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Sample records for oral p2y12 receptor

  1. Molecular mechanisms of platelet P2Y(12) receptor regulation.

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    Cunningham, Margaret R; Nisar, Shaista P; Mundell, Stuart J

    2013-02-01

    Platelets are critical for haemostasis, however inappropriate activation can lead to the development of arterial thrombosis, which can result in heart attack and stroke. ADP is a key platelet agonist that exerts its actions via stimulation of two surface GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), P2Y(1) and P2Y(12). Similar to most GPCRs, P2Y receptor activity is tightly regulated by a number of complex mechanisms including receptor desensitization, internalization and recycling. In the present article, we review the molecular mechanisms that underlie P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor regulation, with particular emphasis on the structural motifs within the P2Y(12) receptor, which are required to maintain regulatory protein interaction. The implications of these findings for platelet responsiveness are also discussed.

  2. Optimal timing of initiation of oral P2Y12-receptor antagonist therapy in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeymer, Uwe; Montalescot, Gilles; Ardissino, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The optimal time-point of the initiation of P2Y12 antagonist therapy in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NTSE-ACS) is still a matter of debate. European guidelines recommend P2Y12 as soon as possible after first medical contact. However, the only trial which compared the two...... strategies did not demonstrate any benefit of pre-treatment with prasugrel before angiography compared to starting therapy after angiography and just prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This paper summarizes the results of pharmacodynamic and previous studies, and gives recommendations...

  3. Purinergic P2Y12 Receptor Activation in Eosinophils and the Schistosomal Host Response.

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    Muniz, Valdirene S; Baptista-Dos-Reis, Renata; Benjamim, Claudia F; Mata-Santos, Hilton A; Pyrrho, Alexandre S; Strauch, Marcelo A; Melo, Paulo A; Vicentino, Amanda R R; Silva-Paiva, Juliana; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Weller, Peter F; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T; Neves, Josiane S

    2015-01-01

    Identifying new target molecules through which eosinophils secrete their stored proteins may reveal new therapeutic approaches for the control of eosinophilic disorders such as host immune responses to parasites. We have recently reported the expression of the purinergic P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) in human eosinophils; however, its functional role in this cell type and its involvement in eosinophilic inflammation remain unknown. Here, we investigated functional roles of P2Y12R in isolated human eosinophils and in a murine model of eosinophilic inflammation induced by Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni) infection. We found that adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) induced human eosinophils to secrete eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) in a P2Y12R dependent manner. However, ADP did not interfere with human eosinophil apoptosis or chemotaxis in vitro. In vivo, C57Bl/6 mice were infected with cercariae of the Belo Horizonte strain of S. mansoni. Analyses performed 55 days post infection revealed that P2Y12R blockade reduced the granulomatous hepatic area and the eosinophilic infiltrate, collagen deposition and IL-13/IL-4 production in the liver without affecting the parasite oviposition. As found for humans, murine eosinophils also express the P2Y12R. P2Y12R inhibition increased blood eosinophilia, whereas it decreased the bone marrow eosinophil count. Our results suggest that P2Y12R has an important role in eosinophil EPO secretion and in establishing the inflammatory response in the course of a S. mansoni infection.

  4. Arrestin scaffolds NHERF1 to the P2Y12 receptor to regulate receptor internalization.

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    Nisar, Shaista P; Cunningham, Margaret; Saxena, Kunal; Pope, Robert J; Kelly, Eamonn; Mundell, Stuart J

    2012-07-13

    We have recently shown in a patient with mild bleeding that the PDZ-binding motif of the platelet G protein-coupled P2Y(12) receptor (P2Y(12)R) is required for effective receptor traffic in human platelets. In this study we show for the first time that the PDZ motif-binding protein NHERF1 exerts a major role in potentiating G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization. NHERF1 interacts with the C-tail of the P2Y(12)R and unlike many other GPCRs, NHERF1 interaction is required for effective P2Y(12)R internalization. In vitro and prior to agonist stimulation P2Y(12)R/NHERF1 interaction requires the intact PDZ binding motif of this receptor. Interestingly on receptor stimulation NHERF1 no longer interacts directly with the receptor but instead binds to the receptor via the endocytic scaffolding protein arrestin. These findings suggest a novel model by which arrestin can serve as an adaptor to promote NHERF1 interaction with a GPCR to facilitate effective NHERF1-dependent receptor internalization.

  5. Platelets Express Activated P2Y12 Receptor in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Hu, Liang; Chang, Lin; Zhang, Yan; Zhai, Lili; Zhang, Shenghui; Qi, Zhiyong; Yan, Hongmei; Yan, Yan; Luo, Xinping; Zhang, Si; Wang, Yiping; Kunapuli, Satya P; Ye, Hongying; Ding, Zhongren

    2017-08-29

    Platelets from patients with diabetes mellitus are hyperactive. Hyperactivated platelets may contribute to cardiovascular complications and inadequate responses to antiplatelet agents in the setting of diabetes mellitus. However, the underlying mechanism of hyperactivated platelets is not completely understood. We measured P2Y 12 expression on platelets from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and on platelets from rats with diabetes mellitus. We also assayed platelet P2Y 12 activation by measuring cAMP and VASP phosphorylation. The antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of AR-C78511 and cangrelor were compared in rats. Finally, we explored the role of the nuclear factor-κB pathway in regulating P2Y 12 receptor expression in megakaryocytes. Platelet P2Y 12 levels are 4-fold higher in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared with healthy subjects. P2Y 12 expression correlates with ADP-induced platelet aggregation (r=0.89, P diabetes mellitus is constitutively activated. Although both AR-C78511, a potent P2Y 12 inverse agonist, and cangrelor have similar antiplatelet efficacy on platelets from healthy subjects, AR-C78511 exhibits more powerful antiplatelet effects on diabetic platelets than cangrelor (aggregation ratio 36±3% versus 49±5%, respectively, P diabetes mellitus than cangrelor (thrombus weight 4.9±0.3 mg versus 8.3±0.4 mg, respectively, P diabetes mellitus. Platelet P2Y 12 receptor expression is significantly increased and the receptor is constitutively activated in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, which contributes to platelet hyperactivity and limits antiplatelet drug efficacy in type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Pathophysiological consequences of receptor mistraffic: Tales from the platelet P2Y12 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Margaret R; Aungraheeta, Riyaad; Mundell, Stuart J

    2017-07-05

    Genetic variations in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes can disrupt receptor function in a wide variety of human genetic diseases, including platelet bleeding disorders. Platelets are critical for haemostasis with inappropriate platelet activation leading to the development of arterial thrombosis, which can result in heart attack and stroke whilst decreased platelet activity is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. GPCRs expressed on the surface of platelets play key roles in regulating platelet activity and therefore function. Receptors include purinergic receptors (P2Y 1 and P2Y 12 ), proteinase-activated receptor (PAR1 and PAR4) and thromboxane receptors (TPα), among others. Pharmacological blockade of these receptors forms a powerful therapeutic tool in the treatment and prevention of arterial thrombosis. With the advance of genomic technologies, there has been a substantial increase in the identification of naturally occurring rare and common GPCR variants. These variants include single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion or deletions that have the potential to alter GPCR expression or function. A number of defects in platelet GPCRs that disrupt receptor function have now been characterized in patients with mild bleeding disorders. This review will focus on rare, function-disrupting variants of platelet GPCRs with particular emphasis upon mutations in the P2Y 12 receptor gene that affect receptor traffic to modulate platelet function. Further this review will outline how the identification and characterization of function-disrupting GPCR mutations provides an essential link in translating our detailed understanding of receptor traffic and function in cell line studies into relevant human biological systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Inverse agonism at the P2Y12 receptor and ENT1 transporter blockade contribute to platelet inhibition by ticagrelor.

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    Aungraheeta, Riyaad; Conibear, Alexandra; Butler, Mark; Kelly, Eamonn; Nylander, Sven; Mumford, Andrew; Mundell, Stuart J

    2016-12-08

    Ticagrelor is a potent antagonist of the P2Y 12 receptor (P2Y 12 R) and consequently an inhibitor of platelet activity effective in the treatment of atherothrombosis. Here, we sought to further characterize its molecular mechanism of action. Initial studies showed that ticagrelor promoted a greater inhibition of adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-induced Ca 2+ release in washed platelets vs other P2Y 12 R antagonists. This additional effect of ticagrelor beyond P2Y 12 R antagonism was in part as a consequence of ticagrelor inhibiting the equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) on platelets, leading to accumulation of extracellular adenosine and activation of G s -coupled adenosine A 2A receptors. This contributed to an increase in basal cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation (VASP-P). In addition, ticagrelor increased platelet cAMP and VASP-P in the absence of ADP in an adenosine receptor-independent manner. We hypothesized that this increase originated from a direct effect on basal agonist-independent P2Y 12 R signaling, and this was validated in 1321N1 cells stably transfected with human P2Y 12 R. In these cells, ticagrelor blocked the constitutive agonist-independent activity of the P2Y 12 R, limiting basal G i -coupled signaling and thereby increasing cAMP levels. These data suggest that ticagrelor has the pharmacological profile of an inverse agonist. Based on our results showing insurmountable inhibition of ADP-induced Ca 2+ release and forskolin-induced cAMP, the mode of antagonism of ticagrelor also appears noncompetitive, at least functionally. In summary, our studies describe 2 novel modes of action of ticagrelor, inhibition of platelet ENT1 and inverse agonism at the P2Y 12 R that contribute to its effective inhibition of platelet activation. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. Identification of endogenous surrogate ligands for human P2Y12 receptors by in silico and in vitro methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Yosuke; Hiramoto, Takeshi; Fujita, Norihisa

