case study revealed that this programme was producing a number of unintended effects, mostly negative, affecting those already disadvantaged such as the poorest, women and children. The trialling process demonstrated the effectiveness of the UOEA and suggests that this can serve as a useful guide for future evaluation practice. It also provides the discipline of evaluation with an empirically-based reference point for further theoretical developments in the study of unintended outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Outcome Quality in Medical Rehabilitation: Relationship Between "Patient-Reported Outcomes" (PROs) and Social Security Contributions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nübling, R; Kaluscha, R; Krischak, G; Kriz, D; Martin, H; Müller, G; Renzland, J; Reuss-Borst, M; Schmidt, J; Kaiser, U; Toepler, E

    2017-02-01

    Aim of the Study The outcome quality of medical rehabilitation is evaluated often by "Patient Reported Outcomes" (PROs). It is examined to what extent these PROs are corresponding with "hard" or "objective" outcomes such as payments of contributions to social insurance. Methods The "rehabilitation QM outcome study" includes self-reports of patients as well as data from the Rehabilitation Statistics Database (RSD) of the German pension insurance Baden-Wurttemberg. The sample for the question posed includes N=2 947 insured who were treated in 2011 in 21 clinics of the "health quality network" and who were either employed or unemployed at the time of the rehabilitation application (e. g. the workforce or labour force group, response rate: 55%). The sample turned out widely representative for the population of the insured persons. Results PROs and payment of contributions to pension insurance clearly correspond. In the year after the rehabilitation improved vs. not improved rehabilitees differed clearly with regard to their payments of contributions. Conclusions The results support the validity of PROs. For a comprehensive depiction of the outcome quality of rehabilitation PROs and payments of contributions should be considered supplementary. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Charlotte; Carlsson, Jessica; Bech, Per

    2016-01-01

    at the Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry (CTP), Denmark. The CTP Predictor Index used in the study included 15 different possible outcome predictors concerning the patients' past, chronicity of mental health problems, pain, treatment motivation, prerequisites for engaging in psychotherapy, and social...... situation. The primary outcome measure was PTSD symptoms measured on the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Other outcome measures included the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25, the WHO-5 Well-being Index, Sheehan Disability Scale, Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales, the somatisation scale of the Symptoms...

  13. 26 CFR 1.1013-1 - Property included in inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Property included in inventory. 1.1013-1 Section... inventory. The basis of property required to be included in inventory is the last inventory value of such property in the hands of the taxpayer. The requirements with respect to the valuation of an inventory are...

  14. 31 CFR 103.51 - Dollars as including foreign currency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS General Provisions § 103.51 Dollars as including foreign currency. Wherever in this part an amount is stated in dollars, it shall be deemed to mean... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dollars as including foreign currency...

  15. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

    2014-04-22

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  16. 7 CFR 1437.303 - Aquaculture, including ornamental fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aquaculture, including ornamental fish. 1437.303... ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Determining Coverage Using Value § 1437.303 Aquaculture, including ornamental fish. (a... human consumption as determined by CCC. (2) Fish raised as feed for other fish that are consumed by...

  17. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  18. A framework for including family health spillovers in economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Al-Janabi (Hareth); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); W.B.F. Brouwer (Werner); J. Coast (Joanna)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHealth care interventions may affect the health of patients' family networks. It has been suggested that these health spillovers? should be included in economic evaluation, but there is not a systematic method for doing this. In this article, we develop a framework for including health

  19. Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2014-12-09

    An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

  20. Outcome Research in Classical Psychodrama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Peter Felix

    1987-01-01

    Examines various aspects of psychodrama outcome research and summarizes in tabular form 23 outcome studies published between 1952 and 1985, interpreting them as a whole. Concludes that psychodrama constitutes a valid alternative to other therapeutic approaches, especially in promoting behavior change in adjustment, antisocial, and related…

  1. Early outcome of noma surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, M A; Marck, K W; Griep, J E M; Marck, R E; Huijing, M A; Werker, P M N

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reconstructive noma surgery is performed on many short-term medical missions. The treatment outcome, however, has rarely been studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied complications and clinical outcome of reconstructive noma surgery performed during four short-term medical missions.

