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Sample records for outcome measures body

  1. Discordance Between Body Mass Index (BMI) and a Novel Body Composition Change Index (BCCI) as Outcome Measures in Weight Change Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Stephen D; Kaats, Gilbert R; Preuss, Harry G

    2018-01-01

    A general assumption is that the body mass index (BMI) reflects changes in fat mass (FM). However, it fails to distinguish the type of weight that is lost or gained-fat mass (FM) or fat-free mass (FFM). The BMI treats both changes the same although they have opposite health consequences. The objective of this study was to propose a more precise measure, a body composition change index (BCCI), which distinguishes between changes in FM and FFM, and this study compares it with using the BMI as an outcome measure. Data were obtained from 3,870 subjects who had completed dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) total body scans at baseline and end-of-study when participating in a variety of weight-loss interventions. Since height remained constant in this adult cohort, changes in the BMI corresponded with scale weight changes (r = 0.994), allowing BMI changes to be converted to "lbs." to match the statistic used for calculation of the BCCI. The BCCI is calculated by scoring increases in FFM (lbs.) and decreases in FM (lbs.) as positive outcomes and scoring decreases in FFM and increases in FM as negative outcomes. The BCCI is the net sum of these calculations. Differences between scale weight changes and BCCI values were subsequently compared to obtain "discordance scores." Discordance scores ranged from 0.0 lbs. to >30.0 lbs. with a mean absolute value of between the two measures of 7.79 lbs. (99% confidence interval: 7.49-8.10, p BCCI and the BMI to evaluate the efficacy of weight loss interventions. If assessing changes in body composition is a treatment goal, use of the BMI could result in significantly erroneous conclusions.

  2. Reproducibility, and age, body-weight and gender dependency of candidate skeletal muscle MRI outcome measures in healthy volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Reilly, Mary M.; Hanna, Michael G.; Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Thornton, John S.; Fischmann, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can potentially meet the pressing need for objective, sensitive, reproducible outcome measures in neuromuscular disease trials. We tested, in healthy volunteers, the consistency, reliability and sensitivity to normal inter-subject variation of MRI methods targeted to lower limb muscle pathology to inform the design of practical but comprehensive MRI outcome measure protocols for use in imminent patient studies. Forty-seven healthy volunteers, age 21-81 years, were subject at 3T to three-point Dixon fat-fraction measurement, T 1 -relaxometry, T 2 -relaxometry and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) imaging at mid-thigh and mid-calf level bilaterally. Fifteen subjects underwent repeat imaging at 2 weeks. Mean between-muscle fat fraction and T 2 differences were small, but significant (p 2 correlated positively, and MTR negatively with subject age in both the thigh and calf, with similar significant correlations with weight at thigh level only (p < 0.001 to p < 0.05). Scan-rescan and inter-observer intra-class correlation coefficients ranged between 0.62-0.84 and 0.79-0.99 respectively. Quantitative lower-limb muscle MRI using readily implementable methods was sensitive enough to demonstrate inter-muscle differences (small in health), and correlations with subject age and weight. In combination with high reliability, this strongly supports the suitability of these methods to provide longitudinal outcome measures in neuromuscular disease treatment trials. (orig.)

  3. Introducing the Body-QoL®: A New Patient-Reported Outcome Instrument for Measuring Body Satisfaction-Related Quality of Life in Aesthetic and Post-bariatric Body Contouring Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilla, Stefan; Cuevas, Pedro; Aedo, Sócrates; Dominguez, Carlos; Jara, Rocío; Calderón, María E; Al-Himdani, Sarah; Rios, Marco A; Taladriz, Cristián; Rodriguez, Diego; Gonzalez, Rolando; Lazo, Ángel; Erazo, Cristián; Benitez, Susana; Andrades, Patricio; Sepúlveda, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    To develop a new patient-reported outcome instrument (PRO) to measure body-related satisfaction quality of life (QoL). Standard 3-phase PRO design was followed; in the first phase, a qualitative design was used in 45 patients to develop a conceptual framework and to create preliminary scale domains and items. In phase 2, large-scale population testing on 1340 subjects was performed to reduce items and domains. In phase 3, final testing of the developed instrument on 34 patients was performed. Statistics used include Factor, RASCH, and multivariate regression analysis. Psychometric properties measured were internal reliability, item-rest, item-test, and test-retest correlations. The PRO-developed instrument is composed of four domains (satisfaction with the abdomen, sex life, self-esteem and social life, and physical symptoms) and 20 items in total. The score can range from 20 (worst) to 100 (best). Responsiveness was 100 %, internal reliability 93.3 %, and test-retest concordance 97.7 %. Body image-related QoL was superior in men than women (p instrument (p measured reliably with the Body-QoL instrument. It can be used to quantify the improvement in cosmetic and post-bariatric patients including non- or minimally invasive procedures, suction assisted lipectomy, abdominoplasty, lipoabdominoplasty, and lower body lift and to give an evidence-based approach to standard practice. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  4. Measuring body composition using the bioelectrical impedance method can predict the outcomes of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy in patients with pancreatobiliary tract cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Mami; Tsuchiya, Aya; Ohta, Seiko; Iijima, Yukie; Maruyama, Miyuki; Onodera, Yoshiko; Hagihara, Megumi; Nakaya, Naoki; Sato, Itaru; Omura, Kenji; Ueno, Soichiro; Nakajima, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    In order to examine the effect on body composition of anticancer drug treatments, the body composition rate in patients being treated with gemcitabine (GEM)-based chemotherapy was measured over time on an outpatient basis with a simple body composition monitor using the bioelectrical impedance (BI) method. The results revealed a significant reduction in the body fat rate (P=0.01) over the course of treatment in patients with pancreatobiliary tract cancer who became unable to continue GEM-based chemotherapy due to progressive disease or a decreased performance status. Meanwhile, no changes were observed in the body composition of control patients with urothelial carcinoma receiving GEM-based chemotherapy. In association with the adverse reactions to GEM and the hematotoxicity profile, a decreased white blood cell count was more likely to occur in body fat-dominant patients (mean fat rate, 25.8%; mean muscle rate, 26.2%), whereas a decreased blood platelet count was more likely to occur in skeletal muscle-dominant patients (mean fat rate, 23.3%; mean muscle rates, 28.7%). The correlation between body composition parameters and the relative dose intensity (RDI) associated with GEM administration was also analyzed. The results revealed a positive correlation between the RDI and basal metabolism amount (P=0.03); however, the RDI did not correlate with the body fat rate, skeletal muscle rate or body mass index (P=0.61, P=0.14 and P=0.20, respectively). In conclusion, the body composition rate measurement using the BI method over time may be useful for predicting the outcome of GEM-based chemotherapy and adverse events in patients with pancreatobiliary tract cancer. In particular, the present findings indicate that the changes in body fat rate may be helpful as an adjunct index for assessing potential continuation of chemotherapy and changes in physical conditions.

  5. Reproducibility, and age, body-weight and gender dependency of candidate skeletal muscle MRI outcome measures in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Reilly, Mary M.; Hanna, Michael G. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Medical Research Council Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Thornton, John S. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Medical Research Council Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, Neuroradiological Academic Unit, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); Fischmann, Arne [University of Basel Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can potentially meet the pressing need for objective, sensitive, reproducible outcome measures in neuromuscular disease trials. We tested, in healthy volunteers, the consistency, reliability and sensitivity to normal inter-subject variation of MRI methods targeted to lower limb muscle pathology to inform the design of practical but comprehensive MRI outcome measure protocols for use in imminent patient studies. Forty-seven healthy volunteers, age 21-81 years, were subject at 3T to three-point Dixon fat-fraction measurement, T{sub 1}-relaxometry, T{sub 2}-relaxometry and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) imaging at mid-thigh and mid-calf level bilaterally. Fifteen subjects underwent repeat imaging at 2 weeks. Mean between-muscle fat fraction and T{sub 2} differences were small, but significant (p < 0.001). Fat fraction and T{sub 2} correlated positively, and MTR negatively with subject age in both the thigh and calf, with similar significant correlations with weight at thigh level only (p < 0.001 to p < 0.05). Scan-rescan and inter-observer intra-class correlation coefficients ranged between 0.62-0.84 and 0.79-0.99 respectively. Quantitative lower-limb muscle MRI using readily implementable methods was sensitive enough to demonstrate inter-muscle differences (small in health), and correlations with subject age and weight. In combination with high reliability, this strongly supports the suitability of these methods to provide longitudinal outcome measures in neuromuscular disease treatment trials. (orig.)

  6. FastStats: Body Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Body Measurements Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data ... 7 MB] Related FastStats Obesity/Overweight Related Links Body Mass Index table CDC Growth Charts National Health ...

  7. Body Dissatisfaction and Mental Health Outcomes Among Korean College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sukkyung; Shin, Kyulee

    2016-06-01

    For many years, body dissatisfaction and mental health were thought of as Western phenomena and were studied mostly in Caucasian women. Recent studies, however, suggest that these issues are also present in men and in other ethnic groups. This study examined the association between body dissatisfaction and mental health outcomes, with personality traits and neuroticism playing possible predictive roles, using a Korean sample. A total of 545 college students, from five private universities in South Korea, completed assessment measures for depression, self-esteem, neuroticism, and body esteem scales. After controlling for covariates including body mass index and exercise time, body dissatisfaction was seen to play a mediating role between neuroticism and mental health outcomes. Differences between the sexes were also found in this relationship. For men, body dissatisfaction acted as a mediator between neuroticism and depression. For women, body dissatisfaction acted as a mediator between neuroticism and both depression and self-esteem. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Measuring Population Health Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Parrish, R. Gibson

    2010-01-01

    An ideal population health outcome metric should reflect a population's dynamic state of physical, mental, and social well-being. Positive health outcomes include being alive; functioning well mentally, physically, and socially; and having a sense of well-being. Negative outcomes include death, loss of function, and lack of well-being. In contrast to these health outcomes, diseases and injuries are intermediate factors that influence the likelihood of achieving a state of health. On the basis...

  9. Measuring radioactivity in the body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-09-15

    Techniques of measuring the total amount of radioactivity in the body of a living person as well as the principal applications of such measurements were reviewed at a Symposium on Whole Body Counting held in Vienna from 12 to 16 June 1961. The whole body counters can be divided into two broad groups: (a) counters for the radiation protection surveillance of the general public and radiation workers, capable of detecting extremely low levels of radioactivity in the human body, and (b) counters for medical research and diagnosis, designed to check the retention and excretion of radioactive substances administered to patients for metabolic and pathological studies. In both cases, the primary requirement is that the counter must be able to measure the total activity in the body. In recent years, there has been a remarkable development of the instruments and techniques for such measurements. One of the main purposes of the symposium in Vienna was to discuss how best to use these highly sophisticated instruments.

  10. Conceptual basis of outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, R A

    1995-01-01

    Because of its treatment configuration and the assumption of long-term benefit, rehabilitation has had a continuing interest in the measurement of outcomes. The utility of outcome indicators rests on their conceptual foundations, the technical development of measures and validation research. Some measures, particularly of functional status, have become increasingly sophisticated with the application of psychometric and statistical analysis techniques. Less effort has been devoted to an elaboration of their theoretical basis. A first step is an examination of the assumptions underlying outcome measures, the purpose of this article. Central to an understanding is clarification of definitions of key terms such as outcomes, independence, impairment, disability and handicap. All outcome measures must be seen as part of a social context of norms and expectations. However, most norms in rehabilitation are implied rather than explicit. The assumptions behind several common outcomes are examined with suggestions for ways to increase their utility. The ability of rehabilitation to compete in the current climate, stressing cost-effectiveness, will depend heavily on the robustness of outcome measures.

  11. Mind-Body Medicine and Immune System Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Wahbeh, Helané; Haywood, Ashley; Kaufman, Karen; Zwickey, Heather

    2009-01-01

    This study is a systematic review of mind-body interventions that used immune outcomes in order to: 1) characterize mind-body medicine studies that assessed immune outcomes, 2) evaluate the quality of mind-body medicine studies measuring immune system effects, and 3) systematically evaluate the evidence for mind-body interventions effect on immune system outcomes using existing formal tools. 111 studies with 4,777 subjects were reviewed. The three largest intervention type categories were Rel...

  12. Estimation Of Body Weight From Linear Body Measurements In Two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prediction of body weight from body girth, keel length and thigh length was studied using one hundred Ross and one hundred Anak Titan broilers. Data were collected on the birds from day-old to 9 weeks of age. Body measurement was regressed against body weight at 9 weeks of age using simple linear and ...

  13. Outcomes of nonoperatively treated displaced scapular body fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulias, Apostolos; Molinero, Kenneth G; Krenk, Daniel E; Muffly, Matthew T; Altman, Daniel T; Altman, Gregory T

    2011-05-01

    Displaced scapular body fractures most commonly are treated conservatively. However there is conflicting evidence in the literature regarding the outcomes owing to retrospective design of studies, different classification systems, and diverse outcome tools. The functional outcome after nonoperative management of displaced scapular body fractures was assessed by change in the DASH (Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand) score; (2) the radiographic outcome was assessed by the change of the glenopolar angle (GPA); and (3) associated scapular and extrascapular injuries that may affect outcome were identified. Forty-nine consecutive patients were treated with early passive and active ROM exercises for a displaced scapular body fracture. We followed 32 of these patients (65.3%) for a minimum of 6 months (mean, 15 months; range, 6-33 months). Mean age of the patients was 46.9 years (range, 21-84 years) and the mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 21.5 (range, 5-50). Subjective functional results (DASH score) and radiographic assessment (fracture union, glenopolar angle) were measured. All fractures healed uneventfully. The mean change of glenopolar angle was 9° (range, 0°-20°). The mean change of the DASH score was 10.2, which is a change with minimal clinical importance. There was a correlation between the change in this score with the ISS and presence of rib fractures. Satisfactory outcomes are reported with nonoperative treatment of displaced scapular body fractures. We have shown that the severity of ISS and the presence of rib fractures adversely affect the clinical outcome.

  14. Measurements of body protein for clinical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, J.R.; Harrison, J.E.; McNeill, M.G.; Jeejeebhoy, K.N.; Krishnan, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Body protein (nitrogen) is determined by bilaterally irradiating the body with neutrons using Pu-Be sources and measuring the resultant 10.8 MeV gamma rays from the reaction 14 N(n,8) 15 N. In the authors lab the whole body can be scanned or separate segments of the body can be measured independently. A nitrogen index has been developed based on body size and is used as a predictor of normal total body nitrogen (TBN). They have found that TBN, when normalized to body size in this way, provides a reliable index of protein status which cannot be accurately determined by body weight, anthropometry, or body potassium measurements. Changes in body composition with age were studied by measuring the composition of 56 healthy female volunteers aged 20-80. Measurements were made for K( 40 K), Ca and N. It was shown that protein and bone mineral decrease with age but that this is not reflected in K or anthropometry measurements. Results of other studies to be presented include: body protein measurements pre and post TPN (total parenteral nutrition), nutritional status of patients on long term CAPD (continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis) and changes in body composition as a result of TPN in patients with small cell lung cancer receiving chemotherapy. Clinical results show that indirect measurements of body protein based on weight, potassium, or anthropometry, do not give an accurate measure of body protein. For an accurate measurement, direct measurement of body protein is necessary

  15. Outcome measures in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, J.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are generally multifaceted disorders and, therefore, measurement of multiple outcomes is relevant to most of these diseases. Developments in outcome measures in the rheumatic diseases are promoted by the development of successful treatments. Outcome measurement will

  16. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Austin, Stephen Fitzgerald; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for anxiety and depressive disorders are an important aspect of measurement-based care. AIM: The aim of the study was to perform a clinimetric analysis of two PROMs scales in patents with depression and anxiety. METHODS: Patients completed...... recruited from two Danish mental health centers with anxiety or depression. The standardization of the SCL-10 and WHO-5 by T-scores indicated that a T-score of 65 corresponding to being moderately in need of treatment and a T-score of 75 to be severely in need of treatment. The coefficient of alpha...... with anxiety or depression undergoing psychotherapy treatment....

  17. Impact of tumor attachment to the pleura measured by a pretreatment CT image on outcome of stage I NSCLC treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takaya; Kadoya, Noriyuki; Shirata, Yuko; Koto, Masashi; Sato, Kiyokazu; Matsushita, Haruo; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Umezawa, Rei; Kubozono, Masaki; Ishikawa, Yojiro; Kozumi, Maiko; Takahashi, Noriyoshi; Ito, Kengo; Katagiri, Yu; Takeda, Ken; Jingu, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Pleural invasion status is known to be a predictor of survival after pulmonary resection for non-small cell lung cancer. Our goal was to determine whether the length of tumor attachment to the pleura on a pretreatment CT image has prognostic value as an alternative to pleural invasion status for stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). A total of 90 tumors in 87 patients (males: 68, females: 19) who received SBRT between March 2005 and September 2011 in our institution were reviewed. The median age of the patients was 78 years (range, 48-90 years). The median tumor diameter was 2.2 cm (range, 0.9-4.2 cm). The prescribed dose was typically 48 Gy in 4 fractions, 60 Gy in 8 fractions or 60 Gy in 15 fractions to the isocenter with 6 MV X-ray using 4 non-coplanar and 3 coplanar static beams. The lengths of attachment were measured using pretreatment CT images at the lung window. Cumulative incidence rates were calculated using Kaplan-Meier curves, and univariate and multivariate analyses for in-field tumor control, locoregional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis and freedom from progression (FFP) were performed using a Cox proportional hazards model. Of the 90 tumors, 42 tumors were attached to the pleura (median, 14.7 mm; range, 4.3-36.0 mm), 21 tumors had pleural indentation and 27 tumors had no attachment. The median follow-up period for survivors was 46.1 months. The 3-year in-field control, LRC, FFP and overall survival rates were 91.2%, 75.3%, 63.8% and 68.6%, respectively. SBRT dose and tumor diameter were independently significant predictors of in-field control (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively). Broad attachment to the pleura, the length being more than 14.7 mm, was a negative independent predictor of LRC and FFP (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively). Pleural attachment status on a pretreatment CT image might be an important predictor of LRC and FFP

  18. Nutritional assessment with body composition measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shizgal, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement of body composition by multiple isotope dilution provides an accurate and precise measure of both the nutritional state and the response to nutritional support. A multiple isotope dilution technique has been developed that permits measurement of the three major components of body composition: body fat, extracellular mass (ECM), and body cell mass (BCM). Normal body composition was defined by data obtained in 25 healthy volunteers. Malnutrition is characterized by a loss of BCM and an expansion of the ECM, and as a result the lean body mass is not significantly different from normal. The loss of body weight with malnutrition therefore often reflects the loss of body fat. The utility of body composition measurements was demonstrated by determining the effect of total parenteral nutrition on body composition to determine the relationship between caloric intake and the change in the BCM. A statistically significant relationship was developed which demonstrated that a caloric intake in the range of 30-40 cal/kg/day is required for maintenance. To restore a depleted or malnourished BCM requires a caloric intake in excess of that required for maintenance. The measurement of body composition by multiple isotope dilution is complex and time consuming, and requires specialized laboratory facilities and specially trained personnel. As a result, these measurements are not suited for routine patient management, but should rather be reserved for research purposes

  19. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Weight Loss and Body Contouring Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lotte; Klassen, Anne; Rose, Michael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health-related quality of life and satisfaction with appearance are important outcomes in bariatric and body contouring surgery. To investigate these outcomes, scientifically sound and clinically meaningful patient-reported outcome instruments are needed. The authors measured health-r...

  20. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W

    2015-01-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis...

  1. [Patient evaluation and outcome measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Pol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Both the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis require systematic evaluation of the indicators that provide information on the degree of involvement of the disease and allow its quantification. Reliable measures of disease progression help decision-making by clinicians and provide valid information on treatment response and the effectiveness of the distinct therapeutic interventions. The instruments recommended in research, as outcome measures in osteoarthritis, are pain evaluation, assessment of physical function, and self-reported global evaluation. In studies lasting more than 1 year, structural changes are evaluated through simple X-ray. Self-reported quality of life assessment and physician global assessment are also recommended as options. These indicators should be incorporated into routine clinical practice for adequate evaluation and correct follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. The recommended pain evaluation method for use in clinical practice is the visual analog scale (VAS). The best instrument to evaluate physical function in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis is the WOMAC scale (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index). For patient-reported global assessment in routine practice, the recommended scales are VAS or the SF-12 (12-item short-form health survey). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Relative relationships of general shame and body shame with body dysmorphic phenomenology and psychosocial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Hilary; Renshaw, Keith D; Davidson, Eliza; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2017-07-01

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is characterized by a preoccupation with a perceived flaw in appearance and repetitive avoidance behaviors. BDD involves severe psychosocial outcomes (e.g., depression, suicidality, functional impairment). Identifying correlates of BDD symptoms and outcomes can inform treatment. Shame, a painful emotion felt in response to critical self-judgment, may be one key correlate. However, research on shame in BDD is scarce and previous studies have not distinguished general shame from body shame. This study examines the relative relationships between body shame and general shame with body dysmorphic phenomenology and psychosocial outcomes. Participants ( N = 184) were recruited online via BDD organizations and completed a survey. Path analysis was used to examine associations between body and general shame with 1) body dysmorphic phenomenology and 2) depression severity, suicide risk, and functional impairment. Both types of shame were differentially related to outcomes. Body shame was more strongly related to phenomenology, whereas general shame was more strongly related to psychosocial outcomes. Thus, it may be important for BDD treatment to focus on reducing both general and body shame. Further research should evaluate whether current treatments adequately address and reduce general and body shame, and whether addressing shame promotes better treatment outcomes.

  3. Health outcome after major trauma: what are we measuring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Karen; Cole, Elaine; Playford, E Diane; Grill, Eva; Soberg, Helene L; Brohi, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Trauma is a global disease and is among the leading causes of disability in the world. The importance of outcome beyond trauma survival has been recognised over the last decade. Despite this there is no internationally agreed approach for assessment of health outcome and rehabilitation of trauma patients. To systematically examine to what extent outcomes measures evaluate health outcomes in patients with major trauma. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL (from 2006-2012) were searched for studies evaluating health outcome after traumatic injuries. Studies of adult patients with injuries involving at least two body areas or organ systems were included. Information on study design, outcome measures used, sample size and outcomes were extracted. The World Health Organisation International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) were used to evaluate to what extent outcome measures captured health impacts. 34 studies from 755 studies were included in the review. 38 outcome measures were identified. 21 outcome measures were used only once and only five were used in three or more studies. Only 6% of all possible health impacts were captured. Concepts related to activity and participation were the most represented but still only captured 12% of all possible concepts in this domain. Measures performed very poorly in capturing concepts related to body function (5%), functional activities (11%) and environmental factors (2%). Outcome measures used in major trauma capture only a small proportion of health impacts. There is no inclusive classification for measuring disability or health outcome following trauma. The ICF may provide a useful framework for the development of a comprehensive health outcome measure for trauma care.

  4. Health outcome after major trauma: what are we measuring?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Hoffman

    Full Text Available Trauma is a global disease and is among the leading causes of disability in the world. The importance of outcome beyond trauma survival has been recognised over the last decade. Despite this there is no internationally agreed approach for assessment of health outcome and rehabilitation of trauma patients.To systematically examine to what extent outcomes measures evaluate health outcomes in patients with major trauma.MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL (from 2006-2012 were searched for studies evaluating health outcome after traumatic injuries.Studies of adult patients with injuries involving at least two body areas or organ systems were included. Information on study design, outcome measures used, sample size and outcomes were extracted. The World Health Organisation International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF were used to evaluate to what extent outcome measures captured health impacts.34 studies from 755 studies were included in the review. 38 outcome measures were identified. 21 outcome measures were used only once and only five were used in three or more studies. Only 6% of all possible health impacts were captured. Concepts related to activity and participation were the most represented but still only captured 12% of all possible concepts in this domain. Measures performed very poorly in capturing concepts related to body function (5%, functional activities (11% and environmental factors (2%.Outcome measures used in major trauma capture only a small proportion of health impacts. There is no inclusive classification for measuring disability or health outcome following trauma. The ICF may provide a useful framework for the development of a comprehensive health outcome measure for trauma care.

  5. Mind-Body Medicine and Immune System Outcomes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbeh, Helané; Haywood, Ashley; Kaufman, Karen; Zwickey, Heather

    2009-01-01

    This study is a systematic review of mind-body interventions that used immune outcomes in order to: 1) characterize mind-body medicine studies that assessed immune outcomes, 2) evaluate the quality of mind-body medicine studies measuring immune system effects, and 3) systematically evaluate the evidence for mind-body interventions effect on immune system outcomes using existing formal tools. 111 studies with 4,777 subjects were reviewed. The three largest intervention type categories were Relaxation Training (n=25), Cognitive Based Stress Management (n=22), and Hypnosis (n=21). Half the studies were conducted with healthy subjects (n=51). HIV (n=18), cancer (n=13) and allergies (n=7) were the most prominent conditions examined in the studies comprising of non-healthy subjects. Natural killer cell and CD4 T lymphocyte measures were the most commonly studied outcomes. Most outcome and modality categories had limited or inconclusive evidence. Relaxation training had the strongest scientific evidence of a mind-body medicine affecting immune outcomes. Immunoglobulin A had the strongest scientific evidence for positive effects from mind-body medicine. Issues for mind-body medicine studies with immune outcomes are discussed and recommendations are made to help improve future clinical trials.

  6. Predictors and Health-Related Outcomes of Positive Body Image in Adolescent Girls: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Rachel; Tiggemann, Marika; Clark, Levina

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate prospective predictors and health-related outcomes of positive body image in adolescent girls. In so doing, the modified acceptance model of intuitive eating was also examined longitudinally. A sample of 298 girls aged 12 to 16 years completed a questionnaire containing measures of body appreciation, potential…

  7. Assessment of body temperature measurement options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund-Levander, Märtha; Grodzinsky, Ewa

    Assessment of body temperature is important for decisions in nursing care, medical diagnosis, treatment and the need of laboratory tests. The definition of normal body temperature as 37°C was established in the middle of the 19th century. Since then the technical design and the accuracy of thermometers has been much improved. Knowledge of physical influence on the individual body temperature, such as thermoregulation and hormones, are still not taken into consideration in body temperature assessment. It is time for a change; the unadjusted mode should be used, without adjusting to another site and the same site of measurement should be used as far as possible. Peripheral sites, such as the axillary and the forehead site, are not recommended as an assessment of core body temperature in adults. Frail elderly individuals might have a low normal body temperature and therefore be at risk of being assessed as non-febrile. As the ear site is close to the hypothalamus and quickly responds to changes in the set point temperature, it is a preferable and recommendable site for measurement of body temperature.

  8. The effects of maternal body mass index on pregnancy outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khashan, A S

    2012-01-31

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is presenting a critical challenge to healthcare services. We examined the effect of Body Mass Index in early pregnancy on adverse pregnancy outcome. We performed a population register-based cohort study using data from the North Western Perinatal survey (N = 99,403 babies born during 2004-2006), based at The University of Manchester, UK. The main outcome measures were Caesarean section delivery, preterm birth, neonatal death, stillbirth, Macrosomia, small for gestational age and large for gestational age. The risk of preterm birth was reduced by almost 10% in overweight (RR = 0.89, [95% CI: 0.83, 0.95]) and obese women (RR = 0.90, [95% CI: 0.84, 0.97]) and was increased in underweight women (RR = 1.33, [95% CI: 1.16, 1.53]). Overweight (RR = 1.17, [95% CI: 1.09, 1.25]), obese (RR = 1.35, [95% CI: 1.25, 1.45]) and morbidly obese (RR = 1.24, [95% CI: 1.02, 1.52]) women had an elevated risk of post-term birth compared to normal women. The risk of fetal macrosomia and operative delivery increased with BMI such that morbidly obese women were at greatest risk of both (RR of macrosomia = 4.78 [95% CI: 3.86, 5.92] and RR of Caesarean section = 1.66 [95% CI: 1.61, 1.71] and a RR of emergency Caesarean section = 1.59 [95% CI: 1.45, 1.75]). Excessive leanness and obesity are associated with different adverse pregnancy outcomes with major maternal and fetal complications. Overweight and obese women have a higher risk of macrosomia and Caesarean delivery and lower risk of preterm delivery. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear and is worthy of further investigation.

  9. Measurement of Radioactivity in the Human Body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, I Oe; Nilsson, I

    1960-12-15

    A body counter with a steel room and a 4-inch-diameter by 4-inch thick Nal scintillation counter has been in operation since February 1958. It is used to control the internal contamination in people working with radioactive materials. Measurements have also been made on the natural activity in the human body. The average cesium-137/potassium ratio in a group of Swedish males was in May 1959 73 {mu}{mu}c per gram of body potassium and in June 1960 55 {mu}{mu}c per gram of body potassium. The cessation of the nuclear bomb tests has caused a decrease in the cesium level in people. This gives some information of how cesium is entering the biosphere.

  10. Sensing Movement: Microsensors for Body Motion Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansong Zeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of body posture and motion is an important physiological function that can keep the body in balance. Man-made motion sensors have also been widely applied for a broad array of biomedical applications including diagnosis of balance disorders and evaluation of energy expenditure. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art sensing components utilized for body motion measurement. The anatomy and working principles of a natural body motion sensor, the human vestibular system, are first described. Various man-made inertial sensors are then elaborated based on their distinctive sensing mechanisms. In particular, both the conventional solid-state motion sensors and the emerging non solid-state motion sensors are depicted. With their lower cost and increased intelligence, man-made motion sensors are expected to play an increasingly important role in biomedical systems for basic research as well as clinical diagnostics.

  11. Measurement of Radioactivity in the Human Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, I.Oe.; Nilsson, I.

    1960-12-01

    A body counter with a steel room and a 4-inch-diameter by 4-inch thick Nal scintillation counter has been in operation since February 1958. It is used to control the internal contamination in people working with radioactive materials. Measurements have also been made on the natural activity in the human body. The average cesium-137/potassium ratio in a group of Swedish males was in May 1959 73 μμc per gram of body potassium and in June 1960 55 μμc per gram of body potassium. The cessation of the nuclear bomb tests has caused a decrease in the cesium level in people. This gives some information of how cesium is entering the biosphere

  12. Long term surgical treatment outcome of talar body fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ramesh Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Talar body fractures are rare and have poor treatment outcome. The purpose of this study is to report the long term surgical treatment outcome of closed talar dome fractures. Methods: Eight closed talar body fractures, treated by open reduction and internal fixation with small fragment cancellous screws and/or Herbert screws in our level I trauma centre were retrospectively analyzed. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs of the foot (antero-posterior, lateral and oblique views and ankle (antero-posterior, lateral and mortise views were obtained. The patients were followed up both radiologically and functionally (foot function index, FFI after 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and then annually. Results: There were five crush fractures and three shear fractures (two sagittal shear and one coronal shear, with average follow-up of 5 years. No early complications were noticed in these patients. Late complications included osteoarthrosis of subtalar/ankle joints in six patients and osteonecrosis of talar body in four patients. On functional assessment, mean FFI after 5 years was 104.63 points and worse outcome was noticed in crush injury and coronal shear fractures. Sagittal shear fractures had a good functional and radiological outcome. Conclusions: Late complications subsequent to surgically treated talar body fractures are inevitable, even though exact reduction and rigid fixation are achieved, thus patients are supposed to be counseled about the adverse outcome. Although crush and coronal shear fractures have poor outcome, sagittal injuries have good prognosis on long term evaluation. Key words: Fractures, bone; Talus; Fracture fixation, internal

  13. Responsiveness of Clinical Outcome Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    Background The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) is one of two standardised functional health measurement scales (HMS) recommended. Despite extensive psychometric testing, little is known about HMS behaviour and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in subgroups of LBP patients. Moreover...... obtainable by a certain treatment. Chronic LBP patients seem to have a reasonable idea of an acceptable change in pain but overestimate change in functional and psychological /affective domains....

  14. Predictors and health-related outcomes of positive body image in adolescent girls: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Rachel; Tiggemann, Marika; Clark, Levina

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate prospective predictors and health-related outcomes of positive body image in adolescent girls. In so doing, the modified acceptance model of intuitive eating was also examined longitudinally. A sample of 298 girls aged 12 to 16 years completed a questionnaire containing measures of body appreciation, potential predictors, and a range of health outcomes, at 2 time points separated by 1 year. Longitudinal change regression models showed that perceived body acceptance by others (positively), self-objectification and social comparison (negatively), and body appreciation (positively) prospectively predicted intuitive eating 1 year later, consistent with the acceptance model of intuitive eating. Perceived body acceptance by others was the only proposed predictor to prospectively predict an increase in body appreciation over time. Time 1 body appreciation prospectively predicted a decrease in dieting, alcohol, and cigarette use, and an increase in physical activity 1 year later. In particular, girls with low body appreciation were more likely than girls with high body appreciation to take up alcohol and cigarette use between time points. The results highlight body appreciation as an important target for interventions designed to prevent or delay the uptake of alcohol and cigarette consumption among girls. More broadly, they suggest that a positive body image can confer considerable benefit for adolescent girls. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: relation to infarct size and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Marjolein; Scheijmans, Féline E V; van Seeters, Tom; Biessels, Geert J; Kappelle, L Jaap; Velthuis, Birgitta K; van der Worp, H Bart

    2016-11-21

    High body temperatures after ischemic stroke have been associated with larger infarct size, but the temporal profile of this relation is unknown. We assess the relation between temporal profile of body temperature and infarct size and functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. In 419 patients with acute ischemic stroke we assessed the relation between body temperature on admission and during the first 3 days with both infarct size and functional outcome. Infarct size was measured in milliliters on CT or MRI after 3 days. Poor functional outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score ≥3 at 3 months. Body temperature on admission was not associated with infarct size or poor outcome in adjusted analyses. By contrast, each additional 1.0 °C in body temperature on day 1 was associated with 0.31 ml larger infarct size (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-0.59), on day 2 with 1.13 ml larger infarct size(95% CI, 0.83-1.43), and on day 3 with 0.80 ml larger infarct size (95% CI, 0.48-1.12), in adjusted linear regression analyses. Higher peak body temperatures on days two and three were also associated with poor outcome (adjusted relative risks per additional 1.0 °C in body temperature, 1.52 (95% CI, 1.17-1.99) and 1.47 (95% CI, 1.22-1.77), respectively). Higher peak body temperatures during the first days after ischemic stroke, rather than on admission, are associated with larger infarct size and poor functional outcome. This suggests that prevention of high temperatures may improve outcome if continued for at least 3 days.

  16. Measuring Inclusive Education Outcomes in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreman, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This study details the results of a review of the academic and public sector literature on measuring inclusive education in large systems. It highlights some outcomes drawn from the international literature on inclusion that might be indicative of the presence and quality of inclusive education in an effort to develop a set of outcomes for…

  17. Body hair transplantation: Case report of successful outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataram Mysore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of body hair in to scalp has been suggested as an option to treat extensive cases of baldness with poor donor scalp. However, evidence about its long-term efficacy is yet lacking, with very few published reports and the routine use of the technique is still controversial. We report the satisfactory outcome in a case of extensive baldness in whom hairs from different donor areas such as chest, abdomen, arms, thighs were transplanted on to scalp.

  18. Korean Clinic Based Outcome Measure Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Jongbae Park

    2003-01-01

    Background: Evidence based medicine has become main tools for medical practice. However, conducting a highly ranked in the evidence hierarchy pyramid is not easy or feasible at all times and places. There remains a room for descriptive clinical outcome measure studies with admitting the limit of the intepretation. Aims: Presents three Korean clinic based outcome measure studies with a view to encouraging Korean clinicians to conduct similar studies. Methods: Three studies are presented...

  19. Whole body measurements in Bavarian school children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmier, H.; Berg, D.

    1992-12-01

    On behalf of the Bavarian State Ministry for State Development and Environmental Affairs measurements were conducted using the whole body counters at the Institute for Radiation Hygiene (of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection), and the Institute for Radiation Biology (of the GSF Research Centre for Environment and Health). Between September 1988 and July 1990 about 1600 school children from all over Bavaria were investigated for incorporated radiocesium. The aim of these measurements was to evaluate the whole body activity due to regionally differing soil contaminations in Bavaria following the accident in the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl and to assess the effective dose from an intake of radionuclides for the pupils by comparing the results of their WBC measurements with those of reference groups of children which underwent WBC examinations at regular intervals at both institutes since the middle of the year 1986. The results of the WBC measurements of those pupils who had not eaten mushrooms in the days before the measurement are in good agreement with the results of comparative measurements in children living in the regions of Munich and Frankfurt-am-Main. Based on these results an effective dose of 0,2 mSv for the Munich region children and of 0,1 mSv for Nothern Bavarian children can be derived. For children living in the highest contaminated region of Bavaria, i.e. the counties adjacent to the Alps, no comparable reference group results are available, but the amount of incorporated radiocesium is only twice that for pupils in the Munich region. The mean value for the specific activity of radiocesium in South Bavarian school children who consumed mushrooms was found to be twice the value of pupils who did not. This is also true for that group of children whose parents had bought allegedly low contaminated foodstuffs. Other effecs of nutrition habits on the specific whole body activity could not be found. (orig.) [de

  20. Body image flexibility: A predictor and moderator of outcome in transdiagnostic outpatient eating disorder treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzer, Mia L; Waller, Glenn; Wade, Tracey D

    2018-04-01

    Predictors of attrition and predictors and moderators of outcome were explored in a transdiagnostic sample of patients who received ten-session cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-T) for nonunderweight eating disorders. Body image flexibility, a protective positive body image construct, was hypothesized to be a significant moderator. Data from two case series were combined to form a sample of 78 participants who received CBT-T. Baseline measures of body image, negative affect, personality, and motivation (readiness to change and self-efficacy) were included as potential predictors. Global eating disorder psychopathology at each assessment point (baseline, mid- and post-treatment, 1- and 3-month follow-up) was the outcome variable. Predictors of attrition were assessed using logistic regression, and multilevel modeling was applied for predictors and moderators of outcome. Body image flexibility emerged as the strongest predictor and moderator of global eating disorder psychopathology, followed by body image avoidance. Body checking, negative affect, personality beliefs, and self-efficacy were significant predictors of global eating disorder psychopathology. Higher body image flexibility predicted lower global eating disorder psychopathology at every assessment point. Further research is required to replicate findings and explore the benefit of focusing on positive body image in treatment. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Food away from home and body mass outcomes: taking heterogeneity into account enhances quality of results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Eui-Kyung; Han, Euna

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the heterogeneous association of consumption of food away from home (FAFH) with individual body mass outcomes including body mass index and waist circumference over the entire conditional distribution of each outcome. Information on 16,403 adults obtained from nationally representative data on nutrition and behavior in Korea was used. A quantile regression model captured the variability of the association of FAFH with body mass outcomes across the entire conditional distribution of each outcome measure. Heavy FAFH consumption was defined as obtaining ≥1400 kcal from FAFH on a single day. Heavy FAFH consumption, specifically at full-service restaurants, was significantly associated with higher body mass index (+0.46 kg/m2 at the 50th quantile, 0.55 at the 75th, 0.66 at the 90th, and 0.44 at the 95th) and waist circumference (+0.96 cm at the 25th quantile, 1.06 cm at the 50th, 1.35 cm at the 75th, and 0.96 cm at the 90th quantiles) with overall larger associations at higher quantiles. Findings of the study indicate that conventional regression methods may mask important heterogeneity in the association between heavy FAFH consumption and body mass outcomes. Further public health efforts are needed to improve the nutritional quality of affordable FAFH choices and nutrition education and to establish a healthy food consumption environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimating Body Weight of Cattle Using Linear Body Measurements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationships between body weight (BW) and heart girth, body length and height at withers of 116 Indigenous, 72 Friesian, 95 Brahman, 88 Red Dane and 123 Crossbred cattle from 42 smallholder herds in Nharira-Lancashire, Zimbabwe, were investigated. The principal objective was to develop simple models that ...

  3. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfson, Ola; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric

    2016-01-01

    survey (SF-12) or the similar Veterans RAND 12-item health survey (VR-12). The most common specific PROMs were the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), the Western Ontario...... of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty in registries worldwide. The 2 main types of PROMs include generic (general health) PROMs, which provide a measure of general health for any health state, and specific PROMs, which focus on specific symptoms, diseases, organs, body regions, or body functions...... all elective hip or knee arthroplasty patients and 6 registries collected PROMs for sample populations; 1 other registry had planned but had not started collection of PROMs. The most common generic instruments used were the EuroQol 5 dimension health outcome survey (EQ-5D) and the Short Form 12 health...

  4. Estimation of Body Weight from Body Size Measurements and Body Condition Scores in Dairy Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Carsten; Kristensen, T.

    1997-01-01

    , and body condition score were consistently associated with BW. The coefficients of multiple determination varied from 80 to 89%. The number of significant terms and the parameter estimates of the models differed markedly among groups of cows. Apparently, these differences were due to breed and feeding...... regimen. Results from this study indicate that a reliable model for estimating BW of very different dairy cows maintained in a wide range of environments can be developed using body condition score, demographic information, and measurements of hip height and hip width. However, for management purposes......The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of hip height and width, body condition score, and relevant demographic information to predict body weight (BW) of dairy cows. Seven regression models were developed from data from 972 observations of 554 cows. Parity, hip height, hip width...

  5. Relationships between brain and body temperature, clinical and imaging outcomes after ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaszewski, Bartosz; Carpenter, Trevor K; Thomas, Ralph G R; Armitage, Paul A; Lymer, Georgina Katherine S; Marshall, Ian; Dennis, Martin S; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2013-01-01

    Pyrexia soon after stroke is associated with severe stroke and poor functional outcome. Few studies have assessed brain temperature after stroke in patients, so little is known of its associations with body temperature, stroke severity, or outcome. We measured temperatures in ischemic and normal-appearing brain using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and its correlations with body (tympanic) temperature measured four-hourly, infarct growth by 5 days, early neurologic (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, NIHSS) and late functional outcome (death or dependency). Among 40 patients (mean age 73 years, median NIHSS 7, imaged at median 17 hours), temperature in ischemic brain was higher than in normal-appearing brain on admission (38.6°C-core, 37.9°C-contralateral hemisphere, P=0.03) but both were equally elevated by 5 days; both were higher than tympanic temperature. Ischemic lesion temperature was not associated with NIHSS or 3-month functional outcome; in contrast, higher contralateral normal-appearing brain temperature was associated with worse NIHSS, infarct expansion and poor functional outcome, similar to associations for tympanic temperature. We conclude that brain temperature is higher than body temperature; that elevated temperature in ischemic brain reflects a local tissue response to ischemia, whereas pyrexia reflects the systemic response to stroke, occurs later, and is associated with adverse outcomes. PMID:23571281

  6. Measuring Quality and Outcomes in Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzbarsky, Joseph J; Marom, Niv; Marx, Robert G

    2018-07-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are objective metrics critical to evaluating outcomes throughout orthopedic surgery. New instruments continue to emerge, increasing the breadth of information required for those intending to use these measures for research or clinical care. Although earlier metrics were developed using the principles of classic test theory, newer instruments constructed using item response theory are amenable to computer-adaptive testing and may change the way these instruments are administered. This article aims to define the psychometric properties that are important to understand when using all PROMs and to review the most widely used instruments in sports medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Measurement properties of outcome measures for vitiligo. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijman, Charlotte; Linthorst Homan, May W; Limpens, Jacqueline; van der Veen, Wietze; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Terwee, Caroline B; Spuls, Phyllis I

    2012-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To summarize and critically appraise the evidence on the measurement properties of clinician-, patient-, and observer-reported outcomes, measuring any construct of interest in patients with all types of vitiligo. DATA SOURCES Electronic databases including PubMed (1948 to July 2011), OVID EMBASE (1980 to July 2011), and CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (1982 to July 2011) were searched. STUDY SELECTION Two authors independently screened all records for eligibility. For inclusion, the study population had to include patients with vitiligo, for which outcome measures were developed or evaluated on their measurement properties. The initial search retrieved 1249 records, of which 14 articles met the inclusion criteria. DATA EXTRACTION Characteristics of the included instruments, study population, and results of the measurement properties were extracted. The Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Status Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) 4-point checklist, combined with quality criteria for measurement properties, was used to calculate the overall level of evidence per measurement property of each instrument. Independent extraction and assessment was performed by 2 authors. DATA SYNTHESIS Eleven different measurement instruments were identified. Strong evidence was found for a positive internal consistency of the Dermatology Life Quality Index. For other instruments, the evidence of measurement properties was limited or unknown. CONCLUSIONS Recommendations on the use of specific outcome measures for vitiligo should be formulated with caution because current evidence is insufficient owing to a low number of studies with poor methodological quality and unclear clinical relevance. To recommend outcome measures for vitiligo, further research on measurement properties of clinical relevant outcome measures for vitiligo according to COSMIN quality criteria is needed.

  8. Measuring Learning Outcomes in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    2003-01-01

    The ability to provide sensible measures for learning outcomes in accounting education is under increased scrutiny. In this paper we use a learner perspective in auditing education, which reflects that some students taking accounting classes also are provided with on-the-job training in accounting...... firms. Hence knowledge about learning outcomes for different groups of students is essential information for educators as well as the accounting profession. This paper extends prior research on the role of declarative and procedural knowledge in performing auditing tasks. Measuring learning outcomes......). The study provides evidence, which confirms an interrelationship between declarative and procedural knowledge in auditing, and the findings also suggest that students with auditing experience perform better than students without experience on procedural questions....

  9. Influence of body habitus on feasibility and outcome of laparoscopic liver resections: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratti, Francesca; D'Alessandro, Valentina; Cipriani, Federica; Giannone, Fabio; Catena, Marco; Aldrighetti, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to prospectively investigate whether the anthropometric measures of A Body Shape Index (ABSI, taking into account waist circumference adjusted for height and weight) affects feasibility and outcome of laparoscopic liver resections. One hundred patients undergoing laparoscopic liver resection were prospectively included in the study (2014-2015). Preoperative clinical parameters, including body mass index (BMI) and ABSI were evaluated for associations with intraoperative outcome and postoperative results (morbidity, mortality and functional recovery). Twenty-two and 78 patients underwent major and minor hepatectomies, respectively. Conversion rate was 9%, mean blood loss was 210 ± 115 ml. Postoperative morbidity was 15% and mortality was nil. Mean length of stay was 4 days. When considering the entire series, ABSI was not associated with intra and postoperative outcome. After stratification of patients according to difficulty score, Pearson's correlation demonstrated an association between ABSI and intraoperative blood loss (P = 0.03) and time for functional recovery (P = 0.05) in patients undergoing resections with high score of difficulty. Body habitus has an influence on outcome of laparoscopic liver resections with high degree of difficulty, while feasibility and outcome of low difficulty resections seem not to be affected by anthropometric measures. © 2016 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  10. Measuring Learning Outcomes in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    The ability to provide sensible measures for learning outcomes in accounting education is under increased scrutiny. In this paper we use a learner perspective in auditing education, which reflects that some students taking accounting classes also are provided with on-the-job training in accountin...

  11. Measurement Properties of Outcome Measures for Vitiligo A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijman, C.; Homan, M.W.L.; Limpens, J.; Veen, W.; Wolkerstorfer, A.; Terwee, C.B.; Spuls, P.I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and critically appraise the evidence on the measurement properties of clinician-, patient-, and observer-reported outcomes, measuring any construct of interest in patients with all types of vitiligo. Data Sources: Electronic databases including PubMed (1948 to July 2011),

  12. Measurement properties of outcome measures for vitiligo. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijman, Charlotte; Linthorst Homan, May W.; Limpens, Jacqueline; van der Veen, Wietze; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Terwee, Caroline B.; Spuls, Phyllis I.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To summarize and critically appraise the evidence on the measurement properties of clinician-, patient-, and observer-reported outcomes, measuring any construct of interest in patients with all types of vitiligo. DATA SOURCES Electronic databases including PubMed (1948 to July 2011), OVID

  13. Waist circumference, body mass index, and employment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinge, Jonas Minet

    2017-07-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is an imperfect measure of body fat. Recent studies provide evidence in favor of replacing BMI with waist circumference (WC). Hence, I investigated whether or not the association between fat mass and employment status vary by anthropometric measures. I used 15 rounds of the Health Survey for England (1998-2013), which has measures of employment status in addition to measured height, weight, and WC. WC and BMI were entered as continuous variables and obesity as binary variables defined using both WC and BMI. I used multivariate models controlling for a set of covariates. The association of WC with employment was of greater magnitude than the association between BMI and employment. I reran the analysis using conventional instrumental variables methods. The IV models showed significant impacts of obesity on employment; however, they were not more pronounced when WC was used to measure obesity, compared to BMI. This means that, in the IV models, the impact of fat mass on employment did not depend on the measure of fat mass.

  14. Developing a Novel Measure of Body Satisfaction Using Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Clare K.; Jones, Megan; Bailey, Jakki O.; Bailenson, Jeremy; Taylor, C. Barr

    2015-01-01

    Body image disturbance (BID), considered a key feature in eating disorders, is a pervasive issue among young women. Accurate assessment of BID is critical, but the field is currently limited to self-report assessment methods. In the present study, we build upon existing research, and explore the utility of virtual reality (VR) to elicit and detect changes in BID across various immersive virtual environments. College-aged women with elevated weight and shape concerns (n = 38) and a non-weight and shape concerned control group (n = 40) were randomly exposed to four distinct virtual environments with high or low levels of body salience and social presence (i.e., presence of virtual others). Participants interacted with avatars of thin, normal weight, and overweight body size (BMI of approximately 18, 22, and 27 respectively) in virtual social settings (i.e., beach, party). We measured state-level body satisfaction (state BD) immediately after exposure to each environment. In addition, we measured participants’ minimum interpersonal distance, visual attention, and approach preference toward avatars of each size. Women with higher baseline BID reported significantly higher state BD in all settings compared to controls. Both groups reported significantly higher state BD in a beach with avatars as compared to other environments. In addition, women with elevated BID approached closer to normal weight avatars and looked longer at thin avatars compared to women in the control group. Our findings indicate that VR may serve as a novel tool for measuring state-level BID, with applications for measuring treatment outcomes. Implications for future research and clinical interventions are discussed. PMID:26469860

  15. Korean Clinic Based Outcome Measure Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongbae Park

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence based medicine has become main tools for medical practice. However, conducting a highly ranked in the evidence hierarchy pyramid is not easy or feasible at all times and places. There remains a room for descriptive clinical outcome measure studies with admitting the limit of the intepretation. Aims: Presents three Korean clinic based outcome measure studies with a view to encouraging Korean clinicians to conduct similar studies. Methods: Three studies are presented briefly here including 1 Quality of Life of liver cancer patients after 8 Constitutional acupuncture; 2 Developing a Korean version of Measuring yourself Medical Outcome profile (MYMOP; and 3 Survey on 5 Shu points: a pilot In the first study, we have included 4 primary or secondary liver cancer patients collecting their diagnostic X-ray film and clinical data f개m their hospital, and asked them to fill in the European Organization Research and Treatment of Cancer, Quality of Life Questionnaire before the commencement of the treatment. The acupuncture treatment is set up format but not disclosed yet. The translation and developing a Korean version of outcome measures that is Korean clinician friendly has been sought for MYMOP is one of the most appropriate one. The permission was granted, the translation into Korean was done, then back translated into English only based on the Korean translation by the researcher who is bilingual in both languages. The back translation was compared by the original developer of MYMOP and confirmed usable. In order to test the existence of acupoints and meridians through popular forms of Korean acupuncture regimes, we aim at collecting opinions from 101 Korean clinicians that have used those forms. The questions asked include most effective symptoms, 5 Shu points, points those are least likely to use due to either adverse events or the lack of effectiveness, theoretical reasons for the above proposals, proposing outcome measures

  16. Concordance of In-Home "Smart" Scale Measurement with Body Weight Measured In-Person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kathryn M; Wing, Rena R

    2016-06-01

    Newer "smart" scales that transmit participants' body weights directly to data collection centers offer the opportunity to simplify weight assessment in weight management research; however, little data exist on the concordance of these data compared to weights measured at in-person assessments. We compared the weights of 58 participants (mean±SD BMI = 31.6±4.8, age = 52.1±9.7 years, 86.2% White, 65.5% Female) measured by study staff at an in-person assessment visit to weights measured on the same day at home using BodyTrace "smart" scales. These measures occurred after 3 months of an internet-based weight management intervention. Weight (mean±SD) measured at the 3-month in-person assessment visit was 81.5±14.7kg compared to 80.4±14.5kg measured on the same day using in-home body weight scales; mean bias =1.1±0.8kg, 95% limits of agreement = -0.5 to 2.6. Two outliers in the data suggest that there may be greater variability between measurements for participants weighing above 110 kg. Results suggest good concordance between the measurements and support the use of the BodyTrace smart scale in weight management research. Future trials using BodyTrace scales for outcome assessment should clearly define protocols for measurement and associated instructions to participants (e.g., instruct individuals to weigh at the same time of day, similarly clothed). Finally, measure concordance should be investigated in a group of individuals weighing more than 110kg.

  17. Questionnaires for Measuring Refractive Surgery Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Himal; Khadka, Jyoti; Lundström, Mats; Goggin, Michael; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2017-06-01

    To identify the questionnaires used to assess refractive surgery outcomes, assess the available questionnaires in regard to their psychometric properties, validity, and reliability, and evaluate the performance of the available questionnaires in measuring refractive surgery outcomes. An extensive literature search was done on PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases to identify articles that described or used at least one questionnaire to assess refractive surgery outcomes. The information on content quality, validity, reliability, responsiveness, and psychometric properties was extracted and analyzed based on an extensive set of quality criteria. Eighty-one articles describing 27 questionnaires (12 refractive error-specific, including 4 refractive surgery-specific, 7 vision-but-non-refractive, and 8 generic) were included in the review. Most articles (56, 69.1%) described refractive error-specific questionnaires. The Quality of Life Impact of Refractive Correction (QIRC), the Quality of Vision (QoV), and the Near Activity Visual Questionnaire (NAVQ) were originally constructed using Rasch analysis; others were developed using the Classical Test Theory. The National Eye Institute Refractive Quality of Life questionnaire was the most frequently used questionnaire, but it does not provide a valid measurement. The QoV, QIRC, and NAVQ are the three best existing questionnaires to assess visual symptoms, quality of life, and activity limitations, respectively. This review identified three superior quality questionnaires for measuring different aspects of quality of life in refractive surgery. Clinicians and researchers should choose a questionnaire based on the concept being measured with superior psychometric properties. [J Refract Surg. 2017;33(6):416-424.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Measuring outcomes in psychiatry: an inpatient model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D E; Fong, M L

    1996-02-01

    This article describes a system for measuring outcomes recently implemented in the department of psychiatry of Baptist Memorial Hospital, a 78-bed inpatient and day treatment unit that represents one service line of a large, urban teaching hospital in Memphis. In June 1993 Baptist Hospital began a 15-month pilot test of PsychSentinel, a measurement tool developed by researchers in the Department of Community Medicine at the University of Connecticut. The hospital identified the following four primary goals for this pilot project: provide data for internal hospital program evaluation, provide data for external marketing in a managed care environment, satisfy requirements of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations, and generate studies that add to the literature in psychiatry and psychology. PsychSentinel is based on the standardized diagnostic criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV). The outcome measure assesses the change in the number of symptoms of psychopathology that occurs between admission and discharge from the hospital. Included in the nonproprietary system are risk adjustment factors, as well as access to a national reference database for comparative analysis purposes. Data collection can be done by trained ancillary staff members, with as much or as little direct physician involvement as desired. The system has proven to be both time effective and cost effective, and it provides important outcome information both at the program level and at the clinician level. After the pilot test, the staff at Baptist Memorial Hospital determined that the system met all initial objectives identified and recently adopted the system as an ongoing measure of quality patient care in the department of psychiatry.

  19. Body weight prediction of Brakmas and Bali cattle using body measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Hafiz, A.W.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the rural areas facilities for farm animal weighing are often difficult to find and the construction of such facilities is relatively expensive. Therefore a study was conducted with the objective to estimate body weight of Brakmas and Bali cattle using prediction equations of linear body measurements. Data of body weight and body measurements, namely withers height, body length and heart girth from 279 heads of Brakmas (age 1 to 10 y old and 74 heads of Bali (age 1 to 10 y old cows were collected. The animals were in average body condition of 3 (1= emaciated, 3= moderate fat cover, and 5= excess fat cover. The correlation analysis showed that body weight of Brakmas cattle was highly correlated with its body length, heart girth and withers height with the correlation coefficients of 0.967, 0.964 and 0.942, respectively, while body weight in Bali cattle had the highest correlation with heart girth followed by body length and height at withers with the correlation coefficient of 0.985, 0.954 and 0.945, respectively. Regression analysis showed that body length provided a good estimate of live body weight with high precision as it accounted for 91.6% of the variability in body weight in Brakmas cattle, while heart girth accounted 97.1% of body weight variability in Bali cattle. The combination of body length-withers height, body length-heart girth and body length-withers height-heart girth showed an improvement in terms of predictive precision with the changes of 0.21%, 0.21% and 0.44%, respectively, in coeficient of determination (R2 compared to a single measure of body length in Brakmas cattle. The combination of heart girth-body length did not show any change in R2 in Bali cattle compared to a single measure of heart girth. Combining heart girth-height at withers and the combination of all body measurements showed the increment in coefficients of determination at 0.41% and 0.51%, respectively as compared to heart girth. Although the combination

  20. Strength, body composition, and functional outcomes in the squat versus leg press exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Fabrício E; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Ocetnik, Skyler; Young, Jonathan; Vigotsky, Andrew; Contreras, Bret; Krieger, James W; Miller, Michael G; Cholewa, Jason

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare strength, body composition, and functional outcome measures following performance of the back squat, leg press, or a combination of the two exercises. Subjects were pair-matched based on initial strength levels and then randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: a squat-only group (SQ) that solely performed squats for the lower body; a leg press-only group (LP) that solely performed leg presses for the lower body, or a combined squat and leg press group (SQ-LP) that performed both squats and leg presses for the lower body. All other RT variables were held constant. The study period lasted 10 weeks with subjects performing 2 lower body workouts per week comprising 6 sets per session at loads corresponding to 8-12 RM with 90- to 120-second rest intervals. Results showed that SQ had greater transfer to maximal squat strength compared to the leg press. Effect sizes favored SQ and SQ-LP versus LP with respect to countermovement jump while greater effect sizes for dynamic balance were noted for SQ-LP and LP compared to SQ, although no statistical differences were noted between conditions. These findings suggest that both free weights and machines can improve functional outcomes, and that the extent of transfer may be specific to the given task.

  1. Measuring Outcomes in Adult Weight Loss Studies That Include Diet and Physical Activity: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A. Millstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Measuring success of obesity interventions is critical. Several methods measure weight loss outcomes but there is no consensus on best practices. This systematic review evaluates relevant outcomes (weight loss, BMI, % body fat, and fat mass to determine which might be the best indicator(s of success. Methods. Eligible articles described adult weight loss interventions that included diet and physical activity and a measure of weight or BMI change and body composition change. Results. 28 full-text articles met inclusion criteria. Subjects, settings, intervention lengths, and intensities varied. All studies measured body weight (−2.9 to −17.3 kg, 9 studies measured BMI (−1.1 to −5.1 kg/m2, 20 studies measured % body fat (−0.7 to −10.2%, and 22 studies measured fat mass (−0.9 to −14.9 kg. All studies found agreement between weight or BMI and body fat mass or body fat % decreases, though there were discrepancies in degree of significance between measures. Conclusions. Nearly all weight or BMI and body composition measures agreed. Since body fat is the most metabolically harmful tissue type, it may be a more meaningful measure of health change. Future studies should consider primarily measuring % body fat, rather than or in addition to weight or BMI.

  2. 42 CFR 486.318 - Condition: Outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Outcome measures. 486.318 Section 486... Organizations Organ Procurement Organization Outcome Requirements § 486.318 Condition: Outcome measures. (a..., territories, or possessions, an OPO must meet all 3 of the following outcome measures: (1) The OPO's donation...

  3. Measurement of total body radioactivity in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naversten, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques for the determination of whole-body radioactivity in man using uncollimated NaI(Tl) detectors have been studied. Geometrical effects and photon attenuation effects due to the different shapes of humans as well as due to varying in-vivo radioactivity distributions have been evaluated particularly for scanning-bed geometries and the chair geometry. Theoretically it is shown that the attenuation effects are generally dominating, for full-energy-peak pulse-range methods. For the application in radiation protection a cheap and simple chair-geometry unit has been constructed and used at various places distantly from the home-laboratory, for studies of body activity of Cs-137 in northern Sweden. High body activities were found particularly in reindeer-breeding Lapps. The elimination rate of Cs-137 in man was studied in the stationary whole-body counter in Lund as well as with the field-system. For the study of the performances at low and high photon energies clinical applications of methods for gastro-intestinal absorption of vitamin B12 (Co-57; 122 keV) and total body potassium determination (K-40; 1.46 MeV, K-42; 1.52 MeV) have been evaluated. Theoretical and experimental results as well as experiences of applications in radiation protection and medicine show that the scanning-bed geometry effectively evens out redistributional effects. For optimum results, however, scatter-energy pulse-ranges rather than full-energy-peak ranges should be used. (Auth.)

