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Sample records for orthodontic adhesive systems

  1. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Fixed with Remineralizing Adhesive Systems after Simulating One Year of Orthodontic Treatment

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    Gisele Lima Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess, in vitro, the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets fixed with remineralizing adhesive systems submitted to thermomechanical cycling, simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Sixty-four bovine incisor teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n=16: XT: Transbond XT, QC: Quick Cure, OL: Ortholite Color, and SEP: Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer. The samples were submitted to thermomechanical cycling simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Shear bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine with a load cell of 50 KgF at 0.5 mm/minute. The samples were examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM in order to analyze enamel surface and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (with Bonferroni correction tests showed a significant difference between the studied groups (p<0.05. Groups XT, QC, and SEP presented the highest values of adhesive resistance and no statistical differences were found between them. The highest frequency of failures between enamel and adhesive was observed in groups XT, QC, and OL. Quick Cure (QC remineralizing adhesive system presented average adhesive resistance values similar to conventional (XT and self-etching (SEP adhesives, while remineralizing system (OL provided the lowest values of adhesive resistance.

  2. In vitro evaluation of microleakage under orthodontic brackets bonded with different adhesive systems.

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    Atash, Ramin; Fneiche, Ali; Cetik, Sibel; Bahrami, Babak; Balon-Perin, Alain; Orellana, Maria; Glineur, Régine

    2017-01-01

    Adhesives systems have a drawback when utilized for bonding orthodontic brackets: they shrink during photopolymerization creating microleakage. The aim of this study was to assess the stability of different orthodontic adhesives around brackets and enamel. Sixty noncarious mandibular premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly divided into six groups of adhesives used for bonding brackets to dental enamel: NeoBond ® Light Cure Adhesive Kit, Transbond™ Plus Self-Etching, Victory V-Slot APC PLUS ® + Transbond™ MIP, Rely-A-Bond ® Kit, Light Cure Orthodontic Adhesive Kit (OptiBond ® ), and Transbond™ MIP. Following bonding, all teeth underwent 2500 cycles of thermal cycling in baths ranging from 5°C to 55°C before being immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 h. All samples were examined under a binocular microscope to assess the degree of microleakage at the "bracket-adhesive" and "adhesive-enamel" interfaces in the gingival and occlusal regions of the bracket. A significant difference was found at the "occlusal bracket-adhesive" interface. The highest microleakage values were found in the occlusal region, although no significant. Microleakage was observed in all groups. Group 2 had the highest microleakage values whereas Group 6 had the lowest values.

  3. Effect of saliva contamination on cementation of orthodontic brackets using different adhesive systems.

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    Robaski, Aliden-Willian; Pamato, Saulo; Tomás-de Oliveira, Marcelo; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2017-07-01

    The enamel condition and the quality of surface are points that need to be considered for achieving optimal efficiency in the treatment with orthodontic brackets. The aim of this study was to assess the immediate bond strength of metallic brackets cemented to dental. Forty human premolars were double-sectioned, placed in PVC matrices and randomly divided into 10 groups (n=8). They received artificial saliva contamination before or after the application of adhesive systems, except for the control groups. The metallic brackets were cemented using two orthodontic cements (Transbond™ Plus Color Change, 3M Unitek e Transbond™ XT Light, 3M Unitek). The specimens were subjected to mechanical shear bond strength testing and classified according to the fracture pattern. The results were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons ( p brackets cemented on the dental enamel. Key words: Bonding, orthodontic brackets, shear bond strength, saliva, adhesive systems.

  4. Bacterial endotoxin adhesion to different types of orthodontic adhesives

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    Priscilla Coutinho ROMUALDO

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial endotoxin (LPS adhesion to orthodontic brackets is a known contributing factor to inflammation of the adjacent gingival tissues. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems, comparing two commercial brands. Material and Methods Forty specimens were fabricated from Transbond XT and Light Bond composite and bonding agent components (n=10/component, then contaminated by immersion in a bacterial endotoxin solution. Contaminated and non-contaminated acrylic resin samples were used as positive and negative control groups, respectively. LPS quantification was performed by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate QCL-1000™ test. Data obtained were scored and subjected to the Chi-square test using a significance level of 5%. Results There was endotoxin adhesion to all materials (p0.05. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 among commercial brands. Affinity of endotoxin was significantly greater for the bonding agents (p=0.0025. Conclusions LPS adhered to both orthodontic adhesive systems. Regardless of the brand, the endotoxin had higher affinity for the bonding agents than for the composites. There is no previous study assessing the affinity of LPS for orthodontic adhesive systems. This study revealed that LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems. Therefore, additional care is recommended to orthodontic applications of these materials.

  5. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

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    Mandall, N A; Millett, D T; Mattick, C R; Hickman, J; Macfarlane, T V; Worthington, H V

    2003-01-01

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. To evaluate the effectiveness of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE. Date of most recent searches: August 2002 (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2002). Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in duplicate by pairs of reviewers (Nicky Mandall (NM) and Rye Mattick (CRM); Declan Millett (DTM) and Joy Hickman (JH2)). Since the data were not presented in a form that was amenable to meta-analysis, the results of the review are presented in narrative form only. Three trials satisfied the inclusion criteria. A chemical cured composite was compared with a light cure composite (one trial), a conventional glass ionomer cement (one trial) and a polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer) (one trial). The quality of the trial reports was generally poor. It is difficult to draw any conclusions from this review, however, suggestions are made for methods of improving future research involving

  6. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

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    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  7. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

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    Mandall, Nicky A; Hickman, Joy; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Mattick, Rye Cr; Millett, Declan T; Worthington, Helen V

    2018-04-09

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. This is an update of the Cochrane Review first published in 2003. A new full search was conducted on 26 September 2017 but no new studies were identified. We have only updated the search methods section in this new version. The conclusions of this Cochrane Review remain the same. To evaluate the effects of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 26 September 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 8) in the Cochrane Library (searched 26 September 2017), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 26 September 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 26 September 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in

  8. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

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    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  9. Release of bisphenol A and its derivatives from orthodontic adhesive systems available on the European market as a potential health risk factor

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    Konrad Małkiewicz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction[/b]. Treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances requires the application of adhesive systems to enable secure fastening of brackets and retainers to the surface of tooth enamel. The orthodontic bonding systems are similar in terms of chemical composition to dental filling materials, the chemical stability of which is not satisfactory. Particularly alarming is the release of bisphenol A and its derivatives to the external environment, which has been well-documented for materials used in conservative dentistry. [b]Objectives[/b]. The aim of the study was an in vitro assessment of the release of biologically harmful bisphenol A and its derivatives from orthodontic adhesives available on the European market, as a potential health risk factor for orthodontic patients. [b]Material and methods[/b]. The study assessed levels of BPA, BPA polymers and Bis-GMA resin in eluates of six commonly used orthodontic adhesives: Light Bond, Transbond XT, Resilence, Aspire, GrĕnGloo and ConTec LC, obtained after one hour, 24 hours, 7 days and 31 days of material sample storage in water. The presence and concentration of the studied chemicals in the obtained solutions were identified using the HPLC method. [b]Results[/b]. The highest (p≤0.05 concentration of BPA at 32.10µg/ml was observed in the Resilence material eluates. The highest concentration of poly-bisphenol A was found in solutions obtained after incubation of ConTec LC adhesive at 371.90µg/ml, whereas the highest amount of Bis-GMA resin (425.07µg/ml was present in Aspire material eluates. [b]Conclusions[/b]. 1 In conditions of the current experiment it was demonstrated that most of the assessed orthodontic adhesive resins available on the European market and released into the outside environment – biologically harmful bisphenol A or its derivatives, posing a potential threat to the patients’ health. 2 Release of BPA and its derivatives into aqueous solutions is the highest in the

  10. Evaluation of an Experimental Adhesive Resin for Orthodontic Bonding

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    Durgesh, B. H.; Alkheraif, A. A.; Pavithra, D.; Hashem, M. I.; Alkhudhairy, F.; Elsharawy, M.; Divakar, D. D.; Vallittu, P. K.; Matinlinna, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of an experimental adhesive resin for orthodontic bonding by measuring some the chemical and mechanical properties. The resin demonstrated increased values of nanohardness and elastic modulus, but the differences were not significant compared with those for the Transbond XT adhesives. The experimental adhesive resin could be a feasible choice or a substitute for the traditional bis-GMA-based resins used in bonding orthodontic attachments.

  11. A comparative clinical study of the failure rate of orthodontic brackets bonded with two adhesive systems: conventional and self-etching primer (SEP).

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    Dominguez, Gladys Cristina; Tortamano, André; Lopes, Luiz Vicente de Moura; Catharino, Priscilla Campanatti Chibebe; Morea, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the clinical performance of orthodontic brackets bonded with Transbond adhesive paste after two primer systems: a two-stage conventional system (acid etching + Transbond XT adhesive primer) and a single-stage self-etching primer (SEP) (Transbond Plus). The sample comprised 480 metal brackets bonded to the teeth of 24 consecutive patients treated for 36 to 48 months. A split-mouth design was used for bonding, and both systems were used in each patient. Bracket failure rates for each system were analyzed; and failure causes as reported by the patients and the quadrant of teeth for which brackets failed were recorded. The conventional system group had a failure rate of 5.41%, whereas the rate for SEP was 4.58%. In this group, there were 5 failures (38.4%) in the right maxillary quadrant, 2 (15.4%) in the left maxillary quadrant, 4 (30.8%) in the right mandibular quadrant, and 2 (15.4%) in the left mandibular quadrant. In the SEP group, there were 4 (36.4%) failures in the right maxillary quadrant, 1 (9%) in the left maxillary quadrant, 3 (27.3%) in the right mandibular quadrant, and 3 (27.3%) in the left mandibular quadrant. Results of descriptive statistical analysis and odds ratio did not show any significant differences between rates (p = 0.67). The clinical efficiency of SEP was similar to that of the conventional system.

  12. A comparative clinical study of the failure rate of orthodontic brackets bonded with two adhesive systems: conventional and self-etching primer (SEP

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    Gladys Cristina Dominguez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study compared the clinical performance of orthodontic brackets bonded with Transbond adhesive paste after two priming systems: a two-stage conventional system (acid etching + Transbond XT adhesive primer and a singlestage self-etching primer (SEP (Transbond Plus. METHODS: The sample comprised 480 metal brackets bonded to the teeth of 24 consecutive patients treated for 36 to 48 months. A split-mouth design was used for bonding, and both systems were used in each patient. Bracket failure rates for each system were analyzed; and failure causes as reported by the patients and the quadrant of teeth for which brackets failed were recorded. RESULTS: The conventional system group had a failure rate of 5.41%, whereas the rate for SEP was 4.58%. In this group, there were 5 failures (38.4% in the right maxillary quadrant, 2 (15.4% in the left maxillary quadrant, 4 (30.8% in the right mandibular quadrant, and 2 (15.4% in the left mandibular quadrant. In the SEP group, there were 4 (36.4% failures in the right maxillary quadrant, 1 (9% in the left maxillary quadrant, 3 (27.3% in the right mandibular quadrant, and 3 (27.3% in the left mandibular quadrant. Results of descriptive statistical analysis and odds ratio did not show any significant differences between rates (p = 0.67. CONCLUSION: The clinical efficiency of SEP was similar to that of the conventional system.

  13. Release of bisphenol A and its derivatives from orthodontic adhesive systems available on the European market as a potential health risk factor

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    Konrad Małkiewicz

    2015-02-01

    1 In conditions of the current experiment it was demonstrated that most of the assessed orthodontic adhesive resins available on the European market and released into the outside environment – biologically harmful bisphenol A or its derivatives, posing a potential threat to the patients’ health. 2 Release of BPA and its derivatives into aqueous solutions is the highest in the early stages of sample incubation.

  14. A comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives

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    Sharma, Sudhir; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Gyan P; Singh, Alka; Chugh, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives. Materials and Methods: Eighty newly extracted premolars were bonded to 0.022 SS brackets (Ormco, Scafati, Italy) and equally divided into four groups based on adhesive used: (1) Rely-a-Bond (self-cure adhesive, Reliance Orthodontic Product, Inc., Illinois, USA), (2) Transbond XT (light-cure adhesive, 3M Unitek, CA, USA), (3) Transbond Plus (sixth generation self-etch primer, 3M Unitek, CA, USA) with Transbond XT (4) Xeno V (seventh generation self-etch primer, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) with Xeno Ortho (light-cure adhesive, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) adhesive. Brackets were debonded with a universal testing machine (Model No. 3382 Instron Corp., Canton, Mass, USA). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was recordedIn addition, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: Transbond XT (15.49 MPa) attained the highest bond strength. Self-etching adhesives (Xeno V, 13.51 MPa; Transbond Plus, 11.57 MPa) showed clinically acceptable SBS values and almost clean enamel surface after debonding. The analysis of variance (F = 11.85, P adhesives left on the tooth) to be the most prevalent in Transbond XT (40%), followed by Rely-a-Bond (30%), Transbond Plus with Transbond XT (15%), and Xeno V with Xeno Ortho (10%). Under SEM, enamel surfaces after debonding of the brackets appeared porous when an acid-etching process was performed on the surfaces of Rely-a-Bond and Transbond XT, whereas with self-etching primers enamel presented smooth and almost clean surfaces (Transbond Plus and Xeno V group). Conclusion: All adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the recommended bond strength (5.9-7–8 MPa), Seventh generation self-etching primer Xeno V with Xeno Ortho showed clinically acceptable SBS and the least amount of residual adhesive left on the

  15. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, M.Y.; Sandham, A.; Rumachik, E.N.; Ruben, J.L.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. METHODS: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  16. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing

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    Chin, Yeen; Sandham, John; Rumachik, Elena N.; Ruben, Jan L.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. Methods: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  17. Genotoxic evaluation of orthodontic bonding adhesives exposed to electron beam irradiation: an in vitro study

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    Vijay, R.; Ravi, M.S.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Panchasara, Chirag; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro genotoxicity of two orthodontic adhesives and to determine the type of cell death they induce on human lymphocytes after exposing to Electron Beam Irradiation. The materials tested were 1. Light cure orthodontic adhesive with conventional primer (Transbond XT3M) and 2. Self cure orthodontic adhesive (Unite, 3M). Cured sterile individual masses were immersed in Phosphate Buffer saline and left at 370℃ for 24 h. Then a volume of 200 μL of the extract medium was mixed with human peripheral blood lymphocyte tested for comet assay by single cell DNA damage assay and apoptosis by DNA diffusion agar assay. The results showed all parameters studied by comet assay were significant (P>0.05). In case of apoptosis, light cure orthodontic adhesive (188.92±55.05) and self cure orthodontic adhesives (255.23±76.43) showed increased diffusion of DNA compared to normal lymphocyte (111.22±8.78). However the level of DNA diffusion was not significantly different between the two adhesives. Light cure orthodontic and self cure orthodontic adhesives were induced apoptosis. Both the adhesives had no significant effect on the percentage of DNA tail and olive tail moment. (author)

  18. Rebonding of unused brackets with different orthodontic adhesives

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    Emigdio Enrique Orellana Jimenez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare in vitro shear bond strength (SBS of different orthodontic adhesives in bonding and repeatedly rebonding metal brackets, and to evaluate the bond failure site with the adhesive remnant index (ARI. METHODS: Specimens consisted of 90 extracted human first premolars, randomly divided into three groups (n=30. The adhesives Alpha Plast (AP, ConciseTM (CO and TransbondTM XT (TB were used in each group. Three SBS tests were performed, i.e., one at T0 (initial and the other two at T1 and T2 (first and second rebondings, respectively, observing a 24-hour interval. The tests were performed in a Shimadzu AG-I (10kN SBS testing machine, at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: SBS data were subjected to ANOVA, Tukey's test and Bonferroni test (p<0.05. For the ARI, the Kruskal Wallis test was performed, followed by the Dunn test. The results revealed that at T0 groups AP and CO showed SBS values that were near, but above TB values; and at T1 and T2, the highest SBS values were observed for the AP group, followed by the CO and TB groups. CONCLUSION: Statistically significant differences were found in SBS between groups AP, CO and TB during bonding and repeated rebondings of unused metal brackets, with group AP achieving the highest SBS value. Regarding ARI, adhesive AP exhibited bond failure at the enamel-adhesive interface, with a higher enamel fracture frequency.

  19. The use of easily debondable orthodontic adhesives with ceramic brackets.

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    Ryu, Chiyako; Namura, Yasuhiro; Tsuruoka, Takashi; Hama, Tomohiko; Kaji, Kaori; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally produced an easily debondable orthodontic adhesive (EDA) containing heat-expandable microcapsules. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the best debondable condition when EDA was used for ceramic brackets. Shear bond strengths were measured before and after heating and were compared statistically. Temperatures of the bracket base and pulp wall were also examined during heating. Bond strengths of EDA containing 30 wt% and 40 wt% heat-expandable microcapsules were 13.4 and 12.9 MPa, respectively and decreased significantly to 3.8 and 3.7 MPa, respectively, after heating. The temperature of the pulp wall increased 1.8-3.6°C after heating, less than that required to induce pulp damage. Based on the results, we conclude that heating for 8 s during debonding of ceramic brackets bonded using EDA containing 40 wt% heat-expandable microcapsules is the most effective and safest method for the enamel and pulp.

  20. Influence of adhesion promoters and curing-light sources on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

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    Claudia Tavares Machado

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The conventional orthodontic adhesive presented higher bond strength than the nanofilled composite, although both materials interacted similarly to the teeth. The curing-light devices tested did not influence on bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  1. Reflections about Adhesive Systems

    OpenAIRE

    de Freitas Borges, Marciano; Diesel, Pâmela Gutheil; Corrêa, Fernanda Gomez; Bernardi, Eledana; Fernandes Montagner, Anelise; Skupien, Jovito Adiel; Susin, Alexandre Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The adhesive systems are responsible for an efficient union between teeth and resin, resulting in a longevity restoration. They are organic molecules di or multifunctional that contain reactive groups that interact with dentin and with the resin monomer of composite resin. The adhesive systems are characterized by wet adhesion, which is a result of presence of hidrophylics radicals in their compositions, to promote a better bond and the best properties of the adhesion. Adhesive systems may us...

  2. Orthodontic bracket bonding without previous adhesive priming: A meta-regression analysis.

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    Altmann, Aline Segatto Pires; Degrazia, Felipe Weidenbach; Celeste, Roger Keller; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo

    2016-05-01

    To determine the consensus among studies that adhesive resin application improves the bond strength of orthodontic brackets and the association of methodological variables on the influence of bond strength outcome. In vitro studies were selected to answer whether adhesive resin application increases the immediate shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets bonded with a photo-cured orthodontic adhesive. Studies included were those comparing a group having adhesive resin to a group without adhesive resin with the primary outcome measurement shear bond strength in MPa. A systematic electronic search was performed in PubMed and Scopus databases. Nine studies were included in the analysis. Based on the pooled data and due to a high heterogeneity among studies (I(2)  =  93.3), a meta-regression analysis was conducted. The analysis demonstrated that five experimental conditions explained 86.1% of heterogeneity and four of them had significantly affected in vitro shear bond testing. The shear bond strength of metal brackets was not significantly affected when bonded with adhesive resin, when compared to those without adhesive resin. The adhesive resin application can be set aside during metal bracket bonding to enamel regardless of the type of orthodontic adhesive used.

  3. CARIOSTATIC EFFECT AND FLUORIDE RELEASE FROM A VISIBLE LIGHT-CURING ADHESIVE FOR BONDING OF ORTHODONTIC BRACKETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OGAARD, B; REZKLEGA, F; RUBEN, J; ARENDS, J

    This study was designed to investigate the cariostatic potential in vivo of a visible light-curing adhesive for the bonding of orthodontic brackets. The fluoride release of the adhesive in water and saliva was also measured. Ten orthodontic patients with premolars to be extracted participated. One

  4. Damage of the Interface Between an Orthodontic Bracket and Enamel - the Effect of Some Elastic Properties of the Adhesive Material

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    Durgesh, B. H.; Alkheraif, A. A.; Al Sharawy, M.; Varrela, J.; Vallittu, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the magnitude of debonding stress of an orthodontic bracket bonded to the enamel with resin systems having different elastic properties. For the same purpose, sixty human premolars were randomly divided into four groups according to the adhesive system used for bonding brackets: G Fix flowable resin (GFI) with Everstick NET (ESN), GFI, G Aenial Universal Flow (GAU) with ESN, and GAU. The brackets were stressed in the occlusogingival direction on a universal testing machine. The values of debonding load and displacement were determined at the point of debonding. The elastic modulus of the tested materials was determined using nanoindentation. An analysis of variance showed a significant difference in the loads required to debond the bracket among the groups tested. The GAU group had the highest elastic modulus, followed by the GFI and ESN groups. ARI (Adhesive Remnant Index) scores demonstrated more remnants of the adhesive material on the bracket surface with adhesives having a higher elastic modulus. Taking into consideration results of the present in-vitro study, it can be concluded that the incorporation of a glass-fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) with a low elastic modulus between the orthodontic bracket and enamel increases the debonding force and strain more than with adhesive systems having a higher elastic modulus.

  5. High potential of adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces by opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from orthodontic appliances.

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    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Ben Nejma, Mouna; Dallel, Ines; Tobji, Samir; Ben Amor, Adel; Janel, Sébastien; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-02-01

    Orthodontic and other oral appliances act as reservoir of opportunistic pathogens that can easily become resistant to antibiotics and cause systemic infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from healthy patients with orthodontic appliances, to adhere to biotic (HeLa cells) and abiotic surfaces (polystyrene and dental alloy). Adhesive ability to polystyrene was tested by crystal violet staining and quantitative biofilm production on dental alloy surfaces was evaluated by MTT reduction assay. In addition, the presence of icaA and icaD genes was achieved by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Qualitative biofilm production revealed that 70.6% of strains were slime producers. The metabolic activity of S. aureus biofilms on dental alloy surfaces was high and did not differ between tested strains. Moreover, all the isolates were adhesive to HeLa cells and 94% of them harbor icaA and icaD genes. Considerable adhesion and internalization capacity to the epithelial HeLa cells and strong biofilm production abilities together, with a high genotypic expression of icaA/icaD genes are an important equipment of S. aureus to colonize orthodontic appliances and eventually to disseminate towards other body areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was

  7. Adhesion of Candida albicans to Vanillin Incorporated Self-Curing Orthodontic PMMA Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zam, K.; Sawaengkit, P.; Thaweboon, S.; Thaweboon, B.

    2018-02-01

    It has been observed that there is an increase in Candida carriers during the treatment with orthodontic removable appliance. Vanillin is flavouring agent, which is known to have antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of vanillin incorporated PMMA on adhesion of Candida albicans. A total of 36 orthodontic self-curing PMMA resin samples were fabricated. The samples were divided into 3 groups depending on percentage of vanillin incorporated (0.1%, 0.5% and PMMA without vanillin as control). PMMA samples were coated with saliva. The adhesion assay was performed with C. albicans (ATCC 10231). The adherent yeast cells were stained with crystal violet and counted under microscope by random selection of 3 fields at 10X magnification. The statistical analyses performed by Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney non-parametric test. It was found that the PMMA resin samples with vanillin incorporation significantly reduced the adhesion of C. albicans as compared to the control group. This study indicates that vanillin incorporated resin can impede the adhesion of C. albicans to about 45 - 56 %. With further testing and development, vanillin can be employed as an antifungal agent to prevent adhesion of C. albicans to orthodontic self-curing PMMA resin.

  8. Evaluation of enamel damages following orthodontic bracket debonding in fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baherimoghadam, Tahreh; Akbarian, Sahar; Rasouli, Reza; Naseri, Navid

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) of the orthodontic brackets bonded to fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth using Light Bond with and without adhesion promoters and compare their enamel damages following debonding. In this study, 30 fluorosed (Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index = 4-5) and 30 nonfluorosed teeth were randomly distributed between two subgroups according to the bonding materials: Group 1, fluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 2, fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond; Group 3, nonfluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 4, nonfluorosed bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond. After bonding, the SBS of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopic evaluation was performed by unbiased stereology in all teeth to determine the amount of adhesive remnants and the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding and after debonding. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and Mann-Whitney test. While fluorosis reduced the SBS of orthodontic bracket (P = 0.017), Enhance Locus Ceruleus LC significantly increased the SBS of the orthodontic bracket in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth (P = 0.039). Significant increasing in the number and length of enamel crack after debonding was found in all four groups. There were no significant differences in the length of enamel crack increased after debonding among four groups (P = 0.768) while increasing in the number of enamel cracks after debonding was significantly different among the four groups (P = 0.023). Teeth in Group 2 showed the highest enamel damages among four groups following debonding. Adhesion promoters could improve the bond strength of orthodontic brackets, but conservative debonding methods for decreasing enamel damages would be necessary.

  9. Comparative in vitro study for orthodontic adhesives relatively to sorption and solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, A.; Mesaros, A.; Festila, D.; Moldovan, M.; Boboia, S.; Mesaros, M.

    2015-12-01

    Water sorption and solubility correspond to undesirable physical characteristics because it may cause micro leakage and dissolution for composite materials used for orthodontic attachment bonding. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of four composite materials employed in orthodontic as adhesives, relatively to water and 50% alcoholic solution, by means of in vitro tests of sorption and solubility. We used an experimental composite sealer SO® (ICCRR Cluj Napoca) and 3 commercial products already on the market: Blugloo® (Ormco), Opal Bond MV® (Ultradent) and Bond It® (DB orthodontics). Data were recorded and specific statistic tests were performed, revealing significant differences for all materials relatively to tested solutions. The materials expressed an adequate performance in terms of sorption and solubility, offering various alternatives for orthodontists.

  10. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with different self-etching adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scougall Vilchis, Rogelio José; Yamamoto, Seigo; Kitai, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with 4 self-etching adhesives. A total of 175 extracted premolars were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 35). Group I was the control, in which the enamel was etched with 37% phosphoric acid, and stainless steel brackets were bonded with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). In the remaining 4 groups, the enamel was conditioned with the following self-etching primers and adhesives: group II, Transbond Plus and Transbond XT (3M Unitek); group III, Clearfil Mega Bond FA and Kurasper F (Kuraray Medical, Tokyo, Japan); group IV, Primers A and B, and BeautyOrtho Bond (Shofu, Kyoto, Japan); and group V, AdheSE and Heliosit Orthodontic (Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Liechtenstein). The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and debonded with a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) including enamel fracture score was also evaluated. Additionally, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope. The SBS values of groups I (19.0 +/- 6.7 MPa) and II (16.6 +/- 7.3 MPa) were significantly higher than those of groups III (11.0 +/- 3.9 MPa), IV (10.1 +/- 3.7 MPa), and V (11.8 +/- 3.5 MPa). Fluoride-releasing adhesives (Kurasper F and BeautyOrtho Bond) showed clinically acceptable SBS values. Significant differences were found in the ARI and enamel fracture scores between groups I and II. The 4 self-etching adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the bond strength (5.9 to 7.8 MPa) suggested for routine clinical treatment, indicating that orthodontic brackets can be successfully bonded with any of these self-etching adhesives.

  11. Bond strengths of different orthodontic adhesives after enamel conditioning with the same self-etching primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Zárate-Díaz, Chrisel; Kusakabe, Shusuke; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2010-05-01

    To determine the shear bond strengths (SBS) of stainless steel brackets bonded with seven light-cured orthodontic adhesives after the enamel was conditioned with the same self-etching primer. A total of 140 extracted human molars were randomly divided into seven groups (N = 20). In all the groups, the enamel was conditioned with Transbond Plus SEP (TPSEP). Stainless steel brackets were bonded with the following orthodontic adhesives: Group I, Transbond XT; Group II, Blūgloo; Group III, BeautyOrtho Bond; Group IV, Enlight; Group V, Light Bond; Group VI, Transbond CC; Group VII, Xeno Ortho. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and debonded with a universal testing machine. The modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) was also recorded. There were no significant differences in the SBS values among the groups: I (18.0 +/- 7.4 MPa); II (18.3 +/- 5.1 MPa); III (14.8 +/- 4.3 MPa); IV (18.3 +/- 7.0 MPa); V (16.4 +/- 4.3 MPa); VI (20.3 +/- 5.3 MPa); VII (15.9 +/- 6.4 MPa), but significant differences in ARI were found. The seven orthodontic adhesives evaluated in this study can be successfully used for bonding stainless steel brackets when the enamel is conditioned with TPSEP, however, the differences among some groups might influence the clinical bond strengths. In addition, the amount of residual adhesive remaining on the teeth after debonding differed among the adhesives. Further studies are required to better understand the differences in SBS and ARI.

  12. Effect of silver nanoparticles on the physicochemical and antimicrobial properties of an orthodontic adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Weidenbach DEGRAZIA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Orthodontic treatment with fixed brackets plays a major role on the formation of white spot lesions. Objective This study aimed to incorporate silver nanoparticle solutions (AgNP in an orthodontic adhesive and evaluate its physicochemical and antimicrobial properties. Material and Methods Silver nanoparticle solutions were added to a commercial adhesive in different concentrations (w/w: 0%, 0.11%, 0.18%, and 0.33%. Shear bond strength (SBS test was performed after bonding metal brackets to enamel. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze in situ the degree of conversion (DC of the adhesive layer. The surface free energy (SFE was evaluated after the measurement of contact angles. Growth inhibition of Streptococcus mutans in liquid and solid media was determined by colony-forming unit count and inhibition halo, respectively. One-way ANOVA was performed for SBS, DC, SFE, and growth inhibition. Results The incorporation of AgNP solution decreased the SBS (p<0.001 and DC in situ (p<0.001 values. SFE decreased after addition of 0.18% and 0.33% AgNP. Growth inhibition of S. mutans in liquid media was obtained after silver addition (p<0.05. Conclusions The addition of AgNP solutions to Transbond™ XT adhesive primer inhibited S. mutans growth. SBS, DC, and SFE values decreased after incorporation up to 0.33% AgNP solution without compromising the chemical and physical properties of the adhesive.

  13. Development of a novel bioactive glass for air-abrasion to selectively remove orthodontic adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ayam A; Hill, Robert G; Fleming, Padhraig S; Patel, Mangala P

    2018-05-01

    To develop a novel, bioactive glass for removing residual orthodontic adhesive via air-abrasion, following bracket debonding, and to evaluate its effectiveness against a proprietary bioactive glass 45S5(Sylc™)-air-abrasion, and a slow-speed tungsten carbide (TC) bur. Three glasses were prepared and their bioactivity was proved. One novel glass (QMAT3) was selected due to its appropriate hardness, lower than that of enamel/45S5(Sylc™). Sixty extracted human premolars were randomly assigned to adhesive removal using: (a) QMAT3-air-abrasion, (b) 45S5(Sylc™)-air-abrasion, and (c) TC bur, which were further subdivided (n = 10) based on the adhesive used (Transbond XT™ or Fuji Ortho LC™). Enamel roughness was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and non-contact profilometry before bracket bonding, after removing residual adhesive following bracket debonding and after polishing. QMAT3 formed apatite faster (6 h) than 45S5(Sylc™) (24 h) in Tris solution. QMAT3-air-abrasion gave the lowest enamel roughness (Ra) after removing the adhesives. SEM images showed a pitted, roughened enamel surface in the TC bur group and to a lesser extent with 45S5(Sylc™), while a virtually smooth surface without any damage was observed in the QMAT3-air-abrasion group. The time taken for adhesive removal with QMAT3 was comparable to 45S5(Sylc™) but was twice as long with the TC bur. QMAT3-air-abrasion is a promising technique for selective removal of adhesives without inducing tangible enamel damage. A novel bioactive glass has been developed as an alternative to the use of TC burs for orthodontic adhesive removal.

  14. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  15. Influence of Adhesives and Methods of Enamel Pretreatment on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurišić, Sanja; Jurišić, Gordan; Jurić, Hrvoje

    2015-12-01

    The objective of present study was to examine influence of adhesives and methods of enamel pretreatment on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. The adhesives used were resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements-GIC (Fuji Ortho LC) and composite resin (Transbond XT). The experimental sample consisted of 80 extracted human first premolars. The sample was divided into four equal groups, and the metal brackets were bonded with different enamel pretreatments by using two adhesives: group A-10% polyacrylic acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group B-37% phosphoric acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group C-self etching primer; Transbond XT, group D-37% phosphoric acid, primer; Transbond XT. SBS of brackets was measured. After debonding of brackets, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated. After the statistical analysis of the collected data was performed (ANOVA; Sheffe post-hoc test), the results showed that significantly lower SBS of the group B was found in relation to the groups C (p=0.031) and D (p=0.026). The results of ARI were similar in all testing groups and it was not possible to determine any statistically significant difference of the ARI (Chi- square test) between all four experimental groups. The conclusion is that the use of composite resins material with appropriate enamel pretreatment according to manufacturer's recommendation is the "gold standard" for brackets bonding for fixed orthodontic appliances.

  16. Antibacterial and remineralizing orthodontic adhesive containing quaternary ammonium resin monomer and amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Ling; Niu, Li-Na; Yu, Tao; Xu, Hockin H K; Weir, Michael D; Oates, Thomas W; Tay, Franklin R; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the bonding performance, antibacterial activity, and remineralization effect on enamel of the orthodontic adhesive containing MAE-DB and NACP. Eighty non-carious human premolars were divided into 3 groups: Transbond XT (TB), PEHB + 5% MAE-DB (PD), and PEHB + 40% NACP + 5% MAE-DB (PND). Premolars were bonded with orthodontic brackets, the first subgroup (n = 10) and the second subgroup (n = 10) were subjected to shear bond strength testing after immersed in water for 1 day and in demineralization solution for 28 days respectively and then tested surface roughness, while the third subgroup (n = 6) was used for microhardness evaluation after aged in demineralization solution for 28 days. For each adhesive, fifty disk samples were prepared for antibacterial study. Specimens measuring 12 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm were fabricated for ion release test. Bond strengths were in the order TB = PND > PND = PD for "1-day in water", and in the order TB = PND > PD for "28-days in pH 4 solution". No significant difference in the ARI scores for the three adhesive. Numerous bacteria adhered to TB surface, while PD and PND had minimal bacterial growth and activity. PND showed high levels of Ca and P ions release and enamel hardness. The surface roughness of enamel in PND was much lower than TB and PD and showed no significant difference with the sound, control enamel. PND adhesive with 5% MAE-DB and 40% NACP exhibits antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, and did not adversely affect bond strength compared to commercial adhesive. Novel adhesive containing quaternary ammonium monomer and nano-amorphous calcium phosphate represents a promising candidate in combating enamel white spot lesions and even dental caries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Micro-CT evaluation of microleakage under orthodontic ceramic brackets bonded with different bonding techniques and adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Fırat; Ersöz, Mustafa; Öztürk, Seyit Ahmet; Hatunoğlu, Erdem; Malkoç, Sıddık

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate microleakage under orthodontic ceramic brackets bonded with direct and different indirect bonding techniques and adhesives using micro-computed tomography. A total of 30 human maxillary premolars were randomly separated into five groups with six teeth in each group. In group I, teeth were bonded directly with Transbond XT (3M Unitek). In group II, group III, group IV, and group V, teeth were bonded through an indirect technique with Custom I.Q. (Reliance Orthodontic Products), Sondhi Rapid-Set (3M Unitek), RMbond (RMO), and Transbond IDB (3M Unitek), respectively, following the manufacturer's instructions. Micro-CT system model 1172 of Skyscan (Kontich, Belgium) was used to scan all samples. NRecon (Skyscan) version 1.6, CT-Analyser V.1.11 (Skyscan), and TView (SkyScan, Bvba) software programs were used for microleakage evaluation. Microleakage values between the test groups were assessed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, while the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for within-group comparisons. The level of significance was set at P Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance test, there were no significant differences among the tested groups, with regard to volume and percentage (microleakage/region of interest × 100) of microleakage values (P test showed that coronal microleakage volume and percentage values significantly differed for RMbond and Transbond IDB groups. In the study, only ceramic brackets were used and microleakage into mini gaps did not show up on the micro-CT image because 50% silver nitrate solution could not penetrate into mini gaps which are smaller than silver nitrate particles. Use of direct and indirect bonding techniques with different adhesives did not significantly affect the amount of microleakage. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Effects of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic resin modified glass ionomer adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Danielle Wiggins

    This study examined the effect of varying delayed polymerization times in combination with bracket manipulation on shear bond strength (SBS), degree of conversion (DC), and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score when using a resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) adhesive. Specimens were divided into three groups of clinically relevant delay times (0.5, 2, and 4-min) to simulate the delay that frequently occurs between bracket placement and manipulation and subsequent light curing. Based on an analysis of variance (alpha=.05), the SBS was not significantly different between the three groups. While one of the goals of this study was to be the first study to quantify DC of RMGI using Raman microspectroscopy, several challenges, including weak peak signal with and without fluorescence, were encountered and as a result, DC could not be determined. A significant difference (pbracket with increasing delay time. A Spearman correlation between SBS and ARI indicated no positive association between SBS and ARI measures across delay times. The results of this study suggest that clinically relevant delay times of 0.5, 2, and 4-min do not negatively impact the SBS of a RMGI adhesive. However, with increasing delay time, the results suggest that more adhesive might remain on the bracket during debonding. With more adhesive remaining on the bracket, this could be beneficial in that less adhesive needs to be removed from enamel by grinding at the time of bracket removal when orthodontic treatment is completed.

  19. Adhesion of periodontal pathogens to self-ligating orthodontic brackets: An in-vivo prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo-Sun; Kim, Kyungsun; Cho, Soha; Ahn, Sug-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Our aims were to analyze adhesion of periodontopathogens to self-ligating brackets (Clarity-SL [CSL], Clippy-C [CC] and Damon Q [DQ]) and to identify the relationships between bacterial adhesion and oral hygiene indexes. Central incisor brackets from the maxilla and mandible were collected from 60 patients at debonding after the plaque and gingival indexes were measured. Adhesions of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), and Tannerella forsythia (Tf) were quantitatively determined using real-time polymerase chain reactions. Factorial analysis of variance was used to analyze bacterial adhesion in relation to bracket type and jaw position. Correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the relationships between bacterial adhesion and the oral hygiene indexes. Total bacteria showed greater adhesion to CSL than to DQ brackets, whereas Aa, Pg, and Pi adhered more to DQ than to CSL brackets. CC brackets showed an intermediate adhesion pattern between CSL and DQ brackets, but it did not differ significantly from either bracket type. Adhesion of Fn and Tf did not differ significantly among the 3 brackets. Most bacteria were detected in greater quantities in the mandibular than in the maxillary brackets. The plaque and gingival indexes were not strongly correlated with bacterial adhesion to the brackets. Because Aa, Pg, and Pi adhered more to the DQ brackets in the mandibular area, orthodontic patients with periodontal problems should be carefully monitored in the mandibular incisors where the distance between the bracket and the gingiva is small, especially when DQ brackets are used. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and degree of conversion of orthodontic adhesives over different time periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Melo Pithon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As new orthodontic resin adhesives continue to be marketed, rapid and sensitive tests for examining their toxic effects at the ' cell and tissue level ' are needed because patient safety has been identifi ed as a legal concept. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and degree of monomer conversion of orthodontic adhesives over different time periods. Seven adhesives: Transbond® XT, Transbond® Color Change, Quick Cure, EagleBond, Orthobond®, Fill Mágic® and Biofix® were evaluated for their cytotoxicity in L929 fibroblastic cells and for their degree of monomer conversion over different time periods. Three control groups were also analysed: Positive control (C+, consisting of Tween 80 cell detergent; Negative control (C-, consisting of PBS; and cell control (CC, consisting of cells exposed to any material. The dye-uptake technique that involves the absorption of a neutral red dye in viable cells was used for the cytotoxicity evaluation and the degree of conversion was evaluated using spectroscopy with infrared. The results showed the cytotoxicity of the adhesives at 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours. At these times, the viability values presented for these materials were statistically different from the groups CC and C- (p 0.05. In the monomer conversions there was a percentage increase of monomer conversion from 24 to 72 hours. A direct correlation could be observed between cytotoxicity and monomer conversions. From this work it can be concluded that all adhesives evaluated are cytotoxic at the times of 24, 48 and 72 hours. Monomers continued conversion even after photopolymerization had stopped.

  1. Effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticle addition into orthodontic adhesive resin on enamel microhardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriani, A.; Krisnawati; Purwanegara, M. K.

    2017-08-01

    White spots are an early sign of enamel demineralization, which may lead to development of dental caries. Enamel demineralization can be determined by examining the microhardness number of the enamel. Addition of antibacterial agents such as TiO2 nanoparticles into the orthodontic adhesive (TiO2 nanocomposite) is expected to prevent enamel demineralization. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of TiO2 nanocomposites in maintaining enamel microhardness around orthodontic brackets. The bracket was bonded to the premolar using Transbond XT (group 1), 1% TiO2 nanocomposites (group 2), and 2% TiO2 nanocomposites (group 3). Group 4 was the control group, and it was not given any treatment prior to the microhardness test. The samples of groups 1, 2, and 3 were soaked in BHI solution containing Streptococcus mutans, and then stored in an incubator at 37°C for 30 days. Demineralizations were determined on cross-sectioned tooth 100μm and 200μm cervical to the bracket by the Vickers microhardness test. The microhardness values were significantly different between every group, with the highest value obtained for control group, followed by the 2% TiO2 nanocomposite group, 1% TiO2 nanocomposite group, and then the Transbond XT group. The results of this study reveal that 2% TiO2 nanocomposites have the ability to maintain enamel microhardness around the orthodontic bracket.

  2. Comparison of enamel discoloration associated with bonding with three different orthodontic adhesives and cleaning-up with four different procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Cui; Zhao, Zhihe; Zhao, Qing; Du, Xi; Ye, Jun; Wei, Xing

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare whether there was any difference in the enamel discoloration after staining when three orthodontic adhesives and four enamel clean-up methods were tested. Three types of orthodontic adhesives were used: chemically cured resin, light-cured resin and resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. A total of 120 human extracted premolars were included. 10 teeth of each orthodontic adhesive were randomly cleaned-up with one of four different procedures and stained in coffee for seven days: (1) carbide bur (TC); (2) carbide bur; Sof-Lex polishers (TC+SL); (3) carbide bur and one gloss polishers (TC+OG); and (4) carbide bur and PoGo polishers (TC+PG). Color measurements were made with Crystaleye dental spectrophotometer at baseline and after storage in a coffee solution one week. Two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests were used for statistical analyses (P0.05). The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement groups showed the lowest color differences and chemically cured resin groups showed the highest ΔE* values among all the orthodontic adhesives (P<0.05). The color change of enamel surface was affected by the type of adhesive materials and cleanup procedures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Biofilm Formation on Different Types of Orthodontic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Papaioannou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the interaction between Porphyromonas gingivalis and 3 different orthodontic brackets in vitro, focusing on the effect of an early salivary pellicle and other bacteria on the formation of biofilms. Material and Methods. Mono- and multi-species P. gingivalis biofilms were allowed to form in vitro, on 3 different bracket types (stainless steel, ceramic and plastic with and without an early salivary pellicle. The brackets were anaerobically incubated for 3 days in Brain Heart Infusion Broth to form biofilms. Bacteria were quantified by trypsin treatment and enumeration of the total viable counts of bacteria recovered. Results. Saliva was found to significantly affect (<0.001 adhesion and biofilm formation of P. gingivalis, with higher numbers for the coated brackets. No significant effect was detected for the impact of the type of biofilm, although on stainless steel and plastic brackets there was a tendency for higher numbers of the pathogen in multi-species biofilms. Bracket material alone was not found to affect the number of bacteria. Conclusions. The salivary pellicle seems to facilitate the adhesion of P. gingivalis and biofilm formation on orthodontic brackets, while the material comprising the brackets does not significantly impact on the number of bacteria.

  4. Streptococcus mutans forms xylitol-resistant biofilm on excess adhesive flash in novel ex-vivo orthodontic bracket model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cindy S F; Ming, Yue; Foong, Kelvin W C; Rosa, Vinicius; Thuyen, Truong; Seneviratne, Chaminda J

    2017-04-01

    During orthodontic bonding procedures, excess adhesive is invariably left on the tooth surface at the interface between the bracket and the enamel junction; it is called excess adhesive flash (EAF). We comparatively evaluated the biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans on EAF produced by 2 adhesives and examined the therapeutic efficacy of xylitol on S mutans formed on EAF. First, we investigated the biofilm formation of S mutans on 3 orthodontic bracket types: stainless steel preadjusted edgewise, ceramic preadjusted edgewise, and stainless steel self-ligating. Subsequently, tooth-colored Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) and green Grengloo (Ormco, Glendora, Calif) adhesives were used for bonding ceramic brackets to extracted teeth. S mutans biofilms on EAF produced by the adhesives were studied using the crystal violet assay and scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness and surface energy of the EAF were examined. The therapeutic efficacies of different concentrations of xylitol were tested on S mutans biofilms. Significantly higher biofilms were formed on the ceramic preadjusted edgewise brackets (P = 0.003). Transbond XT had significantly higher S mutans biofilms compared with Grengloo surfaces (P = 0.007). There was no significant difference in surface roughness between Transbond XT and Grengloo surfaces (P >0.05). Surface energy of Transbond XT had a considerably smaller contact angle than did Grengloo, suggesting that Transbond XT is a more hydrophilic material. Xylitol at low concentrations had no significant effect on the reduction of S mutans biofilms on orthodontic adhesives (P = 0.016). Transbond XT orthodontic adhesive resulted in more S mutans biofilm compared with Grengloo adhesive on ceramic brackets. Surface energy seemed to play a more important role than surface roughness for the formation of S mutans biofilm on EAF. Xylitol does not appear to have a therapeutic effect on mature S mutans biofilm. Copyright © 2017 American

  5. Clinical acceptability of two self-etch adhesive resins for the bonding of orthodontic brackets to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnebel, Bradley; Mateer, Scott; Maganzini, Anthony Louis; Freeman, Katherine

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether two self-adhesive resin cements, Clearfil SA and RelyX, can be used to successfully bond orthodontic brackets to enamel. Seventy extracted premolars were custom mounted, cleaned and randomly divided into three groups. In group 1 (control), orthodontic brackets were bonded to 25 premolars using the Transbond Plus and Transbond XT two step adhesive systerm adhesive. In group 2, brackets were bonded to 25 premolars using Clearfil SA. In group 3, brackets were bonded to 20 premolars using RelyX. The brackets were debonded using a universal testing machine and shear bond strengths recorded. After debonding, each tooth was examined under 20× magnification to evaluate the residual adhesive remaining. An ANOVA with Duncan's Multiple Range Test was used to determine whether there were significant differences in shear bond strength between the groups. A Kruskal-Wallis Test and a Bonferroni multiple comparison procedure were used to compare the bond failure modes (adhesive remnant index scores) between the groups. The mean shear bond strengths for the brackets bonded using Clearfil SA and RelyX were 5·930±1·840 and 3·334±1·953 MPa, respectively. Both were significantly lower than that for the brackets bonded using Transbond (7·875±3·611 MPa). Both self-etch adhesive resin cement groups showed a greater incidence of bracket failure at the enamel/adhesive interface while the Transbond group showed a higher incidence at the bracket/adhesive interface. The shear bond strengths of the self-etch adhesive resin cements may be inadequate to successfully bond orthodontic brackets to enamel.

  6. Efficacy of antimicrobial agents incorporated in orthodontic bonding systems: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, C M; da Rosa, W L O; Meereis, C T W; de Almeida, S M; Ribeiro, J S; da Silva, A F; Lund, Rafael Guerra

    2018-03-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of orthodontic bonding systems containing different antimicrobial agents, as well as the influence of antimicrobial agent incorporation in the bonding properties of these materials. Eight databases were searched: PubMed (Medline), Web of Science, Scopus, Lilacs, Ibecs, BBO, Scielo and Google Scholar. Any study that evaluated antimicrobial activity in experimental or commercial orthodontic bonding systems was included. Data were tabulated independently and in duplicated by two authors on pre-designed data collection form. The global analysis was carried out using a random-effects model, and pooled-effect estimates were obtained by comparing the standardised mean difference of each antimicrobial orthodontic adhesive with the respective control group. A p-value orthodontic bonding systems. The antimicrobial agent incorporation in orthodontic bonding systems showed higher antimicrobial activity than the control group in agar diffusion (overall standardised mean difference: 3.71; 95% CI 2.98 to 4.43) and optical density tests (0.41; 95% CI -0.05 to 0.86) (p orthodontic bonding systems were statistically similar to the control. Although there is evidence of antibacterial activity from in vitro studies, clinical and long-term studies are still necessary to confirm the effectiveness of antibacterial orthodontic bonding systems in preventing caries disease.

  7. Cytotoxic and genotoxic evaluation of orthodontic adhesives with primer and without primer exposed to electron beam irradiation - an in-vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi, M.S.; Panchasara, Chirag; Vijay, R.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of two visible light-cured adhesives. The materials tested were 1. orthodontic adhesive with primer (Transbond XT3M) and 2. Orthodontic adhesive without primer (Heliosit, Ivoclar Vivadent AG), Cured sterile individual masses were exposed to 2 kGy electron beam radiation, both irradiated and non irradiated materials were immersed in Phosphate buffer saline and left at 370℃ for 24 hr. Then a volume of 200 μL of the extract medium was mixed with human peripheral blood lymphocyte tested for comet assay by single cell DNA Damage assay and Apoptosis by DNA diffusion agar assay. Evaluation of cytotoxicity was carried out by Hemolysis assay method. Haemolytic activity of orthodontic adhesive without primer (53.34±3.12) was slightly more than that of orthodontic adhesive with primer (52.9±.88). In case of Apoptosis, adhesive with primer (188.92±55.05) and adhesives without primer (186.75±101.83) showed increased diffusion of DNA compared to normal lymphocyte (111.22±8.78). However the level of DNA diffusion was not significantly different between the two adhesives. Both adhesives were cytotoxic and induced apoptosis. Adhesives without primer were found to be slightly toxic than that of adhesive with primer. Both the adhesives had no significant effect on the percentage of DNA tail and olive tail moment of DNA exposed to electron beam radiation. (author)

  8. Viscoelastic properties of orthodontic adhesives used for lingual fixed retainer bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadogiannis, D; Iliadi, A; Bradley, T G; Silikas, N; Eliades, G; Eliades, T

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the viscoelastic properties of two experimental BPA-free and one BisGMA-based orthodontic resin composite adhesives for bonding fixed retainers. A commercially available BisGMA-based (TXA: Transbond LR) and two bisphenol A-free experimental adhesives (EXA and EXB) were included in the study. The viscoelastic behavior of the adhesives was evaluated under static and dynamic conditions at dry and wet states and at various temperatures (21, 37, 50°C). The parameters determined were shear modulus (G), Young's modulus (E) under static testing and storage modulus (G 1 ), loss tangent (tanδ) and dynamic viscosity (n*) under dynamic testing. Statistical analysis was performed by 2-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post-hoc tests (α=0.05). For static testing, a significant difference was found within material and storage condition variables and a significant interaction between the two independent variables (p<0.001 for G and E). EXA demonstrated the highest G and E values at 21°C/dry group. Dry specimens showed the highest G and E values, but with no significant difference from 21°C/wet specimens, except EXA in G. Wet storage at higher temperatures (37°C and 50°C) adversely affected all the materials to a degree ranging from 40 to 60% (p<0.001). For dynamic testing, a significant difference was also found in material and testing condition groups, with a significant interaction between the two independent variables (p<0.001 for G 1 and n*, p<0.01 for tanδ). Reduction in G 1 , and n* values, and increase in tanδ values were encountered at increased water temperatures. The apparent detrimental effect of high temperature on the reduction of properties of adhesives may contribute to the loss of stiffness of the fixed retainer configuration under ordinary clinical conditions with unfavorable effects on tooth position and stability of the orthodontic treatment result. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  9. Avaliação do Índice de Remanescente Adesivo utilizando braquetes com e sem tratamento na base e a interação com três sistemas de colagem Evaluation of Adhesive Remnant Index using conventional mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases and three bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Maria Brisque Pignatta

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o Índice de Remanescente Adesivo (IRA em dentes bovinos após a descolagem de braquetes com e sem tratamento na base. METODOLOGIA: foram utilizados três sistemas de colagem ortodôntica para os dois padrões de base. Os dentes bovinos foram divididos em seis grupos de 40, de acordo com a base do braquete e o sistema de colagem. Vinte e quatro horas após a colagem foram realizados os testes de compressão em uma máquina de ensaios. A avaliação do IRA foi realizada em um estereomicroscópio por três examinadores calibrados. Foi utilizado o teste não paramétrico de Kruskal-Wallis, seguido do método de Dunn, para fazer as comparações múltiplas entre todos os grupos. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: observou-se que o tratamento das bases dos braquetes com óxido de alumínio não foi determinante para o aumento da adesividade entre o braquete e o adesivo. O grupo em que se utilizou braquetes com tratamento na base e adesivo TXT (3M-Unitek + Transbond Plus SEP (3M-Unitek apresentou a maior parte das fraturas na interface dente-adesivo (escore 4.AIM: To assess the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI in bovine teeth after debonding mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases. METHODS: Were used three bonding systems for the two standards of base. The bovine teeth were divided into 6 groups of 40, according to the bracket base and to the bonding system. Twenty four hours after bonding they had been carried through shear bond strength tests in a universal testing machine. The assessment of ARI was performed in a stereomicroscopy by three calibrated examiners. It was used the non-parametric Kruskall-Wallis test, followed by Dunn's method, to do the multiple comparisons among all groups. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: It was observed that the aluminum oxide sandblasting bracket bases was not determinative to the increase of the adhesiveness between bracket and adhesive. The group where it was used sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases and

  10. The influence of adding modified zirconium oxide-titanium dioxide nano-particles on mechanical properties of orthodontic adhesive: an in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Felemban, Nayef H.; Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this in-vitro study was to examine the effect of incorporating different concentrations of Zirconium oxide-Titanium dioxide (ZrO2-TiO2) nanoparticles, which can have antibacterial properties, on the mechanical properties of an orthodontic adhesive. Methods ZrO2-TiO2 (Zirconium oxide, HWNANO, Hongwu International Group Ltd, China) -Titanium dioxide, Nanoshell, USA) nanopowder were incorporated into orthodontic adhesive (Transbond XT, 3?M Unitek, Monrovia, USA) with di...

  11. Enamel shear bond strength of two orthodontic self-etching bonding systems compared to Transbond™ XT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellak, Andreas; Rusdea, Patrick; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike Maria

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) scores of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (Prompt L-Pop™ and Scotchbond™) for orthodontic appliances to the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™ (in combination with phosphoric acid). In all, 60 human premolars were randomly divided into three groups of 20 specimens each. In group 1 (control), brackets were bonded with Transbond™ XT primer. Prompt L-Pop™ (group 2) and Scotchbond™ Universal (group 3) were used in the experimental groups. Lower premolar brackets were bonded by light curing the adhesive. After 24 h of storage, the shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a Zwicki 1120 testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was determined under 10× magnification. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to statistically compare the SBS and the ARI scores. No significant differences in the SBS between any of the experimental groups were detected (group 1: 15.49 ± 3.28 MPa; group 2: 13.89 ± 4.95 MPa; group 3: 14.35 ± 3.56 MPa; p = 0.489), nor were there any significant differences in the ARI scores (p = 0.368). Using the two self-etching no-mix adhesives (Prompt L-Pop™ and Scotchbond™) for orthodontic appliances does not affect either the SBS or ARI scores in comparison with the commonly used total-etch system Transbond™ XT. In addition, Scotchbond™ Universal supports bonding on all types of surfaces (enamel, metal, composite, and porcelain) with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures.

  12. Development of an easy-debonding orthodontic adhesive using thermal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, Takashi; Namura, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2007-01-01

    We produced experimentally a new bonding material that consisted of a mixture of a base resin (4-META/MMA-TBB resin adhesive) and thermoexpandable microcapsules for safe, easy debonding. Microcapsules in the base resin would start expansion at 80 degrees C, leading to a remarkable decrease in bond strength. Stainless steel brackets were bonded to bovine permanent mandibular incisors using bonding materials containing the microcapsules at different contents. After thermal cycling or heating, the shear bond strength of the brackets was measured. Shear bond strength of the bonding materials containing 30-40 wt% microcapsules decreased to about one-third or one-fifth that of the base resin on heating. Heating the brackets for eight seconds increased the temperature in the pulp chamber by 2 degrees C, which should not induce pulp damage. Results obtained suggested that the new bonding material should prove useful for removing brackets easily at the time of bracket debonding without any pain or enamel cracks, while maintaining the bonding strength during active orthodontic treatment.

  13. Comparison of Microleakage under Rebonded Stainless Steel Orthodontic Brackets Using Two Methods of Adhesive Removal: Sandblast and Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudehzaeim, Mohamad Hossein; Yassaei, Soghra; Taherimoghadam, Shohreh

    2015-02-01

    Debonding is a common occurrence in orthodontic treatment and a considerable number of orthodontists prefer to rebond the detached brackets because of economic issues. The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage beneath rebonded stainless steel brackets using two methods of adhesive removal namely sandblast and laser. Sixty human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups. Following bonding the brackets, group 1 served as the control group. Brackets in groups 2 and 3 were debonded, and adhesive removal from the bracket bases was done by means of sandblasting and Er-YAG laser, respectively. After rebonding, teeth in each group were stained with 2% methylene blue for 24 hours, sectioned and examined under a stereomicroscope. Marginal microleakage at the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces in the occlusal and gingival margins was determined. Statistical analysis was done using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Comparison of the microleakage scores among the three groups revealed no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). At the enamel-adhesive interface, the gingival margins in all groups showed higher microleakage while in the adhesive-bracket interface, the occlusal margin exhibited greater microleakage. Er-YAG laser irradiation and sandblasting for adhesive removal from the debonded brackets yielded clinically acceptable microleakage scores.

  14. Acid Neutralizing Ability and Shear Bond Strength Using Orthodontic Adhesives Containing Three Different Types of Bioactive Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Yi Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the acid neutralizing ability and shear bond strength (SBS of three different types of orthodontic adhesives containing bioactive glasses (BAGs. 45S5, 45S5F and S53P4 BAGs were prepared using the melting technique and ground to fine particles. Orthodontic adhesives containing three types of BAGs were prepared as follows: 52.5% 45S5 BAG + 17.5% glass (45S5_A; 61.25% 45S5 BAG + 8.75% glass (45S5_B; 52.5% 45S5F BAG + 17.5% glass (45S5F_A; 61.25% 45S5F BAG + 8.75% glass (45S5F_B; 52.5% S53P4 BAG + 17.5% glass (S53P4_A; 61.25% S53P4 BAG + 8.75% glass (S53P4_B; and 70.0% glass (BAG_0. To evaluate the acid neutralizing properties, specimens were immersed in lactic acid solution, and pH changes were measured. SBS was measured with a universal testing machine. For all of the BAG-containing adhesives, the one with 61.25% of BAG showed a significantly greater increase of pH than the one with 52.5% of BAG (p < 0.05. Groups with 61.25% of BAG showed lower SBS than samples with 52.5% of BAG. 45S5F_A showed no significant difference of SBS compared to BAG_0 (p > 0.05. The adhesive containing 61.25% of 45S5F BAG exhibited clinically acceptable SBS and acid neutralizing properties. Therefore, this composition is a suitable candidate to prevent white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment.