  2. Psychologic Outcomes in Implant Prosthodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassi, Francesco; Carr, Alan B.; Chang, Ting-Ling; Estafanous, Emad W.; Garrett, Neal R.; Happonen, Risto-Pekka; Koka, Sreenivas; Laine, Juhani; Osswald, Martin; Reintsema, Harry; Rieger, Jana; Roumanas, Eleni; Salinas, Thomas J.; Stanford, Clark M.; Wolfaardt, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Consensus regarding outcomes of the treatment of tooth loss, especially the psychologic outcomes, is needed to guide discovery of best practices and enable a better understanding of patient management for this chronic condition. This paper presents the findings of the ORONet Psychological Working

  3. Alcohol intake and colorectal cancer: a comparison of approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Wu, Kana; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In numerous studies, alcohol intake has been found to be positively associated with colorectal cancer risk. However, the majority of studies included only one exposure measurement, which may bias the results if long-term intake is relevant.METHODS: We compared different approaches...... for including repeated measures of alcohol intake among 47,432 US men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Questionnaires including questions on alcohol intake had been completed in 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998. The outcome was incident colorectal cancer during follow-up from 1986 to 2002.RESULTS......: During follow-up, 868 members of the cohort experienced colorectal cancer. Baseline, updated, and cumulative average alcohol intakes were positively associated with colorectal cancer, with only minor differences among the approaches. These results support moderately increased risk for intake >30 g...

  4. Aphasia As a Predictor of Stroke Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Ronald M; Boehme, Amelia K

    2017-09-19

    Aphasia is a common feature of stroke, affecting 21-38% of acute stroke patients and an estimated 1 million stroke survivors. Although stroke, as a syndrome, is the leading cause of disability in the USA, less is known about the independent impact of aphasia on stroke outcomes. During the acute stroke period, aphasia has been found to increase length of stay, inpatient complications, overall neurological disability, mortality, and to alter discharge disposition. Outcomes during the sub-acute and chronic stroke periods show that aphasia is associated with lower Functional Independence Measures (FIM) scores, longer stays in rehabilitation settings, poorer function in activities of daily living, and mortality. Factors that complicate the analysis of aphasia on post-stroke outcomes, however, include widely different systems of care across international settings that result in varying admission patterns to acute stroke units, allowable length of stays based on reimbursement, and criteria for rehabilitation placement. Aphasia arising from stroke is associated with worse outcomes both in the acute and chronic periods. Future research will have to incorporate disparate patterns in analytic models, and to take into account specific aphasia profiles and evolving methods of post-stroke speech-language therapy.

  5. Outcomes of polytrauma patients with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of diabetes mellitus in patients with multiple system injuries remains obscure. This study was designed to increase knowledge of outcomes of polytrauma in patients who have diabetes mellitus. Methods Data from the Trauma Audit and Research Network was used to identify patients who had suffered polytrauma during 2003 to 2011. These patients were filtered to those with known outcomes, then separated into those with diabetes, those known to have other co-morbidities but not diabetes and those known not to have any co-morbidities or diabetes. The data were analyzed to establish if patients with diabetes had differing outcomes associated with their diabetes versus the other groups. Results In total, 222 patients had diabetes, 2,558 had no past medical co-morbidities (PMC), 2,709 had PMC but no diabetes. The diabetic group of patients was found to be older than the other groups (P <0.05). A higher mortality rate was found in the diabetic group compared to the non-PMC group (32.4% versus 12.9%), P <0.05). Rates of many complications including renal failure, myocardial infarction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis were all found to be higher in the diabetic group. Conclusions Close monitoring of diabetic patients may result in improved outcomes. Tighter glycemic control and earlier intervention for complications may reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:25026864