  4. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group: formation of patient-centered outcome measures in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W; Abernethy, April; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Bhushan, Reva; Garg, Amit; Merola, Joseph F; Maccarone, Mara; Christensen, Robin

    2015-02-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Live weight and body measurement of Hungarian Thoroughbred broodmares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabolcs Bene

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Live weights and 21 body measurements of 110 adult brood mares from Thoroughbred breed were evaluated in Hungary. Body measurements and some body measure indices were determined. One way ANOVA was used to compare the studs. Regression equations were developed to estimate the live weight from body measurements. Population genetic parameters of the examined traits were estimated. Only few differences among studs, concerning evaluated body measurements, were presented - firstly: body measurements, related to the kilter and nutritional status (hearth girth - were significant. Between the mentioned traits and the live weight medium positive correlation (r = 0.47 - 0.79; P<0.01 was found. For the estimation of live weight with regression model the necessary data are as follows: hearth girth, 2nd width of rump and diagonal length of body. The determination coefficient was 0.80 (P<0.01. Height at withers, of back and at rump (h2 = 0.66, 0.67 and 0.51 showed medium heritability values. The heritability of depth of chest and height of bieler-point were 0.32 and 0.48, respectively. Quite small differences were found between the stallions in most of the body measurements. The live weight and height measurements were exceptions, as here the differences between the sires were slightly higher. As a conclusion it can be stated that the Thoroughbred population in Hungary is quite homogenous in terms of the most important body measurements.

  6. Dynamic Anthropometry – Deffning Protocols for Automatic Body Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavenka Petrak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research on possibilities of protocol development for automatic computer-based determination of measurements on a 3D body model in defined dynamic positions. Initially, two dynamic body positions were defined for the research on dimensional changes of targeted body lengths and surface segments during body movement from basic static position into a selected dynamic body position. The assumption was that during body movement, specifi c length and surface dimensions would change significantly from the aspect of clothing construction and functionality of a garment model. 3D body scanning of a female test sample was performed in basic static and two defined dynamic positions. 3D body models were processed and measurement points were defined as a starting point for the determination of characteristic body measurements. The protocol for automatic computer measurement was defined for every dynamic body position by the systematic set of activities based on determined measurement points. The verification of developed protocols was performed by automatic determination of defined measurements on the test sample and by comparing the results with the conventional manual measurement.

  7. Estimation of Live Weight of Calves from Body Measurements within ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All phenotypic correlations between body measurements were positive and significant (P<0.001). The highest correlation coefficient was found between chest girth and body weight. The polynomial equation using chest girth as an independent variable predicted body weight more accurately within breed as compared to the ...

  8. A Diary Study of Self-Compassion, Upward Social Comparisons, and Body Image-Related Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie; Dodos, Louisa; Chatzisarantis, Nikos; Ntoumanis, Nikos

    2017-07-01

    Self-compassion may protect individuals experiencing poor body image and associated maladaptive outcomes. The purpose of the study was to examine within-person associations (whilst controlling for between-person differences) between appearance-related self-compassion, appearance-related threats (operationalised as upward appearance comparisons), and body image-related variables, namely, social physique anxiety, drive for thinness, and body dissatisfaction. A diary methodology was used whereby young women (n = 126; M age = 21.26) responded to brief online surveys three times per day (11am, 3pm, and 7pm) every second day for one week (i.e. a total of 12 measurement points). Results of mixed linear modeling revealed that both state appearance-related upward comparisons and self-compassion independently predicted all three outcomes in a positive and negative fashion, respectively. No significant interaction effects between state appearance-related upward comparisons and self-compassion were found. The results suggested that appearance-based self-compassion was important, not just when there was a potential threat to body image via upward appearance comparisons. The findings highlight the importance of fostering self-compassion on a daily level. © 2017 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  9. Maternal obesity, gestational weight gain and childhood cardiac outcomes: role of childhood body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toemen, L; Gishti, O; van Osch-Gevers, L; Steegers, E A P; Helbing, W A; Felix, J F; Reiss, I K M; Duijts, L; Gaillard, R; Jaddoe, V W V

    2016-07-01

    Maternal obesity may affect cardiovascular outcomes in the offspring. We examined the associations of maternal prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with childhood cardiac outcomes and explored whether these associations were explained by parental characteristics, infant characteristics or childhood body mass index. In a population-based prospective cohort study among 4852 parents and their children, we obtained maternal weight before pregnancy and in early, mid- and late pregnancy. At age 6 years, we measured aortic root diameter (cm) and left ventricular dimensions. We calculated left ventricular mass (g), left ventricular mass index (g m(-2.7)), relative wall thickness ((2 × left ventricular posterior wall thickness)/left ventricular diameter), fractional shorting (%), eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy and concentric remodeling. A one standard deviation score (SDS) higher maternal prepregnancy body mass index was associated with higher left ventricular mass (0.10 SDS (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08, 0.13)), left ventricular mass index (0.06 SDS (95% CI 0.03, 0.09)) and aortic root diameter (0.09 SDS (95% CI 0.06, 0.12)), but not with relative wall thickness or fractional shortening. A one SDS higher maternal prepregnancy body mass index was associated with an increased risk of eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy (odds ratio 1.21 (95% CI 1.03, 1.41)), but not of concentric remodeling. When analyzing the effects of maternal weight in different periods simultaneously, only maternal prepregnancy weight and early pregnancy weight were associated with left ventricular mass, left ventricular mass index and aortic root diameter (P-valuesMaternal prepregnancy body mass index and weight gain in early pregnancy are both associated with offspring cardiac structure in childhood, but these associations seem to be fully explained by childhood body mass index.

  10. Culturally Sensitive and Environment-Friendly Outcome Measures in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    A systematic review of evidence on culturally sensitive and environment-friendly outcome measures in ..... which included manual grass cutting/hoeing, assuming the Islamic ... who opined that the starting point for any outcome measure is to ...

  11. Nonverbal synchrony of head- and body-movement in psychotherapy: different signals have different associations with outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eRamseyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The coordination of patient’s and therapist’s bodily movement – nonverbal synchrony – has been empirically shown to be associated with psychotherapy outcome. This finding was based on dynamic movement patterns of the whole body. The present paper is a new analysis of an existing dataset (Ramseyer & Tschacher, 2011, which extends previous findings by differentiating movements pertaining to head and upper-body regions. Method: In a sample of 70 patients (37 female, 33 male treated at an outpatient psychotherapy clinic, we quantified nonverbal synchrony with an automated objective video-analysis algorithm (Motion Energy Analysis, MEA. Head- and body-synchrony was quantified during the initial 15 minutes of video-recorded therapy sessions. Micro-outcome was assessed with self-report post-session questionnaires provided by patients and their therapists. Macro-outcome was measured with questionnaires that quantified attainment of treatment goals and changes in experiencing and behavior at the end of therapy. Results: The differentiation of head- and body-synchrony showed that these two facets of motor coordination were differentially associated with outcome. Head-synchrony predicted global outcome of therapy, while body-synchrony did not, and body-synchrony predicted session outcome, while head-synchrony did not. Conclusions: The results pose an important amendment to previous findings, which showed that nonverbal synchrony embodied both outcome and interpersonal variables of psychotherapy dyads. The separation of head- and body-synchrony suggested that distinct mechanisms may operate in these two regions: Head-synchrony embodied phenomena with a long temporal extension (overall therapy success, while body-synchrony embodied phenomena of a more immediate nature (session-level success. More explorations with fine-grained analyses of synchronized phenomena in nonverbal behavior may shed additional light on the embodiment of

  12. Body Image in Transmen: Multidimensional Measurement and the Effects of Mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Grift, Tim C; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Elfering, Lian; Özer, Müjde; Bouman, Mark-Bram; Buncamper, Marlon E; Smit, Jan Maerten; Mullender, Margriet G

    2016-11-01

    Transmen are generally dissatisfied with their breasts and often opt for mastectomy. However, little is known about the specific effects of this procedure on this group's body image. To prospectively assess the effect of mastectomy on the body image of transmen, including cognitive, emotional, and behavioral aspects. During a 10-month period, all transmen applying for mastectomy were invited to participate in this study. The 33 participants completed assessments preoperatively and at least 6 months postoperatively. Participants were surveyed on body satisfaction (Body Image Scale for Transsexuals), body attitudes (Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire), appearance schemas (Appearance Schemas Inventory), situational bodily feelings (Situational Inventory of Body Image Dysphoria), body image-related quality of life (Body Image Quality of Life Inventory), and self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale). Control values were retrieved from the literature and a college sample. Before surgery, transmen reported less positive body attitudes and satisfaction, a lower self-esteem and body image-related quality of life compared with cisgender men and women. Mastectomy improved body satisfaction most strongly, although respondents reported improvements in all domains (eg, decreased dysphoria when looking in the mirror and improved feelings of self-worth). Most outcome measurements were strongly correlated. Mastectomy improves body image beyond satisfaction with chest appearance alone. Body satisfaction and feelings of "passing" in social situations are associated with a higher quality of life and self-esteem. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Field measurements of radium in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toohey, R.E.; May, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    Two whole body counting systems have been developed and employed for field measurements. The radium contents of nine previously unmeasured cases have been determined during three field trips. Future trips are being scheduled to make body radioactivity measurements on a specific subpopulation of CHR radium cases

  14. Establishment of Average Body Measurement and the Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    body measurement for height and backneck to waist for ages 2,3,4 and 5 years. The ... average measurements of the different parts of the body must be established. ..... and OAU Charter on Rights of the child: Lagos: Nigeria Country office.

  15. Measurement of Organ Uptake by Whole-Body Counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudley, R.A.

    1970-01-01

    This paper reviews methods for the measurement of radioactivity in body organs based on whole-body radioactivity measurements. Such measurements can of course only be used to measure radioactivity in a body organ when the radioactivity is exclusively localized in the organ or when the ratio of radioactivity in the organ to that in the whole body is known from other sources of information. They find particular applications, however, when the organ is so widely dispersed throughout the body that more localized measurement is impossible. Examples of situations in which whole-body radioactivity measurements have been used in this way are cited. The more important techniques used for such measurements are described and their respective advantages and disadvantages indicated. The importance of uniformity of counting efficiency with position of source throughout the body is stressed. Simple systems incorporating sodium iodide crystal scintillation detectors are shown to combine satisfactory sensitivity and uniformity of efficiency for clinical measurements of radioactivity in body organs and have the additional advantage that they can be readily adapted for profile scanning. Systems incorporating plastic or liquid scintillation detectors are less convenient in this respect. (author)

  16. 42 CFR 410.146 - Diabetes outcome measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diabetes outcome measurements. 410.146 Section 410.146 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.146 Diabetes outcome measurements. (a) Information...

  17. Measurement of body potassium with a whole-body counter: relationship between lean body mass and resting energy expenditure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, M.D.; Braun, J.S.; Vetter, R.J.; Marsh, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    We conducted studies to determine whether the Mayo whole-body counter could be used to measure body potassium, and thus lean body mass (LBM), and whether moderate obesity alters resting energy expenditure when corrected for LBM. Twenty-four nonobese and 18 moderately obese adults underwent body potassium (40K) counting, as well as tritiated water space measurement and indirect calorimetry. LBM values predicted from 40K counting and tritiated water space measurements were highly correlated (P = 0.001; r = 0.88). Resting energy expenditure was closely related to LBM (P less than 0.0001; r = 0.78): kcal/day = 622 kcal + (LBM.20.0 kcal/kg LBM). In this relationship, the obese subjects did not differ from nonobese subjects. In summary, the Mayo whole-body counter can accurately measure LBM, and moderate obesity has no detectable effect on corrected resting energy expenditure

  18. Body Temperature Measurements for Metabolic Phenotyping in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carola W.; Ootsuka, Youichirou; Romanovsky, Andrej A.

    2017-01-01

    Endothermic organisms rely on tightly balanced energy budgets to maintain a regulated body temperature and body mass. Metabolic phenotyping of mice, therefore, often includes the recording of body temperature. Thermometry in mice is conducted at various sites, using various devices and measurement practices, ranging from single-time probing to continuous temperature imaging. Whilst there is broad agreement that body temperature data is of value, procedural considerations of body temperature measurements in the context of metabolic phenotyping are missing. Here, we provide an overview of the various methods currently available for gathering body temperature data from mice. We explore the scope and limitations of thermometry in mice, with the hope of assisting researchers in the selection of appropriate approaches, and conditions, for comprehensive mouse phenotypic analyses. PMID:28824441

  19. Long-Term Outcomes of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Georgina; de la Cruz, Lorena Fernández; Monzani, Benedetta; Bowyer, Laura; Anson, Martin; Cadman, Jacinda; Heyman, Isobel; Turner, Cynthia; Veale, David; Mataix-Cols, David

    2017-07-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for adolescent body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in the short term, but longer-term outcomes remain unknown. The current study aimed to follow up a group of adolescents who had originally participated in a randomized controlled trial of CBT for BDD to determine whether treatment gains were maintained. Twenty-six adolescents (mean age = 16.2, SD = 1.6) with a primary diagnosis of BDD received a course of developmentally tailored CBT and were followed up over 12 months. Participants were assessed at baseline, midtreatment, posttreatment, 2-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was the clinician-rated Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD. Secondary outcomes included measures of insight, depression, quality of life, and global functioning. BDD symptoms decreased significantly from pre- to posttreatment and remained stable over the 12-month follow-up. At this time point, 50% of participants were classified as responders and 23% as remitters. Participants remained significantly improved on all secondary outcomes at 12-month follow-up. Neither baseline insight nor baseline depression predicted long-term outcomes. The positive effects of CBT appear to be durable up to 12-month follow-up. However, the majority of patients remained symptomatic and vulnerable to a range of risks at 12-month follow-up, indicating that longer-term monitoring is advisable in this population. Future research should focus on enhancing the efficacy of CBT in order to improve long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Management and outcome of low velocity penetrating head injury caused by impacted foreign bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Wael Mohamed Mohamed; Abbas, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Penetrating head injuries with impacted foreign bodies are rare, associated with a high incidence of morbidity and potentially life-threatening. In this study, we aimed at investigating the outcome of these cases as well as analyzing the factors affecting the prognosis. A retrospective study in which the records of 16 patients who had penetrating head injuries caused by low-velocity impacted foreign bodies were revised. All patients were males with a mean age of 28.9 years (range, 18 to 50 years). The follow-up period ranged from 4 to 13 months with a mean of 8.1 months. Causes of injury were construction accidents in 6 (37.5 %) patients, assault in 6 (37.5 %) and road traffic accidents in 4 (25 %). The impacted objects included a bar of iron, a piece of wood, a nail, a sickle and a piece of glass. Diagnostic computerized tomography (CT) of the brain was carried out on admission in all patients. Thirteen (81.3 %) patients were submitted to surgery, and all had the appropriate management in the form of antibiotics and dehydrating measures as required. The primary outcome measure was the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at the end of follow-up. At the end of follow-up, ten (62.5 %) patients had a GOS score of 5, two (12.5 %) patients had a score of 4, and four (25 %) patients had a score of 1. Low-velocity penetrating head injuries are most common in young adult males. With the appropriate management, a majority of even the most severe cases can have a favorable outcome.

  1. Estimating body weight and body composition of chickens by using noninvasive measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latshaw, J D; Bishop, B L

    2001-07-01

    The major objective of this research was to develop equations to estimate BW and body composition using measurements taken with inexpensive instruments. We used five groups of chickens that were created with different genetic stocks and feeding programs. Four of the five groups were from broiler genetic stock, and one was from sex-linked heavy layers. The goal was to sample six males from each group when the group weight was 1.20, 1.75, and 2.30 kg. Each male was weighed and measured for back length, pelvis width, circumference, breast width, keel length, and abdominal skinfold thickness. A cloth tape measure, calipers, and skinfold calipers were used for measurement. Chickens were scanned for total body electrical conductivity (TOBEC) before being euthanized and frozen. Six females were selected at weights similar to those for males and were measured in the same way. Each whole chicken was ground, and a portion of ground material of each was used to measure water, fat, ash, and energy content. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate BW from body measurements. The best single measurement was pelvis width, with an R2 = 0.67. Inclusion of three body measurements in an equation resulted in R2 = 0.78 and the following equation: BW (g) = -930.0 + 68.5 (breast, cm) + 48.5 (circumference, cm) + 62.8 (pelvis, cm). The best single measurement to estimate body fat was abdominal skinfold thickness, expressed as a natural logarithm. Inclusion of weight and skinfold thickness resulted in R2 = 0.63 for body fat according to the following equation: fat (%) = 24.83 + 6.75 (skinfold, ln cm) - 3.87 (wt, kg). Inclusion of the result of TOBEC and the effect of sex improved the R2 to 0.78 for body fat. Regression analysis was used to develop additional equations, based on fat, to estimate water and energy contents of the body. The body water content (%) = 72.1 - 0.60 (body fat, %), and body energy (kcal/g) = 1.097 + 0.080 (body fat, %). The results of the present study

  2. Oscillation measuring device for body of rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komita, Hideo.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns an internal pump of a BWR type reactor and provides a device for detecting oscillations of a rotational shaft. Namely, recesses are formed along an identical circumference on the outer circumferential surface of the rotating portion each at a predetermined distance. The recesses rotate along with the rotation. An eddy current type displacement gage measures the distance to the outer circumferential surface of the rotating portion. The recesses are detected by the displacement gage as pulse signals. When the rotating portion oscillates, it is detected by the displacement gage as waveform signals. Accordingly, the output signals of the eddy current type displacement gage are formed by pulse signals superposed on the waveform signals. A rising detection circuit detects the rising position of the pulse signals as the components of the number of rotation of the rotating portion, and fall detection circuit detects the falling position. A comparator circuit is disposed in parallel with both of rising/falling detection circuits. A predetermined threshold value is set in the comparator circuit to output a signal when the inputted signal exceeds the value. (I.S.)

  3. Principal Component Analysis of Body Measurements In Three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to explore the relationship among body measurements in 3 strains of broilers chicken (Arbor Acre, Marshal and Ross) using principal component analysis with the view of identifying those components that define body conformation in broilers. A total of 180 birds were used, 60 per strain.

  4. Improved measurement system for the whole body monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotler, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    A static four-detector system has been established as a whole body radioactivity measurement system. A technique is being developed to position the detectors in such a manner as to minimise longitudinal distribution effects within a subject. This technique, which represents the human body as a simple geometric model, requires the determination of efficiency at any point within this model

  5. Relationship between pelvic and linear body measurements in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine pelvic height, width and area and to estimate correlations between these measurements and other external linear body parameters, i.e. body height, shoulder height, chest depth, front quarter width, hindquarter width, rump length and rump slope in Dorper ewes. A total of 332 young ...

  6. Comparative study of growth and linear body measurements in Anak ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to compare the performance of two different breeds of broilers (Anak and Hubbard) using body weight and body linear measurements. Data on a total of 200 (100 each) Anak and Hubbard broiler breeds were collected weekly and the experiment lasted for 8 weeks. The parameters investigated ...

  7. Miniature ingestible telemeter devices to measure deep-body temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, J. M.; Fryer, T. B. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A telemetry device comprised of a pill-size ingestible transmitter developed to obtain deep body temperature measurements of a human is described. The device has particular utility in the medical field where deep body temperatures provide an indication of general health.

  8. The importance of body composition as a primary outcome in trials on MAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the effects of moderate-acute malnutrition (MAM) in early life is primarily based on measures of anthropometry – mostly weight and height, which are often converted to age- and sex-specific z-scores, but which may also be expressed as weight-for-height, or body mass index (BMI), also in z-score format. Another widely used outcome is mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC). These data provide indices of stunting (short stature) and wasting (low weight for age), which are often categorized using cut-offs. Much information can be gained from such measurements, and data can be compared across populations because of the standardized format. However, the ‘abstract’ nature of anthropometry means that much is also concealed by these outcomes. Measurement of body composition represents a novel approach to nutritional status. The simplest approach aims to differentiate fat from lean mass. These two traits have very different implications for short- and long-term outcomes. Fat represents a store of energy that may fund immune function or future growth. Lean tissue represents functional tissue, which may also contribute to immune function. The relative ratio of fat to lean provides an indication of the allocation of energy between ‘completed growth’ and ‘investment potential’. Low levels of fat may indicate reduced resilience to ecological stresses, whereas low levels of lean mass indicate exposure to cumulative stresses. The relative ‘survival’ value of fat versus lean tissue in early life remains uncertain, hence it is unclear what constitutes the optimum pattern of tissue accretion, and whether variation in fat and lean accretion across populations represents local adaptation or pathology. Equally, it remains unclear whether public health interventions should promote lean mass, fat, or a particular ratio of the two. Measurement of body composition in early life is now possible through several techniques. Air displacement plethysmography can

  9. Association of body composition with outcome of docetaxel chemotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weixin; Liu, Xiandong; Chaftari, Patrick; Cruz Carreras, Maria Teresa; Gonzalez, Carmen; Viets-Upchurch, Jayne; Merriman, Kelly; Tu, Shi-Ming; Dalal, Shalini; Yeung, Sai-Ching J

    2015-01-01

    Docetaxel, a lipophilic drug, is indicated for castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer. Most men with such disease would have had androgen-deprivation therapy, which decreases muscle and increases body fat. Obesity and body composition changes may influence the outcomes of docetaxel therapy. We conducted a retrospective review of 333 patients with metastatic prostate cancer treated with docetaxel at a comprehensive cancer center between October 7, 2004 and December 31, 2012. Body composition parameters were measured based on the areas of muscle and adipose tissues in the visceral and subcutaneous compartments on CT images at L3-4 levels. Dose calculations, toxicity and adverse reaction profiles, and overall survival were analyzed. Obese patients were younger at the diagnosis of prostate cancer and had a shorter duration from diagnosis to docetaxel therapy. Analysis of body composition found that a high visceral fat-to-subcutaneous fat area ratio (VSR) was associated with poor prognosis but a high visceral fat-to-muscle area ratio (VMR) and high body mass index were associated with increased duration from starting docetaxel to death, allowing such men to catch up with patients with normal body mass index in overall survival from cancer diagnosis to death. Cox proportional hazard regression showed that age ≥65 years, high VSR, abnormal serum alkaline phosphatase, and >10% reduction of initial dosage were significant predictors of shorter time between starting docetaxel and death, and that high VMR, obesity, and weekly regimens were significant predictors of longer survival after docetaxel. Obese and overweight patients may benefit more from weekly docetaxel regimens using the reference dosage of 35 mg/m2 without empirical dosage reduction.

  10. Functional outcome measures in a surgical model of hip osteoarthritis in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Little, Dianne; Johnson, Stephen; Hash, Jonathan; Olson, Steven A.; Estes, Bradley T.; Moutos, Franklin T.; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    Background The hip is one of the most common sites of osteoarthritis in the body, second only to the knee in prevalence. However, current animal models of hip osteoarthritis have not been assessed using many of the functional outcome measures used in orthopaedics, a characteristic that could increase their utility in the evaluation of therapeutic interventions. The canine hip shares similarities with the human hip, and functional outcome measures are well documented in veterinary medicine, pr...

  11. Key to good fit: body measurement problems specific to key ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key to good fit: body measurement problems specific to key dimensions. ... to explore and describe the problems that the South African Clothing Industry currently ... A postal survey was conducted among South African apparel and footwear ...

  12. Predicting live weight using body measurements in Afar goats in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    Predicting live weight using body measurements in Afar goats in north eastern. Ethiopia ... farmers get value for their stock rather than the middlemen. However ..... of West African long-legged and West African dwarf sheep in Northern Ghana.

  13. Growth performance and certain body measurements of ostrich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth performance and certain body measurements of ostrich chicks as affected by dietary protein levels during 2–9 weeks of age. Kh M Mahrose, AI Attia, IE Ismail, DE Abou-Kassem, ME Abd El-Hack ...

  14. Measurement of the Lorentz-FitzGerald body contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafelski, Johann

    2018-02-01

    A complete foundational discussion of acceleration in the context of Special Relativity (SR) is presented. Acceleration allows the measurement of a Lorentz-FitzGerald body contraction created. It is argued that in the back scattering of a probing laser beam from a relativistic flying electron cloud mirror generated by an ultra-intense laser pulse, a first measurement of a Lorentz-FitzGerald body contraction is feasible.

  15. Body dysmorphic disorder: prevalence and outcomes in an oculofacial plastic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Austin J; Perry, Julian D

    2015-06-01

    To determine the prevalence, associated factors, and surgical outcomes of patients with body dysmorphic disorder in an oculofacial surgery practice. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of a consecutive case series. Participants consisted of a consecutive series of 728 patients who completed the Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire in an oculofacial surgery practice at The Cole Eye Institute between November 2013 and June 2014. A questionnaire score ≥9 was used as a positive screen for body dysmorphic disorder. Three control patients scoring ≤8 in the same month were randomly selected for each positive-screening patient. Main outcome measures included number of reoperations, surgical complications, and follow-up visits; preoperative and postoperative pain scores; and the technician word count. Categorical variables were analyzed with Pearson χ(2) tests or Fisher exact tests, while continuous variables were analyzed with Wilcoxon rank sum tests or t tests. A total of 728 patients completed the questionnaire and 50 (6.9%) scored 9 or more. Using a confidence interval of 95%, patients in the positive questionnaire screen group were younger (P = .004), had more eyelid surgeries (P = .007), experienced higher rates of complications after surgery (P = .002), reported higher postoperative pain scores (P = .034), required more reoperations (P = .050), and had a higher technician word count compared to the control group (P = .003). The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in an oculofacial surgical setting matches reports from other surgical specialties, and is significantly higher than in the general population. Patients screening positively for body dysmorphic disorder tend to have higher postoperative pain scores and more postoperative complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Food and beverage television advertising exposure and youth consumption, body mass index and adiposity outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Lisa M; Wada, Roy; Khan, Tamkeen; Emery, Sherry L

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the relationships between exposure to food and beverage product television advertisements and consumption and obesity outcomes among youth. Individual-level data on fast-food and soft drink consumption and body mass index (BMI) for young adolescents from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten Cohort (1998-1999) and adiposity measures for children from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2003-2004) were combined with designated market area (DMA) Nielsen media advertising ratings data. To account for unobserved individual-level and DMA-level heterogeneity, various fixed- and random-effects models were estimated. The results showed that exposure to soft drink and sugar-sweetened beverage advertisements are economically and statistically significantly associated with higher frequency of soft drink consumption among youth even after controlling for unobserved heterogeneity, with elasticity estimates ranging from 0.4 to 0.5. The association between fast-food advertising exposure and fast-food consumption disappeared once we controlled for unobservables. Exposure to cereal advertising was significantly associated with young adolescents' BMI percentile ranking but exposures to fast-food and soft drink advertisements were not. The results on adiposity outcomes revealed that children's exposure to cereal advertising was associated with both percent body and trunk fatness; fast-food advertising was significantly associated with percent trunk fatness and marginally significantly associated with percent body fatness; and, exposure to SSB advertising was marginally significantly associated with percent body and trunk fatness. The study results suggest that continued monitoring of advertising is important and policy debates regarding the regulation of youth-directed marketing are warranted.

  17. Body composition as measured by in vivo neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.; Sawitsky, A.; Vartsky, D.; Yasumura, S.; Zanzi, I.; Gartenhaus, W.; Ellis, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    A large scale study is currently underway on the changes in body composition resulting from the cachexia of malignancy. The ultimate objective of the overall project is to assess the changes in body composition associated with hyperalimentation and other modes of nutritional support to cancer patients. The first phase of this study is now in progress. In this phase, a study is being made of a control group of normal patients to provide baseline data against which data from cancer patients can be evaluated. Total body nitrogen and potassium are measured in a group of normal men and women, and are analyzed as a function of age. Additionally, changes in skeletal mass (total body calcium) are also recorded, and body water is measured simultaneously with the use of tritiated water

  18. A method for measuring the inertia properties of rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, M.; Mastinu, G.; Previati, G.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the inertia properties of rigid bodies is presented. Given a rigid body and its mass, the method allows to measure (identify) the centre of gravity location and the inertia tensor during a single test. The proposed technique is based on the analysis of the free motion of a multi-cable pendulum to which the body under consideration is connected. The motion of the pendulum and the forces acting on the system are recorded and the inertia properties are identified by means of a proper mathematical procedure based on a least square estimation. After the body is positioned on the test rig, the full identification procedure takes less than 10 min. The natural frequencies of the pendulum and the accelerations involved are quite low, making this method suitable for many practical applications. In this paper, the proposed method is described and two test rigs are presented: the first is developed for bodies up to 3500 kg and the second for bodies up to 400 kg. A validation of the measurement method is performed with satisfactory results. The test rig holds a third part quality certificate according to an ISO 9001 standard and could be scaled up to measure the inertia properties of huge bodies, such as trucks, airplanes or even ships.

  19. Hepatology may have problems with putative surrogate outcome measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian; Brok, Jesper; Gong, Yan

    2007-01-01

    A surrogate outcome measure is a laboratory measurement, a physical sign, or another intermediate substitute that is able to predict an intervention's effect on a clinically meaningful outcome. A clinical outcome detects how a patient feels, functions, or survives. Surrogate outcome measures occur...... faster or more often, are cheaper, and/or are less invasively achieved than the clinical outcome. In practice, validation is surprisingly often overlooked, especially if a biologic plausible rationale is proposed. Surrogate outcomes must be validated before use. The first step in validation...... predicts the intervention's effect on the clinical outcome. In hepatology a number of putative surrogate outcomes are used both in clinical research and in clinical practice without having been properly validated. Sustained virological response to interferons and ribavirin in patients with chronic...

  20. National survey of human body radioactivity measured by a mobile whole-body counter and installed whole-body counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boddy, K.; Fenwick, J.D.; McKenzie, A.L.

    1989-05-01

    Body radioactivity in the general public has been measured in 2339 volunteers throughout the U.K. A mobile whole-body monitor visited collaborating Medical Physics Departments and data were also contributed by Medical Physics Departments possessing installed counters. Levels of body radiocaesium ranged from below detection level to 4149 Bq. Radiocaesium levels were normalised by dividing by the content of natural body potassium-40. In all cases, the dose rate to the body from radiocaesium was less than that from potassium-40. Radiocaesium levels were 2-3 times higher in N.W. England, Scotland and N. Wales than the rest of the country, but this factor is much less than the variation in deposition of Chernobyl radiocaesium. This discrepancy may be accounted for by the nationwide distribution of foodstuffs. At all sites where volunteers were monitored, the ratio of caesium-137/caesium-134 was consistent with a radiocaesium intake attributable primarily to fallout from the Chernobyl fire. (author)

  1. Contribution of body surface mapping to clinical outcome after surgical ablation of postinfarction ventricular tachycardia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dessel, Pascal F.; van Hemel, Norbert M.; Groenewegen, Arne Sippens; de Bakker, Jacques M.; Linnebank, André C.; Defauw, Jo J.

    2002-01-01

    This article investigates the influence of body surface mapping on outcome of ventricular antiarrhythmic surgery. Preoperative mapping is advocated to optimize map-guided antiarrhythmic surgery of postinfarction ventricular tachycardia. We sequentially analyzed the results of catheter activation

  2. Measuring outcomes in children's rehabilitation: a decision protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, M; King, G; Russell, D; MacKinnon, E; Hurley, P; Murphy, C

    1999-06-01

    To develop and test the feasibility and clinical utility of a computerized self-directed software program designed to enable service providers in children's rehabilitation to make decisions about the most appropriate outcome measures to use in client and program evaluation. A before-and-after design was used to test the feasibility and initial impact of the decision-making outcome software in improving knowledge and use of clinical outcome measures. A children's rehabilitation center in a city of 50,000. All service providers in the children's rehabilitation center. Disciplines represented included early childhood education, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech and language pathology, audiology, social work, and psychology. Using a conceptual framework based on the International Classification of Impairment, Disability, and Handicap (ICIDH), an outcome measurement decision-making protocol was developed. The decision-making protocol was computerized in an educational software program with an attached database of critically appraised measures. Participants learned about outcome measures through the program and selected outcome measures that met their specifications. The computer software was tested for feasibility in the children's rehabilitation center for 6 months. Knowledge and use of clinical outcome measures were determined before and after the feasibility testing using a survey of all service providers currently at the centre and audits of 30 randomly selected rehabilitation records (at pretest, posttest, and follow-up). Service providers indicated that the outcomes software was easy to follow and believed that the use of the ICIDH framework helped them in making decisions about selecting outcome measures. Results of the survey indicated that there were significant changes in the service providers' level of comfort with selecting measures and knowing what measures were available. Use of outcome measures as identified through the audit did not change

  3. The CROES percutaneous nephrolithotomy global study: the influence of body mass index on outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuller, Andrew; Razvi, Hassan; Denstedt, John D

    2012-01-01

    In addition to more commonly forming stones, obese patients present a number of challenges when undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy. We evaluated percutaneous nephrolithotomy outcomes in 3,709 patients stratified by body mass index.......In addition to more commonly forming stones, obese patients present a number of challenges when undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy. We evaluated percutaneous nephrolithotomy outcomes in 3,709 patients stratified by body mass index....

  4. Measuring Learning Outcomes in Library Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Connor, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The author uses clicker technology to incorporate polling and multiple choice question techniques into library instruction classes. Clickers can be used to give a keener understanding of how many students grasp the concepts presented in a specific class session. Typically, a student that aces a definition-type question will fail to answer an application-type question correctly. Immediate, electronic feedback helps to calibrate teaching approaches and gather data about learning outcomes. Th...

  5. Histologically Measured Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Correlates with Body Height as Strongly as with Body Mass Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac myocytes are presumed to enlarge with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH. This study correlates histologically measured myocytes with lean and fat body mass. Cases of LVH without coronary heart disease and normal controls came from forensic autopsies. The cross-sectional widths of myocytes in H&E-stained paraffin sections followed log normal distributions almost to perfection in all 104 specimens, with constant coefficient of variation across the full range of ventricular weight, as expected if myocytes of all sizes contribute proportionately to hypertrophy. Myocyte sizes increased with height. By regression analysis, height2.7 as a proxy for lean body mass and body mass index (BMI as a proxy for fat body mass, exerted equal effects in the multiple correlation with myocyte volume, and the equation rejected race and sex. In summary, myocyte sizes, as indexes of LVH, suggest that lean and fat body mass may contribute equally.

  6. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: Relation to infarct size and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Geurts (Marjolein); Scheijmans, F.E.V. (Féline E.V.); T. van Seeters (Tom); G.J. Biessels; L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta K.); H.B. van der Worp (Bart); C.B. Majoie (Charles); Y.B.W.E.M. Roos (Yvo); L.E.M. Duijm (Lucien); K. Keizer (Koos); A. van der Lugt (Aad); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); Greve, D. (Droogh-de); H.P. Bienfait (Henri); M.A.A. van Walderveen (Marianne); M.J.H. Wermer (Marieke); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); J. Boiten (Jelis); A. Duyndam (Anita); V.I.H. Kwa; F.J. Meijer (F.); E.J. van Dijk (Ewoud); A.M. Kesselring (Anouk); J. Hofmeijer; J.A. Vos (Jan Albert); W.J. Schonewille (Wouter); W.J. van Rooij (W.); P.L.M. de Kort (Paul); C.C. Pleiter (C.); S.L.M. Bakker (Stef); Bot, J.; M.C. Visser (Marieke); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta); I.C. van der Schaaf (Irene); J.W. Dankbaar (Jan); W.P. Mali (Willem); van Seeters, T.; A.D. Horsch (Alexander D.); J.M. Niesten (Joris); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); J.S.K. Luitse; Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: High body temperatures after ischemic stroke have been associated with larger infarct size, but the temporal profile of this relation is unknown. We assess the relation between temporal profile of body temperature and infarct size and functional outcome in patients with acute

  7. Body Composition in Relation to Clinical Outcomes in Renal Cell Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Alina; Kampman, Ellen; Knijnenburg, Nathalja C.; Mulders, Peter F.; Sedelaar, J.P.M.; Baracos, Vickie E.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Several studies suggest that body composition (ie, body proportions of muscle and fat defined by computed tomography) is associated with clinical outcomes of several cancer types, including renal cell cancer (RCC). Objective: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of routine postoperative body temperature measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Hester; Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Goossens, Astrid; Speelman, Peter; Legemate, Dink A.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On surgical wards, body temperature is routinely measured, but there is no proof that this is useful for detecting postoperative infection. The aim of this study was to compare temperature measurements (the test) with the confirmed absence or presence of a postoperative infection (the

  9. Repeatability of Objective Measurements of Linear Udder and Body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to estimates the repeatability of objective measurements on linear udder and body conformation traits and to evaluate the objectivity of the measurements in Friesian x Bunaji cows. Data from 50 (F1) Frisian X Bunaji cows collected between 2007 and 2008 at the Dairy Research Farm of the ...

  10. High frequency body mass measurement, feedback, and health behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooreman, P.; Scherpenzeel, A.

    We analyze weight and fat percentage measurements of respondents in an online general population panel in the Netherlands, collected using wireless scales, with an average frequency of 1.6 measurements per week. First, we document the existence of a weekly cycle; body mass is lowest on Fridays and

  11. SOI Transistor measurement techniques using body contacted transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worley, E.R.; Williams, R.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of body contacted SOI transistors are used to isolate parameters of the back channel and island edge transistor. Properties of the edge and back channel transistor have been measured before and after X-ray irradiation (ARACOR). The unique properties of the edge transistor are shown to be a result of edge geometry as confirmed by a two dimensional transistor simulator

  12. Staff perceptions of using outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Louisa-Jane; Tyson, Sarah; McGovern, Alison

    2013-05-01

    The use of standardised outcome measures is an integral part of stroke rehabilitation and is widely recommended as good practice. However, little is known about how measures are actually used or their impact. This study aimed to identify current clinical practice; how healthcare professionals working in stroke rehabilitation use outcome measures and their perceptions of the benefits and barriers to use. Eighty-four Health Care Professionals and 12 service managers and commissioners working in stroke services across a large UK county were surveyed by postal questionnaire. Ninety-six percent of clinical respondents used at least one measure, however, less than half used measures regularly during a patient's stay. The mean number of tools used was 3.2 (SD = 1.9). Eighty-one different tools were identified; 16 of which were unpublished and unvalidated. Perceived barriers in using outcome measures in day-to-day clinical practice included lack of resources (time and training) and lack of knowledge of appropriate measures. Benefits identified were to demonstrate the effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions and monitor patients' progress. Although the use of outcome measures is prevalent in clinical practice, there is little consistency in the tools utilised. The term "outcome measures" is used, but staff rarely used the measures at appropriate time points to formally assess and evaluate outcome. The term "measurement tool" more accurately reflects the purposes to which they were put and potential benefits. Further research to overcome the barriers in using standardised measurement tools and evaluate the impact of implementation on clinical practice is needed. • Health professionals working in stroke rehabilitation should work together to agree when and how outcome measures can be most effectively used in their service. • Efforts should be made to ensure that standardised tools are used to measure outcome at set time-points during rehabilitation, in order to

  13. Measuring outcomes in adult spinal deformity surgery: a systematic review to identify current strengths, weaknesses and gaps in patient-reported outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Sayf S A; van Hooff, Miranda L; Holewijn, Roderick M; Polly, David W; Haanstra, Tsjitske M; de Kleuver, Marinus

    2017-08-01

    Adult spinal deformity (ASD) causes severe disability, reduces overall quality of life, and results in a substantial societal burden of disease. As healthcare is becoming more value based, and to facilitate global benchmarking, it is critical to identify and standardize patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). This study aims to identify the current strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in PROMs used for ASD. Studies were included following a systematic search in multiple bibliographic databases between 2000 and 2015. PROMs were extracted and linked to the outcome domains of WHO's International Classification of Functioning and Health (ICF) framework. Subsequently, the clinimetric quality of identified PROMs was evaluated. The literature search identified 144 papers that met the inclusion criteria, and nine frequently used PROMs were identified. These covered 29 ICF outcome domains, which could be grouped into three of the four main ICF chapters: body function (n = 7), activity and participation (n = 19), environmental factors (n = 3), and body structure (n = 0). A low quantity (n = 3) of papers was identified that studied the clinimetric quality of PROMs. The Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 has the highest level of clinimetric quality for ASD. Outcome domains related to mobility and pain were well represented. We identified a gap in current outcome measures regarding neurological and pulmonary function. In addition, no outcome domains were measured in the ICF chapter body structure. These results will serve as a foundation for the process of seeking international consensus on a standard set of outcome domains, accompanied PROMs and contributing factors to be used in future clinical trials and spine registries.

  14. Impact of maternal body mass index and gestational weight gain on neonatal outcomes among healthy Middle-Eastern females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Papazian

    Full Text Available Studies on the relative impact of body mass index in women in childbearing age and gestational weight gain on neonatal outcomes are scarce in the Middle East.The primary objective of this research was to assess the impact of maternal body mass index (BMI and gestational weight gain (GWG on neonatal outcomes. The effect of maternal age and folic acid supplementation before and during pregnancy was also examined.This is a retrospective cross sectional observational study of 1000 full term deliveries of women enrolled thru the National Collaborative Perinatal Neonatal Network, in Lebanon. Maternal characteristics such as age, BMI and GWG and neonatal outcomes such as weight, height, head circumference and Apgar score were the primary studied variables in this study. Total maternal weight gain were compared to the guidelines depicted by the Institute of Medicine (IOM.The negative outcomes of newborns such as lean body weight and macrosomia were significantly present in women who gained respectively below or above the IOM's cut-off points. Pregestational body mass index influenced significantly the infants' birth weight, in both the underweight and obese categories. Birth height, head circumference and Apgar score were not influenced by pregestational body mass index or gestational weight gain. No significant associations were found between maternal age and pregestational body mass index and gestational weight gain.Studies evaluating the impact of weight before and during pregnancy on neonatal outcomes and anthropometrics measurements are lacking in the Middle East. Our results highlight the importance of nutritional counseling in order to shed the extra weights before conceiving and monitor weight gain to avoid the negative impact on feto-maternal health.

  15. Impact of maternal body mass index and gestational weight gain on neonatal outcomes among healthy Middle-Eastern females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazian, Tatiana; Abi Tayeh, Georges; Sibai, Darine; Hout, Hala; Melki, Imad; Rabbaa Khabbaz, Lydia

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the relative impact of body mass index in women in childbearing age and gestational weight gain on neonatal outcomes are scarce in the Middle East. The primary objective of this research was to assess the impact of maternal body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) on neonatal outcomes. The effect of maternal age and folic acid supplementation before and during pregnancy was also examined. This is a retrospective cross sectional observational study of 1000 full term deliveries of women enrolled thru the National Collaborative Perinatal Neonatal Network, in Lebanon. Maternal characteristics such as age, BMI and GWG and neonatal outcomes such as weight, height, head circumference and Apgar score were the primary studied variables in this study. Total maternal weight gain were compared to the guidelines depicted by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The negative outcomes of newborns such as lean body weight and macrosomia were significantly present in women who gained respectively below or above the IOM's cut-off points. Pregestational body mass index influenced significantly the infants' birth weight, in both the underweight and obese categories. Birth height, head circumference and Apgar score were not influenced by pregestational body mass index or gestational weight gain. No significant associations were found between maternal age and pregestational body mass index and gestational weight gain. Studies evaluating the impact of weight before and during pregnancy on neonatal outcomes and anthropometrics measurements are lacking in the Middle East. Our results highlight the importance of nutritional counseling in order to shed the extra weights before conceiving and monitor weight gain to avoid the negative impact on feto-maternal health.

  16. Outcome Measurement in the Treatment of Spasmodic Dysphonia: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbach, Anna; Aiken, Patrick; Novakovic, Daniel

    2018-04-11

    The aim of this review was to systematically identify all available studies reporting outcomes measures to assess treatment outcomes for people with spasmodic dysphonia (SD). Full-text journal articles were identified through searches of PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases and hand searching of journals. A total of 4,714 articles were retrieved from searching databases; 1,165 were duplicates. Titles and abstracts of 3,549 were screened, with 171 being selected for full-text review. During full-text review, 101 articles were deemed suitable for inclusion. An additional 24 articles were identified as suitable for inclusion through a hand search of reference lists. Data were extracted from 125 studies. A total of 220 outcome measures were identified. Considered in reference to the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), the majority of outcomes were measured at a Body Function level (n = 212, 96%). Outcomes that explored communication and participation in everyday life and attitudes toward communication (ie, activity and participation domains) were infrequent (n = 8; 4%). Quality of life, a construct not measured within the ICF, was also captured by four outcome measures. No instruments evaluating communication partners' perspectives or burden/disability were identified. The outcome measures used in SD treatment studies are many and varied. The outcome measures identified predominately measure constructs within the Body Functions component of the ICF. In order to facilitate data synthesis across trials, the development of a core outcome set is recommended. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Do Activity Level Outcome Measures Commonly Used in Neurological Practice Assess Upper-Limb Movement Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Marika; Levin, Mindy F

    2017-07-01

    Movement is described in terms of task-related end point characteristics in external space and movement quality (joint rotations in body space). Assessment of upper-limb (UL) movement quality can assist therapists in designing effective treatment approaches for retraining lost motor elements and provide more detailed measurements of UL motor improvements over time. To determine the extent to which current activity level outcome measures used in neurological practice assess UL movement quality. Outcome measures assessing arm/hand function at the International Classification of Function activity level recommended by neurological clinical practice guidelines were reviewed. Measures assessing the UL as part of a general mobility assessment, those strictly evaluating body function/structure or participation, and paediatric measures were excluded. In all, 15 activity level outcome measures were identified; 9 measures assess how movement is performed by measuring either end point characteristics or movement quality. However, except for the Reaching Performance Scale for Stroke and the Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke Patients, these measures only account for deficits indirectly by giving a partial score if movements are slower or if the person experiences difficulties. Six outcome measures neither assess any parameters related to movement quality, nor distinguish between improvements resulting from motor compensation or recovery of desired movement strategies. Current activity measures may not distinguish recovery from compensation and adequately track changes in movement quality over time. Movement quality may be incorporated into clinical assessment using observational kinematics with or without low-cost motion tracking technology.

  18. Improving Outcome Measures Other Than Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Anderson Moore

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that educational, economic, and life success reflect children’s nonacademic as well as academic competencies. Therefore, longitudinal surveys that assess educational progress and success need to incorporate nonacademic measures to avoid omitted variable bias, inform development of new intervention strategies, and support mediating and moderating analyses. Based on a life course model and a whole child perspective, this article suggests constructs in the domains of child health, emotional/psychological development, educational achievement/attainment, social behavior, and social relationships. Four critical constructs are highlighted: self-regulation, agency/motivation, persistence/diligence, and executive functioning. Other constructs that are currently measured need to be retained, including social skills, positive relationships, activities, positive behaviors, academic self-efficacy, educational engagement, and internalizing/emotional well-being. Examples of measures that are substantively and psychometrically robust are provided.

  19. Body awareness: construct and self-report measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf E Mehling

    Full Text Available Heightened body awareness can be adaptive and maladaptive. Improving body awareness has been suggested as an approach for treating patients with conditions such as chronic pain, obesity and post-traumatic stress disorder. We assessed the psychometric quality of selected self-report measures and examined their items for underlying definitions of the construct.PubMed, PsychINFO, HaPI, Embase, Digital Dissertations Database.Abstracts were screened; potentially relevant instruments were obtained and systematically reviewed. Instruments were excluded if they exclusively measured anxiety, covered emotions without related physical sensations, used observer ratings only, or were unobtainable. We restricted our study to the proprioceptive and interoceptive channels of body awareness. The psychometric properties of each scale were rated using a structured evaluation according to the method of McDowell. Following a working definition of the multi-dimensional construct, an inter-disciplinary team systematically examined the items of existing body awareness instruments, identified the dimensions queried and used an iterative qualitative process to refine the dimensions of the construct.From 1,825 abstracts, 39 instruments were screened. 12 were included for psychometric evaluation. Only two were rated as high standard for reliability, four for validity. Four domains of body awareness with 11 sub-domains emerged. Neither a single nor a compilation of several instruments covered all dimensions. Key domains that might potentially differentiate adaptive and maladaptive aspects of body awareness were missing in the reviewed instruments.Existing self-report instruments do not address important domains of the construct of body awareness, are unable to discern between adaptive and maladaptive aspects of body awareness, or exhibit other psychometric limitations. Restricting the construct to its proprio- and interoceptive channels, we explore the current understanding

  20. Body image in patients with mental disorders : Characteristics, associations with diagnosis and treatment outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffers, Mia; van Busschbach, Jooske T; Bosscher, Ruud J; Aerts, Liza C; Wiersma, Durk; Schoevers, Robert A

    Objective: Despite the increasing recognition in clinical practice of body image problems in other than appearance related mental disorders, the question remains how aspects of body image are affected in different disorders. The aim of this study was to measure body image in patients with a variety

  1. A new method of body habitus correction for total body potassium measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hehir, S; Green, S; Beddoe, A H

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an accurate and time-efficient method for the determination of total body potassium via a combination of measurements in the Birmingham whole body counter and the use of the Monte Carlo n-particle (MCNP) simulation code. In developing this method, MCNP has also been used to derive values for some components of the total measurement uncertainty which are difficult to quantify experimentally. A method is proposed for MCNP-assessed body habitus corrections based on a simple generic anthropomorphic model, scaled for individual height and weight. The use of this model increases patient comfort by reducing the need for comprehensive anthropomorphic measurements. The analysis shows that the total uncertainty in potassium weight determination by this whole body counting methodology for water-filled phantoms with a known amount of potassium is 2.7% (SD). The uncertainty in the method of body habitus correction (applicable also to phantom-based methods) is 1.5% (SD). It is concluded that this new strategy provides a sufficiently accurate model for routine clinical use

  2. A new method of body habitus correction for total body potassium measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hehir, S [University Hospital Birmingham Foundation NHS Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Green, S [University Hospital Birmingham Foundation NHS Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Beddoe, A H [University Hospital Birmingham Foundation NHS Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-07

    This paper describes an accurate and time-efficient method for the determination of total body potassium via a combination of measurements in the Birmingham whole body counter and the use of the Monte Carlo n-particle (MCNP) simulation code. In developing this method, MCNP has also been used to derive values for some components of the total measurement uncertainty which are difficult to quantify experimentally. A method is proposed for MCNP-assessed body habitus corrections based on a simple generic anthropomorphic model, scaled for individual height and weight. The use of this model increases patient comfort by reducing the need for comprehensive anthropomorphic measurements. The analysis shows that the total uncertainty in potassium weight determination by this whole body counting methodology for water-filled phantoms with a known amount of potassium is 2.7% (SD). The uncertainty in the method of body habitus correction (applicable also to phantom-based methods) is 1.5% (SD). It is concluded that this new strategy provides a sufficiently accurate model for routine clinical use.

  3. Measurements of whole-body radioactivity in the UK population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, J.D.; Boddy, K.; McKenzie, A.L.; Oxby, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    A national survey of whole-body radioactivity was undertaken. A mobile whole-body counter visited collaborating Medical Physics Departments and Hospitals in England and Wales. Data were also obtained from an installed whole-body counter at the West Cumberland Hospital, Whitehaven, and from a control site at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge. 1657 volunteer members of the public were measured, including 162 children. 36% of volunteers had been measured in a similar survey 2 years earlier, and showed between a two and five fold reduction in body radiocaesium. No radiocaesium was detected in 54% of people measured. Measurements showed a progressive fall over the course of the study, reaching a baseline of 0.3 Bq 137 Cs/gK. In 1989, the additional radiation dose incurred from radiocaesium varied from a maximum of 4.1 μSv in Cumbria to 1.5 μSv in the South East, compared with the average annual radiation dose of 2500 μSv due to all other causes. No other gamma-emitting radionuclides were found. Results are consistent with Chernobyl as the source of the radiocaesium detected. (author)

  4. Convergence of Algorithms for Reconstructing Convex Bodies and Directional Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, Richard; Kiderlen, Markus; Milanfar, Peyman

    2006-01-01

    We investigate algorithms for reconstructing a convex body K in Rn from noisy measurements of its support function or its brightness function in k directions u1, . . . , uk. The key idea of these algorithms is to construct a convex polytope Pk whose support function (or brightness function) best...

  5. Systematic Review of Treatment Outcome Measures for Vulvodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadownik, Leslie A; Yong, Paul J; Smith, Kelly B

    2018-07-01

    To systematically evaluate the literature regarding vulvodynia treatment outcome measures. A systematic literature search on OVID, PubMed, and PsycINFO databases was conducted from inception until May 2016. Studies were included/excluded based on prespecified criteria. Reported outcome measures were organized into 6 core outcome domains recommended by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT): pain; physical functioning, emotional functioning, participant ratings of global improvement and satisfaction with treatment, symptoms and adverse events, and participant disposition. Of the 206 articles identified for full-text screening, 33 met our criteria. One study adhered to all IMMPACT recommendations. The number of outcomes measured per study ranged from 1 to greater than 20. Patient-reported pain outcomes were found in the majority (27/33; 82%) of studies. Pain severity with intercourse was reported by 24 (73%) of 33 studies-9 different scales were used to measure this outcome. Clinician-reported outcomes were present in 14 (42%) of 33 studies. Methods of measuring vestibular sensitivity by "cotton swab" test were different in 8 of 10 studies. Other domains reported included; physical function (8/33 studies; 24%), sexual function (23/33 studies; 70%), and emotional function (13/33 studies; 39%). Symptoms and adverse events were reported by 15 (45%) of 33 studies. One study formally reported participant disposition using all the information recommended by CONSORT. Comparison of clinical trial results in vulvodynia is not possible because of a lack of standard treatment outcome measures. Vulvodynia researchers should apply the IMMPACT criteria to guide the development of a minimum core set of standard outcome measures that measure holistic health.

  6. Bioimpedance measurement of body water correlates with measured volume balance in injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemurgy, A S; Rodriguez, E; Hart, M B; Kurto, H Z; Albrink, M H

    1993-06-01

    Bioimpedance technology is being used increasingly to determine drug volume of distribution, body water status, and nutrition repletion. Its accuracy in patients experiencing large volume flux is not established. To address this, we undertook this prospective study in 54 consecutive seriously injured adults who had emergency celiotomy soon after arrival in the emergency department. Bioimpedance measurements were obtained in the emergency department before the patient was transported to the operating room, on completion of celiotomy, and 24 hours and 48 hours after celiotomy. Bioimpedance measurements of body water were compared with measured fluid balance. If insensible losses are subtracted from measured fluid balance, the percentage of body weight, which is body water determined by bioimpedance, closely follows fluid flux. This study supports the use of bioimpedance measurements in determining total body water even during periods of surgery, blood loss, and vigorous resuscitation.

  7. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)--development of a self-administered outcome measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Roos, H P; Lohmander, L S

    1998-01-01

    There is broad consensus that good outcome measures are needed to distinguish interventions that are effective from those that are not. This task requires standardized, patient-centered measures that can be administered at a low cost. We developed a questionnaire to assess short- and long......-term patient-relevant outcomes following knee injury, based on the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, a literature review, an expert panel, and a pilot study. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) is self-administered and assesses five outcomes: pain, symptoms, activities of daily living, sport...

  8. Investigation of human body potential measured by a non-contact measuring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Norimitsu

    2016-12-07

    A human body is occasionally electrified in a room. This charged object will be a source of electrostatic accidents, including the malfunction of electronic equipment. Hence, prevention of these accidents is required. Accidents occasionally occur, even though antistatic clothes and shoes are used. One of the causes for these accidents is that there is a lack of the preventive measures. This situation occurs when using, for example, unconductive wax. In this study, human body potential (voltage) is measured using a non-contact measuring system. An investigation of the human body's voltage when using this system is conducted. The result demonstrates that the voltage of a human body wearing antistatic clothes and shoes or light clothes and slippers exceeds a malfunctioning voltage of a microelectronics device when the body walks on floors. Thus, accidents may occur even if a human body wearing the antistatic clothes walks on flooring. These results will be useful in estimating determination whether electrostatic accidents occur or not.

  9. New possibilities in the prevention of eating disorders: The introduction of positive body image measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piran, Niva

    2015-06-01

    Delineating positive psychological processes in inhabiting the body, as well as quantitative measures to assess them, can facilitate progress in the field of prevention of eating disorders by expanding outcome evaluation of prevention interventions, identifying novel mediators of change, and increasing highly needed research into protective factors. Moreover, enhancing positive ways of inhabiting the body may contribute toward the maintenance of gains of prevention interventions. Integrated social etiological models to eating disorders that focus on gender and other social variables, such as the Developmental Theory of Embodiment (Piran & Teall, 2012a), can contribute to positive body image intervention development and research within the prevention field. Using the Developmental Theory of Embodiment as a lens, this article explores whether existing prevention programs (i.e., Cognitive Dissonance and Media Smart) may already work to promote positive body image, and whether prevention programs need to be expanded toward this goal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Instagram Unfiltered: Exploring Associations of Body Image Satisfaction, Instagram #Selfie Posting, and Negative Romantic Relationship Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Jessica L; Clayton, Russell B

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the predictors and consequences associated with Instagram selfie posting. Thus, this study explored whether body image satisfaction predicts Instagram selfie posting and whether Instagram selfie posting is then associated with Instagram-related conflict and negative romantic relationship outcomes. A total of 420 Instagram users aged 18 to 62 years (M = 29.3, SD = 8.12) completed an online survey questionnaire. Analysis of a serial multiple mediator model using bootstrapping methods indicated that body image satisfaction was sequentially associated with increased Instagram selfie posting and Instagram-related conflict, which related to increased negative romantic relationship outcomes. These findings suggest that when Instagram users promote their body image satisfaction in the form of Instagram selfie posts, risk of Instagram-related conflict and negative romantic relationship outcomes might ensue. Findings from the current study provide a baseline understanding to potential and timely trends regarding Instagram selfie posting.

  11. Measurement of body fat and hydration of the fat-free body in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streat, S.J.; Beddoe, A.H.; Hill, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Body fat mass, fat-free body mass and body water are basic components of body composition which are used in nutritional and metabolic studies and in patient care. A method of measuring total body fat (TBF), fat-free mass (FFM) and its hydration (TBW/FFM) involving prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) and tritium dilution has been compared with the more traditional methods of densitometry and skinfold anthropometry in 36 normal volunteers, and with skinfold anthropometry in 56 patients presenting for nutritional support. While the mean values of TBF were in reasonable agreement for the three methods in normals it was founds that skinfold anthropometry underestimated TBF relative to the IVNAA/tritium method by, on average, 3.0 kg (19%) in patients. Furthermore, the ranges of values in normals of the ratio TBW/FFM for the anthropometric (0.62 to 0.80) and densitometric (0.65 to 0.80) methods were much wider than the range for the IVNAA/tritium method (0.69 to 0.76), in which TBW was measured by tritium dilution in all cases. In the patients, the ranges of this ratio were 0.52 to 0.90 for the anthropometric method and 0.67 to 0.82 for the IVNAA/tritium method; clearly anthropometry yields values of TBW/FFM which are outside accepted biological limits. On the basis of these findings, ranges of TBW/FFM are suggested for both normal adults (0.69 to 0.75) and patients requiring nutritional support (0.67 to 0.83). Finally it is concluded that the IVNAA/tritium method is a suitable method for measuring TBF and FFM and particularly so when body composition is abnormal

  12. West African donkey's liveweight estimation using body measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Claver Nininahazwe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to determine a formula for estimating the liveweight in West African donkeys. Materials and Methods: Liveweight and a total of 6 body measurements were carried out on 1352 donkeys from Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger, and Senegal. The correlations between liveweight and body measurements were determined, and the most correlated body measurements with liveweight were used to establish regression lines. Results: The average weight of a West African donkey was 126.0±17.1 kg, with an average height at the withers of 99.5±3.67 cm; its body length was 104.4±6.53 cm, and a heart girth (HG of 104.4±6.53 cm. After analyzing the various regression lines and correlations, it was found that the HG could better estimate the liveweight of West African donkeys by simple linear regression method. Indeed, the liveweight (LW showed a better correlation with the HG (R2=0.81. The following formulas (Equations 1 and 2 could be used to estimate the LW of West Africa donkeys. Equation 1: Estimated LW (kg = 2.55 x HG (cm - 153.49; Equation 2: Estimated LW (kg = Heart girth (cm2.68 / 2312.44. Conclusion: The above formulas could be used to manufacture weighing tape to be utilized by veterinary clinicians and farmers to estimate donkey's weight in the view of medication and adjustment of load.

  13. A Binomial Test of Group Differences with Correlated Outcome Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Levin, Joel R.; Ferron, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Building on previous arguments for why educational researchers should not provide effect-size estimates in the face of statistically nonsignificant outcomes (Robinson & Levin, 1997), Onwuegbuzie and Levin (2005) proposed a 3-step statistical approach for assessing group differences when multiple outcome measures are individually analyzed…

  14. Culturally Sensitive and Environment-Friendly Outcome Measures in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    to review research studies on outcome measures that were developed for ... A systematic review of evidence on culturally sensitive and environment- ... Various databases including Google Scholar, PEDro and PubMed were accessed to search for relevant empirical ... utilization of disease-specific, patient-centered outcome.