  15. Adhesive Properties of Bonded Orthodontic Retainers to Enamel : Stainless Steel Wire vs Fiber-reinforced Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Krebs, Eliza; Sandham, John; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to compare the bond strength of a stainless steel orthodontic wire vs various fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) used as orthodontic retainers on enamel, analyze the failure types after debonding, and investigate the influence of different application

  16. The Effect of CuO Nanoparticles on Antimicrobial Effects and Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Zandi, Hengameh; Meshkani, Hamidreza; Hosseinzadeh Firouzabadi, Azadeh

    2018-03-01

    Orthodontic appliances facilitate microbial plaque accumulation and increase the chance of white spot lesions. There is a need for new plaque control methods independent of patient's cooperation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles on antimicrobial properties and bond strength of orthodontic adhesive. CuO nanoparticles were added to the composite transbond XT at concentrations of 0.01, 0.5 and 1 wt.%. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of composites containing nanoparticles, the disk agar diffusion test was used. For this purpose, 10 discs from each concentration of nano-composites (totally 30 discs) and 10 discs from conventional composite (as the control group) were prepared. Then the diameter of streptococcus mutans growth inhibition around each disc was determined in blood agar medium. To evaluate the shear bond strength, with each concentration of nano-composites as well as the control group (conventional composite), 10 metal brackets were bonded to the human premolars and shear bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine. Nano-composites in all three concentrations showed significant antimicrobial effect compared to the control group ( p nano-composites compared to control group ( p = 0.695). Incorporating CuO nanoparticles into adhesive in all three studied concentrations added antimicrobial effects to the adhesive with no adverse effects on shear bond strength.

  17. Effects of long-term repeated topical fluoride applications and adhesion promoter on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Toshiya; Ishida, Rieko; Komatsuzaki, Akira; Sanpei, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of long-term repeated topical application of fluoride before bonding and an adhesion promoter on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 bovine incisors were collected and divided equally into four groups. In group 1, the brackets were bonded without topical fluoride application or adhesion promoter. In group 2, before bonding, the adhesion promoter was applied to nonfluoridated enamel. In group 3, the brackets were bonded without the application of the adhesion promoter to enamel, which had undergone long-term repeated topical fluoride treatments. Teeth in group 4 received the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride, and the brackets were bonded using the adhesion promoter. All the brackets were bonded using BeautyOrtho Bond self-etching adhesive. The shear bond strength was measured and the bond failure modes were evaluated with the use of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) after debonding. Results: The mean shear bond strength was significantly lower in group 3 than in groups 1, 2, and 4, and there were no significant differences between the groups except for group 3. There were significant differences in the distribution of ARI scores between groups 2 and 3, and between groups 3 and 4. Conclusions: The adhesion promoter can recover the bond strength reduced by the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride to the prefluoridation level and had a significantly great amount of adhesives left on either fluoridated or nonfluoridated enamel. PMID:25512720

  18. The influence of adding modified zirconium oxide-titanium dioxide nano-particles on mechanical properties of orthodontic adhesive: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felemban, Nayef H; Ebrahim, Mohamed I

    2017-01-13

    The purpose of this in-vitro study was to examine the effect of incorporating different concentrations of Zirconium oxide-Titanium dioxide (ZrO2-TiO2) nanoparticles, which can have antibacterial properties, on the mechanical properties of an orthodontic adhesive. ZrO2-TiO2 (Zirconium oxide, HWNANO, Hongwu International Group Ltd, China) -Titanium dioxide, Nanoshell, USA) nanopowder were incorporated into orthodontic adhesive (Transbond XT, 3 M Unitek, Monrovia, USA) with different concentrations (0.5% weight nonofiller and 1% weight nanofiller). The size of nanoparticle was 70-80 nm for ZrO2 and less than 50 nm for TiO2. For measuring the shear bond strength of the three groups of orthodontic adhesives [Transbond (control), Transbond mixed with 0.5% weight ZrO2-TiO2, and Transbond mixed with 1% weight ZrO2-TiO2], 30 freshly extracted human first premolars were used and bonded with stainless steel metal brackets (Dentaurum®, Discovery®, Deutschland), using the 3 orthodontic adhesives and 3 M Unitek; Transbond TM Plus Self-Etching Primer (10 samples in each group). The recorded values of compressive strength and tensile strength (measured separately on 10 samples of orthodontic adhesives (add the 3 D size of sample, light cured for 40 s on both sides) of each orthodontic adhesives), as well as the shear bond strength in Mega Pascal unit (MPa) were collected and exposed to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post-hoc tests. orthodontic adhesive with 1% weight ZrO2-TiO2 showed the highest mean compressive (73.42 ± 1.55 MPa, p: 0.003, F: 12.74), tensile strength (8.65 ± 0.74 MPa, p: 0.001, F: 68.20), and shear bond strength (20.05 ± 0.2 MPa, p: 0.001, F: 0.17). Adding ZrO2-TiO2 nanoparticle to orthodontic adhesive increased compressive strength, tensile strength, and shear bond strength in vitro, but in vivo studies and randomized clinical trials are needed to validate the present findings.

  19. Effectiveness of clean-up procedures on stain susceptibility of different orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Pundlik Mane

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Chemical-cure adhesive showed higher stain susceptibility than light-cure adhesive in all clean-up procedures. Both adhesives would show less stain susceptibility with polishing step with rubber cup and pumice.

  20. Orthodontic treatment with skeletal anchorage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Brahmanta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Correction of class I malocclusion with bimaxillary dental protrusion and unilateral free end right upper ridge in adult patient is one of difficult biomechanical case in orthodontics. Due to this case that needs proper anchorage for upper incisor retraction with missing teeth in the right posterior segment. Purpose: The aim of this study to find an effective therapy for correction of bimaxillary protrusion with unilateral free and ridge. Case: A female patient, 36 year old complaining for the difficulty of lip closure due to severe bimaxillary protrusion with incompetence lip. Case management: Firstly correction of the maxillary and mandibular incisor proclination were done by extraction of the mandibular first premolar, the maxillary second premolar on left side and finally placement of miniplates implant in the zygomatic process on right side as an absolut anchorage. Conclusion: Skeletal anchorage system (SAS can be considered as an effective therapy for corection of bimaxillary protrusion with unilateral free end ridge.Latar belakang: Koreksi dari maloklusi klas I dari penderita dewasa yang disertai protrusi bimaksiler dengan kehilangan gigi posterior pada regio kanan atas merupakan salah satu kasus sulit untuk dikerjakan terutama berhubungan dengan biomekanik pergerakan giginya dalam perawatan ortodonti. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penulisan artikel ini adalah untuk menemukan terapi yang efektif untuk perbaikan protrusi bimaksiler dan kehilangan gigi posterior pada satu sisi. Kasus: Seorang penderita wanita usia 35 tahun datang dengan keluhan utama kesulitan untuk menutup mulut oleh karena gigi rahang atas dan rahang bawahnya maju dan bibirnya tidak kompeten. Tatalaksana kasus: Koreksi pada gigi insisivus rahang atas dan insisivus rahang bawah yang protrusi dilakukan dengan melakukan pencabutan terlebih dahulu pada gigi premolar pertama dirahang bawah sisi kanan dan sisi kiri serta pencabutan pada gigi premolar kedua di rahang atas sisi

  1. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  2. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hellak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond™ and Scotchbond™ on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™. Materials and Methods. A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n=30 were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2 and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3 were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal–Wallis test (P≤0.05. Results. Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions. Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain, with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  3. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellak, Andreas; Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond ™ and Scotchbond ™ ) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT ™ . Materials and Methods . A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120 ™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis test ( P ≤ 0.05). Results . Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions . Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  4. Effect of two-step and one-step surface conditioning of glass ceramic on adhesion strength of orthodontic bracket and effect of thermo-cycling on adhesion strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiry, Moshabab A; AlShahrani, Ibrahim; Alaqeel, Samer M; Durgesh, Bangalore H; Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar

    2018-08-01

    The adhesion strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to dental glass ceramics was evaluated after ceramic surface was treated with two-step and one-step surface conditioning systems, and subjecting to thermo-cycling. A total of forty specimens were fabricated from silica based glass ceramic (lithium disilicate) by duplicating the buccal surface of maxillary first premolar. The specimens were randomly assigned to two experimental groups (n = 20), group one specimens were treated with two-step surface conditioning system (IPS ceramic etching gel™ and Monobond plus™) and group two specimens were treated with one-step surface conditioning system (Monobond etch and prime™). The surface roughness of the specimens after treatment with two-step and one-step surface conditioning system was measured using non-contact surface profilometer. Ten randomly selected specimens from each group were subjected to thermo-cycling and the remaining ten served as baseline. The shear bond strength of the specimens was measured using universal material testing machine. The adhesive remnant index score was calculated, and the results of surface roughness and bond strength were tabulated and subjected to analysis of variance and post hoc tukey's test at a significance level of p step conditioning system had higher surface roughness and bond strength than one-step conditioning system. The majority of the specimens treated with both two-step and one-step conditioned specimens showed adhesive failure after subjecting thermo-cycling. Traditional two-step conditioning provides better bond strength. The clinical importance of the study is that, the silane promoted adhesion significantly reduces on exposure to thermo-cycling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Visual application of the American Board of Orthodontics Grading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Steven A; Freer, Terry J

    2005-05-01

    Assessment of treatment outcomes has traditionally been accomplished using the subjective opinion of experienced clinicians. Reduced subjectivity in the assessment of orthodontic treatment can be achieved with the use of an occlusal index. To implement an index for quality assurance purposes is time-consuming and subject to the inherent error of the index. Quality assessment of orthodontic treatment on a routine basis has been difficult to implement in private practice. To investigate whether a clinician can accurately apply the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System by direct visual inspection instead of measuring individual traits. A random sample of 30 cases was selected, including pretreatment and post-treatment upper and lower study casts and panoramic radiographs. The cases were examined and scored with the standardized measuring gauge according to the protocol provided by the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO). The records were re-examined 6 weeks later and the individual traits scored by visual inspection (VI). There were no significant differences between the pre- and post-treatment ABO gauge and VI scores. This study suggests that occlusal traits defined by the ABO Objective Grading System can be accurately assessed by visual inspection. The VI score provides a simple and convenient method for critical evaluation of treatment outcome by a clinician.

  6. Effect of moisture on dental enamel in the interaction of two orthodontic bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoz, André Pinheiro de Magalhães; de Oliveira, Derly Tescaro Narcizo; Gimenez, Carla Maria Melleiro; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Bertoz, Francisco Antonio; Santos, Eduardo César Almada

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the remaining adhesive interface after debonding orthodontic attachments bonded to bovine teeth with the use of hydrophilic and hydrophobic primers under different dental substrate moisture conditions. Twenty mandibular incisors were divided into four groups (n = 5). In Group I, bracket bonding was performed with Transbond MIP hydrophilic primer and Transbond XT adhesive paste applied to moist substrate, and in Group II a bonding system comprising Transbond XT hydrophobic primer and adhesive paste was applied to moist substrate. Brackets were bonded to the specimens in Groups III and IV using the same adhesive systems, but on dry dental enamel. The images were qualitatively assessed by SEM. The absence of moisture in etched enamel enabled better interaction between bonding materials and the adamantine structure. The hydrophobic primer achieved the worst micromechanical interlocking results when applied to a moist dental structure, whereas the hydrophilic system proved versatile, yielding acceptable results in moist conditions and excellent interaction in the absence of contamination. The authors assert that the best condition for the application of primers to dental enamel occurs in the absence of moisture.

  7. Effects of two soft drinks on shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of orthodontic metal brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Soodabeh Sadat; Eslami Amirabadi, Gholamreza; Sajadi, Sepideh

    2014-07-01

    Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro. Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic beer (Istak), and a control group of artificial saliva. Over a period of thirty days, the test groups were immersed in the respective soft drinks for 5 minutes, twice a day. For the remainder of the time, they were kept in artificial saliva at 37°C. The control group was stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. All samples were subjected to shearing forces using Universal Testing Machine. ARI was determined with a stereomicroscope at ×12 magnification. The data of shear bond strength were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's Post-Hoc test and the data of ARI scores were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. No significant difference was observed in ARIs of the three groups (P≤ 0.552). The shear bond strength of Coke group was significantly lower than that of the two other groups (P≤ 0.035); but there was no significant difference between the shear bond strength of Istak and the control group (P≤ 0.999). Coca-Cola decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  8. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; S?, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder? Scotchbond? Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-s...

  9. Effect of dental bleaching after bracket bonding and debonding using three different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucianna de Oliveira Gomes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets on dental in-home bleaching, taking into account three different adhesive systems. METHODS: Forty-four bovine incisors were divided into four groups according to the primer system used for orthodontic bracket bonding. Following the debonding of orthodontic brackets, the teeth were stored in staining solution for 96 hours. Then, teeth were whitened using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks at a 6-hour-a-day regime. Standardized digital photographs were taken at the following intervals: T0 (initial; T1 (after debonding; T2 (after pigmentation; T3, T4 and T5 representing 1, 7, and 14 days of bleaching. Repeatability and stability tests were carried out to check the method accuracy. Images were analyzed using Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software considering (L*a*b*color coordinate values and a modified color difference total (Δ;E'. RESULTS: The results of this study (ANOVA and Tukey; p < 0.01 demonstrated that after 7 days of bleaching, experimental groups showed significantly less teeth whitening compared to the control group. However, there were no significant color differences between the groups after 14 days, according to values of lightness (L*. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of the adhesive primer system applied, bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets alters the outcome of tooth whitening in the first 7 days of bleaching, however it has no influence on the whitening of the dental structure after 14 days of in-home dental bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide.

  10. Preparation and study of new rubber to steel adhesive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaj, I.; Ondrusova, D.; Dubec, A.; Pajtasova, M.; Kohutiar, M.

    2017-01-01

    The present paper deals with the preparation of new rubber to steel adhesive systems using the steel surface treatment by applying the adhesive coats based on Co (II) and Cu(II) salts. For demonstration of coats chemical composition EDX analysis was used. The topography and microstructure of prepared adhesive coats were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Finally the efficiency of adhesion between rubber blends and coated metal steel pieces was evaluated according to Test ASTM D429 Rubber to metal adhesion, method A. The adhesive strength resulting values of prepared steel samples with new adhesive coats were compared with samples covered with adhesive systems commonly used in industry. (authors)

  11. Orthodontic tooth movement and root resorption in ovariectomized rats treated by systemic administration of zoledronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisoontorn, Irin; Hotokezaka, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Megumi; Gonzales, Carmen; Luppanapornlarp, Suwannee; Darendeliler, M Ali; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2012-05-01

    The effect of zoledronic acid, a potent and novel bisphosphonate, on tooth movement and orthodontically induced root resorption in osteoporotic animals systemically treated with zoledronic acid as similarly used in postmenopausal patients has not been elucidated. Therefore, this study was undertaken. Fifteen 10-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: ovariectomy, ovariectomy + zoledronic acid, and control. Only the ovariectomy and ovariectomy + zoledronic acid groups underwent ovariectomies. Two weeks after the ovariectomy, zoledronic acid was administered only to the ovariectomy + zoledronic acid group. Four weeks after the ovariectomy, 25-g nickel-titanium closed-coil springs were applied to observe tooth movement and orthodontically induced root resorption. There were significant differences in the amounts of tooth movement and orthodontically induced root resorption between the ovariectomy and the control groups, and also between the ovariectomy and the ovariectomy + zoledronic acid groups. There was no statistically significant difference in tooth movement and orthodontically induced root resorption between the ovariectomy + zoledronic acid and the control groups. Zoledronic acid inhibited significantly more tooth movement and significantly reduced the severity of orthodontically induced root resorption in the ovariectomized rats. The ovariectomy + zoledronic acid group showed almost the same results as did the control group in both tooth movement and orthodontically induced root resorption. Zoledronic acid inhibits excessive orthodontic tooth movement and also reduces the risk of severe orthodontically induced root resorption in ovariectomized rats. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbial adhesion in flow displacement systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    Flow displacement systems are superior to many other (static) systems for studying microbial adhesion to surfaces because mass transport and prevailing shear conditions can be adequately controlled and notoriously ill-defined slight rinsing steps to remove so-called "loosely adhering organisms" can

  13. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Adhesion Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Molchanova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture presents the materials of foreign studies on the mechanisms responsible for the formation of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. The hypotheses accounting for the occurrence of SIRS in emergencies are described. Adhesion molecules (AM and endothelial dysfunction are apparent to be involved in the inflammatory process, no matter what the causes of SIRS are. The current classification of AM and adhesion cascades with altered blood flow is presented. There are two lines in the studies of AM. One line is to measure the concentration of AM in the plasma of patients with emergencies of various etiology. The other is to study the impact of antiadhesion therapy on the alleviation of the severity of terminal state and its outcome. The studies provide evidence for that an adhesive process is a peculiar prelude to a systemic inflammatory response.

  14. The Influence of No-Primer Adhesives and Anchor Pylons Bracket Bases on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Scribante

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI scores of no-primer adhesives tested with two different bracket bases. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens. Two brackets (ODP with different bracket bases (anchor pylons and 80-gauge mesh were bonded to the teeth using a conventional adhesive (Transbond XT and two different no-primer adhesive (Ortho Cem; Heliosit systems. Groups were tested using an instron universal testing machine. SBS values were recorded. ARI scores were measured. SEM microphotographs were taken to evaluate the pattern of bracket bases. Statistical analysis was performed. ANOVA and Tukey tests were carried out for SBS values, whereas a chi-squared test was applied for ARI scores. Results. Highest bond strength values were reported with Transbond XT (with both pad designs, Ortho Cem bonded on anchor pylons and Heliosit on 80-gauge mesh. A higher frequency of ARI score of “3” was reported for Transbond XT groups. Other groups showed a higher frequency of ARI score “2” and “1.” Conclusion. Transbond XT showed the highest shear bond strength values with both pad designs.

  15. Advances in modeling and design of adhesively bonded systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, S

    2013-01-01

    The book comprehensively charts a way for industry to employ adhesively bonded joints to make systems more efficient and cost-effective Adhesively bonded systems have found applications in a wide spectrum of industries (e.g., aerospace, electronics, construction, ship building, biomedical, etc.) for a variety of purposes. Emerging adhesive materials with improved mechanical properties have allowed adhesion strength approaching that of the bonded materials themselves. Due to advances in adhesive materials and the many potential merits that adhesive bonding offers, adhesive bonding has replac

  16. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  17. Comparison of Self-Etch Primers with Conventional Acid Etching System on Orthodontic Brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Amit; Zope-Khalekar, Yogita; Chitko, Shrikant S.; Kerudi, Veerendra V.; Patil, Harshal Ashok; Jaltare, Pratik; Dolas, Siddhesh G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The self-etching primer system consists of etchant and primer dispersed in a single unit. The etching and priming are merged as a single step leading to fewer stages in bonding procedure and reduction in the number of steps that also reduces the chance of introduction of error, resulting in saving time for the clinician. It also results in smaller extent of enamel decalcification. Aim To compare the Shear Bond Strength (SBS) of orthodontic bracket bonded with Self-Etch Primers (SEP) and conventional acid etching system and to study the surface appearance of teeth after debonding; etching with conventional acid etch and self-etch priming, using stereomicroscope. Materials and Methods Five Groups (n=20) were created randomly from a total of 100 extracted premolars. In a control Group A, etching of enamel was done with 37% phosphoric acid and bonding of stainless steel brackets with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, California). Enamel conditioning in left over four Groups was done with self-etching primers and adhesives as follows: Group B-Transbond Plus (3M Unitek), Group C Xeno V+ (Dentsply), Group D-G-Bond (GC), Group E-One-Coat (Coltene). The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was also evaluated. Additionally, the surface roughness using profilometer were observed. Results Mean SBS of Group A was 18.26±7.5MPa, Group B was 10.93±4.02MPa, Group C was 6.88±2.91MPa while of Group D was 7.78±4.13MPa and Group E was 10.39±5.22MPa respectively. In conventional group ARI scores shows that over half of the adhesive was remaining on the surface of tooth (score 1 to 3). In self-etching primer groups ARI scores show that there was no or minor amount of adhesive remaining on the surface of tooth (score 4 and 5). SEP produces a lesser surface roughness on the enamel than conventional etching. However, statistical analysis shows significant correlation (pbracket bonding after enamel conditioning with any of the SEPs tested. The SEPs used in Groups C (Xeno V

  18. Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Adhesion URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001493.htm Adhesion To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue that form between two ...

  19. Leakage Testing for Different Adhesive Systems and Composites to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-16

    Nov 16, 2015 ... resin composite, the fifth group – two‑stage SE adhesive applied and cavities filled with ... KEYWORDS: Adhesives, composite, evaluation, leakage ... the glass ionomers. ... systems are realized in one or two clinical step(s).[5].

  20. Geographic information system and index of orthodontic treatment need: Tools to assess orthodontic treatment needs of 12-year-old children of Mysuru District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyalakshmi Avinash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The various research studies conducted in India have shown the prevalence of malocclusion ranging from 20% to 55%. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the orthodontic treatment need of school going children of Mysuru district and to assess the perceptive need of orthodontic treatment using mapping of malocclusion. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive survey was conducted among 12-year-old schoolgoing children of Mysuru district. The orthodontic need has been assessed with the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN, and the mapping of malocclusion has been done with the use ArcGIS software version 9.3. With SPSS Version 16, frequency, descriptive, cross-tabulations (Contingency table analysis, and Chi-square test have been applied. Results: Among 409 boys, 163 (39.9% had a little need, whereas 125 (30.6% had a moderate need and 121 (29.6% had a definite need for orthodontic treatment. Among 436 girls, 190 (43.6% had little, whereas 122 (28% had moderate need and 124 (28.4% had definite need for orthodontic treatment (P = 0.53. Moreover, the overall perceptive need for orthodontic treatment need was only 35.6%. Conclusion: The prevalence of malocclusion in the studied sample is 58.2%. There is a general lack of awareness regarding orthodontic treatment as assessed by esthetic component of IOTN index. This study also found that Geographic Information System is a valuable tool for mapping of malocclusion and thus must be considered for studies related to public health.

  1. Bonding Durability of Four Adhesive Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Atash Biz Yeganeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to compare the durability of four adhesive systems by assessing their microtensile bond strength (MTBS and microleakage during six months of water storage.Materials and Methods: A total of 128 human third molars were used. The adhesives tested were Scotch Bond Multipurpose (SBMP, Single Bond (SB, Clearfil-SE bond (CSEB, and All-Bond SE (ABSE. After sample preparation for MTBS testing, the microspecimens were subjected to microtensile tester after one day and six months of water storage. For microleakage evaluation, facial and lingual class V cavities were prepared and restored with composite. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated. Bond strength values were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s test, and the microleakage data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P<0.05.Results: Single Bond yielded the highest and ABSE yielded the lowest bond strength at one day and six months. Short-term bond strength of SBMP and CSEB was similar. After six months, a significant decrease in bond strength was observed in ABSE and SBMP groups. At one day, ABSE showed the highest microleakage at the occlusal margin; however, at the gingival margin, there was no significant difference among groups. Long-term microleakage of all groups at the occlusal margins was similar, whilst gingival margins of SBMP and SB showed significantly higher microleakage.Conclusion: The highest MTBS and favorable sealability were obtained by Clearfil SE bond. Water storage had no effect on microleakage of self-etch adhesives at the gingival margin or MTBS of CSEB and SB. 

  2. Shear Bond Strengths of Different Adhesive Systems to Biodentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaş, Mesut Enes; Bani, Mehmet; Tirali, Resmiye Ebru

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to Biodentine with different time intervals. Eighty specimens of Biodentine were prepared and divided into 8 groups. After 12 minutes, 40 samples were randomly selected and divided into 4 groups of 10 each: group 1: (etch-and-rinse adhesive system) Prime & Bond NT; group 2: (2-step self-etch adhesive system) Clearfil SE Bond; group 3: (1-step self-etch adhesive systems) Clearfil S3 Bond; group 4: control (no adhesive). After the application of adhesive systems, composite resin was applied over Biodentine. This procedure was repeated 24 hours after mixing additional 40 samples, respectively. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, and the data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance and Scheffé post hoc test. No significant differences were found between all of the adhesive groups at the same time intervals (12 minutes and 24 hours) (P > .05). Among the two time intervals, the lowest value was obtained for group 1 (etch-and-rinse adhesive) at a 12-minute period, and the highest was obtained for group 2 (two-step self-etch adhesive) at a 24-hour period. The placement of composite resin used with self-etch adhesive systems over Biodentine showed better shear bond strength. PMID:24222742

  3. ADHESIVE SYSTEM AFFECTS REPAIR BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür IRMAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Adhesive type and aging significantly affected the repair bond strengths (p<0.0001. No statistical difference was found in aged composite groups repaired with two-step self- etch or two-step total-etch adhesive. One-step self-etch adhesive showed lower bond strength values in aged composite repair (p<0.0001. Conclusion: In the repair of aged resin composite, two-step self-etch and two-step total-etch adhesives exhibited higher shear bond strength values than that of one-step self-etch adhesive.

  4. Easy Debonding of Ceramic Brackets Bonded with a Light-Cured Orthodontic Adhesive Containing Microcapsules with a CO2 Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Shiori; Namura, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Takahiko; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2018-03-01

    An easy debonding method for ceramic brackets using a light-cured Bis-GMA resin containing heat-expandable microcapsules and CO 2 laser was investigated. Ceramic brackets are used frequently in orthodontic treatment because of their desirable esthetic properties. However, the application of heavy force to ceramic brackets in debonding can fracture the tooth enamel and ceramic brackets, causing tooth pain. In total, 60 freshly extracted bovine permanent mandibular incisors were divided randomly into 10 groups of 6 specimens each, corresponding to the number of variables tested. Ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine permanent mandibular incisors using an orthodontic bonding agent containing heat-expandable microcapsules at different levels (0-30 wt%) and resin composite paste, and cured by a curing device. The bond strengths were measured before and after CO 2 laser irradiation, and the temperature increase in the pulp chamber in fresh human first premolars was also evaluated. With CO 2 laser irradiation for 5 sec to the bracket, the bond strength in the 25% microcapsule group decreased significantly, to ∼0.17-fold, compared with that of the no-laser group (p brackets, with less debonding time and enamel damage.

  5. Skeletal anchorage in orthodontics : A review of various systems in animal and human studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Krista I.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Vissink, Arjan; Sandham, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present investigation was to review and evaluate the current literature on skeletal bone anchorage in orthodontics with regard to success rates of the various systems. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE, PubMed, and Cochrane searches (period January 1966 to January 2006, English

  6. 3-dimensional orthodontics visualization system with dental study models and orthopantomograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Ong, S. H.; Foong, K. W. C.; Dhar, T.

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that provides 3-dimensional visualization of orthodontic treatments. Dental plaster models and corresponding orthopantomogram (dental panoramic tomogram) are first digitized and fed into the system. A semi-auto segmentation technique is applied to the plaster models to detect the dental arches, tooth interstices and gum margins, which are used to extract individual crown models. 3-dimensional representation of roots, generated by deforming generic tooth models with orthopantomogram using radial basis functions, is attached to corresponding crowns to enable visualization of complete teeth. An optional algorithm to close the gaps between deformed roots and actual crowns by using multi-quadratic radial basis functions is also presented, which is capable of generating smooth mesh representation of complete 3-dimensional teeth. User interface is carefully designed to achieve a flexible system with as much user friendliness as possible. Manual calibration and correction is possible throughout the data processing steps to compensate occasional misbehaviors of automatic procedures. By allowing the users to move and re-arrange individual teeth (with their roots) on a full dentition, this orthodontic visualization system provides an easy and accurate way of simulation and planning of orthodontic treatment. Its capability of presenting 3-dimensional root information with only study models and orthopantomogram is especially useful for patients who do not undergo CT scanning, which is not a routine procedure in most orthodontic cases.

  7. Three-dimensional quantitative analysis of adhesive remnants and enamel loss resulting from debonding orthodontic molar tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Tandecka, Katarzyna; Szatkiewicz, Tomasz; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Grocholewicz, Katarzyna

    2014-09-10

    Presenting a new method for direct, quantitative analysis of enamel surface. Measurement of adhesive remnants and enamel loss resulting from debonding molar tubes. Buccal surfaces of fifteen extracted human molars were directly scanned with an optic blue-light 3D scanner to the nearest 2 μm. After 20 s etching molar tubes were bonded and after 24 h storing in 0.9% saline - debonded. Then 3D scanning was repeated. Superimposition and comparison were proceeded and shape alterations of the entire objects were analyzed using specialized computer software. Residual adhesive heights as well as enamel loss depths have been obtained for the entire buccal surfaces. Residual adhesive volume and enamel loss volume have been calculated for every tooth. The maximum height of adhesive remaining on enamel surface was 0.76 mm and the volume on particular teeth ranged from 0.047 mm3 to 4.16 mm3. The median adhesive remnant volume was 0.988 mm3. Mean depths of enamel loss for particular teeth ranged from 0.0076 mm to 0.0416 mm. Highest maximum depth of enamel loss was 0.207 mm. Median volume of enamel loss was 0.104 mm3 and maximum volume was 1.484 mm3. Blue-light 3D scanning is able to provide direct precise scans of the enamel surface, which can be superimposed in order to calculate shape alterations. Debonding molar tubes leaves a certain amount of adhesive remnants on the enamel, however the interface fracture pattern varies for particular teeth and areas of enamel loss are present as well.

  8. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Aleksiejunaite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n=10. Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers’ instructions (experiment I and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p<0.05. LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted.

  9. Effectiveness and efficiency of a CAD/CAM orthodontic bracket system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew W; Koroluk, Lorne; Ko, Ching-Chang; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Mengqi; Nguyen, Tung

    2015-12-01

    The first straight-wire appliance was introduced over 40 years ago to increase the consistency and efficiency of orthodontic treatment. More recently, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has been used to create individualized orthodontic appliances. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical effectiveness and efficiency of CAD/CAM customized orthodontic appliances compared with direct and indirect bonded stock orthodontic brackets. This retrospective study included 3 treatment groups: group 1 patients were direct bonded with self-ligating appliances, group 2 patients were indirect bonded with self-ligating appliances, and group 3 patients were indirect bonded with CAD/CAM self-ligating appliances. Complete pretreatment and posttreatment records were obtained for all patients. The American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) Discrepancy Index was used to evaluate the pretreatment records, and the posttreatment outcomes were analyzed using the ABO Cast-Radiograph Evaluation. All data collection and analysis were completed by 1 evaluator. There were no statistically significant differences in the ABO Discrepancy Index or the ABO Cast-Radiograph Evaluation among the groups. Treatment times for the 3 groups were significantly different; the CAD/CAM group was the shortest at 13.8 ± 3.4 months, compared with 21.9 ± 5.0 and 16.9 ± 4.1 months for the direct bonded and indirect bonded groups, respectively. The number of treatment appointments for the CAD/CAM group was significantly fewer than for the direct bonded group. The CAD/CAM orthodontic bracket system evaluated in this study was as effective in treatment outcome measures as were standard brackets bonded both directly and indirectly. The CAD/CAM appliance was more efficient in regard to treatment duration, although the decrease in total archwire appointments was minimal. Further investigation is needed to better quantify the clinical benefits of CAD/CAM orthodontic

  10. Effects of moisture conditions of dental enamel surface on bond strength of brackets bonded with moisture-insensitive primer adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Toshiya; Ozoe, Rieko; Sanpei, Sugako; Shinkai, Koichi; Katoh, Yoshiroh; Shimooka, Shohachi

    2008-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the effects of different degrees of water contamination on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to dental enamel with a moisture-insensitive primer (MIP) adhesive system and to compare the modes of bracket/adhesive failure. A total of 68 human premolars were divided into four groups by primers and enamel surface conditions (desiccated, blot dry, and overwet). In group I, the hydrophobic Transbond XT primer adhesive system was used under desiccated conditions for bonding the brackets; in group II, the hydrophilic Transbond MIP adhesive system was used under desiccated conditions; in group III, the hydrophilic Transbond MIP adhesive system was used under blot dry conditions; and in group IV, the hydrophilic Transbond MIP adhesive system was used under overwet conditions. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine, and the mode of bracket/adhesive failure was determined according to the adhesive remnant index. The mean shear bond strengths were not significantly different among groups I, II, and III, and were higher than the clinically required range of 6 to 8 MPa. The mean shear bond strength achieved in group IV was significantly lower than that achieved in groups I, II, and III, and also lower than the clinically required values. Bond failure occurred at the enamel-adhesive interface more frequently in group IV than in groups I and III. To achieve clinically sufficient bond strengths with the hydrophilic MIP adhesive system, excess water should be blotted from the water-contaminated enamel surface.

  11. Three-dimensional quantitative analysis of adhesive remnants and enamel loss resulting from debonding orthodontic molar tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Tandecka, Katarzyna; Szatkiewicz, Tomasz; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Grocholewicz, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Aims Presenting a new method for direct, quantitative analysis of enamel surface. Measurement of adhesive remnants and enamel loss resulting from debonding molar tubes. Material and methods Buccal surfaces of fifteen extracted human molars were directly scanned with an optic blue-light 3D scanner to the nearest 2 μm. After 20 s etching molar tubes were bonded and after 24 h storing in 0.9% saline - debonded. Then 3D scanning was repeated. Superimposition and comparison were proceeded and shap...

  12. T-scan III system diagnostic tool for digital occlusal analysis in orthodontics - a modern approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpevska, Vesna; Kovacevska, Gordana; Benedeti, Alberto; Jordanov, Bozidar

    2014-01-01

    This systematic literature review was performed to establish the mechanism, methodology, characteristics, clinical application and opportunities of the T-Scan III System as a diagnostic tool for digital occlusal analysis in different fields of dentistry, precisely in orthodontics. Searching of electronic databases, using MEDLINE and PubMed, hand searching of relevant key journals, and screening of reference lists of included studies with no language restriction was performed. Publications providing statistically examined data were included for systematic review. Twenty potentially relevant Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) were identified. Only ten met the inclusion criteria. The literature demonstrates that using digital occlusal analysis with T-Scan III System in orthodontics has significant advantage with regard to the capability of measuring occlusal parameters in static positions and during dynamic of the mandible. Within the scope of this systematic review, there is evidence to support that T-Scan system is rapid and accurate in identifying the distribution of the tooth contacts and it shows great promise as a clinical diagnostic screening device for occlusion and for improving the occlusion after various dental treatments. Additional clinical studies are required to advance the indication filed of this system. Importance of using digital occlusal T-Scan analysis in orthodontics deserves further investigation.

  13. The effect of water on the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alyssa Yeager

    The gecko adhesive system is a dry, reversible adhesive that is virtually surface-insensitive due to the utilization of intermolecular van der Waals forces. Remarkably, although detailed models of the adhesive mechanism exist and hundreds of gecko-inspired synthetics have been fabricated, our ability to fully replicate the system still falls short. One reason for this is our limited understanding of how the system performs in natural environments. To begin to resolve this I focused on one particular environmental parameter, water. Although thin layers of water can disrupt van der Waals forces, I hypothesized that geckos are able to retain or regain adhesive function on wet surfaces. I was motivated to investigate this hypothesis because many species of gecko are native to the tropics, a climate where we expect surface water to be prevalent, thus it is likely geckos have some mechanism to overcome the challenges associated with surface water and wetting. Despite the challenge water should pose to adhesion, I found that when tested on hydrophobic substrates geckos cling equally well in air and water. Conversely, on wet hydrophilic substrates geckos cannot support their body weight. Investigating these results further, I found that the superhydrophobic nature of the adhesive toe pads allows geckos to form an air bubble around their foot, which when pressed into contact with a hydrophobic substrate likely removes water from the adhesive interface. When the toe pads are no longer superhydrophobic however, geckos cannot support their body weight and fall from substrates. In order to regain adhesion geckos only need to take about ten steps on a dry substrate to self-dry their toe pads. Finally, when measuring a dynamic component of adhesion, running, we found that geckos are able to maintain speed on misted hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrates, contrary to what we would predict based on static shear adhesion measurements. In conclusion, my research provides a detailed

  14. [Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 by Postnikov appliance, face mask and bracket system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikov, M A; Trunin, D A; Pankratova, N V; Nesterov, A M; Sadykov, M I; Ostankov, S A

    2018-01-01

    The diagnostics and treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 is an vital problem in orthodontics. Method of orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients with the help of improved and patented orthodontic construction - 'Postnikov appliance' - and face mask and bracket system is analysed in the article. Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III was examined in 24 patients aged 6-12 by the suggested method. All patients were examined clinically and with the help af additional diagnostic methods: head cephalometry in lateral position with further data analysis in Dolphin Imaging (USA). The use of computer technologies in Dolphin Imaging helps to controll the process of correction of dentition correlation in different stages of treatment, to reduce the period of treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 and to improve face esthetics and life quality ratio.

  15. Force systems in the initial phase of orthodontic treatment -- a comparison of different leveling arch wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuck, Lars-Michael; Drescher, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The determination of orthodontically-effective forces and moments places great demands on the technical equipment. Many patients report severe pain after fixed appliance insertion. Since it is assumed that pain from orthodontic appliances is associated with the force and moment levels applied to the teeth and since the occurrence of root resorption is a common therapeutic side effect, it would seem important to know the actual magnitudes of the components of the active orthodontic force systems. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure initial force systems produced by different leveling arch-wires in a complete multi-bracket appliance and to assess whether force and moment levels can be regarded as biologically acceptable or not. The actual bracket position in 42 patients was transferred onto a measurement model. Forces and moments produced by a super-elastic nickel-titanium (NiTi) archwire, a 6-strand stainless steel archwire, and a 7-strand super-elastic NiTi archwire were determined experimentally on different teeth. Average forces and moments produced by the super-elastic NiTi arch wires were found to be the highest. In spite if their larger diameter, the stranded arch wires' average force and moment levels were lower, especially that of the stranded super-elastic archwire. Nevertheless, maximum force levels sometimes exceeded recommended values in the literature and must be considered as too high. The measured arch wires' initial force systems differed significantly depending on the type of archwire and its material structure. Stranded arch wires produced lower force and moment levels, and we recommend their use in the initial phase of orthodontic treatment.

  16. Adhesive performance of a multi-mode adhesive system: 1-year in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Giulio; Frassetto, Andrea; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Apolonio, Fabianni; Diolosà, Marina; Cadenaro, Milena; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the adhesive stability over time of a multi-mode one-step adhesive applied using different bonding techniques on human coronal dentine. The hypotheses tested were that microtensile bond strength (μTBS), interfacial nanoleakage expression and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activation are not affected by the adhesive application mode (following the use of self-etch technique or with the etch-and-rinse technique on dry or wet dentine) or by ageing for 24h, 6 months and 1year in artificial saliva. Human molars were cut to expose middle/deep dentine and assigned to one of the following bonding systems (N=15): (1) Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE) self-etch mode, (2) Scotchbond Universal etch-and-rinse technique on wet dentine, (3) Scotchbond Universal etch-and-rinse technique on dry dentine, and (4) Prime&Bond NT (Dentsply De Trey) etch-and-rinse technique on wet dentine (control). Specimens were processed for μTBS test in accordance with the non-trimming technique and stressed to failure after 24h, 6 months or 1 year. Additional specimens were processed and examined to assay interfacial nanoleakage and MMP expression. At baseline, no differences between groups were found. After 1 year of storage, Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode and Prime&Bond NT showed higher μTBS compared to the other groups. The lowest nanoleakage expression was found for Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode, both at baseline and after storage. MMPs activation was found after application of each tested adhesive. The results of this study support the use of the self-etch approach for bonding the tested multi-mode adhesive system to dentine due to improved stability over time. Improved bonding effectiveness of the tested universal adhesive system on dentine may be obtained if the adhesive is applied with the self-etch approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Release of metal ions from fixed orthodontic appliance: an in vitro study in continuous flow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulewicz, Marcin; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Wołowiec, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the release of metal ions from fixed orthodontic appliances. A new system for in vitro testing of dental materials was constructed and consisted of a thermostatic glass reactor that enabled immersion of the studied material. Experimental conditions reflected the human oral cavity, with a temperature of 37°C and a saliva flow rate of 0.5mL/min. The simulated fixed orthodontic appliance made of stainless steel was evaluated. Sampling was performed at several time points during the 28-day study, and the metal ion concentration was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The total mass of released metal ions from the appliance during 4 weeks of the experiment was as follows nickel 18.7 μg, chromium 5.47 μg, copper 31.3 μg. The estimated doses of nickel, chromium, and copper determined by extrapolation of experimental data released during the treatment period were far below the toxic dose to humans. This shows that orthodontic treatment might not be a significant source of exposure to these metal ions.

  18. Outcomes of different Class II treatments : Comparisons using the American Board of Orthodontics Model Grading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci Cansunar, Hatice; Uysal, Tancan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of three different Class II treatment modalities followed by fixed orthodontic therapy, using the American Board of Orthodontics Model Grading System (ABO-MGS). As a retrospective study, files of patients treated at postgraduate orthodontic  clinics in different cities in Turkey was randomly selected. From 1684 posttreatment records, 669 patients were divided into three groups: 269 patients treated with extraction of two upper premolars, 198 patients treated with cervical headgear, and 202 patients treated with functional appliances. All the cases were evaluated by one researcher using ABO-MGS. The χ (2), Z test, and multivariate analysis of variance were used for statistical evaluation (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found among the groups in buccolingual inclination, overjet, occlusal relationship, and root angulation. However, there were significant differences in alignment, marginal ridge height, occlusal contact, interproximal contact measurements, and overall MGS average scores. The mean treatment time between the extraction and functional appliance groups was significantly different (p = 0.017). According to total ABO-MGS scores, headgear treatment had better results than functional appliances. The headgear group had better tooth alignment than the extraction group. Headgear treatment resulted in better occlusal contacts than the functional appliances and had lower average scores for interproximal contact measurements. Functional appliances had the worst average scores for marginal ridge height. Finally, the functional appliance group had the longest treatment times.

  19. Bonding stability of adhesive systems to eroded dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros CRUZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the immediate and 6 months microshear bond strength (µSBS of different adhesive systems to sound and eroded dentin. Sixty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated into two groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (erosive challenge following a pH cycling model comprising 4 ×/day Sprite Light® drink for 10 days. Then, specimens were reassigned according to the adhesive system: etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond, two-step self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond, or one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over pre-treated dentin and filled with resin composite (Z250. Half of the specimens were evaluated by the µSBS test after 24 h, and the other half 6 months later, after water storage at 37°C. Failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Data were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α = 0.05. After 6 months of water aging, marked reductions in µSBS values were observed, irrespective of the substrate. The µSBS values for eroded dentin were lower than those obtained for sound dentin. No difference in bonding effectiveness was observed among adhesive systems. For all groups, adhesive/mixed failure was observed. In conclusion, eroded dentin compromises the bonding quality of adhesive systems over time.

  20. Effect of nanotechnology in self-etch bonding systems on the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaza M. Hammad

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of silica dioxide (SiO2 nanofillers in different bonding systems on shear bond strength (SBS and mode of failure of orthodontic brackets at two experimental times. Methods: Ninety-six intact premolars were divided into four groups: A Conventional acid-etch and primer Transbond XT; B Transbond Plus self-etch primer; and two self-etch bonding systems reinforced with silica dioxide nanofiller at different concentrations: C Futurabond DC at 1%; D Optibond All-in-One at 7%. Each group was allocated into two subgroups (n = 12 according to experimental time (12 and 24 hours. SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine. ARI scores were determined under a stereomicroscope. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to determine the size and distribution of nanofillers. One-way ANOVA was used to compare SBS followed by the post-hoc Tukey test. The chi-square test was used to evaluate ARI scores. Results: Mean SBS of Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One were significantly lower than conventional system, and there were no significant differences between means SBS obtained with all self-etch bonding systems used in the study. Lower ARI scores were found for Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One. There was no significant difference of SBS and ARI obtained at either time points for all bonding systems. Relative homogeneous distribution of the fillers was observed with the bonding systems. Conclusion: Two nanofilled systems revealed the lowest bond strengths, but still clinically acceptable and less adhesive was left on enamel. It is advisable not to load the brackets immediately to the maximum.

  1. Effect of nanotechnology in self-etch bonding systems on the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Shaza M.; El-Wassefy, Noha; Maher, Ahmed; Fawakerji, Shafik M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of silica dioxide (SiO2) nanofillers in different bonding systems on shear bond strength (SBS) and mode of failure of orthodontic brackets at two experimental times. Methods: Ninety-six intact premolars were divided into four groups: A) Conventional acid-etch and primer Transbond XT; B) Transbond Plus self-etch primer; and two self-etch bonding systems reinforced with silica dioxide nanofiller at different concentrations: C) Futurabond DC at 1%; D) Optibond All-in-One at 7%. Each group was allocated into two subgroups (n = 12) according to experimental time (12 and 24 hours). SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine. ARI scores were determined under a stereomicroscope. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to determine the size and distribution of nanofillers. One-way ANOVA was used to compare SBS followed by the post-hoc Tukey test. The chi-square test was used to evaluate ARI scores. Results: Mean SBS of Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One were significantly lower than conventional system, and there were no significant differences between means SBS obtained with all self-etch bonding systems used in the study. Lower ARI scores were found for Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One. There was no significant difference of SBS and ARI obtained at either time points for all bonding systems. Relative homogeneous distribution of the fillers was observed with the bonding systems. Conclusion: Two nanofilled systems revealed the lowest bond strengths, but still clinically acceptable and less adhesive was left on enamel. It is advisable not to load the brackets immediately to the maximum. PMID:28444018

  2. A "typodont" study of rate of orthodontic space closure: self-ligating systems vs. conventional systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saporito, I; Butti, A C; Salvato, A; Biagi, R

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of space closure of two bracket systems, self-ligating and conventional ones, considering two systems with the same design and prescription. The experimental model of this study aims to identify in general if one type of system is more suitable for planning the extractive therapy, without considering the clinical aspect necessary for an adequate orthodontic approach. A resin maxilla without the first premolars was used to test the self-ligating and conventional brackets system. Space closure was achieved on 0.016x0.022" in stainless steel wires with nickel-titanium coil springs 150 grams in strength and 10 mm in length. Two experiment settings have been prepared. The first setting was made bonding conventional bracket on the right side and self-ligating on the left; the last one was made bonding self-ligating bracket on the right side and conventional on the left. All measurements (runs) have been repeated seven times for both settings. During the closing phase of extraction spaces both systems are equable since there are no significant statistical differences (P=0.70). Our typodont model showed no significant difference in the efficiency of space closure between the self-ligating bracket and conventional bracket tied with stainless steel ligatures.

  3. Comparison of the initial orthodontic force systems produced by a new lingual bracket system and a straight-wire appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuck, Lars-Michael; Wiechmann, Dirk; Drescher, Dieter

    2005-09-01

    Over the last few years, lingual appliances have become an established orthodontic treatment technique. Many studies have concentrated on various esthetic aspects, on laboratory and clinical procedures, and on patient comfort and compliance. The orthodontic force systems of these appliances, however, have not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was thus to determine the forces and moments produced by a new lingual bracket system during the leveling phase of orthodontic treatment and to compare those with the corresponding force system of a labial straight-wire appliance. The intra-oral situation of ten patients undergoing orthodontic treatment was replicated in measurement casts fitted with lingual and labial brackets. Special care was taken to precisely reproduce each patient's interbracket geometry. We measured each tooth's force systems as generated by a leveling arch inserted into the lingual and labial brackets. The resulting force systems of both appliances were found to be quite similar with regard to the magnitude of most force and moment components. Only the first molars were subjected to considerably greater single forces with the lingual appliance. Tipping moments were found to be significantly smaller with the lingual technique, whereas the rotational moments were significantly smaller with the labial appliance. All in all we noted significant differences between the two techniques only in certain areas which upon closer examination were distributed over only a few tooth types. The initial force systems produced by the new lingual bracket system proved to be comparable with those delivered by a conventional straight-wire appliance. The actual levels of forces and moments, however, were found in certain cases to be too heavy with both techniques. We therefore recommend the development of leveling wires producing considerably lighter forces and moments.

  4. Flexible and biocompatible high-performance solid-state micro-battery for implantable orthodontic system

    KAUST Repository

    Kutbee, Arwa T.

    2017-09-25

    To augment the quality of our life, fully compliant personalized advanced health-care electronic system is pivotal. One of the major requirements to implement such systems is a physically flexible high-performance biocompatible energy storage (battery). However, the status-quo options do not match all of these attributes simultaneously and we also lack in an effective integration strategy to integrate them in complex architecture such as orthodontic domain in human body. Here we show, a physically complaint lithium-ion micro-battery (236 μg) with an unprecedented volumetric energy (the ratio of energy to device geometrical size) of 200 mWh/cm3 after 120 cycles of continuous operation. Our results of 90% viability test confirmed the battery’s biocompatibility. We also show seamless integration of the developed battery in an optoelectronic system embedded in a three-dimensional printed smart dental brace. We foresee the resultant orthodontic system as a personalized advanced health-care application, which could serve in faster bone regeneration and enhanced enamel health-care protection and subsequently reducing the overall health-care cost.

  5. Microleakage of different adhesive systems in primary molars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and aim: This study aimed to examine the microleakage of class V cavities of primary molars prepared by either a conventional dental bur or Er:YAG laser and one of two different adhesive systems. Methods: A total of 50 tooth samples from primary molars were used in this study. They were randomly assigned ...

  6. Pharmacology of cell adhesion molecules of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiryushko, Darya; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play a pivotal role in the development and maintenance of the nervous system under normal conditions. They also are involved in numerous pathological processes such as inflammation, degenerative disorders, and cancer, making them attractive targets for drug...

  7. O efeito do jateamento do esmalte na força de adesão na colagem de braquetes The effect of air abrasion in enamel adhesion of orthodontic bracket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla D'Agostini Derech

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o propósito deste estudo in vitro foi avaliar o efeito do jateamento com óxido de alumínio na adesão de braquetes ortodônticos e compará-lo à tradicional técnica de condicionamento ácido do esmalte. METODOLOGIA: foram utilizados 80 dentes bovinos distribuídos aleatoriamente entre quatro grupos, sendo que a superfície do esmalte foi tratada da seguinte maneira: grupo 1 (somente jateamento com óxido de alumínio, grupo 2 (profilaxia com pedra-pomes e condicionamento com ácido, grupo 3 (jateamento com óxido de alumínio e condicionamento ácido e grupo 4 (somente condicionamento ácido. Após, foi aplicado sistema adesivo e o braquete colado com resina. Os corpos-de-prova foram submetidos ao teste de cisalhamento e análise do IAR. Aos resultados foram aplicados o teste de variância múltipla (ANOVA e a comparação entre pares (Tukey. Para a análise do IAR foi aplicado o teste Qui-quadrado. RESULTADOS: o grupo 1 apresentou a menor resistência ao cisalhamento (3,6MPa e o 3 a maior (13,27MPa. A análise Qui-quadrado do IAR demonstrou que o tratamento da superfície do esmalte tem influência sobre a quantidade de remanescente de resina sobre o esmalte e os grupos 3 e 4 apresentaram a maior quantidade de resina aderida. CONCLUSÕES: o jateamento de óxido de alumínio não deve ser o único procedimento utilizado no preparo da superfície do esmalte na colagem de braquetes, porém, quando associado ao condicionamento ácido, mostrou-se eficaz no aumento da retenção entre esmalte e resina. Novos estudos são necessários visando menor dano do esmalte e adesão satisfatória.AIM: The purpose of this study in vitro was to evaluate the effect of the air abrasion with Al-oxide in the adhesion of orthodontic brackets and compare with traditional technique of acid conditioning of the enamel. METHODS: Eighty bovine teeth distributed randomly between four groups had been used and the surface of the enamel was prepared in the

  8. Comparison of three-dimensional orthodontic load systems of different commercial archwires for space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Steven; Chen, Jie

    2012-03-01

    To experimentally quantify the effects of the loop design on three-dimensional orthodontic load systems of two types of commercial closing loop archwires: Teardrop and Keyhole. An orthodontic force tester and custom-made dentoform were used to measure the load systems produced on two teeth during simulated space closure. The system included three force components along and three moment components about three clinically defined axes on two target teeth: the left maxillary canine and the lateral incisor. The archwires were attached to the dentoform and were activated following a standard clinical procedure. The resulting six load components produced by the two archwires were reported and compared. The results were also compared with those of the T-loop archwire published previously. The three designs deliver similar loading patterns; however, the component magnitudes are dependent on the design. All of the designs result in lingual tipping of the teeth, canine lingual-mesial displacement, canine crown-mesial-in rotation, and incisor crown-distal-in rotation.

  9. Laser diagnostics in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkova, Anastasia V.; Lebedeva, Nina G.; Sedykh, Alexey V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Kharish, Natalia A.

    2003-10-01

    The results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra of intensity fluctuations of light, scattered from mucose membrane of oral cavity of healthy volunteers and patients, abused by the orthodontic diseases, are presented. Analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients, is carried out. New approach to monitoring of blood microcirculation in orthodontics is suggested. Influence of own noise of measuring system on formation of the speckle-interferometric signal is studied.

  10. Success rates of a skeletal anchorage system in orthodontics: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Raymond; Goonewardene, Mithran S; Allan, Brent P; Sugawara, Junji

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the premise that skeletal anchorage with SAS miniplates are highly successful and predictable for a range of complex orthodontic movements. This retrospective cross-sectional analysis consisted of 421 bone plates placed by one clinician in 163 patients (95 female, 68 male, mean age 29.4 years ± 12.02). Simple descriptive statistics were performed for a wide range of malocclusions and desired movements to obtain success, complication, and failure rates. The success rate of skeletal anchorage system miniplates was 98.6%, where approximately 40% of cases experienced mild complications. The most common complication was soft tissue inflammation, which was amenable to focused oral hygiene and antiseptic rinses. Infection occurred in approximately 15% of patients where there was a statistically significant correlation with poor oral hygiene. The most common movements were distalization and intrusion of teeth. More than a third of the cases involved complex movements in more than one plane of space. The success rate of skeletal anchorage system miniplates is high and predictable for a wide range of complex orthodontic movements.

  11. Association of orthodontic force system and root resorption: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Marina G; Meira, Josete B C; Cattaneo, Paolo M

    2015-05-01

    In this systematic review, we assessed the literature to determine which evidence level supports the association of orthodontic force system and root resorption. PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase databases were searched with no restrictions on year, publication status, or language. Selection criteria included human studies conducted with fixed orthodontic appliances or aligners, with at least 10 patients and the force system well described. A total of 259 articles were retrieved in the initial search. After the review process, 21 full-text articles met the inclusion criteria. Sample sizes ranged from 10 to 73 patients. Most articles were classified as having high evidence levels and low risks of bias. Although a meta-analysis was not performed, from the available literature, it seems that positive correlations exist between increased force levels and increased root resorption, as well as between increased treatment time and increased root resorption. Moreover, a pause in tooth movement seems to be beneficial in reducing root resorption because it allows the resorbed cementum to heal. The absence of a control group, selection criteria of patients, and adequate examinations before and after treatment are the most common methodology flaws. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Avaliação da atividade antimicrobiana de adesivo ortodôntico associado a verniz de clorexidina e timol na colagem de braquetes Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of orthodontic adhesive associated with chlorhexidine-thymol varnish in bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Freire de Carvalho Calabrich

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a atividade antimicrobiana da associação de um adesivo ortodôntico com um verniz de clorexidina e timol. MÉTODOS: foram utilizados 32 pré-molares humanos divididos em 4 grupos. O grupo 1 consistiu do grupo controle, no qual o adesivo utilizado para a colagem do braquete não estava associado a nenhum agente antimicrobiano. Os grupos 2, 3 e 4 foram colados com um sistema adesivo associado a um verniz de clorexidina e timol. Os grupos 3 e 4 foram armazenados em água por 7 dias e 30 dias, respectivamente, enquanto os corpos de prova do grupo 2 foram, logo depois da colagem, colocados em ágar semeado com Streptococcus mutans por 48h a 37ºC. RESULTADOS: os grupos experimentais, com exceção do grupo controle, apresentaram atividade antimicrobiana com tendência de redução do seu potencial de ação com maior tempo de imersão em água. CONCLUSÃO: a associação do verniz de clorexidina a um sistema adesivo utilizado em Ortodontia apresenta-se vantajosa pela sua atividade antimicrobiana.OBJECTIVE: To assess the antimicrobial activity resulting from the association of an orthodontic adhesive with chlorhexidine-thymol varnish. METHODS: Thirty-two extracted human premolars were used, divided into four groups. In Group 1, the control group, the adhesive used to bond the bracket was not associated with any antimicrobial agent. Groups 2, 3 and 4 were bonded with an adhesive system associated with chlorhexidine-thymol varnish. Groups 3 and 4 were stored in water for 7 days and 30 days, respectively, while the specimens from group 2 were, soon after bonding, placed on agar seeded with Streptococcus mutans for 48 hours, at 37º C. RESULTS: The experimental groups, with the exception of the control group, showed antimicrobial activity whose action tended to decline commensurately with the amount of time that they remained immersed in water. CONCLUSIONS: The association of chlorhexidine-thymol varnish with an adhesive system used in

  13. Evaluation of the antimicrobial and physical properties of an orthodontic photo-activated adhesive modified with an antiplaque agent: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjyot Singh

    2013-01-01

    Results: The findings indicated that (1 addition of chlorhexidine to the orthodontic composite resin enhanced its antimicrobial properties, (2 there was no significant difference between the bond strengths of the control and the experimental resins tested after 24 h and 25 days and (3 maximum release of chlorhexidine from the modified resin was much higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration level.

  14. Evaluation of cell responses toward adhesives with different photoinitiating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Krifka, Stephanie; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Bolay, Carola; Waha, Claudia; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Schmalz, Gottfried; Schweikl, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    The photoinitiator diphenyl-(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)phosphine oxide (TPO) is more reactive than a camphorquinone/amine (CQ) system, and TPO-based adhesives obtained a higher degree of conversion (DC) with fewer leached monomers. The hypothesis tested here is that a TPO-based adhesive is less toxic than a CQ-based adhesive. A CQ-based adhesive (SBU-CQ) (Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE) and its experimental counterpart with TPO (SBU-TPO) were tested for cytotoxicity in human pulp-derived cells (tHPC). Oxidative stress was analyzed by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by the expression of antioxidant enzymes. A dentin barrier test (DBT) was used to evaluate cell viability in simulated clinical circumstances. Unpolymerized SBU-TPO was significantly more toxic than SBU-CQ after a 24h exposure, and TPO alone (EC50=0.06mM) was more cytotoxic than CQ (EC50=0.88mM), EDMAB (EC50=0.68mM) or CQ/EDMAB (EC50=0.50mM). Cultures preincubated with BSO (l-buthionine sulfoximine), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, indicated a minor role of glutathione in cytotoxic responses toward the adhesives. Although the generation of ROS was not detected, a differential expression of enzymatic antioxidants revealed that cells exposed to unpolymerized SBU-TPO or SBU-CQ are subject to oxidative stress. Polymerized SBU-TPO was more cytotoxic than SBU-CQ under specific experimental conditions only, but no cytotoxicity was detected in a DBT with a 200μm dentin barrier. Not only DC and monomer-release determine the biocompatibility of adhesives, but also the cytotoxicity of the (photo-)initiator should be taken into account. Addition of TPO rendered a universal adhesive more toxic compared to CQ; however, this effect could be annulled by a thin dentin barrier. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Shear bond strength of hydrophilic adhesive systems to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, A T; Amaral, C M; Pimenta, L A; Sinhoreti, M A

    1999-08-01

    To compare the enamel shear bond strength of four hydrophilic adhesive systems: one multiple-bottle (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus), two one-bottle (Stae, Single Bond) and one self-etching (Etch & Prime). 120 bovine incisor teeth were obtained, embedded in polyester resin, polished to 600 grit to form standardized enamel surfaces, and randomly assigned to four groups (n = 30). Each adhesive system was used on enamel according to the manufacturer's instructions, and resin-based composite (Z100) cylinders with 3 mm diameter and 5 mm height were bonded. Specimens were stored in humid environment for 1 week, and bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The mean shear bond strength values (MPa +/- SD) were: Single Bond: 24.28 +/- 5.27 (a); Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus: 21.18 +/- 4.35 (ab); Stae: 19.56 +/- 4.71 (b); Etch & Prime 3.0: 15.13 +/- 4.92 (c). ANOVA revealed significant difference in means (P < 0.01) and Tukey's test showed the statistical differences that are expressed by different letters for each group. It could be concluded that the self-etching adhesive system did not provide as good a bond to enamel surface, as did the one- and multiple-bottle systems.