  6. Singing voice outcomes following singing voice therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastolfo-Hromack, Christina; Thomas, Tracey L; Rosen, Clark A; Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe singing voice therapy (SVT), describe referred patient characteristics, and document the outcomes of SVT. Retrospective. Records of patients receiving SVT between June 2008 and June 2013 were reviewed (n = 51). All diagnoses were included. Demographic information, number of SVT sessions, and symptom severity were retrieved from the medical record. Symptom severity was measured via the 10-item Singing Voice Handicap Index (SVHI-10). Treatment outcome was analyzed by diagnosis, history of previous training, and SVHI-10. SVHI-10 scores decreased following SVT (mean change = 11, 40% decrease) (P singing lessons (n = 10) also completed an average of three SVT sessions. Primary muscle tension dysphonia (MTD1) and benign vocal fold lesion (lesion) were the most common diagnoses. Most patients (60%) had previous vocal training. SVHI-10 decrease was not significantly different between MTD and lesion. This is the first outcome-based study of SVT in a disordered population. Diagnosis of MTD or lesion did not influence treatment outcomes. Duration of SVT was short (approximately three sessions). Voice care providers are encouraged to partner with a singing voice therapist to provide optimal care for the singing voice. This study supports the use of SVT as a tool for the treatment of singing voice disorders. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2546-2551, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Pregnancy outcomes after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mila Trementosa; Lin, Lawrence Hsu; Fushida, Koji; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli Vieira; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2016-12-01

    The successful development of chemotherapy enabled a fertilitysparing treatment for patients with trophoblastic neoplasia. After disease remission, the outcome of a subsequent pregnancy becomes a great concern for these women. To analyze existing studies in the literature that describe the reproductive outcomes of patients with trophoblastic neoplasia treated with chemotherapy. Systematic review was performed searching for articles on Medline/ Pubmed, Lilacs and Cochrane Library databases, using the terms "gestational trophoblastic disease" and "pregnancy outcome". A total of 18 articles were included. No evidence of decreased fertility after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia was observed. The abortion rates in patients who conceived within 6 months after chemotherapy was higher compared to those who waited longer. Some studies showed increased rates of stillbirth and repeat hydatidiform moles. Only one work showed increased congenital abnormalities. The pregnancies conceived after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia should be followed with clinical surveillance due to higher rates of some pregnancy complications. However, studies in the literature provide reassuring data about reproductive outcomes of these patients.

  8. Epidemiology, course, and outcome of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smink, Frédérique R E; van Hoeken, Daphne; Hoek, Hans W

    2013-11-01

    To review the recent literature about the epidemiology, course, and outcome of eating disorders in accordance with the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The residual category 'eating disorder not otherwise specified' (EDNOS) was the most common DSM-IV eating disorder diagnosis in both clinical and community samples. Several studies have confirmed that the DSM-5 criteria for eating disorders effectively reduce the proportion of EDNOS diagnoses. The lifetime prevalence of DSM-5 anorexia nervosa among women might be up to 4%, and of bulimia nervosa 2%. In a cross-national survey, the average lifetime prevalence of binge eating disorder (BED) was 2%. Both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are associated with increased mortality. Data on long-term outcome, including mortality, are limited for BED. Follow-up studies of BED are scarce; remission rates in randomized controlled trials ranged from 19 to 65% across studies. On a community level, 5-year recovery rates for DSM-5 anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are 69 and 55%, respectively; little is known about the course and outcome of BED in the community. Applying the DSM-5 criteria effectively reduces the frequency of the residual diagnosis EDNOS, by lowering the threshold for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, and adding BED as a specified eating disorder. Course and outcome studies of both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa show that no significant differences exist between DSM-5 and DSM-IV definitions.