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous ligands acting on a human P2Y 12 receptor, one of the G-protein coupled receptors, were searched by in silico screening against our own database, which contains more than 500 animal metabolites. The in silico screening using the docking software AutoDock resulted in selection of cysteinylleukotrienes (CysLTs) and 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), with high free energy changes, in addition to the known P2Y 12 ligands such as 2MeSADP and ADP. These candidates were subjected to an in vitro Ca 2+ assay using the CHO cells stably expressing P2Y 12 -G 16 α fusion proteins. We found that CysLTE4 and PRPP acted on the P2Y 12 receptor as agonists with the EC 50 values of 1.3 and 7.8 nM, respectively. Furthermore, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of the P2Y, P2Y-like, and CysLT receptors based on sequence alignment followed by evolutionary analyses. The analyses showed that the P2Y 12 , P2Y 13 , P2Y 14 , GPR87, CysLT-1, and CysLT-2 receptors formed a P2Y-related receptor subfamily with common sequence motifs in the transmembrane regions

  9. Nanoparticle-Encapsulated Curcumin Inhibits Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Involving the P2Y12 Receptor in the Dorsal Root Ganglia

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    Tianyu Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy results in diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP. Satellite glial cells (SGCs enwrap the neuronal soma in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG. The purinergic 2 (P2 Y12 receptor is expressed on SGCs in the DRG. SGC activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DNP. Curcumin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Because curcumin has poor metabolic stability in vivo and low bioavailability, nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin was used to improve its targeting and bioavailability. In the present study, our aim was to investigate the effects of nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin on DNP mediated by the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the rat DRG. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy increased the expression levels of the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the DRG and enhanced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with diabetes mellitus (DM. Up-regulation of the P2Y12 receptor in SGCs in the DRG increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Up-regulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β and connexin43 (Cx43 resulted in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with DM. The nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin decreased up-regulated IL-1β and Cx43 expression and reduced levels of phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt in the DRG of rats with DM. The up-regulation of P2Y12 on SGCs and the up-regulation of the IL-1β and Cx43 in the DRG indicated the activation of SGCs in the DRG. The nano-curcumin treatment inhibited the activation of SGCs accompanied by its anti-inflammatory effect to decrease the up-regulated CGRP expression in the DRG neurons. Therefore, the nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin treatment decreased the up-regulation of the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the DRG and decreased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with DM.

  10. Rationale and design of the Affordability and Real-world Antiplatelet Treatment Effectiveness after Myocardial Infarction Study (ARTEMIS): A multicenter, cluster-randomized trial of P2Y12 receptor inhibitor copayment reduction after myocardial infarction.

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    Doll, Jacob A; Wang, Tracy Y; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Cannon, Christopher P; Cohen, David J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Henry, Timothy D; Bhandary, Durgesh D; Khan, Naeem; Davidson-Ray, Linda D; Anstrom, Kevin; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-07-01

    The use of oral P2Y12 receptor inhibitors after acute myocardial infarction (MI) can reduce risks of subsequent major adverse cardiovascular events (composite of all-cause death, recurrent MI, and stroke), yet medication persistence is suboptimal. Although copayment cost has been implicated as a factor influencing medication persistence, it remains unclear whether reducing or eliminating these costs can improve medication persistence and/or downstream clinical outcomes. ARTEMIS is a multicenter, cluster-randomized clinical trial designed to examine whether eliminating patient copayment for P2Y12 receptor inhibitor therapy affects medication persistence and clinical outcomes. We will enroll approximately 11,000 patients hospitalized for acute ST-elevation and non-ST-elevation MI at 300 hospitals. Choice and duration of treatment with a P2Y12 receptor inhibitor will be determined by the treating physician. Hospitals randomized to the copayment intervention will provide vouchers to cover patients' copayments for their P2Y12 receptor inhibitor for up to 1 year after discharge. The coprimary end points are 1-year P2Y12 receptor inhibitor persistence and major adverse cardiovascular events. Secondary end points include choice of P2Y12 receptor inhibitor, patient-reported outcomes, and postdischarge cost of care. ARTEMIS will be the largest randomized assessment of a medication copayment reduction intervention on medication persistence, clinical outcomes, treatment selection, and cost of care after acute MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. P2Y12 receptor upregulation in satellite glial cells is involved in neuropathic pain induced by HIV glycoprotein 120 and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine.

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    Yi, Zhihua; Xie, Lihui; Zhou, Congfa; Yuan, Huilong; Ouyang, Shuai; Fang, Zhi; Zhao, Shanhong; Jia, Tianyu; Zou, Lifang; Wang, Shouyu; Xue, Yun; Wu, Bing; Gao, Yun; Li, Guilin; Liu, Shuangmei; Xu, Hong; Xu, Changshui; Zhang, Chunping; Liang, Shangdong

    2018-03-01

    The direct neurotoxicity of HIV and neurotoxicity of combination antiretroviral therapy medications both contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Activation of satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) plays a crucial role in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. The P2Y 12 receptor expressed in SGCs of the DRG is involved in pain transmission. In this study, we explored the role of the P2Y 12 receptor in neuropathic pain induced by HIV envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120) combined with ddC (2',3'-dideoxycytidine). A rat model of gp120+ddC-induced neuropathic pain was used. Peripheral nerve exposure to HIV-gp120+ddC increased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in gp120+ddC-treated model rats. The gp120+ddC treatment increased expression of P2Y 12 receptor mRNA and protein in DRG SGCs. In primary cultured DRG SGCs treated with gp120+ddC, the levels of [Ca 2+ ] i activated by the P2Y 12 receptor agonist 2-(Methylthio) adenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt (2-MeSADP) were significantly increased. P2Y 12 receptor shRNA treatment inhibited 2-MeSADP-induced [Ca 2+ ] i in primary cultured DRG SGCs treated with gp120+ddC. Intrathecal treatment with a shRNA against P2Y 12 receptor in DRG SGCs reduced the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, decreased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in the DRG of gp120+ddC-treated rats. Thus, downregulating the P2Y 12 receptor relieved mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in gp120+ddC-treated rats.

  12. The platelet P2Y(12) receptor under normal and pathological conditions. Assessment with the radiolabeled selective antagonist [(3)H]PSB-0413.

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    Ohlmann, Philippe; Lecchi, Anna; El-Tayeb, Ali; Müller, Christa E; Cattaneo, Marco; Gachet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Various radioligands have been used to characterize and quantify the platelet P2Y(12) receptor, which share several weaknesses: (a) they are metabolically unstable and substrates for ectoenzymes, (b) they are agonists, and (c) they do not discriminate between P2Y(1) and P2Y(12). We used the [(3)H]PSB-0413 selective P2Y(12) receptor antagonist radioligand to reevaluate the number of P2Y(12) receptors in intact platelets and in membrane preparations. Studies in humans showed that: (1) [(3)H]PSB-0413 bound to 425 ± 50 sites/platelet (K (D) = 3.3 ± 0.6 nM), (2) 0.5 ± 0.2 pmol [(3)H]PSB-0413 bound to 1 mg protein of platelet membranes (K (D) = 6.5 ± 3.6 nM), and (3) competition studies confirmed the known features of P2Y(12), with the expected rank order of potency: AR-C69931MX > 2MeSADP ≫ ADPβS > ADP, while the P2Y(1) ligand MRS2179 and the P2X(1) ligand α,β-Met-ATP did not displace [(3)H]PSB-0413 binding. Patients with severe P2Y(12) deficiency displayed virtually no binding of [(3)H]PSB-0413 to intact platelets, while a patient with a dysfunctional P2Y(12) receptor had normal binding. Studies in mice showed that: (1) [(3)H]PSB-0413 bound to 634 ± 87 sites/platelet (K (D) = 14 ± 4.5 nM) and (2) 0.7 pmol ± 0.3 [(3)H]PSB-0413 bound to 1 mg protein of platelet membranes (K (D) = 9.1 ± 5.3 nM). Clopidogrel and other thiol reagents like pCMBS or DTT abolished the binding both to intact platelets and membrane preparations. Therefore, [(3)H]PSB-0413 is an accurate and selective tool for radioligand binding studies aimed at quantifying P2Y(12) receptors, to identify patients with P2Y(12) deficiencies or quantify the effect of P2Y(12) targeting drugs.