  15. Measuring Outcomes for Children Late Placed for Adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Alan

    1998-01-01

    Describes the selection of outcome measures used by the Maudsley Family Research team to assess outcomes--across a broad range of developmental dimensions--of permanent placement for children and adolescents. Developed a package of instruments to examine child emotional, cognitive, social, and academic development; attachment; and self-esteem, for…

  16. The Development of NOAA Education Common Outcome Performance Measures (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, J.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Education Council has embarked on an ambitious Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) project that will allow it to assess education program outcomes and impacts across the agency, line offices, and programs. The purpose of this internal effort is to link outcome measures to program efforts and to evaluate the success of the agency's education programs in meeting the strategic goals. Using an outcome-based evaluation approach, the NOAA Education Council is developing two sets of common outcome performance measures, environmental stewardship and professional development. This presentation will examine the benefits and tradeoffs of common outcome performance measures that collect program results across a portfolio of education programs focused on common outcomes. Common outcome performance measures have a few benefits to our agency and to the climate education field at large. The primary benefit is shared understanding, which comes from our process for writing common outcome performance measures. Without a shared and agreed upon set of definitions for the measure of an outcome, the reported results may not be measuring the same things and would incorrectly indicate levels of performance. Therefore, our writing process relies on a commitment to developing a shared set of definitions based on consensus. We hope that by taking the time to debate and coming to agreement across a diverse set of programs, the strength of our common measures can indicate real progress towards outcomes we care about. An additional benefit is that these common measures can be adopted and adapted by other agencies and organizations that share similar theories of change. The measures are not without their drawbacks, and we do make tradeoffs as part of our process in order to continue making progress. We know that any measure is necessarily a narrow slice of performance. A slice that may not best represent the unique and remarkable contribution

  17. Understanding paediatric rehabilitation therapists' lack of use of outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; Wright, Virginia; Russell, Dianne J

    2011-01-01

    Despite widespread educational and promotional efforts, paediatric rehabilitation therapists still do not systematically or routinely use outcome measures. A review of contextual and psychosocial factors affecting therapists' use of outcome measures was performed, incorporating information from past studies of barriers to therapists' use of measures and more recent information about measure use, knowledge brokering and expert practice. This cumulative and contextual overview provided insights into how many therapists may approach practice. Therapists' beliefs in the importance of establishing effective relationships may lead them to place less value on formal measurement, to adopt a less rigorous and more pragmatic approach to ascertaining whether outcomes are achieved, and to avoid measures that may show little improvement. A relational goal-oriented approach to practice is proposed in which therapists adopt a broader facilitative and educational role with families about the importance of the measurement process.

  18. A bedside measure of body composition in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sarah A; Davidson, Zoe E; Davies, Peter S W; Truby, Helen

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, monitoring body composition is a critical component of nutritional assessment and weight management in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of a simple bedside measurement tool for body composition, namely bioelectrical impedance analysis, in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Measures of fat-free mass were determined using a bioelectrical impedance analysis machine and compared against estimations obtained from a reference body composition model. Additionally, the use of raw impedance values was analyzed using three existing predictive equations for the estimation of fat-free mass. Accuracy of bioelectrical impedance analysis was assessed by comparison against the reference model by calculation of biases and limits of agreement. Body composition was measured in 10 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, mean age 9.01 ± 2.34 years. The bioelectrical impedance analysis machine values of fat-free mass were on average 2.3 ± 14.1 kg higher than reference values. Limits of agreement (based on 95% confidence interval of the mean) were -7.4 to 2.9 kg. There was a significant correlation between the mean fat-free mass and difference in fat-free mass between the bioelectrical impedance analysis machine and the reference model (r = -0.86; P = 0.02) suggesting that the bias was not consistent across the range of measurements. The most accurate predictive equation for the estimation of fat-free mass using raw impedance values was the equation by Pietrobelli et al. (mean difference, -0.7 kg; 95% limits of agreement, -3.5 to 2.0 kg). In a clinical setting, where a rapid assessment of body composition is advantageous, the use of raw impedance values, combined with the equation by Pietrobelli et al., is recommended for the accurate estimation of fat-free mass, in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sexual quality of life, body image distress, and psychosocial outcomes in colorectal cancer: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jennifer Barsky; Handorf, Elizabeth; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2018-04-20

    The objectives were to assess changes in sexual QOL and body image distress over time and to examine longitudinal associations between sexual QOL and body image variables with psychosocial outcomes in a sample of colorectal cancer patients. Participants (N = 141) completed a mail-based survey assessing sexual QOL [sexual distress (ISS), treatment impact on sexual function (SFQ), sexual function (FSFI; IIEF)], body image distress (BIS), and psychosocial outcomes [relationship quality (DAS-4), depressive symptoms (CESD-SF), and health-related QOL (HRQOL; FACT-C)]; 88 patients completed 6-month follow-up surveys (62%). Gender and cancer subgroups (male vs. female; rectal vs. colon cancer) were compared and longitudinal models examined associations between sexual QOL and body image variables with psychosocial outcomes over time and by subgroup. Impairments in sexual QOL and body image distress were common. Women and patients with rectal cancer reported worse body image distress compared to men (p = .005) and those with colon cancer (p = .03), respectively; compared to patients with colon cancer, those with rectal cancer reported worse treatment impact (p image distress decreased (p = .02), while sexual QOL was stable (e.g., 58% classified as dysfunctional at both time points, p = .13). For most sexual and body image predictors, worse impairment was associated with worse psychosocial outcomes over time. Several significant gender and cancer subgroup effects were found. Sexual QOL and body image are compromised after colorectal cancer and tend to remain impaired if unaddressed. Sexual concerns should be addressed early to limit broader-reaching psychosocial effects.

  20. NATURAL USER INTERFACE SENSORS FOR HUMAN BODY MEASUREMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boehm

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent push for natural user interfaces (NUI in the entertainment and gaming industry has ushered in a new era of low cost three-dimensional sensors. While the basic idea of using a three-dimensional sensor for human gesture recognition dates some years back it is not until recently that such sensors became available on the mass market. The current market leader is PrimeSense who provide their technology for the Microsoft Xbox Kinect. Since these sensors are developed to detect and observe human users they should be ideally suited to measure the human body. We describe the technology of a line of NUI sensors and assess their performance in terms of repeatability and accuracy. We demonstrate the implementation of a prototype scanner integrating several NUI sensors to achieve full body coverage. We present the results of the obtained surface model of a human body.

  1. Natural User Interface Sensors for Human Body Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, J.

    2012-08-01

    The recent push for natural user interfaces (NUI) in the entertainment and gaming industry has ushered in a new era of low cost three-dimensional sensors. While the basic idea of using a three-dimensional sensor for human gesture recognition dates some years back it is not until recently that such sensors became available on the mass market. The current market leader is PrimeSense who provide their technology for the Microsoft Xbox Kinect. Since these sensors are developed to detect and observe human users they should be ideally suited to measure the human body. We describe the technology of a line of NUI sensors and assess their performance in terms of repeatability and accuracy. We demonstrate the implementation of a prototype scanner integrating several NUI sensors to achieve full body coverage. We present the results of the obtained surface model of a human body.

  2. Body mass index and blood pressure measurement during pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, Jennifer L

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The accurate measurement of blood pressure requires the use of a large cuff in subjects with a high mid-arm circumference (MAC). This prospective study examined the need for a large cuff during pregnancy and its correlation with maternal obesity. METHODS: Maternal body mass index (BMI), fat mass, and MAC were measured. RESULTS: Of 179 women studied, 15.6% were obese. With a BMI of level 1 obesity, 44% needed a large cuff and with a BMI of level 2 obesity 100% needed a large cuff. CONCLUSION: All women booking for antenatal care should have their MAC measured to avoid the overdiagnosis of pregnancy hypertension.

  3. Outcome Measurement in Nursing: Imperatives, Ideals, History, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Terry L

    2016-05-31

    Nurses have a social responsibility to evaluate the effect of nursing practice on patient outcomes in the areas of health promotion; injury and illness prevention; and alleviation of suffering. Quality assessment initiatives are hindered by the paucity of available data related to nursing processes and patient outcomes across these three domains of practice. Direct care nurses are integral to self-regulation for the discipline as they are the best source of information about nursing practice and patient outcomes. Evidence supports the assumption that nurses do contribute to prevention of adverse events but there is insufficient evidence to explain how nurses contribute to these and/or other patient outcomes. The purposes of this article are to examine the imperatives, ideal conditions, history, and challenges related to effective outcome measurement in nursing. The article concludes with recommendations for action to move quality assessment forward, such as substantial investment to support adequate documentation of nursing practice and patient outcomes.

  4. Changes in body chemical composition with age measured by total-body neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.; Vaswani, A.; Zanzi, I.; Aloia, J.F.; Roginsky, M.S.; Ellis, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    Total-body levels of calcium and phosphorus (reflecting skeletal mass) and total-body levels of potassium (reflecting muscle mass) were measured by neutron activation analysis in 39 men and 40 women ages 30 to 90 yr. In order to intercompare the total body calcium (TBCa) values in a heterogeneous population, such as this, it was necessary to normalize the data for skeletal size. The normalization consisted of dividing the absolute calcium level by the predicted calcium level for each individual matched to a set of critical parameters. The parameter used in the computation of normal values were age, sex, muscle mass, i.e., total body potassium (TBK) and height. For the calcium data of the women, it was necessary to add an age correction factor after the age of 55 yr. The calcium ratio (mean ratio of the predicted to measured TBCa) in men was 1.000 +- 7.8 percent and in women 0.996 +- 7.1 percent. The TBCa of normal males and females can thus be predicted to +-13 percent (at the 90 percent confidence level). An exception to this was found in males (70 to 90 yr) who exhibited a mean calcium ratio greater than 1.13

  5. The Popularity of Outcome Measures for Hip and Knee Arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Thomas M; Broughton, Nigel S; Williams, Cylie M

    2018-01-01

    The optimal methods of determining outcomes following hip and knee arthroplasty remain controversial. The objectives of this study were to determine the most frequently used outcome measures in randomized controlled trials (RCT) and study protocols registered with clinical trials registries (CTR) on hip and knee arthroplasty. A systematic search strategy was undertaken to identify the outcome measures used in RCT and CTR following joint arthroplasty. Databases searched included Embase, Ovid MEDLINE (including In-Process), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL Plus, clinicaltrials.gov, ISRCTN registry, and ANZCTR. Differences in the use of outcome measures between RCT and CTR were assessed using logistic regression. There were 291 RCT and 113 CTR on hip arthroplasty and 452 RCT and 184 CTR on knee arthroplasty that met the inclusion criteria. The most popular outcome measures were the Harris Hip Score and the Knee Society Score. Multiple outcome measures were used in greater than 50% of the included studies. The Oxford Hip Score, Oxford Knee Score, EuroQol-5D, and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (all P < .001) were used in significantly more CTR than RCT. There is a clear preference for the use of the Harris Hip Score and Knee Society Score, contrary to existing international guidelines and reviews on the topic. Both measures require clinician input, which potentially influences their validity and increases their overall administration cost. Some patient-reported outcome measures, such as the Oxford Hip and Knee Scores, EuroQol-5D, and KOOS, appear to be increasing in popularity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Outcomes assessment in rotator cuff pathology: what are we measuring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Steinhaus, Michael E; Morrow, Zachary S; Jobin, Charles M; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2015-12-01

    Assessments used to measure outcomes associated with rotator cuff pathology and after repair are varied. This lack of standardization leads to difficulty drawing comparisons across studies. We hypothesize that this variability in patient-reported outcome measures and objective metrics used in rotator cuff studies persists even in high-impact, peer reviewed journals. All studies assessing rotator cuff tear and repair outcomes in 6 orthopedic journals with a high impact factor from January 2010 to December 2014 were reviewed. Cadaveric and animal studies and those without outcomes were excluded. Outcome measures included range of motion (forward elevation, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation), strength (in the same 4 planes), tendon integrity imaging, patient satisfaction, and functional assessment scores. Of the 156 included studies, 63% documented range of motion measurements, with 18% reporting range of motion in all 4 planes. Only 38% of studies reported quantitative strength measurements. In 65% of studies, tendon integrity was documented with imaging (38% magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance anrhrogram, 31% ultrasound, and 8% computed tomography arthrogram). Finally, functional score reporting varied significantly, with the 5 most frequently reported scores ranging from 16% to 61% in studies, and 15 of the least reported outcomes were each reported in ≤6% of studies. Significant variability exists in outcomes reporting after rotator cuff tear and repair, making comparisons between clinical studies difficult. Creating a uniformly accepted, validated outcomes tool that assesses pain, function, patient satisfaction, and anatomic integrity would enable consistent outcomes assessment after operative and nonoperative management and allow comparisons across the literature. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Whole-body dose meters. Measurements of total activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppe, P.; Klinikum Steglitz, Berlin

    1990-01-01

    By means of measurements using a whole-body dose meter, the course of the incorporation of radionuclides was established between April 1986 and May 1989 for unchanged conditions of alimentation, activity-conscious alimentation, and uniquely increased incorporation. Monitoring covered persons from the most different spheres of life. The incorporation is compared with the one resulting from nuclear weapons explosions in the atmosphere. (DG) [de

  8. Body Fat Measurements in Singaporean Adults Using Four Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyan Bi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have been conducted to measure body composition in Asian populations. In this study, we determined the percent body fat (PBF by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA, air-displacement plethysmography (ADP or BOD POD, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA and skinfold (SKF in 445 healthy Singaporean adults. We observed that the BOD POD, BIA and SKF estimates of PBF were highly correlated with that from DEXA (as a reference method among Singaporean adults. However, they all underestimated PBF (differences of 3.9% for BOD POD, 5.6% for BIA and 12.5% for SKF. Our results filled a gap in the literature by testing the relationships between DEXA and BOD POD, BIA and SKF in a large sample with a wide range of body mass index (BMI from 16.1 to 37.5 kg/m2 and age from 21 to 69.2 years. The differences of PBF measured by different methods were dependent on age, gender and ethnicity. No significant difference was observed between DEXA and BOD POD in men aged > 40 or in BMI tertile 3. However, the mean difference between DEXA and BOD POD was significant in women. Different measuring methods of estimating PBF therefore must be cautiously interpreted.

  9. Measuring and communicating meaningful outcomes in neonatology: A family perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Annie; Farlow, Barbara; Baardsnes, Jason; Pearce, Rebecca; Barrington, Keith J

    2016-12-01

    Medium- and long-term outcomes have been collected and described among survivors of neonatal intensive care units for decades, for a number of purposes: (1) quality control within units, (2) comparisons of outcomes between NICUs, (3) clinical trials (whether an intervention improves outcomes), (4) end-of-life decision-making, (5) to better understand the effects of neonatal conditions and/or interventions on organs and/or long-term health, and finally (6) to better prepare parents for the future. However, the outcomes evaluated have been selected by investigators, based on feasibility, availability, cost, stability, and on what investigators consider to be important. Many of the routinely measured outcomes have major limitations: they may not correlate well with long-term difficulties, they may artificially divide continuous outcomes into dichotomous ones, and may have no clear relationship with quality of life and functioning of children and their families. Several investigations, such as routine term cerebral resonance imaging for preterm infants, have also not yet been shown to improve the outcome of children nor their families. In this article, the most common variables used in neonatology as well as some variables which are rarely measured but may be of equal importance for families are presented. The manner in which these outcomes are communicated to families will be examined, as well as recommendations to optimize communication with parents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Network meta-analysis of multiple outcome measures accounting for borrowing of information across outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achana, Felix A; Cooper, Nicola J; Bujkiewicz, Sylwia; Hubbard, Stephanie J; Kendrick, Denise; Jones, David R; Sutton, Alex J

    2014-07-21

    Network meta-analysis (NMA) enables simultaneous comparison of multiple treatments while preserving randomisation. When summarising evidence to inform an economic evaluation, it is important that the analysis accurately reflects the dependency structure within the data, as correlations between outcomes may have implication for estimating the net benefit associated with treatment. A multivariate NMA offers a framework for evaluating multiple treatments across multiple outcome measures while accounting for the correlation structure between outcomes. The standard NMA model is extended to multiple outcome settings in two stages. In the first stage, information is borrowed across outcomes as well across studies through modelling the within-study and between-study correlation structure. In the second stage, we make use of the additional assumption that intervention effects are exchangeable between outcomes to predict effect estimates for all outcomes, including effect estimates on outcomes where evidence is either sparse or the treatment had not been considered by any one of the studies included in the analysis. We apply the methods to binary outcome data from a systematic review evaluating the effectiveness of nine home safety interventions on uptake of three poisoning prevention practices (safe storage of medicines, safe storage of other household products, and possession of poison centre control telephone number) in households with children. Analyses are conducted in WinBUGS using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. Univariate and the first stage multivariate models produced broadly similar point estimates of intervention effects but the uncertainty around the multivariate estimates varied depending on the prior distribution specified for the between-study covariance structure. The second stage multivariate analyses produced more precise effect estimates while enabling intervention effects to be predicted for all outcomes, including intervention effects on

  11. Impact of body fat distribution on neoadjuvant chemotherapy outcomes in advanced breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwase, Toshiaki; Sangai, Takafumi; Nagashima, Takeshi; Sakakibara, Masahiro; Sakakibara, Junta; Hayama, Shouko; Ishigami, Emi; Masuda, Takahito; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is known to decrease the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) against breast cancer; however, the relationship between actual body composition and NAC outcomes remains unknown. Therefore, we determined the effect of body composition on NAC outcomes. A total of 172 advanced breast cancer patients who underwent surgery after NAC were retrospectively analyzed. Body composition parameters including abdominal circumference (AC), subcutaneous fat area (SFA), visceral fat area (VFA), and skeletal muscle area (SMA) were calculated using computed tomography volume-analyzing software. VFA/SFA ratio was used to evaluate visceral obesity. The associations of body composition parameters with pathological complete remission (pCR) and survival were analyzed. AC, SFA, and VFA were significantly correlated with body mass index (BMI) (all P < 0.05; r = 0.82, r = 0.71, and r = 0.78, respectively). AC, SFA, and VFA increased significantly and SMA decreased significantly after menopause (all P < 0.05). VFA/SFA ratio increased significantly after menopause, even though BMI remained unchanged. Body composition parameters were not associated with pCR. Distant disease-free survival (DDFS) was significantly worse in the high VFA group than in the low VFA group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, in the high VFA group, postmenopausal patients had significantly shorter DDFS than premenopausal patients (P < 0.05). VFA was independently associated with DDFS in the multivariate analysis (P < 0.05). High visceral fat is associated with worse NAC outcomes in breast cancer patients, especially postmenopausal patients. Interventions targeting visceral fat accumulation will likely improve NAC outcomes

  12. Using Patient Reported Outcomes Measures to Promote Integrated Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel G. M. Olde Rikkert

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs have been introduced as standardised outcomes, but have not been implemented widely for disease targeted pathways of care, nor for geriatric patients who prefer functional performance and quality of life. Discussion: We describe innovative multipurpose implementation of PROMs as evidenced by two best practices of PROMs application in geriatric and physiotherapy practice. We show that PROMs can show meaningful outcomes in older subjects’ patient journeys, which can at the same time serve individuals and groups of both patients and professionals. Key lesson: PROMs can deliver generic outcomes relevant for older patients, may improve patient-physician relationship, quality of care and prediction of future outcomes in geriatric care, if they are valid, reliable and responsive, but still short and simple. A precondition to make the hard tip from research to practice is that PROMs are carefully positioned in the clinical encounters and in electronic health records.

  13. Disability outcome measures in multiple sclerosis clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Jeffrey A; Reingold, Stephen C; Polman, Chris H

    2012-01-01

    Many of the available disability outcome measures used in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis are insensitive to change over time, inadequately validated, or insensitive to patient-perceived health status or quality of life. Increasing focus on therapies that slow or reverse disability...... recommend practical refinements. Conversely, although substantial data support the multiple sclerosis functional composite as an alternative measure, changes to its component tests and scoring method are needed. Novel approaches, including the use of composite endpoints, patient-reported outcomes...... progression makes it essential to refine existing measures or to develop new tools. Major changes to the expanded disability status scale should be avoided to prevent the loss of acceptance by regulators as a measure for primary outcomes in trials that provide substantial evidence of effectiveness. Rather, we...

  14. Measuring Patient-Reported Outcomes: Key Metrics in Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voineskos, Sophocles H; Nelson, Jonas A; Klassen, Anne F; Pusic, Andrea L

    2018-01-29

    Satisfaction and improved quality of life are among the most important outcomes for patients undergoing plastic and reconstructive surgery for a variety of diseases and conditions. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are essential tools for evaluating the benefits of newly developed surgical techniques. Modern PROMs are being developed with new psychometric approaches, such as Rasch Measurement Theory, and their measurement properties (validity, reliability, responsiveness) are rigorously tested. These advances have resulted in the availability of PROMs that provide clinically meaningful data and effectively measure functional as well as psychosocial outcomes. This article guides the reader through the steps of creating a PROM and highlights the potential research and clinical uses of such instruments. Limitations of PROMs and anticipated future directions in this field are discussed.

  15. Anorexia nervosa and nutritional assessment: contribution of body composition measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Lama; Godart, Nathalie; Melchior, Jean Claude; Pichard, Claude

    2011-06-01

    The psychiatric condition of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) is affected by their nutritional status. An optimal assessment of the nutritional status of patients is fundamental in understanding the relationship between malnutrition and the psychological symptoms. The present review evaluates some of the available methods for measuring body composition in patients with AN. We searched literature in Medline using several key terms relevant to the present review in order to identify papers. Only articles in English or French were reviewed. A brief description is provided for each body composition technique, with its applicability in AN as well as its limitation. All methods of measuring body composition are not yet validated and/or feasible in patients with AN. The present review article proposes a practical approach for selecting the most appropriate methods depending on the setting, (i.e. clinical v. research) and the goal of the assessment (initial v. follow-up) in order to have a more personalised treatment for patients suffering from AN.

  16. Implantable microchip transponders for body temperature measurements in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Uttenthal, Åse; Enøe, Claes

    thermometer. This work, however, can be quite time consuming and laborious, and further compromising the immediate well-fare of the pig, when restraining of the individual animal is necessary. Therefore, an electronic body monitoring system using implantable microchip transponders for measuring peripheral...... body temperature was tested, in order to evaluate the utility and reliability of this tool, in domestic pigs. The system is presently used and well optimized in small laboratory animals [1, 2]. We tested the microchip transponders during experimental infection of pigs with classical swine fever virus...... microchip transponder was injected deep subcutaneously by the left ear base of each individual. The transponder was before insertion programmed with ID identical to the individual pig’s ear tag number. The pigs were randomly divided into 3 groups: one group placebo-infected and two groups virus...

  17. Relationships between pregnancy outcomes, biochemical markers and pre-pregnancy body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y S; Ha, E H; Park, H S; Kim, Y J; Lee, S S

    2011-04-01

    We examined the relationships between pre-pregnancy maternal body mass index (BMI), pregnancy outcomes and biochemical markers. This study was conducted as a cross-sectional analysis. Korean women in their second and third trimesters of pregnancy were recruited at two hospitals in the metropolitan Seoul area. Pre-pregnancy BMI was categorized in four groups according to the Asia-Pacific standard. Fasting blood samples were obtained and analyzed for serum levels of homocysteine, folate and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Concentrations of fetal fibronectin were assessed in the cervix and vagina, and cervical length was measured. Obese subjects had a lower education level and a lower income level than subjects of normal weight. The level of maternal stress was positively associated with pre-pregnancy BMI. Normal weight subjects were more likely to eat breakfast and consume meals of appropriate size than the rest of our sample. In overweight and obese subjects, weight gain during pregnancy was significantly lower than in the underweight and normal subjects. High pre-pregnancy maternal BMI increased the risks of preterm delivery (odds ratio (OR)=2.85, confidence interval (CI)=1.20-6.74), low-birth-weight (LBW) infants (overweight subjects: OR=5.07, CI=1.76-14.63; obese subjects: OR=4.49, CI=1.54-13.13) and macrosomia. In obese subjects, the average serum folate level was significantly lower than in the underweight subjects. In obese subjects, the average serum hs-CRP level was significantly higher than in the rest of our sample. Pregnancy outcomes are influenced by pre-pregnancy BMI. These findings suggest that women can minimize their risks of preterm delivery, LBW and macrosomia by maintaining normal pre-pregnancy BMI.

  18. Maternal prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on pregnancy outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the single and joint associations of maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI and gestational weight gain (GWG with pregnancy outcomes in Tianjin, China.Between June 2009 and May 2011, health care records of 33,973 pregnant women were collected and their children were measured for birth weight and birth length. The independent and joint associations of prepregnancy BMI and GWG based on the Institute of Medicine (IOM guidelines with the risks of pregnancy and neonatal outcomes were examined by using Logistic Regression.After adjustment for all confounding factors, maternal prepregnancy BMI was positively associated with risks of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, preterm delivery, large-for-gestational age infant (LGA, and macrosomia, and inversely associated with risks of small-for-gestational age infant (SGA and low birth weight. Maternal excessive GWG was associated with increased risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, LGA, and macrosomia, and decreased risks of preterm delivery, SGA, and low birth weight. Maternal inadequate GWG was associated with increased risks of preterm delivery and SGA, and decreased risks of LGA and macrosomia, compared with maternal adequate GWG. Women with both prepregnancy obesity and excessive GWG had 2.2-5.9 folds higher risks of GDM, pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, LGA, and macrosomia compared with women with normal prepregnancy BMI and adequate GWG.Maternal prepregnancy obesity and excessive GWG were associated with greater risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, and greater infant size at birth. Health care providers should inform women to start the pregnancy with a BMI in the normal weight category and limit their GWG to the range specified for their prepregnancy BMI.

  19. Body Composition in Relation to Clinical Outcomes in Renal Cell Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrieling, Alina; Kampman, Ellen; Knijnenburg, Nathalja C; Mulders, Peter F; Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Baracos, Vickie E; Kiemeney, Lambertus A

    2016-12-04

    Several studies suggest that body composition (ie, body proportions of muscle and fat defined by computed tomography) is associated with clinical outcomes of several cancer types, including renal cell cancer (RCC). To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence on body composition in relation to clinical outcomes in RCC. Literature was reviewed through October 2016 using PubMed and Embase. We included studies investigating computed tomography-measured cross-sectional areas of visceral adipose tissue (VAT), perinephric fat, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), skeletal muscle index (SMI), and skeletal muscle radiodensity (SMD) in relation to perioperative outcomes, treatment toxicity, and survival in RCC patients. We included 28 studies with a total of 6608 patients. Binary classification of body composition was used in most studies. In metastatic RCC (mRCC) patients treated with antiangiogenic drugs, dose-limiting toxicity was more frequent in patients with low versus high SMI (four studies, risk difference = 16%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2-31%, p = 0.03, I 2 = 26%). Low versus high SMI (six studies, hazard ratio = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.08-2.03, p = 0.02, I 2 = 28%) and SMD (four studies, HR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.20-2.03, p = 0.0008, I 2 = 0%) were associated with an increased risk of overall mortality in mRCC. Low versus high VAT and perinephric fat were not consistently associated with perioperative outcomes and survival. No associations for SAT were found. Low SMI is associated with increased dose-limiting toxicity, and low SMI and SMD are associated with increased overall mortality in mRCC. The association of VAT, perinephric fat, and SAT with clinical outcomes needs further investigation, also in localized RCC. We reviewed studies assessing the association of body composition with clinical outcomes in renal cell cancer. We demonstrated higher risk of dose-limiting toxicity and overall mortality for metastatic renal cell cancer patients with low

  20. The uses of outcome measures within multidisciplinary early childhood intervention services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Samuel; Ward, Roslyn; Jones, Megan; Johnston, Jenelle; Claessen, Mary

    2017-07-18

    Purpose of the article: To review the use of outcome measures, across the domains of activity, participation, and environment, within multidisciplinary early childhood intervention services. A systematic literature search was undertaken that included four electronic databases: Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library and Cochrane Database of Systematic Review. Inclusion criteria were age 0-24 months, having or at risk of a developmental disability, in receipt of multidisciplinary early childhood intervention services, and included outcome measures across all domains of the International Classification of Functioning-Child & Youth (ICF-CY). Only peer-reviewed journal articles were considered. Eligible studies were coded using the Oxford Levels of Evidence. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) Scale for randomised controlled trials and the QualSyst for non-randomised control trials. Of the total of 5764 records identified, 10 were considered to meet inclusion criteria. Fourteen outcome measures were identified, addressing the domains of activity, participation, and environment. Of these, eight have been recommended in the early intervention literature. While the methodological quality of the 10 studies varied, these papers make a contribution to the body of research that acknowledges the role of routine and enriched environments. Implications for Rehabilitation Core practice elements of multidisciplinary early childhood intervention services indicate it is necessary to select outcome measures framed within the International Classification of Functioning-Child & Youth to inform clinical decision-making for measuring intervention effectiveness across the domains of activity, participation and environment. Of the identified measures, three (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, and Goal Attainment Scaling) are well-established and identified in the literature as

  1. Measuring patient knowledge of asthma: a systematic review of outcome measures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pink, J.; Pink, K.; Elwyn, G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma self-management education is a key component of international guidelines. No gold standard patient centred outcome measure exists for asthma knowledge. Our aim was to identify high-quality, validated, and reliable outcome measures suitable for use in either the research or

  2. Principal components regression of body measurements in five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Username, Password, Remember me, or Register ... Body weight and seven biometric traits that are; body length (BL), breast girth (BG), wing length ... Pearson correlations between body weight and biometric traits were positive and highly ...

  3. Optical Signature Analysis of Tumbling Rocket Bodies via Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Liou, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has acquired telescopic lightcurve data on massive intact objects, specifically spent rocket bodies, in order to ascertain tumble rates in support of the Active Debris Removal (ADR) task to help remediate the LEO environment. Rotation rates are needed to plan and develop proximity operations for potential future ADR operations. To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC emulates illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC employs a 75-watt Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The light source is mounted on a rotary arm, allowing access any phase angle between 0 -- 360 degrees. The OMC does not attempt to replicate the rotation rates, but focuses on how an object is rotating as seen from multiple phase angles. The two targets studied are scaled (1:48), SL-8 Cosmos 3M second stages. The first target is painted in the standard government "gray" scheme and the second target is primary white, as used for commercial missions. This paper summarizes results of the two scaled rocket bodies, each rotated about two primary axes: (a) a spin-stabilized rotation and (b) an end-over-end rotation. The two rotation states are being investigated as a basis for possible spin states of rocket bodies, beginning with simple spin states about the two primary axes. The data will be used to create a database of potential spin states for future works to convolve with more complex spin states. The optical signatures will be presented for specific phase angles for each rocket body and shown in conjunction with acquired optical data from multiple telescope sources.

  4. Impact of body mass index on outcome in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gensicke, H.; Wicht, A.; Bill, O.; Zini, A.; Costa, P.; Kagi, G.; Stark, R.; Seiffge, D. J.; Traenka, C.; Peters, N.; Bonati, L. H.; Giovannini, G.; De Marchis, G. M.; Poli, L.; Polymeris, A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background and purposeThe impact of body mass index (BMI) on outcome in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) was investigated. MethodsIn a multicentre IVT-register-based observational study, BMI with (i) poor 3-month outcome (i.e. modified Rankin Scale scores 3-6), (ii) death and (iii) symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (sICH) based on criteria of the ECASS II trial was compared. BMI was used as a continuous and categorical variable distinguishing normal wei...

  5. Improvement of measuring techniques with whole-body and partial-body counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical simulation methods have been applied for optimizing and standardizing the calibration of whole-body and partial-body counters for any nuclide accumulation in the human body. (orig./CB) [de

  6. Populations and outcome measures used in ongoing research in sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Ordóñez, Gloria Gabriela; Bustamante Montes, Lilia Patricia; Ramírez Duran, Ninfa; Sánchez Castellano, Carmen; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2017-08-01

    Sarcopenia research may be hampered by the heterogeneity of populations and outcome measures used in clinical studies. The aim of this study was to describe the inclusion/exclusion criteria and outcome measures used in ongoing research in sarcopenia. All active intervention studies registered in the World Health Organization with the keyword sarcopenia were included. Study design, type of intervention, inclusion/exclusion criteria and outcome measures were registered and classified. In April 2014, 151 studies on sarcopenia were registered in the WHO database. One hundred twenty-three were intervention studies. Most trials (94.3 %) were single centre and randomized (93.5 %), 51.2 % were double blind. Nutritional interventions (36.6 %), physical exercise (12.2 %) or both (19.5 %) were the most common interventions tested. Only 54.4 % included subjects of both genders, and 46.3 % had an upper age limit. Definition of the target populations was heterogeneous, with 57.7 % including healthy subjects and none using recent definitions of sarcopenia. Lifestyle and the degree of physical activity of subjects were not described or considered in most cases (79.7 %). Subjects with cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric or metabolic disorders and those with physical disability were usually excluded. Muscle mass and muscle strength were the primary outcome variables in 28.5 and 29.5 % of studies and physical performance in 19.5 %, but only 4.1 % used the three variables used the three of them. An additional 26.8 % used biological outcome variables. Little information and agreement existed in the way muscle and physical performance parameters were measured. We found a large heterogeneity in trial design, definition of populations and outcome measures in present research.

  7. Measurement of caesium-137 in the human body using a whole body counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elessawi, Elkhadra Abdulmula

    Gamma radiation in the environment is mainly due to naturally occurring radionuclides. However, there is also a contribution from anthropogenic radionuclides such as 137Cs which originate from nuclear fission processes. Since 1986, the accident at the Chernobyl power plant has been a significant source of artificial environmental radioactivity. In order to assess the radiological impact of these radionuclides, it is necessary to measure their activities in samples drawn from the environment and in plants and animals including human populations. The whole body counter (WBC) at the University Hospital of Wales in Cardiff makes in vivo measurements of gamma emitting radionuclides using a scanning ring of six large-volume thallium-doped sodium iodide (Nal(Tl)) scintillation detectors. In this work the WBC was upgraded by the addition of two high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The performance and suitability of the detection systems were evaluated by comparing the detection limits for Cs. Sensitivities were measured using sources of known activity in a water filled anthropomorphic phantom and theoretical minimum detectable count-rates were estimated from phantom background pulse height spectra. The theoretical minimum detectable activity was about 24 Bq for the combination of six Nal(Tl) detectors whereas for the individual HPGe detectors it was 64 Bq and 65 Bq, despite the much improved energy resolution Activities of 137Cs in the human body between 1993 and 2007 were estimated from the background Nal(Tl) spectra of 813 patients and compared with recent measurements in 14 volunteers. The body burden of Cs in Cardiff patients increased from an average of about 60 Bq in the early and mid 1990s to a maximum of about 100 Bq in 2000. By 2007 it had decreased to about 40 Bq. This latter value was similar to that of Cardiff residents at the time of the Chernobyl accident and to that of the volunteers measured in 2007 (51 Bq). However, it was less than the mean activity of

  8. Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbensen, Anna J; Hooper, Stephen R; Fidler, Deborah; Hartley, Sigan L; Edgin, Jamie; d'Ardhuy, Xavier Liogier; Capone, George; Conners, Frances A; Mervis, Carolyn B; Abbeduto, Leonard; Rafii, Michael; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J; Urv, Tiina

    2017-05-01

    Increasingly individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including Down syndrome, are being targeted for clinical trials. However, a challenge exists in effectively evaluating the outcomes of these new pharmacological interventions. Few empirically evaluated, psychometrically sound outcome measures appropriate for use in clinical trials with individuals with Down syndrome have been identified. To address this challenge, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) assembled leading clinicians and scientists to review existing measures and identify those that currently are appropriate for trials; those that may be appropriate after expansion of age range addition of easier items, and/or downward extension of psychometric norms; and areas where new measures need to be developed. This article focuses on measures in the areas of cognition and behavior.

  9. a locally adapted functional outcome measurement score for total

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results and success of total hip arthroplasty are often measured using a functional outcome scoring system. Most current scores were developed in Europe and. North America (1-3). During the evaluation of a Total. Hip Replacement (THR) project in Ouagadougou,. Burkina Faso (4) it was felt that these scores were not.

  10. Translation of the Ibadan Knee/Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Measure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    rated by the clinician on five and six (0-5) point ordinal scales. IKHOAM has been ... Igbo translation of Ibadan osteoarthritis outcome measure. 176 .... encourage the use of scales and questionnaires in an .... Validation of a Yoruba translation of the World Health ... Scales: A practical guide to their development and use (1st.

  11. Measuring Student Learning Outcomes Using the SALG Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Kathleen; Olsen, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    U.S. higher education institutions are being called to question their central nature, priorities, and functions, with prominent and unprecedented attention being given to accountability and the measurement of student learning outcomes. As higher education evolves in how it assesses student learning and leisure studies and recreation departments…

  12. [Body dysmorphic disorder in cosmetic surgery - prevalence, psychiatric comorbidity and outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundscheid, T; van der Hulst, R R W J; Rutten, B P F; Leue, C

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from body dysmorphic disorder (bdd) are preoccupied with a slight or imagined defect in appearance. First of all, to review the literature on the prevalence of bdd in cosmetic surgery and thereafter to review the literature on psychiatric comorbidity and the outcome of surgical interventions. We based our search strategy on Embase, Medline and PubMed, using the search terms 'body dysmorphic disorder', 'cosmetic surgery', 'prevalence', 'comorbidity' and 'outcome'. Our search covered English and Dutch literature published after the introduction of bdd in dsm-iii-r and before 1 November, 2013. A study of the relevant articles enabled us to access additional articles mentioned in these texts. Our initial search strategy turned out to be too narrow. It was therefore broadened to include 'body dysmorphic disorder', 'cosmetic surgery', and 'prevalence'. Eventually we included 23 original articles. In 11 of these the prevalence of bdd varied from 3.2 to 53.6%. Twelve articles on psychiatric comorbidity revealed predominantly mood and anxiety disorders on axis I and cluster C personality disorders on axis II. Only two studies reported on the outcome of cosmetic surgery performed on bdd patients; surgical interventions, however, seemed to result in new preoccupations with the prolongation of psychiatric comorbidity. bdd is a common psychiatric disorder that can sometimes lead to cosmetic surgery. However, pre-operative screening of bdd patients is vital so that efficient psychiatric treatment can be initiated and patients are not subjected to surgical interventions which may be ineffective or even harmful.

  13. Associations between nine family dinner frequency measures and child weight, dietary and psychosocial outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Friend, Sarah E.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Background Family meal frequency has been consistently and significantly associated with positive youth dietary and psychosocial outcomes but less consistently associated with weight outcomes. Family meal frequency measurement has varied widely and it is unclear how this variation may impact relationships with youth weight, dietary, and psychosocial outcomes. Objective This study assesses how five parent/caregiver-reported and four child-reported family dinner frequency measures correlate with each other and are associated with health-related outcomes. Design/Participants This secondary, cross-sectional analysis uses baseline, parent/caregiver (n=160) and 8–12 year old child (n=160) data from the Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus trial (collected 2011–2012). Data were obtained from objective measurements, dietary recall interviews, and psychosocial surveys. Outcome measures Outcomes included child body mass index z-scores (BMIz), fruit, vegetable and sugar-sweetened beverage intake, dietary quality (Healthy Eating Index-2010 [HEI-2010]), family connectedness, and meal conversations. Statistical analyses performed Pearson correlations and general linear models were used to assess associations between family dinner frequency measures and outcomes. Results All family dinner frequency measures had comparable means and were correlated within and across parent/caregiver- and child-reporters (r=0.17–0.94, pdinner frequency measures were significantly associated with BMIz scores and 100% were significantly associated with fruit/vegetable intake and HEI-2010. In adjusted models, most significant associations with dietary and psychosocial outcomes remained but associations with child BMIz remained significant only for parent/caregiver- (β±SE= −0.07±0.03; pdinner frequency measures asking about ‘sitting and eating’ dinner. Conclusions In spite of phrasing variations in family dinner frequency measures (e.g., which family members

  14. A systematic review of measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Klokker, Louise; Orbai, Ana Maria

    2018-01-01

    Background: An updated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core outcome set (COS) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was endorsed at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meeting in 2016. Objectives: To synthesize the evidence on measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures...... (PROMs) for PsA and thereby contribute to development of a PsA core outcome measurement set (COMS) as described by the OMERACT Filter 2.0. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO on Jan 1, 2017 to identify full-text articles with an aim of assessing...... the measurement properties of PROMs in PsA. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of studies using the COnsensus based standards for the Selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist, and performed a qualitative evidence synthesis. Results: Fifty-five studies were included in the systematic...

  15. A systematic review of the measurement properties of the Body Image Scale (BIS) in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissant, Heleen C; Neijenhuijs, Koen I; Jansen, Femke; Aaronson, Neil K; Groenvold, Mogens; Holzner, Bernhard; Terwee, Caroline B; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Cuijpers, Pim; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2018-06-01

    Body image is acknowledged as an important aspect of health-related quality of life in cancer patients. The Body Image Scale (BIS) is a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) to evaluate body image in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to systematically review measurement properties of the BIS among cancer patients. A search in Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Web of Science was performed to identify studies that investigated measurement properties of the BIS (Prospero ID 42017057237). Study quality was assessed (excellent, good, fair, poor), and data were extracted and analyzed according to the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) methodology on structural validity, internal consistency, reliability, measurement error, hypothesis testing for construct validity, and responsiveness. Evidence was categorized into sufficient, insufficient, inconsistent, or indeterminate. Nine studies were included. Evidence was sufficient for structural validity (one factor solution), internal consistency (α = 0.86-0.96), and reliability (r > 0.70); indeterminate for measurement error (information on minimal important change lacked) and responsiveness (increasing body image disturbance in only one study); and inconsistent for hypothesis testing (conflicting results). Quality of the evidence was moderate to low. No studies reported on cross-cultural validity. The BIS is a PROM with good structural validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability, but good quality studies on the other measurement properties are needed to optimize evidence. It is recommended to include a wider variety of cancer diagnoses and treatment modalities in these future studies.

  16. A critical review of cosmetic treatment outcomes in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Laura; Krebs, Georgina; Mataix-Cols, David; Veale, David; Monzani, Benedetta

    2016-12-01

    A high proportion of individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) undergo cosmetic treatments in an attempt to 'fix' perceived defect/s in their physical appearance. Despite the frequency with which such procedures are sought, few studies have prospectively examined the outcomes of cosmetic procedures in individuals with BDD. This article aims to critically review the literature and discuss the current debate that exists on outcomes of cosmetic treatment for individuals with BDD. An emerging literature suggests the majority of individuals with BDD have poor outcomes after cosmetic interventions; however, based on the current literature, it cannot be fully ruled out that certain individuals with mild BDD and localised appearance concerns may benefit from these interventions. Gaps in the current literature are highlighted, alongside recommendations for future research. Carefully conducted longitudinal studies with well-characterised patient populations are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Body temperature change and outcomes in patients undergoing long-distance air medical transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Mikio; Aso, Shotaro; Yasunaga, Hideo; Shirokawa, Masamitsu; Nakano, Tomotsugu; Miyakuni, Yasuhiko; Goto, Hideaki; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro

    2018-04-30

    Short-distance air medical transport for adult emergency patients does not significantly affect patients' body temperature and outcomes. This study aimed to examine the influence of long-distance air medical transport on patients' body temperatures and the relationship between body temperature change and mortality. We retrospectively enrolled consecutive patients transferred via helicopter or plane from isolated islands to an emergency medical center in Tokyo, Japan between April 2010 and December 2016. Patients' average body temperature was compared before and after air transport using a paired t-test, and corrections between body temperature change and flight duration were calculated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Multivariable logistic regression models were then used to examine the association between body temperature change and in-hospital mortality. Of 1253 patients, the median age was 72 years (interquartile range, 60-82 years) and median flight duration was 71 min (interquartile range, 54-93 min). In-hospital mortality was 8.5%, and average body temperature was significantly different before and after air transport (36.7 °C versus 36.3 °C; difference: -0.36 °C; 95% confidence interval, -0.30 to -0.42; p 38.0 °C) or normothermia (36.0-37.9 °C) before air transport and hypothermia after air transport (odds ratio, 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-3.63; p = 0.009), and (ii) winter season (odds ratio, 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-4.27; p = 0.030). Physicians should consider body temperature change during long-distance air transport in patients with not only hypothermia but also normothermia or hyperthermia before air transport, especially in winter. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurement of whole body cellular and collagen nitrogen, potassium, and other elements by neutron activation and whole body counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, H.M.; Fabricius, P.J.; Dykes, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    Whole body nitrogen can be measured by neutron activation analysis with an acceptable radiation dose; it is an index of body protein which, in normal subjects, is 65% cellular protein and 35% extracellular connective collagen. Whole body potassium can be measured by whole body counting without irradiating the subject; it is an index of body cell mass. We measured whole body nitrogen, potassium, extracellular water, intracellular water, and fat-folds. The differences between 37 malnourished patients and five normal subjects suggested that the patients had 9 kg less cell mass than normal, but no difference in extracellular mass. Measurements were made on eight patients before and after 14 days of total parenteral nutrition; balance of nitrogen intake and excretion also was measured. The changes were consistent with mean increases of 3 kg of cellular mass and 3 kg of fat with no change of extracellular mass. The accuracy and sensitivity of the whole body measurements need further confirmation for use in patients with changing body composition. Where tissue wasting is largely from the cellular compartment, potassium could be a more sensitive index of wasting than nitrogen. Multielement analysis of nitrogen, potassium, chlorine, and carbon will probably be valuable in elucidating body composition in malnutrition

  19. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures initiative as applied to psoriatic disease outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Armstrong, April W; Christensen, Robin

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, access to care is the number one issue facing our patients with dermatological conditions. In part, this is because we do not have outcome measures that are useful in clinical practice and available in databases where payers and governmental agencies can compare the performa...

  20. Association between different phases of menstrual cycle and body image measures of perceived size, ideal size, and body dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, André Luiz S; Dias, Marcelo Ricardo C; Damasceno, Vinícius O; Lamounier, Joel A; Gardner, Rick M

    2013-12-01

    The association between phases of the menstrual cycle and body image was investigated. 44 university women (M age = 23.3 yr., SD = 4.7) judged their perceived and ideal body size, and body dissatisfaction was calculated at each phase of the menstrual cycle, including premenstrual, menstrual, and intermenstrual. Participants selected one of nine figural drawings ranging from very thin to obese that represented their perceived size and ideal size. Body dissatisfaction was measured as the absolute difference between scores on perceived and ideal figural drawings. During each menstrual phase, anthropometric measures of weight, height, body mass index, circumference of waist and abdomen, and body composition were taken. There were no significant differences in any anthropometric measures between the three menstrual cycle phases. Perceived body size and body dissatisfaction were significantly different between menstrual phases, with the largest perceived body size and highest body dissatisfaction occurring during the menstrual phase. Ideal body size did not differ between menstrual phases, although participants desired a significantly smaller ideal size as compared to the perceived size.

  1. Methodological aspects of EEG and Body dynamics measurements during motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro eReis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available EEG involves recording, analysis, and interpretation of voltages recorded on the human scalp originating from brain grey matter. EEG is one of the favorite methods to study and understand processes that underlie behavior. This is so, because EEG is relatively cheap, easy to wear, light weight and has high temporal resolution. In terms of behavior, this encompasses actions, such as movements, that are performed in response to the environment. However, there are methodological difficulties when recording EEG during movement such as movement artifacts. Thus, most studies about the human brain have examined activations during static conditions. This article attempts to compile and describe relevant methodological solutions that emerged in order to measure body and brain dynamics during motion. These descriptions cover suggestions of how to avoid and reduce motion artifacts, hardware, software and techniques for synchronously recording EEG, EMG, kinematics, kinetics and eye movements during motion. Additionally, we present various recording systems, EEG electrodes, caps and methods for determination of real/custom electrode positions. In the end we will conclude that it is possible to record and analyze synchronized brain and body dynamics related to movement or exercise tasks.

  2. Measuring Learning Outcomes. A Learner Perspective in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    2000-01-01

    The ability to provide sensible measures for learning outcomes in accounting education is under increased scrutiny. In this paper we use a learner perspective in auditing education which reflects that some students taking accounting classes also are provided with on-the-job training in accounting...... for students taking a graduate auditing course reflect prior accounting work experience for some students and undergraduate accounting coursework experience for all students. This paper extends prior research on the role of declarative and procedural knowledge in performing auditing tasks. Measuring learning...... suggested by Robert M. Gagné. An instrument was developed to measure differences regarding learning outcomes in the context of an auditing course by posing a broad set of questions testing declarative knowledge and the full range of intellectual skills from discrimination to the use of higher...

  3. Functional outcome measures in a surgical model of hip osteoarthritis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Dianne; Johnson, Stephen; Hash, Jonathan; Olson, Steven A; Estes, Bradley T; Moutos, Franklin T; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-12-01

    The hip is one of the most common sites of osteoarthritis in the body, second only to the knee in prevalence. However, current animal models of hip osteoarthritis have not been assessed using many of the functional outcome measures used in orthopaedics, a characteristic that could increase their utility in the evaluation of therapeutic interventions. The canine hip shares similarities with the human hip, and functional outcome measures are well documented in veterinary medicine, providing a baseline for pre-clinical evaluation of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of hip osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a surgical model of hip osteoarthritis in a large laboratory animal model and to evaluate functional and end-point outcome measures. Seven dogs were subjected to partial surgical debridement of cartilage from one femoral head. Pre- and postoperative pain and functional scores, gait analysis, radiographs, accelerometry, goniometry and limb circumference were evaluated through a 20-week recovery period, followed by histological evaluation of cartilage and synovium. Animals developed histological and radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis, which was correlated with measurable functional impairment. For example, Mankin scores in operated limbs were positively correlated to radiographic scores but negatively correlated to range of motion, limb circumference and 20-week peak vertical force. This study demonstrates that multiple relevant functional outcome measures can be used successfully in a large laboratory animal model of hip osteoarthritis. These measures could be used to evaluate relative efficacy of therapeutic interventions relevant to human clinical care.

  4. Outcome measures for adult critical care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J A; Black, N A; Jenkinson, C; Young, J D; Rowan, K M; Daly, K; Ridley, S

    2000-01-01

    1. To identify generic and disease specific measures of impairment, functional status and health-related quality of life that have been used in adult critical care (intensive and high-dependency care) survivors. 2. To review the validity, reliability and responsiveness of the measures in adult critical care survivors. 3. To consider the implications for future policy and to make recommendations for further methodological research. 4. To review what is currently known of the outcome of adult critical care. Searches of electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycLIT, The Cochrane Library and SIGLE) from 1970 to August 1998. Manual searches of five journals (1985-98) not indexed in electronic databases and relevant conference proceedings (1993-98). Reference lists of six existing reviews, plus snowballing from reference lists of all relevant articles identified. Randomised trials, non-randomised trials (cohort studies) and case series that included data on outcomes after discharge from adult (16 years and over) critical care. If reported, the following data were extracted from each paper: patient characteristics (age, gender, severity of illness, diagnostic category) number of patients eligible for study, follow-up period, number of deaths before follow-up, number and proportion of survivors included in follow-up method of presentation of outcome data - proportion normal as defined by reference values, or aggregate value (e.g. mean or median), or aggregate values plus an indication of variance (e.g. standard deviation or inter-quartile range). Evidence for three measurement properties was sought for each outcome measure that had been used in at least two studies - their validity, reliability and responsiveness in adult critical care. If the authors did not report these aspects explicitly, an attempt was made to use the data provided to provide these measurement properties. For measures that were used in at least ten studies, information on actual reported

  5. Measuring treatment outcomes in gambling disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Dylan; Keen, Brittany; Entwistle, Gavin; Blaszczynski, Alex

    2018-03-01

    Considerable variation of outcome variables used to measure recovery in the gambling treatment literature has precluded effective cross-study evaluations and hindered the development of best-practice treatment methodologies. The aim of this systematic review was to describe current diffuse concepts of recovery in the gambling field by mapping the range of outcomes and measurement strategies used to evaluate treatments, and to identify more commonly accepted indices of recovery. A systematic search of six academic databases for studies evaluating treatments (psychological and pharmacological) for gambling disorders with a minimum 6-month follow-up. Data from eligible studies were tabulated and analysis conducted using a narrative approach. Guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) were adhered to. Thirty-four studies were reviewed systematically (RCTs = 17, comparative designs = 17). Sixty-three different outcome measures were identified: 25 (39.7%) assessed gambling-specific constructs, 36 (57.1%) assessed non-gambling specific constructs, and two instruments were used across both categories (3.2%). Self-report instruments ranged from psychometrically validated to ad-hoc author-designed questionnaires. Units of measurement were inconsistent, particularly in the assessment of gambling behaviour. All studies assessed indices of gambling behaviour and/or symptoms of gambling disorder. Almost all studies (n = 30; 88.2%) included secondary measures relating to psychiatric comorbidities, psychological processes linked to treatment approach, or global functioning and wellbeing. In research on gambling disorders, the incorporation of broader outcome domains that extend beyond disorder-specific symptoms and behaviours suggests a multi-dimensional conceptualization of recovery. Development of a single comprehensive scale to measure all aspects of gambling recovery could help to facilitate uniform reporting practices

  6. Comparison of Physician-Predicted to Measured Low Vision Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tiffany L.; Goldstein, Judith E.; Massof, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare low vision rehabilitation (LVR) physicians’ predictions of the probability of success of LVR to patients’ self-reported outcomes after provision of usual outpatient LVR services; and to determine if patients’ traits influence physician ratings. Methods The Activity Inventory (AI), a self-report visual function questionnaire, was administered pre and post-LVR to 316 low vision patients served by 28 LVR centers that participated in a collaborative observational study. The physical component of the Short Form-36, Geriatric Depression Scale, and Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status were also administered pre-LVR to measure physical capability, depression and cognitive status. Following patient evaluation, 38 LVR physicians estimated the probability of outcome success (POS), using their own criteria. The POS ratings and change in functional ability were used to assess the effects of patients’ baseline traits on predicted outcomes. Results A regression analysis with a hierarchical random effects model showed no relationship between LVR physician POS estimates and AI-based outcomes. In another analysis, Kappa statistics were calculated to determine the probability of agreement between POS and AI-based outcomes for different outcome criteria. Across all comparisons, none of the kappa values were significantly different from 0, which indicates the rate of agreement is equivalent to chance. In an exploratory analysis, hierarchical mixed effects regression models show that POS ratings are associated with information about the patient’s cognitive functioning and the combination of visual acuity and functional ability, as opposed to visual acuity or functional ability alone. Conclusions Physicians’ predictions of LVR outcomes appear to be influenced by knowledge of patients’ cognitive functioning and the combination of visual acuity and functional ability - information physicians acquire from the patient’s history and examination. However

  7. Redefining Outcome Measurement: A Model for Brief Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinty, Everett; Nelson, John; Carlson, Alain; Crowther, Eric; Bednar, Dina; Foroughe, Mirisse

    2016-05-01

    The zeitgeist for short-term psychotherapy efficacy has fundamentally shifted away from evidence-based practices to include evidence-informed practices, resulting in an equally important paradigm shift in outcome measurement designed to reflect change in this short-term modality. The present article delineates a short-term psychotherapy structure which defines four fundamental stages that all brief therapies may have in common, and are represented through Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, Narrative Therapy, and Emotion-Focused Therapy. These four theoretical approaches were analyzed via a selected literature review through comparing and contrasting specific and common tasks as they relate to the process of psychotherapy and change. Once commonalities were identified within session, they were categorized or grouped into themes or general stages of change within the parameters of a four to six session model of short-term therapy. Commonalities in therapeutic stages of change may more accurately and uniformly measure outcome in short-term work, unlike the symptom-specific psychometric instruments of longer-term psychotherapy. A systematic framework for evaluating the client and clinician adherence to 20 specific tasks for these four short-term therapies is presented through the newly proposed, Brief Task Acquisition Scale (BTAS). It is further proposed that the client-clinicians' adherence to these tasks will track and ultimately increase treatment integrity. Thus, when the client-clinician relationship tracks and evaluates the three pillars of (1) stage/process change, (2) task acquisition, and (3) treatment integrity, the culmination of these efforts presents a new way of more sensitively measuring outcome in short-term psychotherapy. Data collection is suggested as a first step to empirically evaluate the testable hypotheses suggested within this current model. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Key Practitioner Message The

  8. Individualized estimation of human core body temperature using noninvasive measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxminarayan, Srinivas; Rakesh, Vineet; Oyama, Tatsuya; Kazman, Josh B; Yanovich, Ran; Ketko, Itay; Epstein, Yoram; Morrison, Shawnda; Reifman, Jaques

    2018-06-01

    A rising core body temperature (T c ) during strenuous physical activity is a leading indicator of heat-injury risk. Hence, a system that can estimate T c in real time and provide early warning of an impending temperature rise may enable proactive interventions to reduce the risk of heat injuries. However, real-time field assessment of T c requires impractical invasive technologies. To address this problem, we developed a mathematical model that describes the relationships between T c and noninvasive measurements of an individual's physical activity, heart rate, and skin temperature, and two environmental variables (ambient temperature and relative humidity). A Kalman filter adapts the model parameters to each individual and provides real-time personalized T c estimates. Using data from three distinct studies, comprising 166 subjects who performed treadmill and cycle ergometer tasks under different experimental conditions, we assessed model performance via the root mean squared error (RMSE). The individualized model yielded an overall average RMSE of 0.33 (SD = 0.18)°C, allowing us to reach the same conclusions in each study as those obtained using the T c measurements. Furthermore, for 22 unique subjects whose T c exceeded 38.5°C, a potential lower T c limit of clinical relevance, the average RMSE decreased to 0.25 (SD = 0.20)°C. Importantly, these results remained robust in the presence of simulated real-world operational conditions, yielding no more than 16% worse RMSEs when measurements were missing (40%) or laden with added noise. Hence, the individualized model provides a practical means to develop an early warning system for reducing heat-injury risk. NEW & NOTEWORTHY A model that uses an individual's noninvasive measurements and environmental variables can continually "learn" the individual's heat-stress response by automatically adapting the model parameters on the fly to provide real-time individualized core body temperature estimates. This

  9. Dignity Impact as a Primary Outcome Measure for Dignity Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarton, Lisa; Oh, Sungho; Sylvera, Ashley; Lamonge, Ralph; Yao, Yingwei; Chochinov, Harvey; Fitchett, George; Handzo, George; Emanuel, Linda; Wilkie, Diana

    2018-01-01

    Feasibility of dignity therapy (DT) is well established in palliative care. Evidence of its efficacy, however, has been inconsistent and may stem from DT's primary effects differing from the outcomes measured in previous studies. We proposed that DT effects were in the spiritual domain and created a new outcome measure, Dignity Impact Scale (DIS), from items previously used in a large randomized controlled trial (RCT). The purpose of this secondary analysis study was to examine properties of a new measure of dignity impact. Using the DIS, we conducted reanalysis of posttest data from a large 3-arm, multi-site RCT study. Participants were receiving hospice/palliative care (n = 326, 50.6% female, mean age = 65.1 years, 89.3% white, all with a terminal illness with 6 months or less life expectancy). They had been randomized to standard palliative care (n = 111), client-centered care (n = 107), or DT (n = 108). The 7-item DIS was derived from selected items in a posttest DT Patient Feedback Questionnaire. The DIS had strong internal consistency (α = 0.85). The DT group mean DIS score (21.4 ± 5.0) was significantly higher than the usual care group mean score (17.7 ± 5.5; t = 5.2, df = 216, P death, and life completion tasks. We propose that the DIS be used as the primary outcome measure in evaluating the effects of DT.

  10. Comparison of maternal abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness and body mass index as markers for pregnancy outcomes: A stratified cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Ashwin; Liu, Anthony; Poulton, Alison; Quinton, Ann; Amer, Zara; Mongelli, Max; Martin, Andrew; Benzie, Ronald; Peek, Michael; Nanan, Ralph

    2012-10-01

    Obesity in pregnancy is associated with a number of adverse outcomes. The effects of central versus general obesity in pregnancy have not been well established. To compare subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) with body mass index (BMI) as a marker for pregnancy outcomes. A stratified retrospective cohort study was performed on 1200 pregnancies, selected from a total of 4862 nulliparous, nonsmoking women between 2006 and 2010. SFT was measured on routine ultrasound at 18-22 weeks gestation. BMI and SFT measurements were compared for estimating risks for obesity-related pregnancy outcomes using logistic regression adjusted for maternal age. The median SFT was 18.2 mm (range 6.3-50.9 mm), the median BMI was 23.8 kg/m(2) (range 15.2-52.5), and the correlation between SFT and BMI was 0.53. For every 5 mm increase in SFT and every 5 kg/m(2) increase in BMI, the odds ratios for developing gestational diabetes mellitus were 1.40 (CI 1.22-1.61, P gestational age 1.28 (CI 1.16-1.47, P = 0.001) and 1.10 (CI 0.95-1.28, P = 0.16) and cumulative adverse obesity-related pregnancy outcomes 1.16 (CI 1.10-1.28, P = 0.002) and 1.05 (CI 0.95-1.16, P = 0.45), respectively. SFT at 18-22 weeks gestation is better than BMI as a marker for obesity-related pregnancy outcomes. As SFT is considered a surrogate measure for visceral fat, these results suggest that central obesity is a stronger risk factor than general adiposity in pregnancy. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  11. Effects of perceptual body image distortion and early weight gain on long-term outcome of adolescent anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Ilka; Finke, Beatrice; Tam, Friederike I; Fittig, Eike; Scholz, Michael; Gantchev, Krassimir; Roessner, Veit; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a severe mental disorder with an onset during adolescence, has been found to be difficult to treat. Identifying variables that predict long-term outcome may help to develop better treatment strategies. Since body image distortion and weight gain are central elements of diagnosis and treatment of AN, the current study investigated perceptual body image distortion, defined as the accuracy of evaluating one's own perceived body size in relation to the actual body size, as well as total and early weight gain during inpatient treatment as predictors for long-term outcome in a sample of 76 female adolescent AN patients. Long-term outcome was defined by physical, psychological and psychosocial adjustment using the Morgan-Russell outcome assessment schedule as well as by the mere physical outcome consisting of menses and/or BMI approximately 3 years after treatment. Perceptual body image distortion and early weight gain predicted long-term outcome (explained variance 13.3 %), but not the physical outcome alone. This study provides first evidence for an association of perceptual body image distortion with long-term outcome of adolescent anorexia nervosa and underlines the importance of sufficient early weight gain.