  9. Outcome After Surgery for Acute Aortic Dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemtob, Raphaelle Avigael; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Holmvang, Lene

    2017-01-01

    the use of antiplatelet therapy (APT) prior to AAD surgery and patient outcome, including indications according to the European Society of Cardiology's (ESC) recent guidelines. Design A retrospective, observational study. Setting A tertiary University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Heart Centre, Copenhagen......, Denmark. Participants The study included 171 patients operated for AAD during 2010 to 2014. Interventions The independent relationship of preoperative APT was explored on 30-day mortality, intraoperative bleeding and perioperative transfusion requirements. Furthermore, the indications for APT were...... obtained. Measurements and Main Results Patients receiving APT (n = 73) did not have an increased 30-day mortality (29% v 20%, p = 0.18). However, APT increased intraoperative bleeding by 45% (p

  10. Electric drive systems including smoothing capacitor cooling devices and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dede, Ercan Mehmet; Zhou, Feng

    2017-02-28

    An electric drive system includes a smoothing capacitor including at least one terminal, a bus bar electrically coupled to the at least one terminal, a thermoelectric device including a first side and a second side positioned opposite the first side, where the first side is thermally coupled to at least one of the at least one terminal and the bus bar, and a cooling element thermally coupled to the second side of the thermoelectric device, where the cooling element dissipates heat from the thermoelectric device.

  11. Ethical leadership outcomes in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhordari-Sharifabad, Maasoumeh; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, Foroozan

    2017-01-01

    Leadership style adopted by nursing managers is a key element in progress and development of nursing and quality of healthcare services received by the patients. In this regard, the role of ethical leadership is of utmost importance. The objective of the study was to elaborate on the ethical leadership and its role in professional progress and growth of nurses in the light of work condition in health providing institutes. The study was carried out as a qualitative study following conventional content analysis method. In total, 14 nursing faculty members and nursing managers at different levels were selected through purposive sampling method. Semi-structured interviews were used for data gathering. The data were analyzed using latent content analysis and constant comparison analysis. Ethical considerations: This study was conducted in accordance with ethical issues in research with human participants and national rules and regulations related to informed consent and confidentiality. The study was approved by the Committee of Ethics in Research at the Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran, under the code: sbmu.rec.1393.695 on 15 February 2015. Five subcategories were obtained based on the analysis, which constituted two main categories including "all-inclusive satisfaction" and "productivity." Nursing leaders highlighted the point that their ethical behavior creates "inner satisfaction of the leader," "employees' job satisfaction," and "patients' satisfaction." Improvement of productivity was another outcome of ethical behavior of the leaders. This kind of behavior resulted in "providing better services" and "inspiring ethical behavior in the employees." It has great influence on progress and growth of the nursing profession. By creating an ethical climate, ethical leadership leads to positive and effective outcomes-for the patients as well as for the nurses and the leaders-and professional progress and development of the nursing profession

  12. Outcome discrepancies and selective reporting: impacting the leading journals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Padhraig S; Koletsi, Despina; Dwan, Kerry; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Selective outcome reporting of either interesting or positive research findings is problematic, running the risk of poorly-informed treatment decisions. We aimed to assess the extent of outcome and other discrepancies and possible selective reporting between registry entries and published reports among leading medical journals. Randomized controlled trials published over a 6-month period from July to December 31st, 2013, were identified in five high impact medical journals: The Lancet, British Medical Journal, New England Journal of Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine and Journal of American Medical Association were obtained. Discrepancies between published studies and registry entries were identified and related to factors including registration timing, source of funding and presence of statistically significant results. Over the 6-month period, 137 RCTs were found. Of these, 18% (n = 25) had discrepancies related to primary outcomes with the primary outcome changed in 15% (n = 20). Moreover, differences relating to non-primary outcomes were found in 64% (n = 87) with both omission of pre-specified non-primary outcomes (39%) and introduction of new non-primary outcomes (44%) common. No relationship between primary or non-primary outcome change and registration timing (prospective or retrospective; P = 0.11), source of funding (P = 0.92) and presence of statistically significant results (P = 0.92) was found. Discrepancies between registry entries and published articles for primary and non-primary outcomes were common among trials published in leading medical journals. Novel approaches are required to address this problem.