  13. A novel mutation in the P2Y12 receptor and a function-reducing polymorphism in protease-activated receptor 1 in a patient with chronic bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Y M; Lordkipanidzé, M; Lowe, G C; Nisar, S P; Garner, K; Stockley, J; Daly, M E; Mitchell, M; Watson, S P; Austin, S K; Mundell, S J

    2014-05-01

    The study of patients with bleeding problems is a powerful approach in determining the function and regulation of important proteins in human platelets. We have identified a patient with a chronic bleeding disorder expressing a homozygous P2RY(12) mutation, predicting an arginine to cysteine (R122C) substitution in the G-protein-coupled P2Y(12) receptor. This mutation is found within the DRY motif, which is a highly conserved region in G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that is speculated to play a critical role in regulating receptor conformational states. To determine the functional consequences of the R122C substitution for P2Y(12) function. We performed a detailed phenotypic analysis of an index case and affected family members. An analysis of the variant R122C P2Y(12) stably expressed in cells was also performed. ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation was reduced as a result of a significant impairment of P2Y(12) activity in the patient and family members. Cell surface R122C P2Y(12) expression was reduced both in cell lines and in platelets; in cell lines, this was as a consequence of agonist-independent internalization followed by subsequent receptor trafficking to lysosomes. Strikingly, members of this family also showed reduced thrombin-induced platelet activation, owing to an intronic polymorphism in the F2R gene, which encodes protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1), that has been shown to be associated with reduced PAR-1 receptor activity. Our study is the first to demonstrate a patient with deficits in two stimulatory GPCR pathways that regulate platelet activity, further indicating that bleeding disorders constitute a complex trait. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  14. Clopidogrel (Plavix®), a P2Y(12) receptor antagonist, inhibits bone cell function in vitro and decreases trabecular bone in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Susanne; Brandao-Burch, Andrea; Patel, Jessal J

    2012-01-01

    Clopidogrel (Plavix®), a selective P2Y(12) receptor antagonist, is widely prescribed to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke and acts via the inhibition of platelet aggregation. Accumulating evidence now suggests that extracellular nucleotides, signalling through P2 receptors, play...... a significant role in bone, modulating both osteoblast and osteoclast function. In this study, we investigated the effects of clopidogrel treatment on (1) bone cell formation, differentiation and activity in vitro; and, (2) trabecular and cortical bone parameters in vivo. P2Y(12) receptor expression...

  15. P2Y12 Receptor Localizes in the Renal Collecting Duct and Its Blockade Augments Arginine Vasopressin Action and Alleviates Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

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    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Müller, Christa E; Carlson, Noel G; Baqi, Younis; Strasburg, David L; Heiney, Kristina M; Villanueva, Karie; Kohan, Donald E; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2015-12-01

    P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12-R) signaling is mediated through Gi, ultimately reducing cellular cAMP levels. Because cAMP is a central modulator of arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced water transport in the renal collecting duct (CD), we hypothesized that if expressed in the CD, P2Y12-R may play a role in renal handling of water in health and in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. We found P2Y12-R mRNA expression in rat kidney, and immunolocalized its protein and aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in CD principal cells. Administration of clopidogrel bisulfate, an irreversible inhibitor of P2Y12-R, significantly increased urine concentration and AQP2 protein in the kidneys of Sprague-Dawley rats. Notably, clopidogrel did not alter urine concentration in Brattleboro rats that lack AVP. Clopidogrel administration also significantly ameliorated lithium-induced polyuria, improved urine concentrating ability and AQP2 protein abundance, and reversed the lithium-induced increase in free-water excretion, without decreasing blood or kidney tissue lithium levels. Clopidogrel administration also augmented the lithium-induced increase in urinary AVP excretion and suppressed the lithium-induced increase in urinary nitrates/nitrites (nitric oxide production) and 8-isoprostane (oxidative stress). Furthermore, selective blockade of P2Y12-R by the reversible antagonist PSB-0739 in primary cultures of rat inner medullary CD cells potentiated the expression of AQP2 and AQP3 mRNA, and cAMP production induced by dDAVP (desmopressin). In conclusion, pharmacologic blockade of renal P2Y12-R increases urinary concentrating ability by augmenting the effect of AVP on the kidney and ameliorates lithium-induced NDI by potentiating the action of AVP on the CD. This strategy may offer a novel and effective therapy for lithium-induced NDI. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of [3H]PSB-0413, a selective antagonist radioligand for platelet P2Y12 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tayeb, Ali; Griessmeier, Kerstin J; Müller, Christa E

    2005-12-15

    The selective antagonist radioligand [(3)H]2-propylthioadenosine-5'-adenylic acid (1,1-dichloro-1-phosphonomethyl-1-phosphonyl) anhydride ([(3)H]PSB-0413) was prepared by catalytic hydrogenation of its propargyl precursor with a high specific radioactivity of 74Ci/mmol. In preliminary saturation binding studies, [(3)H]PSB-0413 showed high affinity for platelet P2Y(12) receptors with a K(D) value of 4.57nM. Human platelets had a high density of P2Y(12) receptors exhibiting a B(max) value of 7.66pmol/mg of protein.

  17. Satellite glial cell P2Y12 receptor in the trigeminal ganglion is involved in lingual neuropathic pain mechanisms in rats

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    Katagiri Ayano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R is involved in satellite glial cells (SGCs activation, indicating that P2Y12R expressed in SGCs may play functional roles in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms. However, the involvement of P2Y12R in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms is still unknown. We therefore studied the reflex to noxious mechanical or heat stimulation of the tongue, P2Y12R and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP immunohistochemistries in the trigeminal ganglion (TG in a rat model of unilateral lingual nerve crush (LNC to evaluate role of P2Y12R in SGC in lingual neuropathic pain. Results The head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the lateral tongue were significantly decreased in LNC-rats compared to sham-rats. These nocifensive effects were apparent on day 1 after LNC and lasted for 17 days. On days 3, 9, 15 and 21 after LNC, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-immunoreactive (IR cells significantly increased in the ophthalmic, maxillary and mandibular branch regions of TG. On day 3 after LNC, P2Y12R expression occurred in GFAP-IR cells but not neuronal nuclei (NeuN-IR cells (i.e. neurons in TG. After 3 days of successive administration of the P2Y12R antagonist MRS2395 into TG in LNC-rats, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-IR cells was significantly decreased coincident with a significant reversal of the lowered head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the tongue compared to vehicle-injected rats. Furthermore, after 3 days of successive administration of the P2YR agonist 2-MeSADP into the TG in naïve rats, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-IR cells was significantly increased and head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the tongue were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared to vehicle-injected rats

  18. Gene-by-environment effect of house dust mite on purinergic receptor P2Y12 (P2RY12) and lung function in children with asthma.

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    Bunyavanich, S; Boyce, J A; Raby, B A; Weiss, S T

    2012-02-01

    Distinct receptors likely exist for leukotriene (LT)E(4), a potent mediator of airway inflammation. Purinergic receptor P2Y12 is needed for LTE(4)-induced airways inflammation, and P2Y12 antagonism attenuates house dust mite-induced pulmonary eosinophilia in mice. Although experimental data support a role for P2Y12 in airway inflammation, its role in human asthma has never been studied. To test for association between variants in the P2Y12 gene (P2RY12) and lung function in human subjects with asthma, and to examine for gene-by-environment interaction with house dust mite exposure. Nineteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in P2RY12 were genotyped in 422 children with asthma and their parents (n = 1266). Using family based methods, we tested for associations between these SNPs and five lung function measures. We performed haplotype association analyses and tested for gene-by-environment interactions using house dust mite exposure. We used the false discovery rate to account for multiple comparisons. Five SNPs in P2RY12 were associated with multiple lung function measures (P-values 0.006–0.025). Haplotypes in P2RY12 were also associated with lung function (P-values 0.0055–0.046). House dust mite exposure modulated associations between P2RY12 and lung function, with minor allele homozygotes exposed to house dust mite demonstrating worse lung function than those unexposed (significant interaction P-values 0.0028–0.040). The P2RY12 variants were associated with lung function in a large family-based asthma cohort. House dust mite exposure caused significant gene-by-environment effects. Our findings add the first human evidence to experimental data supporting a role for P2Y12 in lung function. P2Y12 could represent a novel target for asthma treatment.

  19. P2Y12 receptor-mediated activation of spinal microglia and p38MAPK pathway contribute to cancer-induced bone pain

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    Liu MJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mingjuan Liu,1 Ming Yao,1,2 Hanqi Wang,1 Longsheng Xu,1 Ying Zheng,1 Bing Huang,1 Huadong Ni,1 Shijie Xu,1 Xuyan Zhou,1 Qingquan Lian2 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The First Hospital of Jiaxing, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jiaxing University, Jiaxing, 2Department of Anesthesiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP is one of the most challenging clinical problems due to a lack of understanding the mechanisms. Recent evidence has demonstrated that activation of microglial G-protein-coupled P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R and proinflammatory cytokine production play an important role in neuropathic pain generation and maintenance. However, whether P2Y12R is involved in CIBP remains unknown.Methods: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of P2Y12R in CIBP and its molecular mechanisms. Using the bone cancer model inoculated with Walker 256 tumor cells into the left tibia of Sprague Dawley rat, we blocked spinal P2Y12R through intrathecal administration of its selective antagonist MRS2395 (400 pmol/µL, 15 µL.Results: We found that not only the ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1-positive microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord but also mechanical allodynia was significantly inhibited. Furthermore, it decreased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK and the production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β and interleukin-6 (IL-6, whereas it increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α.Conclusion: Taken together, our present results suggest that microglial P2Y12R in the spinal cord may contribute to CIBP by the activation of spinal microglia and p38MAPK pathway, thus identifying a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of CIBP. Keywords: P2Y12 receptor, cancer-induced bone pain, p38MAPK pathway, cytokines

  20. THE ROLE OF CLOPIDOGREL IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME AFTER THE EMERGENCE OF MORE POWERFUL INHIBITORS OF P2Y12 RECEPTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Gilyarevsky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel after the introduction into clinical practice of new, more powerful and stable operating drugs belonging to this class of antiplatelet agents is discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the currently used antiplatelet drugs that block the receptor P2Y12 are reviewed. On the basis of the analysis concludes that, despite the emergence of new antiplatelet agents clopidogrel, appears to be widely used for a long time in the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome and / or after coronary stenting. This is primarily due to the presence of large evidence base, and confirmation of safety of long-term therapy clopidogrel.