  16. Orthodontic scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic therapy apart from its benefits also has potential risks and limitations in terms of tissue damage. Fortunately, in orthodontics, risks are minimal and infrequent However, all potential risks and limitations should be considered and addressed when making the decision to undergo orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic treatment carries with it the risk of various types of soft and hard tissue damages (e.g. decalcification of enamel, lacerations, ulcerations, temporomandibular joint disorders, etc-, apart from treatment failure in itself. If correcting a malocclusion is to be of benefit, the advantages offered should outweigh any possible damage- All preventive procedures should be considered during and after orthodontic treatment to restore the normal health of soft and hard tissues. Hence, the orthodontist should be vigilant and prudent enough in assessing and monitoring every aspect of these tissues at any given stage and time in order to achieve a healthy and successful final result.

  17. Posttreatment and retention outcomes with and without periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics assessed using ABO objective grading system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J Ferguson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The posttreatment and retention outcomes following nonextraction orthodontic therapy, with and without corticotomy, were assessed using the American Board of Orthodontists objective grading system (OGS. Purpose: The purpose was to determine if the course of retention was any different following alveolar decortication and augmentation bone grafting, i.e., periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (PAOO. Materials and Methods: Study casts and panoramic radiographs of patients with and without PAOO (28 subjects each were selected on the basis of the following: (1 comprehensive nonextraction orthodontic treatment using straight wire edgewise appliances for Class I crowding, (2 availability of immediate posttreatment records and retention records at least 1 year post de-bracketing, and (3 use of Hawley removable retainers with similar wearing instructions. Results: Independent and paired t-test statistical testing revealed the following: (1 Posttreatment orthodontic outcomes were the same, with or without corticotomy. (2 During retention, 5 of 8 ABO grading criteria improved for the sample without corticotomy, and 6 of 8 ABO grading criteria improved for the group with corticotomy. (3 Retention outcome scores were lower (better for alignment and marginal ridges in the corticotomy-facilitated group. (4 The total score was significantly lower (better for the corticotomy group at retention and the increment of total score change decreased (improved significantly more during retention following corticotomy. Conclusions: The retention phase was more favorable following corticotomy because the amount of OGS total score change demonstrated a significantly improved retention outcome following PAOO therapy.

  18. Bond strength of dental adhesive systems irradiated with ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibo da Cruz, Adriana; Goncalves, Luciano de Souza; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Correr-Sobrinho, Lorenco; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Boscolo, Frab Norberto

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present paper was to determine the effect of different types of ionizing radiation on the bond strength of three different dentin adhesive systems. One hundred twenty specimens of 60 human teeth (protocol number: 032/2007) sectioned mesiodistally were divided into 3 groups according to the adhesives systems used: SB (Adper Single Bond Plus), CB (Clearfil SE Bond) and AP (Adper Prompt Self-Etch). The adhesives were applied on dentin and photo-activated using LED (Lec 1000, MMoptics, 1000 mW/cm2). Customized elastomer molds (0.5 mm thickness) with three orifices of 1.2 mm diameter were placed onto the bonding areas and filled with composite resin (Filtek Z-250), which was photo-activated for 20 s. Each group was subdivided into 4 subgroups for application of the different types of ionizing radiation: ultraviolet radiation (UV), diagnostic x-ray radiation (DX), therapeutic x-ray radiation (TX) and without irradiation (control group, CG). Microshear tests were carried out (Instron, model 4411), and afterwards the modes of failure were evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscope and classified using 5 scores: adhesive failure, mixed failures with 3 significance levels, and cohesive failure. The results of the shear bond strength test were submitted to ANOVA with Tukey's test and Dunnett's test, and the data from the failure pattern evaluation were analyzed with the Mann Whitney test (p = 0.05). No change in bond strength of CB and AP was observed after application of the different radiation types, only SB showed increase in bond strength after UV (p = 0.0267) irradiation. The UV also changed the failure patterns of SB (p = 0.0001). The radio-induced changes did not cause degradation of the restorations, which means that they can be exposed to these types of ionizing radiation without weakening the bond strength.

  19. Effect of nanotechnology in self-etch bonding systems on the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Hammad, Shaza M.; El-Wassefy, Noha; Maher, Ahmed; Fawakerji, Shafik M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of silica dioxide (SiO2) nanofillers in different bonding systems on shear bond strength (SBS) and mode of failure of orthodontic brackets at two experimental times. Methods: Ninety-six intact premolars were divided into four groups: A) Conventional acid-etch and primer Transbond XT; B) Transbond Plus self-etch primer; and two self-etch bonding systems reinforced with silica dioxide nanofiller at different concentrations: C) Futurabond DC at 1%; D...

  20. The selection of adhesive systems for resin-based luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carville, Rebecca; Quinn, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The use of resin-based luting agents is ever expanding with the development of adhesive dentistry. A multitude of different adhesive systems are used with resin-based luting agents, and new products are introduced to the market frequently. Traditional adhesives generally required a multiple step bonding procedure prior to cementing with active resin-based luting materials; however, combined agents offer a simple application procedure. Self-etching 'all-in-one' systems claim that there is no need for the use of a separate adhesive process. The following review addresses the advantages and disadvantages of the available adhesive systems used with resin-based luting agents.

  1. Problems in Standardization of Orthodontic Shear Bond Strength Tests; A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. A. Akhoundi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Bonding brackets to the enamel surface has gained much popularity today. New adhesive systems have been introduced and marketed and a considerable increase in research regarding bond strength has been published. A considerable amount of these studies deal with shear bond strength of adhesives designed for orthodontic purpose.Previous studies have used variety of test designs. This diversity in test design is due to the fact that there is no standard method for evaluating shear bond strength in orthodontics. Therefore comparison of data obtained from different study is almost impossible.This article tries to briefly discuss the developments occurred in the process of shear bond strength measurement of orthodontic adhesives with an emphasis on the type of test set up and load application.Although the test designs for measuring shear bond strength in orthodontics are still far from ideal, attempts must be made to standardize these tests especially in order to makecomparison of different data easier. It is recommended that test designs be set up in such a manner that better matches with the purpose of the study.

  2. In vitro antibacterial activity of adhesive systems on Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradella, Thaís Cachuté; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the antibacterial activity of three adhesive systems -- Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB), Clearfil SE Bond (CS) and One Up Bond F (OU) -- on Streptococcus mutans in vitro. Adherence and agar disk-diffusion tests were performed. For the adherence testing, 40 human enamel specimens (4 mm2) were sterilized and the adhesive sytems were applied (n = 10). The control group did not receive the application of any adhesive system. Specimens were immersed in brain heart infusion broth (BHI) inoculated with S. mutans standardized suspension (10(6) cells/ml) for 48 h at 37 degrees C and 5% CO2. The number of S. mutans cells adhered to each specimen was evaluated by the plating method on BHI agar. For agar disk-diffusion testing, adhesive disks and disks soaked in distilled water (negative control) or 0.2% chlorexidine (positive control) were incubated with S. mutans for 48 h. The diameters of the zones of bacterial inhibition were measured. Adherence data were transformed in logarithms of base 10 (log10). Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Student-Neuman-Keuls tests at the 5% level of significance. The results of the adherence test showed that One Up Bond F (OU) and Clearfil SE Bond (CS) did not differ significantly from one another, but allowed significantly less adherence than Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB) and control [mean log10 (standard deviation) values: PB 6.10 (0.19); CS primer 4.55 (0.98); OU 4.65 (0.54); control group 6.34 (0.27)]. The disk-diffusion test showed no significant difference between OU (diameter in mm: 3.02 +/- 0.13) and CS (3.0 +/- 0.12), but both were significantly more effective in inhibiting bacterial growth than PB (1.0 +/- 0.10). The self-etching systems Clearfil SE Bond and One Up Bond F presented a greater inhibitory effect against S. mutans, also in terms of adherence, than did the conventional system, Prime & Bond 2.1.

  3. Leakage testing for different adhesive systems and composites to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teeth were randomly assigned to six groups of 14 teeth each as follows: The first group – etch‑rinse adhesive applied and cavities filled with flowable composite, the second group – etch‑rinse adhesive applied and cavities filled with bulk‑fill resin composite, the third group – one‑stage self‑etch (SE) adhesive applied ...

  4. Microleakage of hydrophilic adhesive systems in Class V composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, C M; Hara, A T; Pimenta, L A; Rodrigues, A L

    2001-02-01

    To investigate the microleakage of four hydrophilic adhesive systems: one "multiple-bottles" (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus); two "one-bottle" (Single Bond, Stae); and one self-etching (Etch & Prime 3.0). 120 bovine incisor teeth were divided into four groups (n = 30) and Class V cavities were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction. The cavities were restored with the adhesive systems and with Z100 composite. The teeth were thermocycled 1,000 times between 5+/-2 degrees C and 55+/-2 degrees C with a dwell time of 1 min, and then placed in a 2% methylene blue dye (pH 7.0) for 4 hrs, washed and sectioned vertically through the center of the restorations. The qualitative evaluation was made by three examiners who distributed pre-established scores (0-4) for each tooth using a stereomicroscope at x30 magnification. In enamel margins little microleakage was observed and the Kruskal-Wallis analysis did not show differences. In dentin margins the Kruskal-Wallis and multiple comparison analyses were applied: microleakage was significantly greater with Stae (median 3) and Scotchbond MP Plus (median 4). Single Bond (median 1) and Etch & Prime 3.0 (median 2) showed the best results in dentin margins, and the statistical analysis did not demonstrate differences in microleakage among these groups.

  5. Laser debonding of ceramic orthodontic brackets: a theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Kristine L.; Marangoni, Roy D.; Rickabaugh, Jeff L.

    1992-06-01

    Ceramic brackets are an esthetic substitute for conventional stainless steel brackets in orthodontic patients. However, ceramic brackets are more brittle and have higher bond strengths which can lead to bracket breakage and enamel damage during debonding. It has been demonstrated that various lasers can facilitate ceramic bracket removal. One mechanism with the laser is through the softening of the bracket adhesive. The high energy density from the laser on the bracket and adhesive can have a resultant deleterious thermal effect on the pulp of the tooth which may lead to pulpal death. A theoretical computer model of bracket, adhesive, enamel and dentin has been generated for predicting heat flow through this system. Heat fluxes at varying intensities and modes have been input into the program and the resultant temperatures at various points or nodes were determined. Further pursuit should lead to optimum parameters for laser debonding which would have minimal effects on the pulp.

  6. Periodontal health status in patients treated with the Invisalign(®) system and fixed orthodontic appliances: A 3 months clinical and microbiological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrini, Luca; Mangano, Alessandro; Montanari, Paola; Margherini, Silvia; Caprioglio, Alberto; Abbate, Gian Marco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the periodontal health and the microbiological changes via real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in patients treated with fixed orthodontic appliances and Invisalign(®) system (Align Technology, Santa Clara, California). Seventy-seven patients were enrolled in this study and divided into three groups (Invisalign(®) group, fixed orthodontic appliances group and control group). Plaque index, probing depth, bleeding on probing were assessed. Total biofilm mass and periodontal pathogens were analyzed and detected via real-time PCR. All these data were analyzed at the T0 (beginning of the treatment) T1 (1-month) and T2 (3 months); and statistically compared using the Mann-Whitney test for independent groups. After 1-month and after 3 months of treatment there was only one sample with periodontopathic anaerobes found in patient treated using fixed orthodontic appliances. The Invisalign(®) group showed better results in terms of periodontal health and total biofilm mass compared to the fixed orthodontic appliance group. A statistical significant difference (P < 0.05) at the T2 in the total biofilm mass was found between the two groups. Patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with the Invisalign(®) System show a superior periodontal health in the short-term when compared to patients in treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Invisalign(®) should be considered as a first treatment option in patients with risk of developing periodontal disease.

  7. A Comparison of the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded With Light-Emitting Diode and Halogen Light-Curing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM. Abtahi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the problem: Various methods such as light emitting diode (LED have been used to enhance the polymerization of resin-based orthodontic adhesives. There is a lack of information on the advantages and disadvantages of different light curing systems.Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of LED and halogen light curing systems on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human premolars were etched with 37% phosphoric acid and cleansed with water spray and air dried. The sealant was applied on the tooth surface and the brackets were bonded using Transbond adhesive (3M Unitek,Monrovia, Calif. Adhesives were cured for 40 and 20 seconds with halogen (Blue Light, APOZA, Taiwan and LED (Blue dent, Smart, Yugoslavia light-curing systems,respectively. Specimens were thermocycled 2500 times (from 5 to 55 °C and the shear bond strength of the adhesive system was evaluated with an Universal testing machine (Zwick GmbH, Ulm, Germany at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until the bracketswere detached from the tooth. Adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were determined after bracket failure. The data were submitted to statistical analysis, using Mann-Whitney analysis and t-test.Results: No significant difference was found in bond strength between the LED and halogen groups (P=0.12. A significant difference was not observed in the adhesive remnant index scores between the two groups (P=0.97.Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the shear bond strength of resin-based orthodontic adhesives cured with a LED was statistically equivalent to those cured with a conventional halogen-based unit. LED light-curing units can be suggested for the polymerization of orthodontic bonding adhesives.

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Orthodontic Cement Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles Adjacent to Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Eldad; Sharabi, Revital; Eden, Adi; Zabrovsky, Asher; Ben-Gal, Gilad; Sharon, Esi; Pietrokovski, Yoav; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Beyth, Nurit

    2018-03-27

    Enamel demineralization is a common problem found in patients using orthodontic devices, such as orthodontic braces. It was found that Streptoccocus mutans growth increases adjacent to orthodontic devices, which may result in caries development. Incorporated antibacterial quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI) nanoparticles were previously shown to be highly efficacious against various bacteria. Combining antibacterial materials in orthodontic cement may be advantageous to prevent bacterial outgrowth adjacent to orthodontic brackets. The aim was to evaluate the efficiency of orthodontic cement containing QPEI nanoparticles in reducing S. mutans and Lactobacillus casei outgrowth adjacent to orthodontic brackets. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the buccal surfaces of extracted lower incisors. The antibacterial effect on S. mutans and L. casei outgrowth of Neobond bracket adhesive orthodontic cement with and without QPEI nanoparticles was compared. The antibacterial effect was evaluated using crystal violet staining and bacterial count (CFU/mL). The teeth in the experimental group, with the QPEI nanoparticles cement, showed significantly lower optical density (OD) values and CFU counts of S. mutans and L. casei than the teeth in the control group ( p brackets.

  9. Systemic levels of metallic ions released from orthodontic mini-implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Liliane Siqueira; Serra, Glaucio Guimarães; Albuquerque Palermo, Elisabete Fernandes; Andrade, Leonardo Rodrigues; Müller, Carlos Alberto; Meyers, Marc André; Elias, Carlos Nelson

    2009-04-01

    Orthodontic mini-implants are a potential source of metallic ions to the human body because of the corrosion of titanium (Ti) alloy in body fluids. The purpose of this study was to gauge the concentration of Ti, aluminum (Al), and vanadium (V), as a function of time, in the kidneys, livers, and lungs of rabbits that had Ti-6Al-4V alloy orthodontic mini-implants placed in their tibia. Twenty-three New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: control, 1 week, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks. Four orthodontic mini-implants were placed in the left proximal tibia of 18 rabbits. Five control rabbits had no orthodontic mini-implants. After 1, 4, and 12 weeks, the rabbits were killed, and the selected tissues were extracted and prepared for analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Low amounts of Ti, Al, and V were detectable in the 1-week, 4-weeks, and 12-weeks groups, confirming that release of these metals from the mini-implants occurs, with diffusion and accumulation in remote organs. Despite the tendency of ion release when using the Ti alloy as orthodontic mini-implants, the amounts of metals detected were significantly below the average intake of these elements through food and drink and did not reach toxic concentrations.

  10. Does systemic administration of casein phosphopeptides affect orthodontic movement and root resorption in rats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Lachlan; Shen, Gang; Almuzian, Mohammed; Jones, Allan; Walsh, William; Oliver, Rema; Petocz, Peter; Tarraf, Nour E; Darendeliler, M Ali

    2017-10-01

    To assess the potential effects of casein phosphopeptides (CPPs) on orthodontically induced iatrogenic root resorption (OIIRR) and orthodontic teeth movement. Forty Wistar rats (aged 11 weeks) were randomly divided into experimental group (EG; n = 20) that received a diet supplemented with CPP and control group (CG; n = 20) devoid of diet supplement. A 150 g force was applied using nickel titanium (NiTi) coil that was bonded on maxillary incisors and extended unilaterally to a maxillary first molar. At Day 28, animals in both groups were euthanized. Volumetric assessment of root resorption craters and linear measurement of maxillary first molars movement were blindly examined using a micro-computed tomography scan. Nine rats were excluded from the experiment due to loss during general anesthesia or appliances' failure. Intra-operator reproducibility was high in both volumetric and linear measurements, 92.8 per cent and 98.5-97.6 per cent, respectively. The results reveal that dietary CPP has statistically insignificant effect on the overall OIIRR and orthodontic movement. CPP seems to have statistically insignificant effect on the volume of OIIRR and orthodontic movement in rats. A long-term study with larger sample size using a different concentration of CPP is required to clarify the dentoalveolar effect of CPP. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Comparison of two different debonding techniques in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Luca; Migliau, Guido; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio; Di Giorgio, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate whether and how the adhesive bond failure site varied in relation to the material used for the orthodontic bonding and debonding technique applied. Two different methods of orthodontic debonding were included in our survey; cutters for orthodontics and debonding plier. Three different materials for the adhesion of the bracket: composite light curing, self-curing composite and glass ionomer cement. The remaining amount of adhesive on the tooth surface is an important parameter that gives information on how the location of the posting site varied during the debonding. 60 dental elements, maxillary and mandibular, previously extracted for orthodontic reasons, as well as periodontal, were included in our research. We investigated a possible significant correlation between different variables (debonding technique and materials for membership) and the ARI index. The use of orthodontic cutters or debonding pliers does not affect the adhesive bond failure site and both techniques have a tendency to leave a significant amount of adhesive on the surface enamel. In the resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements, detachment occurs at the interface enamel-adhesive and this pattern of detachment increases the risk of the enamel damage during debonding. In both types of composite resins (photopolymerizable or self-curing), the detachment occurs at the interface bracketing adhesive. In this case the amount of remaining adhesive material on the tooth must be removed with further methods, which in addition, increase the risk of iatrogenic injury as well as the working hours.

  12. Shear bond strength evaluation of chemically-cured and light-cured orthodontic adhesives after enamel deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, J. C.; Krisnawati; Purbiati, M.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of enamel deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) before etching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of Unite (UN; 3M Unitek) and Xihu-BIOM adhesive (XB). Fifty-two maxillary first premolars were divided into four groups: (1) UN and (2) XB according to manufacturer’s recommendation and (3) UN and (4) XB deproteinized with 5.25% NaOCl. Brackets were bonded, and a mechanical test was performed using a universal testing machine. The mean SBS value for groups A1, A2, B1, and B2 was 13.51 ± 2.552, 14.36 ± 2.902, 16.43 ± 2.615, and 13.05 ± 2.348 MPa, respectively. A statistically significant difference in SBSs was observed between chemically cured groups and between group B (p 0.05). NaOCl enamel deproteinization before acid etching has a significant effect on the SBS of Unite adhesive, but not on that of the Xihu-BIOM adhesive. Furthermore, a significant difference in the SBS of Unite and Xihu-BIOM adhesives within the enamel deproteinization group was observed in this study.

  13. In Vitro Cytotoxicity Assessment of an Orthodontic Composite Containing Titanium-dioxide Nano-particles

    OpenAIRE

    Farzin Heravi; Mohammad Ramezani; Maryam Poosti; Mohsen Hosseini; Arezoo Shajiei; Farzaneh Ahrari

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Incorporation of nano-particles to orthodontic bonding systems has been considered to prevent enamel demineralization around appliances. This study investigated cytotoxicity of Transbond XT adhesive containing 1 wt% titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano-particles. Materials and methods. Ten composite disks were prepared from each of the conventional and TiO2-containg composites and aged for 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM). The extrac...

  14. In Vitro Cytotoxicity Assessment of an Orthodontic Composite Containing Titanium-dioxide Nano-particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Heravi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Incorporation of nano-particles to orthodontic bonding systems has been considered to prevent enamel demineralization around appliances. This study investigated cytotoxicity of Transbond XT adhesive containing 1 wt% titanium dioxide (TiO2 nano-particles. Materials and methods. Ten composite disks were prepared from each of the conventional and TiO2-containg composites and aged for 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM. The extracts were obtained and exposed to culture media of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF and mouse L929 fibroblasts. Cell viability was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Results. Both adhesives were moderately toxic for HGF cells on the first day of the experiment, but the TiO2-containing adhesive produced significantly lower toxicity than the pure adhesive (P0.05. There was a significant reduction in cell toxicity with increasing pre-incubation time (P<0.001. L929 cells showed similar toxicity trends, but lower sensitivity to detect cytotoxicity of dental composites. Conclusion. The orthodontic adhesive containing TiO2 nano-particles indicated comparable or even lower toxicity than its nano-particle-free counterpart, indicating that incorporation of 1 wt% TiO2 nano-particles to the composite structure does not result in additional health hazards compared to that occurring with the pure adhesive.

  15. Surgical orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, Alexis M; Vitkus, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    The article reviews some commonly used orthodontic treatments as well as new strategies to assist in the correction of malocclusion. Many techniques are used in conjunction with surgical intervention and are a necessary compliment to orthognathic surgery. Basic knowledge of these practices will aid in the surgeon's ability to adequately treat the patient. Many orthodontists and surgeons are eliminating presurgical orthodontics to adopt a strategy of 'surgery first' orthodontics in orthognathic surgery. This has the benefit of immediate improvement in facial aesthetics and shorter treatment times. The advent of virtual surgical planning has helped facilitate the development of this new paradigm by making surgical planning faster and easier. Furthermore, using intraoperative surgical navigation is improving overall precision and outcomes. A variety of surgical and nonsurgical treatments may be employed in the treatment of malocclusion. It is important to be familiar with all options available and tailor the patient's treatment plan accordingly. Surgery-first orthodontics, intraoperative surgical navigation, virtual surgical planning, and 3D printing are evolving new techniques that are producing shorter treatment times and subsequently improving patient satisfaction without sacrificing long-term stability.

  16. University clinic and private practice treatment outcomes in Class I extraction and nonextraction patients: A comparative study with the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislik, Barbara; Konstantonis, Dimitrios; Katsadouris, Alexios; Eliades, Theodore

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes in university vs private practice settings with Class I patients using the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System. A parent sample of 580 Class I patients treated with and without extractions of 4 first premolars was subjected to discriminant analysis to identify a borderline spectrum of 66 patients regarding the extraction modality. Of these patients, 34 were treated in private orthodontic practices, and 32 were treated in a university graduate orthodontic clinic. The treatment outcomes were evaluated using the 8 variables of the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System. The total scores ranged from 10 to 47 (mean, 25.44; SD, 9.8) for the university group and from 14 to 45 (mean, 25.94; SD, 7.7) for the private practice group. The university group achieved better scores for the variables of buccolingual inclination (mean difference, 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.59, 3.98; P = 0.01) and marginal ridges (mean difference, 1.32; 95% CI, 0.28, 2.36; P = 0.01), and the private practice group achieved a better score for the variable of root angulation (mean difference, -0.65; 95% CI, -1.26, -0.03; P = 0.04). However, no statistically intergroup differences were found between the total American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System scores (mean difference, -0.5; 95% CI, -3.82, 4.82; P = 0.82). Patients can receive similar quality of orthodontic treatment in a private practice and a university clinic. The orthodontists in the private practices were more successful in angulating the roots properly, whereas the orthodontic residents accomplished better torque control of the posterior segments and better marginal ridges. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-term occlusal changes assessed by the American Board of Orthodontics' model grading system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aszkler, Robert M; Preston, Charles B; Saltaji, Humam; Tabbaa, Sawsan

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term posttreatment changes in all criteria of the American Board of Orthodontics' (ABO) model grading system. We used plaster models from patients' final and posttreatment records. Thirty patients treated by 1 orthodontist using 1 bracket prescription were selected. An initial discrepancy index for each subject was performed to determine the complexity of each case. The final models were then graded using the ABO's model grading system immediately at posttreatment and postretention. Statistical analysis was performed on the 8 criteria of the model grading system, including paired t tests and Pearson correlations. An alpha of 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The average length of time between the posttreatment and postretention records was 12.7 ± 4.4 years. It was shown that alignment and rotations worsened by postretention (P = 0.014), and a weak statistically significant correlation at posttreatment and postretention was found (0.44; P = 0.016). Both marginal ridges and occlusal contacts scored less well at posttreatment. These criteria showed a significant decrease in scores between posttreatment and postretention (P <0.001), but the correlations were not statistically significant. The average total score showed a significant decrease between posttreatment and postretention (P <0.001), partly because of the large decrease in the previous 2 criteria. Higher scores for occlusal contacts and marginal ridges were found at the end of treatment; however, those scores and the overall scores for the 30 subjects improved in the postretention phase. Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  18. Effect of double-layer application on bond quality of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Satoshi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Imai, Arisa; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Nakatsuka, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of double-layer application of universal adhesives on the bond quality and compare to other adhesive systems. Two universal adhesives used were in this study: Scotchbond Universal (SU), [3M ESPE] and Prime & Bond elect (PE), [Dentsply Caulk]. The conventional single-step self-etch adhesives G-ӕnial Bond (GB), [GC Corporation.] and BeautiBond (BB), [Shofu Inc.], and a two-step self-etch adhesive, Optibond XTR (OX), [Kerr Corporation], were used as comparison adhesives. Shear bond strengths (SBS) and shear fatigue strengths (SFS) to human enamel and dentin were measured in single application mode and double application mode. For each test condition, 15 specimens were prepared for SBS testing and 30 specimens for SFS testing. Enamel and dentin SBS of the universal adhesives in the double application mode were significantly higher than those of the single application mode. In addition, the universal adhesives in the double application mode had significantly higher dentin SFS values than those of the single application mode. The two-step self-etch adhesive OX tended to have lower bond strengths in the double application mode, regardless of the test method or adherent substrate. The double application mode is effective in enhancing SBS and SFS of universal adhesives, but not conventional two-step self-etch adhesives. These results suggest that, although the double application mode may enhance the bonding quality of a universal adhesive, it may be counter-productive for two-step self-etch adhesives in clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily in the Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Pedersen, Martin Volmer; Berezin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are proteins mediating cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. CAMs are traditionally divided into four groups, the cadherins, the selectins, the integrins and CAMs belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF). The present chapter describes...... CAMs belonging to IgSF, that exclusively or in part, are expressed in the nervous system. The chapter includes descriptions of myelin protein zero (P0), integrin-associated protein (CD47), neuroplastin, activated leukocyte-cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM......), myelinassociated glycoprotein (MAG), the neural cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (NCAM, NCAM2), Down Syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) and Down Syndrome cell adhesion molecule-like-1 (DSCAML1), sidekick 1 and 2 (SDK1, SDK2), signal-regulatory proteins (SIRPs), nectins, nectin-like proteins (necls...

  20. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type

    OpenAIRE

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4th and 5th generation) to self-etch (6th, 7th and 8th generation) systems. Currently, bon...

  1. A role for the fibrinolytic system in postsurgical adhesion formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellebrekers, Bart W. J.; Emeis, Jef J.; Kooistra, Teake; Trimbos, J. Baptist; Moore, Norma R.; Zwinderman, Koos H.; Trimbos-Kemper, Trudy C. M.

    2005-01-01

    To look for evidence of a fibrinolytic insufficiency as a cause of adhesion formation. Retrospective and prospective study. University medical center. Retrospective study: 50 patients undergoing laparoscopy, divided into patients with and without endometriosis. Prospective study: 18 patients

  2. Dentine bond strength and antimicrobial activity evaluation of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Carolina Bosso; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo Almeida; Duque, Thais Mageste; Stipp, Rafael Nobrega; Chan, Daniel Chi Ngai; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the dentine bond strength (BS) and the antibacterial activity (AA) of six adhesives against strict anaerobic and facultative bacteria. Three adhesives containing antibacterial components (Gluma 2Bond (glutaraldehyde)/G2B, Clearfil SE Protect (MDPB)/CSP and Peak Universal Bond (PUB)/chlorhexidine) and the same adhesive versions without antibacterial agents (Gluma Comfort Bond/GCB, Clearfil SE Bond/CSB and Peak LC Bond/PLB) were tested. The AA of adhesives and control groups was evaluated by direct contact method against four strict anaerobic and four facultative bacteria. After incubation, according to the appropriate periods of time for each microorganism, the time to kill microorganisms was measured. For BS, the adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' recommendations and teeth restored with composite. Teeth (n=10) were sectioned to obtain bonded beams specimens, which were tested after artificial saliva storage for one week and one year. BS data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Saliva storage for one year reduces the BS only for GCB. In general G2B and GCB required at least 24h for killing microorganisms. PUB and PLB killed only strict anaerobic microorganisms after 24h. For CSP the average time to eliminate the Streptococcus mutans and strict anaerobic oral pathogens was 30 min. CSB showed no AA against facultative bacteria, but had AA against some strict anaerobic microorganisms. Storage time had no effect on the BS for most of the adhesives. The time required to kill bacteria depended on the type of adhesive and never was less than 10 min. Most of the adhesives showed stable bond strength after one year and the Clearfil SE Protect may be a good alternative in restorative procedures performed on dentine, considering its adequate bond strength and better antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of clinical outcomes of Roth and MBT bracket prescription using the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is always a need to assess whether small changes in bracket prescription can lead to visually detectable differences in tooth positions. However, with little clinical evidence to show advantages of any of the popularly used bracket systems, orthodontists are forced to make clinical decisions with little scientific guidance. Aim: To compare the orthodontic cases finished with Roth and MBT prescription using American Board of Orthodontics-Objective Grading System (ABO-OGS. Settings and Design: Department of Orthodontics, Post-graduate dental college, retrospective cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: Forty patients selected were divided into two groups of 20 patients each finished with straight wire appliance using Roth and MBT prescription, respectively. The examiner ability was assessed and calibrated by one of the ABO certified clinician to grade cases using the OGS. Statistical Analysis: Unpaired student t-test was used and P < 0.05 was accepted as significant. Results and Conclusions: MBT bracket group had a lower score of 2.60 points in buccolingual inclination and lower score of 1.10 points in occlusal contact category that was statistically significant when compared with Roth group. The difference in total ABO-OGS score was 2.65 points showing that the outcome for the MBT prescription was better than that of the Roth prescription, which is statistically significant, but with little or no clinical significance. It can be concluded that use of either one of the Roth and MBT bracket prescriptions have no impact to the overall clinical outcome and quality of treatment entirely depends on clinician judgment and experience.

  4. Clinical Evaluation of a Self-Etch Adhesive System in Non-Carious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical performance of a selfetch adhesive system – Adper's Prompt L-Pop in noncarious cervical lesions over a six months period. Method: One hundred and eighty-one (181) restorations were placed by one operator for 35 patients. The self-etch adhesive was applied to the cavity and composite ...

  5. Craniofacial orthodontics and postgraduate orthodontic training in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The least clinical experience was recorded in pre-bone graft orthodontics (7.4%) and orthodontic preparation for orthognathic surgery (5.5%). Some of the challenges highlighted by the residents were low patients turn out for orthodontic care and the absence of multidisciplinary treatment for craniofacial patients in their ...

  6. Salivary contamination during bonding procedures with a one-bottle adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, U B; Finger, W J; Stean, H

    1998-09-01

    The effect of salivary contamination of enamel and dentin on bonding efficacy of an experimental one-bottle resin adhesive was investigated. The adhesive was a light-curing urethane dimethacrylate/hydroxyethyl methacrylate/4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride mixture dissolved in acetone. Evaluation parameters were shear bond strength and marginal gap width in a dental cavity. Apart from a control group without contamination (group 1), etched enamel and dentin were (2) contaminated with saliva and air dried; (3) contaminated, rinsed, and blot dried; (4) coated with adhesive, contaminated, rinsed, and blot dried; (5) coated with adhesive, light cured, contaminated, rinsed, and air dried; or (6) treated as in group 5, with additional adhesive application after air drying. There was no negative effect in groups 3 and 4, compared with control. Air drying after salivary contamination (group 2) resulted in low shear bond strengths and wide marginal gaps. Contamination of the cured adhesive layer (groups 5 and 6) had no adverse effect on enamel shear bond strengths, but resulted in 50% reduced dentin shear bond strengths and wide marginal gaps. The one-bottle adhesive system is relatively insensitive to salivary contamination, provided that the contamination occurs prior to light curing of the adhesive and is carefully rinsed and blot dried. Salivary contact after adhesive curing must be avoided.

  7. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha de Souza Gomes Stumpf

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. METHODS: Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  8. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Aisha de Souza Gomes; Bergmann, Carlos; Prietsch, José Renato; Vicenzi, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests) demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared, but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  9. Adhesive Bonding for Optical Metrology Systems in Space Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohlke, Martin; Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus; Döringshoff, Klaus; Peters, Achim; Johann, Ulrich; Weise, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Laser based metrology systems become more and more attractive for space applications and are the core elements of planned missions such as LISA (NGO, eLISA) or NGGM where laser interferometry is used for distance measurements between satellites. The GRACE-FO mission will for the first time demonstrate a Laser Ranging Instrument (LRI) in space, starting 2017. Laser based metrology also includes optical clocks/references, either as ultra-stable light source for high sensitivity interferometry or as scientific payload e.g. proposed in fundamental physics missions such as mSTAR (mini SpaceTime Asymmetry Research), a mission dedicated to perform a Kennedy-Thorndike experiment on a satellite in a low-Earth orbit. To enable the use of existing optical laboratory setups, optimization with respect to power consumption, weight and dimensions is necessary. At the same time the thermal and structural stability must be increased. Over the last few years we investigated adhesive bonding of optical components to thermally highly stable glass ceramics as an easy-to-handle assembly integration technology. Several setups were implemented and tested for potential later use in space applications. We realized a heterodyne LISA related interferometer with demonstrated noise levels in the pm-range for translation measurement and nano-radiant-range for tilt measurements and two iodine frequency references on Elegant Breadboard (EBB) and Engineering Model (EM) level with frequency stabilities in the 10 -15 range for longer integration times. The EM setup was thermally cycled and vibration tested. (paper)

  10. Validation of the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System for assessing the treatment outcomes of Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guang-Ying; Baumrind, Sheldon; Zhao, Zhi-He; Ding, Yin; Bai, Yu-Xing; Wang, Lin; He, Hong; Shen, Gang; Li, Wei-Ran; Wu, Wei-Zi; Ren, Chong; Weng, Xuan-Rong; Geng, Zhi; Xu, Tian-Min

    2013-09-01

    Orthodontics in China has developed rapidly, but there is no standard index of treatment outcomes. We assessed the validity of the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System (ABO-OGS) for the classification of treatment outcomes in Chinese patients. We randomly selected 108 patients who completed treatment between July 2005 and September 2008 in 6 orthodontic treatment centers across China. Sixty-nine experienced Chinese orthodontists made subjective assessments of the end-of-treatment casts for each patient. Three examiners then used the ABO-OGS to measure the casts. Pearson correlation analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were conducted to evaluate the correspondence between the ABO-OGS cast measurements and the orthodontists' subjective assessments. The average subjective grading scores were highly correlated with the ABO-OGS scores (r = 0.7042). Four of the 7 study cast components of the ABO-OGS score-occlusal relationship, overjet, interproximal contact, and alignment-were statistically significantly correlated with the judges' subjective assessments. Together, these 4 accounted for 58% of the variability in the average subjective grading scores. The ABO-OGS cutoff score for cases that the judges deemed satisfactory was 16 points; the corresponding cutoff score for cases that the judges considered acceptable was 21 points. The ABO-OGS is a valid index for the assessment of treatment outcomes in Chinese patients. By comparing the objective scores on this modification of the ABO-OGS with the mean subjective assessment of a panel of highly qualified Chinese orthodontists, a cutoff point for satisfactory treatment outcome was defined as 16 points or fewer, with scores of 16 to 21 points denoting less than satisfactory but still acceptable treatment. Cases that scored greater than 21 points were considered unacceptable. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of an audience response system on orthodontic knowledge retention of undergraduate dental students--a randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Nicholas; Popat, Hashmat; Richmond, Stephen; Farnell, Damian J J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of an audience response system (ARS) on knowledge retention of dental students and to gauge student perceptions of using the ARS. Randomised control study. School of Dentistry, Cardiff University. Seventy four second-year dental students were stratified by gender and randomised anonymously to one of two groups. One group received a lecture on orthodontic terminology and diagnosis in a traditional didactic format and the other received the same lecture integrated with ARS slides. Students completed an assessment of multiple-choice questions (MCQs) scored out of 20, before and immediately after the lecture. Students were also asked to complete a self-reported questionnaire on their perceptions of ARS. Both groups had statistically significant increases in MCQ scores post-lecture (ARS mean increase 3.6 SD2.0, 95% CI 2.2-3.5 and Didactic mean increase 2.9 SD2.3, 95% CI 2.8-4.3). A mixed-design analysis of variance showed that ARS led to an improved MCQ score (by 0.8 or 25%) compared to the didactic group, although this effect was not significant (P = 0.15). The effect of gender at baseline (P = 0.49), post-lecture (P = 0.73) and increase in MCQ score split by group (P = 0.46) was also not significant. Students reported that the ARS was easy to use, helped them engage with the lecture and encouraged them to work harder. The ARS did not lead to a significant increase in short-term orthodontic knowledge recall of students compared with didactic teaching. However, the use of ARS within orthodontic teaching could make lectures more interactive and engaging.

  12. Adhesive systems: important aspects related to their composition and clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Honorato Silva e Souza Junior

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This literature review article addresses the types and the main components of different etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems available in the market, and relates them to their function, possible chemical interactions and infuence of handling characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images are presented to characterize the interface between adhesives and dentin. Adhesive systems have been recently classifed according to their adhesion approaches in etch-and-rinse, self-etch and glass ionomer. The etch-and-rinse systems require a specifc acid-etch procedure and may be performed in two or three steps. Self-etch systems employ acidic monomers that demineralize and impregnate dental substrates almost at the same time. These systems are separated in one or two steps. Some advantages and defciencies were noted for etch-and-rinse and self-etch approaches, mainly for the simplifed ones due to some chemical associations and interactions. The SEM micrographs illustrate different relationships between adhesive systems and dental structures, particularly dentin. The knowledge of composition, characteristics and mechanisms of adhesion of each adhesive system is of fundamental importance to permit the adoption of ideal bonding strategies under clinical conditions.

  13. Integrative systems and synthetic biology of cell-matrix adhesion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Eli

    2016-09-02

    The complexity of cell-matrix adhesion convolves its roles in the development and functioning of multicellular organisms and their evolutionary tinkering. Cell-matrix adhesion is mediated by sites along the plasma membrane that anchor the actin cytoskeleton to the matrix via a large number of proteins, collectively called the integrin adhesome. Fundamental challenges for understanding how cell-matrix adhesion sites assemble and function arise from their multi-functionality, rapid dynamics, large number of components and molecular diversity. Systems biology faces these challenges in its strive to understand how the integrin adhesome gives rise to functional adhesion sites. Synthetic biology enables engineering intracellular modules and circuits with properties of interest. In this review I discuss some of the fundamental questions in systems biology of cell-matrix adhesion and how synthetic biology can help addressing them.

  14. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos, Laura Alves; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; Drubi-Filho, Brahim; Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Materials and Methods Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE), the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE) was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/S...

  15. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Summary Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4th and 5th generation) to self-etch (6th, 7th and 8th generation) systems. Currently, bonding to dental substrates is based on three different strategies: 1) etch-and-rinse, 2) self-etch and 3) resin-modified glass-ionomer approach as possessing the unique properties of self-adherence to the tooth tissue. More recently, a new family of dentin adhesives has been introduced (universal or multi-mode adhesives), which may be used either as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the current knowledge for each adhesive system according to their classification that have been advocated by many authorities in most operative/restorative procedures. As noted by several valuable studies that have contributed to understanding of bonding to various substrates helps clinicians to choose the appropriate dentin bonding agents for optimal clinical outcomes. PMID:28736601

  16. Post orthodontic treatment stability measurement in dentoskeletal class I malocclusion based on the objective grading system index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Anthony Pasaribu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the stability of orthodontic treatment results in dentoskeletal class I malocclusion treated with and without extraction of four premolars and to compare the stability of treatment result between those groups. Occlusal relationship after treatment and six-month post retention were measured on dental cast using The Objective Grading System Index at Orthodontic Specialist Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran. The analytic descriptive study was carried out on 30 samples that comprised 14 samples were treated without extraction of four premolars and 16 samples were treated with extraction of four premolars. ABO Measuring Gauge was used to measure seven variables: tooth alignment, the height of the marginal ridges, buccolingual inclination, occlusal relationships, occlusal contacts, overjet, and interproximal tooth contacts. The results were statistically analyzed with the Wilcoxon rank test to test the difference of The Objective Grading System Index between posttreatment and postretension. Mann-Whitney U test was applied to determine the difference between the group with the extraction of four premolars and the group without extraction of four premolars. The level of significance was set at 0.05. The results of this study showed these following variables: tooth alignment, occlusal contacts, and overjet were unstable at the group with the extraction of four premolars, while only tooth alignment was found to be unstable in the group without extraction of the four premolars. Mann-Whitney U test did not show statistically significant difference in stability comparison test between the groups.

  17. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  18. Bond strength of a composite resin to glass ionomer cements using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira BECCI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glass ionomer cements are often used as a base or cavity lining prior to restorative material. Objective To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to different glass ionomer cements, when using a two-step conventional and self-etching adhesive systems. Material and method Three glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, Vitremer and Vitrebond, the composite resin Filtek Z350 XT and the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2, Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Easy One were used. As negative control, resin was bonded to cement without using an adhesive system. Holes (4 mm diameter, 2 mm deep prepared in acrilic bloks were filled with the glass ionomer cements (n=12/group. On the surface, an area of 1mm in diameter was delimited, the adhesive system was applied, and a specimen of composite resin with 1 mm height was made. After 24 hours storage (37 °C and 100% humidity, the microshear test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison between groups (α=0.05. Result The adhesive systems significantly improved the bond strenght of composite resin to glass ionomer cements (p≤0.001. There was no significant difference in bond strength when self-etching adhesive systems were compared with the simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, except for Vitrebond where Clearfil SE Bond determined higher bond strength when compared to Adper Single Bond 2 (p=0.003. Conclusion Self-etching adhesive systems are a good option for establishing the bond between the composite resin and the glass ionomer cement.

  19. Shear bond strength of three adhesive systems to enamel and dentin of permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Shadman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the shear bond strength of three new adhesive systems to enamel and dentin of permanent human teeth using three new etch and rinse and self-etch adhesive systems.Materials and Methods: Sixty intact caries-free third molars were selected and randomly divided into 6 groups. Flat buccal and lingual enamel and dentin surfaces were prepared and mounted in the acrylic resin perpendicular to the plan of the horizon. Adhesives used in this study were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE and AdheSE-One F (Ivoclar/Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein. The adhesives were applied on the surfaces and cured with quartz tungsten halogen curing unit (600 mW/cm2 intensity for 20 s. After attaching composite to the surfaces and thermocycling (500 cycles, 5-55ºC, shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The failure modes were examined under a stereomicroscope. The data were statistically analyzed using T-test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Fisher's exact tests.Results: In enamel, Tetric N-Bond (28.57±4.58 MPa and AdheSE (21.97±7.6 MPa had significantly higher bond strength than AdheSE-One F (7.16±2.09 MPa (P0.05.Conclusion: Shear bond strength to dentin in Tetric N-Bond (etch and rinse system( was higher than self-etch adhesives (AdheSE and AdheSE-One F. The bond strength to enamel and dentin in two-step self-etch (AdheSE was higher than one-step self-etch (AdheSE-One F.

  20. Enamel Thickness before and after Orthodontic Treatment Analysed in Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Robert; Safranow, Krzysztof; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    Despite the continuous development of materials and techniques of adhesive bonding, the basic procedure remains relatively constant. The technique is based on three components: etching substance, adhesive system, and composite material. The use of etchants during bonding orthodontic brackets carries the risk of damage to the enamel. Therefore, the article examines the effect of the manner of enamel etching on its thickness before and after orthodontic treatment. The study was carried out in vitro on a group of 80 teeth. It was divided into two subgroups of 40 teeth each. The procedure of enamel etching was performed under laboratory conditions. In the first subgroup, the classic method of enamel etching and the fifth-generation bonding system were used. In the second subgroup, the seventh-generation (self-etching) bonding system was used. In both groups, metal orthodontic brackets were fixed and the enamel was cleaned with a cutter fixed on the micromotor after their removal. Before and after the treatment, two-dimensional optical coherence tomography scans were performed. The enamel thickness was assessed on the two-dimensional scans. The average enamel thickness in both subgroups was not statistically significant. PMID:28243604

  1. Enamel Thickness before and after Orthodontic Treatment Analysed in Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Seeliger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the continuous development of materials and techniques of adhesive bonding, the basic procedure remains relatively constant. The technique is based on three components: etching substance, adhesive system, and composite material. The use of etchants during bonding orthodontic brackets carries the risk of damage to the enamel. Therefore, the article examines the effect of the manner of enamel etching on its thickness before and after orthodontic treatment. The study was carried out in vitro on a group of 80 teeth. It was divided into two subgroups of 40 teeth each. The procedure of enamel etching was performed under laboratory conditions. In the first subgroup, the classic method of enamel etching and the fifth-generation bonding system were used. In the second subgroup, the seventh-generation (self-etching bonding system was used. In both groups, metal orthodontic brackets were fixed and the enamel was cleaned with a cutter fixed on the micromotor after their removal. Before and after the treatment, two-dimensional optical coherence tomography scans were performed. The enamel thickness was assessed on the two-dimensional scans. The average enamel thickness in both subgroups was not statistically significant.

  2. The influence of size and structure of metal orthodontic bracket base on bond strength on tooth enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The factors which may influence the bond strength of the applied orthodontic brackets on the tooth surface are the size and structure of the bracket base. Objective. The aim of the paper was to investigate the influence of size and shape of different types of brackets on bond strength on the enamel and analyze the remaining quality of adhesive material on the tooth surface after debonding of orthodontic brackets (adhesive remnant index - ARI. Methods. In this study, three types of metal brackets of different sizes and shapes of Dentaurum manufacturer were used (Utratrimm, Equilibrium 2, Discovery, Dentaurum, Inspringen, Germany. The brackets were applied onto the middle part of the anatomic crowns of buccal surfaces of 30 premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. In addition, the pre-treatment of teeth by 37% orthophosphoric acid and adhesive material System1+ (Dentaurum, Germany were used. Results. The mean value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Discovery type after debonding was 8.67±0.32 MPa, while the value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Equilibrium 2 type amounted to 8.62±0.22 MPa. The value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Ultratrimm type after debonding was 8.22±0.49 MPa. There were no statistical differences in the values of bond strength regarding all three groups of the investigated orthodontic brackets (F=4.56; p<0.05. Conclusion. The base size and design of metal orthodontic brackets did not play a significant role in bond strength, while the values of ARI index were identical in all three investigated groups.

  3. Microtensile Bond Strength and Micromorphology of Bur-cut Enamel Using Five Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Alexandra; Ramos, João; Messias, Ana; Marques, Fernando; Caramelo, Francisco; Mata, António

    2015-04-01

    This study compared the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of two etch-and-rinse (ER) (OptiBond FL [OBFL]; Prime & Bond NT [PBNT]) and three self-etching (SE) (Clearfil SE Bond [CSEB]; Xeno III [XIII]; Xeno V+ [XV+]) adhesives systems to bur-prepared human enamel considering active (AA) and passive (PA) application of the self-etching systems. Ninety-six enamel surfaces were prepared with a medium-grit diamond bur and randomly allocated into 8 groups to receive adhesive restorations: G1: OBFL; G2: PBNT; G3: CSEB/PA; G4: CSEB/ AA; G5: XIII/PA; G6: XIII/AA; G7: XV+/PA; G8: XV+/AA. After composite buildup, samples were sectioned to obtain a total of 279 bonded sticks (1 mm2) that were submitted to microtensile testing (μTBS; 0.5 mm/min) after 24-h water storage (37°C). Etching patterns and adhesive interfacial ultramorphology were also evaluated with confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data was analyzed with one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Weibull probabilistic distribution was also determined. Regarding μTBS, both adhesive system and application mode yielded statistically significant differences (p systems together with CSEB/AA and XIII/PA recorded the highest and statistically similar bond strength results. XV+ presented very low bond strength values, regardless of the application mode. Among self-etching adhesives, CSEB produced significantly higher μTBS values when applied actively. Qualitative evaluation by SEM and CLSM revealed substantial differences between groups both in adhesive interfaces and enamel conditioning patterns. ER and SE adhesive systems presented distinctive bond strengths to bur-cut enamel. The application mode effect was adhesive dependent. Active application improved etching patterns and resin interfaces micromorphology.

  4. Influence of chlorhexidine concentration on microtensile bond strength of contemporary adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Alves de Campos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chlorhexidine (CHX concentration on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS of contemporary adhesive systems. Eighty bovine central incisors were used in this study. The facial enamel surface of the crowns was abraded with 600-grit silicon carbide paper to expose flat, mid-coronal dentin surfaces. The tested materials were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SMP, Single-Bond (SB, Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Clearfil Tri S Bond (CTSB. All the materials were applied according to manufacturer's instructions and followed by composite application (Z250. The teeth were randomly divided into 16 groups: for the etch-and-rinse adhesives (SMP and SB, 0.12% or 2% CHX was applied prior to or after the acid etching procedure. For the self-etch adhesives (CSEB and CTSB 0.12% or 2% CHX was applied prior to the primer. Control groups for each one of the adhesive systems were also set up. The specimens were immediately submitted to μTBS testing and the data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and the Tukey post hoc test (alpha = .01. The failure patterns of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The effects of 2% CHX were statistically significant (p < 0.01 for the self-etch adhesives but were not significant for the etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Analysis of the data demonstrated no statistical difference between the etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. CHX-based cavity disinfectants in concentrations higher than 0.12% should be avoided prior to the self-etch adhesive systems evaluated in this study to diminish the possibilities of reduction in bond strength.

  5. Influence of Etching Mode on Enamel Bond Durability of Universal Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Tsujimoto, A; Endo, H; Erickson, R L; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the enamel bond durability of three universal adhesives in different etching modes through fatigue testing. The three universal adhesives used were Scotchbond Universal, Prime&Bond Elect universal dental adhesive, and All-Bond Universal light-cured dental adhesive. A single-step self-etch adhesive, Clearfil S 3 Bond Plus was used as a control. The shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) to human enamel were evaluated in total-etch mode and self-etch mode. A stainless steel metal ring with an internal diameter of 2.4 mm was used to bond the resin composite to the flat-ground (4000-grit) tooth surfaces for determination of both SBS and SFS. For each enamel surface treatment, 15 specimens were prepared for SBS and 30 specimens for SFS. The staircase method for fatigue testing was then used to determine the SFS of the resin composite bonded to the enamel using 10-Hz frequencies for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe representative debonded specimen surfaces and the resin-enamel interfaces. A two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc test were used for analysis of the SBS data, whereas a modified t-test with Bonferroni correction was used for the SFS data. All adhesives in total-etch mode showed significantly higher SBS and SFS values than those in self-etch mode. Although All-Bond Universal in self-etch mode showed a significantly lower SBS value than the other adhesives, there was no significant difference in SFS values among the adhesives in this mode. All adhesives showed higher SFS:SBS ratios in total-etch mode than in self-etch mode. With regard to the adhesive systems used in this study, universal adhesives showed higher enamel bond strengths in total-etch mode. Although the influence of different etching modes on the enamel-bonding performance of universal adhesives was found to be dependent on the adhesive material, total-etch mode

  6. Role of pressure-sensitive adhesives in transdermal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Shabbir; Sachdeva, Sameer; Goswami, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) are employed for the delivery of drugs across skin into the systemic circulation. Pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) is one of the most critical components used in a TDDS. The primary function of PSA is to help in adhesion of patch to skin, but more importantly it acts as a matrix for the drug and other excipients. Hence, apart from adhesion of the patch, PSA also affects other critical quality attributes of the TDDS such as drug delivery, flux through skin and physical and chemical stability of the finished product. This review article provides a summary of the adhesives used in various types of TDDS. In particular, this review will cover the design types of TDDS, categories of PSAs and their evaluation and regulatory aspects.

  7. Polymeric reaction of polymer-monomer system for pressure sensitive adhesives by low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiguchi, R.; Uryu, T.

    1985-01-01

    Application of low-energy electron beam to non-solvent type pressure sensitive adhesives is investigated. The adhesive properties such as peel strength and holding time (dead-load strength) were closely related to the reaction of acrylate polymer-monomer systems. The reaction behavior is elucidated by combining the measurement of gel fraction, infrared spectrum of gel, and the molecular weight distribution detected by gel permeation chromatography. It was important for the production of pressure sensitive adhesives by electron beam that the adhesive with high peel strength and long holding time is composed of a proper combination of three factors, that is, about 35% gel fraction, 25% monomer units in gel, and 15% graft efficiency by irradiating the polymer-monomer system containing low molecular weight poly (butyl acrylate). (author)

  8. Novel orthodontic cement containing dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate with strong antibacterial capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaodong; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Hockin H K; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Bai, Yuxing; Zhang, Ke

    2017-09-26

    Orthodontic treatments increase the incidence of white spot lesions. The objectives of this study were to develop an antibacterial orthodontic cement to inhibit demineralization, and to evaluate its enamel shear bond strength and anti-biofilm properties. Novel antibacterial monomer dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) was synthesized and incorporated into Transbond XT at 0, 1.5 and 3% by mass. Anti-biofilm activity was assessed using a human dental plaque microcosm biofilm model. Shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index were also tested. Biofilm activity precipitously dropped when contacting orthodontic cement with DMAHDM. Orthodontic cement containing 3% DMAHDM significantly reduced biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production (p0.1). By incorporating DMAHDM into Transbond XT for the first time, the modified orthodontic cement obtained a strong antibacterial capability without compromising the enamel bond strength.

  9. Influence of Different Etching Modes on Bond Strength to Enamel using Universal Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Ana Cs; Bandeca, Matheus C; Pinheiro, Larissa M; Dos Santosh Almeida, Lauber J; Torres, Carlos Rg; Borges, Alvaro H; Pinto, Shelon Cs; Tonetto, Mateus R; De Jesus Tavarez, Rudys R; Firoozmand, Leily M

    2016-10-01

    The adhesive systems and the techniques currently used are designed to provide a more effective adhesion with reduction of the protocol application. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of universal adhesive systems on enamel in different etching modes (self-etch and total etch). The mesial and distal halves of 52 bovine incisors, healthy, freshly extracted, were used and divided into seven experimental groups (n = 13). The enamel was treated in accordance with the following experimental conditions: FUE-Universal System - Futurabond U (VOCO) with etching; FUWE - Futurabond U (VOCO) without etching; SB-Total Etch System - Single Bond 2 (3M); SBUE-Universal System - Single Bond Universal (3M ESPE) with etching; SBUWE - Single Bond Universal (3M ESPE) without etching; CLE-Self-etch System - Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray) was applied with etching; CLWE - Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray) without etching. The specimens were made using the composite spectrum TPH (Dentsply) and stored in distilled water (37 ± 1°C) for 1 month. The microshear test was performed using the universal testing machine EMIC DL 2000 with the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The bond strength values were analyzed using statistical tests (Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test) with Bonferroni correction. There was no statistically significant difference between groups (p adhesive interface revealed that most failures occurred between the interface composite resin and adhesive. The universal adhesive system used in dental enamel varies according to the trademark, and the previous enamel etching for universal systems and the self-etch both induced greater bond strength values. Selective enamel etching prior to the application of a universal adhesive system is a relevant strategy for better performance bonding.

  10. Microtensile bond strength of three simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtanus, J D; Purwanta, Kenny; Dogan, Nilgun; Kleverlaan, Cees J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft caries-infected dentin was excavated with the help of caries detector dye. On the remaining hard dentin, a standardized smear layer was created by polishing with 600-grit SiC paper. Teeth were divided into three groups and treated with one of the three tested adhesives: Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (3M ESPE), a 2-step etch-andrinse adhesive, Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray), a 1-step self-etching or all-in-one adhesive, and Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), a 2-step self-etching adhesive. Five-mm-thick composite buildups (Z-250, 3M ESPE) were built and light cured. After water storage for 24 h at 37ºC, the bonded specimens were sectioned into bars (1.0 x 1.0 mm; n = 20 to 30). Microtensile bond strength of normal dentin specimens and caries-affected dentin specimens was measured in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed = 1 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p adhesives were found. Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and Clearfil S3 Bond showed significantly lower bond strength values to caries-affected dentin. For Clearfil SE Bond, bond strength values to normal and caries-affected dentin were not significantly different. All the tested simplified adhesives showed similar bond strength values to normal dentin. For the tested 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive and the all-in-one adhesive, the bond strength values to caries-affected dentin were lower than to normal dentin.

  11. Automated margin analysis of contemporary adhesive systems in vitro: evaluation of discriminatory variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Siegward D; Forjanic, Monika; Roulet, François-Jean

    2007-08-01

    Using an optical sensor, to automatically evaluate the marginal seal of restorations placed with 21 adhesive systems of all four adhesive categories in cylindrical cavities of bovine dentin applying different outcome variables, and to evaluate their discriminatory power. Twenty-one adhesive systems were evaluated: three 3-step etch-and-rinse systems, three 2-step etch-and-rinse systems, five 2-step self-etching systems, and ten 1-step self-etching systems. All adhesives were applied in cylindrical cavities in bovine dentin together with Tetric Ceram (n=8). In the control group, no adhesive system was used. After 24 h of storage in water at 37 degrees C, the surface was polished with 4000-grit SiC paper, and epoxy resin replicas were produced. An optical sensor (FRT MicroProf) created 100 profiles of the restoration margin, and an algorithm detected gaps and calculated their depths and widths. The following evaluation criteria were used: percentage of specimens without gaps, the percentage of gap-free profiles in relation to all profiles per specimen, mean gap width, mean gap depth, largest gap, modified marginal integrity index MI. The statistical analysis was carried out on log-transformed data for all variables with ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test for multiple comparisons. The correlation between the variables was tested with regression analysis, and the pooled data accordingto the four adhesive categories were compared by applying the Mann-Whitney nonparametric test (p adhesive systems demonstrated the best marginal adaptation, followed by the 2-step self-etching and the 1-step self-etching adhesives; the latter showed the highest variability in test results between materials and within the same material. The only exception to this rule was Xeno IV, which showed a marginal adaptation that was comparable to that of the best 3-step etch-and-rinse systems. Except for the variables "largest gap" and "mean gap depth", all the other variables had a similar ability to

  12. Changes in biochemical parameters of oral fluid in patients during the orthodontic treatment with a bracket system under the action of a developed mucosal gel with probiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronkova, Anna V; Smaglyuk, Lyubov V

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Many research studies involving orthodontic patients focus on changes in levels of oral microbiocenosis after bracket placement. Based upon this the objective of the current study was to determine the effect of the developed mucosal gel with probiotics on the biochemical parameters of the oral fluid of patients during the orthodontic treatment with a bracket system. The aim: Aim of our study is to determine the effect of the developed mucosal gel with probiotics on the biochemical parameters of the oral fluid of patients during the orthodontic treatment with a bracket system. Materials and methods: 45 patients at the age of 18-24, with 15 people in each group (control, main and comparison group) were examined. The main group was presented by patients who, in order to prevent dysbiosis of the oral cavity during orthodontic treatment, were prescribed local use of the developed mucosal gel with probiotic. The statistical processing of the results of the study was carried out using methods of variation statistics using the EXCEL program (the standard package of Microsoft Office). Results: According to the results of biochemical studies, it was found that the use of orthodontic treatment of mucosal gel with probiotic in patients with crowded teeth contributes to the strengthening of antioxidant protection, an increase in nonspecific resistance, decrease in inflammation and normalization of microbiocenosis of the oral cavity. Conclusion: These studies indicated that the use of the developed mucosal gel with probiotic in patients with maxillofacial anomalies from the first day after fixation, as indicated by the level of biochemical markers of inflammation.