  12. Body-related pride in young adults: an exploration of the triggers, contexts, outcomes and attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, Andree L; Gilchrist, Jenna D; Mack, Diane E; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2013-06-01

    This study explored body-related emotional experiences of pride in young adult males (n=138) and females (n=165). Data were collected using a relived emotion task and analyzed using inductive content analysis. Thirty-nine codes were identified and grouped into six categories (triggers, contexts, cognitive attributions, and affective, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes) for each of two themes (hubristic and authentic pride). Hubristic pride triggers included evaluating appearance/fitness as superior. Cognitions centered on feelings of superiority. Behaviors included strategies to show off. Triggers for authentic pride were personal improvements/maintenance in appearance and meeting or exceeding goals. Feeling accomplished was a cognitive outcome, and physical activity was a behavioral strategy. Contexts for the experience of both facets of pride primarily involved sports settings, swimming/beach, and clothes shopping. These findings provide theoretical support for models of pride as it applies to body image, and advances conceptual understanding of positive body image. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Whole body measurements for in vivo monitoring in emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerfel, H.

    2000-01-01

    The conventional procedures for in vivo monitoring of γ-emitting radionuclides require a lot of information, such as time and pathway of intake, physical and chemical form of incorporated materials, metabolism etc. In emergency situations this information is rarely available, thus resulting in significant uncertainties for the estimation of intake and committed dose equivalent. Moreover, the procedure is time consuming and thus only a relatively small number of persons can be monitored. In order to cope with these difficulties, a new method for direct internal dosimetry has recently been developed at Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. The method is based on the measurement of the integral photon flux emitted from the body using a special detector system which has been optimised in such a way that the system sensitivity matches the respective dose factors for a maximum number of radionuclides and deposition sites in the body. The detector system consists of four plastic scintillation detectors, which are positioned at the thyroid, at the lungs, under the gastro-intestinal tract and over the thighs of the person monitored in a seated posture. The system allows for detection of effective dose equivalent rates down to 1.6 μSv/week, the mean detection uncertainty being about 200% for known radionuclide mixtures and about 600% for unknown radionuclide mixtures, respectively. The detector system is very easy to handle; the measurement can be performed by untrained individuals and the results are available after a very short measuring time (20 s). Thus, the detector system is appropriate especially for short-term decision making after incidents or accidents. Because of its relative low weight (1 t) the detector system could be installed as a mobile unit in a container for transportation by car, train or aircraft. Thus, in emergency situations the detector system can be brought to the site within a short period of time. It allows for the rapid monitoring of a large number

  14. Optical Signature Analysis of Tumbling Rocket Bodies via Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Liou, J.-C.; Ojakangas, G.; Mulrooney, M.

    2012-09-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has acquired telescopic lightcurve data on massive intact objects, specifically spent rocket bodies (R/Bs), to ascertain tumble rates in support of the Active Debris Removal (ADR) studies to help remediate the LEO environment. Tumble rates are needed to plan and develop proximity and docking operations for potential future ADR operations. To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC emulates illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC employs a 75-W Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The OMC does not attempt to replicate the rotation rates, but focuses on ascertaining how an object is rotating as seen from multiple phase angles. The two targets studied are scaled (1:48) SL-8 Cosmos 3M second stages. The first target is painted in the standard Russian government "gray" scheme and the second target is white/orange as used for commercial missions. This paper summarizes results of the two scaled rocket bodies, each observed in three independent rotation states: (a) spin-stabilized rotation (about the long axis), (b) end-over-end rotation, and (c) a 10 degree wobble about the center of mass. The first two cases represent simple spin about either primary axis. The third - what we call "wobble" - represents maximum principal axis rotation, with an inertia tensor that is offset from the symmetry axes. By comparing the resultant phase and orientation-dependent laboratory signatures with actual lightcurves derived from telescopic observations of orbiting R/Bs, we intend to assess the intrinsic R/B rotation states. In the simplest case, simulated R/B behavior coincides with principal axis spin states, while more complex R

  15. Development of a Force Measurement Device for Lower-Body Muscular Strength Measuring of Skaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Ki; Lee, Jeong Tae

    This paper presents a force measurement system that can measure a lower-body muscular strength of skaters. The precise measurement and analysis of the left and right lower-body strength of skaters is necessary, because a left/right lower-body strength balance is helpful to improve the athletes' performance and to protect them from injury. The system is constructed with a skate sliding board, a couple of sensor-units with load cell, indicator and control box, guard, force pad, and support bracket. The developed force measurement system is calibrated by the calibration setup, and the uncertainty of the force sensing unit on the left is within 0.087% and the uncertainty of the force sensing unit on the right is within 0.109%. In order to check the feasibility of the developed measurement device, a kinematic analysis is conducted with skater. As a result, the subject shows the deviation of left and right of 12.1 N with respect to average strength and 39.1 N with respect to the maximum strength. This evaluation results are reliable enough to make it possible to measure a lower-body muscular strength of skaters. The use of this measurement system will be expected to correct the posture of skaters and record the sports dynamics data for each athlete. It is believed that through the development of this equipment, skaters in elementary, middle, high schools, colleges, and the professional level have the systematic training to compete with world-class skaters.

  16. Measuring Outcome in the Treatment of Cocaine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Gallop, Robert; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Sadicario, Jaclyn S.; Woody, George

    2015-01-01

    Background Little in known about the extent to which outcome measures used in studies of the treatment of cocaine dependence are associated with longer-term use and with broader measures of clinical improvement. The current study examined reductions in use, and abstinence-oriented measures, in relation to functioning and longer-term clinical benefits in the treatment of cocaine dependence. Methods Overall drug use, cocaine use, and functioning in a number of addiction-related domains for 487 patients diagnosed with DSM-IV cocaine dependence and treated with one of four psychosocial interventions in the NIDA Cocaine Collaborative Treatment Study were assessed monthly during 6 months of treatment and at 9, 12, 15, and 18 month follow-up. Results Measures of during-treatment reduction in use were moderately correlated with drug and cocaine use measures 12 months, but showed non-significant or small correlations with measures of functioning at 12 months. Highest correlations were evident for abstinence measures (maximum consecutive days abstinence and completely abstinent) during treatment in relation to sustained (3 month) abstinence at 12 months. Latent class analysis of patterns of change over time revealed that most patients initially (months 1 to 4 of treatment) either became abstinent immediately or continued to use every month. Over the couse of follow-up, patients either maintained abstinence or used regularly – intermittent use was less common. Conclusions There were generally small associations between various measures of cocaine use and longer-term clinical benefits, other than abstinence was associated with continued abstinence. No one method of measuring outcome of treatment of cocaine dependence appears superior to others. PMID:26366427

  17. Combined associations of prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with the outcome of pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nohr, E.A.; Vaeth, M.; Baker, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although both maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) may affect birth weight, their separate and joint associations with complications of pregnancy and delivery and with postpartum weight retention are unclear. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate...... the combined associations of prepregnancy BMI and GWG with pregnancy outcomes and to evaluate the trade-offs between mother and infant for different weight gains. DESIGN: Data for 60892 term pregnancies in the Danish National Birth Cohort were linked to birth and hospital discharge registers. Self...

  18. Performance Characteristics and Prediction of Bodyweight using Linear Body Measurements in Four Strains of Broiler Chicken

    OpenAIRE

    I. Udeh; J.O. Isikwenu and G. Ukughere

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the performance characteristics of four strains of broiler chicken from 2 to 8 weeks of age and predict body weight of the broilers using linear body measurements. The four strains of broiler chicken used were Anak, Arbor Acre, Ross and Marshall. The parameters recorded were bodyweight, weight gain, total feed intake, feed conversion ratio, mortality and some linear body measurements (body length, body width, breast width, drumstick length, shank l...

  19. Microchip-based body temperature measurements in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Lohse, Louise

    In the present study, we tested whether an electronic identification and body temperature monitorring technology presently applied in small experimental animals could be transferred for use in pigs....

  20. Management and clinical outcomes of intraocular foreign bodies with the aid of orbital computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Multidetector CT plays an important role in the detection, localization, size measurement, and surgical approach towards the extraction of the IOFB. The presence of vitreous hemorrhage is a predictive factor for postoperative retinal detachment, and positive bacterial cultures result in poorer visual outcomes.

  1. Direct methods for measuring radionuclides in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Occupational exposure leading to intakes of internally incorporated radionuclides can occur as a result of various activities. This includes work associated with the different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, the use of radioactive sources in medicine, scientific research, agriculture and industry, and occupations which involve exposure to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides. In 1987 the IAEA published a Safety Guide on basic principles for occupational radiation monitoring which set forth principles and objectives of a strategy for monitoring exposures of workers. Since drafting of the present Safety Practice commenced, the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) have been issued. On the basis of the principles laid down in the BSS, the 1987 Safety Guide is also being revised, and recommendations on the assessment of the occupational intake of radioactive materials are to be added. The present Safety Practice, which deals with direct measurement of radionuclides in the human body, is the first to be published in this area. Refs, figs, tabs

  2. Goal setting as an outcome measure: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurn, Jane; Kneebone, Ian; Cropley, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Goal achievement has been considered to be an important measure of outcome by clinicians working with patients in physical and neurological rehabilitation settings. This systematic review was undertaken to examine the reliability, validity and sensitivity of goal setting and goal attainment scaling approaches when used with working age and older people. To review the reliability, validity and sensitivity of both goal setting and goal attainment scaling when employed as an outcome measure within a physical and neurological working age and older person rehabilitation environment, by examining the research literature covering the 36 years since goal-setting theory was proposed. Data sources included a computer-aided literature search of published studies examining the reliability, validity and sensitivity of goal setting/goal attainment scaling, with further references sourced from articles obtained through this process. There is strong evidence for the reliability, validity and sensitivity of goal attainment scaling. Empirical support was found for the validity of goal setting but research demonstrating its reliability and sensitivity is limited. Goal attainment scaling appears to be a sound measure for use in physical rehabilitation settings with working age and older people. Further work needs to be carried out with goal setting to establish its reliability and sensitivity as a measurement tool.

  3. Measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew; Liles, Clive; Rushton, Alison; Kyte, Derek G

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review investigated the measurement properties of disease-specific patient-reported outcome measures used in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. Two independent reviewers conducted a systematic search of key databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINHAL+ and the Cochrane Library from inception to August 2013) to identify relevant studies. A third reviewer mediated in the event of disagreement. Methodological quality was evaluated using the validated COSMIN (Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) tool. Data synthesis across studies determined the level of evidence for each patient-reported outcome measure. The search strategy returned 2177 citations. Following the eligibility review phase, seven studies, evaluating twelve different patient-reported outcome measures, met inclusion criteria. A 'moderate' level of evidence supported the structural validity of several measures: the Flandry Questionnaire, Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Functional Index Questionnaire, Eng and Pierrynowski Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales for 'usual' and 'worst' pain. In addition, there was a 'Limited' level of evidence supporting the test-retest reliability and validity (cross-cultural, hypothesis testing) of the Persian version of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale. Other measurement properties were evaluated with poor methodological quality, and many properties were not evaluated in any of the included papers. Current disease-specific outcome measures for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome require further investigation. Future studies should evaluate all important measurement properties, utilising an appropriate framework such as COSMIN to guide study design, to facilitate optimal methodological quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balcer, Laura J; Miller, David H; Reingold, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple...... sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique...... of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes...

  5. Measuring outcomes of communication partner training of health care professionals:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, Jytte; Jensen, Lise Randrup

    health care, and other communicative exchanges associated with appropriate health care [3]. As a consequence of these challenges in patient-provider communication, implementation of evidence- based methods of communication partner training is becoming increasingly frequent in different health care...... with large groups of trainees, e.g. all staff from a ward. Self-rating questionnaires, however, present another set of issues when used as outcome measures, including the need to examine their content validity, reliability and sensitivity to change [9]. This work appears to be lacking for most...... of the available questionnaires. However, it is important in order to lay the groundwork for future studies, which compare the efficacy and outcome of different methods of implementing conversation partner training in clinical practice. Aims: The overall purpose of this round table is to: 1. provide an overview...

  6. Health economics research into supporting carers of people with dementia: A systematic review of outcome measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Advisory bodies, such as the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the UK, advocate using preference based instruments to measure the quality of life (QoL) component of the quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Cost per QALY is used to determine cost-effectiveness, and hence funding, of interventions. QALYs allow policy makers to compare the effects of different interventions across different patient groups. Generic measures may not be sensitive enough to fully capture the QoL effects for certain populations, such as carers, so there is a need to consider additional outcome measures, which are preference based where possible to enable cost-effectiveness analysis to be undertaken. This paper reviews outcome measures commonly used in health services research and health economics research involving carers of people with dementia. An electronic database search was conducted in PubMed, Medline, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) and Health Technology Assessment database. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they included an outcome measure for carers of people with dementia. 2262 articles were identified. 455 articles describing 361 studies remained after exclusion criteria were applied. 228 outcome measures were extracted from the studies. Measures were categorised into 44 burden measures, 43 mastery measures, 61 mood measures, 32 QoL measures, 27 social support and relationships measures and 21 staff competency and morale measures. The choice of instrument has implications on funding decisions; therefore, researchers need to choose appropriate instruments for the population being measured and the type of intervention undertaken. If an instrument is not sensitive enough to detect changes in certain populations, the effect of an intervention may be underestimated, and hence

  7. changes in body composition and other anthropometric measures of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to investigate the changes in body composition and other anthropometric .... showing a good fit between the values obtained from the equation ..... ideally at 6-monthly intervals, in order to provide useful information to ... training on quality of life in HAART-treated HIV-positive Rwandan subjects with body fat ...

  8. Use of outcome measures in pulmonary hypertension clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Kishan S; Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Arges, Kristine; Ahmad, Tariq; Sivak, Joseph; Kaul, Prashant; Shah, Svati H; Tapson, Victor; Velazquez, Eric J; Douglas, Pamela S; Samad, Zainab

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the use of surrogate measures in pulmonary hypertension (PH) clinical trials and how it relates to clinical practice. Studies of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) employ a variety of surrogate measures in addition to clinical events because of a small patient population, participant burden, and costs. The use of these measures in PH drug trials is poorly defined. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE/Embase for randomized or prospective cohort PAH clinical treatment trials from 1985 to 2013. Extracted data included intervention, trial duration, study design, patient characteristics, and primary and secondary outcome measures. To compare with clinical practice, we assessed the use of surrogate measures in a clinical sample of patients on PH medications at Duke University Medical Center between 2003 and 2014. Between 1985 and 2013, 126 PAH trials were identified and analyzed. Surrogate measures served as primary endpoints in 119 trials (94.0%). Inclusion of invasive hemodynamics decreased over time (78.6%, 75.0%, 52.2%; P for trend = .02), while functional testing (7.1%, 60.0%, 81.5%; P for trend clinical assessments regularly incorporated serial echocardiography and 6-minute walk distance tests (92% and 95% of patients, respectively) and repeat measurement of invasive hemodynamics (46% of patients). The majority of PAH trials have utilized surrogate measures as primary endpoints. The use of these surrogate endpoints has evolved significantly over time with increasing use of patient-centered endpoints and decreasing or stable use of imaging and invasive measures. In contrast, imaging and invasive measures are commonly used in contemporary clinical practice. Further research is needed to validate and standardize currently used measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Engaging the hearts and minds of clinicians in outcome measurement - the UK Rehabilitation Outcomes Collaborative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Williams, Heather; Sephton, Keith; Rose, Hilary; Harris, Sarah; Thu, Aung

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the rationale for choosing the instruments included within the UK Rehabilitation Outcomes Collaborative (UKROC) data set. Using one specialist neuro-rehabilitation unit as an exemplar service, it describes an approach to engaging the hearts and minds of clinicians in recording the data. Measures included within a national data set for rehabilitation should be psychometrically robust and feasible to use in routine clinical practice; they should also support clinical decision-making so that clinicians actually want to use them. Learning from other international casemix models and benchmarking data sets, the UKROC team has developed a cluster of measures to inform the development of effective and cost-efficient rehabilitation services. These include measures of (1) "needs" for rehabilitation (complexity), (2) inputs provided to meet those needs (nursing and therapy intervention), and (3) outcome, including the attainment of personal goals as well as gains in functional independence. By integrating the use of the data set measures in everyday clinical practice, we have achieved a very high rate of compliance with data collection. However, staff training and ongoing commitment from senior staff and managers are critical to the maintenance of effort required to provide assurance of data quality in the longer term.

  10. CT Measured Psoas Density Predicts Outcomes After Enterocutaneous Fistula Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wilson D.; Evans, David C.; Yoo, Taehwan

    2018-01-01

    Background Low muscle mass and quality are associated with poor surgical outcomes. We evaluated CT measured psoas muscle density as a marker of muscle quality and physiologic reserve, and hypothesized that it would predict outcomes after enterocutaneous fistula repair (ECF). Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients 18 – 90 years old with ECF failing non-operative management requiring elective operative repair at Ohio State University from 2005 – 2016 that received a pre-operative abdomen/pelvis CT with intravenous contrast within 3 months of their operation. Psoas Hounsfield Unit average calculation (HUAC) were measured at the L3 level. 1 year leak rate, 90 day, 1 year, and 3 year mortality, complication risk, length of stay, dependent discharge, and 30 day readmission were compared to HUAC. Results 100 patients met inclusion criteria. Patients were stratified into interquartile (IQR) ranges based on HUAC. The lowest HUAC IQR was our low muscle quality (LMQ) cutoff, and was associated with 1 year leak (OR 3.50, p < 0.01), 1 year (OR 2.95, p < 0.04) and 3 year mortality (OR 3.76, p < 0.01), complication risk (OR 14.61, p < 0.01), and dependent discharge (OR 4.07, p < 0.01) compared to non-LMQ patients. Conclusions Psoas muscle density is a significant predictor of poor outcomes in ECF repair. This readily available measure of physiologic reserve can identify patients with ECF on pre-operative evaluation that have significantly increased risk that may benefit from additional interventions and recovery time to mitigate risk before operative repair. PMID:29505144

  11. Investigation into the relationship between body surface area and total body potassium using Monte Carlo and measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.A. [Medical Physics and Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jane.rogers@university-b.wmids.nhs.uk; Blake-James, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Green, S.; Beddoe, A.H. [Medical Physics and Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2002-03-07

    The use of body surface area (BSA) as a means of indexing chemotherapy doses is widespread even though the value of this practice is uncertain. In principle, the body cell mass (BCM) more closely represents the body's metabolic size and this is investigated here as an alternative to BSA; since 98% of body potassium is intracellular the derivation of total body potassium (TBK) via the measurement of {sup 40}K in a whole body counter (WBC) will provide a useful normalizing index for metabolic size, potentially avoiding toxicity and underdosing. The Queen Elizabeth Hospital WBC has been used in this study, initially involving single geometrical phantoms and then combinations of these to simulate human body habitus. Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) codes were constructed to model the phantoms and simulate the measurements made in the WBC. Efficiency corrections were derived by comparing measurement and modelled data for each detector separately. A method of modelling a person in the WBC as a series of ellipsoids was developed. Twenty-four normal males and 24 females were measured for their {sup 40}K emissions. Individual MCNP codes were constructed for each volunteer and the results used in conjunction with the measurements to derive TBK, correcting for body habitus effects and detector efficiencies. An estimate of the component of error arising from sources other than counting statistics was included by analysing data from the measurement of phantoms. The total residual errors (expressed as coefficients of variation) for males and females were 10.1% and 8.5% respectively. The measurement components were determined to be 2.4% and 2.5%, implying that the biological components were 9.8% and 8.1% respectively. These results suggest that the use of BSA for indexing chemotherapy doses is likely to give rise to clinically significant under- or overdosing. (author)

  12. Locked to a wrong body: Eating disorders as the outcome of a primary disturbance in multisensory body integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Gaudio, Santino

    2018-03-01

    In his recent paper "Distorted body representations in anorexia nervosa" Gadsby (2017) discussed empirical evidence regarding anorexic patients' distorted body representations. In particular, he interpreted them using the O'Shaughnessy's long-term body image (LTB) hypothesis (O'Shaughnessy, 1998): individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) have a distorted LTB that tracks changes in the spatial content of the body and supplies this distorted content to other body representations. Even if we agree on the involvement of body memory in the distorted body representation, an open issue not fully addressed in the paper is: why AN patients do not update their LTBs to reflect their true dimensions? Our correspondence tries to answer to this question using a new neuropsychological and neurobiological theory: the Allocentric Lock Theory - ALT. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Association of Maternal Body Mass Index with Adverse Maternal and Prenatal Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahele Alijahan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study aimed to determine association between abnormal maternal body mass index and adverse maternal/prenatal outcomesMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive-correlation study 8270 pregnant women referred to rural and urban health centers of Ardabil district (from Mar 2009 to Dec 2010 were studied. Data were collected from prenatal healthcare records using a self designed questionnaire. Women with twin pregnancy, less than 18 and above 35 of age, and women with systemic or chronic disease were excluded from the study. The variables examined in this study include, demographic information (e.g. age, social and economy status, and literacy, present pregnancy information (e.g. parity, hemoglobin level, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia and prenatal information (e.g. preterm delivery, low birth weight, and congenital malformation. Data were analyzed through Kruscal wallis, chi-square, and logistic regression tests using SPSS-16.Results: Eight point two, 25 and 15.4% pregnant of women were underweight, overweight, and obese, respectively. Obese women were at increased risk for macrosomia (OR=1.820, CI: 1.345-2.447, p=0.001, unwanted pregnancy (OR= 1.436, CI: 1.198-1.720, p=0.001, pregnancy induced hypertension (OR= 1.633, CI: 1.072-2.486, p=0.022, preeclampsia (OR= 4.666, CI: 2.353-9.2550, p=0.001, and still birth (OR= 2.602, CI: 1.306-5.184, p=0.007. However, the risk of low birth weight delivery in underweight women were 1.6 times higher than the normal cases (OR= 1.674, CI: 0962-2.912, p=0.068.Conclusion: Considering high prevalence of abnormal maternal body mass index and its associated adverse maternal and prenatal outcomes; consultation before pregnancy is recommended in order to achieve normal body mass index and reduce the relevant complications.

  14. Measuring Learning Outcomes. A Learner Perspective in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    The ability to provide sensible measures for learning outcomes in accounting education is under increased scrutiny. In this paper we use a learner perspective in auditing education which reflects that some students taking accounting classes also are provided with on-the-job training in accounting...... is part of every day life within most accounting firms. Developing a sound on-the-job training environment is pivotal in the recruitment and design of supervision, and in the end for the expected "successrate" in retaining (valuable) employees. Prior research suggests that scripts or schemas provide...

  15. Disproportionate body composition and neonatal outcome in offspring of mothers with and without gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Martina; Fadl, Helena; Hanson, Ulf; Pasupathy, Dharmintra

    2013-11-01

    High birth weight is a risk factor for neonatal complications. It is not known if the risk differs with body proportionality. The primary aim of this study was to determine the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in relation to body proportionality in large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants stratified by maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Population-based study of all LGA (birth weight [BW] >90th percentile) infants born to women with GDM (n = 1,547) in 1998-2007. The reference group comprised LGA infants (n = 83,493) born to mothers without diabetes. Data were obtained from the Swedish Birth Registry. Infants were categorized as proportionate (P-LGA) if ponderal index (PI) (BW in grams/length in cm(3)) was ≤90th percentile and as disproportionate (D-LGA) if PI >90th percentile. The primary outcome was a composite morbidity: Apgar score 0-3 at 5 min, birth trauma, respiratory disorders, hypoglycemia, or hyperbilirubinemia. Logistic regression analysis was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) for adverse outcomes. The risk of composite neonatal morbidity was increased in GDM pregnancies versus control subjects but comparable between P- and D-LGA in both groups. D-LGA infants born to mothers without diabetes had significantly increased risk of birth trauma (OR 1.19 [95% CI 1.09-1.30]) and hypoglycemia (1.23 [1.11-1.37]). D-LGA infants in both groups had significantly increased odds of Cesarean section. The risk of composite neonatal morbidity is significantly increased in GDM offspring. In pregnancies both with and without GDM, the risk of composite neonatal morbidity is comparable between P- and D-LGA.

  16. Lack of Associations between Body Mass Index and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyemi Kwon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundObesity is associated with aggressive pathological features and poor clinical outcomes in breast and prostate cancers. In papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC, these relationships remain still controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the associations between body mass index (BMI and the clinical outcomes of patients with PTC.MethodsThis retrospective study included 1,189 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for PTCs equal to or larger than 1 cm in size. Clinical outcomes were evaluated and compared based on the BMI quartiles.ResultsThere were no significant associations between BMI quartiles and primary tumor size, extrathyroidal invasion, cervical lymph node metastasis, or distant metastasis. However, an increase in mean age was associated with an increased BMI (P for trend <0.001. Multifocality and advanced tumor-node-metastasis (TNM stage (stage III or IV were significantly associated with increases of BMI (P for trend 0.02 and <0.001, respectively. However, these associations of multifocality and advanced TNM stage with BMI were not significant in multivariate analyses adjusted for age and gender. Moreover, there were no differences in recurrence-free survivals according to BMI quartiles (P=0.26.ConclusionIn the present study, BMI was not associated with the aggressive clinicopathological features or recurrence-free survivals in patients with PTC.

  17. Directly measured secondhand smoke exposure and COPD health outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balmes John

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although personal cigarette smoking is the most important cause and modulator of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, secondhand smoke (SHS exposure could influence the course of the disease. Despite the importance of this question, the impact of SHS exposure on COPD health outcomes remains unknown. Methods We used data from two waves of a population-based multiwave U.S. cohort study of adults with COPD. 77 non-smoking respondents with a diagnosis of COPD completed direct SHS monitoring based on urine cotinine and a personal badge that measures nicotine. We evaluated the longitudinal impact of SHS exposure on validated measures of COPD severity, physical health status, quality of life (QOL, and dyspnea measured at one year follow-up. Results The highest level of SHS exposure, as measured by urine cotinine, was cross-sectionally associated with poorer COPD severity (mean score increment 4.7 pts; 95% CI 0.6 to 8.9 and dyspnea (1.0 pts; 95% CI 0.4 to 1.7 after controlling for covariates. In longitudinal analysis, the highest level of baseline cotinine was associated with worse COPD severity (4.7 points; 95% CI -0.1 to 9.4; p = 0.054, disease-specific QOL (2.9 pts; -0.16 to 5.9; p = 0.063, and dyspnea (0.9 pts; 95% CI 0.2 to 1.6 pts; p Conclusion Directly measured SHS exposure appears to adversely influence health outcomes in COPD, independent of personal smoking. Because SHS is a modifiable risk factor, clinicians should assess SHS exposure in their patients and counsel its avoidance. In public health terms, the effects of SHS exposure on this vulnerable subpopulation provide a further rationale for laws prohibiting public smoking.

  18. Imaging body composition in cancer patients: visceral obesity, sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity may impact on clinical outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Yip, Connie; Dinkel, Charlotte; Mahajan, Abhishek; Siddique, Musib; Cook, Gary J. R.; Goh, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the influence of body composition on oncological patient outcomes. Visceral obesity, sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity have been identified as adverse factors in cancer patients. Imaging quantification of body composition such as lean muscle mass and fat distribution is a potentially valuable tool. This review describes the following imaging techniques that may be used to assess body composition: dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry ...

  19. Scan posture definition and hip girth measurement: the impact on clothing design and body scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Simeon; Parker, Christopher J

    2017-08-01

    Ergonomic measurement is central to product design and development; especially for body worn products and clothing. However, there is a large variation in measurement definitions, complicated by new body scanning technology that captures measurements in a posture different to traditional manual methods. Investigations of hip measurement definitions in current clothing measurement practices supports analysis of the effect of scan posture and hip measurement definition on the circumferences of the hip. Here, the hip girth is a key clothing measurement that is not defined in current body scanning measurement standards. Sixty-four participants were scanned in the standard scan posture of a [TC] 2 body scanner, and also in a natural posture similar to that of traditional manual measurement collection. Results indicate that scan posture affects hip girth circumferences, and that some current clothing measurement practices may not define the largest lower body circumference. Recommendations are made concerning how the hip is defined in measurement practice and within body scanning for clothing product development. Practitioner Summary: The hip girth is an important measurement in garment design, yet its measurement protocol is not currently defined. We demonstrate that body posture during body scanning affects hip circumferences, and that current clothing measurement practices may not define the largest lower body circumference. This paper also provides future measurement practice recommendations.

  20. Whole-body counter intercomparison measurements in Hungary and Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrasi, A. [Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary). KFKI; Tarroni, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1999-01-01

    In the frame of a co-operation agreement between Austrian Research Center Seibersdorf, Italian ENEA Institute for Radiation Protection and Hungarian KFKI Atomic Energy Research Centre, an intercomparison on WBC measurements using a modular bottle phantom was performed during 1995 in Hungary, on May-July 1996 in the Northern part of Italy. Results related to the relative bias for the three body masses are reported, together with indication of their compliance with ANSI report N13.30. It turned out that majority of the results were found to be within the performance criteria of the ANSI report, however there were also few outfalling results which were a good indication to check and improve the reliability of calibration and/or other methodological procedures. In the contrary of the expectance, the results related to 20 kg phantom resulted not significantly worse than those obtained for the adult phantom indicating the capacity for the participating WBC centres of measuring people from the general population. [Italiano] Nell`ambito di un accordo di collaborazione tra il Centro di Ricerca di Seibersdorf (Austria), l`Istituto per la Radioprotezione dell`ENEA (ENEA AMB PRO IRP) ed il Centro di Ricerca per l`Energia Atomica KFKI di Budapest (Ungheria), si e` svolto un interconfronto su misure WBC basato sull`utilizzo di un unico fantoccio modulare a bottiglie cui hanno partecipato centri WBC Ungheresi (1995) ed Italiani (Maggio-Giugno 1996). Nel presente rapporto tecnico vengono presentati i risultati ottenuti ed una loro analisi impostata sui criteri di valutazione recentemente proposti dall`ANSI nel rapporto N. 13.30. Sulla base di tale criterio la maggior parte dei risultati dell`interconfronto rientra nell`intervallo di accettabilita`; nei pochi casi di non accettabilita` si rende invece necessaria una revisione dei dati di calibrazione e delle metodologie. Contrariamente a quanto si poteva prevedere, i risultati relativi al fantoccio da 20 kg appaiono sostanzialmente

  1. Kinematic measures for upper limb robot-assisted therapy following stroke and correlations with clinical outcome measures: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Vi Do; Dario, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Stefano

    2018-03-01

    This review classifies the kinematic measures used to evaluate post-stroke motor impairment following upper limb robot-assisted rehabilitation and investigates their correlations with clinical outcome measures. An online literature search was carried out in PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus and IEEE-Xplore databases. Kinematic parameters mentioned in the studies included were categorized into the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) domains. The correlations between these parameters and the clinical scales were summarized. Forty-nine kinematic parameters were identified from 67 articles involving 1750 patients. The most frequently used parameters were: movement speed, movement accuracy, peak speed, number of speed peaks, and movement distance and duration. According to the ICF domains, 44 kinematic parameters were categorized into Body Functions and Structure, 5 into Activities and no parameters were categorized into Participation and Personal and Environmental Factors. Thirteen articles investigated the correlations between kinematic parameters and clinical outcome measures. Some kinematic measures showed a significant correlation coefficient with clinical scores, but most were weak or moderate. The proposed classification of kinematic measures into ICF domains and their correlations with clinical scales could contribute to identifying the most relevant ones for an integrated assessment of upper limb robot-assisted rehabilitation treatments following stroke. Increasing the assessment frequency by means of kinematic parameters could optimize clinical assessment procedures and enhance the effectiveness of rehabilitation treatments. Copyright © 2018 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Using path analysis to predict bodyweight from body measurements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esnart Mukumbo

    2017-10-05

    Oct 5, 2017 ... South African Journal of Animal Science 2017, 47 (No. 6) .... Some farmers kept Dorper and Karakul sheep, while others kept Boer, Savannah and ..... body weight and biometric traits of red Sokoto goats in northern Nigeria.

  3. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfson, Ola; Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common use...... are the Short Form health surveys (SF-36 or SF-12) and EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D). The Working Group recommends that registries should choose specific PROMs that have been appropriately developed with good measurement properties for arthroplasty patients. The Working Group recommend the use of a 1-item pain...... should consider the absolute level of pain, function, and general health status as well as improvement, missing data, approaches to analysis and case-mix adjustment, minimal clinically important difference, and minimal detectable change. The Working Group recommends data collection immediately before...

  4. Single-case synthesis tools II: Comparing quantitative outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Kathleen N; Pustejovsky, James E; Ledford, Jennifer R; Barton, Erin E; Severini, Katherine E; Lloyd, Blair P

    2018-03-07

    Varying methods for evaluating the outcomes of single case research designs (SCD) are currently used in reviews and meta-analyses of interventions. Quantitative effect size measures are often presented alongside visual analysis conclusions. Six measures across two classes-overlap measures (percentage non-overlapping data, improvement rate difference, and Tau) and parametric within-case effect sizes (standardized mean difference and log response ratio [increasing and decreasing])-were compared to determine if choice of synthesis method within and across classes impacts conclusions regarding effectiveness. The effectiveness of sensory-based interventions (SBI), a commonly used class of treatments for young children, was evaluated. Separately from evaluations of rigor and quality, authors evaluated behavior change between baseline and SBI conditions. SBI were unlikely to result in positive behavior change across all measures except IRD. However, subgroup analyses resulted in variable conclusions, indicating that the choice of measures for SCD meta-analyses can impact conclusions. Suggestions for using the log response ratio in SCD meta-analyses and considerations for understanding variability in SCD meta-analysis conclusions are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Initial constructs for patient-centered outcome measures to evaluate brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Elena M; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Peters, Betts; Patrick, Donald L

    2016-10-01

    The authors describe preliminary work toward the creation of patient-centered outcome (PCO) measures to evaluate brain-computer interface (BCI) as an assistive technology (AT) for individuals with severe speech and physical impairments (SSPI). In Phase 1, 591 items from 15 existing measures were mapped to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). In Phase 2, qualitative interviews were conducted with eight people with SSPI and seven caregivers. Resulting text data were coded in an iterative analysis. Most items (79%) were mapped to the ICF environmental domain; over half (53%) were mapped to more than one domain. The ICF framework was well suited for mapping items related to body functions and structures, but less so for items in other areas, including personal factors. Two constructs emerged from qualitative data: quality of life (QOL) and AT. Component domains and themes were identified for each. Preliminary constructs, domains and themes were generated for future PCO measures relevant to BCI. Existing instruments are sufficient for initial items but do not adequately match the values of people with SSPI and their caregivers. Field methods for interviewing people with SSPI were successful, and support the inclusion of these individuals in PCO research. Implications for Rehabilitation Adapted interview methods allow people with severe speech and physical impairments to participate in patient-centered outcomes research. Patient-centered outcome measures are needed to evaluate the clinical implementation of brain-computer interface as an assistive technology.

  6. Exploring Outcome Measures for Exercise Intervention in People with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. King

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is widely believed that exercise improves mobility in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, it is difficult to determine whether a specific type of exercise is the most effective. The purpose of this study was to determine which outcome measures were sensitive to exercise intervention and to explore the effects of two different exercise programs for improving mobility in patients with PD. Methods. Participants were randomized into either the Agility Boot Camp (ABC or treadmill training; 4x/week for 4 weeks. Outcome measures were grouped by the International Classification of Function/Disability (ICF. To determine the responsiveness to exercise, we calculated the standardized response means. t-tests were used to compare the relative benefits of each exercise program. Results. Four of five variables at the structure/function level changed after exercise: turn duration (P=0.03, stride velocity (P=0.001, peak arm speed (P=0.001, and horizontal trunk ROM during gait (P=0.02. Most measures improved similarly for both interventions. The only variable that detected a difference between groups was postural sway in ABC group (F=4.95; P=0.03. Conclusion. Outcome measures at ICF body structure/function level were most effective at detecting change after exercise and revealing differences in improvement between interventions.

  7. Non-invasive measurement of calcium and phosphorus in human body by NAA technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiying; Luo Xianqing; Huang Hanqiao

    1995-01-01

    A system of measuring calcium and phosphorus in human legs has been developed by the use of partial-body neutron activation analysis and partial-body counting technique. The results are compared for the normals and osteoporotic patients

  8. Proceedings of Patient Reported Outcome Measure?s (PROMs) Conference Sheffield 2016: advances in patient reported outcomes research

    OpenAIRE

    Croudace, Tim; Brazier, John; Gutacker, Nils; Street, Andrew; Robotham, Dan; Waterman, Samantha; Rose, Diana; Satkunanathan, Safarina; Wykes, Til; Nasr, Nasrin; Enderby, Pamela; Carlton, Jill; Rowen, Donna; Elliott, Jackie; Brazier, John

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents S1 Using computerized adaptive testing Tim Croudace S2 Well-being: what is it, how does it compare to health and what are the implications of using it to inform health policy John Brazier O1 “Am I going to get better?”—Using PROMs to inform patients about the likely benefit of surgery Nils Gutacker, Andrew Street O2 Identifying Patient Reported Outcome Measures for an electronic Personal Health Record Dan Robotham, Samantha Waterman, Diana Rose, Safarina Satkunanathan, Til W...

  9. Measuring Nutritional Status, Hydration and Body Composition Changes in Acute Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Kafri, Mohannad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia and cognitive problems, both common after stoke, may affect dietary intake increasing the risk of malnutrition. Malnutrition has adverse effects on body composition especially in conditions that escalate the stress response in the body and may be associated with immobility such as stroke. Study objective: The objective of my study was to understand the prognosis of malnutrition on post cardiovascular disease (CV) outcomes, understand body composition ch...

  10. Psoas muscle cross-sectional area as a measure of whole body lean muscle mass in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Glen R.; Ikizler, Talat A.; Chen, Xiaorui; Heilbrun, Marta E.; Wei, Guo; Boucher, Robert; Beddhu, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigate whether psoas or paraspinous muscle area measured on a single L4–5 image is a useful measure of whole lean body mass compared to dedicated mid-thigh magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Design Observational study. Setting Outpatient dialysis units and a research clinic. Subjects 105 adult participants on maintenance hemodialysis. No control group was used. Exposure variables Psoas muscle area, paraspinous muscle area, and mid-thigh muscle area (MTMA) were measured by MRI. Main outcome measure Lean body mass was measured by dual-energy absorptiometry (DEXA) scan. Results In separate multivariable linear regression models, psoas, paraspinous, and mid-thigh muscle area were associated with increase in lean body mass. In separate multivariate logistic regression models, c-statistics for diagnosis of sarcopenia (defined as lean body mass) were 0.69 for paraspinous muscle area, 0.81 for psoas muscle area, and 0.89 for mid-thigh muscle area. With sarcopenia defined as lean body mass, the corresponding c-statistics were 0.71, 0.92, and 0.94. Conclusions We conclude that psoas muscle area provides a good measure of whole body muscle mass, better than paraspinous muscle area but slightly inferior to mid thigh measurement. Hence, in body composition studies a single axial MR image at the L4–L5 level can be used to provide information on both fat and muscle and may eliminate the need for time-consuming measurement of muscle area in the thigh. PMID:26994780

  11. Impact of body mass index on outcome in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensicke, H; Wicht, A; Bill, O; Zini, A; Costa, P; Kägi, G; Stark, R; Seiffge, D J; Traenka, C; Peters, N; Bonati, L H; Giovannini, G; De Marchis, G M; Poli, L; Polymeris, A; Vanacker, P; Sarikaya, H; Lyrer, P A; Pezzini, A; Vandelli, L; Michel, P; Engelter, S T

    2016-12-01

    The impact of body mass index (BMI) on outcome in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) was investigated. In a multicentre IVT-register-based observational study, BMI with (i) poor 3-month outcome (i.e. modified Rankin Scale scores 3-6), (ii) death and (iii) symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (sICH) based on criteria of the ECASS II trial was compared. BMI was used as a continuous and categorical variable distinguishing normal weight (reference group 18.5-24.9 kg/m 2 ) from underweight (m 2 ), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m 2 ) and obese (≥30 kg/m 2 ) patients. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses with adjustments for age and stroke severity were done and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals [OR (95% CI)] were calculated. Of 1798 patients, 730 (40.6%) were normal weight, 55 (3.1%) were underweight, 717 (39.9%) overweight and 295 (16.4%) obese. Poor outcome occurred in 38.1% of normal weight patients and did not differ significantly from underweight (45.5%), overweight (36.1%) and obese (32.5%) patients. The same was true for death (9.5% vs. 14.5%, 9.6% and 7.5%) and sICH (3.9% vs. 5.5%, 4.3%, 2.7%). Neither in univariable nor in multivariable analyses did the risks of poor outcome, death or sICH differ significantly between BMI groups. BMI as a continuous variable was not associated with poor outcome, death or sICH in unadjusted [OR (95% CI) 0.99 (0.97-1.01), 0.98 (0.95-1.02), 0.98 (0.94-1.04)] or adjusted analyses [OR (95% CI) 1.01 (0.98-1.03), 0.99 (0.95-1.05), 1.01 (0.97-1.05)], respectively. In this largest study to date, investigating the impact of BMI in IVT-treated stroke patients, BMI had no prognostic meaning with regard to 3-month functional outcome, death or occurrence of sICH. © 2016 EAN.

  12. Motion-oriented 3D analysis of body measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loercher, C.; Morlock, S.; Schenk, A.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this project is to develop an ergonomically based and motion-oriented size system. New concepts are required in order to be able to deal competently with complex requirements of function-oriented workwear and personal protective equipment (PPE). Body dimensions change through movement, which are basis for motion optimized clothing development. This affects fit and ergonomic comfort. The situation has to be fundamentally researched in order to derive well-founded anthropometric body data, taking into account kinematic requirements of humans and to define functional dimensions for clothing industry. Research focus shall be on ergonomic design of workwear and PPE. There are huge differences in body forms, proportions and muscle manifestations between genders. An improved basic knowledge can be provided as a result, supporting development as well as sales of motion-oriented clothing with perfect fit for garment manufacturers.

  13. Relation of body mass index to outcome in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Wael; van Domburg, Ron T; Feringa, Harm H H; Schouten, Olaf; Elhendy, Abdou; Bax, Jeroen J; Awara, Adel M M; Klein, Jan; Poldermans, Don

    2007-06-01

    Increased body mass index (BMI), a parameter of total body fat content, is associated with an increased mortality in the general population. However, recent studies have shown a paradoxic relation between BMI and mortality in specific patient populations. This study investigated the association of BMI with long-term mortality in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. In a retrospective cohort study of 5,950 patients (mean age 61 +/- 13 years; 67% men), BMI, cardiovascular risk markers (age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, current smoking, angina pectoris, old myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypercholesterolemia, and previous coronary revascularization), and outcome were noted. The patient population was categorized as underweight, normal, overweight, and obese based on BMI according to the World Health Organization classification. Mean follow-up time was 6 +/- 2.6 years. Incidences of long-term mortality in underweight, normal, overweight, and obese were 39%, 35%, 24%, and 20%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis model, the hazard ratio (HR) for mortality in underweight patients was 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7 to 3.7). Overweight and obese patients had a significantly lower mortality than patients with a normal BMI (HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.6 to 0.7, for overweight; HR 0.61, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.7, for obese patients). In conclusion, BMI is inversely related to long-term mortality in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. A lower BMI was an independent predictor of long-term mortality, whereas an improved outcome was observed in overweight and obese patients.

  14. Impact of intrauterine growth retardation and body proportionality on fetal and neonatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, M S; Olivier, M; McLean, F H; Willis, D M; Usher, R H

    1990-11-01

    Previous prognostic studies of infants with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) have not adequately considered the heterogeneity of IUGR in terms of cause, severity, and body proportionality and have been prone to misclassification of IUGR because of errors in estimation of gestational age. Based on a cohort of 8719 infants with early-ultrasound-validated gestational ages and indexes of body proportionality standardized for birth weight, the consequences of severity and cause-specific IUGR and proportionality for fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality were assessed. With progressive severity of IUGR, there were significant (all P less than .001) linear trends for increasing risks of stillbirth, fetal distress (abnormal electronic fetal heart tracings)O during parturition, neonatal hypoglycemia (minimum plasma glucose less than 40 mg/dL), hypocalcemia (minimum Ca less than 7 mg/dL), polycythemia (maximum capillary hemoglobin greater than or equal to 21 g/dL), severe depression at birth (manual ventilation greater than 3 minutes), 1-minute and 5-minute Apgar scores less than or equal to 6, 1-minute Apgar score less than or equal to 3, and in-hospital death. These trends persisted for the more common outcomes even after restriction to term (37 to 42 weeks) births. There was no convincing evidence that outcome among infants with a given degree of growth retardation varied as a function of cause of that growth retardation. Among infants with IUGR, increased length-for-weight had significant crude associations with hypoglycemia and polycythemia, but these associations disappeared after adjustment for severity of growth retardation and gestational age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Effect of body mass index on in vitro fertilization outcomes in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Sathya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background :Obesity has become a major health problem across the world. In women, it is known to cause anovulation, subfecundity, increased risk of fetal anomalies and miscarriage rates. However, in women going for assisted reproduction the effects of obesity on egg quality, embryo quality, clinical pregnancy, live birth rates are controversial. Objectives :To assess the effect of women′s body mass index (BMI on the reproductive outcome of non donor In vitro fertilization (IVF/Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. The effects of BMI on their gonadotrophin levels (day 2 LH, FSH, gonadotrophin dose required for ovarian stimulation, endometrial thickness and oocyte/embryo quality were looked at, after correcting for age and poor ovarian reserve. Materials and Methods : Retrospective study of medical records of 308 women undergoing non donor IVF cycles in a University affiliated teaching hospital. They were classified into three groups: normal weight (BMI25 30 kg/m 2 . All women underwent controlled ovarian hyper stimulation using long agonist protocol. Results : There were 88 (28.6% in the normal weight group, 147 (47.7% in the overweight and 73 (23.7% in the obese group. All three groups were comparable with respect to age, duration of infertility, female and male causes of infertility. The three groups were similar with respect to day 2 LH/FSH levels, endometrial thickness and gonadotrophin requirements, oocyte quality, fertilization, cleavage rates, number of good quality embryos and clinical pregnancy rates. Conclusion :Increase in body mass index in women does not appear to have an adverse effect on IVF outcome. However, preconceptual counselling for obese women is a must as weight reduction helps in reducing pregnancy-related complications.

  16. Reliability and validity for measurement of body composition: A field ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All three of these instruments do not involve high costs, do not require high technical skills, mobile, save time, and are suitable for use in large populations. Because all three instruments can estimate the percentage of body fat, but it is important to identify the most appropriate instruments and have high reliability. Hence, this ...

  17. Does Impedance Measure a Functional State of the Body Fat?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Větrovská, R.; Vilikus, Z.; Klaschka, Jan; Stránská, Z.; Svačina, Š.; Svobodová, Š.; Matoulek, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl. 2 (2014), S309-S320 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : body composition * DEXA * fat mass * obesity * anthropometric methods * fat tissue functional properties Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  18. Changes in body composition and other anthropometric measures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives. An understanding of the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on various aspects of health, including nutritional status, is needed to ensure that population-specific guidelines can be developed for South Africa. This study aimed to investigate the changes in body composition and ...

  19. Corrections of the whole body counting for various measurement geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, M.; Ragan, P.; Lahham, A.

    1996-01-01

    A simple method was suggested for making corrections during the calibration of HPGe detectors employed for the whole-body counting of humans ranging from infants to adults. The results obtained by calculations were verified by using phantoms. (P.A.). 1 tab., 5 figs., 3 refs

  20. Effects of body mass index on the outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Selcuk Isoglu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To examine the the effect of body mass index (BMI on PNL results and complications with a large number of patients. Materials and Methods A total of 958 patients were included in the study, who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy in our clinic between 2008 and 2015. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to their body mass index. Patients with a BMI < 30 kg/m2 were classified as group 1 (n:676 and patients with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 were classified as group 2 (n:282. Achieving stone-free status or having residual stones of ≤ 4 mm were considered as operational success. Results The mean age was 47.9 years for group 1 and 48.9 years for group 2 patients. At postoperative first month CT analysis, residual stone was not observed in 466 patients (69% of group 1 and 20 (72% patients of group 2. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of stone-free status (p=0.348. There was no significant difference between two groups complications. Also, there was no difference between the groups for requiring additional intervention (p=0.924. No other complications were observed in the patients. Conclusions BMI does not affect the outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy as well as complication rate.

  1. Influence of body composition profile on outcomes following colorectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malietzis, G; Currie, A C; Athanasiou, T; Johns, N; Anyamene, N; Glynne-Jones, R; Kennedy, R H; Fearon, K C H; Jenkins, J T

    2016-04-01

    Muscle depletion is characterized by reduced muscle mass (myopenia), and increased infiltration by intermuscular and intramuscular fat (myosteatosis). This study examined the role of particular body composition profiles as prognostic markers for patients with colorectal cancer undergoing curative resection. Patients with colorectal cancer undergoing elective surgical resection between 2006 and 2011 were included. Lumbar skeletal muscle index (LSMI), visceral adipose tissue (VAT) surface area and mean muscle attenuation (MA) were calculated by analysis of CT images. Reduced LSMI (myopenia), increased VAT (visceral obesity) and low MA (myosteatosis) were identified using predefined sex-specific skeletal muscle index values. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression models were used to determine the role of different body composition profiles on outcomes. Some 805 patients were identified, with a median follow-up of 47 (i.q.r. 24·9-65·6) months. Multivariable analysis identified myopenia as an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (hazard ratio (HR) 1·53, 95 per cent c.i. 1·06 to 2·39; P = 0·041) and overall survival (HR 1·70, 1·25 to 2·31; P cancer survival for patients with colorectal cancer. Muscle depletion may represent a modifiable risk factor in patients with colorectal cancer and needs to be targeted as a relevant endpoint of health recommendations. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Patient reported outcome measures in male incontinence surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, M G B; Yip, J; Uveili, K; Biers, S M; Thiruchelvam, N

    2014-10-01

    Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) were used to evaluate outcomes of the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) and the AdVance™ (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN, US) male sling system (AVMS) for the symptomatic management of male stress urinary incontinence. All male patients with stress urinary incontinence referred to our specialist clinic over a two-year period completed the ICIQ-UI SF (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire on Urinary Incontinence Short Form) and the ICIQ-MLUTS LF (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire on Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Long Form) at consultation as well as at subsequent follow-up appointments. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test for non-parametric paired data was used for pre and postoperative comparisons. The chi-squared test was used for categorical variables. Thirty-seven patients (forty surgical cases) completed a preoperative and at least one follow-up questionnaire. There was a statistically significant improvement in PROMs postoperatively, regardless of mode of surgery (p25) had greater improvement with an AUS than with the AVMS (p<0.01). This prospective study shows that completion and collection of PROMs as part of routine clinical practice is achievable and useful in the assessment of male stress incontinence surgery. PROMs are important instruments to assess effectiveness of healthcare intervention and they are useful adjuncts in surgical studies.

  3. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcer, Laura J.; Miller, David H.; Reingold, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  4. Body condition score, morphometric measurements and estimation of body weight in mature Icelandic horses in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bovbjerg; Danielsen, Signe H.; Tauson, Anne-Helene

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity is related to the development of several diseases like insulin resistance and laminitis in horses. The prevalence of obesity among mature Icelandic horses in Denmark has not been investigated previously. This study aimed to find the prevalence of obesity, to compare body condi...

  5. Impact of body composition on outcome in patients with early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluche, Elise; Leobon, Sophie; Desport, Jean Claude; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Usseglio, Julie; Tubiana-Mathieu, Nicole

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the impact of body composition on outcomes of patients with early breast cancer. Skeletal muscle mass, visceral adipose tissue (VAT), subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), and muscle fat infiltration or inter-muscular adipose tissue areas (IMAT), obtained by computed tomography (CT), were assessed. A total of 119 female patients who had breast cancer were included in this retrospective study. The total skeletal muscle and fat tissue areas were evaluated in two adjacent axial slices obtained at the third lumbar vertebra by CT used for disease staging. The women were assigned to either a sarcopenia or non-sarcopenia group based on their skeletal muscle index (cut-off 41.0 cm 2 /m 2 ). They also were classified into high and low VAT/SAT ratio groups and assigned to either the high or low IMAT index group. The association of the body composition parameters and prognosis was statistically analyzed. Among the 119 evaluable patients, 58 were sarcopenic (48.8%), 55 (46.2%) had a high VAT/SAT ratio, and 62 (52.1%) had a high IMAT index. Median follow-up was 52.4 months. Multivariate analysis revealed sarcopenia and IMAT index as independent prognostic factors for disease-free survival (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.05 and p = 0.02, respectively). BMI was not significantly associated with disease-free survival, but a trend was observed (p = 0.09). Sarcopenia and IMAT index are independent prognostic factors in early breast cancer; therefore, assessing body composition could be a simple and useful approach to integrate into patient management.

  6. Single Fraction Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastasis: Outcomes from 132 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhidasan, S; Ball, D; Kron, T; Bressel, M; Shaw, M; Chu, J; Chander, S; Wheeler, G; Plumridge, N; Chesson, B; David, S; Siva, S

    2018-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is currently used to treat oligometastases, but the optimum dose/fractionation schedule is unknown. In this study, we evaluated outcomes after single fraction SABR in patients with oligometastatic disease. Single institutional retrospective review of patients treated with single fraction SABR for one to three oligometastases between 2010 and 2015. The primary outcome was freedom from widespread disease defined as distant recurrence not amenable to surgery or SABR; or recurrence with four or more metastases. In total, 186 treatments were delivered in 132 patients. The two most common target sites were lung (51%) and bone (40%). The most frequent single fraction prescription dose was 26 Gy (47%). The most common primary malignancy was genitourinary (n = 46 patients). Freedom from widespread disease was 75% at 1 year (95% confidence interval 67-83%) and 52% at 2 years (95% confidence interval 42-63%). Freedom from local progression at 1 year was 90% (95% confidence interval 85-95%) and at 2 years was 84% (95% confidence interval 77-91%). A compression fracture of the lumbar vertebra was the only grade 3+ treatment-related toxicity. Single fraction SABR is associated with a high rate of freedom from widespread disease, favourable local control and low toxicity comparable with historic multi-fraction SABR reports. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer: five-year outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Hypofractionated, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is an emerging treatment approach for prostate cancer. We present the outcomes for low-risk prostate cancer patients with a median follow-up of 5 years after SBRT. Method and Materials Between Dec. 2003 and Dec. 2005, a pooled cohort of 41 consecutive patients from Stanford, CA and Naples, FL received SBRT with CyberKnife for clinically localized, low-risk prostate cancer. Prescribed dose was 35-36.25 Gy in five fractions. No patient received hormone therapy. Kaplan-Meier biochemical progression-free survival (defined using the Phoenix method and RTOG toxicity outcomes were assessed. Results At a median follow-up of 5 years, the biochemical progression-free survival was 93% (95% CI = 84.7% to 100%. Acute side effects resolved within 1-3 months of treatment completion. There were no grade 4 toxicities. No late grade 3 rectal toxicity occurred, and only one late grade 3 genitourinary toxicity occurred following repeated urologic instrumentation. Conclusion Five-year results of SBRT for localized prostate cancer demonstrate the efficacy and safety of shorter courses of high dose per fraction radiation delivered with SBRT technique. Ongoing clinical trials are underway to further explore this treatment approach.

  8. Nonadherence in dialysis patients: prevalence, measurement, outcome, and psychological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sarah; Farrington, Ken; Chilcot, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Nonadherence to aspects of the management of End-Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD) is common. Estimates of nonadherence vary with assessment method. Whilst readily available and free from report bias, physiological proxies-frequently used as measures of adherence-are often confounded by clinical factors including residual kidney function and dialysis adequacy. Despite variation in estimates of its prevalence, it is clear that suboptimal adherence to dialysis prescriptions, medication and diet can lead to adverse clinical outcomes. Several factors can help explain nonadherence in ESKD including mood, self-efficacy, social support, illness, and treatment perceptions. Psychological interventions have been shown to improve ESKD adherence, yet achieving long-term behavior change remains challenging. Identifying individuals who struggle to adhere to aspects of the dialysis regime, and tailoring theory-led interventions to improve and support adherence is a clear clinical need requiring further empirical enquiry. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Gestational Weight Gain and Pregnancy Outcomes in Relation to Body Mass Index in Asian Indian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavadharini, Balaji; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Deepa, Mohan; Jayashree, Gopal; Nrutya, Subramanyam; Shobana, Mahadevan; Malanda, Belma; Kayal, Arivudainambi; Belton, Anne; Joseph, Kurian; Rekha, Kurian; Uma, Ram; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the weight gain during pregnancy (using Institute of Medicine guidelines) among Asian Indians across different body mass index (BMI) categories (using World Health Organization Asia Pacific BMI cut points) and to compare the pregnancy outcomes in each of the different BMI categories. Retrospective records of 2728 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics and private maternity centers in Chennai, South India, from January 2011 to January 2014 were studied. Pregnancy outcomes were analyzed in relation to BMI and weight gain across different BMI categories. Overweight and obese women who gained more weight during pregnancy were at high risk of delivering macrosomic infants (overweight - odds ratio [OR]: 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-5.2, P = 0.02 and obese - OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1-2.4, P = 0.01). In addition, obese women who gained more weight were also at high risk of preterm labor (OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.1-3.8; P = 0.01), cesarean section (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.4-2.5; P women who gained less weight had a protective effect from cesarean section and macrosomia. Overweight/obese women who gained more weight than recommended are at a high risk of developing adverse pregnancy outcomes. Normal and overweight women who gained weight less than recommended have low risk for cesarean section and macrosomia. However, they have a higher (statistically insignificant) risk for low birth weight and preterm birth. This highlights the need for gaining adequate weight during pregnancy.

  10. Muscle MRI and functional outcome measures in Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barp, Andrea; Bello, Luca; Caumo, Luca; Campadello, Paola; Semplicini, Claudio; Lazzarotto, Annalisa; Sorarù, Gianni; Calore, Chiara; Rampado, Alessandro; Motta, Raffaella; Stramare, Roberto; Pegoraro, Elena

    2017-11-22

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a neuromuscular disorder allelic to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), caused by in-frame mutations in the dystrophin gene, and characterized by a clinical progression that is both milder and more heterogeneous than DMD. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed as biomarker of disease progression in dystrophinopathies. Correlation with clinically meaningful outcome measures such as North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) and 6 minute walk test (6MWT) is paramount for biomarker qualification. In this study, 51 molecularly confirmed BMD patients (aged 7-69 years) underwent muscle MRI and were evaluated with functional measures (NSAA and 6MWT) at the time of the MRI, and subsequently after one year. We confirmed a pattern of fatty substitution involving mainly the hip extensors and most thigh muscles. Severity of muscle fatty substitution was significantly correlated with specific DMD mutations: in particular, patients with an isolated deletion of exon 48, or deletions bordering exon 51, showed milder involvement. Fat infiltration scores correlated with baseline functional measures, and predicted changes after 1 year. We conclude that in BMD, skeletal muscle MRI not only strongly correlates with motor function, but also helps in predicting functional deterioration within a 12-month time frame.

  11. Measuring Accurate Body Parameters of Dressed Humans with Large-Scale Motion Using a Kinect Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidan Du

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-contact human body measurement plays an important role in surveillance, physical healthcare, on-line business and virtual fitting. Current methods for measuring the human body without physical contact usually cannot handle humans wearing clothes, which limits their applicability in public environments. In this paper, we propose an effective solution that can measure accurate parameters of the human body with large-scale motion from a Kinect sensor, assuming that the people are wearing clothes. Because motion can drive clothes attached to the human body loosely or tightly, we adopt a space-time analysis to mine the information across the posture variations. Using this information, we recover the human body, regardless of the effect of clothes, and measure the human body parameters accurately. Experimental results show that our system can perform more accurate parameter estimation on the human body than state-of-the-art methods.