  1. P2Y12 Receptor Antagonist, Clopidogrel, Does Not Contribute to Risk of Osteoporotic Fractures in Stroke Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas R; Schwarz, Peter; Iversen, Helle K

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity. It is associated with excessive bone loss and risk of fracture in stroke patients is high. The P2Y12R antagonist and platelet inhibitor, clopidogrel, is widely used for secondary prevention after a stroke. However, recent studies...... have shown that clopidogrel has negative effects on bone and that long-term clopidogrel use is associated with increased fracture risk. The purpose of the current study was therefore to investigate the association of clopidogrel treatment with risk of fractures in stroke and TIA patients.......Methods:The study was a cohort study including all subjects who were prescribed clopidogrel between 1996 and 2008 in Denmark (n= 77,503). Age- and gender matched controls (n= 232,510) were randomly selected from the background population. The study end-points were occurrence of stroke or TIA and occurrence...

  2. The P2Y12 Receptor Antagonist Ticagrelor Reduces Lysosomal pH and Autofluorescence in Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells From the ABCA4-/- Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

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    Wennan Lu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of partially degraded lipid waste in lysosomal-related organelles may contribute to pathology in many aging diseases. The presence of these lipofuscin granules is particularly evident in the autofluorescent lysosome-associated organelles of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE cells, and may be related to early stages of age-related macular degeneration. While lysosomal enzymes degrade material optimally at acidic pH levels, lysosomal pH is elevated in RPE cells from the ABCA4-/- mouse model of Stargardt’s disease, an early onset retinal degeneration. Lowering lysosomal pH through cAMP-dependent pathways decreases accumulation of autofluorescent material in RPE cells in vitro, but identification of an appropriate receptor is crucial for manipulating this pathway in vivo. As the P2Y12 receptor for ADP is coupled to the inhibitory Gi protein, we asked whether blocking the P2Y12 receptor with ticagrelor could restore lysosomal acidity and reduce autofluorescence in compromised RPE cells from ABCA4-/- mice. Oral delivery of ticagrelor giving rise to clinically relevant exposure lowered lysosomal pH in these RPE cells. Ticagrelor also partially reduced autofluorescence in the RPE cells of ABCA4-/- mice. In vitro studies in ARPE-19 cells using more specific antagonists AR-C69931 and AR-C66096 confirmed the importance of the P2Y12 receptor for lowering lysosomal pH and reducing autofluorescence. These observations identify P2Y12 receptor blockade as a potential target to lower lysosomal pH and clear lysosomal waste in RPE cells.

  3. A new reversible and potent P2Y12 receptor antagonist (ACT-246475): tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics in a first-in-man trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldoni, Daniela; Bruderer, Shirin; Krause, Andreas; Gutierrez, Marcello; Gueret, Pierre; Astruc, Béatrice; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2014-11-01

    ACT-246475 is a new reversible, selective, and potent antagonist of the platelet P2Y12 receptor. This study was a first-in-man trial investigating the tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of single oral doses of ACT-246475 and its di-ester prodrug (ACT-281959) in healthy males. The study had a double-blind, randomized, ascending single-dose design with an oral formulation F1 (i.e., ACT-281959 or placebo) (Part I) and an open-label, randomized, 3-period, crossover design comparing exploratory formulations of ACT-281959 (F2) 70 mg and ACT-246475 (dF) 50 mg to F1 70 mg (Part II). In Part I, doses up to 1,000 mg were tested in 40 healthy subjects. Nine healthy subjects were enrolled in Part II. Standard safety parameters, inhibition of platelet aggregation, and ACT-246475 plasma concentrations were measured. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. All doses and formulations were well tolerated. The most frequent adverse event was headache, whereas no events of bleeding or dyspnea were reported. In Part I, ACT-246475 area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) increased dose-proportionally whereas maximum plasma concentration (C max) was less than dose-proportional. The highest C max [geometric mean (95 % CI)] at 1,000 mg was 13.8 (9.7, 19.5) pmol/mL at 4.5 h post-dose, terminal half-life (t ½) was ~10 h. ACT-246475 C max and AUC0-∞ ratios of geometric means (90 % CI) using F1 as reference, for F2 were 8.5 (5.42, 13.35) and 3.4 (2.40, 4.82), respectively, and for dF 2.2 (1.42, 3.49) and 1.5 (1.07, 2.16), respectively. Mean peak platelet inhibition was 31.0 % after F1 (1,000 mg) and 47.8 % after F2. Oral doses of ACT-281959 and ACT-246475 were well tolerated. Platelet inhibition correlated with ACT-246475 exposure. Exploratory formulations enhanced the bioavailability and antiplatelet effect of ACT-246475.

  4. Nucleotide transmitters ATP and ADP mediate intercellular calcium wave communication via P2Y12/13 receptors among BV-2 microglia.

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    Pengchong Jiang

    Full Text Available Nerve injury is accompanied by a liberation of diverse nucleotides, some of which act as 'find/eat-me' signals in mediating neuron-glial interplay. Intercellular Ca2+ wave (ICW communication is the main approach by which glial cells interact and coordinate with each other to execute immune defense. However, the detailed mechanisms on how these nucleotides participate in ICW communication remain largely unclear. In the present work, we employed a mechanical stimulus to an individual BV-2 microglia to simulate localized injury. Remarkable ICW propagation was observed no matter whether calcium was in the environment or not. Apyrase (ATP/ADP-hydrolyzing enzyme, suramin (broad-spectrum P2 receptor antagonist, 2-APB (IP3 receptor blocker and thapsigargin (endoplasmic reticulum calcium pump inhibitor potently inhibited these ICWs, respectively, indicating the dependence of nucleotide signals and P2Y receptors. Then, we detected the involvement of five naturally occurring nucleotides (ATP, ADP, UTP, UDP and UDP-glucose by desensitizing receptors. Results showed that desensitization with ATP and ADP could block ICW propagation in a dose-dependent manner, whereas other nucleotides had little effect. Meanwhile, the expression of P2Y receptors in BV-2 microglia was identified and their contributions were analyzed, from which we suggested P2Y12/13 receptors activation mostly contributed to ICWs. Besides, we estimated that extracellular ATP and ADP concentration sensed by BV-2 microglia was about 0.3 μM during ICWs by analyzing calcium dynamic characteristics. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the nucleotides ATP and ADP were predominant signal transmitters in mechanical stimulation-induced ICW communication through acting on P2Y12/13 receptors in BV-2 microglia.

  5. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 receptor antagonist, potentiates the inflammatory response in a rat model of peptidoglycan polysaccharide-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Analia E; Mada, Sripal R; Rico, Mario C; Dela Cadena, Raul A; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2011-01-01

    The P2Y12 receptor plays a crucial role in the regulation of platelet activation by several agonists, which is irreversibly antagonized by the active metabolite of clopidogrel, a widely used anti-thrombotic drug. In this study, we investigated whether reduction of platelet reactivity leads to reduced inflammatory responses using a rat model of erosive arthritis. We evaluated the effect of clopidogrel on inflammation in Lewis rats in a peptidoglycan polysaccharide (PG-PS)-induced arthritis model with four groups of rats: 1) untreated, 2) clopidogrel-treated, 3) PG-PS-induced, and 4) PG-PS-induced and clopidogrel-treated. There were significant differences between the PG-PS+clopidogrel group when compared to the PG-PS group including: increased joint diameter and clinical manifestations of inflammation, elevated plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta, interferon (IFN) gamma, and IL-6), an elevated neutrophil blood count and an increased circulating platelet count. Plasma levels of IL-10 were significantly lower in the PG-PS+clopidogrel group compared to the PG-PS group. Plasma levels of platelet factor 4 (PF4) were elevated in both the PG-PS and the PG-PS+clopidogrel groups, however PF4 levels showed no difference upon clopidogrel treatment, suggesting that the pro- inflammatory effect of clopidogrel may be due to its action on cells other than platelets. Histology indicated an increase in leukocyte infiltration at the inflammatory area of the joint, increased pannus formation, blood vessel proliferation, subsynovial fibrosis and cartilage erosion upon treatment with clopidogrel in PG-PS-induced arthritis animals. In summary, animals treated with clopidogrel showed a pro-inflammatory effect in the PG-PS-induced arthritis animal model, which might not be mediated by platelets. Elucidation of the mechanism of clopidogrel-induced cell responses is important to understand the role of the P2Y12 receptor in inflammation.

  6. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 receptor antagonist, potentiates the inflammatory response in a rat model of peptidoglycan polysaccharide-induced arthritis.