  13. Effect of hydroxyl bond formation on the adhesion improvement of a polyethylene copper thin film system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, M.; Blantocas, G.; Ramos, H.

    2009-01-01

    Formation of hydroxyl bonds on the surface of a gas plasma treated high density polyethylene (HDPE) sheets significantly enhanced the adhesion strength of the polyethylene copper thin film system. Surface treatments using oxygen gas plasmas at varying plasma parameters are applied in this study to identify the most effective plasma parameters that would promote the best adhesion strength. Analysis of gas plasma adulterated HDPE sheets showed best enhancement of polyethylene copper adhesion after an oxygen gas plasma treatment for 60 minutes at 5mA discharge current. Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Adhesion measurements using Pull out Force Analysis were used to measure the changes in the surface chemistry and surface topology of the HDPE sheets. (author)

  14. Effect of Fluoride-Releasing Adhesive Systems on the Mechanical Properties of Eroded Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Ana Paula Albuquerque; Moda, Mariana Dias; Suzuki, Thaís Yumi Umeda; Godas, André Gustavo de Lima; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of erosive pH cycling with solutions that simulate dental erosion on Martens hardness (HMV) and elastic modulus (Eit) of dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems. Twenty-seven bovine dentin slabs were restored with three adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch adhesive system, One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect fluoride-containing self-etching adhesive systems. The restorations were made with Filtek Z250. The HMV and Eit values at distances of 10, 30, 50 and 70 µm from the interface were evaluated using a dynamic ultra microhardness tester before and after immersion in deionized water, citric acid and hydrochloric acid (n=9). Data were submitted to repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (=0.05). After erosive cycling, HMV values of dentin decreased in all groups. For dentin restored with Adper Single Bond 2, the lowest values were found closer to the hybrid layer, while for One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect, the values remained unaltered at all distances. For dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems, a decrease in Eit was found, but after 30 µm this difference was not significant. The acid substances were able to alter HMV and Eit of the underlying dentin. For fluoride-releasing adhesives, the greater the distance from bonded interface, the lower the Eit values. The fluoride in One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect was able to protect the underlying dentin closer to the materials. In this way, the fluoride from adhesive systems could have some positive effect in the early stages of erosive lesions.

  15. Prevention of Intraabdominal Adhesions by Local and Systemic Administration of Immunosuppressive Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Kemal; Inal, Abdullah; Sayar, Ilyas; Sahin, Murat; Gullu, Huriye; Inal, Duriye Gul; Isik, Arda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intraperitoneal adhesion formation is a serious postsurgical issue. Adhesions develop after damage to the peritoneum by surgery, irradiation, infection or trauma. Objectives: Using a rat model, we compared the effectiveness of systemic and intraperitoneally administered common immunosuppressive drugs for prevention of postoperative intraperitoneal adhesions. Materials and Methods: Peritoneal adhesions were induced in 98 female Wistar-Albino rats by cecal abrasion and peritoneal excision. Rats were randomly separated into seven groups, each containing fourteen rats, and the standard experimental model was applied to all of rats. 14 days later, rats were euthanized, intraperitoneal adhesions were scored and tissues were examined histologically using hematoxylin/eosin and Masson’s trichrome staining. Results: Throughout the investigation, no animal died during or after surgery. In all of experimental groups, decrease in fibrosis was statistically significant. Decrease in fibrosis was most prominently in intraperitoneal tacrolimus group (P = 0.000), and decrease was least in intraperitoneal cyclosporine group (P = 0.022). Vascular proliferation was significantly decreased in all experimental groups (P < 0.05) except for systemic tacrolimus group (P = 0.139). Most prominent reduction in vascular proliferation was in intraperitoneal tacrolimus group (P = 0.000). Conclusions: Administration of immunosuppressive drugs is effective for prevention of intraperitoneal adhesions. PMID:24693396

  16. [The prehistory of orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Julien

    2015-06-01

    Orthodontics came into being in 1728. Previously, practitioners were at a loss when confronted with crooked teeth. A Latin philosopher had an ingenious flash of orthodontic inspiration. Other authors were content to either extract the malposed teeth or to modify their shape. However, interest in an approach to preventive orthodontics had now begun. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2015.

  17. The World of Orthodontic apps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The usage of the portable electronic devices such as the smartphones and handheld tablets has increased over the years, and this is true in the health-care industry also. This is because of the development of various patient management softwares. The use of apps to manage, educate, and inform patient is not uncommon among orthodontists nowadays. The aim of this article was to review the various apps available on the Google Play Store and iOS Apple Store for orthodontists and patients. Four smartphones using orthodontically relevant keywords such as orthodontics, orthodontists, and braces were searched and reviewed in detail. Out of the 354 orthodontically relevant apps available in both Android and Apple operating systems, the apps could be categorized as orthodontist-related apps or patient-related apps. Under these categories they could be further classified as practice managements apps, patient education apps, model analysis apps, tooth material calculators, patient reminder apps, etc.

  18. Myths and realities in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, P S; Springate, S D; Chate, R A C

    2015-02-16

    Comprehensive orthodontic treatment typically comprises an initial phase of alignment over a period of four to six months, followed by vertical, transverse and antero-posterior corrections, space closure, finishing and detailing to enhance dental and facial aesthetics and function. Each course of treatment involves a series of decisions and alternatives relating to objectives, appliance design and treatment mechanics. In recent years there has been increasing interest in short-term approaches to treatment with more limited objectives and the avoidance of phases traditionally considered integral to successful treatment. In this review the veracity of accepted truths in orthodontics are discussed; specifically, the importance of initial molar relationship, final incisor relationship, the merits of orthodontic extractions, anticipated treatment times, the value of modern fixed appliance systems, the importance of torque expression and the relative merits of bonded retainers and inter-proximal reduction are considered.

  19. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura AlveBastos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Materials and Methods Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE, the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Silorane and Silorane groups. Teeth restored with methacrylate based-composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE were hybridized with the two-step self-etching system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray, with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Methacrylate and Methacrylate groups, or three-step adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE (Three-step/Methacrylate group (n = 6. The restored teeth were sectioned into stick-shaped test specimens (1.0 × 1.0 mm, and coupled to a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min to perform microtensile testing. Results Pre-etching/Methacrylate group presented the highest bond strength values, with significant difference from Silorane and Three-step/Methacrylate groups (p < 0.05. However, it was not significantly different from Preetching/Silorane and Methacrylate groups. Conclusions Pre-etching increased bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin.

  20. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Laura Alves; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; Drubi-Filho, Brahim; Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE), the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE) was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Silorane and Silorane groups). Teeth restored with methacrylate based-composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) were hybridized with the two-step self-etching system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray), with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Methacrylate and Methacrylate groups), or three-step adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE) (Three-step/Methacrylate group) (n = 6). The restored teeth were sectioned into stick-shaped test specimens (1.0 × 1.0 mm), and coupled to a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min) to perform microtensile testing. Pre-etching/Methacrylate group presented the highest bond strength values, with significant difference from Silorane and Three-step/Methacrylate groups (p adhesive system to dentin.

  1. INFLUENCE OF SYSTEMIC DISEASES AND REMOVABLE ORTHODONTIC APPLIANCES ON THE QUALITY OF SALIVA IN CHILDHOOD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Rashkova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last 10 years numerous investigations using saliva as a diagnostic tool have been carried out. The aim of present study is to evaluate saliva qualities for various general diseases and conditions that influence its qualities. (1 Evaluation of salivary flow and saliva consistency of children. (2 Evaluation of saliva pH and buffer capacity of children. Material and Methods. The investigation was carried out with 126 children (age 6 to 17 selected by their general diseases and conditions influencing the oral risk environment. The children were divided into 4 groups: 30 children with diabetes, 25 children with asthma treated with local corticosteroids, 27 healthy children with orthodontic treatment, 34 children as a control group (healthy children. The saliva of the children was tested with the help of “Saliva Check” of GC company. The instructions of the company producer were followed.Results. Stimulated saliva current is reliably lower for children with asthma treated with local corticosteroids, diabetes and children with orthodontic appliances. Saliva pH is with lower values for children with diabetes and asthma – diseases predisposing to acid oral environment. The decreased saliva buffer capacity for children with diabetes and asthma is an indicator for the difficult regulation of the dynamically changing oral electrolytic balance of those children.Conclusion. The saliva parameters studied can be used as biomarkers of the liquid oral environment with regard to the risks for caries and periodontal diseases in children. General health status influences saliva qualities increasing thus indirectly the caries risk.

  2. Study of new rubber to steel adhesive systems based on Co(II and Cu(II sulphides coats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labaj Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with the preparation of new rubber to steel adhesive systems using the steel surface treatment with deposition of adhesive coats based on Co(II and Cu(II sulphides. Efficiency of new prepared adhesive systems containing Co(II and Cu(II sulphides has been compared with the efficiency of double layer adhesive system commonly used in industry. The chemical composition of prepared adhesive systems was determined using the EDX analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM was used for study of topography and microstructure of prepared rubber to steel adhesive systems (Co(II, Cu(II sulphide, double layer adhesive system. For determination of adhesion strength between rubber blends and metal pieces with various adhesive systems deposited on these pieces, the test according to ASTM D429 standard relating to Rubber to metal adhesion, method A was used. For all test samples, the same type of rubber blend and the same curing conditions have been used.

  3. Influence of human and bovine substrate on the microleakage of two adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Guará Brusaca Almeida

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the marginal sealing of two adhesive systems and to analyze the influence of human and bovine substrates on marginal microleakage in enamel. Rectangular-shaped class V cavities (4 mm wide x 2 mm high x 2 mm deep were made as follows: 8 cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of the human teeth with margins located on enamel and 16 cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of the bovine teeth. The cavities were randomly assigned to 4 groups of 8 cavities according to the adhesive system and substrate: G1 - Prime & Bond 2.1 (Dentsply/human substrate; G2 - Adhese (Ivoclar/Vivadent/human substrate; G3 - Prime & Bond 2.1 (Dentsply/bovine substrate; G4 - Adhese (Ivoclar/Vivadent/bovine substrate. The cavities were filled with microhybrid composite resin (Fillmagic and after polishing/finishing procedures, the teeth were subjected to a thermocycling regimen of 500 cycles with 1-min immersions in water at 55° ±2°C and 5° ± 2°C. Next, the teeth were coated with two layers of nail polish to within 1 mm of the margin, submerged in a 50% silver nitrate solution for 2 h, rinsed thoroughly in running tap and immersed in developing solution for 8 h. The restorations were bisected resulting in 16 specimens. Microleakage was observed under a stereomicroscope at x25 and recorded using four-point (0-3 scoring system. The data were analyzed statistically by the Mann Whitney U-test at 5% significance level. Leakage was present in all specimens and there was statistically significant difference between the adhesive systems. Adhese self-etching system showed significantly more leakage in both substrates (human - p= 0.0001 and bovine - p= 0.0031. There was no statistically significant difference between human and bovine substrates for either of the adhesive systems based on different bonding mechanisms (Prime & Bond 2.1 - p= 0.6923 and Adhese - p= 0.6109. Neither of the adhesive systems was

  4. Self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesive systems in clinical dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Fusun; Blatz, Markus B

    2013-01-01

    Current adhesive systems follow either an "etch-and-rinse" or "self-etch" approach, which differ in how they interact with natural tooth structures. Etch-and-rinse systems comprise phosphoric acid to pretreat the dental hard tissues before rinsing and subsequent application of an adhesive. Self-etch adhesives contain acidic monomers, which etch and prime the tooth simultaneously. Etch-and-rinse adhesives are offered as two- or three-step systems, depending on whether primer and bonding are separate or combined in a single bottle. Similarly, self-etch adhesives are available as one- or two-step systems. Both etch-and-rinse and self-etch systems form a hybrid layer as a result of resins impregnating the porous enamel or dentin. Despite current trends toward fewer and simpler clinical application steps, one-step dentin bonding systems exhibit bonding agent lower bond strengths and seem less predictable than multi-step etch-and-rinse and self-etch systems. The varying evidence available today suggests that the choice between etch-and-rinse and self-etch systems is often a matter of personal preference. In general, however, phosphoric acid creates a more pronounced and retentive etching pattern in enamel. Therefore, etch-and-rinse bonding systems are often preferred for indirect restorations and when large areas of enamel are still present. Conversely, self-etch adhesives provide superior and more predictable bond strength to dentin and are, consequently, recommended for direct composite resin restorations, especially when predominantly supported by dentin.

  5. Effects of solvent evaporation on water sorption/solubility and nanoleakage of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimeli, Talita Baumgratz Cachapuz; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega; Hilgert, Leandro Augusto; Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of solvent evaporation in the kinetics of water diffusion (water sorption-WS, solubility-SL, and net water uptake) and nanoleakage of adhesive systems. Disk-shaped specimens (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm in thickness) were produced (N=48) using the adhesives: Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3)/Kuraray, Clearfil SE Bond - control group (CSE)/Kuraray, Optibond Solo Plus (OS)/Kerr and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU)/3M ESPE. The solvents were either evaporated for 30 s or not evaporated (N=24/per group), and then photoactivated for 80 s (550 mW/cm2). After desiccation, the specimens were weighed and stored in distilled water (N=12) or mineral oil (N=12) to evaluate the water diffusion over a 7-day period. Net water uptake (%) was also calculated as the sum of WS and SL. Data were submitted to 3-way ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%). The nanoleakage expression in three additional specimens per group was also evaluated after ammoniacal silver impregnation after 7 days of water storage under SEM. Statistical analysis revealed that only the factor "adhesive" was significant (padhesives. CSE (control) presented significantly lower net uptake (5.4%). The nanoleakage was enhanced by the presence of solvent in the adhesives. Although the evaporation has no effect in the kinetics of water diffusion, the nanoleakage expression of the adhesives tested increases when the solvents are not evaporated.

  6. Laboratory Performance of Universal Adhesive Systems for Luting CAD/CAM Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Fabiana; Cardenas, Andres Millan; Gutierrez, Mario Felipe; Malaquias, Pâmela; Hass, Viviane; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Perdigão, Jorge

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of several universal adhesive systems applied on five different indirect restorative materials. Five CAD/CAM materials were selected: 1) indirect resin composite (LAV); 2) feldspathic glass ceramic (VTR); 3) leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (EMP); 4) lithium disilicate ceramic (EMX); 5) yttrium-stabilized zirconium dioxide (CZI). For each material, 15 blocks were cut into 4 rectangular sections (6 × 6 × 6 mm) (n = 60 per group), and processed as recommended by the respective manufacturer. For each indirect material, the following adhesive systems were applied according to the respective manufacturer's instructions: 1) AdheSE Universal [ADU]; 2) All-Bond Universal (ABU); 3) Ambar Universal (AMB); 4) Clearfil Universal (CFU); 5) Futurabond U (FBU); 6) One Coat 7 Universal (OCU); 7) Peak Universal Bond (PUB); 8) Prime&Bond Elect (PBE); 9) Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU); 10) Xeno Select (XEN, negative control). After the application of the adhesive system, cylinder-shaped transparent matrices were filled with a dual-curing resin cement (NX3) and light cured. Specimens were stored in water (37°C for 24 h) and tested in shear mode at 1.0 mm/min (mSBS). The failure pattern and μSBS were statistically evaluated (a = 0.05). LAV, VTR, and EMP showed a greater number of cohesive fractures than EMX and CZI (p materials. There was a wide variability in mean μSBS when different universal adhesives were applied to the several CAD/CAM indirect materials. Most universal adhesives bonded well to air-abraded zirconia.

  7. Influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer on enamel bonding of dental adhesive systems: surface free-energy perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Hirofumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Oouchi, Hajime; Sai, Keiichi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer (OIL) on the shear bond strength (SBS) to enamel and surface free-energy (SFE) of adhesive systems was investigated. The adhesive systems tested were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and Scotchbond Universal (SU). Resin composite was bonded to bovine enamel surfaces to determine the SBS, with and without an OIL, of adhesives. The SFE of cured adhesives with and without an OIL were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. There were no significant differences in the mean SBS of SM and CS specimens with or without an OIL; however, the mean SBS of SU specimens with an OIL was significantly higher than that of SU specimens without an OIL. For all three systems, the mean total SFE (γS), polarity force (γSp), and hydrogen bonding force (γSh) values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those of cured adhesives without an OIL. The results of this study indicate that the presence of an OIL promotes higher SBS of a single-step self-etch adhesive system, but not of a three-step or a two-step self-etch primer system. The SFE values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those without an OIL. The SFE characteristics of the OIL of adhesives differed depending on the type of adhesive. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  8. Evaluation of a new nano-filled restorative material for bonding orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Samir E; Ajlouni, Raed; Soliman, Manal M; Oonsombat, Charuphan; Laffoon, John F; Warren, John

    2007-01-01

    To compare the shear bond strength of a nano-hybrid restorative material, Grandio (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany), to that of a traditional adhesive material (Transbond XT; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) when bonding orthodontic brackets. Forty teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups: 20 teeth were bonded with the Transbond adhesive system and the other 20 teeth with the Grandio restorative system, following manufacturer's instructions. Student t test was used to compare the shear bond strength of the 2 systems. Significance was predetermined at P 5 .05. The t test comparisons (t = 0.55) of the shear bond strength between the 2 adhesives indicated the absence of a significant (P = .585) difference. The mean shear bond strength for Grandio was 4.1 +/- 2.6 MPa and that for Transbond XT was 4.6 +/- 3.2 MPa. During debonding, 3 of 20 brackets (15%) bonded with Grandio failed without registering any force on the Zwick recording. None of the brackets bonded with Transbond XT had a similar failure mode. The newly introduced nano-filled composite materials can potentially be used to bond orthodontic brackets to teeth if its consistency can be more flowable to readily adhere to the bracket base.

  9. An experimental study of double-peeling mechanism inspired by biological adhesive systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heepe, Lars; Raguseo, Saverio; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2017-01-01

    Double- (or multiple-) peeling systems consist of two (or numerous) tapes adhering to a substrate and having a common hinge, where the pulling force is applied. Biological systems, consisting of tape-like (or spatula-like) contact elements, are widely observed in adhesive pads of flies, beetles...

  10. Bond strength and morphology of enamel using self-etching adhesive systems with different acidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Kiss Moura

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the bond strength and the morphology of enamel after application of self-etching adhesive systems with different acidities. The tested hypothesis was that the performance of the self-etching adhesive systems does not vary for the studied parameters. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Composite resin (Filtek Z250 buildups were bonded to untreated (prophylaxis and treated (bur-cut or SiC-paper enamel surfaces of third molars after application of four self-etching and two etch-and-rinse adhesive systems (n=6/condition: Clearfil SE Bond (CSE; OptiBond Solo Plus Self-Etch (OP; AdheSe (AD; Tyrian Self Priming Etching (TY, Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus (SBMP and Adper Single Bond (SB. After storage in water (24 h/37°C, the bonded specimens were sectioned into sticks with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area and the microtensile bond strength was tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean bond strength values (MPa were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05. The etching patterns of the adhesive systems were also observed with a scanning electron microscope. RESULTS: The main factor adhesive system was statistically significant (p<0.05. The mean bond strength values (MPa and standard deviations were: CSE (20.5±3.5, OP (11.3±2.3, AD (11.2±2.8, TY (11.1±3.0, SBMP (21.9±4.0 and SB (24.9±3.0. Different etching patterns were observed for the self-etching primers depending on the enamel treatment and the pH of the adhesive system. CONCLUSION: Although there is a tendency towards using adhesive systems with simplified application procedures, this may compromise the bonding performance of some systems to enamel, even when the prismless enamel is removed.

  11. Effect of adhesive system and application strategy on reduction of dentin permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Oliveira Carvalho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of adhesive systems and application strategies on dentin hydraulic conductance (HC. The buccal enamel was removed from bovine incisors to simulate laminate cavity preparations. After removing the roots and the coronal pulp, the buccal dentin was treated with EDTA solution (0.5 M for 5 minutes, rinsed, ultrasonicated for 12 minutes and connected to a permeability device. HC of the specimens was measured at 10 psi (n = 5. Permeability was measured before and after bonding procedures using G-Bond (GB, Clearfil Tri-S Bond (CTS, Hybrid Coat (HY, Bond Force (BF, Adper Easy Bond (AEB Silorane (SI, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SMP adhesives systems, which were applied following three strategies: 1 according to the manufacturers' instructions; 2 two coats of all-in-one self-etching adhesives (GB, CTS, HY, BF, AEB or priming step plus two coats of bonding resin for the other systems (SI, CSE and SMP; and 3 a thin layer of a flowable composite applied over one coat of all-in-one self-etching adhesives or primed surface for SI, CSE and SMP adhesives. No significant difference was observed among the application modes concerning their ability to reduce HC. None of the adhesives showed complete sealing (100% of the bovine tooth dentin. SI exhibited lower HC than SMP, however, they were not significantly different from the other systems. The results suggest that all systems tested result in an HC reduction of more than 90%. The wet bonding technique seemed to be more sensitive for dentin sealing.

  12. [Application of holistic integrative medicine in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L

    2017-08-09

    Holistic integrative medicine (HIM) is a new medical knowledge system, which is formed based on the theory of HIM. HIM treats people as a whole by combining the results of basic medical research, clinical practice and clinical research during the treatment process. The concept of HIM runs through the education and treatment of orthodontics. HIM is the trending norm of both modern medicine and orthodontics. This review is about the concept of HIM and the advantages and disadvantages of specialization. Moreover, this review also discusses the vital role of HIM in orthodontic treatment and development.

  13. Microshear bond strength of a flowable resin to enamel according to the different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Ho Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (uSBS of two total-etch and four self-etch adhesive systems and a flowable resin to enamel. Materials and Methods Enamels of sixty human molars were used. They were divided into one of six equal groups (n = 10 by adhesives used; OS group (One-Step Plus, SB group (Single Bond, CE group (Clearfil SE Bond, TY group (Tyrian SPE/One-Step Plus, AP group (Adper Prompt L-Pop and GB group (G-Bond. After enamel surfaces were treated with six adhesive systems, a flowable composite resin (Filek Z 350 was bonded to enamel surface using Tygon tubes. the bonded specimens were subjected to uSBS testing and the failure modes of each group were observed under FE-SEM. Results 1. The uSBS of SB group was statistically higher than that of all other groups, and the uSBS of OS, SE and AP group was statistically higher than that of TY and GB group (p < 0.05. 2. The uSBS for TY group was statistically higher than that for GB group (p < 0.05. 3. Adhesive failures in TY and GB group and mixed failures in SB group and SE group were often analysed. One cohesive failure was observed in OS, SB, SE and AP group, respectively. Conclusions Although adhesives using the same step were applied the enamel sur

  14. Shape and Dynamics of Adhesive Cells: Mechanical Response of Open Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuehua; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2017-05-01

    Cell adhesion is an essential biological process. However, previous theoretical and experimental studies ignore a key variable, the changes of cellular volume and pressure, during the dynamic adhesion process. Here, we treat cells as open systems and propose a theoretical framework to investigate how the exchange of water and ions with the environment affects the shape and dynamics of cells adhered between two adhesive surfaces. We show that adherent cells can be either stable (convex or concave) or unstable (spontaneous rupture or collapse) depending on the adhesion energy density, the cell size, the separation of two adhesive surfaces, and the stiffness of the flexible surface. Strikingly, we find that the unstable states vanish when cellular volume and pressure are constant. We further show that the detachments of convex and concave cells are very different. The mechanical response of adherent cells is mainly determined by the competition between the loading rate and the regulation of the cellular volume and pressure. Finally, we show that as an open system the detachment of adherent cells is also significantly influenced by the loading history. Thus, our findings reveal a major difference between living cells and nonliving materials.

  15. Orthodontic Treatment Consideration in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadih, Ahmed; Al-Zayer, Maryam; Dabel, Sukainh; Alkhalaf, Ahmed; Al Mayyad, Ali; Bardisi, Wajdi; Alshammari, Shouq; Alsihati, Zainab

    2018-02-01

    Although orthodontic treatment is commonly indicated for young healthy individuals, recent trends showed an increase in number of older individuals undergoing orthodontic interventions. The increased age resulted in a proportionate increase in the prevalence of systemic diseases facing dentists during orthodontic procedures, especially diabetes mellitus. This necessitates that dentists should be aware of the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and its early signs particularly in teeth and oral cavity. It is also essential for them to understand the implications of diabetes on orthodontic treatment and the measures to be considered during managing those patients. In this review, we focused on the impact of diabetes mellitus on orthodontic treatment. We also summarized the data from previous studies that had explained the measures required to be taken into consideration during managing those patients. We included both human and animal studies to review in depth the pathophysiological mechanisms by which diabetes affects orthodontic treatment outcome. In conclusion, this review emphasizes the need to carefully identify early signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus in patients demanding orthodontic treatment and to understand the considerations to be adopted before and during treating these patients.

  16. Self-adhesive microculture system for extended live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skommer, J; McGuinness, D; Wlodkowic, D

    2011-06-01

    Gas permeable and biocompatible soft polymers are convenient for biological applications. Using the soft polymer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), we established a straightforward technique for in-house production of self-adhesive and optical grade microculture devices. A gas permeable PDMS layer effectively protects against medium evaporation, changes in osmolarity, contamination and drug diffusion. These chip-based devices can be used effectively for long term mammalian cell culture and support a range of bioassays used in pharmacological profiling of anti-cancer drugs. Results obtained on a panel of hematopoietic and solid tumor cell lines during screening of investigative anti-cancer agents corresponded well to those obtained in a conventional cell culture on polystyrene plates. The cumulative correlation analysis of multiple cell lines and anti-cancer drugs showed no adverse effects on cell viability or cell growth retardation during microscale static cell culture. PDMS devices also can be custom modified for many bio-analytical purposes and are interfaced easily with both inverted and upright cell imaging platforms. Moreover, PDMS microculture devices are suitable for extended real time cell imaging. Data from the multicolor, real time analysis of apoptosis on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells provided further evidence that elimination of redundant centrifugation/washing achieved during microscale real time analysis facilitates preservation of fragile apoptotic cells and provides dynamic cellular information at high resolution. Because only small reaction volumes are required, such devices offer reduced use of consumables as well as simplified manipulations during all stages of live cell imaging.

  17. Wood : adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  18. Effects of solvent evaporation on water sorption/solubility and nanoleakage of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Baumgratz Cachapuz CHIMELI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of solvent evaporation in the kinetics of water diffusion (water sorption-WS, solubility-SL, and net water uptake and nanoleakage of adhesive systems. Material and Methods: Disk-shaped specimens (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm in thickness were produced (N=48 using the adhesives: Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3/Kuraray, Clearfil SE Bond - control group (CSE/Kuraray, Optibond Solo Plus (OS/Kerr and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU/3M ESPE. The solvents were either evaporated for 30 s or not evaporated (N=24/per group, and then photoactivated for 80 s (550 mW/cm2. After desiccation, the specimens were weighed and stored in distilled water (N=12 or mineral oil (N=12 to evaluate the water diffusion over a 7-day period. Net water uptake (% was also calculated as the sum of WS and SL. Data were submitted to 3-way ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%. The nanoleakage expression in three additional specimens per group was also evaluated after ammoniacal silver impregnation after 7 days of water storage under SEM. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that only the factor "adhesive" was significant (p<0.05. Solvent evaporation had no influence in the WS and SL of the adhesives. CSE (control presented significantly lower net uptake (5.4%. The nanoleakage was enhanced by the presence of solvent in the adhesives. Conclusions: Although the evaporation has no effect in the kinetics of water diffusion, the nanoleakage expression of the adhesives tested increases when the solvents are not evaporated.

  19. A new angle on clinging in geckos: incline, not substrate, triggers the deployment of the adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Anthony P.; Higham, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Lizards commonly climb in complex three-dimensional habitats, and gekkotans are particularly adept at doing this by using an intricate adhesive system involving setae on the ventral surface of their digits. However, it is not clear whether geckos always deploy their adhesive system, given that doing so may result in decreased (i.e. reduction in speed) locomotor performance. Here, we investigate circumstances under which the adhesive apparatus of clinging geckos becomes operative, and examine the potential trade-offs between speed and clinging. We quantify locomotor kinematics of a gecko with adhesive capabilities (Tarentola mauritanica) and one without (Eublepharis macularius). Whereas, somewhat unusually, E. macularius did not suffer a decrease in locomotor performance with an increase in incline, T. mauritanica exhibited a significant decrease in speed between the level and a 10° incline. We demonstrate that this results from the combined influence of slope and the deployment of the adhesive system. All individuals kept their digits hyperextended on the level, but three of the six individuals deployed their adhesive system on the 10° incline, and they exhibited the greatest decrease in velocity. The deployment of the adhesive system was dependent on incline, not surface texture (600 grit sandpaper and Plexiglas), despite slippage occurring on the level Plexiglas substrate. Our results highlight the type of sensory feedback (gravity) necessary for deployment of the adhesive system, and the trade-offs associated with adhesion. PMID:19656797

  20. Modelling and Laboratory Studies on the Adhesion Fatigue Performance for Thin-Film Asphalt and Aggregate System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion between asphalt and aggregate plays an important role in the performance of asphalt mixtures. A low-frequency adhesion fatigue test was proposed in this paper to study the effect of environment on the asphalt-aggregate adhesion system. The stress-based fatigue model had been utilized to describe the fatigue behavior of thin-film asphalt and aggregate system. The factors influencing the adhesion fatigue performance were also investigated. Experiment results show that asphalt has more important effect on the adhesion performance comparing with aggregate. Basalt, which is regarded as hydrophobic aggregates with low silica content, has better adhesion performance to asphalt binder when compared with granite. The effects of aging on the adhesion fatigue performance are different for PG64-22 and rubber asphalt. Long-term aging is found to reduce the adhesion fatigue lives for rubber asphalt and aggregate system, while the effect of long-term aging for aggregate and PG64-22 binder system is positive. Generally the increased stress amplitude and test temperature could induce greater damage and lead to less fatigue lives for adhesion test system.

  1. Effect of EDTA Conditioning on Microleakage of Four Adhesive Systems in Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shafiei

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluating the effect of dentin conditioning with EDTA on microleakage of composite resin restorations, using two etch and rinse and two self-etch adhesives.Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty extracted molars received class V cavity preparations right under the CEJ and were randomly divided into eight groups of 20, usingfour different adhesive systems. These adhesives included Adper Scotchbond Multi-purpose (SBMP, Adper Single Bond (SB, Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB, and Adper Prompt L-Pop (PLP. In the SBMP and SB experimental groups, EDTA was applied instead of phosphoric acid. In the CSEB and PLP experimental groups, EDTA conditioning was added to the bonding process. After thermocycling, the amount of dye penetration was evaluated using stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests.Results: Two etch and rinse adhesives (SBMP, SB showed a significantly lower micro-leakage than the two self-etch adhesives, CSEB and PLP, (P<0.05. No significant differ-ence was observed among the experimental groups. PLP and CSEB showed significantly less microleakage using EDTA conditioning (P<0.05. There was no significant difference for SBMP and SB when applying either phosphoric acid or EDTA.Conclusion: In the cases of SBMP and SB, EDTA conditioning is as effective as phos-phoric acid in preventing microleakage. In cases of CSEB and PLP, EDTA conditioning can significantly improve the sealing ability.

  2. Evaluation of Scotchbond Multipurpose and maleic acid as alternative methods of bonding orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, M E; Bishara, S E; Damon, P; Jakobsen, J R

    1997-05-01

    Damage to the enamel surface during bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets is a clinical concern. Alternative bonding methods that minimize enamel surface damage while maintaining a clinically useful bond strength is an aim of current research. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects on bond strength and bracket failure location of two adhesives (System 1+ and Scotchbond Multipurpose, 3M Dental Products Division) and two enamel conditioners (37% phosphoric acid and 10% maleic acid). Forty-eight freshly extracted human premolars were pumiced and divided into four groups of 12 teeth, and metal orthodontic brackets were attached to the enamel surface by one of four protocols: (1) System 1+ and phosphoric acid, (2) Scotchbond and phosphoric acid, (3) System 1+ and maleic acid, and (4) Scotchbond and maleic acid. After bracket attachment, the teeth were mounted in phenolic rings and stored in deionized water at 37 degrees C for 72 hours. A Zwick universal testing machine (Zwick GmbH & Co.) was used to determine shear bond strengths. The residual adhesive on the enamel surface was evaluated with the Adhesive Remnant Index. The analysis of variance was used to compare the four groups. Significance was predetermined at p adhesives on the enamel surfaces, revealed significant differences among the four groups (mean 2 = 0.005). A Duncan multiple range test revealed the difference occurred between the phosphoric acid and maleic acid groups, with maleic acid having bond failures at the enamel-adhesive interface. In conclusion, the use of Scotchbond Multipurpose and/or maleic acid does not significantly effect bond strength, however, the use of maleic acid resulted in an unfavorable bond failure location.

  3. Er:YAG pre-treatment for bonding of orthodontic bracket: 1 year of in vitro treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jesus Tavarez RR

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus Tavarez,1 Gisele Lima Bezerra,2 Karla Janilee de Souza Penha,3 Carlos Rocha Gomes Torres,4 Leily Macedo Firoozmand5 1Department of Dentistry, Ceuma University (UNICEUMA, 2Dentistry Program, Ceuma University (UNICEUMA, 3Dentistry Program, Federal University of Maranhão, UFMA, São Luís, MA, 4Restorative Dentistry Department, ICT UNESP University, São Paulo, 5Dentistry Department I, Federal University of Maranhão,UFMA, São Luís, MA, Brazil Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro bond strength of metal brackets bonded with: total etch, total etch with erbium: yttrium aluminum garnet laser (Er:YAG and self-etching adhesive systems, submitted to thermal-mechanical cycling, simulating 1 year of orthodontic treatment.Materials and methods: For the study, 80 bovine incisors were randomly divided into 3 experimental groups (n=16 each: XT- acid etching + Transbond XT, XT/Er:YAG- Transbond XT associated with Er:YAG laser irradiation (λ=2.94 μm, 60 mJ, 10 Hz and SEP- Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer. Samples were submitted to thermal-mechanical cycling, simulating 1 year of orthodontic treatment. Afterward, the shear bond strength test was performed in a universal test machine at a speed of 0.5mm/min. Samples were evaluated under a stereomicroscope and by scanning electron microscopy for analysis of enamel surface and adhesive remnant index. Data were analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney (with Bonferroni correction statistical tests.Results: Statistically significant difference was observed between the groups studied (p<0.05. Groups XT and SEP showed the highest bond strength values, without statistical difference between them, while group XT/Er:YAG showed reduction in bond strength values. Higher frequency of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive system was verified for groups XT and XT/Er:YAG.Conclusion: The conventional (XT and self-etching (SEP adhesive systems showed mean bond

  4. In Vitro Cytotoxicity Assessment of an Orthodontic Composite Containing Titanium-dioxide Nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heravi, Farzin; Ramezani, Mohammad; Poosti, Maryam; Hosseini, Mohsen; Shajiei, Arezoo; Ahrari, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Incorporation of nano-particles to orthodontic bonding systems has been considered to prevent enamel demineralization around appliances. This study investigated cytotoxicity of Transbond XT adhesive containing 1 wt% titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano-particles. Materials and methods. Ten composite disks were prepared from each of the conventional and TiO2-containg composites and aged for 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM). The extracts were obtained and exposed to culture media of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and mouse L929 fibroblasts. Cell viability was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results. Both adhesives were moderately toxic for HGF cells on the first day of the experiment, but the TiO2-containing adhesive produced significantly lower toxicity than the pure adhesive (P0.05). There was a significant reduction in cell toxicity with increasing pre-incubation time (Porthodontic adhesive containing TiO2 nano-particles indicated comparable or even lower toxicity than its nano-particle-free counterpart, indicating that incorporation of 1 wt% TiO2 nano-particles to the composite structure does not result in additional health hazards compared to that occurring with the pure adhesive.

  5. Effects of Different Radiation Doses on the Bond Strengths of Two Different Adhesive Systems to Enamel and Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Sandra Ribeiro de Barros; Ramos, Pedro Augusto Minorin Mendes; Haddad, Cecília Maria Kalil; da Silva, João Luis Fernandes; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of three different radiation doses on the bond strengths of two different adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Eighty human third molars were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the radiation dose (control/no radiation, 20 Gy, 40 Gy, and 70 Gy). The teeth were sagittally sectioned into three slices: one mesial and one distal section containing enamel and one middle section containing dentin. The sections were then placed in the enamel and dentin groups, which were further divided into two subgroups (n = 10) according to the adhesive used. Three restorations were performed in each tooth (one per section) using Adper Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE) or Universal Single Bond (3M ESPE) adhesive system and Filtek Z350 XT (3M ESPE) resin composite and subjected to the microshear bond test. Data were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test. Failure modes were examined under a stereoscopic loupe. Radiotherapy did not affect the bond strengths of the adhesives to either enamel or dentin. In dentin, the Universal Single Bond adhesive system showed higher bond strength values when compared with the Adper Single Bond adhesive system. More adhesive failures were observed in the enamel for all radiation doses and adhesives. Radiotherapy did not influence the bond strength to enamel or dentin, irrespective of the adhesive or radiation dose used.

  6. Microtensile bond strength of three simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; Purwanta, K.; Dogan, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft

  7. Microtensile Bond Strength of Three Simplified Adhesive Systems to Caries-affected Dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes; Purwanta, Kenny; Dogan, Nilgun; Kleverlaan, Cees J.; Feilzer, Albert J.

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft

  8. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Geary

    Full Text Available Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1 expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1. Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism

  9. Nanoparticles in orthodontics, a review of antimicrobial and anti-caries applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Borzabadi, Ebrahim; Lynch, Edward

    2014-08-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are insoluble particles smaller than 100 nm in size. In order to prevent microbial adhesion or enamel demineralization in orthodontic therapy, two broad strategies have been used. These are incorporating certain NPs into orthodontic adhesives/cements or acrylic resins (nanofillers, silver, TiO2, SiO2, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite, fluorohydroxyapatite) and coating surfaces of orthodontic appliances with NPs (i.e. coating bracket surfaces with a thin film of nitrogen-doped TiO2). Although the use of NPs in orthodontics can offer new possibilities, previous studies investigated the antimicrobial or physical characteristic over a short time span, i.e. 24 hours to a few weeks, and the limitations of in vitro studies should be recognized. Information on the long-term performance of orthodontic material using nanotechnology is lacking and necessitates further investigation and so do possible safety issues (toxicity), which can be related to the NP sizes.

  10. Microleakage comparison of three types of adhesive systems versus GIC-based adhesive in class V composite restorations

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    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: New dentin bonding agents and techniques have been developed to reduce microleakage and create higher bond strength. This in-vitro study compared the microleakage of three resin-based adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive on class V composite restorations.  Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 72 sound premolars, randomly assigned to six groups (n=12 and treated as follows: without any treatment (negative control group; total-etch (OptiBond Solo Plus; two-step self-etch (OptiBond XTR; one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One and GIC-based adhesive (Fuji bond LC with pre-cure and co-cure techniques. The treated cavities were filled with a micro-hybrid resin composite (Point 4, Kerr. Following finishing and polishing procedures, the specimens were placed in 100% humidity, stored in distilled water, thermocycled and then immersed in a methylene blue, sectioned, evaluated for microleakage and scored on a 0 to 3 ordinal scale.  Results: None of the adhesives tested were capable of completely eliminating marginal microleakage. There were statistically significant differences among the test groups at occlusal margins; but at cervical margins were not. The Fuji Bond LC with co-cure and control groups had significantly greater microleakage scores at the occlusal margins. At the cervical margins, the bonded restorations with OptiBond XTR and OptiBond All-in-One adhesives presented significantly lower microleakage scores. Also, there were no significant differences between the resin adhesive groups both at occlusal and cervical margins. The microleakage scores at the cervical margins were markedly higher than the occlusal margins in the groups bonded with OptiBond Solo Plus and Fuji Bond LC with pre-cure. The differences between Fuji Bond LC adhesive with pre-cure and co-cure techniques were significant. Conclusion: This study encourages application of the Fuji bond LC adhesive with pre

  11. Amalgam shear bond strength to dentin using single-bottle primer/adhesive systems.

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    Cobb, D S; Denehy, G E; Vargas, M A

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate the in vitro shear bond strengths (SBS) of a spherical amalgam alloy (Tytin) to dentin using several single-bottle primer/adhesive systems both alone: Single Bond (SB), OptiBond Solo (Sol), Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB), One-Step (OS) and in combination with the manufacturer's supplemental amalgam bonding agent: Single Bond w/3M RelyX ARC (SBX) and Prime & Bond 2.1 w/Amalgam Bonding Accessory Kit (PBA). Two, three-component adhesive systems, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus w/light curing (S + V) and w/o light curing (S+) were used for comparison. One hundred eight extracted human third molars were mounted lengthwise in phenolic rings with acrylic resin. The proximal surfaces were ground to expose a flat dentin surface, then polished to 600 grit silicon carbide paper. The teeth were randomly assigned to 9 groups (n = 12), and dentin surfaces in each group were treated with an adhesive system according to the manufacturer's instructions, except for S + V specimens, where the adhesive was light cured for 10 s before placing the amalgam. Specimens were then secured in a split Teflon mold, having a 3 mm diameter opening and amalgam was triturated and condensed onto the treated dentin surfaces. Twenty minutes after condensation, the split mold was separated. Specimens were placed in distilled water for 24 hrs, then thermocycled (300 cycles, between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, with 12 s dwell time). All specimens were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 7 days, prior to shear strength testing using a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The highest to the lowest mean dentin shear bond strength values (MPa) for the adhesive systems tested were: S + V (10.3 +/- 2.3), SBX (10.2 +/- 3.5), PBA, (6.4 +/- 3.6), SOL (5.8 +/- 2.5), SBMP (5.7 +/- 1.8), S+ (4.8 +/- 2.3), PB (2.7 +/- 2.6), SB (2.7 +/- 1.1) and OS (2.5 +/- 1.8). One-way ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple Range Test indicated significant

  12. Two-year clinical evaluation of three adhesive systems in non-carious cervical lesions

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    Evrim Eliguzeloglu Dalkilic

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Adhesive systems are continuously being introduced to Dentistry, unfortunately often without sufficient clinical validation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of cervical restorations done with three different adhesive systems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 158 non-carious cervical lesions of 23 patients were restored with a nanofilled composite resin (Filtek Supreme, 3M/ESPE combined with Single Bond (3M/ESPE, group SI, Clearfil SE (Kuraray Medical Inc., group CL and Xeno III (De Trey Dentsply, group XE. In groups SI-B, CL-B and XE-B, the outer surface of the sclerotic dentin was removed by roughening with a diamond bur before application of the respective adhesive systems. In groups CL-BP and XE-BP, after removal of the outer surface of the sclerotic dentin with the bur, the remaining dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and the self-etch adhesive systems Clearfil SE and Xeno III were applied, respectively. Lesions were evaluated at baseline, and restorations after 3 months, 1 year and 2 years using modified USPHS criteria. RESULTS: After 2 years, no significant difference was found between the retention rates of the groups (p >0.05. Although groups CL and SI showed significantly better marginal adaptation than group XE (p0.05. After 2 years no significant difference was observed among the marginal staining results of all groups (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: Although all adhesive systems showed similar retention rates, Clearfil SE and Single Bond showed better marginal adaptation than Xeno III after 2 years of follow-up.

  13. Influence of laser etching on enamel and dentin bond strength of Silorane System Adhesive.

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    Ustunkol, Ildem; Yazici, A Ruya; Gorucu, Jale; Dayangac, Berrin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of Silorane System Adhesive to enamel and dentin surfaces that had been etched with different procedures. Ninety freshly extracted human third molars were used for the study. After the teeth were embedded with buccal surfaces facing up, they were randomly divided into two groups. In group I, specimens were polished with a 600-grit silicon carbide (SiC) paper to obtain flat exposed enamel. In group II, the overlying enamel layer was removed and exposed dentin surfaces were polished with a 600-grit SiC paper. Then, the teeth in each group were randomly divided into three subgroups according to etching procedures: etched with erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser (a), etched with 35% phosphoric acid (b), and non-etched (c, control). Silorane System Adhesive was used to bond silorane restorative to both enamel and dentin. After 24-h storage in distilled water at room temperature, a SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests (p enamel and dentin (p > 0.05). The SBS of self-etch adhesive to dentin was not statistically different from enamel (p > 0.05). Phosphoric acid treatment seems the most promising surface treatment for increasing the enamel and dentin bond strength of Silorane System Adhesive.

  14. Allergy and orthodontics

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    Chakravarthi, Sunitha; Padmanabhan, Sridevi; Chitharanjan, Arun B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the current literature on allergy in orthodontics and to identify the predisposing factors and the implications of the allergic reaction in the management of patients during orthodontic treatment. A computerized literature search was conducted in PubMed for articles published on allergy in relation to orthodontics. The MeSH term used was allergy and orthodontics. Allergic response to alloys in orthodontics, particularly nickel, has been extensively studied and several case reports of nickel-induced contact dermatitis have been documented. Current evidence suggests that the most common allergic reaction reported in orthodontics is related to nickel in orthodontic appliances and allergic response is more common in women due to a previous sensitizing exposure from nickel in jewellery. Studies have implicated allergy in the etiology of hypo-dontia. It has also been considered as a high-risk factor for development of extensive root resorption during the course of orthodontic treatment. This review discusses the relationship and implications of allergy in orthodontics. PMID:24987632

  15. Orthodontic forces released by low-friction versus conventional systems during alignment of apically or buccally malposed teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Camporesi, Matteo; Defraia, Efisio

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the forces released by passive stainless steel self-ligating brackets (SLBs) and by a non-conventional elastomeric ligature-bracket system on conventional brackets ([slide ligatures on conventional brackets (SLCB)]) when compared with conventional elastomeric ligatures on conventional brackets (CLCB) during the alignment of apically or buccally malposed teeth in the maxillary arch. An experimental model consisting of five brackets was used to assess the forces released by the three different bracket-ligature systems with 0.012-inch super-elastic (SE) nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires in the presence of different amounts of apical or buccal canine misalignment of the canine (ranging from 1.5 to 6 mm). The forces released by each wire/bracket/ligature combination with the three different amounts of apical or buccal canine misalignment were tested 20 times. Comparisons between the different types of wire/bracket/ligature systems were carried out by means of analysis of variance on ranks with Dunnett's post hoc test (P < 0.05). No difference in the amount of force released in presence of a misalignment of 1.5 mm was recorded among the three systems. At 3 mm of apical misalignment a significantly greater amount of orthodontic force was released by SLB or SLCB when compared with CLCB, while no significant differences were found among the three systems at 3 mm of buccal canine displacement. When correction of a large amount of misalignment (6 mm) was attempted, a noticeable amount of force for alignment was still generated by the passive SLB and SLCB systems while no force was released in presence of CLCB.

  16. Reliability of a Novel CBCT-Based 3D Classification System for Maxillary Canine Impactions in Orthodontics: The KPG Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Luca; Martin, Conchita

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate both intra- and interoperator reliability of a radiological three-dimensional classification system (KPG index) for the assessment of degree of difficulty for orthodontic treatment of maxillary canine impactions. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of fifty impacted canines, obtained using three different scanners (NewTom, Kodak, and Planmeca), were classified using the KPG index by three independent orthodontists. Measurements were repeated one month later. Based on these two sessions, several recommendations on KPG Index scoring were elaborated. After a joint calibration session, these recommendations were explained to nine orthodontists and the two measurement sessions were repeated. There was a moderate intrarater agreement in the precalibration measurement sessions. After the calibration session, both intra- and interrater agreement were almost perfect. Indexes assessed with Kodak Dental Imaging 3D module software showed a better reliability in z-axis values, whereas indexes assessed with Planmeca Romexis software showed a better reliability in x- and y-axis values. No differences were found between the CBCT scanners used. Taken together, these findings indicate that the application of the instructions elaborated during this study improved KPG index reliability, which was nevertheless variously influenced by the use of different software for images evaluation. PMID:24235889

  17. Reliability of a Novel CBCT-Based 3D Classification System for Maxillary Canine Impactions in Orthodontics: The KPG Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Dalessandri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate both intra- and interoperator reliability of a radiological three-dimensional classification system (KPG index for the assessment of degree of difficulty for orthodontic treatment of maxillary canine impactions. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT scans of fifty impacted canines, obtained using three different scanners (NewTom, Kodak, and Planmeca, were classified using the KPG index by three independent orthodontists. Measurements were repeated one month later. Based on these two sessions, several recommendations on KPG Index scoring were elaborated. After a joint calibration session, these recommendations were explained to nine orthodontists and the two measurement sessions were repeated. There was a moderate intrarater agreement in the precalibration measurement sessions. After the calibration session, both intra- and interrater agreement were almost perfect. Indexes assessed with Kodak Dental Imaging 3D module software showed a better reliability in z-axis values, whereas indexes assessed with Planmeca Romexis software showed a better reliability in x- and y-axis values. No differences were found between the CBCT scanners used. Taken together, these findings indicate that the application of the instructions elaborated during this study improved KPG index reliability, which was nevertheless variously influenced by the use of different software for images evaluation.

  18. The effect of different environmental factors on force degradation of three common systems of orthodontic space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshagh, Morteza; Khajeh, Farzaneh; Heidari, Somayeh; Torkan, Sepideh; Fattahi, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Different environmental conditions, such as high temperature or exposure to some chemical agents, may affect the force decay of different methods of space closure during orthodontic treatment. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the force decay pattern in the presence of tea as a popular drink in some parts of the world and two mouthwashes that are usually prescribed by the orthodontist once the treatment is in progress. Elastic chain (EC), nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) closed coil spring and tie-back (TB) method were used as the means of space closure. The specimens were placed in five different media: Hot tea, hot water (65°), chlorhexidine mouthwash, fluoride mouthwash and the control group (water at 37°). The specimens were stretched 25 mm and the elastic force of three systems was measured at the beginning of the study, after 24 h, after 1 week and after 3 weeks. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the results between the groups and Duncan test was carried out to compare the sets of means in different groups (P ≤ 0.05). Tea increases the force decay in the EC and TB groups. Oral mouthwashes also resulted in more rapid force decay than the control group. EC and Ni-Ti groups were not much affected in the presence of oral mouthwashes. Regarding the immersion media, TB method showed the biggest variation in different media and Ni-Ti coil spring was least affected by the type of media.

  19. Shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to normal and caries-affected dentin

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    Niloofar Shadman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: According to the effect of the adhesive and substrate type on the bond strength, examination of the adhesive is required in all aspects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to normal dentin (ND and caries affected dentin (CAD in permanent teeth. METHODS: Thirty extracted molars with small occlusal caries were selected. After preparation and determination of ND and CAD by caries detector, teeth were divided into three groups and treated with one of the two tested adhesives: Single Bond 2 (SB2, Scotchbond Universal with etch (SBU-ER, and Scotchbond Universal without etch (SBU-SE. Then composite (Filtek Z-250 XT were attached to the surfaces and cured. After water storage (24 hours and thermocycling (500 cycles 5-55 °C, bond strength was calculated and failure modes were determined by stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post-hoc test [Tukey HSD (honest significant difference] and with P ˂ 0.050 as the level of significance. RESULTS: Only SBU-ER had significantly higher shear bond strength than SBU-SE in ND (P = 0.027 and CAD (P = 0.046. Bond strength in SBU-ER the highest and in SBU-SE had the lowest amounts in CAD and ND. There was no significant difference in each group between ND and CAD. CONCLUSION: The 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (SBU-ER had higher bond strength to ND and CAD than the selfetch adhesive (SBU-SE.

  20. Factors Affecting the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets - a Review of In Vitro Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhadher, Waleed; Halawany, Hassan; Talic, Nabeel; Abraham, Nimmi; Jacob, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    The adhesive material used to bond orthodontic brackets to teeth should neither fail during the treatment period, resulting in treatment delays, untoward expenses or patient inconvenience nor should it damage the enamel on debonding at the end of the treatment. Although the effectiveness of a bonding system and any unfavorable effects on the enamel may be studied by conducting in-vivo studies, it is nearly impossible to independently analyze different variables that influence a specific bonding system in the oral environment. In-vitro studies, on the other hand, may utilize more standardized protocols for testing different bonding systems and materials available. Thus, the present review focused attention on in-vitro studies and made an attempt to discuss material-related, teeth-related (fluorotic vs non-fluorotic teeth) and other miscellaneous factors that influences the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Within the limitations of this review, using conventional acid-etch technique, ceramic brackets and bonding to non-fluorotic teeth was reported to have a positive influence on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets, but higher shear bond strength found on using ceramic brackets can be dangerous for the enamel.

  1. A clinical investigation of force delivery systems for orthodontic space closure.

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    Nightingale, C; Jones, S P

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the force retention, and rates of space closure achieved by elastomeric chain and nickel titanium coil springs. Randomized clinical trial. Eastman Dental Hospital, London and Queen Mary's University Hospital, Roehampton, 1998-2000. Twenty-two orthodontic patients, wearing the pre-adjusted edgewise appliance undergoing space closure in opposing quadrants, using sliding mechanics on 0.019 x 0.025-inch posted stainless steel archwires. Medium-spaced elastomeric chain [Durachain, OrthoCare (UK) Ltd., Bradford, UK] and 9-mm nickel titanium coil springs [OrthoCare (UK) Ltd.] were placed in opposing quadrants for 15 patients. Elastomeric chain only was used in a further seven patients. The initial forces on placement and residual forces at the subsequent visit were measured with a dial push-pull gauge [Orthocare (UK) Ltd]. Study models of eight patients were taken before and after space closure, from which measurements were made to establish mean space closure. The forces were measured in grammes and space closure in millimetres. Fifty-nine per cent (31/53) of the elastomeric sample maintained at least 50 per cent of the initial force over a time period of 1-15 weeks. No sample lost all its force, and the mean loss was 47 per cent (range: 0-76 per cent). Nickel titanium coil springs lost force rapidly over 6 weeks, following that force levels plateaued. Forty-six per cent (12/26) maintained at least 50 per cent of their initial force over a time period of 1-22 weeks, and mean force loss was 48 per cent (range: 12-68 per cent). The rate of mean weekly space closure for elastomeric chain was 0.21 mm and for nickel titanium coil springs 0.26 mm. There was no relationship between the initial force applied and rate of space closure. None of the sample failed during the study period giving a 100 per cent response rate. In clinical use, the force retention of elastomeric chain was better than previously concluded. High initial forces resulted in high force decay

  2. The difference of tensile bond strength between total and self etch adhesive systems in dentin

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    Selly Yusalina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Total etch adhesive system has been widely used in teeth conservation area as an adhesive agent before implicating composite resin restoration agent. The aim of this research is to prove the difference of tensile bond strength between total etch (Single Bond and self etch adhesive system (Adper prompt L-Pop on dentin surface in vitro. The extracted and non carries maxillary premolar teeth were used in this research and were divided into 2 groups. The first group comprised 15 specimen teeth etched in phosphoric acid and was applicated with the Single Bond adhesive agent. The second group comprised 15 specimen teeth, applicated with the Adper Prompt-L-Pop. The composite resin (Z 350, 3M was applied incrementally and each of the layers was rayed for 20 seconds. The specimens were stored in physiologic solution before they were tested. Tensile bond strength was measured by LRX Plus Lloyd Instrument, with 1 N load and 1 mm/minute speed, and the measurement result was in Mpa unit. The result was evaluated statistically by the Student t-test with α = 0.05. Single Bond (the 5th generation showed a better bond strength compared to the Adper Prompt-L-Pop (the 6th generation.

  3. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods: Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives – Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems – Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system – Adper Single Bond (SB). Resin composite (Filtek Z250) crown buildups were made on the bonded surfaces and incrementally light-cured for 20 s. The restored tooth-quarters were stored in water at 37°C for 24 h and then sectioned into beams (0.8 mm2 in cross-section). Maximal microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) was recorded (0.5 mm/min in crosshead speed). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Thirty additional teeth were used to investigate the hybridization quality by SEM using silver methenamine or ammoniacal silver nitrate dyes. Results: SE reached significantly higher μ-TBS (P 0.05), and between SB and ADP (P > 0.05); ADSE and XE were significantly higher than SB and ADP (P adhesives with dentin. The hybridization quality was essential to improve the immediate μ-TBS to dentin. PMID:24926212

  4. Influence of intrapulpal pressure simulation on the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin

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    Marcio Vivan Cardoso

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of intrapulpal pressure simulation on the bonding effectiveness of etch & rinse and self-etch adhesives to dentin. Eighty sound human molars were distributed into eight groups, according to the permeability level of each sample, measured by an apparatus to assess hydraulic conductance (Lp. Thus, a similar mean permeability was achieved in each group. Three etch & rinse adhesives (Prime & Bond NT - PB, Single Bond -SB, and Excite - EX and one self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond - SE were employed, varying the presence or absence of an intrapulpal pressure (IPP simulation of 15 cmH2O. After adhesive and restorative procedures were carried out, the samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C, and taken for tensile bond strength (TBS testing. Fracture analysis was performed using a light microscope at 40 X magnification. The data, obtained in MPa, were then submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test ( a = 0.05. The results revealed that the TBS of SB and EX was significantly reduced under IPP simulation, differing from the TBS of PB and SE. Moreover, SE obtained the highest bond strength values in the presence of IPP. It could be concluded that IPP simulation can influence the bond strength of certain adhesive systems to dentin and should be considered when in vitro studies are conducted.

  5. A discerning approach to simple aesthetic orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, J H; Sharma, S; Roberts-Harry, D; Qureshi, T

    2015-02-16

    There is currently considerable interest from general dental practitioners (GDPs) in the use of simple orthodontics to treat adult malocclusions. There is controversy in this, particularly in relation to 'quick fixes', simple orthodontics and 'straight teeth in six months' as opposed to more conventional treatment where the whole malocclusion is treated. This article will present a case for the use of simple aesthetic adult orthodontics in a measured and planned way. It will discuss the processes, planning and the importance of consent. It will also highlight how digital technology is used to preview, consent and execute an aesthetic result. Many of the recent systems emerging, have been as a result of the demand and supply of cosmetic dentistry. This, to a degree, has not helped since the implication of a 'quick-fix' is associated with this field. There has also been discussion on what the limits of GDP orthodontics should be. There is variability in how GDPs approach orthodontics, their experience, skill and ability to treat to an acceptable standard. Short courses may be one way of delivering orthodontic training but some of these courses are not regulated and the amount of internal mentoring is variable. This article highlights some of the systems in use, and potential upsides and downsides of this approach.