  12. Objective versus subjective outcome measures of biofeedback: what really matters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Amanda; Rudick, Kristen; Richter, Meg; Zderic, Stephen

    2014-08-01

    Clinical epidemiologic studies suggest that once established, voiding dysfunction can become a lifelong condition if not treated correctly early on in life. Biofeedback is one component of a voiding retraining program to help children with voiding dysfunction. Our goal was to compare objective non-invasive urodynamic data obtained during office biofeedback sessions with patient reported voiding symptom scores. Charts of 55 children referred in 2010 for pelvic floor muscle biofeedback therapy for urinary incontinence were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with any anatomic diagnoses were excluded. Forty-seven (86%) females and eight males (14%) with a mean age of 8.2 years made up the cohort. Uroflow curves, voided volumes, and post-void residuals were recorded at each visit and served as objective data. Volumes were normalized as a percentage of expected bladder capacity according to age. The patient reported symptom score and patient reported outcome (improved, no change or worse) served as subjective measures of intervention. The primary referral diagnoses were day and night wetting in 37 (67%) and daytime incontinence in 18 (33%) children. A history of urinary tract infection (UTI) was noted in 32 (64%) patients, and 25% were maintained on antibiotic prophylaxis during the study period. Twenty-nine percent were maintained on anticholinergic medication. Patients attended an average of 2.5 biofeedback sessions. Voided volumes and post void residual volumes were unchanged, 50% of the abnormal uroflow curves normalized over the course of treatment (p biofeedback were rated an improved in 26 (47%), no change in 15 (27%), worse in three (5%) patients, and not rated in 11 patients (21%). Pelvic floor muscle biofeedback is associated with patient-reported improvement in symptoms, reduction in voiding symptom score, and normalization of uroflow curves, but these improvements are not correlated with objective parameters of voided volumes and post-void residual urine

  13. Measurements of Charmless Three-Body and Quasi-Two-Body B Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-08-28

    The authors present preliminary results of a search for several exclusive charmless hadronic B decays from electron-positron annihilation data collected by the BaBar detector near the Upsilon(4S) resonance. These include three-body decay modes with final states h{+-}h{sup minus-plus}h{+-} and h{+-}h{sup minus-plus}pi{sup 0}, and quasi-two-body decay modes with final states X{sup 0}h and X{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}, where h = pi or K and X{sup 0} = eta-prime or omega. They find beta(B{sup 0} --> rho{sup minus-plus}pi{sup {+-}}) = (49{+-}13{sub {minus}5}{sup +6}) x 10{sup {minus}6} and beta(B{sup +} --> eta-prime-K{sup +}) = (62{+-}18{+-}8) x 10{sup {minus}6} and present upper limits for right other decays.

  14. Validation of the Focus on the Outcomes of Communication under Six outcome measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Stonell, Nancy; Oddson, Bruce; Robertson, Bernadette; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to establish the construct validity of the Focus on the Outcomes of Communication Under Six (FOCUS©),a tool designed to measure changes in communication skills in preschool children. Method Participating families' children (n=97; 68 males, 29 females; mean age 2y 8mo; SD 1.04y, range 10mo–4y 11mo) were recruited through eight Canadian organizations. The children were on a waiting list for speech and language intervention. Parents completed the Ages and Stages Questionnaire – Social/Emotional (ASQ-SE) and the FOCUS three times: at assessment and at the start and end of treatment. A second sample (n=28; 16 males 12 females) was recruited from another organization to correlate the FOCUS scores with speech, intelligibility and language measures. Second sample participants ranged in age from 3 years 1 month to 4 years 9 months (mean 3y 11mo; SD 0.41y). At the start and end of treatment, children were videotaped to obtain speech and language samples. Parents and speech–language pathologists (SLPs) independently completed the FOCUS tool. SLPs who were blind to the pre/post order of the videotapes analysed the samples. Results The FOCUS measured significantly more change (p<0.01) during treatment than during the waiting list period. It demonstrated both convergent and discriminant validity against the ASQ-SE. The FOCUS change corresponded to change measured by a combination of clinical speech and language measures (κ=0.31, p<0.05). Conclusion The FOCUS shows strong construct validity as a change-detecting instrument. PMID:23461266

  15. Active Transportation to and on Campus is Associated With Objectively Measured Fitness Outcomes Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Melissa; Bopp, Christopher; Schuchert, Megan

    2015-03-01

    Active transportation (AT) has been associated with positive health outcomes, yet limited research has addressed this with college students, a population at-risk for inactivity. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between AT behavior and objectively measured fitness outcomes. A volunteer, convenience sample (n = 299) of college students from a large northeastern university completed a survey about their AT habits to and on campus and psychosocial constructs related to AT and participated in a laboratory-based fitness assessment (cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, body composition).Off-campus students were dichotomized as nonactive (0-1 AT trips/day) or active travelers (> 1 AT trips/day) to campus; t-tests compared nonactive and active travelers for psychosocial and fitness variables. Students were 56.3% male, 79.2% non-Hispanic White, and primarily living off-campus (87%). Most students (n = 177, 59.2%) reported active travel between classes. Off-campus students were primarily active travelers (76.1%). Active travelers to campus had greater cardiovascular fitness (P = .005), were more flexible (P = .006) and had lower systolic blood pressure (P = .05) compared with nonactive travelers. This study documents a relationship between AT behavior and objectively measured fitness among college students and provides a rationale for targeting this behavior as a method for improving health outcomes.

  16. Evaluating the use of gas discharge visualization to measure massage therapy outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jolie; Patel, Nitin; Schwartz, Gary; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term effects of massage therapy using gas discharge visualization (GDV), a computerized biophysical electrophoton capture (EPC), in tandem with traditional self-report measures to evaluate the use of GDV measurement to assess the bioenergetic whole-person effects of massage therapy. Methods This study used a single treatment group, pre–post-repeated measures design with a sample of 23 healthy adults. This study utilized a single 50-min full-body relaxation massage with participants. GDV measurement method, an EPC, and traditional paper-based measures evaluating pain, stress, muscle tension, and well-being were used to assess intervention outcomes. Results Significant differences were found between pre- and post-measures of well-being, pain, stress, muscle tension, and GDV parameters. Pearson correlations indicate the GDV measure is correlated with pain and stress, variables that impact the whole person. Conclusions This study demonstrates that GDV parameters may be used to indicate significant bioenergetic change from pre- to post-massage. Findings warrant further investigation with a larger diverse sample size and control group to further explore GDV as a measure of whole-person bioenergetic effects associated with massage. PMID:26087069

  17. Applications of quantum measurement in single and many body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steixner, V.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis contains a study about the influence of the back action of a signal emitted by a trapped ion onto itself. The continuous measurement signal is used to alter the motional state of the ion, corresponding to classical friction, in order to cool the ion. The quantum mechanical evolution of the ion with the help of stochastic Schroedinger- and master equations is explored, as well as experimental results. A second method of feedback to obtain the momentum necessary for cooling by means of electromagnetically induced transparency is discussed next. This method allows for a theoretical cooling down to the motional ground state. In a second part of the thesis, the measurement of particle currents in optical lattices is discussed. The usual method of measuring spatial correlations in a cold gas, the time-of-flight method, disadvantageously destroys the measured sample. Here a measurement scheme for atoms with an internal Lambda level structure, coupled with lasers as a Raman transition, is used instead. The measured photons are transformed with the help of homodyne detection into a continuous photon current proportional to the particle current. This thesis contains numerical and analytical calculations for this measurement process and the back action on the measured system. As an application example, the measurement of superfluid currents in a ring optical lattice is described, as well as the entanglement of two of these macroscopic quantum objects. (author) [de

  18. Indications, Outcomes, and Complications of Pedicled Propeller Perforator Flaps for Upper Body Defects: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lazzeri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this investigation was to systematically review the current literature to provide the best data for indications, outcomes, survival, and complication rates of pedicled propeller perforator flaps for upper body defects.MethodsA comprehensive literature review for articles published from January 1991 to December 2011 was performed using the PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane Databases. Articles without available full-text, single case reports or papers with excessive missing data were excluded. Papers reporting pedicle-perforator (propeller flaps used for lower extremity reconstruction were excluded from meta-analysis.ResultsFrom the initial 1,736 studies our search yielded, 343 studies qualified for the second stage of selection. Of 117 full-text reports screened, 41 studies, met the definitive inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of the selected 41 articles, 26 were case series, original papers or retrospective reviews and were included, whereas 15 were case report papers and therefore were excluded. Two hundred ninety-five propeller flaps were reported to have been used in a total of 283 patients. Indications include repair of trauma-induced injuries, post-trauma revision surgery, cancer resection, chronic infection, pressure sores, and chronic ulcers with a major complication rate (3.3% comparable to that of free flaps. No specific exclusion criteria for the procedure were presented in the studies reviewed.ConclusionsPedicled propeller flaps are a versatile and safe reconstructive option that are easy and quick to raise and that provide unlimited clinical solutions because of the theoretical possibility of harvesting them based on any perforator chosen among those classified in the body.

  19. Indications, Outcomes, and Complications of Pedicled Propeller Perforator Flaps for Upper Body Defects: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lazzeri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this investigation was to systematically review the current literatureto provide the best data for indications, outcomes, survival, and complication rates ofpedicled propeller perforator flaps for upper body defects.Methods A comprehensive literature review for articles published from January 1991 toDecember 2011 was performed using the PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane Databases. Articleswithout available full-text, single case reports or papers with excessive missing data wereexcluded. Papers reporting pedicle-perforator (propeller flaps used for lower extremityreconstruction were excluded from meta-analysis.Results From the initial 1,736 studies our search yielded, 343 studies qualified for the secondstage of selection. Of 117 full-text reports screened, 41 studies, met the definitive inclusionand exclusion criteria. Of the selected 41 articles, 26 were case series, original papers orretrospective reviews and were included, whereas 15 were case report papers and thereforewere excluded. Two hundred ninety-five propeller flaps were reported to have been used ina total of 283 patients. Indications include repair of trauma-induced injuries, post-traumarevision surgery, cancer resection, chronic infection, pressure sores, and chronic ulcers with amajor complication rate (3.3% comparable to that of free flaps. No specific exclusion criteriafor the procedure were presented in the studies reviewed.Conclusions Pedicled propeller flaps are a versatile and safe reconstructive option that areeasy and quick to raise and that provide unlimited clinical solutions because of the theoreticalpossibility of harvesting them based on any perforator chosen among those classified in the body.

  20. Body mass index and obstetric outcomes in pregnant in Saudi Arabia: a prospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Hammad, Sabry

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effect of body mass index in early pregnancy on pregnancy outcome since no study in Saudi Arabia has addressed this question.This prospective cohort study involved women registered for antenatal care during the first month of pregnancy at primary health care centers in Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia. Data was collected from records and by direct interview. The study included 787 women. Compared to normal weight women (n=307), overweight (n=187) and obese (n=226) women were at increased risk for pregnancy-induced hypertension (RR=4.9 [95% CI 1.6-11.1] and 6.1 [95% CI 2.1-17.8], respectively), gestational diabetes (RR=4.4 [95% CI 1.2-16.3] and 8.6 [95% CI 2.6-28.8]), preeclamptic toxemia (RR=3.8 [95% CI 1.1-14.6] and 5.9 [95% CI 1.7-20.4]), urinary tract infections (RR=1.4 [95% CI 0.5-3.9] and 3.7 [95% CI 1.7-6.2]), and cesarean delivery (RR=2.0 [95% CI 1.3-3.0] in obese women). Neonates born to obese women had an increased risk for postdate pregnancy (RR=3.7 [95% CI 1.2-11.6]), macrosomia (RR=6.8 [95% CI 1.5-30.7]), low 1-minute Apgar score (RR=1.9 [95% CI 1.1-3.6]), and admission to neonatal care units (RR=2.1 [95% CI 1.2-2.7]). On the other hand, low birth weight was less frequent among obese women (RR=0.5 [95% CI 0.3-0.9]) while the risk was high among underweight women (RR=2.3 [95% CI 1.4-3.8]). Even with adequate prenatal care, overweight and obesity can adversely affect pregnancy outcomes (Author).

  1. Measurement of Turbid Body Optical Properties Using Attenuation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of this work was to investigate the laser light interaction with highly diffusing tissue media like milk. In this work collimated transmission, fluence rate measurements and angular distribution of intensity measurements were made on three types of milks having different fat contents such as fresh cow milk ...

  2. Whole body [O-15]water pharmacokinetics measured in blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maguire, RP; Spyrou, NM; Leenders, KL

    A simple pharmacokinetic model to explain the time course of [0-15]water in human whole blood after bolus injection is described. The model has been derived from measurements in twelve healthy volunteers who were measured repeatedly, resulting in 67 datasets, made in the context of PET blood flow

  3. Measurements of the total-body potassium contents. Application of reference value with the whole-body counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo [Chiba Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Training Radiological Technicians; Saegusa, Kenji; Arimizu, Noboru; Kuniyasu, Yoshio; Itoh, Hisao

    2001-08-01

    The total-body potassium contents were measured in 405 healthy volunteers and 186 patients with whole body counter in Chiba University Hospital. The total-body potassium contents was expressed by the reference value (R value). The R value was calculated as measured potassium contents (g) divided by the body surface area (m{sup 2}) and adjusted by age and sex of healthy persons. The R value was 100.65{+-}9.22% in 405 healthy volunteers. Those of each disease were as follows: liver cirrhosis; 94.24{+-}11.22%, chronic hepatitis; 95.74{+-}11.24%, hyperthyroidism; 99.37{+-}10.8%, periodic paralysis; 82.0{+-}9.01%, Barter's syndrome; 93.99{+-}9.86%, myasthenia gravis; 97.34{+-}6.42% and hypo-potassemia; 90.64{+-}11.76%, respectively. The R values of other diseases such as uterine cancer, breast cancer, anemia, hypertension were 97.78{+-}11.5%, 99.22{+-}8.88%, 96.64{+-}12.73%, 98.5{+-}9.63% respectively. Fourteen patients showed especially lower R values under 75%. These were 1 liver cirrhosis, 3 hypertension, 1 diabetes mellitus, 3 hypo-potassemia, 1 periodic paralysis, 2 Barter's syndrome, 2 chemical poisoning, and 1 breast cancer. Follow-up study was performed in some patients with the lower R values. The result of follow-up study showed that there was a relationship between improvement of symptoms and increase of total body potassium contents. (author)

  4. Outcomes of bone density measurements in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Mark J; Grey, Andrew; Rowbotham, David S

    2016-01-29

    Some guidelines recommend that patients with newly diagnosed coeliac disease undergo bone density scanning. We assessed the bone density results in a cohort of patients with coeliac disease. We searched bone density reports over two 5-year periods in all patients from Auckland District Health Board (2008-12) and in patients under 65 years from Counties Manukau District Health Board (2009-13) for the term 'coeliac.' Reports for 137 adults listed coeliac disease as an indication for bone densitometry. The average age was 47 years, body mass index (BMI) 25 kg/m(2), and 77% were female. The median time between coeliac disease diagnosis and bone densitometry was 261 days. The average bone density Z-score was slightly lower than expected (Z-score -0.3 to 0.4) at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck, but 88-93% of Z-scores at each site lay within the normal range. Low bone density was strongly related to BMI: the proportions with Z-score 30 kg/m(2) were 28%, 15%, 6% and 0% respectively. Average bone density was normal, suggesting that bone density measurement is not indicated routinely in coeliac disease, but could be considered on a case-by-case basis for individuals with strong risk factors for fracture.

  5. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa; Rebueno, Neal C.; Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin A.; Amini, Behrang; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Li, Jing; Chang, Eric L.; Brown, Paul D.; Ghia, Amol J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  6. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rebueno, Neal C. [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xin A. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Amini, Behrang [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tannir, Nizar M. [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D. [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, USC Norris Cancer Hospital, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ghia, Amol J., E-mail: ajghia@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  7. Triceps skin fold thickness as a measure of body fat in Nigerian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2012-11-26

    Nov 26, 2012 ... and body fat distribution.2,3 Skin fold thickness measure- ments are a well ... different recognized areas for the measurement of SFT, ..... 'western children.' These .... Asia Pacific J Clin ... sity in children and young people:.

  8. Ecologically relevant outcome measure for post-inpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez de la Plata, Carlos; Qualls, Devin; Plenger, Patrick; Malec, James F; Hayden, Mary Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Transfer of skills learned within the clinic environment to patients' home or community is important in post-inpatient brain injury rehabilitation (PBIR). Outcome measures used in PBIR assess level of independence during functional tasks; however, available functional instruments do not quantitate the environment in which the behaviors occur. To examine the reliability and validity of an instrument used to assess patients' functional abilities while quantifying the amount of structure and distractions in the environment. 2501 patients who sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and participated in a multidisciplinary PBIR program between 2006 and 2014 were identified retrospectively for this study. The PERPOS and MPAI-4 were used to assess functional abilities at admission and at discharge. Construct validity was assessed using a bivariate Spearman rho analysis A subsample of 56 consecutive admissions during 2014 were examined to determine inter-rater reliability. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Kappa coefficients assessed inter-rater agreement of the total PERPOS and PERPOS subscales respectively. The PERPOS and MPAI-4 demonstrated a strong negative association among both TBI and CVA patients. Kappa scores for the three PERPOS scales each demonstrated good to excellent inter-rater agreement. The ICC for overall PERPOS scores fell in the good agreement range. The PERPOS can be used reliably in PBIR to quantify patients' functional abilities within the context of environmental demands.

  9. Clinical characteristics and outcome of pneumothorax after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kaori; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Matsuo, Yoshio; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Terashima, Kotaro; Shinoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Keiji; Hirata, Hidenari; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    We retrospectively investigated the clinical characteristics and outcome of pneumothorax after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Between April 2003 and July 2012, 473 patients with lung tumors were treated with SBRT. We identified 12 patients (2.5 %) with pneumothorax caused by SBRT, and evaluated the clinical features of pneumothorax. All of the tumors were primary lung cancers. The severity of radiation pneumonitis was grade 1 in 10 patients and grade 2 in two patients. Nine patients had emphysema. The planning target volume and pleura overlapped in 11 patients, and the tumors were attached to the pleura in 7 patients. Rib fractures were observed in three patients before or at the same time as the diagnosis of pneumothorax. The median time to onset of pneumothorax after SBRT was 18.5 months (4-84 months). The severity of pneumothorax was grade 1 in 11 patients and grade 3 in one patient. Although pneumothorax was a relatively rare late adverse effect after SBRT, some patients demonstrated pneumothorax after SBRT for peripheral lung tumors. Although most pneumothorax was generally tolerable and self-limiting, careful follow-up is needed.

  10. Development of the FOCUS (Focus on the Outcomes of Communication under Six), a Communication Outcome Measure for Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Stonell, Nancy L.; Oddson, Bruce; Robertson, Bernadette; Rosenbaum, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Our aim was to develop an outcome measure, called Focus on the Outcomes of Communication Under Six (FOCUS), that captures real-world changes in preschool children's communication. Conceptually grounded in the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework, the FOCUS items were derived…

  11. Outcome measures used in clinical studies on neonatal brachial plexus palsy: A systematic literature review using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarac, Cigdem; Duijnisveld, Bouke J; van der Weide, Amber; Schoones, Jan W; Malessy, Martijn J A; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Vlieland, Thea P M Vliet

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of a neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) can vary widely among individuals and numerous clinical studies have been performed to identify the natural history and to improve treatment. The aim of this study was to identify and describe all outcome measures used in clinical studies on patients with an NBPP and categorize these outcome measures according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Electronic searches of different databases were carried out. All clinical studies describing one or more outcomes of NBPP were selected. Data on outcome measures was systematically extracted and the contents were analyzed and linked to the ICF. A total of 217 full texts were selected and 59 different outcome measures were identified. The 5 most frequently used outcome measures included range of motion of the shoulder (n= 166 studies, 76%), range of motion of the elbow (n= 87 studies, 40%), the Mallet scale (n= 66 studies, 30%), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (n= 37 studies, 17%) and the Medical Research Council motor grading scale (n= 31 studies, 14%). Assessments related to Body functions and Structures were most frequent, whereas assessments associated with Activities and Participation and Environmental Factors were relatively uncommon. There was a high variability among the outcome measures used, with measures within the ICF component Body Functions being most common. These results underscore the need for the development and usage of outcome measures representing all domains of health status in patients with NBPP.

  12. In vivo measurement of total body carbon using 238Pu/Be neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutcliffe, J.F.; Mitra, S.; Hill, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    Total body carbon has been measured by in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) in 278 surgical gastroenterological patients and 29 normal volunteers. This is based on the inelastic scattering reaction { 12 C(n,n') 12 C*} for neutrons with energy above 4.8MeV, producing 4.43 MeV gamma rays. Since only part of the body is scanned, total body carbon is estimated as the ratio of the gamma ray emission from carbon to the emission from hydrogen, using hydrogen as the internal standard. The precision of the estimate is ±1.6kg for a whole body dose of 0.3mSv. There is a significant difference between the estimates of total body water from IVNAA measurements of carbon and nitrogen and measurements of body water in these subjects by tritium dilution (t=3.1, p < 0.005). (author)

  13. Measured versus self-reported body height and body mass in patients after an acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domagała Zygmunt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic anthropometric data describing a person in the broadest context are body weight and height, two of the most frequently analyzed somatometric parameters. The same is true I in relation to clinical patients. The aim of the present study was to compare the self-reported and actual body weight, height and BMI in patients suffering from coronary artery disease and undergoing cardiac rehabilitation. The study sample consisted of 100 patients treated for coronary artery disease. The patients were asked to state their body weight and height. At the same time a three-person study team took measurements, which were later the basis for verification and objective assessment of the data provided by the patients. Statistical analysis was performed with Statistics 11.0 PL software. The analysis of mean results for the assessed group of patients has shown the presence of statistically significant differences between declared and actual data. The differences were observed for both male and female study population. It has been proven that the subjects declare greater body height (mean value 1.697 m vs. 1.666 m and lower body weight (80.643 kg vs. 82.051 kg. Based on the data from surveys and direct measurements, the body mass index for the self-reported and actual data was calculated. A comparison of these values has shown considerable statistically significant differences. The differences between declared and actual data point to highly subjective self-assessment, which disqualifies the declared data in the context of monitoring of treatment and rehabilitation processes. The authors believe that actual data should be used in direct trial examination of patients suffering from coronary artery disease who presented with acute coronary syndrome.

  14. Measurement of total-body oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon in vivo by photon activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulin, K.

    1984-01-01

    With the aim of assessing nutritional status, the feasibility of measuring the total body quantities of the major body elements, i.e. oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon, using the photon beam of a 45 MV betatron and a whole-body counter, has been evaluated in detail. Following photon activation a single energy γ-radiation (.511 MeV) is observed from all three elements to be measured. The half-lives of 15 O, 13 N, and 11 C, however, are sufficiently different (20.5 min, 10.0 min, and 20.4 min. respectively) to permit their measurement from an analysis of the measured decay curve. Following corrections for interfering reactions, a computer curve-fitting algorithm is used to resolve the data into 15 O, 13 N, and 11 C components. Measurements of O, N, and C have been made both in phantoms and in live and dead rats. A comparison of the body composition results from this technique with results from chemical analysis indicates that measured carbon can quite accurately predict total body fat. The comparison of the total body nitrogen measurement by photon activation with total body protein by chemical analysis was inconclusive and suggests that further work be done to verify the estimated accuracy of the nitrogen measurement

  15. Measuring Networking as an Outcome Variable in Undergraduate Research Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I; Hatfull, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose, present, and validate a simple survey instrument to measure student conversational networking. The tool consists of five items that cover personal and professional social networks, and its basic principle is the self-reporting of degrees of conversation, with a range of specific discussion partners. The networking instrument was validated in three studies. The basic psychometric characteristics of the scales were established by conducting a factor analysis and evaluating internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha. The second study used a known-groups comparison and involved comparing outcomes for networking scales between two different undergraduate laboratory courses (one involving a specific effort to enhance networking). The final study looked at potential relationships between specific networking items and the established psychosocial variable of project ownership through a series of binary logistic regressions. Overall, the data from the three studies indicate that the networking scales have high internal consistency (α = 0.88), consist of a unitary dimension, can significantly differentiate between research experiences with low and high networking designs, and are related to project ownership scales. The ramifications of the networking instrument for student retention, the enhancement of public scientific literacy, and the differentiation of laboratory courses are discussed. © 2015 D. I. Hanauer and G. Hatfull. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. Towards global consensus on outcome measures for atopic eczema research: results of the HOME II meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, Jochen; Spuls, Phyllis; Boers, Maarten; Thomas, Kim; Chalmers, Joanne; Roekevisch, Evelien; Schram, Mandy; Allsopp, Richard; Aoki, Valeria; Apfelbacher, Christian; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Charman, Carolyn; Cohen, Arnon; Dohil, Magdalene; Flohr, Carsten; Furue, Masutaka; Gieler, Uwe; Hooft, Lotty; Humphreys, Rosemary; Ishii, Henrique Akira; Katayama, Ichiro; Kouwenhoven, Willem; Langan, Sinéad; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Merhand, Stephanie; Murota, Hiroyuki; Murrell, Dedee F.; Nankervis, Helen; Ohya, Yukihiro; Oranje, Arnold; Otsuka, Hiromi; Paul, Carle; Rosenbluth, Yael; Saeki, Hidehisa; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise; Stalder, Jean-Francois; Svensson, Ake; Takaoka, Roberto; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Weidinger, Stephan; Wollenberg, Andreas; Williams, Hywel

    2012-01-01

    The use of nonstandardized and inadequately validated outcome measures in atopic eczema trials is a major obstacle to practising evidence-based dermatology. The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative is an international multiprofessional group dedicated to atopic eczema outcomes

  17. Towards global consensus on outcome measures for atopic eczema research : Results of the HOME II meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, Jochen; Spuls, Phyllis; Boers, Maarten; Thomas, Kim; Chalmers, Joanne; Roekevisch, Evelien; Schram, Mandy; Allsopp, Richard; Aoki, Valeria; Apfelbacher, Christian; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Charman, Carolyn; Cohen, Arnon; Dohil, Magdalene; Flohr, Carsten; Furue, Masutaka; Gieler, Uwe; Hooft, Lotty; Humphreys, Rosemary; Ishii, Henrique Akira; Katayama, Ichiro; Kouwenhoven, Willem; Langan, Sinéad; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Merhand, Stephanie; Murota, Hiroyuki; Murrell, Dedee F; Nankervis, Helen; Ohya, Yukihiro; Oranje, Arnold; Otsuka, Hiromi; Paul, Carle; Rosenbluth, Yael; Saeki, Hidehisa; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise; Stalder, Jean-Francois; Svensson, Ake; Takaoka, Roberto; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Weidinger, Stephan; Wollenberg, Andreas; Williams, Hywel

    The use of nonstandardized and inadequately validated outcome measures in atopic eczema trials is a major obstacle to practising evidence-based dermatology. The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative is an international multiprofessional group dedicated to atopic eczema outcomes

  18. Using Cross-Cultural Dimensions Exercises to Improve and Measure Learning Outcomes in International Business Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuba, Mohamed; Rahal, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes an approach for using cross-cultural dimensions exercises to improve and measure learning outcomes in international business courses. The following key issues are highlighted: (a) what are the targeted learning outcomes to be assessed, (b) how to measure the accomplishment of these learning outcomes, (c) the input measures…

  19. Ultrasound as an Outcome Measure in Gout. A Validation Process by the OMERACT Ultrasound Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terslev, Lene; Gutierrez, Marwin; Schmidt, Wolfgang A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the work performed by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound (US) Working Group on the validation of US as a potential outcome measure in gout. METHODS: Based on the lack of definitions, highlighted in a recent literature review on US as an outcome tool...

  20. Reduction in food away from home is associated with improved child relative weight and body composition outcomes and this relation is mediated by changes in diet quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Myra; Cahill Holland, Jodi; Lundeen, Delaney; Kolko, Rachel P; Stein, Richard I; Saelens, Brian E; Welch, R Robinson; Perri, Michael G; Schechtman, Kenneth B; Epstein, Leonard H; Wilfley, Denise E

    2015-09-01

    Reducing consumption of food away from home is often targeted during pediatric obesity treatment, given the associations with weight status and gain. However, the effects of this dietary change on weight loss are unknown. Our aim was to evaluate associations between changes in dietary factors and child anthropometric outcomes after treatment. It is hypothesized that reduced consumption of food away from home will be associated with improved dietary intake and greater reductions in anthropometric outcomes (standardized body mass index [BMI] and percent body fat), and the relationship between food away from home and anthropometric outcomes will be mediated by improved child dietary intake. We conducted a longitudinal evaluation of associations between dietary changes and child anthropometric outcomes. Child diet (three 24-hour recalls) and anthropometric data were collected at baseline and 16 weeks. Participants were 170 overweight and obese children ages 7 to 11 years who completed a 16-week family-based behavioral weight-loss treatment as part of a larger multi-site randomized controlled trial conducted in two cohorts between 2010 and 2011 (clinical research trial). Dietary treatment targets during family-based behavioral weight-loss treatment included improving diet quality and reducing food away from home. The main outcome measures in this study were child relative weight (standardized BMI) and body composition (percent body fat). We performed t tests and bootstrapped single-mediation analyses adjusting for relevant covariates. As hypothesized, decreased food away from home was associated with improved diet quality and greater reductions in standardized BMI (Paway from home and anthropometric outcomes were mediated by changes in diet quality. Specifically, change in total energy intake and added sugars mediated the association between change in food away from home and standardized BMI, and change in overall diet quality, fiber, added sugars, and added fats

  1. Associations between body mass and the outcome of surgery for scoliosis in Chinese adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqiang Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this study we intended to prove that being overweight has an unfavorable impact on the surgical treatment outcome of adult idiopathic scoliosis (AdIS. METHODS: This is a retrospective study on the surgical treatment of seventy-one more than 30 years old (58 females and 13 males; mean age 42.9±12.2 idiopathic scoliotic patients with a minimum follow up of at least 2 years. The patients were divided into an overweight group (BMI≥23 and a non-overweight group (BMI<23. Preoperative, postoperative first erect and final follow-up radiographic measures, perioperative data, the Oswestry disability index (ODI, and the visual analog scale (VAS were reviewed and compared. FINDINGS: In the overweight group, no significant differences in radiographic measures, perioperative data, preoperative comorbidities, or postoperative complications, except for the more frequent concomitance of preoperative thoracic kyphosis 37.9±7.7 vs. 26.5±11.8 (P = 0.000 and thoracolumbar kyphosis 14.9±10.1 overweighted group vs. 6.5±9.9 non-overweighted group respectively (P = 0.002 were found. A higher morbidity of hypertension 36.8% vs. 9.6% (P = 0.004 was also observed in the overweight group. Postoperative ODI and VAS improved significantly in both groups compared to pre-operative values. The postoperative ODI of the overweight group (19.6±12.4 was significantly higher than that of the non-overweight group (12.4±7.9 (P = 0.022. CONCLUSIONS: Overweight adult idiopathic scoliotic patients had more frequent concomitance of preoperative thoracic kyphosis and thoracolumbar kyphosis and more serious postoperative pain. However, BMI did not affect the outcomes of surgical correction for coronal and sagittal scoliotic deformity and their postoperative complication rates were not significantly affected.

  2. Size does matter-donor-to-recipient body mass index difference may affect renal graft outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-H; Lin, K-J; Liu, K-L; Chu, S-H; Hsieh, C-Y; Chiang, Y-J

    2012-01-01

    Obesity, in the either kidney donor or the recipient, has been related to worse graft function. The aim of this study was to compare long-term graft outcomes of living-related kidney recipients regarding the donor-to-recipient body mass index (BMI) ratio. From November 2002 to November 2010, 62 consecutive living-related kidney transplantations were performed at our center. Donor and recipient BMIs were categorized by Taiwan's national standard using dividing values of 18.5, 24, and 27 kg/m(2) to divide subjects into donor-to-recipient BMI categories. These with the same BMI category as their donors were defined as the same-BMI group (group 0); recipients with a lower BMI category than their donors were defined as the large-to-small group (group 1); and those with a higher BMI category than their donors were defined as the small-to-large group (group 2). Baseline parameters and posttransplantation follow-up data were analyzed according to this grouping. Of the 57 recipients followed regularly at our hospital (mean follow-up 48.9 months), 21 (36.8.1%) were in group 0; 26 (45.6%) in group 1, and 10 (17.6%) in group 2. The baseline parameters were similar among these groups. The overall graft survival rates were 81.0% in group 0, 76.9% in group 1, and 90.0% in group 2. The rejection-free graft survival rates were 81.0%, 65.4%, and 90.0%, respectively. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, group 1 showed worse rejection-free graft survival than group 0 or group 2 (log-rank P = .046). Living-related recipients of kidneys from donors with a higher BMI showed lower long-term graft survival, which might suggest that petite recipients may need time to compensate adequate blood flow for the relative large graft, thus carrying a higher chance of rejection and worse graft outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional outcome transforaminal lumbar inter body fusion: an experience at a tertiary care centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talha, M.; Qureshi, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess functional outcome of transforaminal lumbar inter body fusion (TLIF) with specific reference to improvement in pain by visual analogue score (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Department of Spine Surgery of a tertiary care hospital in Rawalpindi from May 2004 to May 2013. Material and Methods: Thirty nine patients who underwent TLIF and completed one year of follow up in our department during the study period were included in the study. Cases were evaluated clinically and radiologically preoperatively and assessed for pain with VAS and general well being with ODI. After TLIF they were reassessed at 1, 3, 6 months and 1 year for improvement in VAS and ODI. Patient satisfaction and work status after surgery was also recorded at 1 year of follow up. Results: Out of 39 cases 19(48.7 percent) were operated for degenerated disc disease (DDD), 11(28.2 percent) for spinal stenosis and 7(17.9 percent) for spondylolisthesis and 2(5.2 percent) for trauma. A total of 28(71.79 percent) were males and 11(28.21 percent) were females. Common levels operated were 12 (30.8 percent) at L4-5, 11 (28.2 percent) at L5-S1, and 12(30.8 percent) at L4,5-S1, 2(5.1 percent) at L2-4 and 1(2.6 percent) each at L3-4 and L3-5. At 1 year of follow up median VAS score improved significantly from 7 to 2 and median ODI improved significantly from 76 to 34. Regarding patient satisfaction 26 (66.7 percent) patients were satisfied, 9 (23.1 percent) were partially satisfied and 4 (10.2 percent) were not satisfied with the surgical outcome. Conclusion: TLIF is a safe and effective procedure for reducing chronic low back pain as a result of DDD, instability and spondylolisthesis. (author)

  4. Quality of life measurement and outcome in aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaccavento S

    2013-12-01

    : The QLQA is a valid measure of QL in PWA, contributing to a better distinction between severe and mild aphasia, and it is sensitive also to the variations in QL depending on the time interval from stroke. Keywords: aphasia, quality of life, outcome, rehabilitation

  5. Impact of Maternal Body Mass Index on Intrapartum and Neonatal Outcomes in Brisbane, Australia, 2007 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Xin Y; Greer, Ristan M; Kumar, Sailesh

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of maternal body mass index on intrapartum and neonatal outcomes at one of the largest maternity hospitals in Australia. A retrospective cross-sectional study of 55,352 term singleton deliveries at the Mater Mothers' Hospital in Brisbane, Australia, was conducted. The study cohort was stratified into six groups based on the World Health Organization's body mass index classification. The normal body mass index category was the reference group for all comparisons. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the effect of maternal body mass index, adjusted for maternal age, ethnicity, parity, and preexisting conditions (e.g., diabetes mellitus and hypertension), on selected intrapartum and neonatal outcomes. Women in the overweight and Obese I, II, and III categories were more likely to have chronic or gestational hypertension/preeclampsia, and preexisting or gestational diabetes mellitus. They also had an increased risk for induction of labor, elective and emergency cesarean, and postpartum hemorrhage. Underweight women were less likely to require induction of labor and emergency cesarean. Infants born to women with increased body mass index were more likely to require neonatal resuscitation, neonatal intensive care unit admission, and have lower Apgar scores at 5 minutes. There is an increased risk of adverse intrapartum and neonatal outcomes for women who are overweight and obese, with the risks increasing with rising body mass index. Appropriately targeted weight management strategies and health education may yield improved maternal and perinatal outcomes if effectively implemented before pregnancy. These may particularly be of benefit in the teenage cohort that has yet to embark on pregnancy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Body mass index and outcome after revascularization for symptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greving, Jacoba P.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Algra, Ale; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Becquemin, Jean-Pierre; Bonati, Leo H.; Brott, Thomas G.; Bulbulia, Richard; Calvet, David; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gregson, John; Halliday, Alison; Howard, George; Jansen, Olav; Roubin, Gary S.; Brown, Martin M.; Mas, Jean-Louis; Ringleb, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the obesity paradox exists in patients who undergo carotid artery stenting (CAS) or carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Methods: We combined individual patient data from 2 randomized trials (Endarterectomy vs Angioplasty in Patients with Symptomatic Severe Carotid Stenosis and Stent-Protected Angioplasty vs Carotid Endarterectomy) and 3 centers in a third trial (International Carotid Stenting Study). Baseline body mass index (BMI) was available for 1,969 patients and classified into 4 groups: 120 days after randomization). This outcome was compared between different BMI strata in CAS and CEA patients separately, and in the total group. We performed intention-to-treat multivariable Cox regression analyses. Results: Median follow-up was 2.0 years. Stroke or death occurred in 159 patients in the periprocedural (cumulative risk 8.1%) and in 270 patients in the postprocedural period (rate 4.8/100 person-years). BMI did not affect periprocedural risk of stroke or death for patients assigned to CAS (ptrend = 0.39) or CEA (ptrend = 0.77) or for the total group (ptrend = 0.48). Within the total group, patients with BMI 25–<30 had lower postprocedural risk of stroke or death than patients with BMI 20–<25 (BMI 25–<30 vs BMI 20–<25; hazard ratio 0.72; 95% confidence interval 0.55–0.94). Conclusions: BMI is not associated with periprocedural risk of stroke or death; however, BMI 25–<30 is associated with lower postprocedural risk than BMI 20–<25. These observations were similar for CAS and CEA. PMID:28446644

  7. Anthropometric body measurements based on multi-view stereo image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoxin; Jia, Wenyan; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Li, Jie; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Zuo, Wangmeng; Wang, Kuanquan; Sun, Mingui

    2013-01-01

    Anthropometric measurements, such as the circumferences of the hip, arm, leg and waist, waist-to-hip ratio, and body mass index, are of high significance in obesity and fitness evaluation. In this paper, we present a home based imaging system capable of conducting anthropometric measurements. Body images are acquired at different angles using a home camera and a simple rotating disk. Advanced image processing algorithms are utilized for 3D body surface reconstruction. A coarse body shape model is first established from segmented body silhouettes. Then, this model is refined through an inter-image consistency maximization process based on an energy function. Our experimental results using both a mannequin surrogate and a real human body validate the feasibility of the proposed system.

  8. Measuring cues for stand-off deception detection based on full-body nonverbal features in body-worn cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Henri; Burghouts, Gertjan; den Hollander, Richard; van der Zee, Sophie; Baan, Jan; ten Hove, Johan-Martijn; van Diepen, Sjaak; van den Haak, Paul; van Rest, Jeroen

    2016-10-01

    Deception detection is valuable in the security domain to distinguish truth from lies. It is desirable in many security applications, such as suspect and witness interviews and airport passenger screening. Interviewers are constantly trying to assess the credibility of a statement, usually based on intuition without objective technical support. However, psychological research has shown that humans can hardly perform better than random guessing. Deception detection is a multi-disciplinary research area with an interest from different fields, such as psychology and computer science. In the last decade, several developments have helped to improve the accuracy of lie detection (e.g., with a concealed information test, increasing the cognitive load, or measurements with motion capture suits) and relevant cues have been discovered (e.g., eye blinking or fiddling with the fingers). With an increasing presence of mobile phones and bodycams in society, a mobile, stand-off, automatic deception detection methodology based on various cues from the whole body would create new application opportunities. In this paper, we study the feasibility of measuring these visual cues automatically on different parts of the body, laying the groundwork for stand-off deception detection in more flexible and mobile deployable sensors, such as body-worn cameras. We give an extensive overview of recent developments in two communities: in the behavioral-science community the developments that improve deception detection with a special attention to the observed relevant non-verbal cues, and in the computer-vision community the recent methods that are able to measure these cues. The cues are extracted from several body parts: the eyes, the mouth, the head and the fullbody pose. We performed an experiment using several state-of-the-art video-content-analysis (VCA) techniques to assess the quality of robustly measuring these visual cues.

  9. Evaluating complementary and alternative medicine interventions: in search of appropriate patient-centered outcome measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory Devon

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central to the development of a sound evidence base for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM interventions is the need for valid, reliable and relevant outcome measures to assess whether the interventions work. We assessed the specific needs for a database that would cover a wide range of outcomes measures for CAM research and considered a framework for such a database. Methods The study was a survey of CAM researchers, practitioners and students. An online questionnaire was emailed to the members of the Canadian Interdisciplinary Network for CAM Research (IN-CAM and the CAM Education and Research Network of Alberta (CAMera. The majority of survey questions were open-ended and asked about outcome measures currently used, outcome measures' assessment criteria, sources of information, perceived barriers to finding outcome measures and outcome domains of importance. Descriptive quantitative analysis and qualitative content analysis were used. Results One hundred and sixty-four completed surveys were received. Of these, 62 respondents reported using outcome measures in their CAM research and identified 92 different specific outcomes. The most important barriers were the fact that, for many health concepts, outcome measures do not yet exist, as well as issues related to accessibility of instruments. Important outcome domains identified included physical, psychological, social, spiritual, quality of life and holistic measures. Participants also mentioned the importance of individualized measures that assess unique patient-centered outcomes for each research participant, and measures to assess the context of healing and the process of healing. Conclusion We have developed a preliminary framework that includes all components of health-related outcomes. The framework provides a foundation for a larger, comprehensive collection of CAM outcomes. It fits very well in a whole systems perspective, which requires an expanded set of

  10. Are current psychometric tools suitable for measuring outcomes of diabetes education?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigenmann, C. A.; Colagiuri, R.; Skinner, T. C.

    2009-01-01

    Aims To critically appraise the suitability, validity, reliability, feasibility and sensitivity to change of available psychometric tools for measuring the education outcomes identified in the (Australian) National Consensus on Outcomes and Indicators for Diabetes Patient Education. Methods Poten...

  11. The Association Between Body Adiposity Measures, Postural Balance, Fear of Falling, and Fall Risk in Older Community-Dwelling Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Silvia Gonçalves Ricci; Gadelha, André Bonadias; de David, Ana Cristina; Ferreira, Aparecido Pimentel; Safons, Marisete Peralta; Tiedemann, Anne; Lima, Ricardo M

    2017-12-07

    Recent investigations demonstrate an association between obesity and the propensity of older adults to fall. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between body adiposity measures, postural balance, fear of falling, and risk of falls in older women. One hundred forty-seven volunteers took part in this cross-sectional study. Participants underwent body composition assessment using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and had body mass index, waist circumference (WC), and body adiposity index measured. Postural balance was assessed using a force platform, while fear of falling and risk of falls were, respectively, evaluated by the Falls Efficacy Scale-International and the QuickScreen Clinical Falls Risk Assessment. All adiposity measures were correlated to at least 1 postural stability parameter and to fear of falling (ρ= 0.163, P risk of falls (ρ= 0.325; P falling (28.04 vs 24.59; P = .002) and had a higher proportion of individuals with increased fall risk (72% vs 35%; P risk of falls in older women, which might be mediated by reduced postural balance and increased fear of falling. Among these indices, WC, an easy and low-cost assessment, demonstrated the strongest association with falls-related outcomes.

  12. State-of-the-art measurements in human body composition: A moving frontier of clinical importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D.; Shaheen, I.; Zafar, K.

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of human body composition allows for the estimation of body tissues, organs, and their distributions in living persons without inflicting harm. From a nutritional perspective, the interest in body composition has increased multi-fold with the global increase in the prevalence of obesity and its complications. The latter has driven in part the need for improved measurement methods with greater sensitivity and precision. There is no single gold standard for body-composition measurements in-vivo. All methods incorporate assumptions that do not apply in all individuals and the more accurate models are derived by using a combination of measurements, thereby reducing the importance of each assumption. This review will discuss why the measurement of body composition or human phenotyping is important; discuss new areas where the measurement of body composition (human phenotyping) is recognized as having important application; and will summarize recent advances made in new methodology. Reference will also be made to areas we cannot yet measure due to the lack of appropriate measurement methodologies, most especially measurements methods that provide information on kinetic states (not just static state) and metabolic function. PMID:21234275

  13. Measurements of the total-body potassium contents. Application of reference value with the whole-body counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Saegusa, Kenji; Arimizu, Noboru; Kuniyasu, Yoshio; Itoh, Hisao

    2001-01-01

    The total-body potassium contents were measured in 405 healthy volunteers and 186 patients with whole body counter in Chiba University Hospital. The total-body potassium contents was expressed by the reference value (R value). The R value was calculated as measured potassium contents (g) divided by the body surface area (m 2 ) and adjusted by age and sex of healthy persons. The R value was 100.65±9.22% in 405 healthy volunteers. Those of each disease were as follows: liver cirrhosis; 94.24±11.22%, chronic hepatitis; 95.74±11.24%, hyperthyroidism; 99.37±10.8%, periodic paralysis; 82.0±9.01%, Barter's syndrome; 93.99±9.86%, myasthenia gravis; 97.34±6.42% and hypo-potassemia; 90.64±11.76%, respectively. The R values of other diseases such as uterine cancer, breast cancer, anemia, hypertension were 97.78±11.5%, 99.22±8.88%, 96.64±12.73%, 98.5±9.63% respectively. Fourteen patients showed especially lower R values under 75%. These were 1 liver cirrhosis, 3 hypertension, 1 diabetes mellitus, 3 hypo-potassemia, 1 periodic paralysis, 2 Barter's syndrome, 2 chemical poisoning, and 1 breast cancer. Follow-up study was performed in some patients with the lower R values. The result of follow-up study showed that there was a relationship between improvement of symptoms and increase of total body potassium contents. (author)

  14. Outcomes important to burns patients during scar management and how they compare to the concepts captured in burn-specific patient reported outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Laura L; Calvert, Melanie; Moiemen, Naiem; Deeks, Jonathan J; Bishop, Jonathan; Kinghorn, Philip; Mathers, Jonathan

    2017-12-01

    Pressure garment therapy (PGT) is an established treatment for the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scarring; however, there is limited evidence for its effectiveness. Burn survivors often experience multiple issues many of which are not adequately captured in current PGT trial measures. To assess the effectiveness of PGT it is important to understand what outcomes matter to patients and to consider whether patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) can be used to ascertain the effect of treatments on patients' health-related quality of life. This study aimed to (a) understand the priorities and perspectives of adult burns patients and the parents of burns patients who have experienced PGT via in-depth qualitative data, and (b) compare these with the concepts captured within burn-specific PROMs. We undertook 40 semi-structured interviews with adults and parents of paediatric and adolescent burns patients who had experienced PGT to explore their priorities and perspectives on scar management. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. The outcomes interpreted within the interview data were then mapped against the concepts captured within burn-specific PROMs currently in the literature. Eight core outcome domains were identified as important to adult patients and parents: (1) scar characteristics and appearance, (2) movement and function, (3) scar sensation, (4) psychological distress, adjustments and a sense of normality, (5) body image and confidence, (6) engagement in activities, (7) impact on relationships, and (8) treatment burden. The outcome domains presented reflect a complex holistic patient experience of scar management and treatments such as PGT. Some currently available PROMs do capture the concepts described here, although none assess psychological adjustments and attainment of a sense of normality following burn injury. The routine use of PROMs that represent patient experience and their relative contribution to trial

  15. Measure for measure. Outcome assessment of arthritis treatment in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Gülfe, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate (i) the performance and agreement between various activity indices and response criteria in TNF-blockade of RA; (ii) the predictive ability of different response criteria and disease activity states regarding continuation of anti-TNF treatment of RA; (iii) Euro-QoL-5-dimensions utility development during TNF blockade of RA, PsA and SpA. Also, (iv) to develop a simple, utility-based outcome measure, the number needed to treat per quality adjusted life year gained (NN...

  16. Comparing contents of outcome measures in cerebral palsy using the International Classification of Functioning (ICF-CY): a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiariti, Veronica; Klassen, Anne F; Cieza, Alarcos; Sauve, Karen; O'Donnell, Maureen; Armstrong, Robert; Mâsse, Louise C

    2014-01-01

    The International Classification of Functioning children and youth version (ICF-CY) provides a universal framework for defining and classifying functioning and disability in children worldwide. To facilitate the application of the ICF in practice, ICF based-tools like the "ICF Core Sets" are being developed. In the context of the development of the ICF-CY Core Sets for children with Cerebral Palsy (CP), the aims of this study were as follows: to identify and compare the content of outcome measures used in studies of children with CP using the ICF-CY coding system; and to describe the most frequently addressed areas of functioning in those studies. We searched multiple databases likely to capture studies involving children with CP from January 1998 to March 2012. We included all English language articles that studied children aged 2-18 years and described an interventional or observational study. Constructs of the outcome measures identified in studies were linked to the ICF-CY by two trained professionals. We found 231 articles that described 238 outcome measures. The outcome measures contained 2193 concepts that were linked to the ICF-CY and covered 161 independent ICF-CY categories. Out of the 161 categories, 53 (33.5%) were related to body functions, 75 (46%) were related to activities/participation, 26 (16.1%) were related to environmental factors, and 7 (4.3%) were related to body structures. This systematic review provides information about content of measures that may guide researchers and clinicians in their selection of an outcome measure for use in a study and/or clinical practice with children with CP. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Monte Carlo study of thermal flux profiles and body correction factors for body protein measurements of obese subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, B.J.; Allen, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    In previous calculations for total body nitrogen measurements of children, the anterior/posterior thermal neutron flux profile with depth was found to be fairly flat after an initial rise. However, for obese adults significant variations are found in the flux profile with the central flux value being as low as 20% of the peak value. The significance of these flux variations is examined. Correction factors are calculated for the varying attenuation of the nitrogen and hydrogen photons by a range of obese bodies. The calculations included the effect of the thermal flux profile as well as that of an outer layer of low nitrogen content adipose tissue. The bodies are assumed to have a homogeneous hydrogen content. A study of four obese body models with varying sex and fat content shows that the correction factors do not vary much between males and females. This is surprising since the female models are assumed to have a surface fat layer twice as thick as for the male models. The correction factors are found to be only slightly sensitive to the thermal flux variations with depth. 5 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  18. Triceps skin fold thickness as a measure of body fat in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Skin fold thickness (SFT) at selected areas offers a simple method of subcutaneous fat assessment and provides a good estimate of obesity and body fat distribution. The triceps SFT has been shown to be one of the best and most popular sites for SFT measurement in children. Objective: To assess the body fat ...

  19. Weights and linear measurements of the body and some organs of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The absolute weights of the body, heart, kidneys, spleen, pancreas, liver, gonads, digestive tract and adrenal glands, as well as the absolute linear measurements of the body, digestive tract and oviduct were determined in adult female and male African white-bellied tree pangolins. The relative weights, relative lengths and ...

  20. Body conscious? Interoceptive awareness, measured by heartbeat perception, is negatively correlated with self-objectification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainley, Vivien; Tsakiris, Manos

    2013-01-01

    'Self-objectification' is the tendency to experience one's body principally as an object, to be evaluated for its appearance rather than for its effectiveness. Within objectification theory, it has been proposed that self-objectification accounts for the poorer interoceptive awareness observed in women, as measured by heartbeat perception. Our study is, we believe, the first specifically to test this relationship. Using a well-validated and reliable heartbeat perception task, we measured interoceptive awareness in women and compared this with their scores on the Self-Objectification Questionnaire, the Self-Consciousness Scale and the Body Consciousness Questionnaire. Interoceptive awareness was negatively correlated with self-objectification. Interoceptive awareness, public body consciousness and private body consciousness together explained 31% of the variance in self-objectification. However, private body consciousness was not significantly correlated with interoceptive awareness, which may explain the many nonsignificant results in self-objectification studies that have used private body consciousness as a measure of body awareness. We propose interoceptive awareness, assessed by heartbeat perception, as a measure of body awareness in self-objectification studies. Our findings have implications for those clinical conditions, in women, which are characterised by self-objectification and low interoceptive awareness, such as eating disorders.

  1. Body conscious? Interoceptive awareness, measured by heartbeat perception, is negatively correlated with self-objectification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Ainley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 'Self-objectification' is the tendency to experience one's body principally as an object, to be evaluated for its appearance rather than for its effectiveness. Within objectification theory, it has been proposed that self-objectification accounts for the poorer interoceptive awareness observed in women, as measured by heartbeat perception. Our study is, we believe, the first specifically to test this relationship. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a well-validated and reliable heartbeat perception task, we measured interoceptive awareness in women and compared this with their scores on the Self-Objectification Questionnaire, the Self-Consciousness Scale and the Body Consciousness Questionnaire. Interoceptive awareness was negatively correlated with self-objectification. Interoceptive awareness, public body consciousness and private body consciousness together explained 31% of the variance in self-objectification. However, private body consciousness was not significantly correlated with interoceptive awareness, which may explain the many nonsignificant results in self-objectification studies that have used private body consciousness as a measure of body awareness. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose interoceptive awareness, assessed by heartbeat perception, as a measure of body awareness in self-objectification studies. Our findings have implications for those clinical conditions, in women, which are characterised by self-objectification and low interoceptive awareness, such as eating disorders.

  2. Factors influencing the use of outcome measures in physical therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedge, Frances M; Braswell-Christy, Jennifer; Brown, Cynthia J; Foley, Kathleen T; Graham, Cecilia; Shaw, Sharon

    2012-02-01

    Use of outcome measures in physical therapy practice is central to evaluating the effectiveness of treatment interventions, providing accountability and addressing quality of physical therapy programs. There is limited discussion on barriers and facilitators to using outcome measures in physical therapy practice. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence a physical therapist when deciding to use outcome measures in clinical practice. Participants were 21 physical therapists, seven each from skilled nursing facilities, outpatient clinics, and inpatient rehabilitation facilities. A grounded theory approach was used for interview and data collection. Common themes were determined from the data and a theory developed to explain the rationale behind physical therapists' decisions to use or not use outcome measures in clinical practice. Three overlapping themes related to (1) concepts of time, (2) knowledge, and (3) facility culture were indentified as factors influencing the use of outcome measures. A fourth encompassing theme, professionalism, identified the value placed on the use of outcome measures in practice. Data revealed that therapists require more information on the outcome measures available, and this information needs to be easily accessible within the workplace. Therapists value information generated by using outcome measures in the clinical setting, but need information on what measures are available and psychometric properties. Information must be easily accessible and measures easy to use. Newer graduates and recent learners have a foundation in the use of outcome measures, but more needs to be done in the clinic and through continuing education to promote increased use and understanding.

  3. COLLISIONS BETWEEN GRAVITY-DOMINATED BODIES. II. THE DIVERSITY OF IMPACT OUTCOMES DURING THE END STAGE OF PLANET FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Sarah T.; Leinhardt, Zoë M.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the stochastic end stage of planet formation typically begin with a population of embryos and planetesimals that grow into planets by merging. We analyzed the impact parameters of collisions leading to the growth of terrestrial planets from recent N-body simulations that assumed perfect merging and calculated more realistic outcomes using a new analytic collision physics model. We find that collision outcomes are diverse and span all possible regimes: hit-and-run, merging, partial accretion, partial erosion, and catastrophic disruption. The primary outcomes of giant impacts between planetary embryos are approximately evenly split between partial accretion, graze-and-merge, and hit-and-run events. To explore the cumulative effects of more realistic collision outcomes, we modeled the growth of individual planets with a Monte Carlo technique using the distribution of impact parameters from N-body simulations. We find that fewer planets reached masses >0.7 M Earth using the collision physics model compared to simulations that assumed every collision results in perfect merging. For final planets with masses >0.7 M Earth , 60% are enriched in their core-to-mantle mass fraction by >10% compared to the initial embryo composition. Fragmentation during planet formation produces significant debris (∼15% of the final mass) and occurs primarily by erosion of the smaller body in partial accretion and hit-and-run events. In partial accretion events, the target body grows by preferentially accreting the iron core of the projectile and the escaping fragments are derived primarily from the silicate mantles of both bodies. Thus, the bulk composition of a planet can evolve via stochastic giant impacts.

  4. Metformin in gestational diabetes: the offspring follow-up (MiG TOFU): body composition and metabolic outcomes at 7–9 years of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Elaine C; Plank, Lindsay D; Lu, Jun; Obolonkin, Victor; Coat, Suzette

    2018-01-01

    Objective To compare body composition and metabolic outcomes at 7–9 years in offspring of women with gestational diabetes (GDM) randomized to metformin (±insulin) or insulin treatment during pregnancy. Research design and methods Children were assessed at 7 years in Adelaide (n=109/181) and 9 years in Auckland (n=99/396) by anthropometry, bioimpedance analysis (BIA), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (n=92/99) and fasting bloods (n=82/99). Results In the Adelaide subgroup, mothers were similar at enrollment. Women randomized to metformin versus insulin had higher treatment glycemia (p=0.002) and more infants with birth weight >90th percentile (20.7% vs 5.9%; p=0.029). At 7 years, there were no differences in offspring measures. In Auckland, at enrollment, women randomized to metformin had a higher body mass index (BMI) (p=0.08) but gained less weight during treatment (p=0.07). Offspring birth measures were similar. At 9 years, metformin offspring were larger by measures of weight, arm and waist circumferences, waist:height (p<0.05); BMI, triceps skinfold (p=0.05); DXA fat mass and lean mass (p=0.07); MRI abdominal fat volume (p=0.051). Body fat percent was similar between treatment groups by DXA and BIA. Abdominal fat percentages (visceral adipose tissue, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver) were similar by MRI. Fasting glucose, triglyceride, insulin, insulin resistance, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), cholesterol, liver transaminases, leptin and adiponectin were similar. Conclusions Metformin or insulin for GDM was associated with similar offspring total and abdominal body fat percent and metabolic measures at 7–9 years. Metformin-exposed children were larger at 9 years. Metformin may interact with fetal environmental factors to influence offspring outcomes. PMID:29682291

  5. Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM), a core instrument to measure symptoms in clinical trials: a Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spuls, P. I.; Gerbens, L. A. A.; Simpson, E.; Apfelbacher, C. J.; Chalmers, J. R.; Thomas, K. S.; Prinsen, C. A. C.; von Kobyletzki, L. B.; Singh, J. A.; Williams, H. C.; Schmitt, J.

    2017-01-01

    The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative has defined four core outcome domains for a core outcome set (COS) to be measured in all atopic eczema (AE) trials to ensure cross-trial comparison: clinical signs, symptoms, quality of life and long-term control. The aim of this paper is

  6. Measuring body composition in overweight individuals by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownbill, Rhonda A; Ilich, Jasminka Z

    2005-01-01

    Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is widely used for body composition measurements in normal-weight and overweight/obese individuals. The limitations of bone densitometers have been frequently addressed. However, the possible errors in assessing body composition in overweight individuals due to incorrect positioning or limitations of DXA to accurately assess both bone mineral density and body composition in obese individuals have not received much attention and are the focus of this report. We discuss proper ways of measuring overweight individuals and point to some studies where that might not have been the case. It appears that currently, the most prudent approach to assess body composition of large individuals who cannot fit under the scanning area would be to estimate regional fat, namely the regions of thigh and/or abdomen. Additionally, using two-half body scans, although time consuming, may provide a relatively accurate measurement of total body fat, however, more studies using this technique are needed to validate it. Researchers using bone densitometers for body composition measurements need to have an understanding of its limitations in overweight individuals and address them appropriately when interpreting their results. Studies on accuracy and precision in measurements of both bone and soft tissue composition in overweight individuals using available densitometers are needed

  7. Minimum data set to measure rehabilitation needs and health outcome after major trauma: application of an international framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Karen P; Playford, Diane E; Grill, Eva; Soberg, Helene L; Brohi, Karim

    2016-06-01

    Measurement of long term health outcome after trauma remains non-standardized and ambiguous which limits national and international comparison of burden of injuries. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended the application of the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) to measure rehabilitation and health outcome worldwide. No previous poly-trauma studies have applied the ICF comprehensively to evaluate outcome after injury. To apply the ICF categorization in patients with traumatic injuries to identify a minimum data set of important rehabilitation and health outcomes to enable national and international comparison of outcome data. A mixed methods design of patient interviews and an on-line survey. An ethnically diverse urban major trauma center in London. Adult patients with major traumatic injuries (poly-trauma) and international health care professionals (HCPs) working in acute and post-acute major trauma settings. Mixed methods investigated patients and health care professionals (HCPs) perspectives of important rehabilitation and health outcomes. Qualitative patient data and quantitative HCP data were linked to ICF categories. Combined data were refined to identify a minimum data set of important rehabilitation and health outcome categories. Transcribed patient interview data (N.=32) were linked to 234 (64%) second level ICF categories. Two hundred and fourteen HCPs identified 121 from a possible 140 second level ICF categories (86%) as relevant and important. Patients and HCPs strongly agreed on ICF body structures and body functions categories which include temperament, energy and drive, memory, emotions, pain and repair function of the skin. Conversely, patients prioritised domestic tasks, recreation and work compared to HCP priorities of self-care and mobility. Twenty six environmental factors were identified. Patient and HCP data were refined to recommend a 109 possible ICF categories for a minimum data set. The

  8. Quality of life as an outcome measure in surgical oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenhoff, B S; Krabbe, P F; Wobbes, T; Ruers, T J

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing interest in assessing the impact of a disease and the effect of a treatment on a patient's life, expressed as health-related quality of life (HRQoL). HRQoL assessment can provide essential outcome information for cancer surgery. METHODS: The core of this review is

  9. Outcomes assessment in cancer: measures, methods, and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lipscomb, Joseph; Snyder, Claire; Gotay, Carolyn C

    2005-01-01

    ... on individuals and populations. The findings and recommendations of the working group's 35 internationally recognized members are reported in Outcomes Assessment in Cancer, lucidly written and accessible to both researchers and policy makers in academia, government, and industry. This volume provides the most penetrating yet practical discussion to date of alte...