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    Analia E Garcia

    Full Text Available The P2Y12 receptor plays a crucial role in the regulation of platelet activation by several agonists, which is irreversibly antagonized by the active metabolite of clopidogrel, a widely used anti-thrombotic drug. In this study, we investigated whether reduction of platelet reactivity leads to reduced inflammatory responses using a rat model of erosive arthritis. We evaluated the effect of clopidogrel on inflammation in Lewis rats in a peptidoglycan polysaccharide (PG-PS-induced arthritis model with four groups of rats: 1 untreated, 2 clopidogrel-treated, 3 PG-PS-induced, and 4 PG-PS-induced and clopidogrel-treated. There were significant differences between the PG-PS+clopidogrel group when compared to the PG-PS group including: increased joint diameter and clinical manifestations of inflammation, elevated plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta, interferon (IFN gamma, and IL-6, an elevated neutrophil blood count and an increased circulating platelet count. Plasma levels of IL-10 were significantly lower in the PG-PS+clopidogrel group compared to the PG-PS group. Plasma levels of platelet factor 4 (PF4 were elevated in both the PG-PS and the PG-PS+clopidogrel groups, however PF4 levels showed no difference upon clopidogrel treatment, suggesting that the pro- inflammatory effect of clopidogrel may be due to its action on cells other than platelets. Histology indicated an increase in leukocyte infiltration at the inflammatory area of the joint, increased pannus formation, blood vessel proliferation, subsynovial fibrosis and cartilage erosion upon treatment with clopidogrel in PG-PS-induced arthritis animals. In summary, animals treated with clopidogrel showed a pro-inflammatory effect in the PG-PS-induced arthritis animal model, which might not be mediated by platelets. Elucidation of the mechanism of clopidogrel-induced cell responses is important to understand the role of the P2Y12 receptor in inflammation.

  7. Receptores plaquetários P2Y12: importância na intervenção coronariana percutânea

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    Felipe Jose de Andrade Falcão

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As plaquetas estão envolvidas em vários processos biológicos, desde o combate a agentes infecciosos até a coordenação do controle da permeabilidade vascular e angiogênese. Entretanto, o seu principal foco de ação consiste na modulação da cascata de coagulação. A intervenção coronariana percutânea é um procedimento com alto risco trombogênico, que induz a ativação plaquetária e de monócitos, devido à lesão direta do endotélio e pelo contato de estruturas trombogênicas com o sangue, levando ao aumento da atividade inflamatória, tanto no local do dano vascular coronariano como de forma sistêmica. Os receptores plaquetários P2Y12 desempenham papel central na amplificação da agregação induzida por todos os agonistas plaquetários, como a adenosina difosfato, o colágeno, tromboxano A2, adrenalina e serotonina. Por esse motivo, têm sido o principal alvo das drogas antiplaquetárias. Apesar de atuarem no mesmo receptor, características farmacocinéticas e farmacodinâmicas distintas conferem peculiaridades a cada agente.

  8. Early versus delayed invasive strategy for intermediate- and high-risk acute coronary syndromes managed without P2Y12 receptor inhibitor pretreatment: Design and rationale of the EARLY randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemesle, Gilles; Laine, Marc; Pankert, Mathieu; Puymirat, Etienne; Cuisset, Thomas; Boueri, Ziad; Maillard, Luc; Armero, Sébastien; Cayla, Guillaume; Bali, Laurent; Motreff, Pascal; Peyre, Jean-Pascal; Paganelli, Franck; Kerbaul, François; Roch, Antoine; Michelet, Pierre; Baumstarck, Karine; Bonello, Laurent

    2018-01-01

    According to recent literature, pretreatment with a P2Y 12 ADP receptor antagonist before coronary angiography appears no longer suitable in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) due to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. Optimal delay of the invasive strategy in this specific context is unknown. We hypothesize that without P2Y 12 ADP receptor antagonist pretreatment, a very early invasive strategy may be beneficial. The EARLY trial (Early or Delayed Revascularization for Intermediate- and High-Risk Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes?) is a prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label, 2-parallel-group study that plans to enroll 740 patients. Patients are eligible if the diagnosis of intermediate- or high-risk NSTE-ACS is made and an invasive strategy intended. Patients are randomized in a 1:1 ratio. In the control group, a delayed strategy is adopted, with the coronary angiography taking place between 12 and 72 hours after randomization. In the experimental group, a very early invasive strategy is performed within 2 hours. A loading dose of a P2Y 12 ADP receptor antagonist is given at the time of intervention in both groups. Recruitment began in September 2016 (n = 558 patients as of October 2017). The primary endpoint is the composite of cardiovascular death and recurrent ischemic events at 1 month. The EARLY trial aims to demonstrate the superiority of a very early invasive strategy compared with a delayed strategy in intermediate- and high-risk NSTE-ACS patients managed without P2Y 12 ADP receptor antagonist pretreatment. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Phenotypic approaches to gene mapping in platelet function disorders - identification of new variant of P2Y12, TxA2 and GPVI receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S; Daly, M; Dawood, B; Gissen, P; Makris, M; Mundell, S; Wilde, J; Mumford, A

    2010-01-01

    Platelet number or function disorders cause a range of bleeding symptoms from mild to severe. Patients with platelet dysfunction but normal platelet number are the most prevalent and typically have mild bleeding symptoms. The study of this group of patients is particularly difficult because of the lack of a gold-standard test of platelet function and the variable penetrance of the bleeding phenotype among affected individuals. The purpose of this short review is to discuss the way in which this group of patients can be investigated through platelet phenotyping in combination with targeted gene sequencing. This approach has been used recently to identify patients with mutations in key platelet activation receptors, namely those for ADP, collagen and thromboxane A2 (TxA2). One interesting finding from this work is that for some patients, mild bleeding is associated with heterozygous mutations in platelet proteins that are co-inherited with other genetic disorders of haemostasis such as type 1 von Willebrand's disease. Thus, the phenotype of mild bleeding may be multifactorial in some patients and may be considered to be a complex trait.

  10. Differential endosomal sorting of a novel P2Y12 purinoreceptor mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Margaret R; Nisar, Shaista P; Cooke, Alexandra E; Emery, Elizabeth D; Mundell, Stuart J

    2013-05-01

    P2Y12 receptor internalization and recycling play an essential role in ADP-induced platelet activation. Recently, we identified a patient with a mild bleeding disorder carrying a heterozygous mutation of P2Y12 (P341A) whose P2Y12 receptor recycling was significantly compromised. Using human cell line models, we identified key proteins regulating wild-type (WT) P2Y12 recycling and investigated P2Y12 -P341A receptor traffic. Treatment with ADP resulted in delayed Rab5-dependent internalization of P341A when compared with WT P2Y12 . While WT P2Y12 rapidly recycled back to the membrane via Rab4 and Rab11 recycling pathways, limited P341A recycling was observed, which relied upon Rab11 activity. Although minimal receptor degradation was evident, P341A was localized in Rab7-positive endosomes with considerable agonist-dependent accumulation in the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Rab7 activity is known to facilitate recruitment of retromer complex proteins to endosomes to transport cargo to the TGN. Here, we identified that P341A colocalized with Vps26; depletion of which blocked limited recycling and promoted receptor degradation. This study has identified key points of divergence in the endocytic traffic of P341A versus WT-P2Y12 . Given that these pathways are retained in human platelets, this research helps define the molecular mechanisms regulating P2Y12 receptor traffic and explain the compromised receptor function in the platelets of the P2Y12 -P341A-expressing patient. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. LPS-induced systemic inflammation is more severe in P2Y12 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverani, Elisabetta; Rico, Mario C; Yaratha, Laxmikausthubha; Tsygankov, Alexander Y; Kilpatrick, Laurie E; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2014-02-01

    Thienopyridines are a class of antiplatelet drugs that are metabolized in the liver to several metabolites, of which only one active metabolite can irreversibly antagonize the platelet P2Y12 receptor. Possible effects of these drugs and the role of activated platelets in inflammatory responses have also been investigated in a variety of animal models, demonstrating that thienopyridines could alter inflammation. However, it is not clear whether it is caused only by the P2Y12 antagonism or whether off-target effects of other metabolites also intervene. To address this question, we investigated P2Y12 KO mice during a LPS-induced model of systemic inflammation, and we treated these KO mice with a thienopyridine drug (clopidogrel). Contrary to the reported effects of clopidogrel, numbers of circulating WBCs and plasma levels of cytokines were increased in LPS-exposed KO mice compared with WT in this inflammation model. Moreover, both spleen and bone marrow show an increase in cell content, suggesting a role for P2Y12 in regulation of bone marrow and spleen cellular composition. Finally, the injury was more severe in the lungs of KO mice compared with WT. Interestingly, clopidogrel treatments also exerted protective effects in KO mice, suggesting off-target effects for this drug. In conclusion, the P2Y12 receptor plays an important role during LPS-induced inflammation, and this signaling pathway may be involved in regulating cell content in spleen and bone marrow during LPS systemic inflammation. Furthermore, clopidogrel may have effects that are independent of P2Y12 receptor blockade.