  6. Influence of AC system design on the realisation of tractive efforts by high adhesion locomotives

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    Spiryagin, Maksym; Wolfs, Peter; Cole, Colin; Stichel, Sebastian; Berg, Mats; Manfred, Plöchl

    2017-08-01

    The main task for heavy haul railway operators is to reduce the cost of exported minerals and enhance the long-term viability of rail transport operations through increasing productivity by running longer and heavier trains. The common opinion is that this is achievable by means of implementation of high adhesion locomotives with advanced AC traction technologies. Modern AC high adhesion locomotives are very complex mechatronic systems and can be designed with two alternative traction topologies of either bogie or individual axle controls. This paper describes a modelling approach for these two types of AC traction systems with the application of an advanced co-simulation methodology, where an electrical system and a traction algorithm are modelled in Matlab/Simulink, and a mechanical system is modelled in a multibody software package. Although the paper concentrates on the analysis of the functioning for these two types of traction control systems, the choice of reference slip values also has an influence on the performance of both systems. All these design variations and issues have been simulated for various adhesion conditions at the wheel-rail interface and their influence on the high traction performance of a locomotive equipped with two three-axle bogies has been discussed.

  7. Effects of fixed orthodontic treatment on nickel and chromium levels in gingival crevicular fluid as a novel systemic biomarker of trace elements: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Fariborz; Shariati, Mahsa; Sobouti, Farhad; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2016-05-01

    Nickel and chromium might induce hypersensitivity. Therefore, they are of interest to orthodontists. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) is highly relevant to orthodontic treatments and might reflect systemic changes associated with the inflammatory response induced by orthodontic forces. Therefore, it might also be used to show metal ion changes. Nevertheless, baseline metal levels of GCF are unknown, and the effect of orthodontic treatment on GCF metal levels has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to assess the levels of nickel and chromium in GCF. Based on a pilot study, the sample size was predetermined as 24 × 3 measurements to obtain test powers above 90%. Nickel and chromium concentrations were measured before treatment and 1 month and 6 months later in 12 female and 12 male patients who had fixed orthodontic appliances using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The gingival index was also evaluated in each session. The effects of treatment on GCF ions were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance and Friedman tests (α = 0.05, β ≤0.01). The gingival index worsened over time (chi-square test, P <0.001). The mean nickel levels were 3.894 ± 1.442, 5.913 ± 2.735, and 19.810 ± 8.452 μg per gram, respectively, at baseline, month 1, and month 6. Chromium concentrations were 1.978 ± 0.721, 4.135 ± 1.591, and 13.760 ± 3.555 μg per gram, respectively. Compared with the baseline, nickel increased by 150% and 510%, respectively, in the first and sixth months (Friedman, P <0.0001), and chromium increased by 200% and 700%, respectively (analysis of variance, P <0.0001). Six months of fixed orthodontic treatment might intensify the levels of nickel and chromium in the GCF as well as gingival inflammation. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bracket bond strength and cariostatic potential of an experimental resin adhesive system containing Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masanori; Nakagaki, Susumu; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kohda, Naohisa; Endo, Kazuhiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2012-09-01

    To determine if a new experimental resin-based material containing Portland cement (PC) can help prevent enamel caries while providing adequate shear bond strength (SBS). Brackets were bonded to human premolars with experimental resin-based adhesive pastes composed of three weight rations of resin and PC powder (PC 30, 7:3; PC 50, 5:5; PC 70, 3:7; n  =  7). Self-etching primer (SEP) adhesive (Transbond Plus) and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesive (Fuji Ortho FC Automix) were used for comparison. All of the bonded teeth were subjected to alternating immersion in demineralizing (pH 4.55) and remineralizing (pH 6.8) solutions for 14 days. The SBS for each sample was examined, and the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was calculated. The hardness and elastic modulus of the enamel were determined by a nanoindenter at 20 equidistant depths from the external surface at 100 µm from the bracket edge. Data were compared by one-way analysis of variance and a chi-square test. PC 50 and PC 70 showed significantly greater SBS than Fuji Ortho FC Automix, although Transbond Plus showed significantly greater SBS than other bonding systems. No significant difference in the ARI category was observed among the five groups. For specimens bonded with PC 50 and PC 70, the hardness and elastic modulus values in most locations were equivalent to those of Fuji Ortho FC Automix. Experimental resin-based bonding material containing PC provides adequate SBS and a caries-preventive effect equivalent to that of the RMGIC adhesive system.

  9. Effect of saliva decontamination procedures on shear bond strength of a one-step adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülker, E; Bilgin, S; Kahvecioğlu, F; Erkan, A I

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of different saliva decontamination procedures on the shear bond strength of a one-step universal adhesive system (Single Bond™ Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). The occlusal surfaces of 75 human third molars were ground to expose dentin. The teeth were divided into the following groups: Group 1 (control group): Single Bond™ Universal Adhesive was applied to the prepared tooth according to the manufacturer's recommendations and light cured; no contamination procedure was performed. Group 2: Bonding, light curing, saliva contamination, and dry. Group 3: Bonding, light curing, saliva contamination, rinse, and dry. Group 4: After the procedure performed in Group 2, reapplication of bonding. Group 5: After the procedure performed in Group 3, reapplication of bonding. Then, composite resins were applied with cylindrical-shaped plastic matrixes and light cured. For shear bond testing, a notch-shaped force transducer apparatus was applied to each specimen at the interface between the tooth and composite until failure occurred. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA. One-way ANOVA revealed significant differences in shear bond strength between the control group and experimental Groups 2 and 4 (P 0.05). The present in vitro study showed that water rinsing is necessary if cured adhesive resin is contaminated with saliva to ensure adequate bond strength.

  10. [Preprosthetic orthodontic treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prahl-Andersen, B.; Prahl, C.; Baat, C. de; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of a preprosthetic orthodontic treatment is to position the teeth in such a way that a treatment with (fixed) dental prostheses is made possible or simplified or to affect the result of this treatment positively. Conceivable preprosthetic orthodontic treatments are: correcting primary

  11. Enamel and dentin bond strengths of a new self-etch adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Ricardo; Swift, Edward J; Boushell, Lee W; Braswell, Krista

    2011-12-01

    statement of problem:  Self-etch adhesives typically are mildly acidic and therefore less effective than etch-and-rinse adhesives for bonding to enamel.   The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enamel and dentin shear bond strengths of a new two-step self-etch adhesive system, OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA, USA).   The labial surfaces of 80 bovine teeth were ground to create flat, 600-grit enamel or dentin surfaces. Composite was bonded to enamel or dentin using the new two-step self-etch system or a three-step etch-and-rinse (OptiBond FL, Kerr), two-step self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray America, Houston, TX, USA), or one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno IV, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA). Following storage in water for 24 hours, shear bond strengths were determined using a universal testing machine. The enamel and dentin data sets were subjected to separate analysis of variance and Tukey's tests. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the effects of each system on enamel.   Mean shear bond strengths to enamel ranged from 18.1 MPa for Xeno IV to 41.0 MPa for OptiBond FL. On dentin, the means ranged from 33.3 MPa for OptiBond FL to 47.1 MPa for Clearfil SE Bond. OptiBond XTR performed as well as Clearfil SE Bond on dentin and as well as OptiBond FL on enamel. Field emission scanning electron microscope revealed that OptiBond XTR produced an enamel etch pattern that was less defined than that of OptiBond FL (37.5% phosphoric acid) but more defined than that of Clearfil SE Bond or Xeno IV.   The new two-step self-etch adhesive system formed excellent bonds to enamel and dentin in vitro. OptiBond XTR, a new two-step self-etch adhesive system, is a promising material for bonding to enamel as well as to dentin. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Are claims made in orthodontic journal advertisements evidence-supported?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Christos; Kouskoura, Thaleia; Ren, Yijin; Katsaros, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2015-03-01

    To examine the supporting evidence of advertisements published in six leading orthodontic journals. The 2012-2013 printed issues of American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Australian Orthodontic Journal, Journal of Orthodontics, European Journal of Orthodontics, Journal of Clinical Orthodontics, and Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics were screened for advertisements implying superior performance compared with competitor products. Advertisements were classified according to type of product, availability, and currency of supporting references. A total of 99 unique advertisements claiming clinical benefit or superiority were identified. The overwhelming majority of the identified advertisements promoted appliance products (62.6%), orthodontic materials (14.1%), and dental operatory equipment, including imaging systems (12.1%). Advertisements were found to provide references or not regardless of the product type. Half of the advertisements referred to at least one peer-reviewed publication, whereas unpublished studies were cited by 25% of the advertisements. Most of the referenced articles were published within the past 5 years. The scientific background of advertisements in the orthodontic literature appears limited. While surveillance of journal advertising needs to be regulated, clinicians are urged to critically appraise the claims being made in orthodontic print advertisements by consulting the associated existing evidence.

  13. Local and systemic effects of fibrin and cyanoacrylate adhesives on lung lesions in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V.H. Carvalho

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Tissue adhesives can be used to prevent pulmonary air leaks, which frequently occur after lung interventions. The objective of this study is to evaluate local and systemic effects of fibrin and cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives on lung lesions in rabbits. METHODS: Eighteen rabbits were submitted to videothoracoscopy + lung incision alone (control or videothoracoscopy + lung incision + local application of fibrin or cyanoacrylate adhesive. Blood samples were collected and assessed for leukocyte, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts and interleukin-8 levels preoperatively and at 48 hours and 28 days post-operatively. After 28 days, the animals were euthanized for gross examination of the lung surface, and lung fragments were excised for histopathological analysis. RESULTS: Fibrin and cyanoacrylate produced similar adhesion scores of the lung to the parietal pleura. Microscopic analysis revealed uniform low-cellular tissue infiltration in the fibrin group and an intense tissue reaction characterized by dense inflammatory infiltration of granulocytes, giant cells and necrosis in the cyanoacrylate group. No changes were detected in the leukocyte, neutrophil or lymphocyte count at any time-point, while the interleukin-8 levels were increased in the fibrin and cyanoacrylate groups after 48 hours compared with the pre-operative control levels (p<0.01. CONCLUSION: Both adhesive agents promoted normal tissue healing, with a more pronounced local inflammatory reaction observed for cyanoacrylate. Among the serum markers of inflammation, only the interleukin-8 levels changed post-operatively, increasing after 48 hours and decreasing after 28 days to levels similar to those of the control group in both the fibrin and cyanoacrylate groups.

  14. Opto-acoustic technique to evaluate adhesion strength of thin-film systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yoshida

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An opto-acoustic technique is proposed to evaluate the adhesion strength of thin film systems at the film-substrate interface. The thin-film system to be examined is configured as an end-mirror of a Michelson interferometer, and driven from the rear with an acoustic transducer at audible frequencies. The amplitude of the resultant oscillation of the film is quantified as the variation in the contrast of the interferometric fringe pattern observed with a digital camera at 30 frames/s. As a proof of concept, experiment has been conducted with the use of a pair of strongly and weakly adhered Au-coated Si-wafer specimens. The technique successfully differentiates the adhesion strength of the specimens.

  15. Shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using different dentin adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farimah Sardari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using four dentin adhesive systems.Materials and Methods: One hundred human molars were selected. After enamel removal, a dentin cylinder with 3 mm thickness was prepared. Eighty specimens were resorted with amalgam and four dentin adhesive systems as follows (n=20: group 1, Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose; group 2, One Coat Bond; group 3, PQ1; and group 4, Panavia-F. In group 5, 20 specimens were resorted with amalgam and varnish as control group. The specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 h. The shear bond strengths were then measured by using push out method. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Duncan's tests.Results: Mean values for bond strengths of test groups were as follows: group 1=21.03±8.9, group 2=23.47±9, group 3=13.16±8.8, group 4=20.07±8.9 and group 5=14.15±8.7 MPa±SD. One-way ANOVA showed the statistically significant difference between the bond strengths of five groups (P=0.001. Post hoc Duncan's test showed significant difference between groups 1and 3 (P=0.008, groups 1 and 5 (P=0.019, groups 2 and 5 (P=0.0008, groups 4 and 5 (P=0.042, and groups 3 and 4 (P=0.018.Conclusion: Results of this study showed that the bond strength of amalgam to dentin using One Coat Bond as dentin adhesive system was higher than that observed in other dentin adhesive systems.

  16. Effects of bleaching agents and adhesive systems in dental pulp: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Maria Antonieta Veloso Carvalho de; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Magalhães, Denildo; Biffi, João Carlos Gabrielli

    2012-01-01

    The dental pulp may be exposed to several irritants that are potentially noxious to the health and functions of this tissue. Each type of irritant or injury has different effects on the pulp, which are generally characterized by acute inflammation, chronic inflammation or necrosis. Common examples of irritants are dental caries, cavity preparation procedures, traumatic injuries, and chemical substances like bleaching agents and adhesive systems. The present study aimed to review the current k...

  17. Evaluation of bond strength of a conventional adhesive system in irradiated teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Jordan de CARVALHO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction One of the most common treatments of head and neck cancer patients is radiotherapy, a treatment method which uses ionizing radiation beam and destroys tumor cells, minimizing damage to neighbor cells. Purpose To evaluate the bond strength of a conventional adhesive system in irradiated teeth. Method 24 third human molars, 12 of which were randomly exposed to radiation and prepared from the removal of occlusal enamel, then exposed to a flat dentine surface. The adhesive system Stae was applied according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Next, two 2 mm increments of resin were implemented. The samples were hemi sectioned specimens, originating shapped toothpick. To evaluate the bond strength, a micro tensile test was done with 500N load and speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Result There was no statistically significant difference between the bond strength of teeth which were or were not exposed to radiation and which used a conventional adhesive system. Conclusion Although the radiation doses applied may cause some alterations in microscopic range in dental tissues, it can be concluded that these alterations do not influence in the bond strength in dentin of irradiated teeth.

  18. Influence of CVD diamond tips and Er:YAG laser irradiation on bonding of different adhesive systems to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Melissa Aline; Di Nicolo, Rebeca; Barcellos, Daphne Camara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Pucci, Cesar Rogerio; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of three adhesive systems, using different methods of dentin preparation. A hundred and eight bovine teeth were used. The dentin from buccal face was exposed and prepared with three different methods, divided in 3 groups: Group 1 (DT)- diamond tip on a high-speed handpiece; Group 2 (CVD)-CVD tip on a ultrasonic handpiece; Group 3 (LA)-Er: YAG laser. The teeth were divided into 3 subgroups, according adhesive systems used: Subgroup 1-Adper Single Bond Plus/3M ESPE (SB) total-etch adhesive; Subgroup 2-Adper Scotchbond SE/3M ESPE (AS) selfetching adhesive; Subgroup 3-Clearfil SE Bond/Kuraray (CS) selfetching adhesive. Blocks of composite (Filtek Z250-3M ESPE) 4 mm high were built up and specimens were stored in deionized water for 24 hours at 37°C. Serial mesiodistal and buccolingual cuts were made and stick-like specimens were obtained, with transversal section of 1.0 mm(2). The samples were submitted to microtensile test at 1 mm/min and load of 10 kg in a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (p adhesive produced significantly lower bond strength values compared to other groups. Surface treatment with Er: YAG laser associated with Single Bond Plus or Clearfil SE Bond adhesives and surface treatment with CVD tip associated with Adper Scotchbond SE adhesive produced significantly lower bond strength values compared to surface treatment with diamond or CVD tips associated with Single Bond Plus or Adper Scotchbond SE adhesives. Interactions between laser and the CVD tip technologies and the different adhesive systems can produce a satisfactory bonding strength result, so that these associations may be beneficial and enhance the clinical outcomes.

  19. Implants for orthodontic anchorage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaowen; Sun, Yannan; Zhang, Yimei; Cai, Ting; Sun, Feng; Lin, Jiuxiang

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Implantanchorage continues to receive much attention as an important orthodontic anchorage. Since the development of orthodontic implants, the scope of applications has continued to increase. Although multiple reviews detailing implants have been published, no comprehensive evaluations have been performed. Thus, the purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the effects of implants based on data published in review articles. An electronic search of the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Ebsco and Sicencedirect for reviews with “orthodontic” and “systematic review or meta analysis” in the title, abstract, keywords, or full text was performed. A subsequent manual search was then performed to identify reviews concerning orthodontic implants. A manual search of the orthodontic journals American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO), European Journal of Orthodontics (EJO), and Angle Othodontist was also performed. Such systematic reviews that evaluated the efficacy and safety of orthodontic implants were used to indicate success rates and molar movements. A total of 23 reviews were included in the analysis. The quality of each review was assessed using a measurement tool for Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR), and the review chosen to summarize outcomes had a quality score of >6. Most reviews were less than moderate quality. Success rates of implants ranged in a broad scope, and movement of the maxillary first molar was superior with implants compared with traditional anchorage. PMID:29595673

  20. Pain experience during initial alignment with a self-ligating and a conventional fixed orthodontic appliance system. A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, P S; Dibiase, A T; Sarri, G; Lee, R T

    2009-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that (1) there is no difference in the pain experience during the week following initial placement of two orthodontic appliances (SmartClip and Victory; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif); and (2) there is no difference in the pain experience during removal and insertion of orthodontic archwires with these brackets. Sixty-six consecutive patients were treated with a self-ligating bracket system (SmartClip) or a conventional appliance (Victory) on the basis of computer-generated random allocation. After appliance placement and engagement of a 0.016'' nickel-titanium archwire, pain experience was recorded after 4, 24, and 72 hours and after 7 days with the use of a visual analog system (VAS) questionnaire. At a subsequent visit, participants documented pain experiences during removal and insertion of 0.019 x 0.025'' archwires on an additional 100 mm VAS questionnaire. Independent t-tests and analyses of covariance were used to analyze normally distributed data; the Mann-Whitney U-test was used for skewed distributions. Forty-eight (72.2%) and fifty-one (77.3%) subjects completed the first and second parts of the study, respectively. Bracket type had no influence on pain experience at 4 hours (P = .958), 24 hours (P = .289), 72 hours (P = .569), and 7 days (P = .756) following appliance placement. However, bracket type significantly influenced pain experience during archwire removal (P = .001) and insertion (P = .013). Hypothesis 1 cannot be rejected. The bracket type had no effect on subjective pain experience during the first week after initial placement of two preadjusted orthodontic appliances. Hypothesis 2 was rejected. Significantly greater discomfort was experienced during archwire insertion and removal with the SmartClip appliance.

  1. Flexible and biocompatible high-performance solid-state micro-battery for implantable orthodontic system

    KAUST Repository

    Kutbee, Arwa T.; Bahabry, Rabab R.; Alamoudi, Kholod O.; Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Cordero, Marlon D.; Almuslem, Amani S.; Gumus, Abdurrahman; Diallo, Elhadj M.; Nassar, Joanna M.; Hussain, Aftab M.; Khashab, Niveen M.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    To augment the quality of our life, fully compliant personalized advanced health-care electronic system is pivotal. One of the major requirements to implement such systems is a physically flexible high-performance biocompatible energy storage

  2. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives - Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems - Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system - Adper Single Bond (SB). Resin composite (Filtek Z250) crown buildups were made on the bonded surfaces and incrementally light-cured for 20 s. The restored tooth-quarters were stored in water at 37°C for 24 h and then sectioned into beams (0.8 mm(2) in cross-section). Maximal microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) was recorded (0.5 mm/min in crosshead speed). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Thirty additional teeth were used to investigate the hybridization quality by SEM using silver methenamine or ammoniacal silver nitrate dyes. SE reached significantly higher μ-TBS (P 0.05), and between SB and ADP (P > 0.05); ADSE and XE were significantly higher than SB and ADP (P quality than that observed for ADP and XE. The bond strength and hybridization quality were affected by the interaction form of the adhesives with dentin. The hybridization quality was essential to improve the immediate μ-TBS to dentin.

  3. Influence of different adhesive systems on bond strength of carbon fiber posts used to restore endodontically treated teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Lorena dos Santos; Reis, Kátia Rodrigues; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Chuí, Fabíola Mendonça da Silva; Sena, Neylla Teixeira; Carvalhal, Cintia Iara Oda; Oliveira, Jonas Alves de

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of three adhesive systems on resinous bonding of carbon fiber posts on roots of endodontically treated bovine incisors. Thirty bovine lower incisors with similar dimensions were selected for this study. The roots were endodontically treated and subsequently prepared for post cementation. The posts were treated with adhesive systems Scotchbond MultiPurpose Plus – 3M chemical cure (Group I), light cure (Group II) and dual cure (Group III). Car...

  4. EVALUATION OF MICROLEAKAGE DEGREE IN COMPOSITE RESIN RESTORATIONS BY COMPARING TWO ADHESIVES SYSTEMS AFTER DIFFERENT AGING PERIODS

    OpenAIRE

    Falconí-Borja, Gabriela Marina; Molina-Pule, Carla Grimaneza; Velásquez-Ron, Byron Vinicio; Armas-Vega, Ana del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: the clinical success of adhesive systems is based on the use of a responsible for creating microporosity in the dental structure acid and arises assess in vitro the degree of microfiltration in direct restorations with cavities class V where two adhesive systems differently used composition and at different periods of time. Methods: in the cervical third of 60 third molars extracted by therapeutic indication performed by diamond instruments, two cavities one on the ...

  5. The Use of Invisalign® System in the Management of the Orthodontic Treatment before and after Class III Surgical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Renato; Signorino, Fabrizio; Poli, Pier Paolo; Manzini, Pietro; Panisi, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The approach to skeletal dysmorphisms in the maxillofacial area usually requires an orthodontic treatment by means of fixed appliances, both before and after the surgical phase. Since its introduction, Invisalign system has become a popular treatment choice for the clinicians because of the aesthetics and comfort of the removable clear aligners compared with the traditional appliances. Therefore, the aim of the present report was to illustrate the management of a malocclusion by means of Invisalign system associated with the traditional surgical technique. The present paper shows a case of a 23-year-old male patient characterized by a Class III malocclusion with lateral deviation of the mandible to the left side and cross-bite on teeth 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4. Invisalign system was used during the pre- and postsurgical phases rather than fixed appliances. The posttreatment cephalometric analysis emphasized the stability of the dental and skeletal symmetry corrections, occlusion and functional balance, over a 6-year follow-up. The results achieved at the end of the treatment showed how Invisalign can be effective in the management of the orthodontic phases in orthognathic surgery. The follow-up after 6 years emphasizes the stability of the treatment over time.

  6. The Use of Invisalign® System in the Management of the Orthodontic Treatment before and after Class III Surgical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Pagani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The approach to skeletal dysmorphisms in the maxillofacial area usually requires an orthodontic treatment by means of fixed appliances, both before and after the surgical phase. Since its introduction, Invisalign system has become a popular treatment choice for the clinicians because of the aesthetics and comfort of the removable clear aligners compared with the traditional appliances. Therefore, the aim of the present report was to illustrate the management of a malocclusion by means of Invisalign system associated with the traditional surgical technique. The present paper shows a case of a 23-year-old male patient characterized by a Class III malocclusion with lateral deviation of the mandible to the left side and cross-bite on teeth 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4. Invisalign system was used during the pre- and postsurgical phases rather than fixed appliances. The posttreatment cephalometric analysis emphasized the stability of the dental and skeletal symmetry corrections, occlusion and functional balance, over a 6-year follow-up. The results achieved at the end of the treatment showed how Invisalign can be effective in the management of the orthodontic phases in orthognathic surgery. The follow-up after 6 years emphasizes the stability of the treatment over time.

  7. 21 CFR 872.5410 - Orthodontic appliance and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5410 Orthodontic appliance and... device includes the preformed orthodontic band, orthodontic band material, orthodontic elastic band...

  8. Long-term bond strength of adhesive systems applied to etched and deproteinized dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoshka Uceda-Gómez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the early and 12-month bond strength of two adhesive systems (Single Bond-SB and One Step-OS applied to demineralized dentin (WH and demineralized/NaOCl-treated dentin (H. Twenty flat dentin surfaces were exposed, etched, rinsed and slightly dried. For the H groups, a solution of 10% NaOCl was applied for 60 s, rinsed (15 s and slightly dried. The adhesives were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and composite resin crowns were incrementally constructed. After 24 h (water-37ºC, the specimens was sectioned in order to obtain resin-dentin sticks (0.8 mm². The specimens were tested in microtensile (0.5 mm/min immediately (IM or after 12 months of water storage (12M. The data (MPa were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. Only the main factors adhesive and time were significant (p=0.004 and p=0.003, respectively. SB (42.3±9.1 showed higher bond strengths than OS (33.6±11.6. The mean bond strength for IM-group (42.5±8.7 was statistically superior to 12M (33.3±11.8. The use of 10% NaOCl, after acid etching, did not improve the immediate and the long-term resin-dentin bond strength.

  9. Tetraspanin CD9: A Key Regulator of Cell Adhesion in the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Reyes

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The tetraspanin CD9 is expressed by all the major subsets of leukocytes (B cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, granulocytes, monocytes and macrophages, and immature and mature dendritic cells and also at a high level by endothelial cells. As a typical member of the tetraspanin superfamily, a prominent feature of CD9 is its propensity to engage in a multitude of interactions with other tetraspanins as well as with different transmembrane and intracellular proteins within the context of defined membranal domains termed tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs. Through these associations, CD9 influences many cellular activities in the different subtypes of leukocytes and in endothelial cells, including intracellular signaling, proliferation, activation, survival, migration, invasion, adhesion, and diapedesis. Several excellent reviews have already covered the topic of how tetraspanins, including CD9, regulate these cellular processes in the different cells of the immune system. In this mini-review, however, we will focus particularly on describing and discussing the regulatory effects exerted by CD9 on different adhesion molecules that play pivotal roles in the physiology of leukocytes and endothelial cells, with a particular emphasis in the regulation of adhesion molecules of the integrin and immunoglobulin superfamilies.

  10. Compatibility between dental adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-Luc; MacKenzie, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    Information is lacking about incompatibilities between certain types of adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins, and universal adhesives have yet to be tested with these resins. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the bonding outcome of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins by using different categories of adhesive solutions and to determine whether incompatibilities were present. One hundred and eighty caries-free, extracted third molar teeth were allocated to 9 groups (n=20), in which 3 different bonding agents (Single Bond Plus [SB]), Scotchbond Multi-purpose [MP], and Scotchbond Universal [SU]) were used to bond 3 different composite resins (CompCore AF [CC], Core Paste XP [CP], and Filtek Supreme Ultra [FS]). After restorations had been fabricated using an Ultradent device, the specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours. The specimens were tested under shear force at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and post hoc pairwise comparisons (α=.05). All 3 composite resins produced comparable shear bond strengths when used with MP (P=.076). However, when either SB or SU was used, the light-polymerized composite resin (FS) and 1 dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CC) bonded significantly better than the other dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CP) (Pincompatibilities exist between different products. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An orthodontic oral appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Marie; Legrell, Per Erik

    2010-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to test the hypothesis that an orthodontic oral appliance (OA) that is designed to work against the backwardly directed forces on the upper incisors may counteract the reduction in overjet from these devices. Thirty patients with normal bites, good oral health, and milder sleep apnea were randomized to treatment with either OAs or orthodontic OAs. Bite changes were evaluated on plaster casts and radiographs and by questionnaires after a mean of 2.4 years in 19 frequent users. Four of nine patients in the orthodontic OA group increased their overjet by > or =0.4 mm, while none of the 10 patients in the OA group experienced that effect. Only the orthodontic OA increases the overjet; this design may therefore be beneficial to patients at risk of negative effects on their bite during OA treatment.

  12. Impact of head and neck radiotherapy on the mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Troconis, Cristhian Camilo; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2017-11-01

    To analyze the evidence regarding the impact of head and neck radiotherapy (HNRT) on the mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems. Searches were conducted on PubMed, Embase, Scopus and ISI Web of Science databases using "Radiotherapy", "Composite resins" and "Adhesive systems" as keywords. Selected studies were written in English and assessed the mechanical behavior of composite resins and/or adhesive systems when bonding procedure was conducted before and/or after a maximum radiation dose ≥50Gy, applied under in vitro or in vivo conditions. In total, 115 studies were found but only 16 were included, from which five evaluated the effect of in vitro HNRT on microhardness, wear resistance, diametral tensile and flexural strength of composite resins, showing no significant negative effect in most of reports. Regarding bond strength of adhesive systems, 11 studies were included from which five reported no meaningful negative effect when bonding procedure was conducted before simulated HNRT. Conversely, five studies showed that bond strength diminished when adhesive procedure was done after in vitro radiation therapy. Only two studies about dental adhesion were conducted after in vivo radiotherapy but the results were not conclusive. The mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems seems not to be affected when in vitro HNRT is applied after bonding procedure. However, bond strength of adhesive systems tends to decrease when simulated radiotherapy is used immediately before bonding procedure. Studies assessing dentin bond strength after in-vivo HNRT were limited and controversial. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Denture Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Denture Adhesives Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Wearers Reporting Problems to the FDA Background Denture adhesives are pastes, powders or adhesive pads that may ...

  14. Evaluation of Underwater Adhesives and Friction Coatings for In Situ Attachment of Fiber Optic Sensor System for Subsea Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Henry H.; Le, Suy Q.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Smith, Frederick D.; Tapia, Alma S.; Brower, David V.

    2012-01-01

    Integrity and performance monitoring of subsea pipelines and structures provides critical information for managing offshore oil and gas production operation and preventing environmentally damaging and costly catastrophic failure. Currently pipeline monitoring devices require ground assembly and installation prior to the underwater deployment of the pipeline. A monitoring device that could be installed in situ on the operating underwater structures could enhance the productivity and improve the safety of current offshore operation. Through a Space Act Agreement (SAA) between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Astro Technology, Inc. (ATI), JSC provides technical expertise and testing facilities to support the development of fiber optic sensor technologies by ATI. This paper details the first collaboration effort between NASA JSC and ATI in evaluating underwater applicable adhesives and friction coatings for attaching fiber optic sensor system to subsea pipeline. A market survey was conducted to examine different commercial ]off ]the ]shelf (COTS) underwater adhesive systems and to select adhesive candidates for testing and evaluation. Four COTS epoxy based underwater adhesives were selected and evaluated. The adhesives were applied and cured in simulated seawater conditions and then evaluated for application characteristics and adhesive strength. The adhesive that demonstrated the best underwater application characteristics and highest adhesive strength were identified for further evaluation in developing an attachment system that could be deployed in the harsh subsea environment. Various friction coatings were also tested in this study to measure their shear strengths for a mechanical clamping design concept for attaching fiber optic sensor system. A COTS carbide alloy coating was found to increase the shear strength of metal to metal clamping interface by up to 46 percent. This study provides valuable data for

  15. Bond strength of an adhesive system irradiated with Nd:YAG laser in dentin treated with Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malta, D A M P; De Andrade, M F; Costa, M M; Lizarelli, R F Z; Pelino, J E P

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to verify through micro tensile bond test the bond strength of an adhesive system irradiated with Nd:YAG laser in dentine previously treated with Er:YAG laser. Twenty caries free extracted human third molars were used. The teeth were divided in four experimental groups (n = 5): (G1) control group; (G2) irradiation of the adhesive system with the Nd:YAG laser; (G3) dentin treatment with Er:YAG laser; (G4) dentin treatment with Er:YAG laser followed by the irradiation of the adhesive system with Nd:YAG laser. The Er:YAG laser fluency parameter for the dentin treatment was of 60 J/cm 2 . The adhesive system was irradiated with the Nd:YAG laser with fluency of 100 J/cm 2 . Dental restorations were performed with Adper Single Bond 2/Z250. One tooth from each group was prepared for the evaluation of the adhesive interface under SEM and bond failure tests were also performed and evaluated. The statistical analysis showed statistical significant difference between the groups G1 and G3, G1 and G4, G2 and G3, and G2 and G4; and similarity between the groups G1 and G2, and G3 and G4. The adhesive failures were predominant in all the experimental groups. The SEM analysis showed an adhesive interface with features confirming the results of the mechanical tests. The Nd:YAG laser on the adhesive system did not influence the bond strength in dentin treated or not with the Er:YAG laser

  16. [Effects of surface treatment and adhesive application on shear bond strength between zirconia and enamel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinghui; Wu, Buling; Sun, Fengyang

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different orthodontic adhesives on shear bond strength between zirconia and enamel. Zirconia ceramic samples were designed and manufactured for 40 extracted human maxillary first premolars with CAD/CAM system. The samples were randomized into 4 groups for surface treatment with sandblasting and non-treated with adhesives of 3M Transbond XT or Jingjin dental enamel bonding resin. After 24 h of bonded fixation, the shear bond strengths were measured by universal mechanical testing machine and analyzed with factorial variance analysis. The shear bond strength was significantly higher in sandblasting group than in untreated group (Padhesives of Transbond XT and dental enamel bonding resin (P>0.05). The shear bond strength between zirconia and enamel is sufficient after sandblasting regardless of the application of either adhesive.

  17. Dental Hygiene and Orthodontics: Effect of Ultrasonic Instrumentation on Bonding Efficacy of Different Lingual Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribante, Andrea; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Collesano, Vittorio; Tovt, Gaia; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Gandini, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Dental hygienists are often faced with patients wearing lingual orthodontic therapy, as ultrasonic instrumentation (UI) is crucial for oral health. As the application of external forces can lead to premature bonding failure, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of UI on shear bond strength (SBS) and on adhesive remnant index (ARI) of different lingual orthodontic brackets. 200 bovine incisors were divided into 10 groups. Four different lingual (STB, Ormco; TTR, Rocky Mountain Orthodontics; Idea, Leone; 2D, Forestadent) and vestibular control (Victory, 3M) brackets were bonded. UI was performed in half of specimens, whereas the other half did not receive any treatment. All groups were tested with a universal testing machine. SBS and ARI values were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed (significance: P = 0.05). TTR, Idea, and 2D lingual brackets significantly lowered SBS after UI, whereas for other braces no effect was recorded. Appliances with lower mesh area significantly reduced their adhesion capacity after UI. Moreover groups subjected to UI showed higher ARI scores than controls. UI lowered SBS of lingual appliances of small dimensions so particular care should be posed avoiding prolonged instrumentation around bracket base during plaque removal. Moreover, UI influenced also ARI scores.

  18. Systemic factors effects on orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption: A systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugland, Linn; Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Vandevska-Radunovich, Vaska

    systemic effect on OIIRR in human or animal subjects. Methods: A comprehensive search strategy was performed for all major electronic databases. Two reviewers independently selected studies, undertook data extraction, and assessed risk of bias for all included studies according to a pre-specific protocol...

  19. Dentoalveolar Segmental Osteotomy Combined with Orthodontic Treatment for an Impacted and Ankylosed Upper Canine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aludden, Hanna Cecilia; Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosis is the abnormal adhesion of alveolar bone to dentin or cementum and commonly seen after traumatic dental injuries. Treatment of impacted and ankylosed teeth solely by orthodontics alignment may be challenging. Consequently, several treatment alternatives have been proposed for the manag....... A dentoalveolar segmental osteotomy with immediate repositioning of an upper canine was performed. One year after final orthodontic treatment a satisfying occlusal and esthetic treatment outcome was obtained....

  20. Effect of material variation on the biomechanical behaviour of orthodontic fixed appliances: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Keilig, Ludger; Hasan, Istabrak; Jäger, Andreas; Bourauel, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Biomechanical analysis of orthodontic tooth movement is complex, as many different tissues and appliance components are involved. The aim of this finite element study was to assess the relative effect of material alteration of the various components of the orthodontic appliance on the biomechanical behaviour of tooth movement. A three-dimensional finite element solid model was constructed. The model consisted of a canine, a first, and a second premolar, including the surrounding tooth-supporting structures and fixed appliances. The materials of the orthodontic appliances were alternated between: (1) composite resin or resin-modified glass ionomer cement for the adhesive, (2) steel, titanium, ceramic, or plastic for the bracket, and (3) β-titanium or steel for the wire. After vertical activation of the first premolar by 0.5mm in occlusal direction, stress and strain calculations were performed at the periodontal ligament and the orthodontic appliance. The finite element analysis indicated that strains developed at the periodontal ligament were mainly influenced by the orthodontic wire (up to +63 per cent), followed by the bracket (up to +44 per cent) and the adhesive (up to +4 per cent). As far as developed stresses at the orthodontic appliance are concerned, wire material had the greatest influence (up to +155 per cent), followed by bracket material (up to +148 per cent) and adhesive material (up to +8 per cent). The results of this in silico study need to be validated by in vivo studies before they can be extrapolated to clinical practice. According to the results of this finite element study, all components of the orthodontic fixed appliance, including wire, bracket, and adhesive, seem to influence, to some extent, the biomechanics of tooth movement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Water permeability, hybrid layer long-term integrity and reaction mechanism of a two-step adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Geneviève; Dabsie, Firas; Delannée, Mathieu; Akon, Bernadette; Sharrock, Patrick

    2010-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate the reaction mechanism of formation of the hybrid layer by a HEMA-containing self-etch adhesive and to study fluid filtration, contact angle and interfacial ultrastructure by SEM following a 1 year ageing period. Acidic behaviour and chemical interactions between Silorane System Adhesive and dentine were studied by potentiometric titrations, atomic absorption spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The hydrophilicity of the adhesive was evaluated using the sessile drop method and dentine permeability by hydraulic conductance. The morphological study of the dentine/adhesive system interface was conducted using SEM. The Silorane System Adhesive behaved as a multi-acid with several different pK(a) values. When the adhesive was in contact with dentine, the acid was progressively consumed and calcium ions were released. The acrylate substituted phosphonate bound strongly to apatite crystals. The polyacrylic acid copolymer reacted with calcium ions and formed an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN). Water contact angle measurements showed rapid spreading on primer (angles reached 15 degrees at 30s) and larger contact angles when the Silorane bonding layer was added (from over 60 degrees to 44 degrees ). A thick, homogeneous hybrid layer was observed both initially and after 1 year of ageing, with a corresponding hydraulic conductance of -48.50% initially and -52.07% at 12 months. The Silorane System Adhesive is capable of both dissolving calcium ions and binding to apatite surfaces. The results showed the hydrophilicity of the adhesive, which formed an IPN-like hybrid layer that conserved adequate impermeability over a 1-year period. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Allergic reactions seen in orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Görücü Coşkuner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergy can be defined as inappropriate and harmful response to harmless and ordinary materials. Allergic reactions, like in other fields of dentistry, can also be seen in the field of orthodontics. The reactions that occur against orthodontic materials can be seen as irritant or hypersensitivity reactions. The main reason of the irritant reactions is friction between soft tissues and orthodontic appliances. However, the reason of the hypersensitivity reactions is usually the antigenicity of the materials. Hypersensitivity reactions are usually seen as allergic contact dermatitis on face and neck; the occurrence of mucosal-gingival reactions and dermal and systemic reactions are rare. Latex, metal and acrylic resins are the most common allergens in orthodontics. Apart from these materials, allergic reactions can occur against bonding materials, extraoral appliances, disinfectants and antimicrobial agents. The reactions that occur against extraoral appliances usually result from metallic and elastic parts of the appliances or the appliance parts that are in contact with skin. Orthodontists should be aware of the allergic reactions to protect their patients’ health. The aim of this review was to evaluate the allergic reactions seen in orthodontic patients and discuss the cautions that orthodontists can take.

  3. The effect of using an audience response system on learning, motivation and information retention in the orthodontic teaching of undergraduate dental students: a cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Harmeet Kaur; Allen, Mark; Kang, Jing; Bates, Claire; Hodge, Trevor

    2015-06-01

    New methods of teaching and learning are constantly being sought in the adult learning environment. Audience Response Systems (ARS) have been used in many different learning environments, especially in the field of medical education. The objective of this investigation was to ascertain the effect of ARS use in undergraduate teaching in a UK dental school. A cross-over clustered randomized educational trial. Leeds Dental Institute. Year 4 undergraduate dental students in orthodontics. Students at Leeds Dental Institute were taught two different topics within the curriculum to test the use of ARS in a cross-over trial. A questionnaire was delivered to the test (ARS) and control (non-ARS) groups. The response rate to the questionnaires was 89·5% (test group) and 82·9% (control group). The ARS enabled students to perform better as shown by knowledge retention (P = 0·013). Students found the seminar more interesting (P = 0·013), easier to concentrate (P = 0·025) and easier to participate in (P = 0·020) when ARS was used. When ARS was used, students were more able to answer questions (P<0·0001), were more likely to prepare for the seminar (P<0·0001) and significantly preferred using ARS (P<0·0001). ARS was found to significantly improve student concentration and participation in small group seminar teaching and significantly improved knowledge retention. ARS may be useful in facilitating orthodontic teaching in the future.

  4. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  5. Role of bacterial adhesion in the microbial ecology of biofilms in cooling tower systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas; Warta, Richard; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Packman, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    The fate of the three heterotrophic biofilm forming bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. in pilot scale cooling towers was evaluated both by observing the persistence of each species in the recirculating water and the formation of biofilms on steel coupons placed in each cooling tower water reservoir. Two different cooling tower experiments were performed: a short-term study (6 days) to observe the initial bacterial colonization of the cooling tower, and a long-term study (3 months) to observe the ecological dynamics with repeated introduction of the test strains. An additional set of batch experiments (6 days) was carried out to evaluate the adhesion of each strain to steel surfaces under similar conditions to those found in the cooling tower experiments. Substantial differences were observed in the microbial communities that developed in the batch systems and cooling towers. P. aeruginosa showed a low degree of adherence to steel surfaces both in batch and in the cooling towers, but grew much faster than K. pneumoniae and Flavobacterium in mixed-species biofilms and ultimately became the dominant organism in the closed batch systems. However, the low degree of adherence caused P. aeruginosa to be rapidly washed out of the open cooling tower systems, and Flavobacterium became the dominant microorganism in the cooling towers in both the short-term and long-term experiments. These results indicate that adhesion, retention and growth on solid surfaces play important roles in the bacterial community that develops in cooling tower systems.

  6. Effect of saliva contamination on the microshear bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesive systems to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, H M; Oh, T S; Pereira, P N R

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of saliva contamination and decontamination methods on the dentin bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesive systems. Three commercially available "all-in-one" adhesives (One Up Bond F, Xeno III and Adper Prompt) and one resin composite (Filtek Z-250) were used. Third molars stored in distilled water with 0.5% thymol at 4 degrees C were ground with #600 SiC paper under running water to produce a standardized smear layer. The specimens were randomly divided into groups according to contamination methods: no contamination, which was the control (C); contamination of the adhesive surface with fresh saliva before light curing (A) and contamination of the adhesive surface with fresh saliva after light curing (B). Each contamination group was further subdivided into three subgroups according to the decontamination method: A1-Saliva was removed by a gentle air blast and the adhesive was light-cured; A2-Saliva was rinsed for 10 seconds, gently air-dried and the was adhesive light-cured; A3-Saliva was rinsed and dried as in A2, then the adhesive was re-applied to the dentin surface and light-cured; B1-Saliva was removed with a gentle air blast; B2-Saliva was rinsed and dried; B3-Saliva was rinsed, dried and the adhesive was re-applied and light cured. Tygon tubes filled with resin composite were placed on each surface and light cured. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Microshear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine (EZ test), and data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by the Duncan test to make comparisons among the groups (p0.05). Bond strengths of all B groups were significantly lower compared to the controls (pcontamination after adhesive curing. There was no statistically significant difference among the control groups (p>0.05).

  7. Pre-treating dentin with chlorhexadine and CPP-ACP: self-etching and universal adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Ricardo Alves; de Lima, Eliane Alves; Montes, Marcos Antônio Japiassu Resende; Braz, Rodivan

    2016-12-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of pre-treating dentin with chlorhexidine, at concentrations of 0.2% and 2%, and remineralizing paste containing CPP-ACP (MI Paste - GC) on the bond strength of adhesive systems. Material and methods: In total, 80 slides of dentin were used. These slides were 2 mm thick and were obtained from bovine incisors. Standard cavities were created using diamond bur number 3131. In the control groups, a Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SUA) self-etching adhesive system of 3M ESPE and a Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) adhesive system of Kuraray were applied, following the manufacturer's instructions. In the other groups, dentin was pretreated with chlorhexidine (0.2% and 2%) for 1 min and with MI Paste for 3 min. The cavities were restored with Z350 XT resin (3M ESPE). After 24 h of storage, the push-out test was applied at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: The different dentin pretreatment techniques did not affect the intra-adhesive bond strength. There was a difference between treatment with MI Paste and chlorhexidine 0.2% in favor of the SUA, with values of 15.22 and 20.25 Mpa, respectively. Conclusions: The different pretreatment methods did not alter the immediate bond strength to dentin. Differences were only recorded when comparing the adhesives.

  8. Modified grassline technique for orthodontic space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmiller, Rose Marie

    2006-04-01

    Use of traditional orthodontic measures in the periodontally compromised dentition can be problematic. This article describes a variation of the Grassline technique, in which the author uses adhesive bonding to harmoniously re-align malpositioned teeth. In this simple, easy-to-learn technique, a cotton thread is used to achieve orthodontic tooth movement. Initial contact with the saliva causes shrinkage of the thread, exercising a minor force that moves the teeth while allowing enough time for the tissues to regenerate. With this moderate, intermittent force, successful treatment is achieved with minimal risk. Moreover, this orthodontic technique has been associated with an increase in bone volume. This article presents this new technique and details methods for maintaining treatment success. The technique also is compared with an approach described in the literature. Two case reports are presented; the technique is employed in the first to close a diastema in a periodontally compromised dentition and in the second to correct the migration of maxillary and mandibular incisors. Photographs and radiographs show the esthetic improvement achieved in both cases using this technique.

  9. Influence of different adhesive systems on the pull-out bond strength of glass fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luciana Mendonça; Andrade, Andréa Mello de; Machuca, Melissa Fernanda Garcia; da Silva, Paulo Maurício Batista; da Silva, Ricardo Virgolino C; Veronezi, Maria Cecília

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts (Reforpost - Angelus-Brazil) cemented to root dentin with a resin cement (RelyX ARC - 3M/ESPE) associated with two different adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond - 3M/ESPE and Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose (MP) Plus - 3M/ESPE), using the pull-out test. Twenty single-rooted human teeth with standardized root canals were randomly assigned to 2 groups (n=10): G1- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel (3M/ESPE) + Adper Single Bond + #1 post (Reforpost - Angelus) + four #1 accessory posts (Reforpin - Angelus) + resin cement; G2- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel + Adper Scotchbond MP Plus + #1 post + four #1 accessory posts + resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 7 days and submitted to the pull-out test in a universal testing machine (EMIC) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean values of bond strength (kgf) and standard deviation were: G1- 29.163 +/- 7.123; G2- 37.752 +/-13.054. Statistical analysis (Student's t-test; a=0.05 showed no statistically significant difference (pAdhesive bonding failures between resin cement and root canal dentin surface were observed in both groups, with non-polymerized resin cement in the apical portion of the post space when Single Bond was used (G1). The type of adhesive system employed on the fiber post cementation did not influence the pull-out bond strength.

  10. Influence of different adhesive systems on the pull-out bond strength of glass fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mendonça da Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts (Reforpost - Angelus-Brazil cemented to root dentin with a resin cement (RelyX ARC - 3M/ESPE associated with two different adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond - 3M/ESPE and Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose (MP Plus - 3M/ESPE, using the pull-out test. Twenty single-rooted human teeth with standardized root canals were randomly assigned to 2 groups (n=10: G1- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel (3M/ESPE + Adper Single Bond + #1 post (Reforpost - Angelus + four #1 accessory posts (Reforpin - Angelus + resin cement; G2- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel + Adper Scotchbond MP Plus + #1 post + four #1 accessory posts + resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days and submitted to the pull-out test in a universal testing machine (EMIC at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean values of bond strength (kgf and standard deviation were: G1- 29.163 ± 7.123; G2- 37.752 ±13.054. Statistical analysis (Student's t-test; a=0.05 showed no statistically significant difference (p<0.05 between the groups. Adhesive bonding failures between resin cement and root canal dentin surface were observed in both groups, with non-polymerized resin cement in the apical portion of the post space when Single Bond was used (G1. The type of adhesive system employed on the fiber post cementation did not influence the pull-out bond strength.

  11. Comparative evaluation of microleakage of composite restorations using fifth and seventh generations of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Tabari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Simultaneous etching of enamel and dentin using the novel generation of adhesive systems with contracted operational steps, has shown a good clinical efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of composite restorations using the V and VII generations of adhesive systems on primary teeth. Methods: This study was performed on 45 human intact extracted primary teeth. Following class V cavity preparation, the samples were randomly divided into three groups included 15 teeth based on the type of bonding agent Single Bond 2, Clearfil S3 Bond or G Bond. After applying the bonding agents, the teeth filled with composite Z250. The microleakage values of incisal and gingival margins were separately scored by 2% basic fuchsine staining based on a 0-3 ordinal ranking system. The data were analyzed by using Kruskal Wallis and Mann_whitney U tests. Results: In overall, the score of microleakage at incisal (0.58±0.94 and gingival (1.06±0.19 edges did not have significant difference. Also, there was no significant difference between incisal and gingival microleakage considering the different types of bonding. Conclusion: Regarding to less operational steps and lower risk of salivary contamination, the VII generation of dentin bonding agents can be applied for filling the class V cavities of primary teeth.

  12. A completely transparent, adhesively bonded soda-lime glass block masonry system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Oikonomopoulou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A pioneering, all transparent, self-supporting glass block facade is presented in this paper. Previously realized examples utilize embedded metal components in order to obtain the desired structural performance despite the fact that these elements greatly affect the facade’s overall transparency level. Undeniably, the oxymoron ‘transparency and strength’ remains the prime concern in such applications. In this paper, a new, innovative structural system for glass block facades is described, which demonstrably meets both criteria. The structure is exclusively constructed by monolithic glass blocks, bonded with a colourless, UV-curing adhesive, obtaining thus a maximum transparency. In addition, the desired structural performance is achieved solely through the masonry system, without any opaque substructure. Differing from previous realized projects, solid soda-lime glass blocks are used rather than borosilicate ones. This article provides an overview of the integrated architectural and structural design and discusses the choice of materials. The structural verification of the system is demonstrated. The results show that the adhesively bonded glass block structure has the required self-structural behaviour, but only if strict tolerances are met in the geometry of the glass blocks.

  13. Adhesive and Cohesive Strength in FeB/Fe2B Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses-Amador, A.; Blancas-Pérez, D.; Corpus-Mejía, R.; Rodríguez-Castro, G. A.; Martínez-Trinidad, J.; Jiménez-Tinoco, L. F.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, FeB/Fe2B systems were evaluated by the scratch test. The powder-pack boriding process was performed on the surface of AISI M2 steel. The mechanical parameters, such as yield stress and Young's modulus of the boride layer, were obtained by the instrumented indentation technique. Residual stresses produced on the boride layer were estimated by using the x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The scratch test was performed in order to evaluate the cohesive/adhesive strength of the FeB/Fe2B coating. In addition, a numerical evaluation of the scratch test on boride layers was performed by the finite element method. Maximum principal stresses were related to the failure mechanisms observed by the experimental scratch test. Shear stresses at the interfaces of the FeB/Fe2B/substrate system were also evaluated. Finally, the results obtained provide essential information about the effect of the layer thickness, the residual stresses, and the resilience modulus on the cohesive/adhesive strength in FeB/Fe2B systems.

  14. Digital workflows in contemporary orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars R Christensen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital workflows are now increasingly possible in orthodontic practice. Workflows designed to improve the customization of orthodontic appliances are now available through laboratories and orthodontic manufacturing facilities in many parts of the world. These now have the potential to improve certain aspects of patient care.

  15. Effect of Adhesive Application on Sealant Success: A Clinical Study of Fifth and Seventh Generation Adhesive Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Tandon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the effect of fifth and seventh generation bonding agent on sealant success.Materials and Methods: Sixty-four school children aged six to nine years received sealants in four permanent molars in a split mouth design, such that each patient received sealant in the first permanent molar with fifth generation bonding agent in one arch and seventh generation bonding agent in the other arch; contra-lateral molars were sealed with sealant alone. The evaluation was carried out at baseline, three months, six months and 12 months, according to the criteria by Feigal et al, in 2000. Chi- square test was used to analyze data at P<0.05 level of significance.Results: Statistically significant differences were found for sealant retention between fifth generation and sealant group, and fifth generation and seventh generation groups; whereas, no significant difference was found for sealant retention between seventh generation and sealant group at three, six and 12 months.Conclusion: As separate etch and rinse steps are not required for seventh generation bonding agents, and almost similar results were obtained for both sealant and seventh generation groups, it can be concluded that application of sealant along with a seventh generation bonding agent may enhance sealant success and can be used for caries prevention in preventive programs.Key words:  Pit and Fissure Sealants; Dental Caries; Adhesives

  16. Effects of type I collagen degradation on the durability of three adhesive systems in the early phase of dentin bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hu

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effects of type I collagen degradation on the durability of three adhesive systems in the early phase of dentin bonding.Bonded dentin specimens were prepared using three different types of adhesive systems. Micro-tensile bond strength and degradation of collagen were tested before, and after 1 month or 4 months of aging in artificial saliva. The relationship between micro-tensile bond strength and collagen degradation was analyzed by calculating their Pearson's correlation coefficient.Aging induced time-dependent reduction in micro-tensile bond strengths for all the tested adhesive systems, although such reduction for the single-step self-etching adhesive G-Bond (GB was not statistically significant. The bond strength of the two-step self-etching primer adhesive system Clearfil SE Bond (SEB was similar to that of the two-step etch-and-rinse self-priming adhesive system Single Bond 2 (SB, and they were both significantly reduced after one or four months of aging. A negative correlation was found between the degree of collagen degradation and magnitude of micro-tensile bond strength (r = -0.65, p = 0.003. The Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.426, indicating that 42.6% of the aging-induced reduction in bond strength can be explained by the degradation of collagen.In the early phase of dentin bonding, there was a negative correlation between the degree of collagen degradation and the magnitude of micro-tensile bond strength. The reduction of bond strength was accompanied by the degradation of collagen. These results provide evidence for the causative relationship between the degradation of collagen and the deterioration of dentin-adhesive interface.

  17. Enamel Wetness Effects on Microshear Bond Strength of Different Bonding Agents (Adhesive Systems): An in vitro Comparative Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Mishra, Vinay K

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of enamel wetness on microshear bond strength using different adhesive systems. To evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on dry enamel; to evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on wet enamel; and to compare microshear bond strength of three different bonding agents on dry and wet enamel. Sixty extracted noncarious human premolars were selected for this study. Flat enamel surfaces of approximately 3 mm were obtained by grinding the buccal surfaces of premolars with water-cooled diamond disks. This study evaluated one etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Single Bond 2) and two self-etching adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Xeno-V). The specimens were divided into two groups (n = 30). Group I (dry) was air-dried for 30 seconds and in group II (wet) surfaces were blotted with absorbent paper to remove excess water. These groups were further divided into six subgroups (n = 10) according to the adhesives used. The resin composite, Filtek Z 250, was bonded to flat enamel surfaces that had been treated with one of the adhesives, following the manufacturer's instructions. After being stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours, bonded specimens were stressed in universal testing machine (Fig. 3) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were evaluated with one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-test, and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests (a = 0.05). The two-way ANOVA and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests showed significant differences among adhesive systems, but wetness did not influence microshear bond strength (p = 0.1762). The one-way ANOVA and t-test showed that the all-in-one adhesive (Xeno-V) was the only material influenced by the presence of water on the enamel surface. Xeno-V showed significantly higher microshear bond strength when the enamel was kept wet. Single Bond 2 adhesive showed significantly higher microshear bond strength as compared with Xeno-V adhesive but no

  18. Effect of different methods of enamel conditioning on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davari AR

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: With the introduction of different bondable restorative materials in dentistry, various methods have been suggested to enhance the polymerization and shear bond strength of these materials. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different methods of enamel conditioning on bond strength of orthodontic brackets and on the bracket/ adhesive failure mode. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, brackets were bonded to thirty-six bovine incisor teeth with different protocols according to the manufacturer's instructions as follows: Group 1: conventional multistep adhesive (n=12; Group 2: self-etching primer system (n=12; Group 3: acid+self-etching primer system (n=12. Specimens were loaded in a universal testing machine (Instron, Canton and Mass and the mode of failure was recorded. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Kruskall-Wallis tests with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The mean shear bond strength was 11.7 ± 4.2, 10.5 ± 4.4, and 10.9 ± 4.8 MPa for group 1, 2, and 3 respectively. There was no significant difference in bond strength among the three groups (P=0.800. No significant difference was observed among the three groups with respect to residual adhesive on the enamel surfaces (P=0.554. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, the use of self-etching primers may be an alternative to conventional phosphoric acid pre-treatment in orthodontic bonding.

  19. The role of type III secretion system and lens material on adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Elizabeth P; Tsay, Ruey-Yug; Chia, Jean-San; Wu, Semon; Lee, Jing-Wen; Hu, Fung-Rong

    2012-09-21

    To determine the distribution of invasive and cytotoxic genotypes among ocular isolates of P. aeruginosa and investigate the influence of the type III secretion system (T3SS) on adhesion to conventional, cosmetic, and silicone hydrogel contact lenses (CL). Clinical isolates from 2001 to 2010 were analyzed by multiplex PCR for exoS, exoU, and exoT genes. Bacterial adhesion to etafilcon, nelfilcon (gray colored), balafilcon, and galyfilcon CL with or without artificial tear fluid (ATF) incubation were compared. Surface characteristics were determined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Among 87 total isolates, 64 strains were from microbial keratitis cases. CL-related microbial keratitis (CLMK) isolates were mostly of the cytotoxic genotype (expressing exoU) (P = 0.002). No significant differences were found in bacterial adhesion to all types of CL between the genotypes under T3SS-inducing conditions. A trend for least bacterial adhesion of galyfilcon compared to the other CL was noted for both genotypes. Needle complex pscC mutants adhered less to all materials than the wild type (P bacteria adhering on CL surfaces. CLMK isolates were mostly of cytotoxic genotype. Different genotypes did not significantly differ in its adhesion to various CL. T3SS and other adhesins are involved in bacteria-contact lens adhesion through complex interactions. Contact lens materials may also play an important role in the adherence of both genotypes of P. aeruginosa.

  20. Six-month storage-time evaluation of one-bottle adhesive systems to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Marcelo; Seixas, Carla Alessandra Marcelino; Reis, Andre Figueiredo; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the 1-week, 3-month, and 6-month performance of eight commercially available one-bottle adhesive systems to dentin. Lingual and buccal surfaces from human third molars were ground wet on 600-grit SiC paper to obtain a flat dentinal surface. The specimens were randomly divided into 24 groups (n = 10), which were established to measure the shear bond strengths of Bond-1 (B1), ONE-STEP (OS), OptiBond SOLO (OP), Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB), Single Bond (SB), STAE (ST), Syntac Sprint (SS), and Tenure Quick (TQ) after 1-week, 3-month, and 6-month water storage at 37 degrees C. One-bottle adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' instructions and Z100 composite cylinders were applied on the bonded dentinal surfaces. The 3-month water-storage groups were thermocycled for 1500 cycles at 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C and 6-month groups for 3000 cycles. After storage periods, specimens were tested in shear in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey test. Results: The changes in shear bond strengths were not uniform over time. Over the test period, OS, PB, SB, and SS exhibited bond strength stability, however, SS presented low bond strengths on all tested periods. A significant decrease in bond strength was observed for B1, OP, ST, and TQ after the 6-month storage period.

  1. Climbing Robot for Ferromagnetic Surfaces with Dynamic Adjustment of the Adhesion System

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    Manuel F. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a climbing robot with wheeled locomotion and adhesion through permanent magnets, developed with the intention of being used in the inspection of different types of man-made ferromagnetic structures, such as towers for wind turbines, fuel storage tanks, and ship hulls. In this paper are presented the main considerations thought for its project, as well as several constructive aspects, among which are detailed its mechanical and electrical construction, the implemented control architecture, and the human-machine interface developed for the manual and automatic control of the vehicle while in operation. Although it can be manually controlled, the vehicle is designed to have a semiautonomous behavior, allowing a remote inspection process controlled by a technician, this way reducing the risks associated with the human inspection of tall structures and ATEX places. The distinguishing characteristic of this robot is its dynamic adjustment system of the permanent magnets in order to assure the machine adhesion to the surfaces, even when crossing slightly irregular and curved surfaces with a large radius.