  10. Validation of bioelectrical-impedance analysis as a measurement of change in body composition in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, R.F.; Kunigk, A.; Alspaugh, M.; Andronis, P.T.; Leitch, C.A.; Schoeller, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The bioelectrical-impedance-analysis (BIA) method accurately measures body composition in weight-stable subjects. This study validates the use of BIA to measure change in body composition. Twelve obese females underwent weight loss at a mean rate of 1.16 kg/wk. Body composition was measured by deuterium oxide dilution (D2O), BIA, and skinfold anthropometry (SFA) at baseline and at 5% decrements in weight. Highly significant correlations were obtained between D2O and BIA (r = 0.971) and between D2O and SFA (r = 0.932). Overall, BIA predicted change in fat-free mass with greater accuracy (to 0.4 kg) and precision (+/- 1.28 kg) than did anthropometry (to 0.8 kg and +/- 2.58 kg, respectively). We conclude that BIA is a useful clinical method for measuring change in body composition

  11. The Aphasia Communication Outcome Measure (ACOM): Dimensionality, Item Bank Calibration, and Initial Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hula, William D.; Doyle, Patrick J.; Stone, Clement A.; Hula, Shannon N. Austermann; Kellough, Stacey; Wambaugh, Julie L.; Ross, Katherine B.; Schumacher, James G.; St. Jacque, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the structure and measurement properties of the Aphasia Communication Outcome Measure (ACOM), a patient-reported outcome measure of communicative functioning for persons with aphasia. Method: Three hundred twenty-nine participants with aphasia responded to 177 items asking about communicative…

  12. Developing a General Outcome Measure Off Growth in Social Skills for Infants and Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Judith; Greenwood, Charles; Luze, Gayle; Cline, Gabriel; Kuntz, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Proficiency in social interaction with adults and peers is an important outcome in early childhood. The development of an experimental measure for assessing growth in social skills in children birth to 3 years is described. Based on the general outcome measurement (GOM) approach (e.g., Deno, 1997), the measure is intended for use by early…

  13. Developing a General Outcome Measure of Growth in Social Skills for Infants and Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Judith; Greenwood, Charles; Luze, Gayle; Cline, Gabriel; Kuntz, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Proficiency in social interaction with adults and peers is an important outcome in early childhood. The development of an experimental measure for assessing growth in social skills in children birth to 3 years is described. Based on the general outcome measurement (GOM) approach (e.g., Deno, 1997), the measure is intended for use by early…

  14. A nonintrusive temperature measuring system for estimating deep body temperature in bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, S Y; Lee, W K; Baek, H J; Park, K S

    2012-01-01

    Deep body temperature is an important indicator that reflects human being's overall physiological states. Existing deep body temperature monitoring systems are too invasive to apply to awake patients for a long time. Therefore, we proposed a nonintrusive deep body temperature measuring system. To estimate deep body temperature nonintrusively, a dual-heat-flux probe and double-sensor probes were embedded in a neck pillow. When a patient uses the neck pillow to rest, the deep body temperature can be assessed using one of the thermometer probes embedded in the neck pillow. We could estimate deep body temperature in 3 different sleep positions. Also, to reduce the initial response time of dual-heat-flux thermometer which measures body temperature in supine position, we employed the curve-fitting method to one subject. And thereby, we could obtain the deep body temperature in a minute. This result shows the possibility that the system can be used as practical temperature monitoring system with appropriate curve-fitting model. In the next study, we would try to establish a general fitting model that can be applied to all of the subjects. In addition, we are planning to extract meaningful health information such as sleep structure analysis from deep body temperature data which are acquired from this system.

  15. Relationships among ketosis, serum metabolites, body condition, and reproductive outcomes in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eun-Kyung; Jeong, Jae-Kwan; Choi, In-Soo; Kang, Hyun-Gu; Hur, Tai-Young; Jung, Young-Hun; Kim, Ill-Hwa

    2015-07-15

    We determined the relationships among ketosis, serum metabolites, body condition, and reproductive disorders and performance in dairy cows. Blood samples from 213 dairy cows were collected at 4 and 2 weeks prepartum, just after calving, and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postpartum to measure serum β-hydroxybutyrate, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), glucose, total cholesterol, urea nitrogen, aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyltransferase, and progesterone concentrations. Cows were grouped on the basis of the β-hydroxybutyrate concentration at 1 and/or 2 weeks postpartum into two groups: the ketotic group (≥1200 μmol/L, n = 59) and the nonketotic group (50% pus), and subclinical endometritis was diagnosed by evaluation of uterine cytology (>18% neutrophils) at 4 weeks postpartum. Ovarian cysts were diagnosed by ultrasonography, and resumption of postpartum cyclicity was evaluated by progesterone concentrations (≥1 ng/mL) at 4, 6, and 8 weeks postpartum. In the ketotic group, NEFA levels were higher (P ≤ 0.0005), whereas glucose (P ketosis, increased reproductive disorders, and decreased reproductive performance in dairy cows. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Body fat and blood pressure: comparison of blood pressure measurements in Chinese children with different body fat levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Zhiqiang; Dong, Bin; Song, Yi; Hu, Peijin; Zhang, Bing

    2012-11-14

    Children in China are experiencing a rapid increase in the prevalence of obesity, which is associated with hypertension. To compare the effect of body fat on blood pressure (BP) with that of the normal physical growth, we compared BP levels in Chinese children with different body fat levels. In the present population-based study, 13 972 children in the highest-skinfold-thickness-quartile group were individually matched to 13 972 children in the lowest-skinfold-thickness-quartile group by height and weight. Similarly, 5103 children in the highest-waist-circumference-quartile group were matched to the same number of children in the lowest-waist-circumference-quartile group. The high- and low-fat groups had similar height and weight but the high-fat group had significantly higher skinfold and waist circumference measurements. The differences in systolic BP (SBP) between the high- and low-skinfold-thickness groups were small: 0·01 (95 % CI -0·41, 0·44) mmHg in boys and 0·20 (95 % CI -0·15, 0·54) mmHg in girls. The differences in diastolic BP (DBP) were also small (0·39 and 0·38 mmHg for boys and girls, respectively) but were statistically significant. The differences in both SBP and DBP between the high- and low-waist-circumference groups were small but not statistically significant. For a given body size as measured by height and weight, relative body fat had little impact on BP levels in these children. Fat mass and lean mass may have a similar quantitative impact on BP in healthy-weight children.

  17. Evaluation of electrical broad bandwidth impedance spectroscopy as a tool for body composition measurement in cows in comparison with body measurements and the deuterium oxide dilution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäff, C T; Pliquett, U; Tuchscherer, A; Pfuhl, R; Görs, S; Metges, C C; Hammon, H M; Kröger-Koch, C

    2017-05-01

    Body fatness and degree of body fat mobilization in cows vary enormously during their reproduction cycle and influence energy partitioning and metabolic adaptation. The objective of the study was to test bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) as a method for predicting fat depot mass (FDM), in living cows. The FDM is defined as the sum of subcutaneous, omental, mesenteric, retroperitoneal, and carcass fat mass. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy is compared with the prediction of FDM from the deuterium oxide (DO) dilution method and from body conformation measurements. Charolais × Holstein Friesian (HF; = 18; 30 d in milk) crossbred cows and 2 HF (lactating and nonlactating) cows were assessed by body conformation measurements, BIS, and the DO dilution method. The BCS of cows was a mean of 3.68 (SE 0.64). For the DO dilution method, a bolus of 0.23 g/kg BW DO (60 atom%) was intravenously injected and deuterium (D) enrichment was analyzed in plasma and whey by stabile isotope mass spectrometry, and total body water content was calculated. Impedance measurement was performed using a 4-electrode interface and time domain-based measurement system consisting of a voltage/current converter for applying current stimulus and an amplifier for monitoring voltage across the sensor electrodes. For the BIS, we used complex impedances over three frequency decades that delivers information on intra- and extracellular water and capacity of cell membranes. Impedance data (resistance of extra- and intracellular space, cell membrane capacity, and phase angle) were extracted 1) by simple curve fit to extract the resistance at direct current and high frequency and 2) by using an electrical equivalent circuit. Cows were slaughtered 7 d after BIS and D enrichment measurements and dissected for the measurement of FDM. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to predict FDM based on data obtained from body conformation measurements, BIS, and D enrichment, and applied

  18. Measurements of Radioactivity in Body Organs. Report of a Panel of Experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of radioactivity in body organs in vivo entail physical and other problems which do not arise in measurements of radioactivity in vitro. From 8-12 December 1969 the International Atomic Energy Agency convened at its Headquarters in Vienna a panel of experts to review the existing status of techniques for such measurements

  19. Analysis of measured data of human body based on error correcting frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Aiyan; Peipei, Gao; Shang, Xiaomei

    2014-04-01

    Anthropometry is to measure all parts of human body surface, and the measured data is the basis of analysis and study of the human body, establishment and modification of garment size and formulation and implementation of online clothing store. In this paper, several groups of the measured data are gained, and analysis of data error is gotten by analyzing the error frequency and using analysis of variance method in mathematical statistics method. Determination of the measured data accuracy and the difficulty of measured parts of human body, further studies of the causes of data errors, and summarization of the key points to minimize errors possibly are also mentioned in the paper. This paper analyses the measured data based on error frequency, and in a way , it provides certain reference elements to promote the garment industry development.

  20. Issues in the definition and measurement of drinking outcomes in alcoholism treatment research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babor, T F; Longabaugh, R; Zweben, A; Fuller, R K; Stout, R L; Anton, R F; Randall, C L

    1994-12-01

    This article reviews methodological and conceptual issues regarding the choice of drinking outcome measures in alcoholism treatment research. The following issues are discussed: Should drinking outcomes be conceptualized in terms of an underlying unitary disorder, or should provision be made for independent outcomes that cover a wide variety of dimensions? Which drinking outcomes are typically measured in treatment evaluation studies and how are they operationalized? What are the empirical associations among drinking outcome measures? If multiple outcomes are measured, which should be given primary importance? Over what period of time should treatment outcome be evaluated? What procedures can be used to detect, correct or prevent the response bias associated with verbal report methods? Because outcome measures need to fit the hypotheses and practical needs of a particular study, it is unlikely that complete standardization can be achieved across all studies. Nevertheless, given the importance of drinking outcomes and the need for economy, two primary dependent measures are recommended: (1) proportion of available drinking days abstinent; and (2) intensity of drinking, as defined by the total amount consumed (in ounces absolute alcohol) during the follow-up period divided by the number of actual drinking days. This article also proposes a strategy that may help to guide the selection of outcome measures in future research.

  1. Comparison between auricular and standard rectal thermometers for the measurement of body temperature in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Marlos G; Carareto, Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Valdo A; Aquino, Monally C C

    2011-04-01

    Although the rectal mucosa remains the traditional site for measuring body temperature in dogs, an increasing number of clinicians have been using auricular temperature to estimate core body temperature. In this study, 88 mature healthy dogs had body temperatures measured with auricular and rectal thermometers. The mean temperature and confidence intervals were similar for each method, but Bland-Altman plots showed high biases and limits of agreement unacceptable for clinical purposes. The results indicate that auricular and rectal temperatures should not be interpreted interchangeably.

  2. An Evaluation of pectus excavatum by means of body surface measurements on chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotani, Taichi; Ohama, Kazunori; Shimotake, Takashi; Ishikawa, Nobuki; Watanabe, Reiji

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether the body surface index replaces the Haller index in order to evaluate the severity of pectus excavatum. Sixty-nine cases with a diagnosis of pectus excavatum between August 2001 and January 2008 were prospectively enrolled in the study. The anterior-posterior chest dimension, lateral chest dimension and depth of the most profound depressed area were measured. The body surface index was expressed as an equation A/(B-C), where A was the transverse diameter, B was the anterior-posterior diameter and C was the depth of the depressed area. This index was compared to the Haller index in each patient. In this study, each value was measured on a chest CT scan. The body surface index significantly correlated with the Haller index, in which the coefficient of correlation was 0.879 (p<0.01). The body surface index corresponding to Haller index 3.25 seems to be 1.67. We could find the body surface index corresponding to each Haller index. We propose that an evaluation of pectus excavatum by means of body surface measurements is clinically useful, and may replace the Haller index. The body surface index may allow us to assess the severity of pectus excavatum without a CT scan, resulting in a reduction of radiation exposure for children with pectus excavatum. It's possible to evaluate the body surface index by using a relational table between this index and the Hailer index. We'll evaluate the body surface index by using values measured on a real body. (author)

  3. Outcome Measures in Myasthenia Gravis: Incorporation Into Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muppidi, Srikanth

    2017-03-01

    The development of validated assessment tools for evaluating disease status and response to interventions in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) has been driven by clinical studies of emerging MG therapies. However, only a small proportion of MG-focused neurology practices have adopted these assessment tools for routine clinical use. This article reviews the suitability of 5 assessment instruments for incorporation into clinical practice, which should be driven by their ability to contribute to improved patient outcomes, and to be implemented within practice personnel and resource constraints. It is recommended that assessments based on both physician-evaluated and patient-reported outcomes be selected, to adequately evaluate both point-in-time symptom load and functional impact of MG symptoms over time. Provider resource allocation and reimbursement issues may be the most significant roadblocks to successful ongoing use of these tools; to that end, the addition of regular assessments to MG standards of care is recommended.

  4. Transportation performance measures for outcome based system management and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) is mature in its development and use of : performance measures, however there was not a standard approach for selecting measures nor : evaluating if existing ones were used to inform decision-making. Thi...

  5. Measuring management success for protected species: Looking beyond biological outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn D Bisack

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the ocean ecosystem, including the human component, is such that a single fishery may require multiple policy instruments to support recovery and conservation of protected species, in addition to those for fisheries management. As regulations multiply, the need for retrospective analysis and evaluation grows in order to inform future policy. To accurately evaluate policy instruments, clear objectives and their link to outcomes are necessary, as well as identifying criteria to evaluate outcomes. The Northeast United States sink gillnet groundfish fishery provides a case study of the complexity of regulations and policy instruments implemented under the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Endangered Species Act to address bycatch of marine mammals. The case study illustrates a range of possible objectives for the policy instruments including biological, economic, social-normative and longevity factors. We highlight links between possible objectives, outcomes and criteria for the four factors, as well as areas for consideration when undertaking ex-post analyses. To support learning from past actions, we call for a coordinated effort involving multiple disciplines and jurisdictions to undertake retrospective analyses and evaluations of key groups of policy instruments used for protected species.

  6. Impact of body composition parameters on clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer treated with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushen, Samantha J; Power, Derek G; Murphy, Kevin P; McDermott, Ray; Griffin, Brendan T; Lim, Marvin; Daly, Louise; MacEneaney, Peter; O' Sullivan, Kathleen; Prado, Carla M; Ryan, Aoife M

    2016-06-01

    Body composition may influence clinical outcomes of certain chemotherapeutic agents. We examined the prognostic significance of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue on docetaxel toxicity and overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). A retrospective review of patients medical records with mCRPC, treated with docetaxel was conducted. Body composition parameters (skeletal muscle mass, muscle attenuation [MA], visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue) were measured at L3 by computed tomography (CT) and defined using previously established cut points. Toxicity profile was assessed after 3 cycles of the drug and graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (version 4). Overall survival was analysed. Overall 63 patients, mean age 69 years (SD 8.3), were included. Sarcopenia was present in 47% (n = 30) and of these 26.7% (8/30) were sarcopenic obese. Common toxicities (all grades) observed included fatigue (80.9%), pain (46%), and constipation (34.9%). DLT occurred in 22 (34.9%) patients; of these 10 patients (15.8%) experienced dose reductions and 12 patients (19%) experienced dose terminations. Measurements of adiposity were not predictive of DLT, however 59.1% patients who had a combination of both sarcopenia and low MA experienced DLT compared to 29.3% of patients without sarcopenia and low MA (p = 0.021). Skeletal muscle index and MA were significantly lower in patients who experienced neutropenia (grade I-II) (46.5 cm 2 /m 2 vs. 51.2 cm 2 /m 2 , p = 0.005) compared to their counterparts (24.6 HU vs. 32.2 HU, p = 0.044). Neither sarcopenia nor sarcopenic obesity was associated with overall survival. In multivariate analysis, BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 (HR: 0.349, CI: 0.156-0.782, p = 0.010) was a significant predictor of longer overall survival and both visceral fat index ≥ median 58.7 cm 2 /m 2 (HR: 2.266 CI: 1.066-4.814, p = 0.033) and anaemia (HR: 2.81, CI: 1.297-6.091, p

  7. Between-centre variability versus variability over time in DXA whole body measurements evaluated using a whole body phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, Olivia [Department of Radiology, AZ-VUB, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussel (Belgium)]. E-mail: olivia.louis@az.vub.ac.be; Verlinde, Siska [Belgian Study Group for Pediatric Endocrinology (Belgium); Thomas, Muriel [Belgian Study Group for Pediatric Endocrinology (Belgium); De Schepper, Jean [Department of Pediatrics, AZ-VUB, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussel (Belgium)

    2006-06-15

    This study aimed to compare the variability of whole body measurements, using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), among geographically distinct centres versus that over time in a given centre. A Hologic-designed 28 kg modular whole body phantom was used, including high density polyethylene, gray polyvinylchloride and aluminium. It was scanned on seven Hologic QDR 4500 DXA devices, located in seven centres and was also repeatedly (n = 18) scanned in the reference centre, over a time span of 5 months. The mean between-centre coefficient of variation (CV) ranged from 2.0 (lean mass) to 5.6% (fat mass) while the mean within-centre CV ranged from 0.3 (total mass) to 4.7% (total area). Between-centre variability compared well with within-centre variability for total area, bone mineral content and bone mineral density, but was significantly higher for fat (p < 0.001), lean (p < 0.005) and total mass (p < 0.001). Our results suggest that, even when using the same device, the between-centre variability remains a matter of concern, particularly where body composition is concerned.

  8. Standardized uptake value of FDG corrected by lean body mass measured by DEXA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guirao, M.A.; Sanchez, A.M.; Saravi, F.D.; Mosconi, S.; Frias, L.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluating the metabolic activity of tumor lesion sometimes becomes important to evaluate grading of malignancy, prognosis, or response to therapy. The most used measure of the metabolic activity of [18F]-Fluorodeoxiglucose (FDG) in clinical PET is the Standardized Uptake Value (SUV). It relates the activity measured by the PET scan to the injected dose of FDG divided by the body mass. This approach overestimates SUV in 'heavy' patients, as the proportion of the 'low avid of FDG' fat mass increases. For this reason, different approaches are being evaluated to obtain a more accurate SUV measure. Aims: to compare the measured lean body mass by Dual X-Ray Absorptiometry with the previous methods of correction, to assess the more independent to the body constitution. Material and Methods: FDG metabolism was studied to 15 patients of both sexes, age between 28 and 72 y.o., body weight 55 to 92 Kg. One hour after the IV injection of 0.0045mCi/Kg of FDG, a whole body emission and transmission scan was performed to each subject in a positron emission tomograph (QUEST 250, GE-UGM, USA) for over 1 hour. Body lean mass composition was measured the same or next day by DEXA (Lunar DPX-L, USA.) ROIs were drawn on brain, liver and muscle. SUVbw =[(corrected mCi/g of tissue) / (mCi injected / body weight in grams)] was calculated for each tissue, and then recalculated replacing body weight with the measured lean body mass (SUVlm), calculated lean mass (SUVlc), body mass index (SUVmi) and body surface area (SUVsa). Corrected SUVs were normalized to each SUVbw average for a comparable visualization of results. Results: obtained data was analyzed by linear regression and curve estimation for each case in all tissues with the SPSS statistical software. A positive correlation between SUVbw and subject weight was confirmed for the 3 tissues. In Muscle and liver there was no significant correlation. The liver scanning time was variable ( 90 to 123 minutes after injection). Relating liver

  9. Influence of body position, food and beverage consumption on BIS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, G.; Eitner, F.; Ismail, A. H.; Pikkemaat, R.; Cordes, A.; Floege, J.; Leonhardt, S.

    2010-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of fluid changes using bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) during hemodialysis could help to predict hypotensive complications and extend the patient's life. Food and beverage consumption during the treatment may influence the measurements and the calculated fluid removal. In the present article the change observed in whole body and segmental (knee-to-knee, abdomen) BIS measurements following a sequence similar to the one of dialysis treatment (lying down, sitting and eating, lying down) on healthy subjects is presented. The measurements have been performed using a commercial bioimpedance device with a frequency range of 5 kHz to 1 MHz. Knee-to-knee measurements seem to be less sensitive to these influences, compared to the standard whole body and the alternative abdomen BIS measurements. The results indicate that the individual influence of both body posture and food and beverage consumption may be superposed when combined.

  10. Relationship between Arm Span Measurements and Body Height in Dinaric Alpes Population: a Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Masanovic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Several researches have reported the benefit of using various body parameters in predicting standing height, and arm span happened to be one of the most reliable ones in adults. On the other hand, it is well-known the tallness and body proportions are specific in the area that are covered by Dinaric Alpes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the potential relationship between arm span measurements and body height in Dinaric Alpes population. The most visible electronic database (Google Scholar was searched for original research articles available until September 2017. Then research findings were summarized and relationship between arm span measurements and body height in Dinaric Alpes population were identified, as well as areas of future research were recommended. The assessment of body height using various anthropometric measures is very typical from the past centuries and it has been attempted to be studied by many researchers. However, it is important to underline that the arm span has been obtained as the most reliable body indicator for predicting the true height of an individual. However, the studies sampled with the populations lived at Dinaric Alpes mountains have specific estimates. Therefore, all above-mentioned have confirmed the necessity for developing separate body height models for each population on account of ethnic as well as regional differences.

  11. Measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures for spondyloarthritis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Kelly; Kwan, Yu Heng; Leung, Ying Ying; Phang, Jie Kie; Lau, Jia Qi; Lim, Ka Keat; Chew, Eng Hui; Low, Lian Leng; Tan, Chuen Seng; Thumboo, Julian; Fong, Warren; Østbye, Truls

    2018-03-21

    This systematic review aimed to identify studies investigating measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for spondyloarthritis (SpA), and to evaluate their methodological quality and level of evidence relating to the measurement properties of PROMs. This systematic review was guided by the preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis (PRISMA). Articles published before 30 June 2017 were retrieved from PubMed ® , Embase ® , and PsychINFO ® (Ovid). Methodological quality and level of evidence were evaluated according to recommendations from the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN). We identified 60 unique PROMs from 125 studies in 39 countries. Twenty-one PROMs were validated for two or more SpA subtypes. The literature examined hypothesis testing (82.4%) most frequently followed by reliability (60.0%). A percentage of 77.7% and 42.7% of studies that assessed PROMs for hypothesis testing and reliability, respectively had "fair" or better methodological quality. Among the PROMs identified, 41.7% were studied in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) only and 23.3% were studied in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) only. The more extensively assessed PROMs included the ankylosing spondylitis quality of life (ASQoL) and bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) for ankylosing spondylitis, and the psoriatic arthritis quality of life questionnaire (VITACORA-19) for psoriatic arthritis. This study identified 60 unique PROMs through a systematic review and synthesized evidence of the measurement properties of the PROMs. There is a lack of validation of PROMs for use across SpA subtypes. Future studies may consider validating PROMs for use across different SpA subtypes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of sarcopenia and changes in body composition after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and associations with clinical outcomes in oesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Connie; Goh, Vicky; Davies, Andrew; Gossage, James; Mitchell-Hay, Rosalind; Hynes, Orla; Maisey, Nick; Ross, Paul; Gaya, Andrew; Landau, David B; Cook, Gary J; Griffin, Nyree; Mason, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Sarcopenia and changes in body composition following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) may affect clinical outcome. We assessed the associations between CT body composition changes following NAC and outcomes in oesophageal cancer. A total of 35 patients who received NAC followed by oesophagectomy, and underwent CT assessment pre- and post-NAC were included. Fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM), subcutaneous fat to muscle ratio (FMR) and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio (VA/SA) were derived from CT. Changes in FM, FFM, FMR, VA/SA and sarcopenia were correlated to chemotherapy dose reductions, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay (LOS), circumferential resection margin (CRM), pathological chemotherapy response, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Nine (26 %) patients were sarcopenic before NAC and this increased to 15 (43 %) after NAC. Average weight loss was 3.7 % ± 6.4 (SD) in comparison to FM index (-1.2 ± 4.2), FFM index (-4.6 ± 6.8), FMR (-1.2 ± 24.3) and VA/SA (-62.3 ± 12.7). Changes in FM index (p = 0.022), FMR (p = 0.028), VA/SA (p = 0.024) and weight (p = 0.007) were significant univariable factors for CRM status. There was no significant association between changes in body composition and survival. Loss of FM, differential loss of VA/SA and skeletal muscle were associated with risk of CRM positivity. • Changes in CT body composition occur after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in oesophageal cancer. • Sarcopenia was more prevalent after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. • Fat mass, fat-free mass and weight decreased after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. • Changes in body composition were associated with CRM positivity. • Changes in body composition did not affect perioperative complications and survival.

  13. Review of the Interaction Between Body Composition and Clinical Outcomes in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Treated With Targeted Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Yip

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC currently focuses on inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Obesity confers a higher risk of RCC. However, the influence of obesity on clinical outcomes in mRCC in the era of targeted therapy is less clear. This review focuses on the impact of body composition on targeted therapy outcomes in mRCC. The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium database has the largest series of patients evaluating the impact of body mass index (BMI on outcomes in mRCC patients treated with targeted therapy. Overall survival was significantly improved in overweight patients (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, and this observation was externally validated in patients who participated in Pfizer trials. In contrast, sarcopenia is consistently associated with increased toxicity to inhibitors of angiogenesis and mTOR. Strengthening patients with mRCC and sarcopenia, through a structured exercise program and dietary intervention, may improve outcomes in mRCC treated with targeted therapies. At the same time, the paradox of obesity being a risk factor for RCC while offering a better overall survival in response to targeted therapy needs to be further evaluated.

  14. Towards global consensus on outcome measures for atopic eczema research: results of the HOME II meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Jochen; Spuls, Phyllis; Boers, Maarten; Thomas, Kim; Chalmers, Joanne; Roekevisch, Evelien; Schram, Mandy; Allsopp, Richard; Aoki, Valeria; Apfelbacher, Christian; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Charman, Carolyn; Cohen, Arnon; Dohil, Magdalene; Flohr, Carsten; Furue, Masutaka; Gieler, Uwe; Hooft, Lotty; Humphreys, Rosemary; Ishii, Henrique Akira; Katayama, Ichiro; Kouwenhoven, Willem; Langan, Sinéad; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Merhand, Stephanie; Murota, Hiroyuki; Murrell, Dedee F; Nankervis, Helen; Ohya, Yukihiro; Oranje, Arnold; Otsuka, Hiromi; Paul, Carle; Rosenbluth, Yael; Saeki, Hidehisa; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise; Stalder, Jean-Francois; Svensson, Ake; Takaoka, Roberto; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Weidinger, Stephan; Wollenberg, Andreas; Williams, Hywel

    2012-09-01

    The use of nonstandardized and inadequately validated outcome measures in atopic eczema trials is a major obstacle to practising evidence-based dermatology. The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative is an international multiprofessional group dedicated to atopic eczema outcomes research. In June 2011, the HOME initiative conducted a consensus study involving 43 individuals from 10 countries, representing different stakeholders (patients, clinicians, methodologists, pharmaceutical industry) to determine core outcome domains for atopic eczema trials, to define quality criteria for atopic eczema outcome measures and to prioritize topics for atopic eczema outcomes research. Delegates were given evidence-based information, followed by structured group discussion and anonymous consensus voting. Consensus was achieved to include clinical signs, symptoms, long-term control of flares and quality of life into the core set of outcome domains for atopic eczema trials. The HOME initiative strongly recommends including and reporting these core outcome domains as primary or secondary endpoints in all future atopic eczema trials. Measures of these core outcome domains need to be valid, sensitive to change and feasible. Prioritized topics of the HOME initiative are the identification/development of the most appropriate instruments for the four core outcome domains. HOME is open to anyone with an interest in atopic eczema outcomes research. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Reproducibility of DXA measurements of bone mineral density and body composition in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Cheryl M.; Roza, Melissa A.; Webber, Colin E. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Barr, Ronald D. [McMaster Children' s Hospital, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    The technique of X-ray-based dual photon absorptiometry (DXA) is frequently used in children for the detection of changes in bone mass or body composition. Such changes can only be considered real if the uncertainties arising from the measurement technique are exceeded. Our objectives were twofold: (1) to determine the reproducibility of bone mineral density (BMD) measurements in children at the spine and the hip and from the whole body, as well as of whole-body measurements of mineral mass, lean body mass and fat mass in children; and (2) to estimate, from the measured precision, the time interval that needs to elapse before a statistically significant change in a DXA variable can be detected. The reproducibility of techniques for the measurement of BMD and body composition using DXA was measured in 15 young children (9 girls and 6 boys) and 17 older children (9 girls and 8 boys). Reproducibility was derived from the standard deviation of three repeated measurements of spine BMD, total hip BMD, whole-body BMD (WBBMD), whole-body bone mineral content (WBBMC), lean mass and fat mass. Technique precision was better than 0.01 g cm{sup -2} for spine BMD and for WBBMD. Hip BMD measurements were slightly less precise, particularly in younger children (0.013 g cm{sup -2}). For body composition variables, technique precision was 13 g for WBBMC, 201 g for lean body mass and 172 g for fat mass in younger children. Technique precision for older children was 18 g, 251 g and 189 g for the corresponding variables. Predictions showed that the absence of a normal increase in WBBMC in a small-for-age girl could be established after 12 months. For spine BMD, a significant increase should be observable after 6 months for boys over the age of 11 years. For younger boys, more than 12 months has to elapse before anticipated changes can be detected with confidence. The time intervals required to elapse before decisions can be made concerning the significance of observed differences

  16. Reproducibility of DXA measurements of bone mineral density and body composition in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Cheryl M.; Roza, Melissa A.; Webber, Colin E.; Barr, Ronald D.

    2009-01-01

    The technique of X-ray-based dual photon absorptiometry (DXA) is frequently used in children for the detection of changes in bone mass or body composition. Such changes can only be considered real if the uncertainties arising from the measurement technique are exceeded. Our objectives were twofold: (1) to determine the reproducibility of bone mineral density (BMD) measurements in children at the spine and the hip and from the whole body, as well as of whole-body measurements of mineral mass, lean body mass and fat mass in children; and (2) to estimate, from the measured precision, the time interval that needs to elapse before a statistically significant change in a DXA variable can be detected. The reproducibility of techniques for the measurement of BMD and body composition using DXA was measured in 15 young children (9 girls and 6 boys) and 17 older children (9 girls and 8 boys). Reproducibility was derived from the standard deviation of three repeated measurements of spine BMD, total hip BMD, whole-body BMD (WBBMD), whole-body bone mineral content (WBBMC), lean mass and fat mass. Technique precision was better than 0.01 g cm -2 for spine BMD and for WBBMD. Hip BMD measurements were slightly less precise, particularly in younger children (0.013 g cm -2 ). For body composition variables, technique precision was 13 g for WBBMC, 201 g for lean body mass and 172 g for fat mass in younger children. Technique precision for older children was 18 g, 251 g and 189 g for the corresponding variables. Predictions showed that the absence of a normal increase in WBBMC in a small-for-age girl could be established after 12 months. For spine BMD, a significant increase should be observable after 6 months for boys over the age of 11 years. For younger boys, more than 12 months has to elapse before anticipated changes can be detected with confidence. The time intervals required to elapse before decisions can be made concerning the significance of observed differences between

  17. Projectile metallic foreign bodies in the orbit: a retrospective study of epidemiologic factors, management, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, M; Legmann, A; Rubin, P A

    1997-01-01

    Intraorbital projectile metallic foreign bodies are associated with significant ocular and orbital injuries. The authors sought to evaluate epidemiologic factors, the incidence of associated ocular and orbital injury, and the nature and necessity of surgical intervention in these cases. Charts of all patients with projectile intraorbital metallic foreign bodies seen at our institution (27) over the preceding 7 years were evaluated with respect to age, sex, type of injury, associated ocular and orbital injuries, location of the projectile (anterior, epibulbar, or posterior), postinjury visual acuity, and surgical intervention. The majority of patients were male, between the ages of 11 and 30, and had BB pellet injuries. Thirteen projectiles were lodged anteriorly, 4 were in an epibulbar position, and the remaining 10 were posterior to the equator. Twelve of 13 anterior, and 4 of 4 epibulbar foreign bodies were removed surgically, whereas only 2 of 10 posterior foreign bodies required surgery. No case of surgical intervention resulted in a decrease of visual acuity. Associated ocular injuries were both more common and severe in patients with posteriorly located foreign bodies. Final visual acuity was better at presentation and at discharge in patients with anteriorly located foreign bodies. Intraorbital projectile metallic foreign bodies can be a source of significant ocular morbidity. Management of these cases is dependent on the location of the projectile. Ancillary radiographic studies can be helpful. Surgery to remove the projectile should be considered in each case, but foreign bodies that are not readily accessible often may be left safely in place. Closer regulation of the pellet gun industry, with an emphasis on education and protective eyewear use, would be helpful in reducing these injuries.

  18. Body measurements and carcass characteristics correlation of Nellore young bulls finishidedED IN FEEDLOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Laurindo Rosa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work it was aimed to evaluate Pearson correlations between body measurements, carcass characteristics and production of 35 Nellore bulls, confined for 96 days, with 402±14.90 kg and 18 months old. Weightings, ultrasound images and 14 measurements were obtained at the beginning of each experimental period and before slaughter, totaling four weight ratings of ultrasound images and measurements per animal. For the evaluation of body measurements and ultrasound images with carcass traits the values from the last measurement were considered. The images were made along with weighing animals through a Scanner, and measurements with a tape measure and a zoométrica cane, and these were correlated with each other and with productive and carcass characteristics. For measures of loin eye area evaluated by ultrasonography, it were found positive correlations with body length (0.32, rump (0.36 and thigh (0.20; withers height (0.20 and pelviano contour (0.38 (P<0.05. Variables of hip height and chest, chest width and pin bones, and heart girth showed positive correlations with two or more productive traits of economic interest, such as slaughter weight, hot carcass weight and dressing percentage (P<0.05. Significant correlations were found for most of the variables studied. Linear body measurements such as length and height emerge as a tool that can be useful in the formation of more homogenous lots and to predict the point of slaughter, along with the weight of the animals.

  19. Healing models for organizations: description, measurement, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloch, K

    2000-01-01

    Healthcare leaders are continually searching for ways to improve their ability to provide optimal healthcare services, be financially viable, and retain quality caregivers, often feeling like such goals are impossible to achieve in today's intensely competitive environment. Many healthcare leaders intuitively recognize the need for more humanistic models and the probable connection with positive patient outcomes and financial success but are hesitant to make significant changes in their organizations because of the lack of model descriptions or documented recognition of the clinical and financial advantages of humanistic models. This article describes a study that was developed in response to the increasing work in humanistic or healing environment models and the need for validation of the advantages of such models. The healthy organization model, a framework for healthcare organizations that incorporates humanistic healing values within the traditional structure, is presented as a result of the study. This model addresses the importance of optimal clinical services, financial performance, and staff satisfaction. The five research-based organizational components that form the framework are described, and key indicators of organizational effectiveness over a five-year period are presented. The resulting empirical data are strongly supportive of the healing model and reflect positive outcomes for the organization.

  20. Prospective evaluation of outcome measures in free-flap surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, John L

    2004-08-01

    Free-flap failure is usually caused by venous or arterial thrombosis. In many cases, lack of experience and surgical delay also contribute to flap loss. The authors prospectively analyzed the outcome of 57 free flaps over a 28-month period (January, 1999 to April, 2001). The setting was a university hospital tertiary referral center. Anastomotic technique, ischemia time, choice of anticoagulant, and the grade of surgeon were recorded. The type of flap, medications, and co-morbidities, including preoperative radiotherapy, were also documented. Ten flaps were re-explored (17 percent). There were four cases of complete flap failure (6.7 percent) and five cases of partial failure (8.5 percent). In patients who received perioperative systemic heparin or dextran, there was no evidence of flap failure (p = .08). The mean ischemia time was similar in flaps that failed (95 +\\/- 29 min) and in those that survived (92 +\\/- 34 min). Also, the number of anastomoses performed by trainees in flaps that failed (22 percent), was similar to the number in flaps that survived (28 percent). Nine patients received preoperative radiotherapy, and there was complete flap survival in each case. This study reveals that closely supervised anastomoses performed by trainees may have a similar outcome to those performed by more senior surgeons. There was no adverse effect from radiotherapy or increased ischemia time on flap survival.

  1. Interaction between an ADCY3 Genetic Variant and Two Weight-Lowering Diets Affecting Body Fatness and Body Composition Outcomes Depending on Macronutrient Distribution: A Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Goni

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The adenylate cyclase 3 (ADCY3 gene is involved in the regulation of several metabolic processes including the development and function of adipose tissue. The effects of the ADCY3 rs10182181 genetic variant on changes in body composition depending on the macronutrient distribution intake after 16 weeks of the dietary intervention were tested. The ADCY3 genetic variant was genotyped in 147 overweight or obese subjects, who were randomly assigned to one of the two diets varying in macronutrient content: a moderately-high-protein diet and a low-fat diet. Anthropometric and body composition measurements (DEXA scan were recorded. Significant interactions between the ADCY3 genotype and dietary intervention on changes in weight, waist circumference, and body composition were found after adjustment for covariates. Thus, in the moderately-high-protein diet group, the G allele was associated with a lower decrease of fat mass, trunk and android fat, and a greater decrease in lean mass. Conversely, in the low-fat diet group carrying the G allele was associated with a greater decrease in trunk, android, gynoid, and visceral fat. Subjects carrying the G allele of the rs10182181 polymorphism may benefit more in terms of weight loss and improvement of body composition measurements when undertaking a hypocaloric low-fat diet as compared to a moderately-high-protein diet.

  2. Impact of eating and drinking on body composition measurements by bioelectrical impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androutsos, O; Gerasimidis, K; Karanikolou, A; Reilly, J J; Edwards, C A

    2015-04-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis would be a more practical tool to measure body composition in clinical settings, dietetic practice and epidemiological studies if patients/subjects did not have to fast before measurements. The present study assessed whether the ingestion of food or drink had any biologically significant effect on bioimpedance measurements and body composition by the foot-to-foot method. Fifty-five healthy adults [30 males and 25 females; mean (SD) age 27.7 (7.1) years; mean (SD)body mass index 24 (3.8) kg m(-2)] were randomly assigned to a 2-day food trial (high-fat meal or high-carbohydrate meal) or a 2-day drink trial (water or high electrolyte drink). Body composition measurements were carried out in the fasting state, immediately after meal consumption and every 30 min for 2 h by the foot-to-foot single frequency bioimpedance technique. Bioimpedance increased significantly after the ingestion of food and fluid, although the changes were small. The electrolyte drink, high-fat and high-carbohydrate meals significantly increased the percentage body fat and fat mass. In all cases, the median percentage changes from baseline were approximately 1% in body fat percentage units. Although there were statistically significant changes in body composition estimates after food or drink consumption, these were small and within the imprecision of the impedance technique, and so are unlikely to be of clinical significance. The present study suggests that impedance measures of body fatness in clinical settings do not require strict adherence to fasting, and this should increase the opportunities for clinical application. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  3. Use of a pulsed neutron generator for in vivo measurement of body carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehayias, J.J.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.; Yasumura, S.

    1986-01-01

    The measurement of total body fat is of importance in studies of nutritional assessment, dietary regimens, and for the management of obesity. In the past, fat has been determined either by anthropometric methods, which introduce high uncertainties, or by model-dependent estimation of fat-free tissue. The validity, however, of the different models in disease is questionable. Total body carbon measurements provide a more direct evaluation of body fat both in normal subjects and in patients. The authors present here a facility for carbon measurements without the use of a major accelerator. The same facility can be used for the measurement of other major body elements and for the evaluation of the body's compartments. Carbon is measured in vivo through neutron inelastic scattering, by detecting the 4.44 MeV gamma rays. A miniature (10 cm long) 14 MeV D-T neutron generator is used. The short half-life of the 4.44 MeV state of carbon requires detection of the gamma rays simultaneously with the 10 μs neutron pulse. Generators with low pulsing rate were found inappropriate for carbon measurement because of their low duty-cycle (high neutron output during pulse). The detection system consists of NaI(T1) detectors and fast electronics for handling the high even rate during the neutron pulse. A description of the facility and an evaluation of the technique will be presented

  4. Proposed outcome measures for prospective clinical trials in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Foeldvari, Ivan; Edelsten, Clive

    2012-01-01

    To develop a set of core outcome measures for use in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis.......To develop a set of core outcome measures for use in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis....

  5. A systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures in paediatric otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J; Powell, S; Robson, A

    2018-01-01

    Recently, there has been increased emphasis on the development and application of patient-reported outcome measures. This drive to assess the impact of illness or interventions, from the patient's perspective, has resulted in a greater number of available questionnaires. The importance of selecting an appropriate patient-reported outcome measure is specifically emphasised in the paediatric population. The literature on patient-reported outcome measures used in paediatric otolaryngology was reviewed. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using the databases Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycInfo, using the terms: 'health assessment questionnaire', 'structured questionnaire', 'questionnaire', 'patient reported outcome measures', 'PROM', 'quality of life' or 'survey', and 'children' or 'otolaryngology'. The search was limited to English-language articles published between 1996 and 2016. The search yielded 656 articles, of which 63 were considered relevant. This included general paediatric patient-reported outcome measures applied to otolaryngology, and paediatric otolaryngology disease-specific patient-reported outcome measures. A large collection of patient-reported outcome measures are described in the paediatric otolaryngology literature. Greater standardisation of the patient-reported outcome measures used in paediatric otolaryngology would assist in pooling of data and increase the validation of tools used.

  6. Body temperature measurement in mice during acute illness: implantable temperature transponder versus surface infrared thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jie; Riedel, Nico; Grittner, Ulrike; Endres, Matthias; Banneke, Stefanie; Emmrich, Julius Valentin

    2018-02-23

    Body temperature is a valuable parameter in determining the wellbeing of laboratory animals. However, using body temperature to refine humane endpoints during acute illness generally lacks comprehensiveness and exposes to inter-observer bias. Here we compared two methods to assess body temperature in mice, namely implanted radio frequency identification (RFID) temperature transponders (method 1) to non-contact infrared thermometry (method 2) in 435 mice for up to 7 days during normothermia and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin-induced hypothermia. There was excellent agreement between core and surface temperature as determined by method 1 and 2, respectively, whereas the intra- and inter-subject variation was higher for method 2. Nevertheless, using machine learning algorithms to determine temperature-based endpoints both methods had excellent accuracy in predicting death as an outcome event. Therefore, less expensive and cumbersome non-contact infrared thermometry can serve as a reliable alternative for implantable transponder-based systems for hypothermic responses, although requiring standardization between experimenters.

  7. Neutron activation probe for measuring the presence of uranium in ore bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, N.P.; Smith, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron activation proble comprises a pulsed neutron source in series with a plurality of delayed neutron detectors for measuring radioactivity in a well borehole together with a NaI (Tl) counter for measuring the high energy 2.62 MeV gamma line from thorium. The neutron source emits neutrons which produce fission in uranium and thorium in the ore body and the delayed neutron detectors measure the delayed neutrons produced from such fission while the NaI (Tl) counter measures the 2.62 MeV gamma line from the undisturbed thorium in the ore body. The signal from the NaI (Tl) counter is processed and subtracted from the signal from the delayed neutron detectors with the result being indicative of the amount of uranium present in the ore body

  8. Using theory and evidence to drive measurement of patient, nurse and organizational outcomes of professional nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Lianne; Sidani, Souraya; Rose, Donald; Espin, Sherry; Smith, Orla; Martin, Kirsten; Byer, Charlie; Fu, Kaiyan; Ferris, Ella

    2013-04-01

    An evolving body of literature suggests that the implementation of evidence based clinical and professional guidelines and strategies can improve patient care. However, gaps exist in our understanding of the effect of implementation of guidelines on outcomes, particularly patient outcomes. To address this gap, a measurement framework was developed to assess the impact of an organization-wide implementation of two nursing-centric best-practice guidelines on patient, nurse and organizational level outcomes. From an implementation standpoint, we anticipate that our data will show improvements in the following: (i) patient satisfaction scores and safety outcomes; (ii) nurses ability to value and engage in evidence based practice; and (iii) organizational support for evidence-informed nursing care that results in quality patient outcomes. Our measurement framework and multifaceted methodological approach outlined in this paper might serve as a blueprint for other organizations in their efforts to evaluate the impacts associated with implementation of clinical and professional guidelines and best practices. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Quantitation of the degree of osteoporosis by measure of total-body calcium employing neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.; Zanzi, I.; Vaswani, A.; Wallach, S.; Aloia, J.; Ellis, K.J.

    1975-01-01

    Two techniques for measuring the amount of Ca in the total skeleton were employed: total-body neutron activation analysis (TBNAA) and the determination of the mineral content of a bone of the appendicular skeleton (absorptiometric measurement of the radius, BMC). (U.S.)

  10. Prediction of human core body temperature using non-invasive measurement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermann, Reto; Wyss, Eva; Annaheim, Simon; Psikuta, Agnes; Davey, Sarah; Rossi, René Michel

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of core body temperature is an efficient method for monitoring heat stress amongst workers in hot conditions. However, invasive measurement of core body temperature (e.g. rectal, intestinal, oesophageal temperature) is impractical for such applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define relevant non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature under various conditions. We conducted two human subject studies with different experimental protocols, different environmental temperatures (10 °C, 30 °C) and different subjects. In both studies the same non-invasive measurement methods (skin temperature, skin heat flux, heart rate) were applied. A principle component analysis was conducted to extract independent factors, which were then used in a linear regression model. We identified six parameters (three skin temperatures, two skin heat fluxes and heart rate), which were included for the calculation of two factors. The predictive value of these factors for core body temperature was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The calculated root mean square deviation (rmsd) was in the range from 0.28 °C to 0.34 °C for all environmental conditions. These errors are similar to previous models using non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature. The results from this study illustrate that multiple physiological parameters (e.g. skin temperature and skin heat fluxes) are needed to predict core body temperature. In addition, the physiological measurements chosen in this study and the algorithm defined in this work are potentially applicable as real-time core body temperature monitoring to assess health risk in broad range of working conditions.

  11. Methods of Assessing Body Fatness among Children: Implications for the National Child Measurement Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Sharon; Twist, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is increasingly recognized as an inadequate measure for determining obesity in children. Therefore, the aim within this study was to investigate other indirect methods of body fat assessment that could potentially be used in place of BMI. Twenty-four children (boys: 13.8 [plus or minus] 0.8 yr; girls: 13.3 [plus or minus] 0.5…

  12. Effect of body mass index on functional outcomes following arthroplasty procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Gokhan; Ceylan, Hasan Huseyin; Sayar, Safak; Kucukdurmaz, Fatih; Erdil, Mehmet; Tuncay, Ibrahim

    2015-12-18

    To evaluate the body mass index (BMI) change in arthroplasty patients and its impact on the patients' functional results. Between October 2010 and May 2013, 606 patients who were operated due to gonarthrosis, coxarthrosis, aseptic loosening of the total knee and hip prosthesis were evaluated prospectively. Patients were operated by three surgeons in three medical centers. Patients who were between 30-90 years of age and who were underwent total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, revision knee arthroplasty, or revision hip arthroplasty were included in the study. We excluded the patients who cannot tolerate our standard postoperative rehabilitation program. Additionally, patients who had systemic inflammatory diseases, diabetes mellitus, or endochrinopathies were excluded from the study. The remaining 513 patients comprised our study group. Preoperative functional joint scores, height, weight and BMI of all patients were recorded. We used the Knee Society Score (KSS) for knee and Harris Hip Score (HHS) for hip patients. Postoperative functional scores were measured at 1(st), 6(th) and 12(th) months and recorded separately at outpatient visits. The mean age of the patients was 64.7 (range: 30-90) years (207 males/306 females) and the mean follow-up duration was 14.3 (range: 12-26) mo. We found that arthroplasty patients had weight gain and had an increase in BMI at the postoperative 1(st), 6(th) and 12(th) months. The mean BMI of the patients was 27.7 preoperatively, 27.8 at the postoperative 1(st) month, 28.1 at the 6(th) month and 28.6 at the 12(th) month (P < 0.01). At the last visit, the mean postoperative HHS of the hip arthroplasty patients was 82.2 ± 7.12 (preoperatively, 52.3; 1(st) month, 78.2; 6(th) month, 81.1; 12(th) month, 82.2), and the mean KSS of the knee arthroplasty patients was 79.3 ± 4.31 (preoperatively, 35.8; 1(st) month, 75.2; 6(th) month, 79.1; 12(th) month, 79.3). Worse functional results were noted in the patients who had a BMI

  13. The outcome of drug smuggling by 'body packers'--the British experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulstrode, N; Banks, F; Shrotria, S

    2002-01-01

    Body packing or internal concealment used by drug dealers to smuggle illicit substances, puts the body packer at risk of both imprisonment and death. We report our experience over a 4 year period from January 1996 to December 1999 of suspects presenting to our hospital (the largest series in Europe). A total of 572 cases were assessed radiographically and 180 were shown to be carrying foreign bodies. The commonest reasons for admission were suspected overdose or gastrointestinal obstruction. Thirty-six cases were admitted, of whom 7 required surgical intervention. No deaths occurred. Of all people detained for smuggling by internal concealment into Britain during this period, 27% were seen in our hospital. These cases may present alone or escorted by Her Majesty's Customs and Excise personnel, and one must be aware of this possibility even when situated away from a port of entry.

  14. Translating patient reported outcome measures: methodological issues explored using cognitive interviewing with three rheumatoid arthritis measures in six European languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hewlett, Sarah E.; Nicklin, Joanna; Bode, Christina; Carmona, Loretto; Dures, Emma; Engelbrecht, Matthias; Hagel, Sofia; Kirwan, John R.; Molto, Anna; Redondo, Marta; Gossec, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Cross-cultural translation of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) is a lengthy process, often performed professionally. Cognitive interviewing assesses patient comprehension of PROMs. The objective was to evaluate the usefulness of cognitive interviewing to assess translations and

  15. Electric Field Measurement of the Living Human Body for Biomedical Applications: Phase Measurement of the Electric Field Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Hieda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors are developing a technique for conducting measurements inside the human body by applying a weak electric field at a radio frequency (RF. Low RF power is fed to a small antenna, and a similar antenna located 15–50 cm away measures the electric field intensity. Although the resolution of the method is low, it is simple, safe, cost-effective, and able to be used for biomedical applications. One of the technical issues suggested by the authors' previous studies was that the signal pattern acquired from measurement of a human body was essentially different from that acquired from a phantom. To trace the causes of this difference, the accuracy of the phase measurements was improved. This paper describes the new experimental system that can measure the signal phase and amplitude and reports the results of experiments measuring a human body and a phantom. The results were analyzed and then discussed in terms of their contribution to the phase measurement.

  16. Calorimetry Minisensor for the Localised Measurement of Surface Heat Dissipated from the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, Fabiola; Rodríguez de Rivera, Pedro Jesús; Rodríguez de Rivera, Manuel

    2016-11-06

    We have developed a calorimetry sensor that can perform a local measurement of the surface heat dissipated from the human body. The operating principle is based on the law of conductive heat transfer: heat dissipated by the human body passes across a thermopile located between the individual and a thermostat. Body heat power is calculated from the signals measured by the thermopile and the amount of power dissipated across the thermostat in order to maintain a constant temperature. The first prototype we built had a detection area measuring 6 × 6 cm², while the second prototype, which is described herein, had a 2 × 2 cm² detection area. This new design offers three advantages over the initial one: (1) greater resolution and three times greater thermal sensitivity; (2) a twice as fast response; and (3) it can take measurements from smaller areas of the body. The sensor has a 5 mW resolution, but the uncertainty is greater, up to 15 mW, due to the measurement and calculation procedure. The order of magnitude of measurements made in healthy subjects ranged from 60 to 300 mW at a thermostat temperature of 28 °C and an ambient room temperature of 21 °C. The values measured by the sensor depend on the ambient temperature and the thermostat's temperature, while the power dissipated depends on the individual's metabolism and any physical and/or emotional activity.

  17. Outcome measurements in major trauma--results of a consensus meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardolino, A; Sleat, G; Willett, K

    2012-10-01

    The NHS Outcomes Framework for England has identified recovery from major injury as an important clinical area. At present, there are no established outcome indicators. As more patients survive major trauma, outcomes will need to be measured in terms of morbidity and not mortality alone. To make recommendations for a selection of outcome measures that could be integrated into National Clinical Audit data collection and form part of clinical governance requirements for Regional Trauma Networks (RTNs) and measures by which RTNs are held to account by government. Specific focus was given to acute care and rehabilitation for both adults and children. A Multiprofessional, multidisciplinary expert group reviewed the current evidence on outcome measures for major trauma in the adult and children's populations, informed by a systematic review carried out jointly by the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN) and the Cochrane Injuries Group. A structured discussion covered functional and quality of life outcome measures as well as patient experience and indicators such as return to work, education and social dependency. For the adult population the group agreed with the in-hospital performance and hospital discharge measures recommended in the TARN and Cochrane systematic review. Concerning longer-term outcome indicators, the group suggested the use of the Glasgow Outcome Scale - Extended (GOS-E) and European Quality of Life 5D (EQ-5D) with consideration to be given to the World Health Organisation Quality of Life survey (WHO-QoL). For patients who had ongoing inpatient rehabilitation needs the group thought the measurement of the Rehabilitation Complexity Scale (RCS) and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) were important in total brain injury and, the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (ASIA) and Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) in spinal cord injury. For children the group recommended the use of the King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury

  18. Beyond FEV1 in COPD: a review of patient-reported outcomes and their measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Paul Jones,1 Marc Miravitlles,2 Thys van der Molen,3 Karoly Kulich41Division of Clinical Science, University of London, London, UK; 2Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Hospital Clínic, Ciber de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Barcelona, Spain; 3Department of Primary Care, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; 4Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD present with a variety of symptoms and pathological consequences. Although primarily viewed as a respiratory disease, COPD has both pulmonary and extrapulmonary effects, which have an impact on many aspects of physical, emotional, and mental well-being. Traditional assessment of COPD relies heavily on measuring lung function, specifically forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1. However, the evidence suggests that FEV1 is a relatively poor correlate of symptoms such as breathlessness and the impact of COPD on daily life. Furthermore, many consequences of the disease, including anxiety and depression and the ability to perform daily activities, can only be described and reported reliably by the patient. Thus, in order to provide a comprehensive view of the effects of interventions in clinical trials, it is essential that spirometry is accompanied by assessments using patient-reported outcome (PRO instruments. We provide an overview of patient-reported outcome concepts in COPD, such as breathlessness, physical functioning, and health status, and evaluate the tools used for measuring these concepts. Particular attention is given to the newly developed instruments emerging in response to recent regulatory guidelines for the development and use of PROs in clinical trials. We conclude that although data from the development and validation of these new PRO instruments are emerging, to build the body of evidence that supports the use of a new instrument takes many years. Furthermore, new

  19. Beyond Body Mass Index: Using Anthropometric Measures and Body Composition Indicators to Assess Odds of an Endometriosis Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backonja, Uba; Hediger, Mary L; Chen, Zhen; Lauver, Diane R; Sun, Liping; Peterson, C Matthew; Buck Louis, Germaine M

    2017-09-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and endometriosis have been inversely associated. To address gaps in this research, we examined associations among body composition, endometriosis, and physical activity. Women from 14 clinical sites in the Salt Lake City, Utah and San Francisco, California areas and scheduled for laparoscopy/laparotomy were recruited during 2007-2009. Participants (N = 473) underwent standardized anthropometric assessments to estimate body composition before surgery. Using a cross-sectional design, odds of an endometriosis diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]; 95% confidence interval [CI]) were calculated for anthropometric and body composition measures (weight in kg; height in cm; mid upper arm, waist, hip, and chest circumferences in cm; subscapular, suprailiac, and triceps skinfold thicknesses in mm; arm muscle and fat areas in cm 2 ; centripetal fat, chest-to-waist, chest-to-hip, waist-to-hip, and waist-to-height ratios; arm fat index; and BMI in kg/m 2 ). Physical activity (metabolic equivalent of task-minutes/week) and sedentariness (average minutes sitting on a weekday) were assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form. Measures were modeled continuously and in quartiles based on sample estimates. Adjusted models were controlled for age (years, continuous), site (Utah/California), smoking history (never, former, or current smoker), and income (below, within 180%, and above of the poverty line). Findings were standardized by dividing variables by their respective standard deviations. We used adjusted models to examine whether odds of an endometriosis diagnosis were moderated by physical activity or sedentariness. Inverse relationships were observed between endometriosis and standardized: weight (aOR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.57-0.88); subscapular skinfold thickness (aOR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.65-0.98); waist and hip circumferences (aOR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.64-0.98 and aOR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.61-0.94, respectively); total

  20. Funen Anorexia Nervosa Study - a follow-up study on outcome, mortality, quality of life and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Laura Al-Dakhiel

    2017-06-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) comprise a wide range of symptoms, with severe psychological and physical implications for the patient. EDs include anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and until 2013 eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS), if criteria for AN or BN were not met. Patients suffering from an ED have poor prognosis, with more than half of AN patients not obtaining complete remission. One-fifth develops a chronic disease. EDs have an increased risk of premature death and patients with EDs report poorer quality of life (QoL) compared to both the general population and other psychiatric/somatic diseases. Patients who, apparently, obtain complete remission will still be affected in QoL when compared to a healthy reference group. Treatment is complicated by high drop-out rates, hence making large retrospective follow-up studies difficult to conduct. The multiple endocrine disturbances as a result of the severe malnourishment in AN often result in amenorrhea and a weight goal for remenorrhea has been ambiguous. This thesis encompasses results from four studies examining the abovementioned challenges and is based on a large retrospective cohort of ED patients referred to a highly specialized ED treatment unit. Study 1: QoL in EDs was reported for a large retrospective Danish cohort. Furthermore, meta-analysis on existing published literature was performed to determine potential differences between the diagnostic groups. QoL in EDs was significantly decreased compared to the general population and no difference between the diagnostic groups was established. Study 2: ED pathology (measured by the Eating Disorder Inventory - 2 (EDI-2)) and outcome (measured by the Morgan Russell Outcome Schedule (MROS)) was reported for a large retrospective Danish cohort. The correlation between the patient-reported measurements (SF-36 & EDI-2) and clinician-assessed characteristics (BMI and remission status) was investigated in a group of ED patients (n=383). A high

  1. Assessment of sarcopenia and changes in body composition after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and associations with clinical outcomes in oesophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Connie [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Singapore (Singapore); Imaging 2, Level 1, Lambeth Wing, St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Goh, Vicky [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Davies, Andrew; Gossage, James; Mason, Robert [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Upper Gastrointestinal and General Surgery, London (United Kingdom); Mitchell-Hay, Rosalind; Griffin, Nyree [Department of Radiology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hynes, Orla [Department of Dietetics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Maisey, Nick; Ross, Paul; Gaya, Andrew [Department of Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Landau, David B. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Department of Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Cook, Gary J. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    Sarcopenia and changes in body composition following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) may affect clinical outcome. We assessed the associations between CT body composition changes following NAC and outcomes in oesophageal cancer. A total of 35 patients who received NAC followed by oesophagectomy, and underwent CT assessment pre- and post-NAC were included. Fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM), subcutaneous fat to muscle ratio (FMR) and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio (VA/SA) were derived from CT. Changes in FM, FFM, FMR, VA/SA and sarcopenia were correlated to chemotherapy dose reductions, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay (LOS), circumferential resection margin (CRM), pathological chemotherapy response, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Nine (26 %) patients were sarcopenic before NAC and this increased to 15 (43 %) after NAC. Average weight loss was 3.7 % ± 6.4 (SD) in comparison to FM index (-1.2 ± 4.2), FFM index (-4.6 ± 6.8), FMR (-1.2 ± 24.3) and VA/SA (-62.3 ± 12.7). Changes in FM index (p = 0.022), FMR (p = 0.028), VA/SA (p = 0.024) and weight (p = 0.007) were significant univariable factors for CRM status. There was no significant association between changes in body composition and survival. Loss of FM, differential loss of VA/SA and skeletal muscle were associated with risk of CRM positivity. (orig.)

  2. Assessment of sarcopenia and changes in body composition after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and associations with clinical outcomes in oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, Connie; Goh, Vicky; Davies, Andrew; Gossage, James; Mason, Robert; Mitchell-Hay, Rosalind; Griffin, Nyree; Hynes, Orla; Maisey, Nick; Ross, Paul; Gaya, Andrew; Landau, David B.; Cook, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia and changes in body composition following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) may affect clinical outcome. We assessed the associations between CT body composition changes following NAC and outcomes in oesophageal cancer. A total of 35 patients who received NAC followed by oesophagectomy, and underwent CT assessment pre- and post-NAC were included. Fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM), subcutaneous fat to muscle ratio (FMR) and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio (VA/SA) were derived from CT. Changes in FM, FFM, FMR, VA/SA and sarcopenia were correlated to chemotherapy dose reductions, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay (LOS), circumferential resection margin (CRM), pathological chemotherapy response, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Nine (26 %) patients were sarcopenic before NAC and this increased to 15 (43 %) after NAC. Average weight loss was 3.7 % ± 6.4 (SD) in comparison to FM index (-1.2 ± 4.2), FFM index (-4.6 ± 6.8), FMR (-1.2 ± 24.3) and VA/SA (-62.3 ± 12.7). Changes in FM index (p = 0.022), FMR (p = 0.028), VA/SA (p = 0.024) and weight (p = 0.007) were significant univariable factors for CRM status. There was no significant association between changes in body composition and survival. Loss of FM, differential loss of VA/SA and skeletal muscle were associated with risk of CRM positivity. (orig.)