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Flavonolignans on the P2Y12 Pathway in Blood Platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijak, Michal; Szelenberger, Rafal; Dziedzic, Angela; Saluk-Bijak, Joanna

    2018-02-10

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is the major platelet agonist, which is important in the shape changes, stability, and growth of the thrombus. Platelet activation by ADP is associated with the G protein-coupled receptors P2Y1 and P2Y12. The pharmacologic blockade of the P2Y12 receptor significantly reduces the risk of peripheral artery disease, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and vascular death. Recent studies demonstrated the inhibition of ADP-induced blood platelet activation by three major compounds of the flavonolignans group: silybin, silychristin, and silydianin. For this reason, the aim of the current work was to verify the effects of silybin, silychristin, and silydianin on ADP-induced physiological platelets responses, as well as mechanisms of P2Y12-dependent intracellular signal transduction. We evaluated the effect of tested flavonolignans on ADP-induced blood platelets' aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) (using light transmission aggregometry), adhesion to fibrinogen (using the static method), and the secretion of PF-4 (using the ELISA method). Additionally, using the double labeled flow cytometry method, we estimated platelet vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation. We demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction of blood platelets' ability to perform ADP-induced aggregation, adhere to fibrinogen, and secrete PF-4 in samples treated with flavonolignans. Additionally, we observed that all of the tested flavonolignans were able to increase VASP phosphorylation in blood platelets samples, which is correlated with P2Y12 receptor inhibition. All of these analyses show that silychristin and silybin have the strongest inhibitory effect on blood platelet activation by ADP, while silydianin also inhibits the ADP pathway, but to a lesser extent. The results obtained in this study clearly demonstrate that silybin, silychristin, and silydianin have inhibitory properties against the P2Y12 receptor and block ADP-induced blood platelet

  13. An intact PDZ motif is essential for correct P2Y12 purinoceptor traffic in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Shaista; Daly, Martina E; Federici, Augusto B; Artoni, Andrea; Mumford, Andrew D; Watson, Stephen P; Mundell, Stuart J

    2011-11-17

    The platelet P2Y(12) purinoceptor (P2Y(12)R), which plays a crucial role in hemostasis, undergoes internalization and subsequent recycling to maintain receptor responsiveness, processes that are essential for normal platelet function. Here, we observe that P2Y(12)R function is compromised after deletion or mutation of the 4 amino acids at the extreme C-terminus of this receptor (ETPM), a putative postsynaptic density 95/disc large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ)-binding motif. In cell line models, removal of this sequence or mutation of one of its core residues (P341A), attenuates receptor internalization and receptor recycling back to the membrane, thereby blocking receptor resensitization. The physiologic significance of these findings in the regulation of platelet function is shown by identification of a patient with a heterozygous mutation in the PDZ binding sequence of their P2Y(12)R (P341A) that is associated with reduced expression of the P2Y(12)R on the cell surface. Importantly, platelets from this subject showed significantly compromised P2Y(12)R recycling, emphasizing the importance of the extreme C-terminus of this receptor to ensure correct receptor traffic.

  14. Synergistic action between inhibition of P2Y12/P2Y1 and P2Y12/thrombin in ADP- and thrombin-induced human platelet activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylander, Sven; Mattsson, Christer; Ramström, Sofia; Lindahl, Tomas L

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if there is a synergistic effect of a combination of P2Y12 and P2Y1 inhibition and P2Y12 and thrombin inhibition, on ADP- and thrombin-induced platelet activation, respectively. The rationale being that these combinations will cause a concurrent inhibition of both Gαq and Gαi signalling.Blood from healthy volunteers was preincubated with AR-C69931MX, a reversible P2Y12 antagonist; MRS2179, a reversible P2Y1 antagonist; or melagatran, a direct reversible thrombin inhibitor; alone or in various combinations prior to activation with ADP or thrombin. Platelet function in whole blood was assessed by flow cytometry using the antibody PAC-1 to estimate the expression of active αIIbβ3 (the fibrinogen receptor GPIIb/IIIa). A synergistic effect was evaluated by comparing the concentrations in the different combinations with those of corresponding equipotent concentrations of each single inhibitor alone. The equipotent single concentrations were experimentally obtained from concentration response curves performed in parallel.A synergistic effect regarding inhibition of ADP-induced platelet activation (10 μM) was obtained with different combinations of AR-C69931MX and MRS2179.Inhibition of thrombin-induced platelet activation (2 nM) with combinations of AR-C69931MX and the thrombin inhibitor melagatran did also result in a strong synergistic effect.To our knowledge, this is the first time that data supporting a synergistic effect has been published for the inhibitor combinations described.Whether this synergistic effect in vitro also results in an improved antithrombotic effect in vivo with or without an increased risk of bleeding remains to be studied in well-conducted clinical studies. PMID:15265806

  15. P2Y12R-Dependent Translocation Mechanisms Gate the Changing Microglial Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ukpong B. Eyo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Microglia are an exquisitely tiled and self-contained population in the CNS that do not receive contributions from circulating monocytes in the periphery. While microglia are long-lived cells, the extent to which their cell bodies are fixed and the molecular mechanisms by which the microglial landscape is regulated have not been determined. Using chronic in vivo two-photon imaging to follow the microglial population in young adult mice, we document a daily rearrangement of the microglial landscape. Furthermore, we show that the microglial landscape can be modulated by severe seizures, acute injury, and sensory deprivation. Finally, we demonstrate a critical role for microglial P2Y12Rs in regulating the microglial landscape through cellular translocation independent of proliferation. These findings suggest that microglial patrol the CNS through both process motility and soma translocation. : Using a chronic in vivo imaging approach, Eyo et al. show that the physical positions of brain microglia change daily and that these changes increase following certain experimental manipulations. The mechanism underlying these changes involves cell translocation controlled by microglial-specific P2Y12 receptors. Keywords: microglia, P2Y12, seizures, epilepsy, whisker trimming, microglial landscape, two photon chronic imaging

  16. Prehospital administration of P2Y12 inhibitors and early coronary reperfusion in primary PCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Ratcovich, Hanna; Biasco, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The newer oral P2Y12 inhibitors prasugrel and ticagrelor have been reported to be more potent and faster-acting antiplatelet agents than clopidogrel. This study aimed to investigate whether prehospital loading with prasugrel or ticagrelor improves early coronary reperfusion as compared to prehosp......The newer oral P2Y12 inhibitors prasugrel and ticagrelor have been reported to be more potent and faster-acting antiplatelet agents than clopidogrel. This study aimed to investigate whether prehospital loading with prasugrel or ticagrelor improves early coronary reperfusion as compared...... to prehospital loading with clopidogrel in a real-world ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) setting. Over a 70-month period, 3497 patients with on-going STEMI of less than 6 hours and without cardiac arrest or cardiogenic shock underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) at our centre....... The primary endpoint of this study was the proportion of patients who did not meet the criteria for TIMI (Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction) flow grade 3 in the infarct-related artery at initial angiography before PPCI. Prehospital loading with prasugrel (n = 883) or ticagrelor (n = 491) did...

  17. Inhibition of platelet aggregation by AZD6140, a reversible oral P2Y12 receptor antagonist, compared with clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storey, Robert F; Husted, Steen; Harrington, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a substudy of DISPERSE (Dose confIrmation Study assessing anti-Platelet Effects of AZD6140 vs. clopidogRel in non-ST-segment Elevation myocardial infarction)-2, we compared the antiplatelet effects of AZD6140 and clopidogrel and assessed the effects of AZD6140 in clopidogrel...

  18. Identification and characterization of a novel P2Y 12 variant in a patient diagnosed with type 1 von Willebrand disease in the European MCMDM-1VWD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Martina E; Dawood, Ban B; Lester, William A; Peake, Ian R; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Goodeve, Anne C; Makris, Michael; Wilde, Jonathan T; Mumford, Andrew D; Watson, Stephen P; Mundell, Stuart J

    2009-04-23

    We investigated whether defects in the P2Y(12) ADP receptor gene (P2RY12) contribute to the bleeding tendency in 92 index cases enrolled in the European MCMDM-1VWD study. A heterozygous mutation, predicting a lysine to glutamate (K174E) substitution in P2Y(12), was identified in one case with mild type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD) and a VWF defect. Platelets from the index case and relatives carrying the K174E defect changed shape in response to ADP, but showed reduced and reversible aggregation in response to 10 muM ADP, unlike the maximal, sustained aggregation observed in controls. The reduced response was associated with an approximate 50% reduction in binding of [(3)H]2MeS-ADP to P2Y(12), whereas binding to the P2Y(1) receptor was normal. A hemagglutinin-tagged K174E P2Y(12) variant showed surface expression in CHO cells, markedly reduced binding to [(3)H]2MeS-ADP, and minimal ADP-mediated inhibition of forskolin-induced adenylyl cyclase activity. Our results provide further evidence for locus heterogeneity in type 1 VWD.

  19. Selective and rapid monitoring of dual platelet inhibition by aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists by using multiple electrode aggregometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenz Reinhard

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor platelet inhibition by aspirin or clopidogrel has been associated with adverse outcomes in patients with cardiovascular diseases. A reliable and facile assay to measure platelet inhibition after treatment with aspirin and a P2Y12 antagonist is lacking. Multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA, which is being increasingly used in clinical studies, is sensitive to platelet inhibition by aspirin and clopidogrel, but a critical evaluation of MEA monitoring of dual anti-platelet therapy with aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists is missing. Design and Methods By performing in vitro and ex vivo experiments, we evaluated in healthy subjects the feasibility of using MEA to monitor platelet inhibition of P2Y12 antagonists (clopidogrel in vivo, cangrelor in vitro and aspirin (100 mg per day in vivo, and 1 mM or 5.4 mM in vitro alone, and in combination. Statistical analyses were performed by the Mann-Whitney rank sum test, student' t-test, analysis of variance followed by the Holm-Sidak test, where appropriate. Results ADP-induced platelet aggregation in hirudin-anticoagulated blood was inhibited by 99.3 ± 1.4% by in vitro addition of cangrelor (100 nM; p 95% and 100 ± 3.2%, respectively (p in vitro or ex vivo. Oral intake of clopidogrel did not significantly reduce AA-induced aggregation, but P2Y12 blockade by cangrelor (100 nM in vitro diminished AA-stimulated aggregation by 53 ± 26% (p Conclusions Selective platelet inhibition by aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists alone and in combination can be rapidly measured by MEA. We suggest that dual anti-platelet therapy with these two types of anti-platelet drugs can be optimized individually by measuring platelet responsiveness to ADP and AA with MEA before and after drug intake.