  2. A contractile and counterbalancing adhesion system controls the 3D shape of crawling cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, Dylan T; Shao, Lin; Ott, Carolyn; Pasapera, Ana M; Fischer, Robert S; Baird, Michelle A; Der Loughian, Christelle; Delanoe-Ayari, Helene; Paszek, Matthew J; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2014-04-14

    How adherent and contractile systems coordinate to promote cell shape changes is unclear. Here, we define a counterbalanced adhesion/contraction model for cell shape control. Live-cell microscopy data showed a crucial role for a contractile meshwork at the top of the cell, which is composed of actin arcs and myosin IIA filaments. The contractile actin meshwork is organized like muscle sarcomeres, with repeating myosin II filaments separated by the actin bundling protein α-actinin, and is mechanically coupled to noncontractile dorsal actin fibers that run from top to bottom in the cell. When the meshwork contracts, it pulls the dorsal fibers away from the substrate. This pulling force is counterbalanced by the dorsal fibers' attachment to focal adhesions, causing the fibers to bend downward and flattening the cell. This model is likely to be relevant for understanding how cells configure themselves to complex surfaces, protrude into tight spaces, and generate three-dimensional forces on the growth substrate under both healthy and diseased conditions.

  3. Degradation of Multimode Adhesive System Bond Strength to Artificial Caries-Affected Dentin Due to Water Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follak, A C; Miotti, L L; Lenzi, T L; Rocha, R O; Soares, F Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of water storage on bond strength of multimode adhesive systems to artificially induced caries-affected dentin. One hundred twelve sound bovine incisors were randomly assigned to 16 groups (n=7) according to the dentin condition (sound; SND, artificially induced caries-affected dentin; CAD, cariogenic challenge by pH cycling for 14 days); the adhesive system (SU, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive; AB, All-Bond Universal; PB, Prime & Bond Elect; SB, Adper Single Bond 2; and CS, Clearfil SE Bond), and the etching strategy (etch-and-rinse and self-etch). All adhesive systems were applied under manufacturer's instructions to flat dentin surfaces, and a composite block was built up on each dentin surface. After 24 hours of water storage, the specimens were sectioned into stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm 2 ) and submitted to a microtensile test immediately (24 hours) or after six months of water storage. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using three-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey test (α=5%), considering each substrate separately (SND and CAD). The etching strategy did not influence the bond strength of multimode adhesives, irrespective of the dentin condition. Water storage only reduced significantly the bond strength to CAD. The degradation of bond strength due to water storage was more pronounced in CAD, regardless of the etching strategy.

  4. [In vitro study of marginal microleakage of Clearfil S3 BOND adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Zhu, Ya-qin

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the microleakage of standard box-type cavity filled with Clearfil S3 BOND self-etch adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin. 40 permanent molars were randomly divided into experimental and control groups, 20 of each . The box-type cavities, 3mm in length and width and 2mm in depth, were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction on buccal surface of forty permanent extracted teeth. According to grouping, the experimental group was filled with Clearfil S(3) BOND self-adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin, and the control group was filled with 3M Adper Prompt self-adhesive and Filtek Z350 composite resin. After thermal circulation(2000 times, 5 degrees centigrade-55 degrees centigrade) and soaked for 24 hours in 2% methyl blue solution, the samples were cut through the midline of the restoration and the leakage depth was measured with vernier caliper. The microleakage degrees and microleakage depth of 2 groups were analyzed with SPSS 17.0 software package for Mann-Whitney U test and independent-samples t test. Microleakage was observed in both groups. But the microleakage degrees and microleakage depth of 2 groups had no significant difference (P>0.05). The marginal sealibility of Clearfil S(3) BOND self-adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin is as good as Adper Prompt self-adhesive and Filtek Z350 composite resin,it may be an ideal clinical restoration material.

  5. Orthodontic exposure of multiple lmpactions: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munda-Lacson, Maridin C; Venugopal, Adith

    2014-01-01

    There are rare cases of impacted permanent central incisors with dilacerations, a dental deformity characterized by pronounced angulations of the longitudinal tooth axis. Impaction of maxillary canines is an orthodontic anomaly that causes facial and dentoalveolar system problems, both functional and esthetic. A combination of surgery and orthodontics is important in bringing impacted teeth to their ideal position in the dental arch. This is a case report of a 10-year-old patient with impacted and dilacerated right central incisor and impacted left maxillary canine, following surgical exposure and appropriate orthodontic traction, the impacted teeth were surgically exposed and aligned into the dental arch.

  6. Degree of conversion of simplified contemporary adhesive systems as influenced by extended air-activated or passive solvent volatilization modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Boniek C D; Souza-Junior, Eduardo Jose; Brandt, William C; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Montes, Marcos A J R; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of five methods of solvent volatilization on the degree of conversion (DC) of nine one-bottle adhesive systems using Fourier transform infrared/attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR) analysis. Nine adhesives were tested: Adper Single Bond 2 (SB), Adper Easy One (EO), One Up Bond F Plus (OUP), One Coat Bond SL (OC), XP Bond (XP), Ambar (AM), Natural Bond (NB), GO, and Stae. The adhesive systems were applied to a zinc-selenide pellet and 1) cured without solvent volatilization, 2) left undisturbed for 10 seconds before curing, 3) left undisturbed for 60 seconds before curing, 4) air-dried with an air stream for 10 seconds before curing, and 5) air-dried with an air stream for 60 seconds before curing. FTIR/ATR spectra were obtained, and the DC was calculated by comparing the aliphatic bonds/reference peaks before and after light activation for 10 seconds (FlashLite 1401). The DC means of each material were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey test (pStae adhesive systems was not affected by the five evaporation conditions. Air-drying for 60 seconds before curing yielded the highest DC for SB, EO, and OC. Extended solvent volatilization time (60 seconds) either with or without air-drying before curing provided the highest DC for AM, NB, XP, and OUP. Thus, the monomer conversion of adhesive systems was material dependent. In general, the 60-second passive or active air-drying modes to volatilize solvents before curing enhanced the degree of conversion for the one-bottle simplified adhesive systems.

  7. Microleakage assessment of one- and two-step self-etch adhesive systems with ‎the low shrinkage composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Hoseinifar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Different studies evaluating one-step self-etch (SE adhesive systems show contradictory findings, so the aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of one-step SE adhesive systems and CLEARFIL SE BOND (that serves as the “gold-standard” SE adhesive with low shrinkage composites. METHODS: In this in vitro study, Class V cavities with the occlusal margin in enamel and cervical margin in cementum were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 36 human premolars and molars (72 cavities. The enamel surfaces of the cavities were etched with 37% phosphoric acid and then the specimens were divided into six groups of 6 (12 cavities and the cavities were restored according bellow: Group 1 (Kalore-GC + G-Bond, Group 2 (Grandio + Futurabond NR, Group 3 (Aelite LS Posterior + All Bond SE, Group 4 (Kalore-GC + CLEARFIL SE BOND, Group 5 (Grandio + CLEARFIL SE BOND, and Group 6 (Aelite LS Posterior + CLEARFIL SE BOND. All the specimens were thermocycled for 2000 cycles (5-55 °C and then placed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye for 24 hours at 37 °C and finally sectioned and observed under the stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests at a P 0.050. There were no significant differences in microleakage among two-step and one-step SE adhesive systems on both the occlusal and gingival margins. CONCLUSION: According to this study, two-step SE adhesive system (CLEARFIL SE BOND did not provide better marginal seal than the one-step SE adhesive systems.

  8. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Resin Composite Bond Strength to Enamel and Dentin Using Different Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobaldo, J D; Catelan, A; Rodrigues-Filho, U; Marchi, G M; Lima, Danl; Aguiar, Fhb

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength of composite resin restorations in dental blocks with or without exposure to cigarette smoke. Eighty bovine dental blocks were divided into eight groups (n=10) according to the type of adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA [SBMP]; Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE [SB]; Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray Medical Inc, Okayama, Japan [CSEB]; Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE [SBU]) and exposure to smoke (no exposure; exposure for five days/20 cigarettes per day). The adhesive systems were applied to the tooth structure, and the blocks received a composite restoration made using a matrix of perforated pasta. Data were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey test (αadhesive systems (padhesives, but no differences were noted in enamel.

  9. Differences of Streptococcus mutans adhesion between artificial mouth systems: a dinamic and static methods

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    Aryan Morita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various materials have been used for treating dental caries. Dental caries is a disease that attacks hard tissues of the teeth. The initial phase of caries is a formation of bacterial biofilm, called as dental plaque. Dental restorative materials are expected for preventing secondary caries formation initiated by dental plaque. Initial bacterial adhesion is assumed to be an important stage of dental plaque formation. Bacteria that recognize the receptor for binding to the pellicle on tooth surface are known as initial bacterial colonies. One of the bacteria that plays a role in the early stage of dental plaque formation is Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans. Artificial mouth system (AMS used in bacterial biofilm research on the oral cavity provides the real condition of oral cavity and continous and intermittent supply of nutrients for bacteria. Purpose: This study aimed to compare the profile of S. mutans bacterial adhesion as the primary etiologic agent for dental caries between using static method and using artificial mouth system, a dinamic. method (AMS. Method: The study was conducted at Faculty of Dentistry and Integrated Research and testing laboratory (LPPT in Universitas Gadjah Mada from April to August 2015. Composite resin was used as the subject of this research. Twelve composite resins with a diameter of 5 mm and a width of 2 mm were divided into two groups, namely group using static method and group using dynamic method. Static method was performed by submerging the samples into a 100µl suspension of 1.5 x 108 CFU/ml S. mutans and 200µl BHI broth. Meanwhile AMS method was carried out by placing the samples at the AMS tube drained with 20 drops/minute of bacterial suspension and sterile aquadest. After 72 hours, five samples from each group were calculated for their biofilm mass using 1% crystal violet and read by a spectrofotometer with a wavelength of 570 nm. Meanwhile, one sample from each group was taken for its

  10. Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

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    Shailesh Mohanlal Bhandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report demonstrates an orthodontic method that offers short treatment time and the ability to simultaneously reshape and increase the buccolingual thickness of the supporting alveolar bone. A 23-year-old female with Angle′s Class I moderately to severely crowded malocclusion with periodontal pocket with 31 and reduced thickness of the buccal cortical plate of lower anteriors, requested shortened orthodontic treatment time. This surgery technique included buccal full-thickness flaps, selective partial decortication of the cortical plates, concomitant bone grafting/augmentation, and primary flap closure. Following the surgery, orthodontic adjustments were made approximately every 2 weeks. From bracketing to debracketing, the case was completed in approximately 7 months and 3 weeks. Posttreatment evaluation of patient revealed good results. Preexisting thin labial bony cortical plate with lower anteriors was covered. This finding suggests credence to the incorporation of the bone augmentation procedure into the corticotomy surgery because this made it possible to complete the orthodontic treatment with a more intact periodontium. The rapid expansive tooth movements with no significant apical root resorption may be attributed to the osteoclastic or catabolic phase of the regional acceleratory phenomenon.

  11. Cephalometry in orthodontic practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theunissen, J.J.W.; Terlingen, P.J.A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Cephalometry is applied in orthodontic practice to: - obtain information on the growth of the skull - assist diagnosis of the relationship between the jaws and abnormalities in dentition - evaluate the results of treatment. The course of the diagnostic procedure with the aid of the Ricketts analysis and evaluation of the treatment results using five superimpositions is demonstrated by means of two examples. (Auth.)

  12. Systemic effects of fluoxetine on the amount of tooth movement, root resorption, and alveolar bone remodeling during orthodontic force application in rat

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    Mehdi Rafiei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antidepressant drugs such as fluoxetine are of the most commonly used drugs among the public. These drugs may impact the regulation of bone cell functioning, and thus affect orthodontic tooth movement. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of fluoxetine on tooth movements during orthodontic treatment in rats. Materials and Methods: In this study, 30 male rats were randomly assigned into two groups and injected with fluoxetine 10 mg/kg (experimental group and normal saline (control group for a period of 1-month intraperitoneally 5 times/week. Then, the rats were anesthetized and a nickel-titanium closed-coil spring was placed between the left maxillary first molar and left maxillary central incisors of all samples, and then fluoxetine (experimental group and normal saline (control group were injected for another 3 weeks by the same method. After measuring tooth movements, rats were sacrificed, and histomorphometric analyses were conducted and the obtained data were statistically analyzed using independent t-test and the significance was set at 0.05. Results: Following the fluoxetine injection, the mean amount of tooth movements in the experimental group was reduced compared to the control group, which was not statistically significant (P = 0.14. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding bone apposition rate (P = 0.83, external root resorption rate (P = 0.1, and mean number of root resorption lacunae (P = 0.16. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, systemic use of fluoxetine may cause insignificant reduction of tooth movement rate in rats; however, this subject needs more evaluations.

  13. Influence of different etching modes on bond strength and fatigue strength to dentin using universal adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Berry, Thomas P; Watanabe, Hedehiko; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dentin bonding ability of three new universal adhesive systems under different etching modes using fatigue testing. Prime & Bond elect [PE] (DENTSPLY Caulk), Scotchbond Universal [SU] (3M ESPE), and All Bond Universal [AU] (Bisco) were used in this study. A conventional single-step self-etch adhesive, Clearfil Bond SE ONE [CS] (Kuraray Noritake Dental) was also included as a control. Shear bond strengths (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) to human dentin were obtained in the total-etch mode and self-etch modes. For each test condition, 15 specimens were prepared for the SBS and 30 specimens for SFS. SEM was used to examine representative de-bonded specimens, treated dentin surfaces and the resin/dentin interface for each test condition. Among the universal adhesives, PE in total-etch mode showed significantly higher SBS and SFS values than in self-etch mode. SU and AU did not show any significant difference in SBS and SFS between the total-etch mode and self-etch mode. However, the single-step self-etch adhesive CS showed significantly lower SBS and SFS values in the etch-and-rinse mode when compared to the self-etch mode. Examining the ratio of SFS/SBS, for PE and AU, the etch-and-rinse mode groups showed higher ratios than the self-etch mode groups. The influence of different etching modes on dentin bond quality of universal adhesives was dependent on the adhesive material. However, for the universal adhesives, using the total-etch mode did not have a negative impact on dentin bond quality. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Orthodontic-periodontal interactions: Orthodontic extrusion in interdisciplinary regenerative treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolone, Maria Giacinta; Kaitsas, Roberto

    2018-06-01

    Orthodontics is a periodontal treatment. "Guided orthodontic regeneration" (GOR) procedures use orthodontic movements in perio-restorative patients. The GOR technique includes a guided orthodontic "soft tissue" regeneration (GOTR) and a guided orthodontic "bone" regeneration (GOBR) with a plastic soft tissue approach and a regenerating reality. The increased amount of soft tissue gained with orthodontic movement can be used for subsequent periodontal regenerative techniques. The increased amount of bone can as well improve primary implant stability and, eventually, simplify a GTR technique to regenerate soft tissues, to restore tooth with external resorption in aesthetic zone or to extract a tooth to create new hard-soft tissue for adjacent teeth. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires: Progress in their knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Rongo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In orthodontics, is quickly increasing the demand for treatments with a very low aesthetic impact in the social life. More and more adult patients want satisfy their necessity to have a beautiful smile, with “invisible” appliances. Numerous are the opportunities to perform an aesthetic orthodontic treatment such as lingual orthodontics, clear aligners or clear labial orthodontics. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires are a component of clear labial orthodontics together with aestheti...

  16. Bond Strength of Resin Composite to Dentin with Different Adhesive Systems: Influence of Relative Humidity and Application Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Fabienne; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian; Flury, Simon

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the influence of relative humidity and application time on bond strength to dentin of different classes of adhesive systems. A total of 360 extracted human molars were ground to mid-coronal dentin. The dentin specimens were treated with one of six adhesive systems (Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, Clearfil SE Bond, AdheSE, Xeno Select, or Scotchbond Universal), and resin composite (Filtek Z250) was applied to the treated dentin surface under four experimental conditions (45% relative humidity/application time according to manufacturers' instructions; 45% relative humidity/reduced application time; 85% relative humidity/application time according to manufacturers' instructions; 85% relative humidity/reduced application time). After storage (37°C, 100% humidity, 24 h), shear bond strength (SBS) was measured and data analyzed with nonparametric ANOVA followed by Kruskal-Wallis tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests with Bonferroni-Holm correction for multiple testing (level of significance: α = 0.05). Increased relative humidity and reduced application time had no effect on SBS for Clearfil SE Bond and Scotchbond Universal (p = 1.00). For Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, AdheSE, and Xeno Select there was no effect on SBS of reduced application time of the adhesive system (p ≥ 0.403). However, increased relative humidity significantly reduced SBS for Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, and Xeno Select irrespective of application time (p ≤ 0.003), whereas for AdheSE, increased relative humidity significantly reduced SBS at recommended application time only (p = 0.002). Generally, increased relative humidity had a detrimental effect on SBS to dentin, but reduced application time had no effect.

  17. Digital lingual orthodontics and temporary anchorage devices for efficient biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Shetty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment at all times present with an esthetic demand even during treatment. The lingual orthodontics, apart from its esthetic values, also presents several other advantages. Currently, it has become a complete system in itself, starting from an accurate diagnosis, treatment protocol, and laboratory procedure to placement of the appliance in the patient′s mouth. With the advent of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system, the lingual orthodontics is more evolved and made ease operators in respect to more efficient mechanics and reduced archwire adjustments. The present article presents two cases to show the efficiency of lingual orthodontics with temporary anchorage devices and anterior retraction hook.

  18. Effect of moisture and drying time on the bond strength of the one-step self-etching adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Lee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To investigate the effect of dentin moisture degree and air-drying time on dentin-bond strength of two different one-step self-etching adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Twenty-four human third molars were used for microtensile bond strength testing of G-Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond. The dentin surface was either blot-dried or air-dried before applying these adhesive agents. After application of the adhesive agent, three different air drying times were evaluated: 1, 5, and 10 sec. Composite resin was build up to 4 mm thickness and light cured for 40 sec with 2 separate layers. Then the tooth was sectioned and trimmed to measure the microtensile bond strength using a universal testing machine. The measured bond strengths were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and regression analysis was done (p = 0.05. Results All three factors, materials, dentin wetness and air drying time, showed significant effect on the microtensile bond strength. Clearfil S3 Bond, dry dentin surface and 10 sec air drying time showed higher bond strength. Conclusions Within the limitation of this experiment, air drying time after the application of the one-step self-etching adhesive agent was the most significant factor affecting the bond strength, followed by the material difference and dentin moisture before applying the adhesive agent.

  19. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  20. Design of an Orthodontic Torque Simulator for Measurement of Bracket Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenka, G. W.; Nobes, D. S.; Major, P. W.; Carey, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The design and testing of an orthodontic torque simulator that reproduces the effect of archwire rotation on orthodontic brackets is described. This unique device is capable of simultaneously measuring the deformation and loads applied to an orthodontic bracket due to archwire rotation. Archwire rotation is used by orthodontists to correct the inclination of teeth within the mouth. This orthodontic torque simulator will provide knowledge of the deformation and loads applied to orthodontic bracket that will aide clinicians by describing the effect of archwire rotation on brackets. This will also impact that design on new archwirebracket systems by providing an assessment of performance. Deformation of the orthodontic bracket tie wings is measured using a digital image correlation process to measure elastic and plastic deformation. The magnitude of force and moments applied to the bracket though the archwire is also measured using a six-axis load cell. Initial tests have been performed on two orthodontic brackets of varying geometry to demonstrate the measurement capability of the orthodontic torque simulator. The demonstration experiment shows that a Damon Q bracket had a final plastic deformation after a single loading of 0.022 mm while the Speed bracket deformed 0.071 mm. This indicates that the Speed bracket plastically deforms 3.2 times more than the Damon Q bracket for similar magnitude of applied moment. The demonstration experiment demonstrates that bracket geometry affect the deformation of orthodontic brackets and this difference can be detected using the orthodontic torque simulator.

  1. Children's orthodontic utilization in the United States: Socioeconomic and surveillance considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laniado, Nadia; Oliva, Stephanie; Matthews, Gregory J

    2017-11-01

    There has been no epidemiologic study of malocclusion prevalence and treatment need in the United States since the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted from 1988 to 1991. In this descriptive study, the authors sought to estimate orthodontic treatment prevalence by examining a nationally representative survey to assess current pediatric dental and orthodontic utilization. The 2009 and 2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys were used to categorize and compare all types of pediatric dental and orthodontic procedures in children and adolescents up to 20 years old. Descriptive variables included dental insurance, poverty level, and racial/ethnic background. Visits for orthodontic procedures constituted the third largest treatment category (14.5%) and were greatest among the uninsured and higher income populations. Children with public insurance had the fewest orthodontic visits (9.4%). Racial/ethnic disparities were most pronounced among orthodontic visits, with black and Hispanic children receiving the fewest orthodontic procedures (8.89% and 10.56%, respectively). Orthodontic treatment prevalence data suggest that significant disparities exist in orthodontic utilization based on race/ethnicity, poverty level, and insurance status. To establish the burden of malocclusion, describe populations in greatest need of interventions, and craft appropriate programs and policies, an active orthodontic surveillance system is essential. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Shear bond strength of two 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesives when bonding ceramic brackets to bovine enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, Marion; Deuve, Benjamin; Lopez, Isabelle; Hippolyte, Marie-Pascale; Barthélemi, Stéphane

    2017-09-01

    The present study assessed a fracture analysis and compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of two 2-step etch-and-rinse (E&R) adhesives when bonding ceramic orthodontic brackets to bovine enamel. Thirty healthy bovine mandibular incisors were selected and were equally and randomly assigned to 2 experimental groups. Ceramic brackets (FLI Signature Clear ® , RMO) were bonded onto bovine enamel using an adhesive system. In group 1 (n=15), the conventional E&R adhesive (OrthoSolo ® +Enlight ® , Ormco) was used, and in group 2 (n=15), the new E&R adhesive limited to ceramic bracket bonding (FLI ceramic adhesive ® : FLI sealant resin ® +FLI adhesive paste ® , RMO) was used. In order to obtain appropriate enamel surfaces, the vestibular surfaces of mandibular bovine incisors were flat ground. After bonding, all the samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 21 days and subsequently tested for SBS, using the Instron ® universal testing machine. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) scores were evaluated. Failure modes were assessed using optical microscopy at magnification ×40. A statistic data analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U-test (Penamel/adhesive interface. A statistically significant difference was found for the ARI scores between the two groups (P=0.00996). Only two fractured brackets, which remained bonded onto the bovine enamel, were reported. Both occurred in group 1. When bonded to ceramic brackets, FLI ceramic adhesive ® (RMO) was demonstrated to be very predictable and safe for clinical application in enamel bonding, whereas the results obtained with the conventional adhesive system (OrthoSolo ® +Enlight ® , Ormco) were less reproducible and revealed slightly excessive shear bond strength values. Copyright © 2017 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Studies on Mathematical Models of Wet Adhesion and Lifetime Prediction of Organic Coating/Steel by Grey System Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fandi; Liu, Ying; Liu, Li; Li, Ying; Wang, Fuhui

    2017-06-28

    A rapid degradation of wet adhesion is the key factor controlling coating lifetime, for the organic coatings under marine hydrostatic pressure. The mathematical models of wet adhesion have been studied by Grey System Theory (GST). Grey models (GM) (1, 1) of epoxy varnish (EV) coating/steel and epoxy glass flake (EGF) coating/steel have been established, and a lifetime prediction formula has been proposed on the basis of these models. The precision assessments indicate that the established models are accurate, and the prediction formula is capable of making precise lifetime forecasting of the coatings.

  4. Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tsouris, Costas [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-11-07

    The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. In conclusion, the poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

  5. Bond Stability of a Universal Adhesive System to Eroded/Abraded Dentin After Deproteinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, M G; Torres, Crg; Pucci, C R; Schlueter, N; Borges, A B

    Erosive/abrasive challenges can potentially compromise bonding to dentin. Aiming to improve the quality and stability of bonding to this substrate, this study investigated the combined effect of erosion and toothbrush abrasion on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) stability to dentin using a universal adhesive system in total and self-etching modes, associated or not associated with deproteinization. Bovine dentin specimens were divided into five groups according to the organic matrix condition (n=20): control (C); erosion (E); erosion + abrasion (EA); erosion + sodium hypochlorite (EH); erosion + abrasion + sodium hypochlorite (EAH). The groups were further divided (n=10) according to the mode of application (total or self-etching) of a universal adhesive. After the bonding procedure, composite blocks were built up, and the samples were cut to obtain sticks for μTBS testing. For each specimen, one-half of the sticks was immediately tested, and the other one-half was tested after artificial aging (5000 thermocycles, 5°C and 55°C). Three-way analysis of variance (α=5%) showed a significant difference for the triple interaction ( p=0.0007). Higher μTBS means were obtained for the EH and EAH groups compared with the E and EA groups. The control group showed immediate μTBS values similar to that of the E and EA groups for both bond strategies. Erosion and erosion/abrasion did not significantly influence the immediate μTBS to dentin. Artificial aging reduced μTBS values for the groups C, E, and EA using the total-etching mode. Deproteinization maintained the bond stability to artificially aged eroded and eroded/abraded dentin.

  6. The Trw type IV secretion system of Bartonella mediates host-specific adhesion to erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Vayssier-Taussat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens typically infect only a limited range of hosts; however, the genetic mechanisms governing host-specificity are poorly understood. The alpha-proteobacterial genus Bartonella comprises 21 species that cause host-specific intraerythrocytic bacteremia as hallmark of infection in their respective mammalian reservoirs, including the human-specific pathogens Bartonella quintana and Bartonella bacilliformis that cause trench fever and Oroya fever, respectively. Here, we have identified bacterial factors that mediate host-specific erythrocyte colonization in the mammalian reservoirs. Using mouse-specific Bartonella birtlesii, human-specific Bartonella quintana, cat-specific Bartonella henselae and rat-specific Bartonella tribocorum, we established in vitro adhesion and invasion assays with isolated erythrocytes that fully reproduce the host-specificity of erythrocyte infection as observed in vivo. By signature-tagged mutagenesis of B. birtlesii and mutant selection in a mouse infection model we identified mutants impaired in establishing intraerythrocytic bacteremia. Among 45 abacteremic mutants, five failed to adhere to and invade mouse erythrocytes in vitro. The corresponding genes encode components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS Trw, demonstrating that this virulence factor laterally acquired by the Bartonella lineage is directly involved in adherence to erythrocytes. Strikingly, ectopic expression of Trw of rat-specific B. tribocorum in cat-specific B. henselae or human-specific B. quintana expanded their host range for erythrocyte infection to rat, demonstrating that Trw mediates host-specific erythrocyte infection. A molecular evolutionary analysis of the trw locus further indicated that the variable, surface-located TrwL and TrwJ might represent the T4SS components that determine host-specificity of erythrocyte parasitism. In conclusion, we show that the laterally acquired Trw T4SS diversified in the Bartonella lineage

  7. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  8. Effect of Nd:YAG laser on the solvent evaporation of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Damião, Álvaro José; de Oliveira, Hueder Paulo Moisés; de Paiva Gonçalves, Sérgio Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of Nd:YAG laser on the evaporation degree (ED) of the solvent components in total-etch and self-etch adhesives. The ED of Gluma Comfort Bond (Heraeus-Kulzer) one-step self-etch adhesive, and Adper Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE), and XP Bond (Dentsply) total-etch adhesives was determined by weight alterations using two techniques: Control--spontaneous evaporation of the solvent for 5 min; Experimental--Nd:YAG laser irradiation for 1 min, followed by spontaneous evaporation for 4 min. The weight loss due to evaporation of the volatile components was measured at baseline and after 10 s, 20 s, 30 s, 40 s, 50 s, 60 s, 70 s, 80 s, 90 s, 100 s, 110 s, 2 min, 3 min, 4 min, and 5 min. Evaporation of solvent components significantly increased with Nd:YAG laser irradiation for all adhesives investigated. Gluma Comfort Bond showed significantly higher evaporation of solvent components than Adper Single Bond 2 and XP Bond. All the adhesives lost weight quickly during the first min of Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The application of Nd:YAG laser on adhesives before light curing had a significant effect on the evaporation of the solvent components, and the ED of Gluma Comfort Bond one-step self-etch adhesive was significantly higher than with Adper Single Bond 2 and XP Bond total-etch adhesives. The use of the Nd:YAG laser on the uncured adhesive technique can promote a greater ED of solvents, optimizing the longevity of the adhesive restorations.

  9. Optimal management of orthodontic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolski, Francielle; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria; Schimim, Sasha Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician's range of options in the search for better patient care.

  10. Craniofacial orthodontics and postgraduate orthodontic training in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiekwe, G I; Oguchi, C O; daCosta, O O; Utomi, I L

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial orthodontics has been shown to be a critical component of the care of patients with craniofacial anomalies such as cleft lip and palate. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions and clinical experience in cleft and craniofacial care, of orthodontic residents in Nigeria. Questionnaires were sent out to orthodontic residents in the six Postgraduate Orthodontic Training Centers in the country at that time. The questionnaires were self-administered and covered areas in beliefs in cleft care and the clinical experience and challenges faced by the residents in the provision of craniofacial orthodontic care at their various institutions. Thirty-three respondents returned completed questionnaires, with a response rate of 97%. All the respondents believed that residents should be involved in cleft and craniofacial care. Postnatal counseling was the clinical procedure in which the residents reported the highest level of clinical experience (47.4%). The least clinical experience was recorded in pre-bone graft orthodontics (7.4%) and orthodontic preparation for orthognathic surgery (5.5%). Some of the challenges highlighted by the residents were low patients turn out for orthodontic care and the absence of multidisciplinary treatment for craniofacial patients in their centers. Orthodontic residents in Nigeria believe that they should be involved in the management of patients with craniofacial anomalies and cleft lip and palate. However, majority of the residents have limited clinical experience in the management of these patients. A lot more needs to be done, to expose orthodontic residents in training, to all aspects of the orthodontic and multidisciplinary team care required for the cleft/craniofacial patient.

  11. Experimental etch-and-rinse adhesive systems containing MMP-inhibitors: Physicochemical characterization and resin-dentin bonding stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; de Sá Rodrigues, Carolina Ullmann Fernandes; de Oliveira Matos, Marcos Paulo; de Carvalho, Thais Rodrigues; dos Santos, Glauco Botelho; Amaral, Cristiane Mariote

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC%), water sorption (WS), solubility (SO) and the resin-dentin bonding stability (μTBS) of experimental (EXP) etch-and-rinse adhesive systems containing MMP-inhibitors: Galardin-GAL, Batimastat-BAT, GM1489-GM1 and chlorhexidine diacetate-CHX. DC% was measured using FT-IR spectroscopy, while WS and SO were calculated based on ISO4049. Thirty-six human molars were wet ground until the occlusal dentin was exposed. The adhesive systems were applied and resin composite buildups were incrementally constructed. After 24 h immersion in distilled water at 37 °C, the specimens were cut into resin-dentin beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2). The μTBS was evaluated after 24 h, 6 months and 12 months of water storage at 37 °C. Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2) was used as a commercial control. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. SB2 presented the highest DC% (p0.05). SO was found to be not significant (p>0.05). All adhesive systems maintained μTBS stability after 6 months of water storage. Only BAT, GM1 and CHX maintained μTBs stability after 12 months of water storage. The experimental adhesive systems with GM1489 and chlorhexidine diacetate presented the best physicochemical properties and preserved resin-dentin bonding stability after 12 months of water storage. GM1489 could be suitable for inclusion as an MMP-inhibitor in etch-and-rinse adhesive systems to maintain resin-dentin bonding stability over time. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Material testing of reconditioned orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, S; Rewari, A; Keilig, L; Widu, F; Jäger, A; Bourauel, C

    2012-12-01

    While all manufacturers of orthodontic brackets label these products for single use, there are commercial providers offering bracket reconditioning (or "recycling"). We conducted this study to investigate the effects of different recycling techniques on material-related parameters in orthodontic brackets, aiming to derive indications for clinical use and conclusions about the biocompatibility, longevity, and application of recycled brackets. New metal brackets (equilibrium(®); Dentaurum, Ispringen, Germany) were compared to brackets recycled by different techniques, including direct flaming with a Bunsen burner, chemical reconditioning in an acid bath, a commercial unit (Big Jane; Esmadent, IL, USA), and outsourcing to a company (Ortho Clean, Dellstedt, Germany). Material-related examinations included the following: (1) corrosion behavior by static immersion testing and use of a mass spectrometer to determine nickel-ion concentrations in the corrosive medium, (2) surface features in scanning electron micrographs before and after corrosion testing, (3) Vickers hardness using a hardness testing machine, (4) shear bond strength as defined in DIN 13990-1, (5) dimensional stability of the bracket slots by light microscopy, and (6) frictional loss as assessed by an orthodontic measurement and simulation system (OMSS). Each examination was performed on ten brackets. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. Compared to the new brackets, those recycled in an acid bath or by a commercial provider revealed significant dimensional changes (pbrackets varied according to the recycling techniques employed. The group of brackets recycled by one company revealed hardness values that differed from those of all the other groups. No significant differences were observed in nickel-ion release, frictional loss, and shear bond strength. Recycling was found to significantly reduce the corrosion resistance and dimensional stability of orthodontic brackets. As the savings

  13. Laser Applications in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Somayeh; Torkan, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    A laser is a collimated single wavelength of light which delivers a concentrated source of energy. Soon after different types of lasers were invented, investigators began to examine the effects of different wavelengths of laser energy on oral tissues, routine dental procedures and experimental applications. Orthodontists, along with other specialist in different fields of dentistry, can now benefit from several different advantages that lasers provide during the treatment process, from the beginning of the treatment, when separators are placed, to the time of resin residues removal from the tooth surface at the end of orthodontic treatment. This article outlines some of the most common usages of laser beam in orthodontics and also provides a comparison between laser and other conventional method that were the standard of care prior to the advent of laser in this field. PMID:25606324

  14. Influence of surface roughness on streptococcal adhesion forces to composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin

    OBJECTIVE: To determine streptococcal adhesion forces with composite resins with different surface roughness. METHODS: Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain smooth (roughness 20 nm), moderately rough (150 nm) and rough (350 nm) surfaces of two orthodontic, light-cured composites. Adhesion

  15. Light energy attenuation through orthodontic ceramic brackets at different irradiation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ario; Tiu, Szu Hui; McGuinness, Niall J P; Aldossary, Mohammed Saeed

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the total light energy (TLE) transmission through three types of ceramic brackets with, bracket alone and with the addition of orthodontic adhesive, at different exposure durations, and to compare the microhardness of the cured adhesive. Three different makes of ceramic brackets, Pure Sapphire(M), Clarity™ ADVANCED(P) and Dual Ceramic(P) were used. Eighteen specimens of each make were prepared and allocated to three groups (n = 6). MARC(®)-resin calibrator was used to determine the light curing unit (LCU) tip irradiance (mW/cm(2)) and TLE (J/cm(2)) transmitted through the ceramic brackets, and through ceramic bracket plus Transbond™ XT Light Cure Adhesive, for 5, 10 and 20 s. Vickers-hardness values at the bottom of the cured adhesive were determined. Statistical analysis used one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA); P = 0.05. TLE transmission rose significantly among all samples with increasing exposure durations. TLE reaching the adhesive- enamel interface was less than 10 J/cm(2), and through monocrystalline and polycrystalline ceramic brackets was significantly different (P brackets. Clinicians are advised to measure the tip irradiance of their LCUs and increase curing time beyond 5 s. Orthodontic clinicians should understand the type of light curing device and the orthodontic adhesive used in their practice.

  16. Optimal management of orthodontic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topolski F

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Francielle Topolski,1 Alexandre Moro,1,2 Gisele Maria Correr,3 Sasha Cristina Schimim1 1Department of Orthodontics, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 2Department of Orthodontics, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 3Department of Restorative Dentistry, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil Abstract: Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician’s range of options in the search for better patient care. Keywords: tooth movement, pain control, drug therapy, laser therapy

  17. Bonding of composite resins to PEEK: the influence of adhesive systems and air-abrasion parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Taufall, Simon; Roos, Malgorzata; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Lümkemann, Nina

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the tensile bond strength (TBS) to polyaryletheretherketone (PEEK) after different pretreatment and conditioning methods. Four hundred PEEK specimens were fabricated and allocated to the following air-abrasion methods (n 1  = 80/pretreatment): (i) 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.05 MPa); (ii) 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.35 MPa); (iii) 110 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.05 MPa); (iv) 110 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.35 MPa); and (v) Rocatec 110 μm (0.28 MPa). These pretreatments were combined with the following conditioning methods (n 2  = 20/pretreatment/conditioning): (a) visio.link (VL); (b) Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH); (c) Scotchbond Universal (SU); and (d) dialog bonding fluid (DB). After veneering of all specimens with dialog occlusal and aging (28 days H 2 O, 37 °C + 20,000 thermal cycles, 5/55 °C), TBS was measured. Data was analysed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with Breslow-Gehan test and Cox-regressions. The major impact on TBS showed the conditioning, followed by the air-abrasion-pressure, while the grain size of the air-abrasion powder did not show any effect. Specimens air-abraded at 0.35 MPa showed the highest survival rates. However, within VL groups, this observation was not statistically significant. Within MH groups, pretreatment using 110 μm Al 2 O 3 and 0.05 MPa resulted in higher survival rates compared to groups treated with 50 and 110 μm Al 2 O 3 using a pressure of 0.35 MPa. The use of VL showed the highest survival rates between the adhesive systems and the TBS values higher than 25 MPa independent of the pretreatment method. As an exception, only VL showed significantly higher survival rates when compared to MH. The adequate choice of the adhesive system and higher pressures improved the TBS between PEEK and veneering resin composite. The particle size had no major impact. According to this study, best veneering of PEEK with dialog occlusal can be achieved by conditioning with visio.link in combination with

  18. Surface modification for bonding between amalgam and orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsamut, Wittawat; Satrawaha, Sirichom; Wayakanon, Kornchanok

    2017-01-01

    Testing of methods to enhance the shear bond strength (SBS) between orthodontic metal brackets and amalgam by sandblasting and different primers. Three hundred samples of amalgam restorations (KerrAlloy ® ) were prepared in self-cured acrylic blocks, polished, and divided into two groups: nonsandblasted and sandblasted. Each group was divided into five subgroups with different primers used in surface treatment methods, with a control group of bonded brackets on human mandibular incisors. Following the surface treatments, mandibular incisor brackets (Unitek ® ) were bonded on the amalgam with adhesive resin (Transbond XT ® ). The SBS of the samples was tested. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) and failure modes were then determined under a stereo-microscope. Two-way analysis of variance, Chi-square, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed to calculate the correlations between and among the SBS and ARI values, the failure modes, and surface roughness results. There were statistically significant differences of SBS among the different adhesive primers and sandblasting methods ( P 0.05). Using adhesive primers with sandblasting together effectively enhances the SBS between orthodontic metal brackets and amalgam. The two primers with the ingredient methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) monomer, Alloy Primer ® and Assure Plus ® , were the most effective. Including sandblasting in the treatment is essential to achieve the bonding strength required.

  19. Oral health: orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Improper tooth alignment due to crowding, malocclusion, and missing teeth can cause difficulties with eating and speech, and premature wear. It is estimated that more than 20% of children would benefit from orthodontic treatment to correct these conditions, many of which will persist into adulthood if not corrected. Orthodontic care is gaining popularity among adults for similar concerns, as well as for correction of cosmetic issues. The psychological effects of malocclusion should not be ignored. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children undergo evaluation at the first recognition of an orthodontic condition and no later than age 7 years. Some children will need early treatment to help eliminate developing conditions and improve the foundations of the bite, which can ease later treatment in adolescence. For others, treatment in adolescence without early treatment is recommended. Standard cemented braces or clear, removable aligners may be used, depending on the patient's corrective needs. Average treatment time is approximately 2 years; this may be shortened by the use of accelerative techniques. Routine preventive dental care should be continued during the treatment period. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  20. Influence of voids in the hybrid layer based on self-etching adhesive systems: a 3-D FE analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Martini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of porosities at the dentin/adhesive interface has been observed with the use of new generation dentin bonding systems. These porosities tend to contradict the concept that etching and hybridization processes occur equally and simultaneously. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the micromechanical behavior of the hybrid layer (HL with voids based on a self-etching adhesive system using 3-D finite element (FE analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three FE models (Mr were built: Mr, dentin specimen (41x41x82 μm with a regular and perfect (i.e. pore-free HL based on a self-etching adhesive system, restored with composite resin; Mp, similar to M, but containing 25% (v/v voids in the HL; Mpp, similar to Mr, but containing 50% (v/v voids in the HL. A tensile load (0.03N was applied on top of the composite resin. The stress field was obtained by using Ansys Workbench 10.0. The nodes of the base of the specimen were constrained in the x, y and z axes. The maximum principal stress (σmax was obtained for all structures at the dentin/adhesive interface. RESULTS: The Mpp showed the highest peak of σmax in the HL (32.2 MPa, followed by Mp (30 MPa and Mr (28.4 MPa. The stress concentration in the peritubular dentin was high in all models (120 MPa. All other structures positioned far from voids showed similar increase of stress. CONCLUSION: Voids incorporated into the HL raised the σmax in this region by 13.5%. This behavior might be responsible for lower bond strengths of self-etching and single-bottle adhesives, as reported in the literature.

  1. FLEXIBLE, HIGH CHAR YIELD HYBRIDSIL ADHESIVE MATERIALS FOR NEXT GENERATION ABLATIVE THERMAL PROTECTION SYSTEMS, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic will create and empirically validate flexible, high char yield HybridSil adhesive nanocomposites for use within current and next generation polymer based...

  2. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  3. A short-time scale colloidal system reveals early bacterial adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Beloin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of bacteria on abiotic surfaces has important public health and sanitary consequences. However, despite several decades of study of bacterial adhesion to inert surfaces, the biophysical mechanisms governing this process remain poorly understood, due, in particular, to the lack of methodologies covering the appropriate time scale. Using micrometric colloidal surface particles and flow cytometry analysis, we developed a rapid multiparametric approach to studying early events in adhesion of the bacterium Escherichia coli. This approach simultaneously describes the kinetics and amplitude of early steps in adhesion, changes in physicochemical surface properties within the first few seconds of adhesion, and the self-association state of attached and free-floating cells. Examination of the role of three well-characterized E. coli surface adhesion factors upon attachment to colloidal surfaces--curli fimbriae, F-conjugative pilus, and Ag43 adhesin--showed clear-cut differences in the very initial phases of surface colonization for cell-bearing surface structures, all known to promote biofilm development. Our multiparametric analysis revealed a correlation in the adhesion phase with cell-to-cell aggregation properties and demonstrated that this phenomenon amplified surface colonization once initial cell-surface attachment was achieved. Monitoring of real-time physico-chemical particle surface properties showed that surface-active molecules of bacterial origin quickly modified surface properties, providing new insight into the intricate relations connecting abiotic surface physicochemical properties and bacterial adhesion. Hence, the biophysical analytical method described here provides a new and relevant approach to quantitatively and kinetically investigating bacterial adhesion and biofilm development.

  4. Microshear bond strength of resin composite to teeth affected by molar hypomineralization using 2 adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, Vanessa; Burrow, Michael F; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Louise B

    2006-01-01

    When restoring hypomineralized first permanent molars, placement of cavo-surface margins can be difficult to ascertain due to uncertainty of the bonding capability of the tooth surface. The purpose of this study was to investigate the adhesion of resin composite bonded to control and hypomineralized enamel with an all-etch single-bottle adhesive or self-etching primer adhesive. Specimens of control enamel (N=44) and hypomineralized enamel (N=45) had a 0.975-mm diameter composite rod (Filtek Supreme Universal Restorative) bonded with either 3M ESPE Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond following manufacturers' instructions. Specimens were stressed in shear at 1 mm/min to failure (microshear bond strength). Etched enamel surfaces and enamel-adhesive interfaces were examined under scanning electron microscopy. The microshear bond strength (MPa) of resin composite bonded to hypomineralized enamel was significantly lower than for control enamel (3M ESPE Single Bond=7.08 +/- 4.90 vs 16.27 +/- 10.04; Clearfil SE Bond=10.39 +/- 7.56 vs 19.63 +/- 7.42; P=.001). Fractures were predominantly adhesive in control enamel and cohesive in hypomineralized enamel. Scotchbond etchant produced deep interprismatic and intercrystal porosity in control enamel and shallow etch patterns with minimal intercrystal porosity in hypomineralized enamel. Control enamel appeared almost unaffected by SE Primer; hypomineralized enamel showed shallow etching. The hypomineralized enamel-adhesive interface was porous with cracks in the enamel. The control enamel-adhesive interface displayed a hybrid layer of even thickness. The microshear bond strength of resin composite bonded to hypomineralized enamel was significantly lower than for control enamel. This was supported by differences seen in etch patterns and at the enamel-adhesive interface.

  5. Dentin bond strength and degree of conversion evaluation of experimental self-etch adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdi, Fatemeh-Maleknejad; Moosavi, Horieh; Atai, Mohammad; Zeynali, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) monomer in one-step self-etch experimental adhesives on dentinal microshear bond strength (?SBS), their degree of conversion and bonded micro structure. Material and Methods Composite resin cylinders (Clearfil AP-X) were bonded on human sound molar dentinal surfaces by using five experimental one-step self-etching adhesives (1-SEAs) containing 0% ...

  6. Reversible adhesion switching of porous fibrillar adhesive pads by humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Longjian; Kovalev, Alexander; Dening, Kirstin; Eichler-Volf, Anna; Eickmeier, Henning; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk; Steinhart, Martin; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-01-01

    We report reversible adhesion switching on porous fibrillar polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) adhesive pads by humidity changes. Adhesion at a relative humidity of 90% was more than nine times higher than at a relative humidity of 2%. On nonporous fibrillar adhesive pads of the same material, adhesion increased only by a factor of ~3.3. The switching performance remained unchanged in at least 10 successive high/low humidity cycles. Main origin of enhanced adhesion at high humidity is the humidity-induced decrease in the elastic modulus of the polar component P2VP rather than capillary force. The presence of spongelike continuous internal pore systems with walls consisting of P2VP significantly leveraged this effect. Fibrillar adhesive pads on which adhesion is switchable by humidity changes may be used for preconcentration of airborne particulates, pollutants, and germs combined with triggered surface cleaning.

  7. Health economic evaluations in orthodontics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollenius, Ola; Petrén, Sofia; Björnsson, Liselotte; Norlund, Anders; Bondemark, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Economic evaluation is assuming increasing importance as an integral component of health services research. To conduct a systematic review of the literature and assess the evidence from studies presenting orthodontic treatment outcomes and the related costs. The literature review was conducted in four steps, according to Goodman's model, in order to identify all studies evaluating economic aspects of orthodontic interventions. The search covered the databases Medline, Cinahl, Cochrane, Embase, Google Scholar, National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database, and SCOPUS, for the period from 1966 to September 2014. The inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing at least two different orthodontic interventions, evaluation of both economic and orthodontic outcomes, and study populations of all ages. The quality of each included study was assessed as limited, moderate, or high. The overall evidence was assessed according to the GRADE system (The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). The applied terms for searches yielded 1838 studies, of which 989 were excluded as duplicates. Application of the inclusion and exclusion criteria identified 26 eligible studies for which the full-text versions were retrieved and scrutinized. At the final analysis, eight studies remained. Three studies were based on cost-effectiveness analyses and the other five on cost-minimization analysis. Two of the cost-minimization studies included a societal perspective, i.e. the sum of direct and indirect costs. The aims of most of the studies varied widely and of studies comparing equivalent treatment methods, few were of sufficiently high study quality. Thus, the literature to date provides an inadequate evidence base for economic aspects of orthodontic treatment. This systematic review disclosed that few orthodontic studies have presented both economic and clinical outcomes. There is currently

  8. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ODONTOGENIC BACTERAEMIA IN ORTHODONTIC PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, O D; Sanu, O O; Utomi, I L; Nwaokorie, F O

    2016-01-01

    Various researches have investigated factors associated with the prevalence and intensity of bacteraemia following oral procedures including orthodontic procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of age, gender, plaque and gingival indices on the occurrence of odontogenic bacteraemia following orthodontic treatment procedures. Orthodontic Clinic, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Lagos , Nigeria. Using the consecutive, convenience sampling method, a total of 100 subjects who met the inclusion criteria were recruited for the study and peripheral blood was collected before and again within 2 minutes of completion of orthodontic procedures for microbiologic analysis using the BACTEC automated blood culture system and the lysis filtration methods of blood culturing. The subjects were randomly placed in one of four orthodontic procedures investigated: alginate impression making (Group I), separator placement (Group II), band cementation (Group III) and arch wire change (Group IV). Plaque and gingival indices were assessed using the plaque component of the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) (Greene & Vermillion) and Modified gingival index (Lobene) respectively before blood collection. Spearman Point bi-serial correlations and logistic regression statistics were used for statistical evaluations at p orthodontic treatment procedures of 16% and 28% were observed respectively using the BACTEC and lysis filtration methods. A statistically significant increase in the prevalence of bateraemia was observed following separator placement (p=0.016). An increase in age, plaque index scores and modified gingival index scores of the subjects were found to be associated with an increase in the prevalence of bacteraemia following orthodontic treatment procedures, with plaque index score showing the strongest correlation. Separator placement was found to induce significantly highest level of bacteraemia. Meticulous oral hygiene practice and the use of 0

  9. The current evidence and implications of lingual orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap Saini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to investigate the current evidence and implications of lingual orthodontics. The electronic database search was done on PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, EBSCOhost, Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar reporting on appliance design, bonding, and laboratory setup, biomechanics, survey studies, case reports, and treatment outcomes to find the current evidence of lingual orthodontics. The evidence available on lingual orthodontics traces a very clear and predictable pattern. The 80′s was devoted to the limitation and progression of the concept; the 90′s to the comparison between labial and lingual and the evolution of laboratory technique and bracket system. The last decade focuses on innovations, the predictability of outcomes, the impact of white spot lesion, and the patient acceptability. This review also shows that biomechanical principles of lingual orthodontics are well understood and established today, any case that can be treated with labial orthodontic appliance, can also be treated effectively with lingual orthodontic appliance as the completely customized lingual appliance can provide predetermined treatment outcome.

  10. Periodontic and orthodontic treatment in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Marianne M A; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an update of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics in adults. Specific areas reviewed are the reaction of periodontal tissue to orthodontic forces, the influence of tooth movement on the periodontium, the effect of circumferential supracrestal fiberotomy in preventing orthodontic relapse, the effect of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, microbiology associated with orthodontic bands, and mucogingival and esthetic considerations. In addition, the relationship between orthodontics and implants (eg, using dental implants for orthodontic anchorage) is discussed.

  11. WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE “WATER BEARS” FOR THE ADHESION SYSTEMS USING IN SPACE APPLICATIONS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E. Filippov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in space research and in particular appearance of complex movable constructions with a number of components exposed to the extreme conditions of open space causes a strong demand for development of new tribological and adhesion systems which are able to resist such conditions. In the last few years, many engineering solutions in the field of tribology and adhesion have been found based on “biomimetics approach” that is searching for ideas originally created by living nature and optimized during billions of years of natural selection. Surprisingly some of the living creatures are found to be optimized even for survival for a long time in the conditions of open space. Such ability is very promising from the point of view of development of new adhesives for future space applications. In this paper we discuss what we can learn in this context from the so-called “water bears” (tardigrades in a combination with some other features, already adopted to reversible technical adhesives from other animals, such as insects and Gecko lizards.

  12. Lingual orthodontic education: An insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Kanta Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing demand for lingual orthodontics, the technique is not very popular among the orthodontists in general. Lingual orthodontics differs from the conventional labial technique in all aspects. Lack of comprehensive training in this field is a major obstacle in popularizing this science of invisible orthodontics. At present, short-term courses and part-time degree programs are the means to learn this technique and the demand for more comprehensive lingual orthodontic education is on a rise among orthodontists. Lingual orthodontics as a super specialty discipline with full-time residency program can be a step forward. This will groom orthodontists to acquire the finest skills to finish lingual cases but also help to the science to grow with dedicated research work.

  13. Clear aligners in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, T

    2017-03-01

    Since the introduction of the Tooth Positioner (TP Orthodontics) in 1944, removable appliances analogous to clear aligners have been employed for mild to moderate orthodontic tooth movements. Clear aligner therapy has been a part of orthodontic practice for decades, but has, particularly since the introduction of Invisalign appliances (Align Technology) in 1998, become an increasingly common addition to the orthodontic armamentarium. An internet search reveals at least 27 different clear aligner products currently on offer for orthodontic treatment. The present paper will highlight the increasing popularity of clear aligner appliances, as well as the clinical scope and the limitations of aligner therapy in general. Further, the paper will outline the differences between the various types of clear aligner products currently available. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  14. A computerized system to conduct the Tweed-Merrifield analysis in orthodontics Sistema computadorizado para conduzir a análise de Tweed-Merrifield na ortodontia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximino Brandão Barreto

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Precision in orthodontic diagnosis can increase the chance of therapeutic success. The objective of this study was to describe the development of a computerized system (prototype, created from a printed table of the Cranial Facial Analysis and Total Dentition Space Analysis with Difficulty Index - Tweed-Merrifield Analysis - in order to aid orthodontic diagnosis. The analysis was transposed from the manual format to the digital format. A user-logical and clear interface was sought for the development of the prototype, consisting of tables and graphs, including automatic, fast and accurate calculations. The result was the immediate visualization of the resolution of the analysis after filling out the fields on the computer. This technological innovation can be a helpful instrument for the orthodontist that favors a more accurate dental-cranial-facial analysis, increases patient safety, orients conduct and may contribute to teaching and research.A precisão no diagnóstico ortodôntico pode aumentar a chance de êxito terapêutico. Este trabalho teve como objetivo descrever o desenvolvimento de um sistema computadorizado (protótipo, criado a partir de uma tabela impressa da Análise Craniofacial e Análise do Espaço Total com o Índice de Dificuldade - Análise de Tweed-Merrifield, que visa auxiliar o diagnóstico ortodôntico. Foi aplicada a transposição da análise do formato manual para o digital. Buscou-se uma interface lógica e simples para o desenvolvimento do protótipo, composta por tabelas e gráficos, incluindo a realização de cálculos automáticos rápidos e precisos. O resultado foi a visualização imediata da resolução da análise, após o preenchimento dos campos no computador. Essa inovação tecnológica pode ser um instrumento de auxílio ao ortodontista, favorecendo a obtenção de um diagnóstico dentocraniofacial mais acurado, aumentando a segurança do paciente, orientando a conduta e pode contribuir para o ensino e

  15. Shear bond strength and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with conventional acid-etch and self-etch primer systems: An in-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Shirazi, Sajjad; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Samaneh; Moghimi, Mahsan; Shahrbaf, Shirin

    2016-02-01

    Different in-vitro studies have reported various results regarding shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets when SEP technique is compared to conventional system. This in-vivo study was designed to compare the effect of conventional acid-etching and self-etching primer adhesive (SEP) systems on SBS and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. 120 intact first maxillary and mandibular premolars of 30 orthodontic patients were selected and bonded with metal and ceramic brackets using conventional acid-etch or self-etch primer system. The bonded brackets were incorporated into the wire during the study period to simulate the real orthodontic treatment condition. The teeth were extracted and debonded after 30 days. The SBS, debonding characteristics and adhesive remnant indices (ARI) were determined in all groups. The mean SBS of metal brackets was 10.63±1.42 MPa in conventional and 9.38±1.53 MPa in SEP system, (P=0.004). No statistically significant difference was noted between conventional and SEP systems in ceramic brackets. The frequency of 1, 2 and 3 ARI scores and debonding within the adhesive were the most common among all groups. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding ARI or failure mode of debonded specimens in different brackets or bonding systems. The SBS of metal brackets bonded using conventional system was significantly higher than SEP system, although the SBS of SEP system was clinically acceptable. No significant difference was found between conventional and SEP systems used with ceramic brackets. Total SBS of metal brackets was significantly higher than ceramic brackets. Due to adequate SBS of SEP system in bonding the metal brackets, it can be used as an alternative for conventional system. Shear bond strength, Orthodontic brackets, Adhesive remnant index, self-etch.

  16. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  17. [Effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphouscalcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) treatment on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after tooth bleaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Ding, Xiao-jun; Yu, Xiao-ping; Gong, Yi-ming

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphouscalcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) treatment on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after tooth bleaching. One hundred extracted human premolars were randomly divided and treated according to 5 groups (n=20) : (1) no treatment; (2) 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching; (3) 38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching; (4)10% carbamide peroxide bleaching and CPP-ACP paste; (5)38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching and CPP-ACP paste. In all groups, the brackets were bonded using a conventional acid-etch and bond system (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). The shear bond strength adhesive remnant index (ARI) of the brackets were determined and the data was analyzed by ANOVA and Bonferroni test using SPSS13.0 software package. The use of 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching significantly decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets when compared with untreated group (P0.05). The ARI did not show any significant difference before and after CPP-ACP treatment. After tooth bleaching, CPP-ACP treatment have little influence on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  18. Are claims made in orthodontic journal advertisements evidence-supported?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, Christos; Kouskoura, Thaleia; Ren, Yijin; Katsaros, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos

    Objective: To examine the supporting evidence of advertisements published in six leading orthodontic journals. Materials and Methods: The 2012-2013 printed issues of American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Australian Orthodontic Journal, Journal of Orthodontics, European

  19. The assessment of orthodontic bonding defects: optical coherence tomography followed by three-dimensional reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominu, R.; Sinescu, C.; Rominu, M.; Negrutiu, M.; Petrescu, E.; Pop, D.; Podoleanu, A. Gh.

    2011-10-01

    Orthodontic bonding is a simple yet important procedure that can influence the outcome of treatment in case it is performed incorrectly. An orthodontic treatment shadowed by repeated bonding failures can become unduly long and will decrease patient trust and compliance. Optical coherence tomography has been widely used in ophtalmology but is relatively new to dentistry. Using OCT one can detect aerial inclusions within the orthodontic adhesive or even identify incongruence between the bracket base and the tooth surface. The aim of our study was to identify bonding defects and reconstruct them three-dimensionally in order to be able to characterize them more accurately. We bonded 30 sound human permanent teeth with ceramic orthodontic brackets using a no-mix self-curing orthodontic adhesive. Prior to bonding all teeth were stored in tap water at 4°C and then professionally cleaned with rotary brushes and pumice. The samples were processed by the same person and the rotary brushes were changed after every fifth tooth. All interfaces were investigated by means of OCT and 4 defects were found. Subsequently, the defects were reconstructed threedimensionally using an open-source program. By identifying and reconstructing bonding defects we could assess the quality of the bonding procedure. Since bonding tends to be more accurate in vitro where the environmental conditions are close to ideal, it is probable that defects found in vivo be even greater in number, which leads to the conclusion that this type of investigation is potentially valuable.