  3. Carotid body size measured by computed tomographic angiography in individuals born prematurely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Melissa L; Welch, Brian T; Randall, Jess T; Petersen-Jones, Humphrey G; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2018-05-24

    We tested the hypothesis that the carotid bodies would be smaller in individuals born prematurely or exposed to perinatal oxygen therapy when compared individuals born full term that did not receive oxygen therapy. A retrospective chart review was conducted on patients who underwent head/neck computed tomography angiography (CTA) at the Mayo Clinic between 10 and 40 years of age (n = 2503). Patients were identified as premature ( body images captured during the CTA were performed. Carotid body visualization was possible in 43% of patients and 52% of age, sex, and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls but only 17% of juvenile preterm subjects (p = 0.07). Of the carotid bodies that could be visualized, widest axial measurements of the carotid bodies in individuals born prematurely (n = 7, 34 ± 4 weeks gestation, birth weight: 2460 ± 454 g; average size: 2.5 ± 0.2 cm) or individuals exposed to perinatal oxygen therapy (n = 3, 38 ± 2 weeks gestation, Average size: 2.2 ± 0.1 cm) were not different when compared to controls (2.3 ± 0.2 cm and 2.3 ± 0.2 cm, respectively, p > 0.05). Carotid body size, as measured using CTA, is not smaller in adults born prematurely or exposed to perinatal oxygen therapy when compared to sex, age, and BMI-matched controls. However, carotid body visualization was lower in juvenile premature patients. The decreased ability to visualize the carotid bodies in these individuals may be a result of their prematurity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Infant-parent attachment: Definition, types, antecedents, measurement and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Diane

    2004-10-01

    Attachment theory is one of the most popular and empirically grounded theories relating to parenting. The purpose of the present article is to review some pertinent aspects of attachment theory and findings from attachment research. Attachment is one specific aspect of the relationship between a child and a parent with its purpose being to make a child safe, secure and protected. Attachment is distinguished from other aspects of parenting, such as disciplining, entertaining and teaching. Common misconceptions about what attachment is and what it is not are discussed. The distinction between attachment and bonding is provided. The recognized method to assess infant-parent attachment, the Strange Situation procedure, is described. In addition, a description is provided for the four major types of infant-parent attachment, ie, secure, insecure-avoidant, insecure-resistant and insecure-disorganized. The antecedents and consequences of each of the four types of infant-parent attachment are discussed. A special emphasis is placed on the description of disorganized attachment because of its association with significant emotional and behavioural problems, and poor social and emotional outcomes in high-risk groups and in the majority of children who have disorganized attachment with their primary caregiver. Practical applications of attachment theory and research are presented.

  5. Comparison of Dolphins' Body and Brain Measurements with Four Other Groups of Cetaceans Reveals Great Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Sam H; Carlin, Kevin P; Van Alstyne, Kaitlin R; Hanson, Alicia C; Tarpley, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    We compared mature dolphins with 4 other groupings of mature cetaceans. With a large data set, we found great brain diversity among 5 different taxonomic groupings. The dolphins in our data set ranged in body mass from about 40 to 6,750 kg and in brain mass from 0.4 to 9.3 kg. Dolphin body length ranged from 1.3 to 7.6 m. In our combined data set from the 4 other groups of cetaceans, body mass ranged from about 20 to 120,000 kg and brain mass from about 0.2 to 9.2 kg, while body length varied from 1.21 to 26.8 m. Not all cetaceans have large brains relative to their body size. A few dolphins near human body size have human-sized brains. On the other hand, the absolute brain mass of some other cetaceans is only one-sixth as large. We found that brain volume relative to body mass decreases from Delphinidae to a group of Phocoenidae and Monodontidae, to a group of other odontocetes, to Balaenopteroidea, and finally to Balaenidae. We also found the same general trend when we compared brain volume relative to body length, except that the Delphinidae and Phocoenidae-Monodontidae groups do not differ significantly. The Balaenidae have the smallest relative brain mass and the lowest cerebral cortex surface area. Brain parts also vary. Relative to body mass and to body length, dolphins also have the largest cerebellums. Cortex surface area is isometric with brain size when we exclude the Balaenidae. Our data show that the brains of Balaenidae are less convoluted than those of the other cetaceans measured. Large vascular networks inside the cranial vault may help to maintain brain temperature, and these nonbrain tissues increase in volume with body mass and with body length ranging from 8 to 65% of the endocranial volume. Because endocranial vascular networks and other adnexa, such as the tentorium cerebelli, vary so much in different species, brain size measures from endocasts of some extinct cetaceans may be overestimates. Our regression of body length on endocranial

  6. Associations of the pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcomes in Taiwanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, I-Hsien; Chen, Chih-Ping; Sun, Fang-Ju; Wu, Chia-Hsun; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Pre-pregnancy weight and gestational weight gain (GWG) are important factors in both maternal and infant outcomes. Little information is available in relation to different levels of pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and body weight gain on obstetric outcomes in Taiwan. This study investigated the associations between pregnancy complications with pre-pregnant BMI and GWG, in Taiwanese women. Data were extracted from a delivery room information bank on all women delivering singleton babies in a medical center. Eight hundred and sixty pregnant women were included. The collected variables included basic information, GWG, and pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Pregnant women were categorized according to their pre-pregnant BMI and GWG to evaluate the impacts of pre-pregnant BMI and maternal weight gain on the risk of pregnancy complications. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed, and odds ratios were calculated. Pre-pregnancy BMI>=24 kg/m2 increased the risks of gestational diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and preterm labor. Preeclampsia and Cesarean delivery were positively associated with high weight gains (>18 kg), whereas a low birth weight and preterm labor were strongly associated with low weight gains (14 kg in women who were underweight and normal weight before pregnancy. An appropriate maternal BMI (18.5-24 kg/m2) at conception followed by a suitable gestational weight gain (10-14 kg) has substantial impact on the overall health of pregnant women and would lead to better obstetric management for Taiwanese women.

  7. Characteristics of attention-related body sensations. Temporal stability and associations with measures of body focus, affect, sustained attention, and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tihanyi, Benedek T; Ferentzi, Eszter; Köteles, Ferenc

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the temporal stability and correlates of attention-related body sensations that emerge without external stimulation during rest and due to focused attention on a body part. To assess attention-related body sensations, participants were asked to focus on a freely chosen body area with closed eyes, and had to report whether the sensation of that area had changed. Self-report questionnaires were used to assess various aspects of body focus (body awareness, body responsiveness, somatosensory amplification, subjective somatic symptoms), and positive and negative affectivity. Previous experiences in body-mind therapies were also measured. PEBL Continuous Performance Test was used to assess sustained attention. Heart rate variability scores were based on a 3-minute long resting heart rate measurement. Fifty-eight university students (22.3 ± 3.95 years; 34 females) participated in the study. The stability of attention-related body sensations was measured 8 weeks later on a randomly chosen sub-group (n = 28). Attention-related body sensations showed a mediocre temporal stability (r ρ  = 0.47, p = 0.012). People reporting attention-related body sensations showed significantly higher body awareness, somatosensory amplification, and resting heart rate; and marginally higher somatic symptoms. No relation was found with body-mind practice, body responsiveness, positive and negative affect, the vagal component of heart rate variability, and performance in the sustained attention task. Attention-related sensations are relatively stable over time. They are connected to some, but not to all of the aspects of body focus. Further studies are needed to elaborate the influencing stable and situational factors.

  8. Hepatic contrast medium enhancement at computed tomography and its correlation with various body size measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Anders; Nouhad, Jallo; Cederlund, Kerstin; Aspelin, Peter; Torkel, Brismar B., E-mail: anders.svensson@karolinska.se [Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology at Karolinska Inst., Div. of Medical Imaging and Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); (Dept. of Radiology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm (Sweden)); Nyman, Ulf (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Univ. of Lund, Trelleborg (Sweden)); Bjoerk, Jonas (Competence Centre for Clinical Research, Skaane Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-07-15

    Background. When the same dose of iodine is given to all patients when performing abdominal computed tomography (CT) there may be a wide inter-individual variation in contrast medium (CM) enhancement of the liver. Purpose. To evaluate if any of the measures body height (BH), body mass index (BMI), lean body mass (LBM), ideal body weight (IBW), and body surface area (BSA) correlated better than body weight (BW) with hepatic enhancement, and to compare the enhancement when using iodixanol and iomeprol. Material and Methods. One hundred patients referred for standard three-phase CT examination of abdomen were enrolled. Body weight and height were measured at the time of the CT examination. Forty grams of iodine (iodixanol 320 mg I/mL or iomeprol 400 mg I/mL) was injected at a rate of 1.6 g-I/s, followed by a 50 mL saline flush. The late arterial phase was determined by using a semi-automatic smart prep technique with a scan delay of 20 s. The hepatic parenchymal phase started automatically 25 s after the late arterial phase. CM concentration was estimated by placement of regions of interest in aorta (native and late arterial phase) and in liver (native and parenchymal phase). Results. BW (r -0.51 and -0.64), LBM (r = -0.54 and -0.59), and BSA (r -0.54 and -0.65) showed the best correlation coefficients with aortic and hepatic parenchymal enhancement, respectively, without any significant differences between the measures. Comparing iodixanol and iomeprol there was no significant difference in aortic enhancement. The liver enhancement was significantly higher (P < 0.05) using iodixanol than iomeprol. Conclusion. To achieve a consistent hepatic enhancement, CM dose may simply be adjusted to body weight instead of using more complicated calculated parameters based on both weight and height.

  9. Wearable sensors in intelligent clothing for measuring human body temperature based on optical fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongqiang; Yang, Haijing; Li, Enbang; Liu, Zhihui; Wei, Kejia

    2012-05-21

    Measuring body temperature is considerably important to physiological studies as well as clinical investigations. In recent years, numerous observations have been reported and various methods of measurement have been employed. The present paper introduces a novel wearable sensor in intelligent clothing for human body temperature measurement. The objective is the integration of optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based sensors into functional textiles to extend the capabilities of wearable solutions for body temperature monitoring. In addition, the temperature sensitivity is 150 pm/°C, which is almost 15 times higher than that of a bare FBG. This study combines large and small pipes during fabrication to implant FBG sensors into the fabric. The law of energy conservation of the human body is considered in determining heat transfer between the body and its clothing. The mathematical model of heat transmission between the body and clothed FBG sensors is studied, and the steady-state thermal analysis is presented. The simulation results show the capability of the material to correct the actual body temperature. Based on the skin temperature obtained by the weighted average method, this paper presents the five points weighted coefficients model using both sides of the chest, armpits, and the upper back for the intelligent clothing. The weighted coefficients of 0.0826 for the left chest, 0.3706 for the left armpit, 0.3706 for the right armpit, 0.0936 for the upper back, and 0.0826 for the right chest were obtained using Cramer's Rule. Using the weighting coefficient, the deviation of the experimental result was ± 0.18 °C, which favors the use for clinical armpit temperature monitoring. Moreover, in special cases when several FBG sensors are broken, the weighted coefficients of the other sensors could be changed to obtain accurate body temperature.

  10. Dose discrepancy between planning system estimation and measurement in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Vial Philip; Berry Megan; Ochoa, Cesar; Beeksma, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat spinal metastases has shown excellent clinical outcomes for local control. High dose gradients wrapping around spinal cord make this treatment technically challenging. In this work, we present a spine SBRT case where a dosimetric error was identified during pre-treatment dosimetric quality assurance (QA). A patient with metastasis in T7 vertebral body consented to undergo SBRT. A dual arc volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was generated on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) with a 6 MV Elekta machine using gantry control point spacing of 4°. Standard pre-treatment QA measurements were performed, including ArcCHECK, ion chamber in CTV and spinal cord (SC) region and film measurements in multiple planes. While the dose measured at CTV region showed good agreement with TPS, the dose measured to the SC was significantly higher than reported by TPS in the original and repeat plans. Acceptable agreement was only achieved when the gantry control point spacing was reduced to 3°. A potentially harmful dose error was identified by pre-treatment QA. TPS parameter settings used safely in conventional treatments should be re-assessed for complex treatments.

  11. Measurement of whole-body human centers of gravity and moments of inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albery, C B; Schultz, R B; Bjorn, V S

    1998-06-01

    With the inclusion of women in combat aircraft, the question of safe ejection seat operation has been raised. The potential expanded population of combat pilots would include both smaller and larger ejection seat occupants, which could significantly affect seat performance. The method developed to measure human whole-body CG and MOI used a scale, a knife edge balance, and an inverted torsional pendulum. Subjects' moments of inertia were measured along six different axes. The inertia tensor was calculated from these values, and principal moments of inertia were then derived. Thirty-eight antropometric measurements were also taken for each subject to provide a means for direct correlation of inertial properties to body dimensions and for modeling purposes. Data collected in this study has been used to validate whole-body mass properties predictions. In addition, data will be used to improve Air Force and Navy ejection seat trajectory models for the expanded population.

  12. Glucose kinetics and pregnancy outcome in Indian women with low and normal body mass indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal energy demands are met from the oxidation of maternally supplied glucose and amino acids. During the fasted state, the glucose supply is thought to be met by gluconeogenesis. Underweight women with low body mass index (BMI) might be unable to adequately supply amino acids to satisfy the demand...

  13. Foreign-body ingestion: characteristics and outcomes in a lower socioeconomic population with predominantly intentional ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Renee; Sahota, Amandeep; Bemarki, Ali; Salama, Paul; Simpson, Nicole; Laine, Loren

    2009-03-01

    Previous reports of foreign-body ingestions focused primarily on accidental ingestions. To describe the characteristics and management of foreign-body ingestions, with predominantly intentional ingestion, in a lower socioeconomic status population. A retrospective case series. An urban county hospital. Patients >/=17 years old, with foreign-body ingestions between 2000 and 2006. Characteristics of ingestion cases, endoscopic extraction, need for surgery, and complications. Among 262 cases, 92% were intentional, 85% involved psychiatric patients, and 84% occurred in patients with prior ingestions. The time from ingestion to presentation was >48 hours in 168 cases (64%). The overall success rate for endoscopic extraction was 90% (165/183 cases). Surgery was performed in 30 cases (11%) and was more common for objects beyond the pylorus versus objects above the pylorus (16/43 [37%] vs 10/151 [7%], respectively) and in cases with a greater delay from ingestion to presentation (25/168 [15%] if >48 hours vs 4/77 [5%] if 48 hours vs 14/165 [8%] if body ingestions in an urban county hospital occurred primarily in psychiatric patients who had repeated episodes of intentional ingestions. Endoscopic extraction was unsuccessful in 10% of cases. Long delays from ingestion to presentation and intervention may account for relatively high rates of surgery and perforation. Strategies to prevent ingestions and delays in endoscopic management are needed in this population.

  14. In vivo ultrasound and biometric measurements predict the empty body chemical composition in Nellore cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilhos, A M; Francisco, C L; Branco, R H; Bonilha, S F M; Mercadante, M E Z; Meirelles, P R L; Pariz, C M; Jorge, A M

    2018-05-04

    Evaluation of the body chemical composition of beef cattle can only be measured postmortem and those data cannot be used in real production scenarios to adjust nutritional plans. The objective of this study was to develop multiple linear regression equations from in vivo measurements, such as ultrasound parameters [backfat thickness (uBFT, mm), rump fat thickness (uRF, mm), and ribeye area (uLMA, cm2)], shrunk body weight (SBW, kg), age (AG, d), hip height (HH, m), as well as from postmortem measurements (composition of the 9th to 11th rib section) to predict the empty body and carcass chemical composition for Nellore cattle. Thirty-three young bulls were used (339 ± 36.15 kg and 448 ± 17.78 d for initial weight and age, respectively). Empty body chemical composition (protein, fat, water, and ash in kg) was obtained by combining noncarcass and carcass components. Data were analyzed using the PROC REG procedure of SAS software. Mallows' Cp values were close to the ideal value of number of independent variables in the prediction equations plus one. Equations to predict chemical components of both empty body and carcass using in vivo measurements presented higher R2 values than those determined by postmortem measurements. Chemical composition of the empty body using in vivo measurements was predicted with R2 > 0.73. Equations to predict chemical composition of the carcass from in vivo measurements showed R2 lower (R2Chemical compounds from components of the empty body of Nellore cattle can be calculated by the following equations: protein (kg) = 47.92 + 0.18 × SBW - 1.46 × uRF - 30.72 × HH (R2 = 0.94, RMSPE = 1.79); fat (kg) = 11.33 + 0.16 × SBW + 2.09 × uRF - 0.06 × AG (R2 = 0.74, RMSPE = 4.18); water (kg) = - 34.00 + 0.55 × SBW + 0.10 × AG - 2.34 × uRF (R2 = 0.96, RMSPE = 5.47). In conclusion, the coefficients of determination (for determining the chemical composition of the empty body) of the equations derived from in vivo measures were higher than those

  15. Evaluation of body condition score measured throughout lactation as an indicator of fertility in dairy cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Banos, G; Brotherstone, S; Coffey, MP

    2004-01-01

    Body condition score (BCS) records of primiparous Holstein cows were analyzed both as a single measure per animal and as repeated measures per sire of cow. The former resulted in a single, average, genetic evaluation for each sire, and the latter resulted in separate genetic evaluations per day of lactation. Repeated measure analysis yielded genetic correlations of less than unity between days of lactation, suggesting that BCS may not be the same trait across lactation. Differences between da...

  16. A study on the applicability of implantable microchip transponders for body temperature measurements in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enøe Claes

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The applicability of an electronic monitoring system using microchip transponders for measurement of body temperatures was tested in 6-week-old conventional Danish weaners infected with classical swine fever virus (CSFV. Subcutaneous tissue temperatures obtained by the implantable transponders were compared with rectal temperatures, recorded by a conventional digital thermometer. Methods In a preliminary study, transponders were inserted subcutaneously at 6 different positions of the body of 5 pigs. The transponders positioned by the ear base provided the best correlation to rectal temperature. To test the stability of the monitoring system in a larger group of pigs, transponders were therefore inserted by the left ear base in a subsequent infection experiment with 30 pigs. Results Generally, the microchip transponders measured a subcutaneous tissue temperature, which was about 1°C lower than the rectal temperature. However, a simple linear relationship between the measures of the two methods was found. Conclusions Our study showed that the tested body monitoring system may represent a promising tool to obtain an approximate correlate of body temperatures in groups of pigs. In contrast, however, the tested system did not constitute a suitable tool to measure body temperatures of individual animals in the present pig infection experiment.

  17. Nonverbal Synchrony in Psychotherapy: Coordinated Body Movement Reflects Relationship Quality and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors quantified nonverbal synchrony--the coordination of patient's and therapist's movement--in a random sample of same-sex psychotherapy dyads. The authors contrasted nonverbal synchrony in these dyads with a control condition and assessed its association with session-level and overall psychotherapy outcome. Method: Using an…

  18. Motor outcome measures in Huntington disease clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilmann, Ralf; Schubert, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in motor function are a hallmark of Huntington disease (HD). The Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale Total Motor Score (UHDRS-TMS) is a categoric clinical rating scale assessing multiple domains of motor disability in HD. The UHDRS-TMS or subsets of its items have served as primary or secondary endpoints in numerous clinical trials. In spite of a well-established video-based annual online certification system, intra- and interrater variability, subjective error, and rater-induced placebo effects remain a concern. In addition, the UHDRS-TMS was designed to primarily assess motor symptoms in manifest HD. Recently, advancement of technology resulted in the introduction of the objective Q-Motor (i.e., Quantitative-Motor) assessments in biomarker studies and clinical trials in HD. Q-Motor measures detected motor signs in blinded cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of manifest, prodromal, and premanifest HD cohorts up to two decades before clinical diagnosis. In a multicenter clinical trial in HD, Q-Motor measures were more sensitive than the UHDRS-TMS and exhibited no placebo effects. Thus, Q-Motor measures are currently explored in several multicenter trials targeting both symptomatic and disease-modifying mechanisms. They may supplement the UHDRS-TMS, increase the sensitivity and reliability in proof-of-concept studies, and open the door for phenotype assessments in clinical trials in prodromal and premanifest HD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient-reported outcome measures versus inertial performance-based outcome measures: A prospective study in patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolink, S A A N; Grimm, B; Heyligers, I C

    2015-12-01

    Outcome assessment of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) by subjective patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) may not fully capture the functional (dis-)abilities of relevance. Objective performance-based outcome measures could provide distinct information. An ambulant inertial measurement unit (IMU) allows kinematic assessment of physical performance and could potentially be used for routine follow-up. To investigate the responsiveness of IMU measures in patients following TKA and compare outcomes with conventional PROMs. Patients with end stage knee OA (n=20, m/f=7/13; age=67.4 standard deviation 7.7 years) were measured preoperatively and one year postoperatively. IMU measures were derived during gait, sit-stand transfers and block step-up transfers. PROMs were assessed by using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Knee Society Score (KSS). Responsiveness was calculated by the effect size, correlations were calculated with Spearman's rho correlation coefficient. One year after TKA, patients performed significantly better at gait, sit-to-stand transfers and block step-up transfers. Measures of time and kinematic IMU measures demonstrated significant improvements postoperatively for each performance-based test. The largest improvement was found in block step-up transfers (effect size=0.56-1.20). WOMAC function score and KSS function score demonstrated moderate correlations (Spearman's rho=0.45-0.74) with some of the physical performance-based measures pre- and postoperatively. To characterize the changes in physical function after TKA, PROMs could be supplemented by performance-based measures, assessing function during different activities and allowing kinematic characterization with an ambulant IMU. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurement of total-body cobalt-57 vitamin B12 absorption with a gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardarelli, J.A.; Slingerland, D.W.; Burrows, B.A.; Miller, A.

    1985-01-01

    Previously described techniques for the measurement of the absorption of [ 57 Co]vitamin B 12 by total-body counting have required an iron room equipped with scanning or multiple detectors. The present study uses simplifying modifications which make the technique more available and include the use of static geometry, the measurement of body thickness to correct for attenuation, a simple formula to convert the capsule-in-air count to a 100% absorption count, and finally the use of an adequately shielded gamma camera obviating the need of an iron room

  1. Measurement of total body chlorine by prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddoe, A.H.; Streat, S.J.; Hill, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    A method of measuring total body chlorine (TBCl) by prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation analysis is described depending on the same NaI(Tl) spectra used for determinations of total body nitrogen. Ratios of chlorine to hydrogen are derived and TBCl determined using a model of body composition depending on measured body weight, total body water (by tritium dilution) and protein (6.25 x nitrogen) as well as estimated body minerals and glycogen. The precision of the method based on scanning an anthropomorphic phantom is approximately 9% (SD), for a patient dose equivalent of less than 0.30 mSv. Spectra collected from 67 normal volunteers (32 male, 35 female) yielded mean values of TBCl of 72 +- 19 (SD) g in males and 53.6 +- 15 g in females, in broad agreement with values reported by workers using delayed gamma methods. Results are presented for two human cadavers analysed by neutron activation and conventional chemical analysis; the ratios of TBCl (neutron activation) to TBCl (chemical) were 0.980 +- 0.028 (SEM) and 0.91 +- 0.09. It is suggested that an improvement in precision will be achieved by increasing the scanning time (thereby increasing the radiation dose equivalent) and by adding two more detectors. (author)

  2. Further development of drag bodies for the measurement of mass flow rates during blowdown experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, E.; John, H.; Reimann, J.

    1983-01-01

    Drag bodies have already been used for sometime for the measurement of mass flow rates in blowdown experiments. Former research concerning the drag body behaviour in non-homogeneous two-phase flows frequently dealt with special effects by means of theoretical models only. For pipe flows most investigations were conducted for ratios of drag plate area to pipe cross section smaller 0.02. The present paper gives the results of experiments with drag bodies in a horizontal, non-homogeneous two-phase pipe flow with slip, which were carried through under the sponsorship of the German Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT). Special interest was layed on the behaviour of the drag coefficient in stationary flows and at various cross sectional ratios. Both design and response of various drag bodies, which were developed at the Battelle-Institut, were tested in stationary and instationary two-phase flows. The influences of density and velocity profiles as well as the drag body position were studied. The results demonstrate, that the drag body is capable of measuring mass flow rates in connection with a gamma densitometer also in non-homogeneous two-phase flows. Satisfying results could be obtained, using simply the drag coefficient which was determined from single-phase flow calibrations

  3. Relationship outcomes as measurement criteria to assist communication strategists to manage organisational relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Botha

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonfinancial assets like relationships are increasingly important to managers. Communication managers in particular are focusing on measuring and managing organisational relationships as a means to quantify the return on investment (ROI of public relations and communication strategies. Measuring relationships offers communication managers a way to evaluate its contribution to the organisation. A commonly agreed upon definition of these relationships, however, does not exist. If we consider communication management is a managerial function, it must first refine its instruments of measurement. This study looks at the three-stage model of organisational relationships (relationship antecedents, maintenance strategies and relationship outcomes proposed by Grunig & Huang (2000 to firstly review the development of the model. Secondly, the study takes an in-depth look at each relationship outcomes of trust, commitment, satisfaction and control mutuality. Lastly, we assess the reliability and validity of the use of current relationship outcome measures through a survey of 154 organisational relationships. Previous studies that have utilized these outcomes in the measurement of organisational relationships do not discuss the possible interaction (or relationship among these outcomes. This study contributes to current literature by both providing an improved framework for the measurement of relationship outcomes and hypothesizing about how these outcomes interact with one another. It also discusses the managerial implications of managing relationships through the constant measurement of trust, commitment, satisfaction and control mutuality

  4. Spectral composition of a measuring signal during measurements of vibration rates of a moving body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daynauskas, I. A. I.; Slepov, N. N.

    1973-01-01

    Cybernetics diagnostics of machines and mechanisms using the spectral approach is discussed. The problem of establishing the accuracy of determination of the spectral composition is investigated. In systems with rectilinear or rotary movement, the vibrations appear in the form of movement rate vibrations, which are equivalent to frequency modulation of the signal, in proportion to the mean movement rate of the body. The case of a harmonic signal which reproduces and analyzes the characteristics of the frequency modulated signal is discussed. Mathematical models are developed to show the relationships of the parameters.

  5. DHA supplementation during pregnancy does not reduce BMI or body fat mass in children: follow-up of the DHA to Optimize Mother Infant Outcome randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlhausler, Beverly S; Yelland, Lisa N; McDermott, Robyn; Tapsell, Linda; McPhee, Andrew; Gibson, Robert A; Makrides, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has proven effective at reducing fat storage in animal studies. However, a systematic review of human trials showed a lack of quality data to support or refute this hypothesis. We sought to determine whether maternal DHA supplementation during the second half of pregnancy results in a lower body mass index (BMI) and percentage of body fat in children. We conducted a follow-up at 3 and 5 y of age of children who were born to mothers enrolled in the DOMInO (DHA to Optimize Mother Infant Outcome) double-blind, randomized controlled trial, in which women with a singleton pregnancy were provided with DHA-rich fish-oil capsules (800 mg DHA/d) or vegetable-oil capsules (control group) in the second half of pregnancy. Primary outcomes were the BMI z score and percentage of body fat at 3 and 5 y of age. Potential interactions between prenatal DHA and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) genotype as a measure of the genetic predisposition to obesity were investigated. A total of 1614 children were eligible for the follow-up. Parent or caregiver consent was obtained for 1531 children (95%), and these children were included in the analysis. BMI z scores and percentages of body fat of children in the DHA group did not differ from those of children in the control group at either 3 y of age [BMI z score adjusted mean difference: 0.03 (95% CI: -0.07, 0.13; P = 0.61); percentage of body fat adjusted mean difference: -0.26 (95% CI: -0.99, 0.46; P = 0.47)] or 5 y of age [BMI z score adjusted mean difference: 0.02 (95% CI: -0.08, 0.12; P = 0.66); percentage of body fat adjusted mean difference: 0.11 (95% CI: -0.60, 0.82; P = 0.75)]. No treatment effects were modified by the PPARγ genotype of the child. Independent of a genetic predisposition to obesity, maternal intake of DHA-rich fish oil during the second half of pregnancy does not affect the growth or body composition

  6. Simulating local measurements on a quantum many-body system with stochastic matrix product states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate how to simulate both discrete and continuous stochastic evolutions of a quantum many-body system subject to measurements using matrix product states. A particular, but generally applicable, measurement model is analyzed and a simple representation in terms of matrix product operators...... is found. The technique is exemplified by numerical simulations of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin-chain model subject to various instances of the measurement model. In particular, we focus on local measurements with small support and nonlocal measurements, which induce long-range correlations....

  7. Clinical outcomes of a phase I/II study of 48 Gy of stereotactic body radiotherapy in 4 fractions for primary lung cancer using a stereotactic body frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Takayama, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masato; Mitsumori, Michihide; Shibuya, Keiko; Araki, Norio; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of 48 Gy of three-dimensional stereotactic radiotherapy in four fractions for treating Stage I lung cancer using a stereotactic body frame. Methods and Materials: Forty-five patients who were treated between September 1998 and February 2004 were included in this study. Thirty-two patients had Stage IA lung cancer, and the other 13 had Stage IB lung cancer where tumor size was less than 4 cm in diameter. Three-dimensional treatment planning using 6-10 noncoplanar beams was performed to maintain the target dose homogeneity and to decrease the irradiated lung volume >20 Gy. All patients were irradiated using a stereotactic body frame and received four single 12 Gy high doses of radiation at the isocenter over 5-13 (median = 12) days. Results: Seven tumors (16%) completely disappeared after treatment (CR) and 38 tumors (84%) decreased in size by 30% or more (PR). Therefore, all tumors showed local response. During the follow-up of 6-71 (median = 30) months, no pulmonary complications greater than an National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria of Grade 3 were noted. No other vascular, cardiac, esophageal, or neurologic toxicities were encountered. Forty-four (98%) of 45 tumors were locally controlled during the follow-up period. However, regional recurrences and distant metastases occurred in 3 and 5 of T1 patients and zero and 4 of T2 patients, respectively. For Stage IA lung cancer, the disease-free survival and overall survival rates after 1 and 3 years were 80% and 72%, and 92% and 83%, respectively, whereas for Stage IB lung cancer, the disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 92% and 71%, and 82% and 72%, respectively. Conclusion: Forty-eight Gy of 3D stereotactic radiotherapy in 4 fractions using a stereotactic body frame is useful for the treatment of Stage I lung tumors

  8. Identifying an outcome measure to assess the impact of Mobility Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudge, Suzie; Rewi, Dallas; Channon, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Mobility Dogs® trains dogs to work with people with physical disabilities to increase independence, confidence, self-esteem and participation. Mobility Dogs® seeks to critically evaluate and improve its services as it grows. This study aimed to identify and implement a standardised outcome measure into practice at Mobility Dogs®. Based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research and guided by a steering group of key stakeholders, a three-phase approach was developed to identify and assess an outcome measure. The steering group highlighted the organisation's specific needs, selected participation as the assessment domain and identified core utility requirements of the measure. A comprehensive review of evidence was undertaken to identify and rank potential measures according to the specified needs. Of the seven participation outcome measures that met inclusion criteria, the three highest ranked measures were critically evaluated by the steering group to determine suitability against the organisation's needs. The Impact on Participation and Autonomy (IPA) was selected for implementation into practice at Mobility Dogs®. Use of the IPA is an important first step for Mobility Dogs® to test the benefits of trained service dogs. This process could be replicated by other service dog organisations to identify outcome measures to assess their own services. Implications for Rehabilitation Service dogs (such as Mobility Dogs® in New Zealand) assist people living with physical impairments by performing tasks, however there is limited evidence on outcomes. The process for selecting an appropriate outcome measure for Mobility Dogs® involving partnership between Mobility Dogs® personnel and academics was an effective way to steer the project by determining important properties of the measure, before a search of the literature was undertaken. While the IPA was selected as the most appropriate outcome measure for use at Mobility Dogs®, it was the process that

  9. Neural activations are related to body-shape, anxiety, and outcomes in adolescent anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Harper, Jessica A; Van Enkevort, Erin A; Latimer, Kelsey; Kelley, Urszula; McAdams, Carrie J

    2017-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an illness that frequently begins during adolescence and involves weight loss. Two groups of adolescent girls (AN-A, weight-recovered following AN) and (HC-A, healthy comparison) completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging task involving social evaluations, allowing comparison of neural activations during self-evaluations, friend-evaluations, and perspective-taking self-evaluations. Although the two groups were not different in their whole-brain activations, anxiety and body shape concerns were correlated with neural activity in a priori regions of interest. A cluster in medial prefrontal cortex and the dorsal anterior cingulate correlated with the body shape questionnaire; subjects with more body shape concerns used this area less during self than friend evaluations. A cluster in medial prefrontal cortex and the cingulate also correlated with anxiety such that more anxiety was associated with engagement when disagreeing rather than agreeing with social terms during self-evaluations. This data suggests that differences in the utilization of frontal brain regions during social evaluations may contribute to both anxiety and body shape concerns in adolescents with AN. Clinical follow-up was obtained, allowing exploration of whether brain function early in course of disease relates to illness trajectory. The adolescents successful in recovery used the posterior cingulate and precuneus more for friend than self evaluations than the adolescents that remained ill, suggesting that neural differences related to social evaluations may provide clinical predictive value. Utilization of both MPFC and the precuneus during social and self evaluations may be a key biological component for achieving sustained weight-recovery in adolescents with AN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Poor outcomes and satisfaction in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery: the relevance of the body mass index and self-image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Sánchez-Soler, Juan Francisco; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Mojal, Sergi; Bagó, Joan; Cáceres, Enric; Ramírez, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) to determine whether a low body mass index (BMI) influences surgery outcomes and satisfaction. There were 39 patients in this prospective 3-year cohort study. The BMI, Cobb angle, the Body Shape Questionnaire 14 (BSQ-14), the Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire 22 (SRS-22) and eight satisfaction questions results were obtained. Having a BMI greater than or less than 18 kg/m(2) was used as a determiner to allocate patients to groups. As a low BMI is related to the presence of a disturbance in body perception, patients were also dichotomized by using the BSQ-14. All scales were worse in both slimmer patients and the group with a body perception disorder. The group with a BMI 18 kg/m(2) (p = 0.001). In terms of satisfaction, the percentage of patients that would undergo surgery again was 30.8 vs 69.2 % (p = 0.054). Patients with an alteration of physical perception obtained a total SRS-22 of 82.90 points versus 96.10 points in the control group (p < 0.001). No differences in terms of the Cobb correction (p = 0.29) or the percentage of correction (p = 0.841) were found in any case. The alteration of physical perception and a low BMI negatively affect the outcomes in AIS surgery, regardless of the curve magnitude and the percentage of correction. Considerable care should be taken in recommending surgical correction to these patients.

  11. Body Measurements of Donkeys of Poitevin and Catalan Breeds and their Crossbreds in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Boujenane

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study concerned the analysis of body measurements of 125 Poitevin (P, 107 Catalan (C and 77 reciprocal crossbred (PxC et CxP donkeys used in the national stud farms of Morocco. The donkeys were born between 1937 and 1973 in Morocco, France and Spain. The genetic type had a significant effect on all measurements studied except on the height at withers. Poitevin donkeys had a height at withers, heart girth, body weight, body length, substernal gap and front cannon bone circumference of 139.7 cm, 152.4 cm, 346.4 kg, 143.2 cm, 76.8 cm and 20.5 cm, respectively. Compared to Catalan donkeys the differences were – 0.5 cm, 2.7 cm, 15.7 kg, 3.7 cm, – 1.4 cm and 1.5 cm, and compared to crossbreds 1.4 cm, 2.3 cm, 14.2 kg, 5.1 cm, – 0.5 cm and 1.3 cm, respectively. The heterosis effect was significant for the body length (– 2.30% and the front cannon bone circumference (– 2.78% only. It was concluded that body measurements of Poitevin and Catalan donkey breeds were slightly different.

  12. Body measurements and testosteron level of male Timor deer (Rusa timorensis at various hierarchies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Samsudewa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to observe body (neck, chest and scrotum circumferences and testosterone level of α-male, β-male and subordinate male Timor deer reared under captivity after establisment of the dominance hierarchy. Twelve males (51 ± 6 months old; 68.29 ± 8.41 kg body weight and in same antler stages were used in this research. The bucks was grouped into three stall each containing four bucks. ELISA kit and tape measurements were used for plasma Testosterone assay and body measurement, respectively. Data was collected before and 43 days after establishment of the dominance hierarchy. Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Kruskal-Wallis H test of non-parametric analysis was used. Significant difference was tested with Mann-Whitney U test. The results showed no significantly different for body circumferences (neck, chest, scrotum and testosterone level of male Timor deer before establishment of dominance hierarchy. Chest and scrotum circumferences of male Timor deer after establihment of dominance hierarchy showed no significantly different. Significantly difference shown on parameter neck circumference (P<0.05; χ2 = 8.74 and testosteron level (P<0.05; χ2 = 7.87 after establishment of dominance hierarchy. In conclusion, dominance hierarchy affected the testosterone level and body measurement.

  13. Changes in CT density-measurement of intraorbital wooden foreign bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Etsuko; Hiyama, Fusako; Machi, Setsuko; Hagihara, Masahiro.

    1991-01-01

    We examined in vitro changes in CT density-measurement of intraorbital wooden foreign bodies. Dry wooden sticks were immersed in distilled water, saline, and serum. Computerized tomography scans were taken several times during 22 weeks. Scans were taken in room air and in fatty tissue. The CT density-measurement of the central part of the wooden bodies was calculated. That of the dry wood was about 500 HU; all of the wooden foreign bodies became denser during the 22 weeks, with those immersed in distilled water and saline at about 130 HU, and those immersed in serum at about 150 HU. It was confirmed that wood becomes denser after soaking in aqueous environments. The CT density of wood soaked in water depends on the density of wood fiber, and the CT density of the wood fiber itself. (author)

  14. A simple calibration of a whole-body counter for the measurement of total body potassium in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Wahab, M.S.; El-Fiki, S.A.; El-Enany, N.; Youssef, S.K.; Aly, A.M.; Abbas, M.T.

    1992-01-01

    A simple calibration procedure for the Inshas whole body counter for evaluating total body potassium has been adopted. More than 120 Egyptian employees in the Nuclear Research Center (N.R.C.) were studied for their total body potassium (TBK). The potassium values were found to have an average of 2.85±0.57 g K kg -1 body weight for males and 2.62±0.52 g K kg -1 for females, which are higher than the recommended value given for reference man by ICRP. The TBK varied directly with body build index and is slightly sex dependent (Author)

  15. Outcome-driven thresholds for home blood pressure measurement: international database of home blood pressure in relation to cardiovascular outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiranen, Teemu J; Asayama, Kei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Johansson, Jouni K; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kikuya, Masahiro; Boggia, José; Hozawa, Atsushi; Sandoya, Edgardo; Stergiou, George S; Tsuji, Ichiro; Jula, Antti M; Imai, Yutaka; Staessen, Jan A

    2013-01-01

    The lack of outcome-driven operational thresholds limits the clinical application of home blood pressure (BP) measurement. Our objective was to determine an outcome-driven reference frame for home BP measurement. We measured home and clinic BP in 6470 participants (mean age, 59.3 years; 56.9% women; 22.4% on antihypertensive treatment) recruited in Ohasama, Japan (n=2520); Montevideo, Uruguay (n=399); Tsurugaya, Japan (n=811); Didima, Greece (n=665); and nationwide in Finland (n=2075). In multivariable-adjusted analyses of individual subject data, we determined home BP thresholds, which yielded 10-year cardiovascular risks similar to those associated with stages 1 (120/80 mm Hg) and 2 (130/85 mm Hg) prehypertension, and stages 1 (140/90 mm Hg) and 2 (160/100 mm Hg) hypertension on clinic measurement. During 8.3 years of follow-up (median), 716 cardiovascular end points, 294 cardiovascular deaths, 393 strokes, and 336 cardiac events occurred in the whole cohort; in untreated participants these numbers were 414, 158, 225, and 194, respectively. In the whole cohort, outcome-driven systolic/diastolic thresholds for the home BP corresponding with stages 1 and 2 prehypertension and stages 1 and 2 hypertension were 121.4/77.7, 127.4/79.9, 133.4/82.2, and 145.4/86.8 mm Hg; in 5018 untreated participants, these thresholds were 118.5/76.9, 125.2/79.7, 131.9/82.4, and 145.3/87.9 mm Hg, respectively. Rounded thresholds for stages 1 and 2 prehypertension and stages 1 and 2 hypertension amounted to 120/75, 125/80, 130/85, and 145/90 mm Hg, respectively. Population-based outcome-driven thresholds for home BP are slightly lower than those currently proposed in hypertension guidelines. Our current findings could inform guidelines and help clinicians in diagnosing and managing patients.

  16. Multiple Measures of Outcome in Assessing a Prison-Based Drug Treatment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Michael L.; Hall, Elizabeth A.; Wexler, Harry K.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluations of prison-based drug treatment programs typically focus on one or two dichotomous outcome variables related to recidivism. In contrast, this paper uses multiple measures of outcomes related to crime and drug use to examine the impact of prison treatment. Crime variables included self-report data of time to first illegal activity,…

  17. Systematic review of tools to measure outcomes for young children with autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McConachie, H.; Parr, J.R.; Glod, M.; Hanratty, J.; Livingstone, N.; Oono, I.P.; Robalino, S.; Baird, G.; Beresford, B.; Charman, T.; Garland, D.; Green, J.; Gringras, P.; Jones, G.; Law, J.; Le Couteur, A.S.; Macdonald, G.; McColl, E.M.; Morris, C.; Rodgers, J.; Simonoff, E.; Terwee, C.B.; Williams, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The needs of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are complex and this is reflected in the number and diversity of outcomes assessed and measurement tools used to collect evidence about children�s progress. Relevant outcomes include improvement in core ASD impairments, such as

  18. [Improving care for cleft lip and palate patients: uniform and patient-orientated outcome measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj, M; de Gier, H H W; van Veen-van der Hoek, M; Versnel, S L; van Adrichem, L N; Wolvius, E B; Hazelzet, J A; Koudstaal, M J

    2018-02-01

    The quality of care for patients with cleft lip and palate is extremely variable across the world. Treatment protocols differ and methods of data registration are not uniform. Improving this care by means of comparative research is challenging. The best treatment programmes can be identified by uniformly registering patient-orientated outcomes and comparing the outcomes with those of other treatment centres. That knowledge can be used to improve one's own care. An international team consisting of specialists and cleft lip and palate patients has developed a set of outcome measures that are considered by patients to be most important. This team is coordinated by the International Consortium of Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM). The cleft lip and palate outcome set can be used by all centres worldwide in following up on cleft lip and palate patients. In the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam, the 'Zorgmonitor Schisis' (Care Monitor Cleft Lip and Palate) has been built, an application in which these outcome measures are collected at fixed times. Implementing this set of outcome measures in other cleft lip and palate treatment centres and using the outcomes as (inter)national benchmarks will result in transparency and the improvement of the treatment of cleft lip and palate worldwide.

  19. Treatment of patients with hand osteoarthritis : outcome measures, patient satisfaction, and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marks, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the limitations in daily life, outcome measures, clinical outcomes with the emphasis on patient satisfaction, and economic aspects of the treatment of hand osteoarthritis (OA). Patients with hand OA report severe restrictions in daily life, in particular in

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis in severe mental illness : Outcome measures selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stant, A. Dennis; Buskens, Erik; Jenner, Jack A.; Wiersma, Durk; TenVergert, Elisabeth M.

    Background: Most economic evaluations conducted in mental healthcare did not include widely recommended preference-based health outcomes like the QALY (Quality-Adjusted Life Years). Instead, studies have mainly been designed as cost-effectiveness analyses that include single outcome measures aimed

  1. Clinical Outcomes Measures for Assessment of Longevity in the Dental Implant Literature : ORONet Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassi, Francesco; Carr, Alan B.; Chang, Ting-Ling; Estafanous, Emad; Garrett, Neal R.; Happonen, Risto-Pekka; Koka, Sreenivas; Laine, Juhani; Osswald, Martin; Reintsema, Harry; Rieger, Jana; Roumanas, Eleni; Salinas, Thomas J.; Stanford, Clark M.; Wolfaardt, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The Oral Rehabilitation Outcomes Network (ORONet) Longevity Working Group undertook a search of the literature from 1995 to 2009 on randomized controlled trials related to longevity of osseointegrated implants. Outcomes measures used in these studies were identified and subjected to the OMERACT

  2. The National Outcomes Measurement System for Pediatric Speech-Language Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Robert; Schooling, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA's) National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS) was developed in the late 1990s. The primary purpose was to serve as a source of data for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who found themselves called on to provide empirical evidence of the functional outcomes associated with their…

  3. Combine body mass index and body fat percentage measures to improve the accuracy of obesity screening in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shang-Ping; Chen, Ching-Yu; Guo, Fei-Ran; Chang, Ching-I; Jan, Chyi-Feng

    Obesity screening among young adult groups is meaningful. Body mass index (BMI) is limited to discriminate between fat and lean mass. Asian young adult group tends to have lower BMI and higher body fat percentage (BFP) than other ethnic groups. Accuracy of obesity screening by commonly used BMI criteria is unclear in young Taiwanese population. A total of 894 young adults (447 males and 447 females) aged 20-26 were recruited. BMI, regional fat percentage and BFP determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) were measured. BMI cutoff points were based on the criteria adopted by the Ministry of Health and Welfare in Taiwan. Cutoff points of low or high BFP were defined as 24% in men and 31.4% in women. Prevalence of BFP defining obesity was 14.8% in young men and 27.3% in young women. 23.2% of young men and only 8.3% of young women were classified to overweight or obesity categories according to the BMI criteria. Disagreement was noticed mainly among overweight males and normal weight females. 68.7% of BMI defining overweight young men had low BFP; however, 29.7% of young women of BMI defining normal group had high BFP. Up to 69.7% of young women with high BFP would be missed by BMI category only. Disagreement between BMI and BFP was significant among young adults, especially young women. We suggest combining BMI and BIA for obesity and overweight screening in Asian young adults. Copyright © 2016 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Definition and outcome of a curriculum to prevent disordered eating and body-shaping drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Diane L; Moe, Esther L; Goldberg, Linn; DeFrancesco, Carol A; Durham, Melissa B; Hix-Small, Hollie

    2006-02-01

    Almost one half of male and female students participate in high school-sponsored athletics, and high school also is a time when classroom health promotion curricula are less effective. The Athletes Training and Learning to Avoid Steroids is a sport team-centered drug-use prevention program for male high school athletes, which has been shown to reduce alcohol and illicit drug use. Just as anabolic steroid use is associated with male athletes, female sport participants may be at a greater risk for disordered eating and body-shaping drug use. Extending sport team-centered programs to young women athletes required defining and ranking factors related to developing those harmful behaviors. Survey results from a cross-sectional cohort of female middle and high school student athletes were used to identify and prioritize potential curriculum components, including mood and self-esteem, norms of behavior, perceptions of healthy body weight, effects of media depictions of women, and societal pressures to be thin. The derived sport team-centered program was prospectively assessed among a second group of female student athletes from 18 high schools, randomized to receive the intervention or the usual care control condition. The Athletes Targeting Healthy Exercise and Nutrition Alternatives (ATHENA) intervention is a scripted, coach-facilitated, peer-led 8-session program, which was incorporated into a team's usual training activities. The ATHENA program significantly altered the targeted risk factors and reduced ongoing and new use of diet pills and body-shaping substances (amphetamines, anabolic steroids, and sport supplements). These findings illustrate the utility of a structured process to define curriculum content, and the program's positive results also confirm the sport team's potential as a vehicle to effectively deter health-harming behaviors.

  5. Creation of virtual reality stimulus for a psychophysiological body balance measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Alatalo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Tero Alatalo1, Martti Juhola1, Veikko Surakka1,2, Timo Tossavainen11Department of Computer Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; 2Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, FinlandAbstract: Virtual reality methods and equipment can be used to create stimulations for several psychophysiological measurements. Such stimulations can be flexibly modified and their versatility is wide; in principle even such could be prepared that are not possible in the real physical world like virtual flying in the space. For the generation of virtual reality stimulations we constructed a three-dimensional (3D graphics engine to measure body balance variations in response to emotional stimulation. The stimulation was implemented as a virtual reality scene, where the subject watched a street view with a human figure approaching the subject at a constant speed. The functioning of the system was tested by measuring body balance variations while the approaching figure’s facial expression was angry, neutral, or happy. The results showed that our young, healthy subjects were slightly, but still statistically significantly affected by the stimulation of the approaching figure. Thus, the whole system offers a tool for controlled experimental studies for analyzing body balance, for example, during stimulating approach-withdrawal behavior. There are several opportunities to further develop new visual psychophysiological stimulations and test forms.Keywords: virtual reality stimulations, signal analysis, body balance measurements, approachwithdrawal behavior, emotions

  6. Total body composition measurements using in vivo neutron activation at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewellen, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    The University of Washington Division of Nuclear Medicine has been using in vivo irradiation to study whole body calcium since 1969. Over 350 patients have been studied and currently five patients per week are being measured in support of research programs on bone wasting disease. (author)

  7. Lecture notes on: Electrical theory behind the measurement of body fluids with bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars

    The lecture notes describe how body fluid volumes can be measured/estimated using the technique bio-impedance spectroscopy (BIS). The opening chapters assume little or none technical/mathematical knowledge and can hopefully be read by anyone interested in the techneque. Later chapters become more...

  8. New equivalent-electrical circuit model and a practical measurement method for human body impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Koyu; Kinjo, Ichiko; Zamami, Aki; Irei, Kotoyo; Nagayama, Kanako

    2015-01-01

    Human body impedance analysis is an effective tool to extract electrical information from tissues in the human body. This paper presents a new measurement method of impedance using armpit electrode and a new equivalent circuit model for the human body. The lowest impedance was measured by using an LCR meter and six electrodes including armpit electrodes. The electrical equivalent circuit model for the cell consists of resistance R and capacitance C. The R represents electrical resistance of the liquid of the inside and outside of the cell, and the C represents high frequency conductance of the cell membrane. We propose an equivalent circuit model which consists of five parallel high frequency-passing CR circuits. The proposed equivalent circuit represents alpha distribution in the impedance measured at a lower frequency range due to ion current of the outside of the cell, and beta distribution at a high frequency range due to the cell membrane and the liquid inside cell. The calculated values by using the proposed equivalent circuit model were consistent with the measured values for the human body impedance.

  9. Long-term adherence to a local guideline on postoperative body temperature measurement: mixed methods analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Knops, Anouk M.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Goossens, Astrid; Legemate, Dink A.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2012-01-01

    Aim To find out whether a successful multifaceted implementation approach of a local evidence-based guideline on postoperative body temperature measurements (BTM) was persistent over time, and which factors influenced long-term adherence. Methods Mixed methods analysis. Patient records were

  10. In vivo and in situ measurement and modelling of intra-body effective complex permittivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadimi, Esmaeil S; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Harslund, Jakob L F

    2015-01-01

    Radio frequency tracking of medical micro-robots in minimally invasive medicine is usually investigated upon the assumption that the human body is a homogeneous propagation medium. In this Letter, the authors conducted various trial programs to measure and model the effective complex permittivity e...

  11. Modelling of fillet traits based on body measurements in three Nile tilapia strains (Oreochromis niloticus L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.M.; Bovenhuis, H.; Komen, J.

    2004-01-01

    In Nile tilapia, breeding programs focus mainly on growth, and information on genetic improvement of fillet yield is scarce. In this study, slaughter data were collected on 1215 tilapia and used to analyze the relationship between body measurements and fillet weight and fillet yield. Fish were

  12. Measurement of body composition in cats using computed tomography and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buelund, Lene E; Nielsen, Dorte H; McEvoy, Fintan

    2011-01-01

    compared CT and DEXA data from 73 healthy adult neutered domestic cats. Three approaches for measuring adipose tissue percentage from full-body CT scans were explored. By examining the frequency distribution of voxels by Hounsfield unit (HU) value, it is possible to calculate a fat index (Fat...

  13. Measurement and Interpretation of Body Mass Index during Childhood and Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Susan Kohl; Zemel, Babette S.

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of childhood health and disease has changed over the past century, and school nurses are now in a unique position to address the conditions that lead to chronic disease, such as obesity. Measuring body mass index (BMI) during childhood and adolescence is the recommended method for screening and/or monitoring obesity in school…

  14. Considerations for the measurement of core, skin and mean body temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nigel A S; Tipton, Michael J; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-12-01

    Despite previous reviews and commentaries, significant misconceptions remain concerning deep-body (core) and skin temperature measurement in humans. Therefore, the authors have assembled the pertinent Laws of Thermodynamics and other first principles that govern physical and physiological heat exchanges. The resulting review is aimed at providing theoretical and empirical justifications for collecting and interpreting these data. The primary emphasis is upon deep-body temperatures, with discussions of intramuscular, subcutaneous, transcutaneous and skin temperatures included. These are all turnover indices resulting from variations in local metabolism, tissue conduction and blood flow. Consequently, inter-site differences and similarities may have no mechanistic relationship unless those sites have similar metabolic rates, are in close proximity and are perfused by the same blood vessels. Therefore, it is proposed that a gold standard deep-body temperature does not exist. Instead, the validity of each measurement must be evaluated relative to one's research objectives, whilst satisfying equilibration and positioning requirements. When using thermometric computations of heat storage, the establishment of steady-state conditions is essential, but for clinically relevant states, targeted temperature monitoring becomes paramount. However, when investigating temperature regulation, the response characteristics of each temperature measurement must match the forcing function applied during experimentation. Thus, during dynamic phases, deep-body temperatures must be measured from sites that track temperature changes in the central blood volume. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A wireless body measurement system to study fatigue in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, F.; Bilberg, A.; Stenager, E.; Rabotti, C.; Zhang, B.; Mischi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue is reported as the most common symptom by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The physiological and functional parameters related to fatigue in MS patients are currently not well established. A new wearable wireless body measurement system, named Fatigue Monitoring System (FAMOS), was

  16. Treatment outcome, body image, and sexual functioning after orchiectomy and radiotherapy for Stage I-II testicular seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incrocci, Luca; Hop, Wim C.J.; Wijnmaalen, Arendjan; Slob, A. Koos

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Orchiectomy followed by infradiaphragmatic irradiation is the standard treatment for Stage I-II testicular seminoma in The Netherlands. Because body image and sexual functioning can be affected by treatment, a retrospective study was carried out to assess treatment outcome, body image, and changes in sexuality after orchiectomy and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The medical charts of 166 patients with Stage I-II testicular seminoma were reviewed. A questionnaire on body image and current sexual functioning regarding the frequency and quality of erections, sexual activity, significance of sex, and changes in sexuality was sent to 157 patients (at a mean of 51 months after treatment). Results: Seventy-eight percent (n=123, mean age 42 years) completed the questionnaire. During irradiation, almost half of patients experienced nausea and 19% nausea and vomiting. Only 3 patients had disease relapse. After treatment, about 20% reported less interest and pleasure in sex and less sexual activity. Interest in sex, erectile difficulties, and satisfaction with sexual life did not differ from age-matched healthy controls. At the time of the survey, 17% of patients had erectile difficulties, a figure that was significantly higher than before treatment, but which correlated also with age. Twenty percent expressed concerns about fertility, and 52% found their body had changed after treatment. Cancer treatment had negatively influenced sexual life in 32% of the patients. Conclusions: Orchiectomy with radiotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for Stage I-II testicular seminoma. Treatment-induced changes in body image and concerns about fertility were detected, but the sexual problems encountered did not seem to differ from those of healthy controls, although baseline data are lacking

  17. Measurement of the body composition of living gray seals by hydrogen isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, J.J.; Fedak, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The body composition of living gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) can be accurately predicted from a two-step model that involves measurement of total body water (TBW) by 2 H or 3 H dilution and application of predictive relationships between body components and TBW that were derived empirically by slaughter chemical analysis. TBW was overestimated by both 2 HHO and 3 HHO dilution; mean overestimates were 2.8 +/- 0.9% (SE) with 2H and 4.0 +/- 0.6% with 3 H. The relationships for prediction of total body fat (TBF), protein (TBP), gross energy (TBGE), and ash (TBA) were as follows: %TBF = 105.1 - 1.47 (%TBW); %TBP = 0.42 (%TBW) - 4.75; TBGE (MJ) = 40.8 (mass in kg) - 48.5 (TBW in kg) - 0.4; and TBA (kg) = 0.1 - 0.008 (mass in kg) + 0.05 (TBW in kg). These relationships are applicable to gray seals of both sexes over a wide range of age and body conditions, and they predict the body composition of gray seals more accurately than the predictive equations derived from ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and from the equation of Pace and Rathbun, which has been reported to be generally applicable to mammals

  18. Measurement Properties of the Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire in Adolescent Patients With Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Gabriel; Joncas, Julie; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Beauséjour, Marie; Roy-Beaudry, Marjolaine; Labelle, Hubert; Parent, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Prospective validation of the Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire French-Canadian version (SRS-22fv) in adolescent patients with spondylolisthesis. To determine the measurement properties of the SRS-22fv. The SRS-22 is widely used for the assessment of health-related quality of life in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and other spinal deformities. Spondylolisthesis has an important effect on quality of life. The instrument was previously used in this population, although its measurement properties remained unknown. We aim to determine its reliability, factorial, concurrent validity, and its discriminant capacity in an adolescent spondylolisthesis population. The SRS-22fv was tested in 479 subjects (272 patients with spondylolisthesis, 143 with AIS, and 64 controls) at a single institution. Its reliability was measured using the coefficient of internal consistency, concurrent validity by the short form-12 (SF-12v2 French version) and discriminant validity using multivariate analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, and multivariate linear regression. The SRS-22fv showed a good global internal consistency (spondylolisthesis: Cronbach α = 0.91, AIS: 0.86, and controls: 0.78) in all its domains for spondylolisthesis patients. It showed a factorial structure consistent with the original questionnaire, with 60% of explained variance under four factors. Moderate to high correlation coefficients were found for specifically corresponding domains between SRS-22fv and SF-12v2. Boys had higher scores than do girls, scores worsened with increasing age and body mass index. Analysis of covariance showed statistically significant differences between patients with spondylolisthesis, patients with AIS, and controls when controlling for age, sex, body mass index, pain, function, and self-image scores. In the spondylolisthesis group, scores on all domains and mean total scores were significantly lower in surgical candidates and in patients with high

  19. Total body-calcium measurements: comparison of two delayed-gamma neutron activation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, R.; Ellis, K.J.; Shypailo, R.J.; Pierson, R.N. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This study compares two independently calibrated delayed-gamma neutron activation (DGNA) facilities, one at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, New York, and the other at the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), Houston, Texas that measure total body calcium (TBCa). A set of BNL phantoms was sent to CNRC for neutron activation analysis, and a set of CNRC phantoms was measured at BNL. Both facilities showed high precision (<2%), and the results were in good agreement, within 5%. (author)

  20. Headset Bluetooth and cell phone based continuous central body temperature measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, J Miguel; Pereira, Bruno; Paiva, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The accurate measure of the central temperature is a very important physiologic indicator in several clinical applications, namely, in the characterization and diagnosis of sleep disorders. In this paper a simple system is described to continuously measure the body temperature at the ear. An electronic temperature sensor is coupled to the microphone of a common commercial auricular Bluetooth device that sends the temperature measurements to a mobile phone to which is paired. The measurements are stored at the mobile phone and periodically sent to a medical facility by email or SMS (short messaging service).

  1. Out-of-equilibrium body potential measurements in pseudo-MOSFET for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benea, Licinius; Bawedin, Maryline; Delacour, Cécile; Ionica, Irina

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the out-of-equilibrium body potential behaviour in the Ψ-MOSFET configuration. Consistent measurements in this experimental setup succeeded in providing a substantial understanding of its characteristics in the depletion region. The final objective of this work is to envision this new measurement technique for biochemical sensor applications. Among its advantages, the most important are its simplicity, the good sensitivity, the measurement of a potential instead of a current and the low bias needed for detection compared to the conventional drain current measurements.

  2. Body posture measurement in a context of example-based teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, Eric; Perrin, Stephane; Coquin, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement process of body postures operated in a context of humanoid robot learning. The basic measured quantities are the angle joints of a human skeleton and the angle joints of a humanoid robot. Due to the differences between the two mechanical structures, the measurement results are expressed into a common representation space by the way of fuzzy scales. This paper shows how the common representation space can be defined, and presents a method to match weakly defined postures with uncertain measurements of a human posture

  3. A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Lund, Hans; Guyatt, GH

    2010-01-01

    Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta-analyses ......Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta...... composite disability scores. Conclusions As choosing the most favorable PROs from individual trials can overestimate the effect compared to a systematic approach, using a prioritized list as presented in this study is recommended to reduce reviewer's likelihood of biased selection of PROs in meta-analyses....