  20. Incidence and Clinical Features of Early Stent Thrombosis in the Era of New P2y12 Inhibitors (PLATIS-2.

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    Elad Asher

    Full Text Available Early stent thrombosis (EST (≤ 30 days after stent implantation is a relatively rare but deleterious complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. Administration of newer P2Y12 inhibitors (prasugrel and ticagrelor combined with aspirin has been shown to reduce the incidence of sub-acute and late stent thrombosis, compared with clopidogrel. We investigated the "real life" incidence of EST in patients from a large acute coronary syndrome (ACS national registry, where newer P2Y12 inhibitors are widely used. Patients were derived from the ACS Israeli Survey (ACSIS, conducted during 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2013. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE at 30days were defined as all-cause death, recurrent ACS, EST and stroke.Of the 4717 ACS patients who underwent PCI and stenting, 83% received clopidogrel and 17% newer P2Y12 inhibitors. The rate of EST was similar in both groups (1.7% in the newer P2Y12 inhibitor group vs. 1.4% in the clopidogrel-treated patients, p = 0.42. Results were consistent after multivariate analysis (adjusted HR = 1.06 [p = 0.89]. MACE occurred in 6.4% in the newer P2Y12 inhibitor group compared with 9.2% in the clopidogrel group (P<0.01. However, multivariate logistic regression modeling showed that treatment with newer P2Y12 inhibitors was not significantly associated with the secondary endpoint of MACE when compared with clopidogrel therapy [OR = 1.26 95%CI (0.93-1.73, P = 0.136]. The incidence of "real life" EST at 1month is relatively low, and appears to be similar in patients who receive newer P2Y12 inhibitors as well as in those who receive clopidogrel.

  1. Incidence and Clinical Features of Early Stent Thrombosis in the Era of New P2y12 Inhibitors (PLATIS-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Elad; Abu-Much, Arsalan; Goldenberg, Ilan; Segev, Amit; Sabbag, Avi; Mazin, Israel; Shlezinger, Meital; Atar, Shaul; Zahger, Doron; Polak, Arthur; Beigel, Roy; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2016-01-01

    Early stent thrombosis (EST) (≤ 30 days after stent implantation) is a relatively rare but deleterious complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Administration of newer P2Y12 inhibitors (prasugrel and ticagrelor) combined with aspirin has been shown to reduce the incidence of sub-acute and late stent thrombosis, compared with clopidogrel. We investigated the “real life” incidence of EST in patients from a large acute coronary syndrome (ACS) national registry, where newer P2Y12 inhibitors are widely used. Patients were derived from the ACS Israeli Survey (ACSIS), conducted during 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2013. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at 30days were defined as all-cause death, recurrent ACS, EST and stroke.Of the 4717 ACS patients who underwent PCI and stenting, 83% received clopidogrel and 17% newer P2Y12 inhibitors. The rate of EST was similar in both groups (1.7% in the newer P2Y12 inhibitor group vs. 1.4% in the clopidogrel-treated patients, p = 0.42). Results were consistent after multivariate analysis (adjusted HR = 1.06 [p = 0.89]). MACE occurred in 6.4% in the newer P2Y12 inhibitor group compared with 9.2% in the clopidogrel group (P<0.01). However, multivariate logistic regression modeling showed that treatment with newer P2Y12 inhibitors was not significantly associated with the secondary endpoint of MACE when compared with clopidogrel therapy [OR = 1.26 95%CI (0.93–1.73), P = 0.136]. The incidence of "real life" EST at 1month is relatively low, and appears to be similar in patients who receive newer P2Y12 inhibitors as well as in those who receive clopidogrel. PMID:27310147

  2. Advocating cardiovascular precision medicine with P2Y12 receptor inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Max-Paul; Grove, Erik L; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2017-01-01

    and biological data (pharmacodynamic, genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and metabolic information) to target therapy in order to maximize efficacy while minimizing bleeding and costs. This review discusses the role of diagnostic tools such as platelet function and pharmacogenomic testing to personalize...

  3. Potent P2Y(12) Inhibitors in Men Versus Women A Collaborative Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Emily S.; Braunwald, Eugene; Murphy, Sabina A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Sex-specific differences in response to antiplatelet therapies have been described. Whether women and men derive comparable benefit from intensification of antiplatelet therapy remains uncertain. Objectives The study investigated the efficacy and safety of the potent P2Y12 inhibitors i...

  4. The reversible P2Y12 antagonist ACT-246475 causes significantly less blood loss than ticagrelor at equivalent antithrombotic efficacy in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Markus; Kramberg, Markus; Hess, Patrick; Morrison, Keith; Ernst, Roland; Haag, Franck; Weber, Edgar; Clozel, Martine; Baumann, Martine; Caroff, Eva; Hubler, Francis; Riederer, Markus A; Steiner, Beat

    2017-10-01

    The P2Y 12 receptor is a validated target for prevention of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome. The aim of this study was to compare two direct-acting, reversible P2Y 12 antagonists, ACT-246475 and ticagrelor, in a rat thrombosis model by simultaneous quantification of their antithrombotic efficacy and surgery-induced blood loss. Blood flow velocity was assessed in the carotid artery after FeCl 3 -induced thrombus formation using a Doppler flow probe. At the same time, blood loss after surgical wounding of the spleen was quantified. Continuous infusions of ACT-246475 and ticagrelor prevented the injury-induced reduction of blood flow in a dose-dependent manner. High doses of both antagonists normalized blood flow and completely abolished thrombus formation as confirmed by histology. Intermediate doses restored baseline blood flow to ≥65%. However, ACT-246475 caused significantly less increase of blood loss than ticagrelor; the difference in blood loss was 2.6-fold (P ACT-246475 and ticagrelor on vascular tone. At concentrations needed to achieve maximal antithrombotic efficacy, ticagrelor compared with ACT-246475 significantly increased carotid blood flow velocity in vivo (P = 0.003), induced vasorelaxation of precontracted rat femoral arteries, and inhibited contraction of femoral artery induced by electrical field stimulation or by phenylephrine. Overall, ACT-246475 showed a significantly wider therapeutic window than ticagrelor. The absence of vasodilatory effects due to high selectivity of ACT-246475 for P2Y 12 provides potential arguments for the observed safety advantage of ACT-246475 over ticagrelor. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Poor adherence to P2Y12 antagonists increased cardiovascular risks in Chinese PCI-treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Li, Chenze; Zhang, Lina; Hu, Dong; Zhang, Xudong; Yu, Ting; Tao, Min; Wang, Dao Wen; Shen, Xiaoqing

    2017-03-01

    Low adherence to secondary prevention medications (ATM) of patients after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is associated with poor clinical outcomes. However, literature provides limited data on assessment of ATM and risks associated with poor in Chinese patients with ACS. In the current work, ATM was assessed in consecutively recruited patients with ACS in Tongji Hospital from November 5, 2013 to December 31, 2014. A total of 2126 patients were classified under low adherence (proportion of days covered (PDC) C50%) groups based on their performance after discharge. All patients were followed up at the 1st, 6th, and 12th month of discharge while recording ATM and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Bivariate logistic regression was used to identify the factors associated with ATM. Cox regression was used to analyze the association between ATM and MACE within one year after discharge. Results showed that coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) alone had significantly lower proportion of high adherence to P2Y12 antagonists (83.0% vs. 90.7%, P < 0.01) than patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) only. Moreover, in patients undergoing PCI, high adherence to P2Y12 antagonists decreased the risk of MACE (hazard ratio = 0.172, 95% confidence interval: 0.039-0.763; P = 0.021). In conclusion, PCI-treated patients are more prone to remaining adherent to medications than CABG-treated patients. High adherence to P2Y12 antagonists was associated with lower risk of MACE.

  6. Association between silent embolic cerebral infarction and continuous increase of P2Y12 reaction units after neurovascular stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kwon, Joo Y; Jung, Jin-Man; Lee, Deok Hee; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kim, Jong S; Kwon, Sun U

    2014-10-01

    Endovascular procedures are one of the important treatment options for steno-occlusive arteries in ischemic stroke patients. However, embolic complications after such procedures are always a concern. The authors investigated the association between serial change of residual platelet reactivity and silent embolic cerebral infarction (SECI) after endovascular treatment. Ischemic stroke patients undergoing stenting of intra- or extracranial arteries were recruited prospectively. Residual platelet reactivity, represented by aspirin reaction units (ARUs) and P2Y12 reaction units (PRUs), was measured serially (6 hours before, immediately after, and 24 hours after the procedure). A loading dosage of aspirin (500 mg) and/or clopidogrel (300 mg) was given 24 hours before the procedure to patients naïve to antiplatelet agents, whereas the usual dosage (aspirin 100 mg and clopidogrel 75 mg) was continued for patients who had previously been taking these agents for more than a week. Diffusion-weighted MRI was performed before and 24 hours after the procedure to detect new SECIs. Clinical characteristics, baseline ARU and PRU values, and the change in ARU and PRU values after stenting were compared between patients with and without SECIs. Among 69 consecutive patients who underwent neurovascular stent insertion, 41 patients (59.4%) had poststenting SECIs. The lesion was located only at the vascular territory of the stented vessel in 21 patients (51.2%), outside the stented vessel territory in 8 patients (19.5%), and both inside and outside in 12 patients (29.3%). The occurrence of SECIs was not associated with the baseline ARU or PRU value, but was associated with PRU increase after stenting (36 ± 73 vs -12 ± 59, p = 0.007), deployment of a longer stent (31.1 ± 16.5 mm vs 21.8 ± 9.9 mm, p = 0.01), and stent insertion in extracranial arteries (78.1% vs 45.2%, p = 0.008). Stent length (OR 1.066, p = 0.01) and PRU change (OR 1.009, p = 0.04) were independently associated with

  7. Polymorphisms of MDR1, CYP2C19 and P2Y12 genes in Indian population: Effects on clopidogrel response

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    Kavita K. Shalia

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: The present study did show a trend toward impaired response of clopidogrel to inhibit platelet aggregation with variant genotypes of CYP2C19*2 and iT744C of P2Y12 compared to respective wild type genotype at 24 h.