  13. Diabetes Nutrition: Including Sweets in Your Meal Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes nutrition: Including sweets in your meal plan Diabetes nutrition focuses on healthy foods, but sweets aren't necessarily ... your meal plan. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes nutrition focuses on healthy foods. But you can eat ...

  14. Initiation devices, initiation systems including initiation devices and related methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Condit, Reston A.; Rasmussen, Nikki; Wallace, Ronald S.

    2018-04-10

    Initiation devices may include at least one substrate, an initiation element positioned on a first side of the at least one substrate, and a spark gap electrically coupled to the initiation element and positioned on a second side of the at least one substrate. Initiation devices may include a plurality of substrates where at least one substrate of the plurality of substrates is electrically connected to at least one adjacent substrate of the plurality of substrates with at least one via extending through the at least one substrate. Initiation systems may include such initiation devices. Methods of igniting energetic materials include passing a current through a spark gap formed on at least one substrate of the initiation device, passing the current through at least one via formed through the at least one substrate, and passing the current through an explosive bridge wire of the initiation device.

  15. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button NCHS Home Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema Recommend on Facebook ... Percent of visits to office-based physicians with COPD indicated on the medical record: 3.2% Source: ...

  16. Including estimates of the future in today's financial statements

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Barth

    2006-01-01

    This paper explains why the question is how, not if, today's financial statements should include estimates of the future. Including such estimates is not new, but their use is increasing. This increase results primarily because standard setters believe asset and liability measures that reflect current economic conditions and up-to-date expectations of the future will result in more useful information for making economic decisions, which is the objective of financial reporting. This is why sta...

  17. Adverse outcome pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leist, Marcel; Ghallab, Ahmed; Graepel, Rabea

    2017-01-01

    -assessment, for continuous updating, as well as for alerting about pitfalls, misuses and limits of applicability. In this review, the history of the AOP concept and its most prominent strengths are discussed, including the advantages of a formalized approach, the systematic collection of weight of evidence, the linkage...... of mechanisms to apical end points, the examination of the plausibility of epidemiological data, the identification of critical knowledge gaps and the design of mechanistic test methods. To prepare the ground for a broadened and appropriate use of AOPs, some widespread misconceptions are explained. Moreover...

  18. 75 FR 16513 - B&C Corporation, JR Engineering Division, Including B&C Distribution Center, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Engineering Division, Including B&C Distribution Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers From B&C Services... occurred during the relevant time period at the B&C Distribution Center, Inc. of the B&C Corporation, JR Engineering Division, Barberton, Ohio. The B&C Distribution Center provides distribution and logistical...

  19. Measuring outcomes in children's rehabilitation: a decision protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, M; King, G; Russell, D; MacKinnon, E; Hurley, P; Murphy, C

    1999-06-01

    To develop and test the feasibility and clinical utility of a computerized self-directed software program designed to enable service providers in children's rehabilitation to make decisions about the most appropriate outcome measures to use in client and program evaluation. A before-and-after design was used to test the feasibility and initial impact of the decision-making outcome software in improving knowledge and use of clinical outcome measures. A children's rehabilitation center in a city of 50,000. All service providers in the children's rehabilitation center. Disciplines represented included early childhood education, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech and language pathology, audiology, social work, and psychology. Using a conceptual framework based on the International Classification of Impairment, Disability, and Handicap (ICIDH), an outcome measurement decision-making protocol was developed. The decision-making protocol was computerized in an educational software program with an attached database of critically appraised measures. Participants learned about outcome measures through the program and selected outcome measures that met their specifications. The computer software was tested for feasibility in the children's rehabilitation center for 6 months. Knowledge and use of clinical outcome measures were determined before and after the feasibility testing using a survey of all service providers currently at the centre and audits of 30 randomly selected rehabilitation records (at pretest, posttest, and follow-up). Service providers indicated that the outcomes software was easy to follow and believed that the use of the ICIDH framework helped them in making decisions about selecting outcome measures. Results of the survey indicated that there were significant changes in the service providers' level of comfort with selecting measures and knowing what measures were available. Use of outcome measures as identified through the audit did not change