  4. Developing a General Outcome Measure of Growth in Movement for Infants and Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Charles R.; Luze, Gayle J.; Cline, Gabriel; Kuntz, Susan; Leitschuh, Carol

    2002-01-01

    The development of an experimental measure for assessing growth in movement in children (ages birth-3) is described. Results from the use of the Movement General Outcome Measurement with 29 infants and toddlers demonstrated the feasibility of the measure. The 6-minute assessment was found reliable in terms of inter-observer agreement. (Contains…

  5. Use of the measure your medical outcome profile (MYMOP2 and W-BQ12 (Well-Being outcomes measures to evaluate chiropractic treatment: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polus Barbara I

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to assess the use of the Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP2 and W-BQ12 well-being questionnaire for measuring clinical change associated with a course of chiropractic treatment. Methods Chiropractic care of the patients involved spinal manipulative therapy (SMT, mechanically assisted techniques, soft tissue therapy, and physiological therapeutic devices. Outcome measures used were MYMOP2 and the Well-Being Questionnaire 12 (W-BQ12. Results Statistical and clinical significant changes were demonstrated with W-BQ12 and MYMOP2. Conclusions The study demonstrated that MYMOP2 was responsive to change and may be a useful instrument for assessing clinical changes among chiropractic patients who present with a variety of symptoms and clinical conditions.

  6. Psychometric evaluation of self-report outcome measures for prosthetic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hafner, Brian J.; Morgan, Sara J.; Askew, Robert L.; Salem, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Documentation of clinical outcomes is increasingly expected in delivery of prosthetic services and devices. However, many outcome measures suitable for use in clinical care and research have not been psychometrically tested with prosthesis users. The aim of this study was to determine test-retest reliability, mode-of-administration (MoA) equivalence, standard error of measurement (SEM), and minimal detectable change (MDC) of standardized, self-report instruments that assess constructs of impo...

  7. Development and evaluation of an Individualized Outcome Measure (IOM) for randomized controlled trials in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesola, Francesca; Williams, Julie; Bird, Victoria; Freidl, Marion; Le Boutillier, Clair; Leamy, Mary; Macpherson, Rob; Slade, Mike

    2015-12-01

    Pre-defined, researcher-selected outcomes are routinely used as the clinical end-point in randomized controlled trials (RCTs); however, individualized approaches may be an effective way to assess outcome in mental health research. The present study describes the development and evaluation of the Individualized Outcome Measure (IOM), which is a patient-specific outcome measure to be used for RCTs of complex interventions. IOM was developed using a narrative review, expert consultation and piloting with mental health service users (n = 20). The final version of IOM comprises two components: Goal Attainment (GA) and Personalized Primary Outcome (PPO). For GA, patients identify one relevant goal at baseline and rate its attainment at follow-up. For PPO, patients choose an outcome domain related to their goal from a pre-defined list at baseline, and complete a standardized questionnaire assessing the chosen outcome domain at baseline and follow-up. A feasibility study indicated that IOM had adequate completion (89%) and acceptability (96%) rates in a clinical sample (n = 84). IOM was then evaluated in a RCT (ISRCTN02507940). GA and PPO components were associated with each other and with the trial primary outcome. The use of the PPO component of IOM as the primary outcome could be considered in future RCTs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Impact of Pretreatment Tumor Growth Rate on Outcome of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atallah, Soha; Cho, B.C. John; Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Giuliani, Meredith [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Le, Lisa W. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brade, Anthony; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hope, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.hope@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of pretreatment tumor growth rate on outcomes in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A review was conducted on 160 patients with T1-T2N0M0 NSCLC treated with SBRT at single institution. The patient's demographic and clinical data, time interval (t) between diagnostic and planning computed tomography (CT), vital status, disease status, and cause of death were extracted from a prospectively kept database. Differences in gross tumor volume between diagnostic CT (GTV1) and planning CT (GTV2) were recorded, and growth rate was calculated by use of specific growth rate (SGR). Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for overall survival (OS). Differences between groups were compared with a log-rank test. Multivariate analyses were performed by use of the Cox proportional hazard model with SGR and other relevant clinical factors. Cumulative incidence was calculated for local, regional, and distant failures by use of the competing risk approach and was compared with Gray's test. Results: The median time interval between diagnostic and planning CT was 82 days. The patients were divided into 2 groups, and the median SGR was used as a cut-off. The median survival times were 38.6 and 27.7 months for the low and high SGR groups, respectively (P=.03). Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (P=.01), sex (P=.04), SGR (P=.03), and GTV2 (P=.002) were predictive for OS in multivariable Cox regression analysis and, except sex, were similarly predictive for failure-free survival (FFS). The 3-year cumulative incidences of regional failure were 19.2% and 6.0% for the high and low SGR groups, respectively (P=.047). Conclusion: High SGR was correlated with both poorer OS and FFS in patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT. If validated, this measurement may be useful in identifying patients most likely to benefit from

  9. Conservation covenants on private land: issues with measuring and achieving biodiversity outcomes in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimons, James A; Carr, C Ben

    2014-09-01

    Conservation covenants and easements have become essential tools to secure biodiversity outcomes on private land, and to assist in meeting international protection targets. In Australia, the number and spatial area of conservation covenants has grown significantly in the past decade. Yet there has been little research or detailed policy analysis of conservation covenanting in Australia. We sought to determine how conservation covenanting agencies were measuring the biodiversity conservation outcomes achieved on covenanted properties, and factors inhibiting or contributing to measuring these outcomes. In addition, we also investigated the drivers and constraints associated with actually delivering the biodiversity outcomes, drawing on detailed input from covenanting programs. Although all conservation covenanting programs had the broad aim of maintaining or improving biodiversity in their covenants in the long term, the specific stated objectives of conservation covenanting programs varied. Programs undertook monitoring and evaluation in different ways and at different spatial and temporal scales. Thus, it was difficult to determine the extent Australian conservation covenanting agencies were measuring the biodiversity conservation outcomes achieved on covenanted properties on a national scale. Lack of time available to covenantors to undertake management was one of the biggest impediments to achieving biodiversity conservation outcomes. A lack of financial resources and human capital to monitor, knowing what to monitor, inconsistent monitoring methodologies, a lack of benchmark data, and length of time to achieve outcomes were all considered potential barriers to monitoring the biodiversity conservation outcomes of conservation covenants.

  10. The elastic body model: a pedagogical approach integrating real time measurements and modelling activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, C; Guastella, I; Tarantino, G

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a pedagogical approach to elastic body movement based on measurements of the contact times between a metallic rod and small bodies colliding with it and on modelling of the experimental results by using a microcomputer-based laboratory and simulation tools. The experiments and modelling activities have been built in the context of the laboratory of mechanical wave propagation of the two-year graduate teacher education programme of Palermo's University. Some considerations about observed modifications in trainee teachers' attitudes in utilizing experiments and modelling are discussed

  11. Body composition in hemodialysis patients measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenver, Doris Irene; Gotfredsen, Arne; Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measures three of the principal components of the body: fat mass, lean soft-tissue mass (comprising muscle, inner organs, and the body water), and the bone mineral content. The purpose of this study was to test the estimation capacity of DXA when it is applied...... and reduction in fat-free mass (lean soft-tissue mass plus bone mineral content) was observed by DXA. The estimation of the fat-free mass was independent of the amount of fluid loss. No significant differences in variance between the data obtained before and after the dialysis were observed. We conclude...

  12. Post-discharge body weight and neurodevelopmental outcomes among very low birth weight infants in Taiwan: A nationwide cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chung-Ting; Chen, Chao-Huei; Wang, Teh-Ming; Hsu, Ya-Chi

    2018-01-01

    Background Premature infants are at high risk for developmental delay and cognitive dysfunction. Besides medical conditions, growth restriction is regarded as an important risk factor for cognitive and neurodevelopmental dysfunction throughout childhood and adolescence and even into adulthood. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between post-discharge body weight and psychomotor development using a nationwide dataset. Materials and methods This was a nationwide cohort study conducted in Taiwan. Total of 1791 premature infants born between 2007 and 2011 with a birth weight of less than 1500 g were enrolled into this multi-center study. The data were obtained from the Taiwan Premature Infant Developmental Collaborative Study Group. The growth and neurodevelopmental evaluations were performed at corrected ages of 6, 12 and 24 months. Post-discharge failure to thrive was defined as a body weight below the 3rd percentile of the standard growth curve for Taiwanese children by the corrected age. Results The prevalence of failure to thrive was 15.8%, 16.9%, and 12.0% at corrected ages of 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. At corrected ages of 24 months, 12.9% had low Mental Developmental Index (MDI) scores (MDIneurodevelopmental impairment. Post-discharge failure to thrive was significantly associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. After controlling for potential confounding factors (small for gestational age, extra-uterine growth retardation at discharge, cerebral palsy, gender, mild intraventricular hemorrhage, persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, chronic lung disease, hemodynamic significant patent ductus arteriosus, necrotizing enterocolitis, surfactant use and indomethacin use), post-discharge failure to thrive remained a risk factor. Conclusion This observational study observed the association between lower body weight at corrected age of 6, 12, and 24 months and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes among VLBW

  13. Effect of size and composition of the body on absolute measurement of calcium in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of size and composition of the body on the measurement of total calcium in absolute units by neutron activation analysis is described. The neutron beam, produced from a cyclotron, was of mean energy 7.5 MeV. Counting of the activities induced in a patient was carried out with a multidetector whole body counter. Calibration of the system was achieved by using two phantoms of different sizes containing known quantities of calcium. The dimensions of various phantom sections were varied to determine the effect on efficiency of activation, an approximately linear relationship with body thickness being found. The influence of body habitus on counting efficiency was assessed by counting different patients who had been given known quantities of 42 K. The effects of (a) the non-uniform distribution of calcium and (b) the variation in density of different tissues on both activation and counting efficiency are discussed. It is estimated that the 68% confidence limits on the measurement of 49 Ca count rate per unit neutron fluence is +- 3.0% and on the measurement of calcium in grams +- 8.2%. (author)

  14. Influence of body size on outcomes of off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Alexander; Baladi, Naoum; Zapolanski, Alex; Pliam, Michael B; Shaw, Richard E

    2005-01-01

    Patients of small physical stature may be more likely selected for an on-pump coronary artery surgery (ONCAB) rather than an off-pump procedure (OPCAB). Small patients who do have OPCAB may do poorly. Our hospital demographics afford a unique opportunity to examine a group of small patients. Information was available over the past 4 years on 1015 patients who had isolated CABG and a calculable body surface area. Sixty-one patients had a body surface area of less than 1.5 m2 (SMALL). The 954 remaining patients were classed as larger (LARGER). Patients were compared with respect to preoperative risk factors, operative procedures, and postoperative results. Among SMALL patients, 59% were Asian, 89% female, averaged slightly older, had higher STS risk scores, lower hematocrits, more severe NYHA class ratings, and less elective surgical status (P < .05) than LARGER patients. Fifty-one percent of SMALL patients had OPCAB, 44.3% received blood, 90% had an event-free course, and 4.9% died postop (versus 1.2%, P < .05). OPCAB mortality was lower than ONCAB for both SMALL and nonsmall (P < .05). Blood use was greater for SMALL than for LARGER (44% versus 20%, P < .05) but less for SMALL OPCAB than SMALL ONCAB (27% versus 62%, P < .05). No differences were noted in postop MI, CVA, or length of stay, but 30-day readmission was lower for SMALL patients (5.0% versus 7.4%). Patients with small physical stature can be safely operated upon using off-pump techniques with good revascularization and postop results, despite apparently higher preop STS risk scores.

  15. Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trujillo A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Trujillo,1,2 Guillem Feixas,1,2 Arturo Bados,1 Eugeni García-Grau,1 Marta Salla,1 Joan Carles Medina,1 Adrián Montesano,1,2 José Soriano,3 Leticia Medeiros-Ferreira,4 Josep Cañete,5 Sergi Corbella,6 Antoni Grau,7 Fernando Lana,8 Chris Evans9 1Department of Personality, Assessment and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology, 2Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, University of Barcelona, 3Hospital of the Holy Cross and Saint Paul, 4Nou Barris Mental Health Center, Barcelona, 5Hospital of Mataró, Sanitary Consortium of Maresme, Mataró, 6FPCEE, Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull, 7Institute of Eating Disorders, Barcelona, 8MAR Health Park, CAEMIL, Santa Coloma de Gramenet, Spain; 9East London NHS Foundation Trust, NPDDNet, London, UK Objective: The objective of this paper is to assess the reliability and validity of the Spanish translation of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure, a 34-item self-report questionnaire that measures the client’s status in the domains of Subjective well-being, Problems/Symptoms, Life functioning, and Risk.Method: Six hundred and forty-four adult participants were included in two samples: the clinical sample (n=192 from different mental health and primary care centers; and the nonclinical sample (n=452, which included a student and a community sample.Results: The questionnaire showed good acceptability and internal consistency, appropriate test–retest reliability, and acceptable convergent validity. Strong differentiation between clinical and nonclinical samples was found. As expected, the Risk domain had different characteristics than other domains, but all findings were comparable with the UK referential data. Cutoff scores were calculated for clinical significant change assessment.Conclusion: The Spanish version of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure showed acceptable psychometric properties, providing support for using the

  16. Prediction of outcome of bright light treatment in patients with seasonal affective disorder: Discarding the early response, confirming a higher atypical balance, and uncovering a higher body mass index at baseline as predictors of endpoint outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Tzvetelina D; Reeves, Gloria M; Snitker, Soren; Lapidus, Manana; Sleemi, Aamar R; Balis, Theodora G; Manalai, Partam; Tariq, Muhammad M; Cabassa, Johanna A; Karim, Naila N; Johnson, Mary A; Langenberg, Patricia; Rohan, Kelly J; Miller, Michael; Stiller, John W; Postolache, Teodor T

    2017-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the early improvement in mood after the first hour of bright light treatment compared to control dim-red light would predict the outcome at six weeks of bright light treatment for depressed mood in patients with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). We also analyzed the value of Body Mass Index (BMI) and atypical symptoms of depression at baseline in predicting treatment outcome. Seventy-eight adult participants were enrolled. The first treatment was controlled crossover, with randomized order, and included one hour of active bright light treatment and one hour of control dim-red light, with one-hour washout. Depression was measured on the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-SAD version (SIGH-SAD). The predictive association of depression scores changes after the first session. BMI and atypical score balance with treatment outcomes at endpoint were assessed using multivariable linear and logistic regressions. No significant prediction by changes in depression scores after the first session was found. However, higher atypical balance scores and BMI positively predicted treatment outcome. Absence of a control intervention for the six-weeks of treatment (only the first session in the laboratory was controlled). Exclusion of patients with comorbid substance abuse, suicidality and bipolar I disorder, and patients on antidepressant medications, reducing the generalizability of the study. Prediction of outcome by early response to light treatment was not replicated, and the previously reported prediction of baseline atypical balance was confirmed. BMI, a parameter routinely calculated in primary care, was identified as a novel predictor, and calls for replication and then exploration of possible mediating mechanisms. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Body Mass Index (BMI) in women booking for antenatal care: comparison between selfreported and digital measurements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fattah, Chro

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: We set out to compare measurement of Body Mass Index (BMI) with selfreporting in women early in pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: We studied 100 women booking for antenatal care in the first trimester with a normal ongoing pregnancy. Selfreported maternal weight and height were recorded and the Body Mass Index was calculated. Afterwards maternal weight and height were digitally measured and actual BMI was calculated. RESULTS: If selfreporting is used for BMI classification, we found that 22% of women were classified incorrectly when BMI was measured. 12% of the women who were classified as having a normal selfreported BMI were overweight and 5% classified as overweight were obese. Similar findings have been reported outside pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: These findings have implications for clinical practice, and for research studies exploring the relationship between maternal adiposity and pregnancy complications.

  18. A wireless body measurement system to study fatigue in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Fei; Rabotti, Chiara; Bilberg, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue is reported as the most common symptom by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The physiological and functional parameters related to fatigue in MS patients are currently not well established. A new wearable wireless body measurement system, named Fatigue Monitoring System (FAMOS......), was developed to study fatigue in MS. It can continuously measure electrocardiogram, body-skin temperature, electromyogram and motions of feet. The goal of this study is to test the ability of distinguishing fatigued MS patients from healthy subjects by the use of FAMOS. This paper presents the realization...... of the measurement system including the design of both hardware and dedicated signal processing algorithms. Twenty-six participants including 17 MS patients with fatigue and 9 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included in the study for continuous 24 h monitoring. The preliminary results show significant...

  19. Engaging the hearts and minds of clinicians in outcome measurement – the UK rehabilitation outcomes collaborative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This article explores the rationale for choosing the instruments included within the UK Rehabilitation Outcomes Collaborative (UKROC) data set. Using one specialist neuro-rehabilitation unit as an exemplar service, it describes an approach to engaging the hearts and minds of clinicians in recording the data. Key messages and implications Measures included within a national data set for rehabilitation should be psychometrically robust and feasible to use in routine clinical practice; they should also support clinical decision-making so that clinicians actually want to use them. Learning from other international casemix models and benchmarking data sets, the UKROC team has developed a cluster of measures to inform the development of effective and cost-efficient rehabilitation services. These include measures of (1) “needs” for rehabilitation (complexity), (2) inputs provided to meet those needs (nursing and therapy intervention), and (3) outcome, including the attainment of personal goals as well as gains in functional independence. Conclusions By integrating the use of the data set measures in everyday clinical practice, we have achieved a very high rate of compliance with data collection. However, staff training and ongoing commitment from senior staff and managers are critical to the maintenance of effort required to provide assurance of data quality in the longer term. PMID:22506959

  20. Associations of Body Composition Measurements with Serum Lipid, Glucose and Insulin Profile: A Chinese Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chunxiao; Gao, Wenjing; Cao, Weihua; Lv, Jun; Yu, Canqing; Wang, Shengfeng; Zhou, Bin; Pang, Zengchang; Cong, Liming; Wang, Hua; Wu, Xianping; Li, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To quantitate and compare the associations of various body composition measurements with serum metabolites and to what degree genetic or environmental factors affect obesity-metabolite relation. Methods Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), lean body mass (LBM), percent body fat (PBF), fasting serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), glucose, insulin and lifestyle factors were assessed in 903 twins from Chinese National Twin Registry (CNTR). Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated from fasting serum glucose and insulin. Linear regression models and bivariate structural equation models were used to examine the relation of various body composition measurements with serum metabolite levels and genetic/environmental influences on these associations, respectively. Results At individual level, adiposity measurements (BMI, WC and PBF) showed significant associations with serum metabolite concentrations in both sexes and the associations still existed in male twins when using within-MZ twin pair comparison analyses. Associations of BMI with TG, insulin and HOMA-IR were significantly stronger in male twins compared to female twins (BMI-by-sex interaction p = 0.043, 0.020 and 0.019, respectively). Comparison of various adiposity measurements with levels of serum metabolites revealed that WC explained the largest fraction of variance in serum LDL-C, TG, TC and glucose concentrations while BMI performed best in explaining variance in serum HDL-C, insulin and HOMA-IR levels. Of these phenotypic correlations, 64–81% were attributed to genetic factors, whereas 19–36% were attributed to unique environmental factors. Conclusions We observed different associations between adiposity and serum metabolite profile and demonstrated that WC and BMI explained the largest fraction of variance in serum lipid profile and insulin

  1. Pectus excavatum postsurgical outcome based on preoperative soft body dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Antonio H. J.; Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Fonseca, Jaime; Pinho, A. C. M.; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Vilaça, João L.

    2012-02-01

    Pectus excavatum is the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall, in which an abnormal formation of the rib cage gives the chest a caved-in or sunken appearance. Today, the surgical correction of this deformity is carried out in children and adults through Nuss technic, which consists in the placement of a prosthetic bar under the sternum and over the ribs. Although this technique has been shown to be safe and reliable, not all patients have achieved adequate cosmetic outcome. This often leads to psychological problems and social stress, before and after the surgical correction. This paper targets this particular problem by presenting a method to predict the patient surgical outcome based on pre-surgical imagiologic information and chest skin dynamic modulation. The proposed approach uses the patient pre-surgical thoracic CT scan and anatomical-surgical references to perform a 3D segmentation of the left ribs, right ribs, sternum and skin. The technique encompasses three steps: a) approximation of the cartilages, between the ribs and the sternum, trough b-spline interpolation; b) a volumetric mass spring model that connects two layers - inner skin layer based on the outer pleura contour and the outer surface skin; and c) displacement of the sternum according to the prosthetic bar position. A dynamic model of the skin around the chest wall region was generated, capable of simulating the effect of the movement of the prosthetic bar along the sternum. The results were compared and validated with patient postsurgical skin surface acquired with Polhemus FastSCAN system.

  2. Development and validation of parenting measures for body image and eating patterns in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Stephanie R; Hart, Laura M; Paxton, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based parenting interventions are important in assisting parents to help their children develop healthy body image and eating patterns. To adequately assess the impact of parenting interventions, valid parent measures are required. The aim of this study was to develop and assess the validity and reliability of two new parent measures, the Parenting Intentions for Body image and Eating patterns in Childhood (Parenting Intentions BEC) and the Knowledge Test for Body image and Eating patterns in Childhood (Knowledge Test BEC). Participants were 27 professionals working in research or clinical treatment of body dissatisfaction or eating disorders, and 75 parents of children aged 2-6 years, who completed the measures via an online questionnaire. Seven scenarios were developed for the Parenting Intentions BEC to describe common experiences about the body and food that parents might need to respond to in front of their child. Parents ranked four behavioural intentions, derived from the current literature on parenting risk factors for body dissatisfaction and unhealthy eating patterns in children. Two subscales were created, one representing positive behavioural intentions, the other negative behavioural intentions. After piloting a larger pool of items, 13 statements were used to construct the Knowledge Test BEC. These were designed to be factual statements about the influence of parent language, media, family meals, healthy eating, and self-esteem on child eating and body image. The validity of both measures was tested by comparing parent and professional scores, and reliability was assessed by comparing parent scores over two testing occasions. Compared with parents, professionals reported significantly higher scores on the Positive Intentions subscale and significantly lower on the Negative Intentions subscale of the Parenting Intentions BEC; confirming the discriminant validity of six out of the seven scenarios. Test-retest reliability was also confirmed as

  3. The effect of preoperative body composition and nutritional status measurements on clinical outcomes for patients with gastrointestinal cancer%术前体成分及营养状况对消化道肿瘤病人临床结局的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴强; 刘兴强; 李春微

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common complication in patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer and has adverse impact on clinical outcomes Thus preoperative comprehensive evaluation is needed to ensure perioperative safety.There are many tools to evaluate nutritional status.However,validated methods for identification of nutritional status in this group of patients is still absent,as well as the pathway for detecting cancer related to malnutrition.This review focuses on the studies related to evaluating the prognostic implications of nutrition related indicators in patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer to provide clinician reference of making preoperative nutritional status assessment.%营养不良是消化道肿瘤病人术前常见并发症,对其临床结局可产生不良影响.为保证病人围术期安全性,术前需对病人进行综合评估.针对肿瘤病人营养状况评估指标较多,然而目前针对消化道肿瘤病人营养状况有效评估方法尚不明确且缺乏肿瘤相关营养不良的评估路径.因此,本文通过综述形式探讨不同营养相关指标对消化道肿瘤病人临床结局的预测作用,以期为临床医生对消化道肿瘤病人行术前营养状况评估提供参考.

  4. Physical outcome measures for conductive and mixed hearing loss treatment: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M L; Tysome, J R; Hill-Feltham, P; Hodgetts, W E; Ostevik, A; McKinnon, B J; Monksfield, P; Sockalingam, R; Wright, T

    2018-05-07

    The number of potential options for rehabilitation of patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss is continually expanding. To be able to inform patients and other stakeholders there is a need to identify and develop patient-centred outcomes for treatment of hearing loss. To identify outcome measures in the physical core area used when reporting the outcome after treatment of conductive and mixed hearing loss in adult patients. Systematic review. Systematic review of literature related to reported physical outcome measures after treatment of mixed or conductive hearing loss without restrictions regarding type of intervention, treatment or device. Any measure reporting the physical outcome after treatment or intervention of mixed or conductive hearing loss was sought and categorised. The physical outcomes measures that had been extracted were then grouped into domains. The literature search resulted in the identification of 1,434 studies, of which 153 were selected for inclusion in the review. The majority (57%) of papers reported results from middle ear surgery, with the remainder reporting results from either bone conduction hearing devices or middle ear implants. Outcomes related to complications were categorised into 17 domains, whereas outcomes related to treatment success was categorised in 22 domains. The importance of these domains to patients and other stakeholders needs to be further explored in order to establish which of these domains are most relevant to interventions for conductive or mixed hearing loss. This will allow us to then assess which outcomes measures are most suitable for inclusion in the core set This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Song repertoire size correlates with measures of body size in Eurasian blackbirds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesler, Nana; Mundry, Roger; Sacher, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In most oscine bird species males possess a repertoire of different song patterns. The size of these repertoires is assumed to serve as an honest signal of male quality. The Eurasian blackbird’s (Turdus merula) song contains a large repertoire of different element types with a flexible song...... organisation. Here we investigated whether repertoire size in Eurasian blackbirds correlates with measures of body size, namely length of wing, 8th primary, beak and tarsus. So far, very few studies have investigated species with large repertoires and a flexible song organisation in this context. We found...... positive correlations, meaning that larger males had larger repertoires. Larger males may have better fighting abilities and, thus, advantages in territorial defence. Larger structural body size may also reflect better conditions during early development. Therefore, under the assumption that body size...

  6. Whole body measurements of sodium turnover in offspring of patients with sustained essential hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henningsen, N.C.; Ohlsson, O.; Mattson, S.; Nosslin, B.; Lund Univ.; Lund Univ.

    1982-01-01

    The elimination rate (percent per day) of injected 22 Na using a whole body measurement technique was significantly lower (26%, 5.8 +- 1.5) in normotensive of borderline hypertensive offspring of essential hypertensive patients than in 15 age- and sex-matched, normotensive controls (7.3 +- 1.0). There were no significant differences in exchangeable sodium, whole body potassium or in the urinary exeretion of sodium, potassium and creatinine. The basis for the difference in turnover rate during weck 1 is probably an alteration in the cellular handling of sodium (i.e. increased intracellular sodium) in the still normotensive offspring of patients with essential hypertension. The long-term (more than 100 days) whole body retention of 22 Na was found to be only 0.1% of that injected, which justifies the use of the method on larger population groups. (orig.)

  7. Peripouch Fat Area Measured on MRI Image and Its Association With Adverse Pouch Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xian Hua; Chouhan, Hanumant; Liu, Gang Lei; Lan, Nan; Remer, Erick; Stocchi, Luca; Ashburn, Jean; Hull, Tracy L; Shen, Bo

    2018-03-19

    There are no published studies on the impact of peripouch fat on pouch outcomes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Patients with pelvic MRI-DIXON scans from our prospectively maintained Pouch Database between 2002 and 2016 were evaluated. Peripouch fat area was measured on MRI-DIXON-F images at the middle height level of the pouch (area M) and the highest level of the pouch (area H). Of all 1863 patients in the database, 197 eligible patients were included in this study. The median of area M was 52.4 cm2, so the 197 patients were classified into 2 groups: group 1 (Area-M Area-M ≥52.4 cm2). Compared with group 1, group 2 was found to have thicker perianal fat, more Caucasian and more males. Group 2 also had a higher Area-H, more weight, height, and body mass index, along with greater age at IBD diagnosis, age at pouch construction and pouch age, and a higher frequency of total pouch complication (86.7% versus 66.7%, P = 0.001), chronic pouch complication (68.4% versus 51.5%, P = 0.016), and chronic antibiotic-refractory pouchitis (16.3% versus 7.1%, P = 0.043). Multivariate logistic analysis showed that Area-M was an independent risk factor for chronic antibiotic-refractory pouchitis (odds ratio [OR]: 1.025; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.007-1.042, P = 0.005). The 22 patients with 2 or more pelvic MRI-DIXON scans were further classified into 2 groups by the change from the initial to latest MRI-DIXON scans. Patients with Area-M increase ≥10% and Area-M/height increase ≥10% were found to have shorter pouch survivals than those with increase <10%. A new method was established for measuring peripouch fat using pelvic MRI-DIXON-F image. Our study suggests that accumulation of peripouch fat may be associated with poor outcomes in selected IBD patients suspected of inflammatory or mechanical disorders of the pouch. Whether this association is causal warrants further investigation.

  8. Assessment of Human Ambulatory Speed by Measuring Near-Body Air Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Salati

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of physical activity are important for the diagnosis of the exacerbation of chronic diseases. Accelerometers have been widely employed in clinical research for measuring activity intensity and investigating the association between physical activity and adverse health conditions. However, the ability of accelerometers in assessing physical activity intensity such as walking speed has been constrained by the inter-individual variability in sensor output and by the necessity of developing unobtrusive low-power monitoring systems. This paper will present a study aimed at investigating the accuracy of a wearable measuring system of near-body air flow to determine ambulatory speed in the field.

  9. Study of the dairy characters of lactating Murrah buffaloes on the basis of body parts measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Dhillod

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to correlate the milk yield of Murrah buffaloes with certain body parts measurements. Materials and Methods: A total of 70 lactating Murrah buffaloes were selected from Buffalo Farm, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Science, Hisar and were randomly selected in a range from first to fifth parity. Traits studied were 305 days milk yield (MY, body weight (BW, body length (BL, muzzle width (MW, height at wither (HW, abdominal girth (AG, chest girth (CG, body depth fore, body depth rear, hip bone distance (HBD, pin bone distance (PBD, skin thickness (STK, and tail length (TL. Data were collected and statically analyzed by Pearson’s correlation method. Result: The result of this study showed that Murrah buffaloes had the average 2604.8±39.5 kg for MY, 556.1±4.9 kg for BW, and 152.2±0.8 cm for BL. This study showed that buffaloes had positive significant (p<0.05 correlation between MY and BW (0.26. Highly significant (p<0.01 correlation was observed between MY and AG (0.64, MW (0.42. Significant (p<0.01 negative correlation was observed between MY and STK (−0.79. Different body part measurements (BW, BL, HW, AG, CG, MW, TL, BD, PBD, HBD, STK were significantly correlated with each other. Conclusion: This study can be helpful as a selection tool to enhance and evaluate the production potential by setting standards of Murrah buffalo breed. BW, abdominal growth, muzzle thickness, and STK were found key factors while selecting a dairy Murrah buffalo.

  10. Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, and Body Composition of Canadian Shift Workers: Data From the Canadian Health Measures Survey Cycles 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil-Sztramko, Sarah E; Gotay, Carolyn C; Demers, Paul A; Campbell, Kristin L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare objectively measured physical activity, sedentary time, physical fitness, and body composition in shift workers (SWs) with those who work regular days. Population-based, cross-sectional data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (n = 4323) were used. Univariate and multivariate linear and logistic regression models were used to compare outcomes between SWs and day workers. In unweighted analyses, SWs were more likely to have poor body composition, although had fewer minutes per week of sedentary time. Despite no differences in physical activity, SWs had a lower aerobic capacity. In weighted analyses, only differences in aerobic capacity were observed. This analysis confirms previous findings that SWs have poorer body composition than day workers, and suggest that SWs may need to engage in more physical activity to achieve the same aerobic capacity as day workers.

  11. Positive psychology outcome measures for family caregivers of people living with dementia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfeld, Jacki; Stoner, Charlotte R; Wenborn, Jennifer; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Moniz-Cook, Esme; Orrell, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Family caregivers of people living with dementia can have both positive and negative experiences of caregiving. Despite this, existing outcome measures predominately focus on negative aspects of caregiving such as burden and depression. This review aimed to evaluate the development and psychometric properties of existing positive psychology measures for family caregivers of people living with dementia to determine their potential utility in research and practice. A systematic review of positive psychology outcome measures for family caregivers of people with dementia was conducted. The databases searched were as follows: PsychINFO, CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed. Scale development papers were subject to a quality assessment to appraise psychometric properties. Twelve positive outcome measures and six validation papers of these scales were identified. The emerging constructs of self-efficacy, spirituality, resilience, rewards, gain, and meaning are in line with positive psychology theory. There are some robust positive measures in existence for family caregivers of people living with dementia. However, lack of reporting of the psychometric properties hindered the quality assessment of some outcome measures identified in this review. Future research should aim to include positive outcome measures in interventional research to facilitate a greater understanding of the positive aspects of caregiving and how these contribute to well-being.

  12. Radium-226 body burden in U miners by measurement of Rn in exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, G K; Raghavayya, M; Kotrappa, P; Somasundaram, S

    1986-02-01

    Uranium miners were made to inhale Rn-free medical O2 and exhale through a 5.2-1 A1 chamber before reporting to work. The chamber was sealed and isolated from the sampling circuit. An electrostatic plate collected the freshly formed Rn-decay products. The subsequent programmed alpha counting of the plate yielded a Rn concentration in the exhaled breath. Assuming that the exhaled breath represents a certain fraction of the Rn produced inside the body, the body burden of 226Ra was calculated. Standardisation of this procedure and the data collected on 310 miners are discussed. The procedure is simple and applicable for routine measurements. The miner needs to be in the laboratory for only 10 min. The system is also portable for field application. For routine use, the minimum detectable concentration is 3.87 Bq X m-3 which corresponds to a body burden of 0.26 kBq in a typical miner, if one assumes the Rn release fraction from the body as 84%. The system offers a more convenient and sensitive alternative to whole-body counting of workers for 226Ra.

  13. High-frequency ultrasound measurements of the normal ciliary body and iris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Julian P S; Spielberg, Leigh; Finger, Paul T

    2011-01-01

    To determine the normal ultrasonographic thickness of the iris and ciliary body. This prospective 35-MHz ultrasonographic study included 80 normal eyes of 40 healthy volunteers. The images were obtained at the 12-, 3-, 6-, and 9-o'clock radial meridians, measured at three locations along the radial length of the iris and at the thickest section of the ciliary body. Mixed model was used to estimate eye site-adjusted means and standard errors and to test the statistical difference of adjusted results. Parameters included mean thickness, standard deviation, and range. Mean thicknesses at the iris root, midway along the radial length of the iris, and at the juxtapupillary margin were 0.4 ± 0.1, 0.5 ± 0.1, and 0.6 ± 0.1 mm, respectively. Those of the ciliary body, ciliary processes, and ciliary body + ciliary processes were 0.7 ± 0.1, 0.6 ± 0.1, and 1.3 ± 0.2 mm, respectively. This study provides standard, normative thickness data for the iris and ciliary body in healthy adults using ultrasonographic imaging. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Development and validation of MyLifeTracker: a routine outcome measure for youth mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan B

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin Kwan,1 Debra J Rickwood,1,2 Nic R Telford2 1Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT, 2headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Purpose: Routine outcome measures are now being designed for session-by-session use, with emphasis on clinically meaningful items and sensitivity to change. Despite an increasing mental health service focus for young people aged 12–25 years, there is a lack of outcome measures that are designed to be used across this age group. Consequently, MyLifeTracker (MLT was developed as a brief mental health outcome measure designed for young people for routine use. It consists of the following five items targeting areas of importance to young people: general well-being, day-to-day activities, relationships with friends, relationships with family, and general coping. Participants and methods: The measure was tested with 75,893 young people aged 12–25 years attending headspace centers across Australia for mental health-related issues. Results: MLT showed a robust unidimensional factor structure and appropriate reliability. It exhibited good concurrent validity against well-validated measures of psychological distress, well-being, functioning, and life satisfaction. The measure was further demonstrated to be sensitive to change. Conclusion: MLT provides a psychometrically sound mental health outcome measure for young people. The measure taps into items that are meaningful to young people and provides an additional clinical support tool for clinicians and clients during therapy. The measure is brief and easy to use and has been incorporated into an electronic system that routinely tracks session-by-session change and produces time-series charts for the ease of use and interpretation. Keywords: MyLifeTracker, youth mental health, routine outcome measure, routine outcome monitoring, adolescent and young adult

  15. Malnutrition risk questionnaire combined with body composition measurement in malnutrition screening in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csontos, Ágnes Anna; Molnár, Andrea; Piri, Zsolt; Pálfi, Erzsébet; Miheller, Pál

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of malnutrition screening is to predict the probability of a worse outcome due to nutritional factors. The Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) can be used for screening in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, it does not provide details about body composition. Our aim was to assess the body composition and combine this with the MUST method to screen risk of malnutrition and sarcopenia. A total of 173 IBD outpatients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. The MUST scale indicated 21.4% of IBD patients to be at risk of malnutrition. A risk of sarcopenia was detected in 27.7%. However, one third of these patients were not considered to be at risk by their MUST score. Furthermore, Crohn's disease (CD) patients had a strongly unfavorable fat-free mass index (FFMI) value compared to ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and these differences were significant among men (FFMI: 18.62 ± 2.16 vs 19.85 ± 2.22, p = 0.02, in CD and UC males, respectively). As sarcopenia is a relevant prognostic factor, the MUST method should be expanded to include body composition analysis to detect more IBD patients at risk of malnutrition and sarcopenia in order to start their nutritional therapy immediately.

  16. Human Body Parts Tracking and Kinematic Features Assessment Based on RSSI and Inertial Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddi Blumrosen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of patient kinematics in different environments plays an important role in the detection of risk situations such as fall detection in elderly patients, in rehabilitation of patients with injuries, and in the design of treatment plans for patients with neurological diseases. Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI measurements in a Body Area Network (BAN, capture the signal power on a radio link. The main aim of this paper is to demonstrate the potential of utilizing RSSI measurements in assessment of human kinematic features, and to give methods to determine these features. RSSI measurements can be used for tracking different body parts’ displacements on scales of a few centimeters, for classifying motion and gait patterns instead of inertial sensors, and to serve as an additional reference to other sensors, in particular inertial sensors. Criteria and analytical methods for body part tracking, kinematic motion feature extraction, and a Kalman filter model for aggregation of RSSI and inertial sensor were derived. The methods were verified by a set of experiments performed in an indoor environment. In the future, the use of RSSI measurements can help in continuous assessment of various kinematic features of patients during their daily life activities and enhance medical diagnosis accuracy with lower costs.

  17. Body composition measures of obese adolescents by the deuterium oxide dilution method and by bioelectrical impedance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.M. Resende

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to describe and compare the body composition variables determined by bioelectrical impedance (BIA and the deuterium dilution method (DDM, to identify possible correlations and agreement between the two methods, and to construct a linear regression model including anthropometric measures. Obese adolescents were evaluated by anthropometric measures, and body composition was assessed by BIA and DDM. Forty obese adolescents were included in the study. Comparison of the mean values for the following variables: fat body mass (FM; kg, fat-free mass (FFM; kg, and total body water (TBW; % determined by DDM and by BIA revealed significant differences. BIA overestimated FFM and TBW and underestimated FM. When compared with data provided by DDM, the BIA data presented a significant correlation with FFM (r = 0.89; P < 0.001, FM (r = 0.93; P < 0.001 and TBW (r = 0.62; P < 0.001. The Bland-Altman plot showed no agreement for FFM, FM or TBW between data provided by BIA and DDM. The linear regression models proposed in our study with respect to FFM, FM, and TBW were well adjusted. FFM obtained by DDM = 0.842 x FFM obtained by BIA. FM obtained by DDM = 0.855 x FM obtained by BIA + 0.152 x weight (kg. TBW obtained by DDM = 0.813 x TBW obtained by BIA. The body composition results of obese adolescents determined by DDM can be predicted by using the measures provided by BIA through a regression equation.

  18. Body Mass Index Trajectories among Middle-Aged and Elderly Canadians and Associated Health Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Whether there is heterogeneity in the development of BMI from middle-age onward is still unknown. The primary aim of this study is to analyze long-term obesity and how BMI trajectories are associated with health outcomes in midlife. Methods. Latent Class Growth Modelling was used to capture the changes in BMI over time. In this study, 3070 individuals from the National Population Health Survey (NPHS, aged 40–55 years at baseline, were included. Results. Four BMI trajectory groups, “Normal-Stable” (N-S, “Overweight-Stable” (OV-S, “Obese I-Stable” (OB I-S, and “Obese II-Stable” (OB II-S, were identified. Men, persons of White ancestry, and individuals who had no postsecondary education had higher odds of being in the latter three groups. Moreover, members of the OV-S, OB I-S, and OB II-S groups experienced more asthma, arthritis, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, cognitive impairment, and reduced self-rated overall health. Individuals in the OB II-S group were at greater risk for back problems, chronic bronchitis or emphysema, and emotional issues when compared to the N-S group. Conclusion. Understanding different BMI trajectories is important in order to identify people who are at the highest risk of developing comorbidities due to obesity and to establish programs to intervene appropriately.

  19. Outcomes of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of multiple synchronous and recurrent lung nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, Dawn; Olivier, Kenneth R; Mayo, Charles S; Miller, Robert C; Nelson, Kathryn; Bauer, Heather; Brown, Paul D; Park, Sean S; Ma, Daniel J; Garces, Yolanda I

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is evolving into a standard of care for unresectable lung nodules. Local control has been shown to be in excess of 90% at 3 years. However, some patients present with synchronous lung nodules in the ipsilateral or contralateral lobe or metasynchronous disease. In these cases, patients may receive multiple courses of lung SBRT or a single course for synchronous nodules. The toxicity of such treatment is currently unknown. Between 2006 and 2012, 63 subjects with 128 metasynchronous and synchronous lung nodules were treated at the Mayo Clinic with SBRT. Demographic patient data and dosimetric data regarding SBRT treatments were collected. Acute toxicity (defined as toxicity < 90 days) and late toxicity (defined as toxicity > = 90 days) were reported and graded as per standardized CTCAE 4.0 criteria. Local control, progression free survival and overall survival were also described. The median age of patients treated was 73 years. Sixty five percent were primary or recurrent lung cancers with the remainder metastatic lung nodules of varying histologies. Of 63 patients, 18 had prior high dose external beam radiation to the mediastinum or chest. Dose and fractionation varied but the most common prescriptions were 48 Gy/4 fractions, 54 Gy/3 fractions, and 50 Gy/5 fractions. Only 6 patients demonstrated local recurrence. With a median follow up of 12.6 months, median SBRT specific overall survival and progression free survival were 35.7 months and 10.7 months respectively. Fifty one percent (32/63 patients) experienced acute toxicity, predominantly grade 1 and 2 fatigue. One patient developed acute grade 3 radiation pneumonitis at 75 days. Forty six percent (29/63 patients) developed late effects. Most were grade 1 dyspnea. There was one patient with grade 5 pneumonitis. Multiple courses of SBRT and SBRT delivery after external beam radiotherapy appear to be feasible and safe. Most toxicity was grade 1 and 2 but the risk was

  20. Genetic association between body energy measured throughout lactation and fertility in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banos, G; Coffey, M P

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the genetic association of body energy assessed throughout lactation with a cow's fertility. Nine direct and indirect body energy traits were defined at different stages of lactation. Four were daily records of energy balance, energy content, cumulative effective energy (CEE) and body condition score (BCS) calculated between lactation days 4 and 311. The other five traits included duration of negative energy balance (DNEB), rate of recovery during DNEB (RNEB), sum of negative energy balance (SNEB), nadir of energy content (NEC) and number of days from calving to NEC. Of these traits, energy balance, DNEB, RNEB and SNEB were primarily based on individual cow feed intake and milk yield, and considered direct measures of body energy. The other traits were calculated from body lipid and protein changes, predicted from BCS and live weight profiles, and were considered indirect measures of body energy. Fertility was defined by number of days between calving and commencement of luteal activity (DLA), first observed oestrus (DH) and conception (DC), and number of services per conception. A total of 957 cows in their first four lactations were considered in the study. Genetic models fitted cubic splines to define longitudinal traits (energy balance, energy content, CEE and BCS) and calculate heritability and genetic correlation with fertility. Daily heritability estimate ranges were 0.10 to 0.34, 0.35 to 0.61, 0.32 to 0.53 and 0.24 to 0.56 for energy balance, energy content, CEE and BCS, respectively, and, in most cases, tended to increase towards the middle of lactation and remain relatively stable thereafter. Of the other body energy traits, heritability of NEC (0.44) was the most notable. Statistically significant (P body energy have the strongest genetic association with cow fertility. NEC and early lactation (circa day 50) BCS and energy content are the most useful traits for selection in terms of the correlated improvement

  1. Association of gestational weight gain and pre-pregnancy body mass index with adverse pregnancy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munim, S.; Maheen, H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association between gestation weight gain (GWG) and adverse pregnancy outcome in a Pakistani population. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: The Aga Khan University, Karachi, from February 2003 to 2007. Methodology: This study used secondary data of 4,735 women from a large cohort study on fetal growth. Pre-pregnancy BMI was categorized according to the recommendations from the institute of medicine (IOM, 2009) and gestation weight gain (GWG) was noted. Chi-square test was used to find the association of GWG and pre-pregnancy BMI with low birth, large for gestational age (LGA), and caesarean section. Logistic regression analysis was weight (LBW), preterm delivery performed to control for confounders like age, parity, working status and ethnicity. Results: The prevalence of LBW decreased with increasing BMI. GWG of the population was noted as 8.5 kg. LBW was omen below the age of 19 were twice more likely to have LBW than observed to have an inverse relationship with GWG. W above 35 years of age. Weight gain above the recommended range were twice more likely to have large for dates. Overweight women were 1.5 times more likely to deliver preterm whereas obese women were 1.4 times more likely to undergo caesarean section than women with normal BMI. Conclusion: The optimal weight gain was estimated to be 8.5 kg to prevent low birth weight in our population. Obese women are more likely to have LGA, caesarean sections and pre-term deliveries. (author)

  2. Long-Term Outcome of Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder: A Naturalistic Case Series of 1 to 4 Years After a Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Anson, Martin

    2015-11-01

    There is some evidence for the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) after 1 to 6months but none in the long term. The aim of this study was to follow up the participants in a randomized controlled trial of CBT versus anxiety management to determine whether or not the treatment gains were maintained over time. Thirty of the original 39 participants who had CBT were followed up over 1 to 4years and assessed using a number of clinician and self-report measures, which included the primary outcome measure of the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for BDD. Outcome scores generally maintained over time from end of treatment to long-term follow-up. There was a slight deterioration from n=20 (51.3%) to n=18 (46.2%) who met improvement criteria at long-term follow-up. Eleven (28.2%) were in full remission and 22 (56.4%) were in partial remission. The gains made were generally maintained at long-term follow-up. However, there were a significant number of participants who maintained chronic symptoms after treatment and may need a longer-term or more complex intervention and active medication management. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Body composition and bone mineral density measurements by using a multi-energy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve, L.

    2003-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is a major technique to evaluate bone mineral density, thus allowing diagnosis of bone decalcification ( osteoporosis). Recently, this method has proved useful to quantify body composition (fat ratio). However, these measurements suffer from artefacts which can lead to diagnosis errors in a number of cases. This work has aimed to improve both the reproducibility and the accuracy of bone mineral density and body composition measurements. To this avail, the acquisition conditions were optimised in order to ameliorate the results reproducibility and we have proposed a new method to correct inaccuracies in the determination of bone mineral density. Experimental validations yield encouraging results on both synthetic phantoms and biological samples. (author)

  4. Measurement of total body calcium in osteoporotic patients treated with salmon calcitonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanzi, I.; Thompson, K.; Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    In the past, the evaluation of therapies for osteoporosis has been limited by the lack of a suitable quantitative end point. The introduction of the technique of in vivo total body neutron activation analysis (TBNAA) has made possible the precise and accurate measurement of total body calcium (TBCa). Since almost 99 percent of TBCa is in the skeleton, TBNAA gives a direct measurement of skeletal mass. Thus, changes in skeletal mass serve as an objective criterion in the evaluation of the efficacy of the therapy in osteoporosis. Studies performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory and elsewhere have reported the use of calcitonin (CT) in the treatment of primary osteoporosis and related conditions in a limited number of patients. The physiological effects of CT as an inhibitor of bone resorption has been the rationale of its use. The results of a randomized, controlled, 2 year therapeutical trial of CT in a group of postmenopausal osteoporotic women are presented in this report

  5. Possibility of semiconductor counters application for internal contamination measurement of whole human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunic, O.; Orlic, M.; Bek-Uzarov, Dj.; Pavlovic, S.; Pavlovic, R.

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of high resolution semiconductor counters application in 'Vinca' Whole Body Counter for direct beta-gamma internal contamination measurement are discussed, assuming the following relevant characteristics: efficiency, resolution and counter price. A comparison with appropriate characteristics of NaI(Tl) crystal used in 'Vinca' WBC is treated. It is evident that the scintillation counters have the higher detection efficiency, but HPGe counters having much better resolution and recently lowest prices are also acceptable to join the existing NaI(Tl) counters with the HPGe counters in the same time, allow better spectral analyses of the human body activity and additionally more precise estimation of the equivalent doses rate which is generally a essential problem in WBC measurements. (author)

  6. Non-invasive body temperature measurement of wild chimpanzees using fecal temperature decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Siv Aina; Mundry, Roger; Nunn, Charles L; Boesch, Christophe; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2009-04-01

    New methods are required to increase our understanding of pathologic processes in wild mammals. We developed a noninvasive field method to estimate the body temperature of wild living chimpanzees habituated to humans, based on statistically fitting temperature decline of feces after defecation. The method was established with the use of control measures of human rectal temperature and subsequent changes in fecal temperature over time. The method was then applied to temperature data collected from wild chimpanzee feces. In humans, we found good correspondence between the temperature estimated by the method and the actual rectal temperature that was measured (maximum deviation 0.22 C). The method was successfully applied and the average estimated temperature of the chimpanzees was 37.2 C. This simple-to-use field method reliably estimates the body temperature of wild chimpanzees and probably also other large mammals.

  7. Fatigue is a reliable, sensitive and unique outcome measure in rheumatoid arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Minnock, Patricia

    2009-12-01

    Fatigue is an important symptom in patients with RA. Measurement of fatigue in clinical trials and in clinical practice requires scales that are reproducible, sensitive to change and practical. This study examined the reliability and sensitivity to change of fatigue and its relative independence as an outcome measure in RA.

  8. Outcomes Measurement in Voice Disorders: Application of an Acoustic Index of Dysphonia Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Roy, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this experiment was to assess the ability of an acoustic model composed of both time-based and spectral-based measures to track change following voice disorder treatment and to serve as a possible treatment outcomes measure. Method: A weighted, four-factor acoustic algorithm consisting of shimmer, pitch sigma, the ratio of…

  9. The Benchmarking Capacity of a General Outcome Measure of Academic Language in Science and Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Paul; Lastrapes, Renée E.

    2016-01-01

    The amount of research evaluating the technical merits of general outcome measures of science and social studies achievement is growing. This study targeted criterion validity for critical content monitoring. Questions addressed the concurrent criterion validity of alternate presentation formats of critical content monitoring and the measure's…

  10. Test-Retest Reliability of Dual-Task Outcome Measures in People With Parkinson Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strouwen, C.; Molenaar, E.A.; Keus, S.H.; Munks, L.; Bloem, B.R.; Nieuwboer, A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dual-task (DT) training is gaining ground as a physical therapy intervention in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Future studies evaluating the effect of such interventions need reliable outcome measures. To date, the test-retest reliability of DT measures in patients with PD remains

  11. Assessment of human body influence on exposure measurements of electric field in indoor enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; García, Jorge; Ramos, Victoria; Blas, Juan

    2015-02-01

    Personal exposure meters (PEMs) used for measuring exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) are typically used in epidemiological studies. As is well known, these measurement devices cause a perturbation of real EMF exposure levels due to the presence of the human body in the immediate proximity. This paper aims to model the alteration caused by the body shadow effect (BSE) in motion conditions and in indoor enclosures at the Wi-Fi frequency of 2.4 GHz. For this purpose, simulation techniques based on ray-tracing have been carried out, and their results have been verified experimentally. A good agreement exists between simulation and experimental results in terms of electric field (E-field) levels, and taking into account the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the spatial distribution of amplitude. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test provides a P-value greater than 0.05, in fact close to 1. It has been found that the influence of the presence of the human body can be characterized as an angle of shadow that depends on the dimensions of the indoor enclosure. The CDFs show that the E-field levels in indoor conditions follow a lognormal distribution in the absence of the human body and under the influence of BSE. In conclusion, the perturbation caused by BSE in PEMs readings cannot be compensated for by correction factors. Although the mean value is well adjusted, BSE causes changes in CDF that would require improvements in measurement protocols and in the design of measuring devices to subsequently avoid systematic errors. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Body Conscious? Interoceptive Awareness, Measured by Heartbeat Perception, Is Negatively Correlated with Self-Objectification

    OpenAIRE

    Ainley, Vivien; Tsakiris, Manos

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 'Self-objectification' is the tendency to experience one's body principally as an object, to be evaluated for its appearance rather than for its effectiveness. Within objectification theory, it has been proposed that self-objectification accounts for the poorer interoceptive awareness observed in women, as measured by heartbeat perception. Our study is, we believe, the first specifically to test this relationship. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a well-validated and reliable...

  13. Individual and collective bodies: using measures of variance and association in contextual epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, J; Ohlsson, H; Lynch, K F; Chaix, B; Subramanian, S V

    2009-12-01

    Social epidemiology investigates both individuals and their collectives. Although the limits that define the individual bodies are very apparent, the collective body's geographical or cultural limits (eg "neighbourhood") are more difficult to discern. Also, epidemiologists normally investigate causation as changes in group means. However, many variables of interest in epidemiology may cause a change in the variance of the distribution of the dependent variable. In spite of that, variance is normally considered a measure of uncertainty or a nuisance rather than a source of substantive information. This reasoning is also true in many multilevel investigations, whereas understanding the distribution of variance across levels should be fundamental. This means-centric reductionism is mostly concerned with risk factors and creates a paradoxical situation, as social medicine is not only interested in increasing the (mean) health of the population, but also in understanding and decreasing inappropriate health and health care inequalities (variance). Critical essay and literature review. The present study promotes (a) the application of measures of variance and clustering to evaluate the boundaries one uses in defining collective levels of analysis (eg neighbourhoods), (b) the combined use of measures of variance and means-centric measures of association, and (c) the investigation of causes of health variation (variance-altering causation). Both measures of variance and means-centric measures of association need to be included when performing contextual analyses. The variance approach, a new aspect of contextual analysis that cannot be interpreted in means-centric terms, allows perspectives to be expanded.

  14. An instrumented implant for vertebral body replacement that measures loads in the anterior spinal column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlmann, Antonius; Gabel, Udo; Graichen, Friedmar; Bender, Alwina; Bergmann, Georg

    2007-06-01

    Realistic loads on a spinal implant are required among others for optimization of implant design and preclinical testing. In addition, such data may help to choose the optimal physiotherapy program for patients with such an implant and to evaluate the efficacy of aids like braces or crutches. Presently, no implant is available that can measure loads in the anterior spinal column during activities of daily life. Therefore, an implant instrumented for in vivo load measurement was developed for vertebral body replacement. The aim of this paper is to describe in detail a telemeterized implant that measures forces and moments acting on it. Six load sensors, a nine-channel telemetry unit and a coil for inductive power supply of the electronic circuits were integrated into a modified vertebral body replacement (Synex). The instrumented part of the implant is hermetically sealed. Patients are videotaped during measurements, and implant loads are displayed on and off line. The average accuracy of load measurement is better than 2% for force and 5% for moment components with reference to the maximum value of 3000 N and 20 Nm, respectively. The measuring implant described here will provide additional information on spinal loads.

  15. A combination of body condition measurements is more informative than conventional condition indices: temporal variation in body condition and corticosterone in brown tree snakes (Boiga irregularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, Heather L; Mason, Robert T

    2008-02-01

    The body condition index is a common method for quantifying the energy reserves of individual animals. Because good body condition is necessary for reproduction in many species, body condition indices can indicate the potential reproductive output of a population. Body condition is related to glucocorticoid production, in that low body condition is correlated to high concentrations of corticosterone in reptiles. We compared the body condition index and plasma corticosterone levels of brown tree snakes on Guam in 2003 to those collected in 1992/1993 to determine whether that population still showed the chronic stress and poor condition apparent in the earlier study. We also examined the relationship between fat mass, body condition and plasma corticosterone concentrations as indicators of physiological condition of individuals in the population. Body condition was significantly higher in 2003 than in the earlier sample for mature male and female snakes, but not for juveniles. The significantly lower levels of corticosterone in all three groups in 2003 suggests that although juveniles did not have significantly improved energy stores they, along with the mature males and females, were no longer under chronic levels of stress. Although the wet season of 2002 was unusually rainy, low baseline levels of corticosterone measured in 2000 indicate that the improved body condition of snakes in 2003 is likely the result of long-term changes in prey populations rather than annual variation in response to environmental conditions.

  16. How do aggregated patient-reported outcome measures data stimulate health care improvement? A realist synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkin, Sonia; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Wright, Judy; Valderas, Jose Maria; Meads, David; Black, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Internationally, there has been considerable debate about the role of data in supporting quality improvement in health care. Our objective was to understand how, why and in what circumstances the feedback of aggregated patient-reported outcome measures data improved patient care. Methods We conducted a realist synthesis. We identified three main programme theories underlying the use of patient-reported outcome measures as a quality improvement strategy and expressed them as nine ‘if then’ propositions. We identified international evidence to test these propositions through searches of electronic databases and citation tracking, and supplemented our synthesis with evidence from similar forms of performance data. We synthesized this evidence through comparing the mechanisms and impact of patient-reported outcome measures and other performance data on quality improvement in different contexts. Results Three programme theories were identified: supporting patient choice, improving accountability and enabling providers to compare their performance with others. Relevant contextual factors were extent of public disclosure, use of financial incentives, perceived credibility of the data and the practicality of the results. Available evidence suggests that patients or their agents rarely use any published performance data when selecting a provider. The perceived motivation behind public reporting is an important determinant of how providers respond. When clinicians perceived that performance indicators were not credible but were incentivized to collect them, gaming or manipulation of data occurred. Outcome data do not provide information on the cause of poor care: providers needed to integrate and interpret patient-reported outcome measures and other outcome data in the context of other data. Lack of timeliness of performance data constrains their impact. Conclusions Although there is only limited research evidence to support some widely held theories of how

  17. To evaluate the effect of pre-pregnancy body mass index on maternal and perinatal outcomes among adolescent pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansu-Celik, Hatice; Kisa Karakaya, Burcu; Guzel, Ali Irfan; Tasci, Yasemin; Erkaya, Salim

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of pre-pregnancy body mass index on maternal and perinatal outcomes among adolescent pregnant women. We conducted this prospective cross-sectional study on 365 singleton adolescent pregnancies (aged between 16 and 20 years) at a Maternity Hospital, between December 2014 and March 2015. We divided participants into two groups based on pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI): overweight and obese adolescent (BMI at or above 25.0 kg/m) and normal weight (BMI between 18.5 and 24.99 kg/m) adolescent. We used multivariate analysis to evaluate the association of the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes and pre-pregnancy BMI. The prevalence of maternal overweight/obesity and normal weight was 34.6% (n = 80) and 65.4% (n = 261) in the study population, respectively. Compared with normal-weight teens (n = 234), overweight/obese teens (n = 71) were at higher risk for cesarean delivery (odds ratio [OR] 0.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4-1.4), preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02-0.9) and small of gestational age (odds ratio [OR] 0.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1-0.9). BMI increased during pre-pregnancy could be an important preventable risk factor for poor obstetric complications in adolescent pregnancies, and for these patients prevention strategies (e.g., nutritional counseling, weight-loss, regular physical activity) for obesity are recommended before getting pregnant.

  18. [Comparison of body temperatures in children measured using 3 different thermometers: tympanic, skin and digital axillary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Raygoza, Nicolás; Ruiz-Paloalto, M Laura; Díaz-Guerrero, Rosalina; Olvera-Villanueva, Georgina; Maldonado, Angélica; Raygoza-Mendoza, María Del Pilar

    2014-01-01

    To compare body temperature measurements using tympanic, skin and digital axillary thermometers. Hospitalized or outpatient children from the General Hospital Celaya, ISSSTE Hospital Clinic and General Hospital No. 4 IMSS, and the pediatric private service in Celaya, Guanajuato, from 1 day of life until 16 years old, were recruited over a one month period, after their parents signed the consent form. The order of each institution was selected by simple randomization. Body temperatures were measured in triplicate using tympanic, skin and digital axillary thermometers. The sample consisted of 554 children. The Pearson r between the tympanic and digital axillary thermometers was 0.57 to 0.65, with a positive linear relationship (P<.05); between the skin and the digital axillary thermometers, it was between 0.47 and 0.52 with a positive linearrelationship (P<.05). The intra-observer Kappa for the tympanic thermometer was 0.86, and for the inter-observer was 0.77; for the skin thermometer it was 0.82 and 0.67, respectively, and for the digital axillary thermometer it was 0.86 for intra-observer reliability and 0.78 for inter -observer reliability. Tympanic and axillary thermometers showed better precision in measuring the body temperature in children than skin thermometers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. In-vivo whole body measurement of internal radioactivity in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risco Norrlid, L. del (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (Sweden)); Halldorsson, O. (Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority (Iceland)); Holm, S. (NM and PET at Copenhagen' s Univ. Hospital (Denmark)); Huikari, J. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)); Isaksson, M. (Goeteborg Univ., Dept. Radiation Physics Sahlgren Academy (Sweden)); Lind, B. (Nor