  20. Optical adhesive property study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  1. Assessment of the periodontal health status in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and Invisalign system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haili; Tang, Haifang; Zhou, Tian; Kang, Na

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: At present, many scholars have studied the periodontal health status of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and invisalign. However, those results are inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted this meta-analysis, and then provide reference for clinical treatment. Methods: Most databases, such as the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, Medline, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, CNKI, and Wan Fang Data were retrieved for related articles from the establishment of the database to October 2017. Meanwhile, we also searched the references of the related literatures manually, in order to increase the included literatures. Two researchers screened the related literatures according to the inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria. Stata 12.0 software was used for data analysis, and results are estimated by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: Finally, 7 articles, including 368 patients, were included into our meta-analysis. Meta-analysis results showed that there was no statistically significant difference of gingival index (GI) and sulcus probing depth (SPD) status between the invisalign group and the control group, including at 1, 3, and 6 months (all P > .05). When compared with the control group, the invisalign group presented a lower plaque index (PLI) and sulcus bleeding index (SBI) status at 1 month (OR = −0.53, 95% CI: −0.89 to −0.18; OR = −0.44, 95% CI: −0.70 to −0.19, respectively), 3 months (OR = −0.69, 95% CI: −1.12 to −0.27; OR = −0.49, 95% CI: −0.93 to −0.05, respectively), and 6 months (OR = −0.91, 95% CI: −1.47 to −0.35; OR = −0.40, 95% CI: −0.63 to −0.07, respectively). Subgroup analysis showed that the SPD status was lower in the invisalign group at 6 months when measured the teeth using Ramfjord index (OR = −0.74, 95% CI: −1.35 to −0.12). However, there was no statistically significant difference between the 2

  2. Current advances in orthodontic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Wang, Yan; Jian, Fan; Liao, Li-Na; Yang, Xin; Lai, Wen-Li

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic pain is an inflammatory pain that is initiated by orthodontic force-induced vascular occlusion followed by a cascade of inflammatory responses, including vascular changes, the recruitment of inflammatory and immune cells, and the release of neurogenic and pro-inflammatory mediators. Ultimately, endogenous analgesic mechanisms check the inflammatory response and the sensation of pain subsides. The orthodontic pain signal, once received by periodontal sensory endings, reaches the sensory cortex for pain perception through three-order neurons: the trigeminal neuron at the trigeminal ganglia, the trigeminal nucleus caudalis at the medulla oblongata and the ventroposterior nucleus at the thalamus. Many brain areas participate in the emotion, cognition and memory of orthodontic pain, including the insular cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, locus coeruleus and hypothalamus. A built-in analgesic neural pathway—periaqueductal grey and dorsal raphe—has an important role in alleviating orthodontic pain. Currently, several treatment modalities have been applied for the relief of orthodontic pain, including pharmacological, mechanical and behavioural approaches and low-level laser therapy. The effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief has been validated, but its effects on tooth movement are controversial. However, more studies are needed to verify the effectiveness of other modalities. Furthermore, gene therapy is a novel, viable and promising modality for alleviating orthodontic pain in the future. PMID:27341389

  3. A network approach to orthodontic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auconi, P; Caldarelli, G; Scala, A; Ierardo, G; Polimeni, A

    2011-11-01

    Network analysis, a recent advancement in complexity science, enables understanding of the properties of complex biological processes characterized by the interaction, adaptive regulation, and coordination of a large number of participating components. We applied network analysis to orthodontics to detect and visualize the most interconnected clinical, radiographic, and functional data pertaining to the orofacial system. The sample consisted of 104 individuals from 7 to 13 years of age in the mixed dentition phase without previous orthodontic intervention. The subjects were divided according to skeletal class; their clinical, radiographic, and functional features were represented as vertices (nodes) and links (edges) connecting them. Class II subjects exhibited few highly connected orthodontic features (hubs), while Class III patients showed a more compact network structure characterized by strong co-occurrence of normal and abnormal clinical, functional, and radiological features. Restricting our analysis to the highest correlations, we identified critical peculiarities of Class II and Class III malocclusions. The topology of the dentofacial system obtained by network analysis could allow orthodontists to visually evaluate and anticipate the co-occurrence of auxological anomalies during individual craniofacial growth and possibly localize reactive sites for a therapeutic approach to malocclusion. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Influence of dentinal regions on bond strengths of different adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, F; Unlü, N; Sengun, A

    2003-06-01

    This in vitro study assessed comparatively the shear bond strengths of three composite resins, 3M Valux Plus (3MVP), Herculite (H), Clearfil AP-X (CAP-X), a polyacid modified composite resin Dyract (D), and a resin modified glass-ionomer materials Vitremer (V), to cervical and buccal dentine regions of extracted human molar teeth. Four different bonding systems, 3M ScotchBond Multipurpose (SB), Clearfil Liner Bond 2 (LB2), Opti Bond (OB), and Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB 2.1) were used with the manufacturer's respective composite and compomer materials. One hundred freshly extracted mandibular molar teeth were selected for this study. Flat buccal dentine surfaces were created on 50 teeth and cylindrical rods of the five materials were bonded to the dentine surfaces. For assessment of cervical bond strengths, the materials were bonded to mesial and distal enamel bordered occlusal dentinal surfaces of the remaining 50 teeth. The five groups of restorative procedures were applied as follows; Group 1: SB + 3MVP, Group 2: LB2 + CAP-X, Group 3: OB + H, Group 4: PB2.1 + D, Group 5: Vitremer primer (VP) VP + V. Each restorative procedure thus had 20 specimens (10 buccal + 10 cervical). After 24 h of water storage (37 degrees C), the specimens were tested on a Universal Testing machine in shear with a cross head speed of 0.5 mm min-1. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa and the results were evaluated statistically using Kruskal-Wallis one-way/anova and Mann-Whitney U-tests. It was found that the bond strengths of SB + 3MVP, LB2 + CAP-X and VP + V to buccal dentine surfaces were significantly stronger (P 0.05). Vitremer was found the least successful adhesive material in terms of shear bond strength on both buccal and occluso-cervical dentine surfaces.

  5. Adhesion science

    CERN Document Server

    Comyn, John

    1997-01-01

    The use of adhesives is widespread and growing, and there are few modern artefacts, from the simple cereal packet, to the jumbo jet, that are without this means of joining. Adhesion Science provides an illuminating account of the science underlying the use of adhesives, a branch of chemical technology which is fundamental to the science of coatings and composite materials and to the performance of all types of bonded structures. This book guides the reader through the essential basic polymer science, and the chemistry of adhesives in use at present. It discusses surface preparation for adhesive bonding, and the use of primers and coupling agents. There is a detailed chapter on contact angles and what can be predicted from them. A simple guide on stress distribution joints and how this relates to testing is included. It also examines the interaction of adhesives and the environment, including an analysis of the resistance of joints to water, oxygen and ultra-violet light. Adhesion Science provides a comprehens...

  6. The adhesive system and root canal region do not influence the degree of conversion of dual resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Cristoforides Pereira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of two adhesive systems and the post space region on the degree of conversion of dual resin cement and its bond strength to root dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One three-step etch-and-rinse (All-bond 2, Bisco and another one-step self-etch (Xeno III, Dentsply adhesive systems were applied on 20 (n=10 crownless bovine incisors, at 12-mm-deep post space preparation, and a fiber post (FRC Postec, Ivoclar was cemented using a dual cure resin cement (Duo-Link, Bisco. Three transverse sections (3 mm were obtained, being one from each study region (cervical, middle and apical. The degree of conversion of the dual cure resin cement was determined by a micro-Raman spectrometer. The data (% were submitted to repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: For both groups, the degree of conversion means (% (All bond 2cervical = 69.3; All bond 2middle = 55.1; All bond 2apical= 56; Xeno III cervical = 68.7; Xeno IIImiddle = 68.8; Xeno III apical = 54.3 were not significantly different along the post space regions (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Neither the adhesive nor the post space region influenced the degree of conversion of the cement layer.

  7. Thermally responsive polymer systems for self-healing, reversible adhesion and shape memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaofan

    Responsive polymers are "smart" materials that are capable of performing prescribed, dynamic functions under an applied stimulus. In this dissertation, we explore several novel design strategies to develop thermally responsive polymers and polymer composites for self-healing, reversible adhesion and shape memory applications. In the first case described in Chapters 2 and 3, a thermally triggered self-healing material was prepared by blending a high-temperature epoxy resin with a thermoplastic polymer, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL). The initially miscible system undergoes polymerization induced phase separation (PIPS) during the curing of epoxy and yields a variety of compositionally dependent morphologies. At a particular PCL loading, the cured blend displays a "bricks-and-mortar" morphology in which epoxy exists as interconnected spheres ("bricks") within a continuous PCL matrix ("mortar"). A heat induced "bleeding" phenomenon was observed in the form of spontaneous wetting of all free surfaces by the molten PCL, and is attributed to the volumetric thermal expansion of PCL above its melting point in excess of epoxy brick expansion, which we term differential expansive bleeding (DEB). This DEB is capable of healing damage such as cracks. In controlled self-healing experiments, heating of a cracked specimen led to PCL bleeding from the bulk that yields a liquid layer bridging the crack gap. Upon cooling, a "scar" composed of PCL crystals was formed at the site of the crack, restoring a significant portion of mechanical strength. We further utilized DEB to enable strong and thermally-reversible adhesion of the material to itself and to metallic substrates, without any requirement for macroscopic softening or flow. After that, Chapters 4--6 present a novel composite strategy for the design and fabrication of shape memory polymer composites. The basic approach involves physically combining two or more functional components into an interpenetrating fiber

  8. Effect of repeated use on dentin bond strength of two adhesive systems: All-in-one and one-bottle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiei Fershteh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare the effects of repeated use of two one-bottle adhesives with that of two all- in- one adhesives (with acetone solvent on bond strength to dentin. Materials and Methods: A flat dentin surface was prepared on 120 bovine incisors using 600- grit abrasive pape. The teeth were randomly assigned into 12 equal groups. The four adhesive systems [Prime and Bond NT (P&B NT, One-Step Plus (OS, iBond (iB, and G-Bond (GB] were used at baseline, after the lid of the container had been opened 30 times, and after it had been opened 60 times. Before each use of the adhesives, the lids of the containers were left open for 1 min. The resin composites were applied on the dentin in a cylindrical split mold. After thermocycling, shear bond strength test was performed with a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min. We used Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests for statistical analysis. Results: There was no statistically significant difference among bond strength (MPa of the groups of P&B NT (31.9 ± 4.6, 31.8 ± 6.5, 26.1 ± 6.7 and OS (33.2 ± 5.1, 30.9 ± 7, 29.3 ± 5.9, respectively (P > 0.05. The mean of the bond strength of iB and GB after 60 times (15.3 ± 4.1 and 12.2 ± 3.9, respectively was significantly lower than that of iB and GB at baseline (23.5 ± 4.8 and 22.2 ± 4.5, respectively (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Repeated use (60 times of the all-in-one adhesive led to a decline in the dentin bond strength. To avoid this problem it would be advisable to have containers with smaller amounts of adhesive or perhaps those with only a singe dose.

  9. Adhesion study of low-k/Si system using 4-point bending and nanoscratch test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damayanti, M.; Widodo, J.; Sritharan, T.; Mhaisalkar, S.G.; Lu, W.; Gan, Z.H.; Zeng, K.Y.; Hsia, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposited (CVD) low-k films using tri-methyl-silane (3MS) and tetra-methyl cyclo-tetra-siloxanes (TMCTS) precursors were studied. A 4-point bend test (4PBT) was performed to assess the adhesion property of the low-k films to Si substrates and the results were compared with that of simpler method, nanoscratch test (NST), as a quality control tool despite its drawbacks. Adhesion energy, G c , of the low-k/Si interface as measured by 4PBT and critical scratch load, P c , as obtained by NST display a linear relationship with hardness and modulus of the low-k film. The lowering of G c as the hardness of the film decreases can be explained by the effects of the C introduction into the Si-O networks found in these films. Lower carbon content for higher hardness films is thought to cause them to be more 'silica-like', and thus, exhibit better adhesion with the Si substrate. Two failure modes were observed for specimens under 4PBT. On one hand, films with low hardness ( c ( 2 ) with an adhesive separation of low-k from the Si substrate. On the other hand, films of high hardness (>5 GPa) display interfacial energies in excess of 10 J/m 2 with delamination of epoxy from the Si substrate, thus, indicating excellent adhesion between the low-k films and Si substrate. For the low hardness films, good correlation exists between P c and G c . However, the two data points of the high hardness films that gave the two highest P c and G c values do not lie on the correlation line drawn for the low hardness film data points due to different factors governing the failure in both tests and a change in the 4PBT failure mechanism

  10. Clinicians' Choices in Selecting Orthodontic Archwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia-Izabella Pop

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the choices made by clinicians in selecting archwires during the initial, intermediate and final stages of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Methods: We carried out a questionnaire-based study at the Orthodontics and Pedodontics Clinic Târgu Mureș, between March 2012 and September 2012. The questionnaires consisted of two parts: the first included questions related to the dimension, alloy used in fabrication, section (round or rectangular and manufacturer of the archwires used by the orthodontists in their orthodontic practice, the second part was concerned with their personal opinion about the physical properties and disadvantages of the archwires. Results: From a total number of 90 distributed questionnaires, 62 were returned. The majority of clinicians are using stainless steel (SS and nickel-titanium alloy (NiTi wires in their fixed orthodontic treatments, very few are using beta-titanium (Beta Ti, copper nickel-titanium (Co- NiTi and esthetic archwires. The preferred dimension seem to be 0.022 inches in the appliance system. Regarding the wire dimensions, 0.014, 0.016 inch wires are mostly used from the round section group and 0.016 × 0.022 inch, 0.017 × 0.025 inch from the rectangular ones. Conclusions: There is a general lack of agreement between the clinicians surveyed regarding the properties of an ideal archwire and the disadvantages of the used wires. The most frequently used alloys seemed to be the SS and NiTi

  11. Lingual Orthodontics simplified : Incognito -customization perfected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroutioun Dedeyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Esthetic orthodontics is the need of the hour, fuelled by the increasing number of adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment. Alternatives to labial appliance include clear aligners and lingual appliance. Conventional lingual treatment is laborious in terms of laboratory setup and manual dexterity of the operator, coupled with less than optimum treatment results. Customization of the appliance to meet varied requirements of each patient due to highly variable lingual morphology within and amongst patients is the key to successful treatment in lingual orthodontics. Efforts at bracket base customization using intra-oral jigs and laboratory setups are fraught with unavoidable errors affecting treatment outcome. With the advent of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology the Eldorado of true customization is now a reality. This paper introduces the Incognito Appliance System based on custom-made brackets and custom-made series of pre-bent wires using state of art CAD/CAM manufacturing procedures.

  12. Effect of Sodium Ascorbate and Delayed Bonding on the Bond Strength of Silorane and Two-step Self-etch Adhesive Systems in Bleached Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Abed Kahnemooyi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Studies have shown decreased bond strength of composite resin to human and bovine bleached enamel. This study evaluated the effect of sodium ascorbate and delayed bonding on the bond strength of two adhesive systems to bleached enamel. Materials and methods. The labial surfaces of 150 sound bovine incisor teeth were abraded with abrasive paper. The teeth were randomly divided into 8 groups: A: control; B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; C: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + sodium ascorbate gel; and D: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + delayed bonding. In groups A‒D, silorane adhesive system and Filtek silorane composite resin were used. In groups E‒H, the same preparation methods of groups A‒D were used. Two-step self-etch Clearfil SE Bond adhesive systems and AP-X composite resin were administered. Shear bond strength of each group was measured. Two samples were prepared for each surface preparation for ultrastructural evaluation. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey test were used for data analysis at P<0.05. Results. The interaction between the adhesive system type and surface preparation protocol was significant (P=0.014, with significant differences in shear bond strengths in terms of the adhesive systems (P<0.01. There were significant differences in shear bond strength in terms of surface preparation techniques irrespective of the adhesive system (P<0.01. Conclusion. The results showed that bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide decreased the shear bond strength values with both adhesive systems, and a one-week delay in bonding and 10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes restored the bond strength in both adhesive systems.

  13. Is skeletal anchorage changing the limit of orthodontics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsen, Birte

    2007-01-01

    The limits for orthodontic treatment are often set by the lack of suitable anchorage. The mini-implant is used where conventional anchorage cannot be applied; not as a replacement for conventional anchorage. In patients with lack of teeth and reduced periodontium, skeletal anchorage allows...... and can be loaded immediately. The course will be addressed the following topics: Are the mini-implants replacing conventional anchorage? Why are orthodontic mini-implants necessary? The development of the skeletal anchorage systems The biological basis for the skeletal anchorage systems...... The characteristics of the different skeletal anchorage systems The insertion procedure The indications for the use of orthodontic mini-implants Treatment planning in relation to the use of mini-implants Case presentations...

  14. Influence of incorrect application of a water-based adhesive system on the marginal adaptation of Class V restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschke, A; Blunck, U; Roulet, J F

    2000-10-01

    To determine the influence of incorrectly performed steps during the application of the water-based adhesive system OptiBond FL on the marginal adaptation of Class V composite restorations. In 96 extracted human teeth Class V cavities were prepared. Half of the margin length was situated in dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into 12 groups. The cavities were filled with Prodigy resin-based composite in combination with OptiBond FL according to the manufacturer's instructions (Group O) and including several incorrect application steps: Group A: prolonged etching (60 s); Group B: no etching of dentin; Group C: excessive drying after etching; Group D: short rewetting after excessive drying; Group E: air drying and rewetting; Group F: blot drying; Group G: saliva contamination; Group H: application of primer and immediate drying; group I: application of only primer; group J: application of only adhesive; Group K: no light curing of the adhesive before the application of composite. After thermocycling, replicas were taken and the margins were quantitatively analyzed in the SEM. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using non-parametric procedures. With exception of the "rewetting groups" (D and E) and the group with saliva contamination (G), all other application procedures showed a significantly higher amount of marginal openings in dentin compared to the control group (O). Margin quality in enamel was only affected when the primer was not applied.

  15. Quick response codes in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moidin Shakil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quick response (QR code codes are two-dimensional barcodes, which encodes for a large amount of information. QR codes in Orthodontics are an innovative approach in which patient details, radiographic interpretation, and treatment plan can be encoded. Implementing QR code in Orthodontics will save time, reduces paperwork, and minimizes manual efforts in storage and retrieval of patient information during subsequent stages of treatment.

  16. Biological adhesion of the flatworm Macrostomum lignano relies on a duo-gland system and is mediated by a cell type-specific intermediate filament protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerer, Birgit; Pjeta, Robert; Wunderer, Julia; Rodrigues, Marcelo; Arbore, Roberto; Schärer, Lukas; Berezikov, Eugene; Hess, Michael W; Pfaller, Kristian; Egger, Bernhard; Obwegeser, Sabrina; Salvenmoser, Willi; Ladurner, Peter

    2014-02-12

    Free-living flatworms, in both marine and freshwater environments, are able to adhere to and release from a substrate several times within a second. This reversible adhesion relies on adhesive organs comprised of three cell types: an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell, which is a modified epidermal cell responsible for structural support. However, nothing is currently known about the molecules that are involved in this adhesion process. In this study we present the detailed morphology of the adhesive organs of the free-living marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. About 130 adhesive organs are located in a horse-shoe-shaped arc along the ventral side of the tail plate. Each organ consists of exactly three cells, an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell. The necks of the two gland cells penetrate the anchor cell through a common pore. Modified microvilli of the anchor cell form a collar surrounding the necks of the adhesive- and releasing glands, jointly forming the papilla, the outer visible part of the adhesive organs. Next, we identified an intermediate filament (IF) gene, macif1, which is expressed in the anchor cells. RNA interference mediated knock-down resulted in the first experimentally induced non-adhesion phenotype in any marine animal. Specifically, the absence of intermediate filaments in the anchor cells led to papillae with open tips, a reduction of the cytoskeleton network, a decline in hemidesmosomal connections, and to shortened microvilli containing less actin. Our findings reveal an elaborate biological adhesion system in a free-living flatworm, which permits impressively rapid temporary adhesion-release performance in the marine environment. We demonstrate that the structural integrity of the supportive cell, the anchor cell, is essential for this adhesion process: the knock-down of the anchor cell-specific intermediate filament gene resulted in the inability of the animals to adhere. The RNAi

  17. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (pgingivitis group than in health people (pgingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis.

  18. Adhesion and friction of the smooth attachment system of the cockroach Gromphadorhina portentosa and the influence of the application of fluid adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Betz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Two different measurement techniques were applied to study the attachment of the smooth foot pads of the Madagascar hissing cockroach Gromphadorhina portentosa. The attachment of the non-manipulated adhesive organs was compared with that of manipulated ones (depletion or substitution by artificial secretions. From measurements of the friction on a centrifuge, it can be concluded that on nanorough surfaces, the insect appears to benefit from employing emulsions instead of pure oils to avoid excessive friction. Measurements performed with a nanotribometer on single attachment organs showed that, in the non-manipulated euplantulae, friction was clearly increased in the push direction, whereas the arolium of the fore tarsus showed higher friction in the pull direction. The surface of the euplantulae shows an imbricate appearance, whereupon the ledges face distally, which might contribute to the observed frictional anisotropy in the push direction. Upon depletion of the tarsal adhesion-mediating secretion or its replacement by oily fluids, in several cases, the anisotropic effect of the euplantula disappeared due to the decrease of friction forces in push-direction. In the euplantulae, adhesion was one to two orders of magnitude lower than friction. Whereas the tenacity was slightly decreased with depleted secretion, it was considerably increased after artificial application of oily liquids. In terms of adhesion, it is concluded that the semi-solid consistence of the natural adhesion-mediating secretion facilitates the detachment of the tarsus during locomotion. In terms of friction, on smooth to nanorough surfaces, the insects appear to benefit from employing emulsions instead of pure oils to avoid excessive friction forces, whereas on rougher surfaces the tarsal fluid rather functions in improving surface contact by keeping the cuticle compliable and compensating surface asperities of the substratum.

  19. Antibacterial Activity of Orthodontic Cement Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles Adjacent to Orthodontic Brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Eldad Sharon; Revital Sharabi; Adi Eden; Asher Zabrovsky; Gilad Ben-Gal; Esi Sharon; Yoav Pietrokovski; Yael Houri-Haddad; Nurit Beyth

    2018-01-01

    Enamel demineralization is a common problem found in patients using orthodontic devices, such as orthodontic braces. It was found that Streptoccocus mutans growth increases adjacent to orthodontic devices, which may result in caries development. Incorporated antibacterial quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI) nanoparticles were previously shown to be highly efficacious against various bacteria. Combining antibacterial materials in orthodontic cement may be advantageous to prevent bacter...

  20. Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Zirconia Conditioned with Various Primer-Adhesive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    adhesion to ceramic crowns through chemical bonding presents a risk of prosthesis surface damage at debond (Falkensammer et al., 2013). When bonding...enamel. Traditional protocol associated with attaching brackets to enamel must be altered for ceramic crowns due to the dissimilarity in composition. The...Uniform Services University of the Health Sciences In Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements For the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE By Michael

  1. Springback Mechanism Analysis and Experiments on Robotic Bending of Rectangular Orthodontic Archwire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Gang; Han, Ying-Shuai; Zhang, Yong-De; Liu, Yan-Jv; Wang, Zhao; Liu, Yi

    2017-11-01

    Fixed-appliance technology is the most common and effective malocclusion orthodontic treatment method, and its key step is the bending of orthodontic archwire. The springback of archwire did not consider the movement of the stress-strain-neutral layer. To solve this problem, a springback calculation model for rectangular orthodontic archwire is proposed. A bending springback experiment is conducted using an orthodontic archwire bending springback measurement device. The springback experimental results show that the theoretical calculation results using the proposed model coincide better with the experimental testing results than when movement of the stress-strain-neutral layer was not considered. A bending experiment with rectangular orthodontic archwire is conducted using a robotic orthodontic archwire bending system. The patient expriment result show that the maximum and minimum error ratios of formed orthodontic archwire parameters are 22.46% and 10.23% without considering springback and are decreased to 11.35% and 6.13% using the proposed model. The proposed springback calculation model, which considers the movement of the stress-strain-neutral layer, greatly improves the orthodontic archwire bending precision.

  2. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  3. Effects of three silane primers and five adhesive agents on the bond strength of composite material for a computer-aided design and manufacturing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Ayano; Taira, Yohsuke; Sakihara, Michino; Sawase, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of combinations of silane primers and adhesive agents on the bond strength of a composite block for a computer-aided design and manufacturing system. Material and Methods Three silane primers [Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CP), Super-Bond PZ Primer (PZ), and GC Ceramic Primer II (GP)] were used in conjunction with five adhesive agents [G-Premio Bond (P-Bond), Repair Adhe Adhesive (R-Adhesive), Super-Bond D-Liner Dual (SB-Dual), Super-Bond C&B (SB-Self), and SB-Dual without tributylborane derivative (SB-Light)]. The surface of a composite block (Gradia Block) was ground with silicon carbide paper. After treatment with a silane primer, a adhesive agent was applied to each testing specimen. The specimens were then bonded with a light-curing resin composite. After 24 h, the shear bond strength values were determined and compared using a post hoc test (α=0.05, n=8/group). We also prepared control specimens without primer (No primer) and/or without adhesive agent (No adhesive). Results PZ/SB-Dual and GP/SB-Dual presented the highest bond strength, followed by GP/P-Bond, CP/SB-Dual, CP/R-Adhesive, No primer/SB-Dual, GP/R-Adhesive, CP/P-Bond, No primer/R-Adhesive, PZ/R-Adhesive, CP/SB-Self, PZ/P-Bond, PZ/SB-Self, and GP/SB-Self in descending order of bond strength. No primer/P-Bond, No primer/SB-Self, and all specimens in the SB-Light and No adhesive groups presented the lowest bond strengths. Conclusion A dual-curing adhesive agent (SB-Dual) containing a tributylborane derivative in combination with a silane primer (GP or PZ) presents a greater bond strength between the composite block and the repairing resin composite than the comparators used in the study.

  4. A novel biomechanical model assessing continuous orthodontic archwire activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Christopher; Larson, Matthew; Grauer, Dan; Sheats, Rose; Stevens, Clarke; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Objective The biomechanics of a continuous archwire inserted into multiple orthodontic brackets is poorly understood. The purpose of this research was to apply the birth-death technique to simulate insertion of an orthodontic wire and consequent transfer of forces to the dentition in an anatomically accurate model. Methods A digital model containing the maxillary dentition, periodontal ligament (PDL), and surrounding bone was constructed from human computerized tomography data. Virtual brackets were placed on four teeth (central and lateral incisors, canine and first premolar), and a steel archwire (0.019″ × 0.025″) with a 0.5 mm step bend to intrude the lateral incisor was virtually inserted into the bracket slots. Forces applied to the dentition and surrounding structures were simulated utilizing the birth-death technique. Results The goal of simulating a complete bracket-wire system on accurate anatomy including multiple teeth was achieved. Orthodontic force delivered by the wire-bracket interaction was: central incisor 19.1 N, lateral incisor 21.9 N, and canine 19.9 N. Loading the model with equivalent point forces showed a different stress distribution in the PDL. Conclusions The birth-death technique proved to be a useful biomechanical simulation method for placement of a continuous archwire in orthodontic brackets. The ability to view the stress distribution throughout proper anatomy and appliances advances understanding of orthodontic biomechanics. PMID:23374936

  5. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded using two different hydrophilic primers: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kumaraswamy Anand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Salivary control and maintenance of a dry operating field is a prime requisite of orthodontic bonding. Moisture insensitive primer (MIP with a clinical significant bond strength values have a better edge over the conventional hydrophobic bonding systems. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of two hydrophilic primers with respect to conventional hydrophobic primer by comparing their shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive-failure locations after contamination with saliva and saliva substitute. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 extracted human premolars were randomly divided into five group s ; Group A (Transbond MIP/saliva substitute, Group B (Opal Primo/saliva substitute, Group C (Transbond MIP/natural saliva, Group D (Opal Primo/natural saliva, control group - Group E (Transbond XT/dry, adhesive-Transbond XT used for all five groups and bonded using stainless steel brackets. Shear forces were applied to the samples with a universal testing machine. SBSs was measured in megapascals. The mode of bond failure was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI. Results: The mean SBS produced by Transbond MIP was higher than Opal Primo, which was statistically significant according to one-way analysis of variance. Both the tested groups showed lesser bond strength values than Transbond XT (the control. ARI scores revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the site of bond failure between study groups. ARI scores were found to be lower for study groups suggesting adhesive failure, compared to higher ARI scores for the control group suggesting cohesive failure. Conclusion: Transbond XT adhesive with Transbond MIP or Opal Primo have clinically acceptable bond strength in wet fields. Opal Primo is a viable option to use as a hydrophilic primer clinically.

  6. Effect of bur-cut dentin on bond strength using two all-in-one and one two-step adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koase, Kaori; Inoue, Satoshi; Noda, Mamoru; Tanaka, Toru; Kawamoto, Chiharu; Takahashi, Akiko; Nakaoki, Yasuko; Sano, Hidehiko

    2004-01-01

    To compare the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of two all-in-one adhesive systems and one experimental two-step self-etching adhesive system to two types of bur-cut dentin. Using one of the three adhesives, Xeno CF Bond (Xeno), Prompt L-Pop (PL), or the experimental two-step system ABF (ABF), resin composite was bonded to flat buccal and root dentin surfaces of eight extracted human premolars. These surfaces were produced using either regular-grit or superfine-grit diamond burs. After storage overnight in 37 degrees C water, the bonded specimens were sectioned into six or seven slices approximately 0.7 mm thick perpendicular to the bonded surface. They were then subjected to microtensile testing. The surfaces of the fractured specimens were observed microscopically to determine the failure mode. In addition, to observe the effect of conditioning, the two types of bur-cut dentin surfaces were conditioned with the adhesives, rinsed with acetone, and observed with SEM. When Xeno and PL were bonded to dentin cut with a regular-grit diamond bur, MTBS values were lower than to superfine bur-cut dentin, and failures occurred adhesively at the interface, whereas the experimental two-step adhesive showed no significant difference in microtensile bond strength between two differently cut surfaces. The all-in-one adhesives tested here improved bond strengths when bonded to superfine bur-cut dentin as a substrate, whereas the experimental two-step adhesive system showed unchanged bonding to both regular and superfine bur-cut dentin surfaces.

  7. Effect of polymerization mode of two adhesive systems on push-out bond strength of fiber post to different regions of root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Farzin Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A few studies have investigated the effect of the activation mode of adhesive systems on bond strength of fiber posts to root canal dentin. This study investigated the push-out bond strengths of a glass fiber post to different root canal regions with the use of two adhesives with light- and dual-cure polymerization modes. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 40 maxillary central incisors were decoronated at cement-enamel junction with 15 ± 1 mm root length. After root canal therapy and post space preparations, they were randomly divided into four groups. Post spaces were treated with four different adhesives: Excite, Excite Dual cure Single Component (DSC, self-etch adhesive (AdheSE, and AdheSE dual-cure. Then the fiber-reinforced composite (FRC post, Postec Plus, was cemented with dual-cure resin cement, Variolink II. The roots were cut into three 2-mm-thick slices. Push-out tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mode of failures was determined under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey test was conducted to compare post hoc with P < 0.05 as the level of significance. Results: The highest bond strength was obtained for AdheSE dual-cure (15.54 ± 6.90 MPa and the lowest was obtained for Excite light-cure (10.07 ± 7.45 MPa and only the bond strength between these two adhesives had significant difference (P = 0.02. Bond strength decreased from the coronal to the apical in all groups and this was significant in Excite (group 1 and AdheSE (group 3 (P < 0.001. In apical regions, bond strength of dual-cure adhesives was significantly higher than light-cure adhesives (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Push-out bond strength of fiber post to different regions of root canal dentin was affected by both adhesive systems and their polymerization modes.

  8. [Mechanics analysis of fracture of orthodontic wires].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeping; Sun, Xiaoye; Zhang, Longqi

    2003-03-01

    Fracture problem of orthodontic wires was discussed in this paper. The calculation formulae of bending stress and tensile stress were obtained. All main factors that affect bending stress and tensile stress of orthodontic wires were analyzed and discussed. It was concluded that the main causes of fracture of orthodontic wires were fatigue and static disruption. Some improving proposals for preventing fracture of orthodontic wires were put forward.

  9. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W; Carey, Jason P

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire?bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are c...

  10. Influence of CVD diamond tips and Er:YAG laser irradiation on bonding of different adhesive systems to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, Melissa Aline [UNESP; Nicolo, Rebeca Di [UNESP; Barcellos, Daphne Camara [UNESP; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro [UNESP; Pucci, Cesar Rogerio [UNESP; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes [UNESP; Borges, Alessandra Bühler [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of three adhesive systems, using different methods of dentin preparation. Materials and methods: A hundred and eight bovine teeth were used. The dentin from buccal face was exposed and prepared with three different methods, divided in 3 groups: Group 1 (DT)- diamond tip on a high-speed handpiece; Group 2 (CVD)-CVD tip on a ultrasonic handpiece; Group 3 (LA)-Er: YAG laser. The teeth were divided into 3 subgroups, accordin...

  11. General characteristics of dental morbidity in children against orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovach I.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A wide spread of orthodontic treatment showed a fairly high risk of complications developed from the use of various devices. The aim of our study was to determine the general characteristics of dental morbidity in children with orthodontic treatment. According to the survey the most common pathologies in children with orthodontic problems are dental caries (87,8-92,9% and chronic catarrhal gingivitis (81.2-84.1%. The prevalence of different types of diseases of the mucous membrane and soft tissues of the oral cavity in children surveyed was 30.5-32.9%. Non-caries lesions of dental hard tissues occurred in 39.5-40.9% of the children surveyed, local enamel hypoplasia was observed in 42.9%, systemic enamel hypoplasia made up 17.8%, signs of hypersensitivity of enamel were found in 9.6%, and the wedge defects – in two children.

  12. Orthodontic treatment for a patient with multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakathir, Manal A

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects myelinated axons, destroying the myelin and damaging axons to varying degrees. The course of MS is highly varied and unpredictable. Metals used during orthodontic treatment can negatively affect imaging techniques used to diagnose and monitor the progression of MS, while medications used to treat MS can negatively affect orthodontic tooth movement. The present case report highlights some of the challenges encountered during orthodontic treatment of a patient with MS and how to overcome them. The patient was a 20-year-old woman with complaints of diastema and spacing in the upper arch. Although closing the spaces was challenging due to some of the MS medications, she was treated successfully, without complications, within 20 months using closing loops. PMID:28717636

  13. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  14. Further characterization of the adhesive-tumor-cell culture system for measuring the radiosensitivity of human tumor primary cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, W.A.; Bock, S.P.; Williams, M.; Baker, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    This study extends the use of the adhesive-tumor-cell culture system to include: over 100 sensitivity measurements at 2.0 Gy; tumorgenicity determinations in nude mice; and flow cytometry of the cells grown in the system. The malignant nature of the growing cells was proved by injecting cells into nude mice. Tumors resulted in 60% of the cases and the histology of each xenograft was similar to that of the human tumor. Flow cytometry was used to obtain DNA histograms of the original cell suspension and of cultures during the two week culture period in order to obtain quantitative information about the growth of aneuploid versus diploid populations. The results thus far demonstrate that 95% of aneuploid populations yield aneuploid growth; of the first 20 cases studied, only one suspension with an aneuploid peak resulted in diploid growth. Of further interest was the observation that it is not unusual for a minor aneuploid population to become the predominate growth fraction after two weeks in culture. These results demonstrate that the adhesive-tumor-cell culture system supports the growth of malignant cells, that multiple cell populations exist in cell suspensions derived from solid tumors, and that differences exist between the radiosensitivity of cells at 2.0 Gy in different histology types

  15. Orthodontic mechanics using mini-implant measured by FBG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trannin, Pamela G.; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Walmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-07-01

    The magnitude of the force generated during orthodontic mechanics anchored in mini-implant in a maxilla model was analyzed. Data was collected during the insertion of the mini-implant and at the moment of applying forces to the structure of the maxilla and dentition. To obtain quantitative results, the Fibre Bragg Gratings (FBG) were inserted in an elastomeric material reproducing a maxilla model. It was observed levels of forces of approximately 3,78N next to the root of first premolar by the insertion of the mini-implant and different levels of the force to different orthodontic mechanics applied on the dental system.

  16. [Evaluation of three dimensional orthodontic force produced by magnet of fix appliance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xin; Hou, Zhi-ming; Yao, Ge; Wen, Jing-long

    2008-12-01

    To analyze the feature and magnitude of three dimensional orthodontic force produced by the magnet of fix appliance. Forces detected by universal fatigue test system included the attractive and repulsive,the inclined and rotated orthodontic forces of two magnets in different air gaps, and the integrated inclined and rotated orthodontic forces of two magnets and NiTi wire. The attractive and repulsive forces of two magnets were 4.68 to 0.45 N and 3.00 to 0.40 N respectively in the air gaps of 0 to 5 mm. The inclined orthodontic forces were 1.54 to 1.67 N, 0.63 to 0.69 N, 0.47 to 0.54 N when the magnets were vertically inclined 10 degrees to 40 degrees in the air gaps of 0, 1, 2mm. The rotated orthodontic forces were 0.97 to 1.32 N, 0.53 to 0.59 N, 0.39 to 0.48 N when the magnets were horizontally rotated 10 degrees to 40 degrees in the air gaps of 0, 1, 2mm. The integrated orthodontic force of two magnets and 0.014-inch NiTi wire was 0.32 to 0.5 N when the magnets was vertically inclined 10 degrees to 40 degrees in the air gap of 4 mm. The integrated orthodontic force of two magnets and 0.012-inch NiTi wire was 0.32 to 0.39 N when the magnets were horizontally rotated 10 degrees to 40 degrees in the air gap of 3 mm. Magnets made into orthodontic brackets to some extent could replace the mechanical orthodontic force produced by orthodontic wires and elastics.

  17. Effect of functional monomers in all-in-one adhesive systems on formation of enamel/dentin acid-base resistant zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaido, Toru; Ichikawa, Chiaki; Li, Na; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Sadr, Alireza; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Tagami, Junji

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of functional monomers in all-in-one adhesive systems on formation of acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) in enamel and dentin. Experimental adhesive systems containing one of three functional monomers; MDP, 3D-SR and 4-META were applied to enamel or dentin surface and light-cured. A universal resin composite was then placed. The specimens were subjected to a demineralizing solution (pH 4.5) and 5% NaClO for acid-base challenge and then observed by SEM. The ABRZ was clearly observed in both enamel and dentin interfaces. However, enamel ABRZ was thinner than dentin ABRZ in all adhesives. Morphology of the ABRZ was different between enamel and dentin, and also among the adhesives. Funnel-shaped erosion was observed only in the enamel specimen with the 4-META adhesive. The formation of enamel/dentin ABRZ was confirmed in all adhesives, but the morphology was influenced by the functional monomers.

  18. A novel biomimetic orthodontic bonding agent helps prevent white spot lesions adjacent to brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfred, Lauren; Covell, David A; Crowe, Jennifer J; Tufekci, Eser; Mitchell, John C

    2013-01-01

    To compare changes in enamel microhardness adjacent to orthodontic brackets after using bonding agents containing various compositions of bioactive glass compared to a traditional resin adhesive following a simulated caries challenge. Extracted human third molars (n  =  10 per group) had orthodontic brackets bonded using one of four novel bioactive glass (BAG)-containing orthodontic bonding agents (BAG-Bonds) or commercially available Transbond-XT. The four new adhesives contained BAG in varying percentages incorporated into a traditional resin monomer mixture. Teeth were cycled through low-pH demineralizing and physiologic-pH remineralizing solutions once each day over 14 days. Microhardness was measured on longitudinal sections of the teeth 100, 200, and 300 µm from the bracket edge and beneath the brackets, at depths of 25 to 200 µm from the enamel surface. Normalized hardness values were compared using three-way analysis of variance. Significantly less reduction in enamel microhardness was found with the experimental adhesives at depths of 25 and 50 µm at all distances from the bracket edge. In all groups, there were no significant changes in enamel microhardness past 125-µm depth. Results varied with the different BAG-Bonds, with 81BAG-Bond showing the smallest decrease in enamel microhardness. The BAG-Bonds tested in this study showed a reduction in the amount of superficial enamel softening surrounding orthodontic brackets compared to a traditional bonding agent. The results indicate that clinically, BAG-Bonds may aid in maintaining enamel surface hardness, therefore helping prevent white spot lesions adjacent to orthodontic brackets.

  19. Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ali H.; Al-Saeed, Samar H.; Al-Maghlouth, Basma A.; Bahammam, Maha A.; Linjawi, Amal I.; El-Bialy, Tarek H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature to assess the quality of evidence related to corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment (CAOT) as adjunctive treatment in orthodontics. Methods: The study was conducted in the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between 2013 and 2014. Various electronic databases were searched and abstracts were retrieved. Defined inclusion criteria were then applied to the obtained original articles for further evaluation by 2 examiners independently. The criteria of selection included human, or animal studies, which assessed some aspects of CAOT and/or the biological principles behind it. Case reports and series were excluded. The quality of the studies was evaluated by the methodological score for clinical trials developed. Results: Fourteen articles were retrieved initially, but only 12 articles were finally selected for the study. The CAOT was found to accelerate tooth movement by 2-2.5 folds when compared with conventional orthodontic tooth movement. The CAOT was found safe on periodontal health and exhibits no or little risk of root resorption. A localized turnover of alveolar spongiosa and the absence of a hyalinized zone was the acceptable biological explanation of CAOT. There is no evidence to support that CAOT enhances the movement of ankylosed teeth, closing old extraction sites, post-orthodontic stability, or transverse expansion. Conclusions: Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment should be considered with caution. Long term randomized clinical trials are still needed. PMID:26108582

  20. [Root resorption and orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbar, M; Bourzgui, F

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of root resorption during and at the end of orthodontic treatment and to assess its relationship with age, sex and treatment with or without extractions. Our study included 82 patients (51 women and 31 men) aged between 6 and 38 years, who received orthodontic treatment. Evaluation of root resorption was performed on panoramics at the beginning and at the end of orthodontic treatment. All the teeth were observed. The degree of root resorption was increased respectively by the standards in four ordinal levels (4). Data analysis was performed by Epi Info 6.0. Root resorption was present in all the teeth and maxillary incisors are the most affected. The correlation between age and root resorption was significant (p = 0.008). Women were more affected by resorption (P = 0.002). Patients treated with extraction showed more root resorption (p = 0.12). Our results suggest that orthodontic treatment is involved in the development of root resorption. The most often teeth resorbed are maxillary incisors. Age, sex and orthodontic extractions can be considered as risk factors for root resorption.

  1. Clear aligners for orthodontic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi, Hanieh; Graham, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    PubMed/Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical trials (CENTRAL), Web of Knowledge, SCOPUS, Google Scholar and LILACS databases. Clinical prospective and retrospective studies of orthodontic treatment with clear aligners on patients over the age of 15 that included clear descriptions of the materials and applied technique were included. Selection was undertaken independently by two reviewers. Two reviewers extracted data independently with study quality being assessed using the grading system described by the Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). A narrative summary of the findings was presented. Eleven studies involving a total of 480 patients were included consisting of two randomised controlled trials, five prospective studies and four retrospective studies. Six studies were considered to be of moderate quality, the remainder of limited quality. Most of the studies presented with methodological problems: small sample size, bias and confounding variables, lack of method error analysis, blinding in measurements, and deficient or missing statistical methods. The quality level of the studies was not sufficient to draw any evidence-based conclusions.

  2. Effect of collagen fibrils removal on shear bond strength of total etch and self etch adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishevar L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Sodium hypochlorite can remove the organic phase of the demineralized dentin and it produces direct resin bonding with hydroxyapatite crystals. Therefore, the hydrolytic degradation of collagen fibrils which might affect the bonding durability is removed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of collagen fibrils removal by 10% NaOCl on dentin shear bond strength of two total etch and self etch adhesive systems."nMaterials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolar teeth were used in this study. Buccal surface of teeth were grounded until dentin was exposed. Then teeth were divided into four groups. According to dentin surface treatment, experimental groups were as follows: Group I: Single Bond (3M according to manufacture instruction, Group II: 10% NaOCl+Single bond (3M, Group III: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray according to manufacture instruction, and Group IV: Clearfil SE Bond primer. After that, the specimens were immersed in 50% acetone solution for removing extra monomer. Then the specimens were rinsed and dried. 10% NaOCl was applied and finally adhesive was used. Then composite was bonded to the treated surfaces using a 4 2 mm cylindrical plastic mold. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles (5-55ºC. A shear load was employed by a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/min. The data were analyzed for statistical significance with One-way ANOVA, Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests."nResults: The mean shear bond strengths of groups were as follows: Single Bond=16.8±4.2, Clearfil SE Bond=23.7±4.07, Single Bond+NaOCl=10.5±4.34, Clearfil SE Bond+NaOCl=23.3±3.65 MPa. Statistical analysis revealed that using 10% NaOCl significantly decreased the shear bond strength in Single Bond group (P=0.00, but caused no significant difference in the shear bond strength in Clearfil SE Bond group (P=0.99."nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, NaOCl treatment did not improve the bond

  3. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    , which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters...

  4. Influence of Nd:YAG laser on the bond strength of self-etching and conventional adhesive systems to dental hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimoto, A K; Cunha, L A; Yui, K C K; Huhtala, M F R L; Barcellos, D C; Prakki, A; Gonçalves, S E P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of Nd:YAG laser on the shear bond strength to enamel and dentin of total and self-etch adhesives when the laser was applied over the adhesives, before they were photopolymerized, in an attempt to create a new bonding layer by dentin-adhesive melting. One-hundred twenty bovine incisors were ground to obtain flat surfaces. Specimens were divided into two substrate groups (n=60): substrate E (enamel) and substrate D (dentin). Each substrate group was subdivided into four groups (n=15), according to the surface treatment accomplished: X (Xeno III self-etching adhesive, control), XL (Xeno III + laser Nd:YAG irradiation at 140 mJ/10 Hz for 60 seconds + photopolymerization, experimental), S (acid etching + Single Bond conventional adhesive, Control), and SL (acid etching + Single Bond + laser Nd:YAG at 140 mJ/10 Hz for 60 seconds + photopolymerization, experimental). The bonding area was delimited with 3-mm-diameter adhesive tape for the bonding procedures. Cylinders of composite were fabricated on the bonding area using a Teflon matrix. The teeth were stored in water at 37°C/48 h and submitted to shear testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min in a universal testing machine. Results were analyzed with three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; substrate, adhesive, and treatment) and Tukey tests (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed significant differences for the substrate, adhesive system, and type of treatment: lased or unlased (penamel groups were X=20.2 ± 5.61, XL=23.6 ± 4.92, S=20.8 ± 4.55, SL=22.1 ± 5.14 and for the dentin groups were X=14.1 ± 7.51, XL=22.2 ± 6.45, S=11.2 ± 5.77, SL=15.9 ± 3.61. For dentin, Xeno III self-etch adhesive showed significantly higher shear bond strength compared with Single Bond total-etch adhesive; Nd:YAG laser irradiation showed significantly higher shear bond strength compared with control (unlased). Nd:YAG laser application prior to photopolymerization of adhesive systems

  5. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Nano-filled Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with two types of nano-composites in comparison to a conventional orthodontic composite. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human first premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups each containing 20 teeth. In group I, a conventional orthodontic composite (Transbond XT was used to bond the brackets, while two nano-composites (Filtek TM Supreme XT and AELITE Aesthetic Enamel were used in groups II and III respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, thermocycled in distilled water and debonded with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was also evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Results: AELITE Aesthetic Enamel nano-composite revealed a SBS value of 8.44±2.09 MPa, which was higher than Transbond XT (6.91± 2.13 and Filtek TM Supreme XT (6.04± 2.01. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between groups II and III (P 0.05. Evaluation of ARI showed that Transbond XT left fewer adhesive remains on teeth after debonding. Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that the aforementioned nano-composites can be successfully used for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  6. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with nano-filled composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalipa, Javad; Akhondi, Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad; Arab, Sepideh; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Ahmadyar, Maryam

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with two types of nano-composites in comparison to a conventional orthodontic composite. Sixty extracted human first premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups each containing 20 teeth. In group I, a conventional orthodontic composite (Transbond XT) was used to bond the brackets, while two nano-composites (Filtek TM Supreme XT and AELITE Aesthetic Enamel) were used in groups II and III respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, thermocycled in distilled water and debonded with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was also evaluated using a stereomicroscope. AELITE Aesthetic Enamel nano-composite revealed a SBS value of 8.44±2.09 MPa, which was higher than Transbond XT (6.91±2.13) and Filtek TM Supreme XT (6.04±2.01). Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between groups II and III (P 0.05). Evaluation of ARI showed that Transbond XT left fewer adhesive remains on teeth after debonding. Results of this study indicate that the aforementioned nano-composites can be successfully used for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  7. Orthodontic parotitis: a rare complication from an orthodontic appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Eileen; Cobb, Alistair R M

    2012-12-01

    A case is presented of a 14-year-old female undergoing orthodontic fixed appliance treatment who presented with right facial swelling in the parotid region. An initial diagnosis of acute infective parotitis was made by her primary care clinician. However, after clinical examination and ultrasonographic imaging, a diagnosis of salivary stasis secondary to inflammatory occlusion of Stensen's ductal orifice was made. The ductal orifice had been traumatized by the adjacent orthodontic appliance. This has not been described before in the literature. The differential diagnosis of parotid enlargement in children is discussed.

  8. Effect of blood contamination on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Gatti, Sara; Scribante, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of blood contamination on the shear bonding strength and sites of failure of orthodontic brackets and bondable buttons. We randomly divided 160 bovine permanent mandibular incisors into 8 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets (Step brackets, Leone, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy) and bondable buttons (Flat orthodontic buttons, Leone, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy) were tested on four different enamel surfaces: dry; contamination with blood before priming; after priming; and before and after priming. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bonding strength and the rate of adhesive failures were recorded. Data were analysed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA), Scheffè tests, and the chi-square test. Uncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bonding strengths for both brackets and buttons. When they were contaminated with blood, orthodontic brackets had significantly lower shear strengths than bondable buttons (P=0.0001). There were significant differences in sites of failure among the groups for the various enamel surfaces (P=0.001). Contamination of enamel by blood during bonding lowers the strength of the bond, more so with orthodontic brackets than with bondable buttons. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Zirconium Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmeti, Blerim; Azizi, Bleron; Kelmendi, Jeta; Iljazi-Shahiqi, Donika; Alar, Željko; Anić-Milošević, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    An increasing demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of all-ceramic restorations, such as zirconium. However, one of the challenges the orthodontist must be willing to face is how to increase bond strength between the brackets and various ceramic restorations.Bond strength can beaffected bybracket type, by the material that bracketsaremade of, and their base surface design or retention mode. ​: A im: of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets bonded to all-zirconium ceramic surfaces used for prosthetic restorations, and also to evaluate the fracture mode of these two types of orthodontic brackets. Twenty samples/semi-crowns of all-zirconium ceramic, on which orthodontic brackets were bonded, 10 metallic and 10 ceramic polycrystalline brackets, were prepared for this research. SBS has been testedby Universal Testing Machine, with a load applied using a knife edged rod moving at a fixed rate of 1 mm/min, until failure occurred. The force required to debond the brackets was recorded in Newton, then SBS was calculated to MPa. In addition, the samples were analyzed using a digital camera magnifier to determine Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Statistical data were processed using t-test, and the level of significance was set at α = 0.05. Higher shear bond strength values were observed in metallic brackets bonded to zirconium crowns compared tothoseof ceramic brackets, with a significant difference. During the test, two of the ceramic brackets were partially or totally damaged. Metallic brackets, compared to ceramic polycrystalline brackets, seemed tocreate stronger adhesion with all-zirconium surfaces due to their better retention mode. Also, ceramic brackets showed higher fragility during debonding.

  10. Metal Hypersensitivity in Orthodontic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Maheshwari Sanjeev K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment of individuals with metal hypersensitivity is a matter of concern for the orthodontist. Orthodontic appliances contain metals like Nickel, Cobalt and Chromium etc. Metals may cause allergic reactions and are known as allergens. Reaction to these metals is due to biodegradation of metals in the oral cavity. This may lead to the formation of corrosion products and their exposure to the patient. Nickel is the most common metal to cause hypersensitivity reaction. Chromium ranks second among the metals, known to trigger allergic reactions. The adverse biological reactions to these metals may include hypersensitivity, dermatitis and asthma. In addition, a significant carcinogenic and mutagenic potential has been demonstrated. The orthodontist must be familiar with the best possible alternative treatment modalities to provide the safest, most effective care possible in these cases. The present article focuses on the issue of metal hypersensitivity and its management in orthodontic

  11. Orthodontics is temporomandibular disorder-neutral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Stellini, Edoardo; Gracco, Antonio; Lombardo, Luca; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    To assess if subjects with a clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a similar prevalence of orthodontic history as a population of TMD-free individuals and to assess if those subjects who have a history of ideal orthodontics have fewer symptoms than those with a history of nonideal orthodontics. Two groups of age- and sex-matched individuals belonging to either a study ("TMD") or a control group were recruited. Subjects who underwent orthodontic treatment were classified as having a history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics based on the current presence of normal values in five reference occlusal features. The correlation with a history of orthodontic treatment was not clinically significant for any of the TMD diagnoses (ie, muscle pain, joint pain, disc displacement, arthrosis), with Phi (Φ) coefficient values within the -0.120 to 0.058 range. Within the subset of patients with a history of orthodontics, the correlation of ideal or nonideal orthodontic treatment with TMD diagnoses was, in general, not clinically relevant or was weakly relevant. Findings confirmed the substantial absence of clinically significant effects of orthodontics as far as TMD is concerned. The very low correlation values of a negative or positive history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics with the different TMD diagnoses suggest that orthodontic treatment could not have a true role for TMD.

  12. Periodontal status of Pakistani orthodontic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuf MOOSA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the periodontal status of orthodontic patients and non-orthodontic patients, aged 15–28 years, of both genders. The cross-sectional study included 100 orthodontic and 100 non-orthodontic patients evaluated using a Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need (CPITN probe on the index teeth. A questionnaire was distributed to the participants to assess and evaluate the use of oral hygiene aids. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 17, and various comparisons were performed using the chi-square test. The study revealed that there was a statistically significant association in CPITN scores between the orthodontic and non-orthodontic patients (p < 0.01. The study showed that patients undergoing orthodontic treatment have increased plaque accumulation and probing depth resulting in periodontal tissue destruction. Proper oral hygiene practices and interdental aids should be employed to control plaque.

  13. Evaluation of the tensile bond strength of an adhesive system self-etching in dentin irradiated with Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, Andrea Malluf Dabul de

    2000-01-01

    Since Buonocore (1955), several researchers have been seeking for the best adhesive system and treatment for the enamel and dentin surfaces. The use of the acid has been presented as one of the best techniques of dentin conditioning , because this promotes the removal of the 'smear layer and exhibition of dentinal structure, for a best penetration and micro- retention of the adhesive system. However, some conditioning methods have been appearing in the literature, for the substitution or interaction with the acid substances, as the laser. The objective of this work is to evaluate the tensile bond strength of the adhesive system self-etching' associated to a composed resin, in dentin surfaces conditioned with the Er:YAG laser. For this study, freshly extracted human teeth were used and in each one the dentinal surfaces , which were treated with three sandpapers of different granulations (120,400,600), to obtain a standard of the smear layer, before the irradiation of the laser and of the restoring procedure. After these procedures the specimens were storage in distilled water at 37 deg C for 24 hours. Soon after, they were submitted to the tensile strength test .After analyzing the results, we can concluded that the use of the Er:YAG laser can substitute the drill without the need of conditioning, when using the adhesive system 'self-etching' in the dentinal surfaces because there was a decline in the strength of adhesion in the groups conditioned with the laser. (author)

  14. Incorporation of soft shaped hydrogel sheets into microfluidic systems using a simple adhesion masking process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Dylan C.; Newsome, Isabel G.; Scrimgeour, Jan

    2017-12-01

    We report the use of simple adhesion masking in fabricating shaped, photo-polymerizable hydrogel sheets with very small elastic moduli on glass substrates. Direct ink masking of surface crosslinking groups allows for low cost hydrogel patterning that is compatible with materials where crosslinking is both photo- and chemically initiated. Mechanical removal of the unwanted polymerized material reveals the shaped hydrogel. The mechanical properties of the shaped hydrogels were characterized by exposure to well-defined shear flow inside the microfluidic device. We show that hydrogel sheets with elastic moduli down to 7.5 Pa can be shaped with millimeter feature sizes using this approach. The shaped hydrogels are suitable for applications such as the detection of shear flow, cell culture, and traction force microscopy.

  15. Strong composition dependence of adhesive properties of ultraviolet curing adhesives with modified acrylates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yefeng; Li, Yandong; Wang, Fupeng; Peng, Cheng; Xu, Zhichao; Hu, Jianbing

    2018-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) curable adhesives have been widely researched in fields of health care and electronic components. UV curing systems with modified acrylic ester prepolymers have been frequently employed. In order to clarify composition dependence of adhesive properties of adhesives containing modified acrylates, in this work, several UV curing adhesives bearing urethane and epoxy acrylates were designed and fabricated. The effects of prepolymer, diluent, feed ratio, initiator and assistant on adhesive performances were investigated. This work might offer a facile route to gain promising high-performance UV curable adhesives with desired adhesive traits through regulating their compositions.

  16. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of two adhesive systems before and after contamination with oral fluids: An In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Kesar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to evaluate the effect of saliva and blood contamination on the shear bond strength (SBS of self- and total-etch adhesive systems on enamel and dentin. Materials and Methods: Sample of 100 extracted noncarious primary molars were taken as experimental groups, which were divided into two groups: self-etch group and total-etch group containing fifty teeth each. These groups were further divided into five subgroups - 10 teeth each. The specimens were then subjected to contamination with saliva or blood; before and after application of adhesive agent, whereas, in control group, there was no contamination done before and after adhesive application. Fresh saliva and blood were used. After the bonding procedure, resin composite was built up with diameter and height of 3 mm. After that, the specimens were tested for SBS in universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 cm/min. The results were then statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Results: The results of the study revealed that the SBS of self-etch adhesive system was better than the total-etch adhesive system and there was significant difference found among various subgroups of total-etch group, i.e., when adhesive application was done before, after and without saliva or blood contamination. There was no significant difference found within the subgroups of self-etch group when adhesive application was done before, after, and without saliva contamination. In case of blood contamination, significant difference was found in SBS in both self- and total-etch groups.

  17. In vitro efficacy and release study with anti-inflammatory drugs incorporated in adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefanie; Peters, Nils; Mann, Tobias; Wolber, Rainer; Pörtner, Ralf; Nierle, Jens

    2014-04-01

    The topical application of two different anti-inflammatory extracts incorporated in adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDSs) was investigated. Therefore, anti-inflammatory properties and percutaneous absorption behavior of adhesive TDDSs were characterized in vitro conducting experiments with a dermatologically relevant human skin model. Anti-inflammatory efficacy against UV irradiation of both TDDSs was determined in vitro with EpiDerm™. The reduction of the release of proinflammatory cytokines by topically applied TDDSs was compared with the reduction during the presence of the specific cyclooxygenase inhibitor diclofenac in the culture medium. A similar anti-inflammatory efficacy of the topically applied TDDSs in comparison with the use of diclofenac in the culture medium should be achieved. Furthermore, percutaneous absorption in efficacy tests was compared with percutaneous absorption in diffusion studies with porcine cadaver skin. Both the topically applied TDDSs showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity. Permeation coefficients through the stratum corneum and the epidermis gained from the release studies on porcine cadaver skin (Magnolia: 2.23·10(-5) cm/h, licorice: 4.68·10(-6) cm/h) were approximately five times lower than the permeation coefficients obtained with the EpiDerm™ skin model (Magnolia: 9.48·10(-5) cm/h, licorice: 24.0·10(-6) cm/h). Therefore, an adjustment of drug doses during experiments with the EpiDerm™ skin model because of weaker skin barrier properties should be considered.