  20. Conceptual basis of outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, R A

    1995-01-01

    Because of its treatment configuration and the assumption of long-term benefit, rehabilitation has had a continuing interest in the measurement of outcomes. The utility of outcome indicators rests on their conceptual foundations, the technical development of measures and validation research. Some measures, particularly of functional status, have become increasingly sophisticated with the application of psychometric and statistical analysis techniques. Less effort has been devoted to an elaboration of their theoretical basis. A first step is an examination of the assumptions underlying outcome measures, the purpose of this article. Central to an understanding is clarification of definitions of key terms such as outcomes, independence, impairment, disability and handicap. All outcome measures must be seen as part of a social context of norms and expectations. However, most norms in rehabilitation are implied rather than explicit. The assumptions behind several common outcomes are examined with suggestions for ways to increase their utility. The ability of rehabilitation to compete in the current climate, stressing cost-effectiveness, will depend heavily on the robustness of outcome measures.

  1. [Knowledge produced from the outcomes of the "Nursing Outcomes Classification--NOC": integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Natália Chantal Magalhães; de Souza Oliveira, Ana Railka; de Carvalho, Emília Campos

    2015-12-01

    To identify the knowledge produced from the outcomes of the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). A literature review using the integrative databases: Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS), US National Library of Medicine (PubMed), Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Scopus Info Site (SCOPUS), during the months of August and September 2014. The review consisted of 21 articles that addressed different issues: Translation and Cultural adaptation (4.77%); Applicability in clinical practice (33.33%); and, Validation (63.90%). Analysis of these articles showed that the knowledge produced from the Nursing Outcomes Classification includes translation and cultural adaptation, evaluation of applicability and validation of its items. Considering the continuous evolution of this classification, periodic reviews should be carried out to identify the knowledge, use and effects of the NOC.

  2. Knowledge produced from the outcomes of the "Nursing Outcomes Classification - NOC": integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Chantal Magalhães da Silva

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the knowledge produced from the outcomes of the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC. Method: A literature review using the integrative databases: Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS, US National Library of Medicine (PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL and Scopus Info Site (SCOPUS, during the months of August and September 2014. Results: The review consisted of 21 articles that addressed different issues: Translation and Cultural adaptation (4.77%; Applicability in clinical practice (33.33%; and, Validation (63.90%. Analysis of these articles showed that the knowledge produced from the Nursing Outcomes Classification includes translation and cultural adaptation, evaluation of applicability and validation of its items. Conclusion: Considering the continuous evolution of this classification, periodic reviews should be carried out to identify the knowledge, use and effects of the NOC.

  3. Surgical management of gynecomastia: an outcome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasielska, Anna; Antoszewski, Bogusław

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the surgical management of gynecomastia focusing on techniques, complications, and aesthetic results. The authors also proposed an evaluation scale of the cosmetic results after the treatment. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 113 patients undergoing the surgery for gynecomastia in our department. Preoperative clinical evaluation included the grade of gynecomastia, its etiology, and side, whereas postoperative analysis concerned histologic findings, complications, and cosmetic results. Operative techniques included subcutaneous mastectomy through circumareolar approach in 94 patients, subcutaneous mastectomy with skin excision in 9 patients, inverted-T reduction mastopexy with nipple-areola complex (NAC) transposition in 6 subjects, and breast amputation through inframammary fold approach with free transplantation of NAC in 4 cases. Complications occurred in