  18. Protective Effect of Adhesive Systems associated with Neodymium-doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet Laser on Enamel Erosive/Abrasive Wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crastechini, Erica; Borges, Alessandra B; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Thomas; Torres, Carlos Rg

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of self-etching adhesive systems associated or not associated with the neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser on the protection against enamel erosive/abrasive wear. Bovine enamel specimens were demineralized with 0.3% citric acid (5 minutes). The samples were randomly assigned to eight groups (n = 20): SB - Single Bond Universal (3M/ESPE); SB+L - Single Bond Universal + laser (80 mJ/10 Hz); FB - Futurabond U (Voco); FB+L -Futurabond U + laser; GEN - G-aenial bond (GC); GEN+L -G-aenial bond + laser; L - laser irradiation; and C - no treatment. The laser was applied before light curing. The samples were subjected to erosive/abrasive challenges (0.3% citric acid - 2 minutes and tooth brushing four times daily for 5 days). Enamel surface loss was recovered profilometrically by comparison of baseline and final profiles. The adhesive layer thickness, retention percentage of the protective layer, and microhardness of cured adhesive were measured. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). There were significant differences for all parameters (p = 0.0001). Mean values ± SD and results of the Tukey's test were: Surface wear: GEN - 4.88 (±1.09)a, L - 5.04 ± 0.99)a, FB - 5.32 (±0.93)ab, GEN + L - 5.46 (±1.27)abc, SB + L - 5.78 (±1.12)abc, FB + L - 6.23 (±1.25)bc, SB - 6.35 (±1.11)c, and C - 6.46 (±0.61)c; layer thickness: GEN - 15.2 (±8.63)c, FB - 5.06 (±1.96)a, GEN + L - 13.96 (±7.07)bc, SB + L - 4.24 (±2.68)a, FB + L - 9.03 (±13.02)abc, and SB - 7.49 (±2.80)ab; retention: GEN - 68.89 (±20.62)c, FB - 54.53 (±24.80)abc, GEN + L - 59.90 (±19.79)abc, SB + L - 63.37 (±19.30)bc, FB + L - 42.23 (±17.68) a, and SB - 47.78 (±18.29)ab; microhardness: GEN - 9.27 (±1.75)c; FB - 6.99 (±0.89)b; GEN + L - 6.22 (±0.87)ab; SB + L - 15.48 (±2.51)d; FB + L - 10.67 (±1.58)c; SB - 5.00 (±1.60)a. The application of Futurabond U and G-aenial bond on enamel surface, as well as the Nd

  19. Oral health with fixed appliances orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konta, Brigitte

    2008-03-01

    and the scientific investigation of this effectiveness of fixed appliances or orthodontic treatment in general. There is much research in the area of diagnostics or further development of appliances or techniques done, however extremely few in the area of need for intervention, analysis of the sustainability; influence factors on the success, like caries or quantification of side effects e. g. root resorption. This research to evaluate the indications is completely lacking, also the required evaluation parameters (e. g. means long-term dental maintenance. This gap is in this respect dubious since a link of determining the demand (inducing demand and supply in Central European health systems is economically given. This enables to create a possibility for a so-called supply induced demand. To get rid of discussions that the professional work of orthodontics can be near to induced demand or unnecessary indications, research of this topic is quite essential. This requires much stronger information for indications. This can improve confidence for patients and insurance companies. Existing indices like the Index of Treatment Need (IOTN seem to be of academic interest without practice importance for daily work. The question which indications can be regarded as scientifically proven for the intervention must be given big attention immediately. The individual and subjective assessment of the orthodontist (whose experience is not doubted has to be considered as not sufficient. The scientific background is absolutely necessary due to ethic reasons for the patient, economic reasons for the social insurance system or financiers and also for the orthodontists to evaluative and legitimates the treatment. Well coordinated research with the goal of collecting specific data is urgently required for individual therapeutic processes with appropriate design. The study quality is also an essential topic. It is unacceptable at the beginning of the 21st century with the background of the

  20. Efficient free-form surface representation with application in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamany, Sameh M.; El-Bialy, Ahmed M.

    1999-03-01

    Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry concerned with the study of growth of the craniofacial complex. The detection and correction of malocclusion and other dental abnormalities is one of the most important and critical phases of orthodontic diagnosis. This paper introduces a system that can assist in automatic orthodontics diagnosis. The system can be used to classify skeletal and dental malocclusion from a limited number of measurements. This system is not intended to deal with several cases but is aimed at cases more likely to be encountered in epidemiological studies. Prior to the measurement of the orthodontics parameters, the position of the teeth in the jaw model must be detected. A new free-form surface representation is adopted for the efficient and accurate segmentation and separation of teeth from a scanned jaw model. THe new representation encodes the curvature and surface normal information into a 2D image. Image segmentation tools are then sued to extract structures of high/low curvature. By iteratively removing these structures, individual teeth surfaces are obtained.

  1. Effect of At-home and In-office Bleaching on Marginal Microleakage in Composite Resin Restorations using Two Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Celso A; da Silva, Douglas; Reston, Eduardo G; Borghetti, Diana Lb; Zimmer, Roberto

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study is to assess marginal microleakage of cervical cavities restored with composite resins and two different adhesive techniques subjected to at-home and in-office bleaching. In this randomized, blind laboratory experiment, 60 bovine teeth recently extracted were collected and divided into six groups (n = 10 each group). The teeth received cervical cavity preparations (2 mm × 3 mm × 1 mm) with enamel margins. Two different adhesive systems were used (Single Bond 2 and Clearfil SE Bond), in addition to composite resin (Z250). Restored teeth received two different bleaching gels (Opalescence PF and Opalescence Boost). Teeth were thermo-cycled and analyzed under confocal laser scanning microscopy. No significant differences were observed (p > 0.05) in microleakage scores between the two groups not subjected to bleaching nor between the four groups that received bleaching treatment (p > 0.05), regardless of the gel and adhesive system employed. However, when comparing nonbleached with bleached teeth, those not subjected to bleaching showed statistically lower marginal microleakage scores (p bleaching agents used both at-home and in-office, regardless of the adhesive system employed (total-etch or self-etch). Both at-home and in-office bleaching agents have an influence on the adhesive interface of resin restorations, producing changes and inducing marginal leakage.

  2. Shear bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems with different pH values to bleached and/or CPP-ACP-treated enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoee, Siavash Savadi; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Navimipour, Elmira Jafari; Firouzmandi, Maryam

    2012-08-01

    To compare shear bond strengths of three different self-etching adhesive systems of different pH values to enamel bleached with carbamide peroxide, treated with casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), or treated with CPP-ACP subsequent to bleaching with carbamide peroxide. Thirty-six human third molars were cut into 4 sections and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 36): group I: no treatment; group II: bleaching; group III: CPP-ACP; group IV: bleaching and CPP-ACP. After surface treatments, the samples of each group were further divided into three subgroups (n = 12) based on the adhesive used. The adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), AdhesE (ADE), and Adper SE Plus (ADP) were applied, and resin composite cylinders with a diameter of 2 mm and a height of 4 mm were bonded to the enamel. Then the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing. Two-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey's test were used for statistical analysis (α = 0.05). There were significant differences between the adhesive systems (p system showed the highest bond strength, and the bleaching procedure reduced bond strengths (p = 0.001). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in shear bond strength values between the control and CPP groups. However, the differences between other groups were statistically significant (p material dependent.

  3. Orthodontic and surgical approach to the treatment of bilaterally impacted maxillary canines: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertan Erdinc, Aslihan M

    2008-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines is a common orthodontic anomaly that causes facial and dentoalveolar system problems, both functional and esthetic. A combination of surgery and orthodontics is important in bringing impacted canines to their ideal position in the dental arch. In this case report of a 14-year-old patient with impacted right and left maxillary canines, the crowns of these teeth were surgically exposed, brackets were bonded, and light orthodontic forces were delivered for 2 years to align the teeth in the dental arch.

  4. A Rare Case of Apical Root Resorption during Orthodontic Treatment of Patient with Multiple Aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Chintan M; Mahida, Khyati; Agrawal, Charu C; Bothra, Jitendrakumar; Mashru, Ketan

    2015-07-01

    External apical root resorption is an adverse effect of orthodontic treatment. It reduces the length of root and breaks the integrity of teeth and dental arch. Orthodontics is the only dental specialty that clinically uses the inflammatory process to correct the mal-aligned teeth. Hence, it is necessary to know the risk factors of root resorption and do everything to reduce the rate of root resorption. Hence, all predisposing factors which are systemic as well as local should be considered before treatment begins. This case report describes the incidence of root resorption following orthodontic treatment and the teeth affected in the patient with multiple aplasia.

  5. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  6. Bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to prefabricated acrylic teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Abdul Razak, Wan Salbiah; Sherriff, Martyn; Bister, Dirk; Seehra, Jadbinder

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the force to debond stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to acrylic teeth using different combinations of adhesive and surface treatments. One hundred prefabricated upper lateral incisor acrylic teeth were divided into 4 equal groups: Transbond XT® adhesive only (Group 1, control), Transbond XT® adhesive with sandblasting (Group 2), Transbond XT® adhesive with abrasion / + methyl methacrylate (MMA) (Group 3) and Triad® Gel only (Group 4). The force in Newtons (N) to debond the brackets was measured. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and pairwise multi-comparison of means (Šidak's adjustment) were undertaken. The highest force to debond was recorded for Group 2 (275.7 N; SD 89.0) followed by Group 3 (241.9 N; SD 76.0), Group 1 (142.7 N; SD 36.7) and Group 4 (67.9 N; SD 21.1). Significant differences in bond strength measurements between the experimental groups were detected. Mean force values for the groups revealed no significant differences between Group 2 and Group 3 (p>0.05). Both sandblasting and surface abrasion/+ application of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in combination with Transbond XT® adhesive are recommended for bonding stainless orthodontic brackets to acrylic teeth.

  7. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannan, Aous

    2010-01-01

    Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opinions concerning periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships. Specific areas reviewed are the ability of orthodontic treatment to afford some degree of protection against periodontal breakdown, short-term and long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, and some mucogingival considerations. Topics considering orthodontic treatment in periodontally compromised patients were not included in this review. While past studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can positively affect the periodontal health, recent reviews indicate an absence of reliable evidence for the positive effects of orthodontic therapy on patients' periodontal status. Periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships are still controversial issues. However, a standard language between the periodontist and the orthodontist must always be established to eliminate the existing communications barrier, and to improve the outcomes of the whole treatment.

  8. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannan Aous

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opinions concerning periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships. Specific areas reviewed are the ability of orthodontic treatment to afford some degree of protection against periodontal breakdown, short-term and long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, and some mucogingival considerations. Topics considering orthodontic treatment in periodontally compromised patients were not included in this review. While past studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can positively affect the periodontal health, recent reviews indicate an absence of reliable evidence for the positive effects of orthodontic therapy on patients′ periodontal status. Periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships are still controversial issues. However, a standard language between the periodontist and the orthodontist must always be established to eliminate the existing communications barrier, and to improve the outcomes of the whole treatment.

  9. Orthodontics at a Pivotal Point of Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The profession of orthodontics is projected to face a multitude of challenges. Do cyclic forces accelerate the rate of tooth movement and hence the speed of orthodontic treatment? Would bioengineered cementum and dentine be a solution to root resorption? What would orthodontics be like when bioengineered periodontal ligament and alveolar bone become clinical practice, or one day, entire teeth are bioengineered? Would it be possible to selectively differentiate stem cells into osteoblasts or osteoclasts by either static or cyclic forces? What is the new demand on orthodontic expertise with increasingly automated appliances? What will be the impact of the next generation of dental implants or rapid prototyped crowns on orthodontics? A century ago, Edward Angle’s practice of fixed appliances, along with other seminal contributions, such as functional appliances, established the profession of orthodontics. Today, the biophysical principles of orthodontics remain largely unchanged from Angle’s era, despite incremental refinements of brackets and wires. The paucity of fundamental innovations in orthodontics for decades presents intrinsic risks for the profession. This review will identify challenges for contemporary orthodontics and delineate strategies for the profession to evolve in an era of unprecedented scientific and technological advances, and serve as a call to action for the orthodontic profession. PMID:25018618

  10. Patients' and parents' expectations of orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Renske; Bos, Annemieke; Hoogstraten, Johan

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the expectations of children and their primary care-givers towards orthodontic treatment and to compare the results with those of a UK sample. A questionnaire survey of children and their primary care-givers attending for their first consultation. The Department of Orthodontics at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), the Netherlands. A total of 168 subjects (84 patients and 84 parents) completed the questionnaire. The children were aged 10 to 14 years. The responses of the children and parents and differences between boys and girls were examined using parametric statistical methods. The data from the Dutch sample were compared with a similar UK sample. Patients and parents shared similar expectations of orthodontic treatment, with the exception of expectations of having a brace fitted at the first appointment, orthodontic treatment involving headgear, any problems with orthodontic treatment, duration of orthodontic treatment and concerning reactions from the public. Among the child participants, boys and girls only differed in their expectations of orthodontic treatment involving jaw surgery. Differences between Dutch and English participants were found regarding the first visit, type of orthodontic treatment, reactions from the public, and pain and problems with orthodontic treatment. Since the expectations of patients and their parents differ on several aspects, effective communication between the orthodontist, patient and parent is considered to be essential. Our hypothesis that Dutch patients' and parents' expectations of orthodontic treatment differ from the expectations of English patients and parents was supported.

  11. Orthodontic springs and auxiliary appliances: assessment of magnetic field interactions associated with 1.5 T and 3 T magnetic resonance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemper, J.; Priest, A.N.; Adam, G.; Schulze, D.; Kahl-Nieke, B.; Klocke, A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate magnetic field interactions at 1.5 and 3 T for 20 orthodontic devices used for fixed orthodontic therapy. Twenty springs and auxiliary parts made from varying ferromagnetic alloys were tested for magnetic field interactions in the static magnetic field at 1.5 and 3 T. Magnetic translational force F z (in millinewtons) was evaluated by determining the deflection angle β [American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standard test method)]. Magnetic-field-induced rotational force F rot was qualitatively determined using a five-point scale. β was found to be >45 in 13(15) devices at 1.5(3) T and translational force F z exceeded gravitational force F g on the particular object [F z 10.17-261.4 mN (10.72-566.4 mN) at 1.5(3) T]. F z was found to be up to 24.1(47.5)-fold higher than F g at 1.5(3) T. Corresponding to this, F rot on the objects was shown to be high at both field strengths (≥ +3). Three objects (at 1.5 T) and one object (at 3 T) showed deflection angles rot was found to be ≥ +3 at both field strengths. For the remaining objects, β was below 45 and torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. Of 20 objects investigated for magnetic field interactions at 1.5(3) T, 13(15) were unsafe in magnetic resonance (MR), based on the ASTM criteria of F z . The implications of these results for orthodontic patients undergoing MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Orthodontic springs and auxiliary appliances: assessment of magnetic field interactions associated with 1.5 T and 3 T magnetic resonance systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemper, J.; Priest, A.N.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Clinic of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Schulze, D. [University Hospital of Freiburg, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Kahl-Nieke, B.; Klocke, A. [University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Orthodontics, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate magnetic field interactions at 1.5 and 3 T for 20 orthodontic devices used for fixed orthodontic therapy. Twenty springs and auxiliary parts made from varying ferromagnetic alloys were tested for magnetic field interactions in the static magnetic field at 1.5 and 3 T. Magnetic translational force F{sub z} (in millinewtons) was evaluated by determining the deflection angle {beta} [American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standard test method)]. Magnetic-field-induced rotational force F{sub rot} was qualitatively determined using a five-point scale. {beta} was found to be >45 in 13(15) devices at 1.5(3) T and translational force F{sub z} exceeded gravitational force F{sub g} on the particular object [F{sub z} 10.17-261.4 mN (10.72-566.4 mN) at 1.5(3) T]. F{sub z} was found to be up to 24.1(47.5)-fold higher than F{sub g} at 1.5(3) T. Corresponding to this, F{sub rot} on the objects was shown to be high at both field strengths ({>=} +3). Three objects (at 1.5 T) and one object (at 3 T) showed deflection angles <45 , but F{sub rot} was found to be {>=} +3 at both field strengths. For the remaining objects, {beta} was below 45 and torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. Of 20 objects investigated for magnetic field interactions at 1.5(3) T, 13(15) were unsafe in magnetic resonance (MR), based on the ASTM criteria of F{sub z}. The implications of these results for orthodontic patients undergoing MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  13. an Adhesive Patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mojtaba Taghizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems  TDDSs containing stimulants, termed as energetic substances, such as caffeine and pantothenic acid, were studied. Caffeine is a white crystalline substance and a stimulant to central nervous system. In humans, caffeine acts as a central nervous system stimulant, temporarily warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness. Pantothenic acid, also recognized as vitamin B5, is a water-soluble vitamin. For many animals, pantothenic acid is an essential nutrient. Animals require pantothenic acid to synthesize and metabolize proteins, carbohydrates and fats. For this purpose caffeine and pantothenic acid were  used  as  drug  components with  6.32%  and  1.12%  loadings,  in  different functional and non-functional acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs of 52.89%, respectively. Ethylene glycol as a chemical enhancer was used in all TDDSs with 39.67%. The effect of PSAs  type on  in vitro  release and adhesion properties  (peel strength and tack values from drug delivery devices were evaluated. It was found that TDDS containing -COOH functional PSA showed  the  lowest steady state fux. The adhesion properties of the samples were improved by addition of functional acrylic PSA in formulations.

  14. Myofunctional orthodontic for growth child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Achmad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal growth and development is a concern for every parent! If your child’s teeth are not straight, facial growth and development could also be affected. Current orthodontic treatment can damage teeth, restrict jaw growth and usually is not a stable result. Most importantly, braces and extractions do not address the real causes of crooked teeth and quite often once they are removed, the teeth crowd up again. Studies have shown that teeth will have a tendency to change their positions after treatment hence the potential need for lifetime retainers with traditional orthodontics. Our orthodontic treatment uses myofunctional techniques to address the poor oral habits (known as myofunctional habits that are the real, underlying causes of crooked teeth and uses light, intermittent forces to align the teeth. Myofunctional orthodontic techniques have been practiced by Orthodontists and Dentists around the world for over 25 years. This is done through the use of a series of removable dental appliances that are worn for just 1-2 hours each day and overnight while sleeping. In traditional adult orthodontic treatment, certain factors can contribute to less stable results and likely long term or permanent retainers being required if poor oral habits have not been corrected. Orofacial Myofunctional therapy is a profound process used to address the improper function of the tongue and facial muscles used at rest. Treatment may help address the symptoms of a a wide variety of health issues, ranging from opening airways, to treating headaches, Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD, and poor digestion just to name a few. Myofunctional therapy is the “neuromuscular re-education or re-patterning of the oral and facial muscles”. The therapy includes facial and tongue exercises and techniques that modify the poor habits that affect proper tongue position, improved breathing, chewing, and swallowing.

  15. Sistema Decodify®: cefalometria como mensuração de risco e ferramenta administrativa para clínica ortodôntica Decodify® system: cephalometrics as risk manager and administrative tool for the orthodontic clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinho Del Santo Junior

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: a cefalometria pode ter uso clínico limitado em Ortodontia por demandar interpretação subjetiva. Um sistema de Inteligência Artificial (IA, o sistema Decodify®, foi desenvolvido para prover uma avaliação quantitativa individualizada de dados cefalométricos contextualizados. Nesse artigo, o sistema é testado como ferramenta administrativa em consultórios de Ortodontia. MÉTODOS: o desenvolvimento de algoritmos incluiu a modelagem de normas e desvios-padrão de dados cefalométricos brasileiros, medidos em radiografias laterais. Para testar o sistema, cefalogramas iniciais de 60 pacientes ortodônticos de dois consultórios diferentes (30 casos cada foram processados e reprocessados por três técnicos diferentes. A reprodutibilidade e a confidencialidade intraexaminador e interexaminadores foram testadas de modo pareado. O risco em cada caso ortodôntico, produto da análise eletrônica, foi comparado por matrizes de covariância e coeficientes de confiança. RESULTADOS: os níveis de correlação pareada interexaminadores (contra padrão-ouro para 23 pares de variáveis foram de 0,68 (distância S-Go a 0,98 (distância Na-Me em uma clínica ortodôntica (JU e de 0,66 (ângulo L1.APg a 0,98 (distância S-Go em outra clínica ortodôntica (SP. Os níveis de correlação pareada intraexaminadores para 23 pares de variáveis foram de 0,52 (ângulo L1.APg a 0,98 (distâncias S-Go e Na-Me em uma clínica (JU e de 0,55 (ângulo U1.Na a 0,92 (distância Wits em outra (SP. Todas as correlações foram significativas em nível de pINTRODUCTION: Cephalometrics may have limited clinical application in Orthodontics because it demands subjective interpretation. An artificial intelligence (A.I. system, Decodify®, was developed to provide an individual quantitative interpretation of contextualized cephalometric data. In this paper the system is tested as a valid management tool in orthodontic offices. METHODS: The development of

  16. Metal-composite adhesion based on diazonium chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oweis, Yara; Alageel, Omar; Kozak, Paige; Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Retrouvey, Jean-Marc; Cerruti, Marta; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-11-01

    Composite resins do not adhere well to dental alloys. This weak bond can result in failure at the composite-metal interface in fixed dental prostheses and orthodontic brackets. The aim of this study was to develop a new adhesive, based on diazonium chemistry, to facilitate chemical bonding between dental alloys and composite resin. Samples of two types of dental alloys, stainless steel and cobalt chromium were primed with a diazonium layer in order to create a surface coating favorable for composite adhesion. Untreated metal samples served as controls. The surface chemical composition of the treated and untreated samples was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the tensile strength of the bond with composite resin was measured. The diazonium adhesive was also tested for shear bond strength between stainless steel orthodontic brackets and teeth. XPS confirmed the presence of a diazonium coating on the treated metals. The coating significantly increased the tensile and shear bond strengths by three and four folds respectively between the treated alloys and composite resin. diazonium chemistry can be used to develop composite adhesives for dental alloys. Diazonium adhesion can effectively achieve a strong chemical bond between dental alloys and composite resin. This technology can be used for composite repair of fractured crowns, for crown cementation with resin based cements, and for bracket bonding. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... desktop! more... Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem Article Chapters Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem print full article print this chapter email this ...

  18. Bacterial endotoxin enhances colorectal cancer cell adhesion and invasion through TLR-4 and NF-kappaB-dependent activation of the urokinase plasminogen activator system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2009-05-19

    Perioperative exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with accelerated metastatic colorectal tumour growth. LPS directly affects cells through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and the transcription factor NF-kappaB. The urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) system is intimately implicated in tumour cell extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions fundamental to tumour progression. Thus we sought to determine if LPS directly induces accelerated tumour cell ECM adhesion and invasion through activation of the u-PA system and to elucidate the cellular pathways involved. Human colorectal tumour cell lines were stimulated with LPS. u-PA concentration, u-PA activity, active u-PA, surface urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) and TLR-4 expression were assessed by ELISA, colorimetric assay, western blot analysis and flow cytometry respectively. In vitro tumour cell vitronectin adhesion and ECM invasion were analysed by vitronectin adhesion assay and ECM invasion chambers. u-PA and u-PAR function was inhibited with anti u-PA antibodies or the selective u-PA inhibitors amiloride or WXC-340, TLR-4 by TLR-4-blocking antibodies and NF-kappaB by the selective NF-kappaB inhibitor SN-50. LPS upregulates u-PA and u-PAR in a dose-dependent manner, enhancing in vitro tumour cell vitronectin adhesion and ECM invasion by >40% (P<0.01). These effects were ameliorated by u-PA and u-PAR inhibition. LPS activates NF-kappaB through TLR-4. TLR-4 and NF-kappaB inhibition ameliorated LPS-enhanced u-PA and u-PAR expression, tumour cell vitronectin adhesion and ECM invasion. LPS promotes tumour cell ECM adhesion and invasion through activation of the u-PA system in a TLR-4- and NF-kappaB-dependent manner.

  19. Wood Composite Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  20. Medical expert system for assessment of coronary heart disease destabilization based on the analysis of the level of soluble vascular adhesion molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkova, Valentina K.; Pavlov, Sergey V.; Romanava, Valentina A.; Monastyrskiy, Yuriy I.; Ziepko, Sergey M.; Kuzminova, Nanaliya V.; Wójcik, Waldemar; DzierŻak, RóŻa; Kalizhanova, Aliya; Kashaganova, Gulzhan

    2017-08-01

    Theoretical and practical substantiation of the possibility of the using the level of soluble vascular adhesion molecules (sVCAM) is performed. Expert system for the assessment of coronary heart disease (CHD) destabilization on the base of the analysis of soluble vascular adhesion molecules level is developed. Correlation between the increase of VCAM level and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with different variants of CHD progression is established. Association of chronic nonspecific vascular inflammation activation and CHD destabilization is shown. The expedience of parallel determination of sVCAM and CRP levels for diagnostics of CHD destabilization and forecast elaboration is noted.

  1. In Vivo Evaluation of Immediately Loaded Stainless Steel and Titanium Orthodontic Screws in a Growing Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluate...

  2. A Rare Case of Apical Root Resorption during Orthodontic Treatment of Patient with Multiple Aplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Chintan M; Mahida, Khyati; Agrawal, Charu C; Bothra, Jitendrakumar; Mashru, Ketan

    2015-01-01

    External apical root resorption is an adverse effect of orthodontic treatment. It reduces the length of root and breaks the integrity of teeth and dental arch. Orthodontics is the only dental specialty that clinically uses the inflammatory process to correct the mal-aligned teeth. Hence, it is necessary to know the risk factors of root resorption and do everything to reduce the rate of root resorption. Hence, all predisposing factors which are systemic as well as local should be considered be...

  3. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships

    OpenAIRE

    Dannan, Aous

    2010-01-01

    Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opi...

  4. APICAL SEAL BETWEEN ADHESIVE ROOT CANAL OBTURATION SYSTEM AND GUTTA-PERCHA/AH-PLUS SEALER: AN IN VITRO COMPARISON STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Three dimensional obturation of the root canal is important for success of root canal treatment. Microleakage is one of the reason for root canal failure. Numerous materials have been used for obturation of which Gutta-percha is the most successful with variety of sealers. One of the recent material to further improve root canal treatment success rate is use of Resilon with Epiphany root canal sealer to apply adhesive concepts in to endodontics. An adhesive bond forms between Epiphany sealer, Resilon and dentin, making it monolithic hence less microleakage if any significantly. METHODS 60 single rooted mandibular premolars were dissected at cement enamel junction with diamond disc. Root canals were explored and working length measured using K file. Root canals of all 60 samples were prepared with ProTaper and irrigated with 5% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA solution. Teeth were divided in to group A and B, each having 30 samples. Group A teeth obturated with Resilon Epiphany obturation system and group B with Gutta-percha and AH-plus sealer. All specimens were stored in incubator for 30 days. Clearing process of samples done with Robertson’s technique to make them transparent. All the specimens were immersed in 2% methylene blue dye solution for 7 days. Specimens were then examined under stereomicroscope with 10x magnification to measure dye penetration in mm with image analysis software. The data collected were analysed statistically. RESULTS This study showed that Resilon Epiphany group has a mean leakage of 1.2307, while the Gutta-percha/AH-plus had a mean leakage of 3.6133. There was statistically significant differences between Resilon and Gutta-percha groups. CONCLUSIONS 1. Resilon Epiphany group showed less apical microleakage than Gutta-percha/AH-plus obturation. 2. Based on result obtained it is suggested that Resilon Epiphany can be recommended for root canal obturation.

  5. Versatile Auxiliary Orthodontic Spring for Orthodontic Correction of Impacted Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavankumar Janardan Vibhute

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malocclusion such as impacted tooth is not uncommon. Many approaches with various auxiliary springs have been reported in literature till date for correction of such malocclusions. They had biomechanical, retentive and stability drawbacks inherent in their designs. This article presents the innovative approach for orthodontic correction of impacted tooth, especially with light force appliance, i.e. Begg′s appliance, where round wires in round molar tubes are used throughout treatment. A versatile auxiliary orthodontic spring (VAOS is fabricated in the 0.018 inch Australian stainless steel round wire, which may be anchored on round molar buccal tube, and desirable force vector may be applied in any of the three dimensions. Fabrication and its clinical application are discussed.

  6. Sealing of adhesive systems in ferric sulfate-contaminated dentinal margins in class V composite resin restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Shadman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hemostatic agents are applied to prepare an isolated bleeding-free condition during dental treatments and can influence adhesive restorations. This study evaluated the effect of a hemostatic agent (ViscoStat on microleakage of contaminated dentinal margin of class V composite resin restorations with three adhesives. Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human molars were selected and class V cavities (3×3×1.5 mm were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed below the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were divided into six groups randomly. The adhesives were Excite, AdheSE and AdheSE One. In three groups, the gingival walls of the cavities were contaminated with ViscoStat and then rinsed. The cavities were restored with composite resin and light-cured. After storage in distilled water (37°C for 24 hours and polishing, the samples were thermocycled and sealed with nail varnish. Then they were stored in 1% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, rinsed and mounted in self-cured acryl resin, followed by sectioning buccolingually. Dye penetration was observed under a stereomicroscope and scored. Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. P 0.05. In the contaminated groups, Excite had significantly less microleakage than the others (P = 0.003. AdheSE and AdheSE One did not exhibit significant difference in microleakage (P > 0.05. Conclusion. ViscoStat hemostatic agent increased dentinal microleakage in AdheSE and AdheSE One adhesives with no effect on Excite.

  7. The influence of salivary contamination on shear bond strength of dentin adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-won; Lee, Kyung Chae

    2004-01-01

    control, I, III and IV (p<0.05). In the Clearfil SE Bond groups, the SE II and SE III groups had decreased shear bond strength compared with the control and SE I, SE IV and SE V groups (p<0.05). In conclusion, when using One-step total etch adhesive and when the etched surface is contaminated by saliva, blotting the surface and applying the primer can recover the bond strength. Complete drying of the salivary contaminated surface should be avoided. In the Clearfil SE Bond groups, the re-priming treatment (SE IV and SE V) resulted in the recovery of shear bond strength in the specimens contaminated after priming.

  8. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  9. Orthodontic treatment in patient with idiopathic root resorption: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Diego; Smit, Rosana Martínez; Gamboa, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Multiple idiopathic external root resorption is a rare pathological condition usually detected as an incidental radiographic finding. External root resorption of permanent teeth is a multifactorial process related to several local and systemic factors. If an etiological factor cannot be identified for root resorption, the term "idiopathic" is applied. This report presents a case of multiple idiopathic apical root resorption. The condition was found in a young female patient seeking orthodontic treatment due to malocclusion. This kind of resorption starts apically and progresses coronally, causing a gradual shortening and rounding of the remaining root. Patients with this condition are not the ideal candidates for orthodontic treatment; however, the aim of this report is to describe an unusual case of idiopathic root resorption involving the entire dentition, and to present the orthodontic treatment of this patient. It describes the progress and completion of orthodontic therapy with satisfactory end results.

  10. Detection of molecular biomarkers as a diagnostic tool in the planning and progression of orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Gaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment focuses on providing patient care at the appropriate timing to utilize the growth potential for best results. It involves growth modification of the craniofacial region along with alveolar bone remodeling during tooth movement. The dynamic process of bone metabolism involves the release of biochemical mediators in the circulation. These molecules are indicative of the bone remodeling activity of osteoblastic deposition and osteoclastic resorption. Such biomarkers when detectable in the systemic circulation highlight the skeletal maturity of orthodontic patients and when detected locally as, in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF and saliva, indicate the progression of orthodontically induced alveolar bone remodeling. Assessment of molecular biomarkers of bone remodeling in the body fluids would aid the clinicians in planning orthodontic treatment at the ideal timing and evaluating the advent of the treatment.

  11. Orthodontic treatment in patient with idiopathic root resorption: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Rey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple idiopathic external root resorption is a rare pathological condition usually detected as an incidental radiographic finding. External root resorption of permanent teeth is a multifactorial process related to several local and systemic factors. If an etiological factor cannot be identified for root resorption, the term "idiopathic" is applied. This report presents a case of multiple idiopathic apical root resorption. The condition was found in a young female patient seeking orthodontic treatment due to malocclusion. This kind of resorption starts apically and progresses coronally, causing a gradual shortening and rounding of the remaining root. Patients with this condition are not the ideal candidates for orthodontic treatment; however, the aim of this report is to describe an unusual case of idiopathic root resorption involving the entire dentition, and to present the orthodontic treatment of this patient. It describes the progress and completion of orthodontic therapy with satisfactory end results.

  12. How home care is essential to ensuring successful orthodontic treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Roger

    2004-09-01

    Patients can significantly affect the outcome of their orthodontic treatment. A practice committed to developing the right systems, scripts, and educational materials will experience a more satisfied patient, increased efficiencies, and higher profits. Educating and motivating patients to maintain their oral health and providing recommendations or dispensing of home care tools such as a power toothbrush increases patient compliance, positively impacts treatment outcomes, enhances customer service, and generates a new revenue stream for the practice. In a tight economy and a highly competitive orthodontic market, a power toothbrush can positively impact your marketing and case close rate. Treatment and fees being relatively equal, patients will tend to accept treatment from a practice that can demonstrate concern for the patients' overall oral health and greater value-added components to the orthodontic case. Power toothbrushes as part of a comprehensive orthodontic treatment provide a great differentiating marketing strategy.

  13. Active application of primer acid on acid-treated enamel: Influence on the bond effectiveness of self-etch adhesives systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Cíntia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Costa, Daiane Cristianismo; Bosso, Mariana Avalone; Coppini, Erick Kamiya; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2017-08-01

    Evaluate the composite-to-enamel bond after passive or active application of self-etching primer systems on polished or pre-etched enamel with phosphoric acid. Two self-etch adhesives systems (SEAS) were used: Clearfil SE Bond and Easy Bond. Third human molars were divided into 8 groups (N = 10). The crown of each tooth was sectioned into halves and the mesial/distal surfaces were used. The adhesives were actively or passively applied on enamel with or without prior phosphoric-acid etching. Resin composite cylinders were built after adhesive application. After stored in relative humidity for 24 hr/37°C the specimens were subjected to microshear test in universal testing a machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and the Tukey test. The enamel-etching pattern was evaluated under SEM. The 2-step SEAS system presented significantly higher adhesive bond strength means (47.37 MPa) than the 1-step (36.87 MPa). A poor enamel- etching pattern was observed in active mode showing irregular and short resin tags, however there was not compromised the bond strength. Active or passive application produced similar values of bond strength to enamel regardless of enamel pretreatment and type of SEAS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Comparative bonding ability to dentin of a universal adhesive system and monomer conversion as functions of extended light curing times and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Paula Costa Pinheiro; Kruly, Paula de Castro; Ribeiro, Clara Cabral; Hilgert, Leandro Augusto; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Scaffa, Polliana Mendes Candia; Di Hipólito, Vinicius; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding ability and monomer conversion of a universal adhesive system applied to dentin as functions of different curing times and storage. The results were compared among a variety of commercial adhesives. Flat superficial dentin surfaces were exposed on human molars and assigned into one of the following adhesives (n = 15): total-etch Adper Single Bond 2 (SB) and Optibond Solo Plus (OS), self-etch Optibond All in One (OA) and Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive in self-etch mode (SU). The adhesives were applied following the manufacturers' instructions and cured for 10, 20, or 40s. Specimens were processed for the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) test in accordance with the non-trimming technique and tested after 24h and 2 years. The fractured specimens were classified under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Infrared (IR) spectra were obtained and monomer conversion (%) was calculated by comparing the aliphatic-to-aromatic IR absorption peak ratio before and after polymerization (n=5). Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA/Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). At 24-h evaluation, OA and CSE presented similar bond strength means irrespective of the curing time, whereas SB and SU exhibited significantly higher means when cured for 40s as did OS when cured for 20 or 40s (p storage, only the self-etching adhesive Optibond All-In-One exhibited the same bonding ability when cured for longer periods of time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Study in electron microscopy of the formation of the hybrid layer using adhesive systems One Coat and Experimental (EXL 759), at the Facultad de Odontologia of the Universidad de Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria Guzman, S. Marcela; Guevara Lopez, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    The formation of the hybrid layer is observed in dental pieces in vitro, utilizing conventional adhesives systems and of self etching with different times of acid etching, by applying of electron microscopy. Samples of dental pieces are prepared utilizing conventional adhesive systems as Single Bond 2 of 3M, One Coat of Coltene and the adhesive self etching Experimental (EXL 759) of 3M. Samples of dental pieces collected have been molars recently extracted and later stored in jars with water. Samples prepared with the adhesive systems are observed in the electron microscope to obtain images of the hybrid layers formed. The hybrid layers formed are compared observing the photographs of the images obtained in the electron microscope. The adhesive system that has allowed the formation of a hybrid layer more convenient is determined. The time of acid etching is determined and has interfered in the formation of a hybrid layer more stable [es

  16. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons: effect of water and saliva contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola; Scribante, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values) and Chi squared test (ARI Scores). Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons.

  17. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values) and Chi squared test (ARI Scores). Results. Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Conclusions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons. PMID:23762825

  18. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a dry, (b water contamination, and (c saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values and Chi squared test (ARI Scores. Results. Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Conclusions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons.

  19. 21 CFR 872.5500 - Extraoral orthodontic headgear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extraoral orthodontic headgear. 872.5500 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5500 Extraoral orthodontic headgear. (a) Identification. An extraoral orthodontic headgear is a device intended for use with an orthodontic appliance to...

  20. Microleakage under Orthodontic Metal Brackets Bonded with Three Different Bonding Techniques with/without Thermocycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berahman Sabzevari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of beneath the orthodontic brackets bonded with 3 different bonding techniques and evaluate the effect of thermocycling. Methods: One hundred and twenty premolars were randomly divided into 6 groups, received the following treatment: group 1: 37% phosphoric acid gel+Unite primer+Unite adhesive, group 2: 37% phosphoric acid gel+ Transbond XT primer+Transbond XT adhesive, group 3: Transbond plus Self Etching Primer (TSEP+Transbond XT adhesive. Groups 4, 5, and 6 were similar to groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Evaluation of microleakage was done following to thermocycling test. After bonding, the specimens were sealed with nail varnish except for 1 mm around the brackets and then stained with 0.5% basic fuchsine. The specimens were sectioned at buccolingual direction in 2 parallel planes and evaluated under a stereomicroscope to determine the amount of microleakage at bracket-adhesive and adhesive-enamel interfaces from gingival and occlusal margins. Results: Microleakage was observed in all groups, and increased significantly after thermocycling at some interfaces of Unite adhesive group and conventional etching+Transbond XT adhesive group, but the increase was not significant in any interface of TSEP group. With or without thermocycling, TSEP displayed more microleakage than other groups. In most groups, microleakage at gingival margin was significantly higher than occlusal margin. Conclusion: Thermocycling and type of bonding technique significantly affect the amount of microleakage.

  1. Effect of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic bracket bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikvar, Michael J.

    This study examined the effect of bracket manipulation in combination with delayed polymerization times on orthodontic bracket shear bond strength and degree of resin composite conversion. Orthodontics brackets were bonded to extracted third molars in a simulated oral environment after a set period of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation. After curing the bracket adhesive, each bracket underwent shear bond strength testing followed by micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis to measure the degree of conversion of the resin composite. Results demonstrated the shear bond strength and the degree of conversion of ceramic brackets did not vary over time. However, with stainless steel brackets there was a significant effect (p ≤ 0.05) of delay time on shear bond strength between the 0.5 min and 10 min bracket groups. In addition, stainless steel brackets showed significant differences related to degree of conversion over time between the 0.5 min and 5 min groups, in addition to the 0.5 min and 10 min groups. This investigation suggests that delaying bracket adhesive polymerization up to a period of 10 min then adjusting the orthodontic bracket may increase both shear bond strength and degree of conversion of stainless steel brackets while having no effect on ceramic brackets.

  2. Age effect on orthodontic tooth movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Yijin

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of age on the efficiency of orthodontic tooth movement based on critical literature reviews, studies on a standardized orthodontic animal model and a non-invasive clinical investigation. A systematic review was performed on the optimum force for

  3. Effects of drying agents on bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems to enamel immediately after bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niat, Alireza Boruzi; Yazdi, Fatmeh Maleknejad; Koohestanian, Niloufar

    2012-12-01

    To determine the effect of drying agents and adhesive solvents on the bond strength of resin composite to enamel immediately after bleaching. Sixty healthy human premolars were bleached using 15% carbamide peroxide gel and randomly divided into three groups according to the immersing solutions applied immediately after bleaching: 70% alcohol, acetone, and distilled water. Each group was randomly divided into two subgroups according to the adhesives that were applied: an alcohol-based adhesive (Single Bond) and an acetone-based adhesive (One Step). By using rubber washers, composite Z100 was placed onto the enamel and shear bond strength was evaluated in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The type of failure was also assessed using a stereomicroscope. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). Fisher's Exact test was used to evaluate differences in the failure modes. Statistical analysis showed that the bond strength of the distilled water groups was significantly lower than that of the other groups, but the bond strengths of the two groups where a drying agent was applied were similar to that of the unbleached group. The acetone-based adhesive (One Step) provided higher bond strength than did the alcohol-based adhesive (Single Bond) (p 0.05). Fisher's Exact test showed there was no significant difference in the failure mode of all the experimental groups (p > 0.05). The application of drying agents improves the bond strength of resin composite to bleached enamel. Furthermore, the acetone-based adhesive used in the study had a higher bond strength to bleached enamel than did the alcohol-based adhesive used.

  4. Influence of application method on surface free-energy and bond strength of universal adhesive systems to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Arisa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Sai, Keiichi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Nojiri, Kie; Endo, Hajime; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of different adhesive application methods and etching modes on enamel bond effectiveness of universal adhesives using shear bond strength (SBS) testing and surface free-energy (SFE) measurements. The adhesives Scotchbond Universal, All-Bond Universal, Adhese Universal, and G-Premio Bond were used. Prepared bovine enamel specimens were divided into four groups, based on type of adhesive, and subjected to the following surface treatments: (i) total-etch mode with active application; (ii) total-etch mode with inactive application; (iii) self-etch mode with active application; and (iv) self-etch mode with inactive application. Bonded specimens were subjected to SBS testing. The SFE of the enamel surfaces with adhesive was measured after rinsing with acetone and water. The SBS values in total-etch mode were significantly higher than those in self-etch mode. In total-etch mode, significantly lower SBS values were observed with active application compared with inactive application; in contrast, in self-etch mode there were no significant differences in SBS between active and inactive applications. A reduction in total SFE was observed for active application compared with inactive application. The interaction between etching mode and application method was statistically significant, and the application method significantly affected enamel bond strength in total-etch mode. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  5. Sealing effectiveness of fissure sealant bonded with universal adhesive systems on saliva-contaminated and noncontaminated enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Shafiei, Fereshteh; Zarean, Mehran; Razmjoei, Faranak

    2018-01-01

    The effectiveness of sealants is dependent upon their adhesion to enamel surface. The aim of the study was to evaluate the sealing ability of a pit and fissure sealant used with a universal adhesive (etch-and-rinse vs. self-etch modes) when the site is contaminated with saliva. Adhesive properties were evaluated as microleakage and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) characteristics. A total of 72 mandibular third molars were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=12). Occlusal pits and fissures were sealed with an unfilled resin fissure sealant (FS) material with or without saliva contamination. The groups included: 1) phosphoric acid etching + FS (control), 2) phosphoric acid etching + Scotchbond Universal (etch-and-rinse) + FS, 3) phosphoric acid etching + saliva + Scotchbond Universal (etch-and-rinse) + FS, 4) Scotchbond Universal (self-etching) + FS,5) Scotchbond Universal (self-etching) + saliva + FS, and 6) Scotchbond Universal (self-etching) + saliva + Scotchbond Universal + FS. After thermocycling, the teeth were placed in 0.5% fuchsin, sectioned, and evaluated by digital microscopy. Two samples from each group were also observed by SEM. The data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests for a significance of p universal adhesive in etch-and-rinse or self-etch modes was similar to that of conventional acid etching. Saliva contamination had a negative effect on sealant adhesion to pretreated enamel. Key words: Pit and fissure sealant, Universal adhesive, Saliva.

  6. Dentistry's oldest specialty: orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) has 15,500 members worldwide and is the oldest and largest of the recognized dental specialties. A strategic planning process has identified six key challenges, and this article describes the progress that is being made in the areas of (a) consumer education, (b) volunteer leadership development, (c) recruitment and retention of orthodontic educators, (d) relationships with ADA and other healthcare organizations, (e) the AAO's role in international orthodontics, and (f) advocacy. The AAO is working for freedom of choice in dental healthcare providers; fee-for-service dental care; orthodontic insurance coverage as a benefit of employment, with direct reimbursement as the preferred plan; self-referred access to specialists; private and public funding that promote quality orthodontic care; and the retention of tax deductibility of dental healthcare benefits, including orthodontic care.

  7. Three-dimensional analysis of enamel surface alteration resulting from orthodontic clean-up -comparison of three different tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Tandecka, Katarzyna; Szatkiewicz, Tomasz; Stępień, Piotr; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Grocholewicz, Katarzyna

    2015-11-18

    The present study aimed at 3D analysis of adhesive remnants and enamel loss following the debonding of orthodontic molar tubes and orthodontic clean-up to assess the effectiveness and safety of One-Step Finisher and Polisher and Adhesive Residue Remover in comparison to tungsten carbide bur. Thirty human molars were bonded with chemical-cure orthodontic adhesive (Unite, 3M, USA), stored 24 h in 0.9 % saline solution, debonded and cleaned using three methods (Three groups of ten): tungsten carbide bur (Dentaurum, Pforzheim, Germany), one-step finisher and polisher (One gloss, Shofu Dental, Kyoto, Japan) and Adhesive Residue Remover (Dentaurum, Pforzheim, Germany). Direct 3D scanning in blue-light technology to the nearest 2 μm was performed before etching and after adhesive removal. Adhesive remnant height and volume as well as enamel loss depth and volume were calculated. An index of effectiveness and safety was proposed and calculated for every tool; adhesive remnant volume and duplicated enamel lost volume were divided by a sum of multiplicands. Comparisons using parametric ANOVA or nonparametric ANOVA rank Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare between tools for adhesive remnant height and volume, enamel loss depth and volume as well as for the proposed index. No statistically significant differences in the volume (p = 0.35) or mean height (p = 0.24) of adhesive remnants were found (ANOVA rank Kruskal-Wallis test) between the groups of teeth cleaned using different tools. Mean volume of enamel loss was 2.159 mm(3) for tungsten carbide bur, 1.366 mm(3) for Shofu One Gloss and 0.659 mm(3) for Adhesive Residue Remover - (F = 2.816, p = 0.0078). A comparison of the proposed new index between tools revealed highly statistically significant differences (p = 0.0081), supporting the best value for Adhesive Residue Remover and the worst - for tungsten carbide bur. The evaluated tools were all characterized by similar effectiveness. The most

  8. Effects of contamination by either blood or a hemostatic agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic buttons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkis, Huseyin; Turkkahraman, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of contamination by either blood or a hemostatic agent on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic buttons. Methods We used 45 freshly extracted, non-carious, impacted third molars that were divided into 3 groups of 15. Each tooth was etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel for 30 s. Human blood or the blood stopper agent was applied to the tooth surface in groups I and II, respectively. Group III teeth were untreated (controls). Orthodontic buttons were bonded to the teeth using light-curing composite resin. After bonding, the SBS of the button was determined using a Universal testing machine. Any adhesive remaining after debonding was assessed and scored according to the modified adhesive remnant index (ARI). ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey's test was used to determine significant differences in SBS and Fisher's exact test, to determine significant differences in ARI scores among groups. Results ANOVA indicated a significant difference between groups (p Contamination of tooth surfaces with either blood or hemostatic agent significantly decreased the SBS of orthodontic buttons. When the contamination risk is high, it is recommended to use the blood stopper agent when bonding orthodontic buttons on impacted teeth. PMID:23671834

  9. In vitro Effects of a Neutral Fluoride Agent on Shear Bond Strength and Microleakage of Orthodontic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Ahrari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pretreatment with a neutral fluoride agent on shear bond strength (SBS and microleakage of orthodontic brackets, and to investigate any significant relationship between SBS and microleakage. Methods: Forty intact premolars were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 served as the control, while group 2 underwent treatment with a 2% sodium fluoride (NaF gel, which was applied on the enamel surface for 4 minutes before etching. After bonding orthodontic brackets, the teeth were immersed for 12 hours in methylen blue dye, followed by mounting in acrylic resin. Shear bond strength was determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the amount of microleakage and the adhesive remnant index (ARI were assessed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The mean SBS and microleakage beneath metal brackets were not significantly different among the control and NaF-treated groups (P>0.05. Furthermore, no significant correlation was found between SBS and microleakage (r=-0.04, P=0.796. The ARI scores revealed that in both groups, most of the adhesive remained on the enamel surface after debonding. Conclusions: It may be concluded that pretreatment of enamel with 2% NaF prior to the bonding procedure does not significantly affect microleakage and SBS of orthodontic brackets and thus, it can be recommended as a suitable approach to reduce the incidence of white spot lesions in orthodontically treated patients, especially those at high risk of caries formation.  

  10. Photoresponsive Molecular Recognition and Adhesion of Vesicles in a Competitive Ternary Supramolecular System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Bultema, Jelle B.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    A competitive photoresponsive supramolecular system is formed in a dilute aqueous solution of three components: vesicles of amphiphilic alpha-cyclodextrin host 1a, divalent p-methylphenyl guest 2 or divalent p-methylbenzamide guest 3, and photoresponsive azobenzene monovalent guest 5. Guests 2 and 3

  11. Gelation in a model 1-component system with adhesive hard-sphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Min; Eberle, Aaron; Fang, Jun; Wagner, Norman

    2012-02-01

    Colloidal dispersions can undergo a dynamical arrest of the disperse phase leading to a system with solid-like properties when either the volume fraction or the interparticle potential is varied. Systems that contain low to moderate particulate concentrations form gels whereas higher concentrations lead to glassy states in which caging by nearest neighbors can be a significant contributor to the arrested long-time dynamics. Colloid polymer mixtures have been the prevalent model system for studying the effect of attraction, where attractions are entropically driven by depletion effects, in which gelation has been shown to be a result of phase separation [1]. Using the model 1-component octadecyl coated silica nanoparticle system, Eberle et al. [2] found the gel-line to intersect the spinodal to the left of the critical point, and at higher concentrations extended toward the mode coupling theory attractive driven glass line. . We continue this study by varying the particle diameter and find quantitative differences which we explain by gravity. 1. Lu, P.J., et al., Nature, 2008. 453(7194): p. 499-504.2. Eberle, A.P.R., N.J. Wagner, and R. Castaneda-Priego, Physical Review Letters, 2011. 106(10).

  12. Cone beam CT in orthodontics: the current picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdissi, Jimmy

    2013-03-01

    The introduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology to dentistry and orthodontics revolutionized the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of orthodontic patients. This review article discusses the use of CBCT in diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. The steps required to install and operate a CBCT facility within the orthodontic practice as well as the challenges are highlighted. The available guidelines in relation to the clinical applications of CBCT in orthodontics are explored. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Influence of Adhesive System on Performance of SiO/C Lithium-ion Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Xin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon based anode material is turning into the research hot point of lithium-ion battery material field due to Si inside supporting higher capacity. Furthermore binder applied as major accessory material of anode system could bring anode material & current collector together, thus the influence given by binder system to battery performance becomes the key point. The paper describes the procedure of adopting commercial LiCoO2 SiO/C as composite material & electrolyte, with using styrene butadiene rubber and acrylic acid copolymer as binder to figure out lithium-ion battery with 2.5Ah, which is testified to present better performance on cold temperature & cycle life plus having a little bit swelling compared with the lithium-ion battery using only styrene butadiene rubber as binder.

  14. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  15. Identification of some nonsmooth evolution systems with illustration on adhesive contacts at small strains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, Lukáš; Outrata, Jiří; Roubíček, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 12 (2017), s. 2025-2049 ISSN 0233-1934 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0357; GA ČR GA14-15264S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 ; RVO:67985556 Keywords : rate-independent systems * optimal control * identification Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics; BA - General Mathematics (UTIA-B) OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics; Pure mathematics (UTIA-B) Impact factor: 0.943, year: 2016 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02331934.2015.1111364

  16. Effects of silane application on the shear bond strength of ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed orthodontic appliances with ceramic brackets are used frequently to fulfill the aesthetic demand of patient through orthodontic treatment. Ceramic brackets have some weaknesses such as bond strength and enamel surface damage. In high bond strength the risk of damage in enamel surfaces increases after debonding. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the effect of silane on base of bracket and adhesive to shear bond strength and enamel structure of ceramic bracket. Method: Sixteen extracted upper premolars were randomly divided into four groups based on silane or no silane on the bracket base and on the adhesive surface. Design of the base on ceramic bracket in this research was microcrystalline to manage the influence of mechanical interlocking. Samples were tested in shear mode on a universal testing machine after attachment. Following it, adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were used to assess bond failure site. Statistical analysis was performed using a two-way Anova and the Mann-Whitney test. A scanning electron microscope (SEM with a magnification of 2000x was used to observe enamel structure after debonding. Result: Shear bond strength was increased between group without silane and group with silane on the base of bracket (p<0,05. There was no significance different between group without silane and group with silane on adhesive (p<0,05. Conclusion: Application of silane on base of bracket increases shear bond strength, however, application of silane on adhesive site does not increase shear bond strength of ceramic bracket. Most bonding failure occurred at the enamel adhesive interface and damage occurred on enamel structure in group contains silane of ceramic bracket.

  17. Systems Biology Reveals Cigarette Smoke-Induced Concentration-Dependent Direct and Indirect Mechanisms That Promote Monocyte-Endothelial Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussin, Carine; Laurent, Alexandra; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia; De Leon, Hector

    2015-10-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) affects the adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells, a critical step in atherogenesis. Using an in vitro adhesion assay together with innovative computational systems biology approaches to analyze omics data, our study aimed at investigating CS-induced mechanisms by which monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion is promoted. Primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were treated for 4 h with (1) conditioned media of human monocytic Mono Mac-6 (MM6) cells preincubated with low or high concentrations of aqueous CS extract (sbPBS) from reference cigarette 3R4F for 2 h (indirect treatment, I), (2) unconditioned media similarly prepared without MM6 cells (direct treatment, D), or (3) freshly generated sbPBS (fresh direct treatment, FD). sbPBS promoted MM6 cells-HCAECs adhesion following I and FD, but not D. In I, the effect was mediated at a low concentration through activation of vascular inflammation processes promoted in HCAECs by a paracrine effect of the soluble mediators secreted by sbPBS-treated MM6 cells. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), a major inducer, was actually shed by unstable CS compound-activated TNFα-converting enzyme. In FD, the effect was triggered at a high concentration that also induced some toxicity. This effect was mediated through an yet unknown mechanism associated with a stress damage response promoted in HCAECs by unstable CS compounds present in freshly generated sbPBS, which had decayed in D unconditioned media. Aqueous CS extract directly and indirectly promotes monocytic cell-endothelial cell adhesion in vitro via distinct concentration-dependent mechanisms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Identification of some nonsmooth evolution systems with illustration on adhesive contacts at small strains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, Lukáš; Outrata, Jiří; Roubíček, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 12 (2017), s. 2025-2049 ISSN 0233-1934 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25911S; GA ČR GA13-18652S; GA ČR GAP201/10/0357; GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0671 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) SVV 260225/2015 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 ; RVO:61388998 Keywords : rate-independent systems * optimal control * identification * fractional-step time discretization * quadratic programming * gradient evaluation * variational analysis * implicit programming approach * limiting subdifferential * coderivative * nonsmooth contact mechanics * delamination Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics; BA - General Mathematics (UT-L) OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics; Pure mathematics (UT-L) Impact factor: 0.943, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/MTR/adam-0453289.pdf

  19. Single macroscopic pillars as model system for bioinspired adhesives: influence of tip dimension, aspect ratio, and tilt angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micciché, Maurizio; Arzt, Eduard; Kroner, Elmar

    2014-05-28

    The goal of our study is to better understand the design parameters of bioinspired dry adhesives inspired by geckos. For this, we fabricated single macroscopic pillars of 400 μm diameter with different aspect ratios and different tip shapes (i.e., flat tips, spherical tips with different radii, and mushroom tips with different diameters). Tilt-angle-dependent adhesion measurements showed that although the tip shape of the pillars strongly influences the pull-off force, the pull-off strength is similar for flat and mushroom-shaped tips. We found no tilt-angle dependency of adhesion for spherical tip structures and, except for high tilt angle and low preload experiments, no tilt-angle effect for mushroom-tip pillars. For flat-tip pillars, we found a strong influence of tilt angle on adhesion, which decreased linearly with increasing aspect ratio. The experiments show that for the tested aspect ratios between 1 and 5, a linear decrease of tilt-angle dependency is found. The results of our studies will help to design bioinspired adhesives for application on smooth and rough surfaces.

  20. In vitro evaluation of influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nujella B.P Suryakumari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems - (the V generation at various stages during the bonding procedure and to investigate the effect of the contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: In this study the V generation one-bottle system - (Adper Single Bond was tested. Fifty caries-free human molars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into five groups of ten teeth each: Group I had 15 second etching with 35% Ortho Phosphoric acid, 15 second rinse and blot dried (Uncontaminated; Group II contaminated and blot dried; Group III contaminated and completely dried; Group IV contaminated, washed, blot dried; Group V contaminated, retched washed, and blot dried. The bonding agent was applied and resin composite (Z-100 3M ESPE was bonded to the treated surfaces using the Teflon mold. The specimens in each group were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm / minute and the data were subjected to one way ANOVA for comparison among the groups (P<0.05. Results: There was a significant difference between the group that was dried with strong oil-free air after contamination (Group III and the other groups. When the etched surface was contaminated by saliva, there was no statistical difference between the just blot dry, wash, or the re-etching groups (Groups II, IV, V if the dentin surface was kept wet before priming. When the etched dentin surface was dried (Group III the shear bond strength decreased considerably. Conclusion: The bond strengths to the tooth structure of the recent dentin bonding agents are less sensitive to common forms of contamination than assumed. Re-etching without additional mechanical preparation is sufficient to provide or achieve the expected bond strength.

  1. Effects of chlorhexidine (gel) application on bacterial levels and orthodontic brackets during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bazi, Samar M; Abbassy, Mona A; Bakry, Ahmed S; Merdad, Leena A; Hassan, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of applying 0.50% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel using the dental drug delivery system (3DS) on salivary Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and on the surface topography of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. The study involved 20 orthodontic patients with high levels of salivary S. mutans. The patients were treated with professional mechanical tooth cleaning followed by application of 0.50% CHX using individual trays (3DS). Salivary S. mutans levels were repeatedly measured 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-treatment. In vitro study utilized forty ceramic and metallic brackets that were immersed in 0.50% CHX gel for 10 min, whereas another untreated forty brackets served as controls. The frictional resistances of stainless steel wires to the brackets before and after CHX treatment were recorded using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare changes in the surface topography of brackets. Statistical analyses were used to determine the effect of CHX on bacterial count and to evaluate the effect of CHX on frictional resistance. According to the results of this study, S. mutans levels were reduced significantly (P brackets before or after application of CHX. (J Oral Sci 58, 35-42, 2016).

  2. [Presurgical orthodontics for facial asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarrère, H

    2003-03-01

    As with the treatment of all facial deformities, orthodontic pre-surgical preparation for facial asymmetry should aim at correcting severe occlusal discrepancies not solely on the basis of a narrow occlusal analysis but also in a way that will not disturb the proposed surgical protocol. In addition, facial asymmetries require specific adjustments, difficult to derive and to apply because of their inherent atypical morphological orientation of both alveolar and basal bony support. Three treated cases illustrate different solutions to problems posed by pathological torque: this torque must be considered with respect to proposed surgical changes, within the framework of their limitations and their possible contra-indications.