  8. Impact of ticagrelor on P2Y1 and P2Y12 localization and on cholesterol levels in platelet plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabani, Vahideh; Montange, Damien; Meneveau, Nicolas; Davani, Siamak

    2017-10-11

    Ticagrelor is an antiplatelet agent that inhibits platelet activation via P2Y12 antagonism. There are several studies showing that P2Y12 needs lipid rafts to be activated, but there are few data about how ticagrelor impacts lipid raft organization. Therefore, we aimed to investigate how ticagrelor could impact the distribution of cholesterol and consequently alter the organization of lipid rafts on platelet plasma membranes. We identified cholesterol-enriched raft fractions in platelet membranes by quantification of their cholesterol levels. Modifications in cholesterol and protein profiles (Flotillin 1, Flotillin 2, CD36, P2Y1, and P2Y12) were studied in platelets stimulated by ADP, treated by ticagrelor, or both. In ADP-stimulated and ticagrelor-treated groups, we found a decreased level of cholesterol in raft fractions of platelet plasma membrane compared to the control group. In addition, the peak of cholesterol in different experimental groups changed its localization on membrane fractions. In the control group, it was situated on fraction 2, while in ADP-stimulated platelets, it was located in fractions 3 to 5, and in fraction 4 in ticagrelor-treated group. The proteins studied also showed changes in their level of expression and localization in fractions of plasma membrane. Cholesterol levels of plasma membranes have a direct role in the organization of platelet membranes and could be modified by stimulation or drug treatment. Since ticagrelor and ADP both changed lipid composition and protein profile, investigating the lipid and protein composition of platelet membranes is of considerable importance as a focus for further research in anti-platelet management.

  9. Universal versus platelet reactivity assay-driven use of P2Y12 inhibitors in acute coronary syndrome patients: cost-effectiveness analyses for six European perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Craig I; Limone, Brendan L

    2014-01-01

    Platelet reactivity assays (PRAs) can predict patients' likely response to clopidogrel. As ticagrelor and prasugrel are typically considered first-line agents for acute coronary syndrome in Europe, we assessed the cost-effectiveness of universal compared to PRA-driven selection of these agents. A Markov model was used to calculate five-year costs (2013£/€), quality-adjusted life-years and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for one-year of universal ticagrelor or prasugrel (given to all) compared to each agents' corresponding PRA-driven strategy (ticagrelor/prasugrel in those with high platelet reactivity [HPR, >208 on the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay], others given generic clopidogrel). We assumed patients had their index event at 65-70 years of age and had a 42.7% incidence of HPR 24-48 hours post-revascularisation. The analysis was conducted from the perspective of six countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands and United Kingdom) and used a one-year cycle length. Event data for P2Y12 inhibitors were taken from multinational randomised trials and adjusted using country-specific epidemiologic data. Neither universal ticagrelor nor prasugrel were found to be cost-effective (all ICERs >40,250€ or £36,600/QALY) compared to their corresponding PRA-driven strategies in any of the countries evaluated. Results were sensitive to differences in P2Y12 Inhibitors costs and drug-specific relative risks of major adverse cardiac events. Monte Carlo simulation suggested universal ticagrelor or prasugrel were cost-effective in only 25-44% and 11-17% of 10,000 iterations compared to their respective PRA-driven strategies, when applying a willingness-to-pay threshold = €30,000 or £20,000/QALY. In conclusion, the universal use of newer P2Y12 inhibitors is not likely cost-effective compared to PRA-driven strategies.

  10. EVALUATION OF COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF PLATELET REACTIVITY ANALYSIS USING THE VERIFYNOW P2Y12 ASSAY IN PATIENTS AFTER ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

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    A. V. Rudakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dual antiplatelet therapy, including clopidogrel and aspirin, in a significant share of patients after acute coronary syndrome (ACS is characterized by high level of platelet reactivity, which is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular events. Perhaps it will make reasonable the prescription of new antiplatelet drugs, particularly the combination of ticagrelor with aspirin.Aim. To assess the cost-effectiveness of VerifyNow P2Y12 platelet reactivity testing in patients after ACS.Material and methods. The analysis was performed for patients aged 55 years after ACS by modeling based on the results of the PLATO trial considering Russian epidemiological data. The time horizon of simulation was 5 years. It was assumed that the patients were receiving either generic clopidogrel or ticagrelor for 1 year, or before maintenance treatment VerifyNow P2Y12 assay had been performed, and the patients with platelet reactivity index >230 24-48 hours after ACS were receiving ticagrelor and the remaining patients - generic clopidogrel. It was expected that after 1 year the patients would discontinue treatment with clopidogrel or ticagrelor, and hereafter additional therapeutic effect of their use would be absent. The costs of antiplatelet agents in the reference case corresponded to the weighted average price of public procurement in 2013 in Russia. The costs of treatment of complications corresponded to the compulsory health insurance rates for St. Petersburg in 2014. The cost and life expectancy were discounted at 3.5% per year.Results. The platelet reactivity test and the prescription by its results of the combination of clopidogrel plus aspirin or ticagrelor plus aspirin can prevent 5 myocardial infarction and 6 deaths per 1000 patients additionally as compared with the prescription of clopidogrel plus aspirin combination to all patients. The costs for one additional year of life as compared with the combination of clopidogrel plus aspirin

  11. Precatheterization Use of P2Y12 Inhibitors in Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients Undergoing Early Cardiac Catheterization and In-Hospital Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: Insights From the National Cardiovascular Data Registry®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Marwan; Abdelbaky, Amr; Li, Shuang; Chiswell, Karen; Wang, Tracy Y

    2017-09-22

    Current guidelines recommend early P2Y 12 inhibitor administration in non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, but it is unclear if precatheterization use is associated with longer delays to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or higher risk of post-CABG bleeding and transfusion. This study examines the patterns and outcomes of precatheterization P2Y 12 inhibitor use in non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients who undergo CABG. Retrospective analysis was done of 20 304 non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients in the ACTION (Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network) Registry (2009-2014) who underwent catheterization within 24 hours of admission and CABG during the index hospitalization. Using inverse probability-weighted propensity adjustment, we compared time from catheterization to CABG, post-CABG bleeding, and transfusion rates between patients who did and did not receive precatheterization P2Y 12 inhibitors. Among study patients, 32.9% received a precatheterization P2Y 12 inhibitor (of these, 2.2% were given ticagrelor and 3.7% prasugrel). Time from catheterization to CABG was longer among patients who received precatheterization P2Y 12 inhibitor (median 69.9 hours [25th, 75th percentiles 28.2, 115.8] versus 43.5 hours [21.0, 71.8], P ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients who undergo early catheterization and in-hospital CABG. Despite longer delays to surgery, the majority of pretreated patients proceed to CABG <3 days postcatheterization. Precatheterization P2Y 12 inhibitor use is associated with higher risks of postoperative bleeding and transfusion. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  12. Interactions among variants in TXA2R, P2Y12 and GPIIIa are associated with carotid plaque vulnerability in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xingyang; Lin, Jing; Luo, Hua; Zhou, Ju; Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Yanfen; Wang, Chun

    2018-04-03

    The associations between variants in platelet activation-relevant genes and carotid plaque vulnerability are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations of the variants in platelet activation-relevant genes and interactions among these variants with carotid plaque vulnerability. There were no significant differences in the frequencies of genotypes of the 11 variants between patients and controls. Among 396 patients, 102 patients had not carotid plaque, 106 had VP, and 188 had SP. The 11 variants were not independently associated with risk of carotid plaque vulnerability after adjusting for potential confounding variables. However, the GMDR analysis showed that there were synergistic effects of gene-gene interactions among TXA2Rr s1131882, GPIIIa rs2317676 and P2Y12 rs16863323 on carotid plaque vulnerability. The high-risk interactions among the three variants were associated with high platelet activation, and independently associated with the risk of carotid plaque vulnerability. Eleven variants in platelet activation-relevant genes were examined using mass spectrometry methods in 396 ischemic stroke patients and 291controls. Platelet-leukocyte aggregates and platelet aggregation were also measured. Carotid plaques were assessed by B-mode ultrasound. According to the results of ultrasound, the patients were stratified into three groups: non-plaque group, vulnerable plaque (VP) group and stable plaque (SP) group. Furthermore, gene-gene interactions were analyzed using generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) methods. The rs1131882, rs2317676, and rs16863323 three-loci interactions may confer a higher risk of carotid plaque vulnerability, and might be potential markers for plaque instability.

  13. Comparison of VerifyNow-P2Y12 test and Flow Cytometry for monitoring individual platelet response to clopidogrel. What is the cut-off value for identifying patients who are low responders to clopidogrel therapy?

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    Castelli Alfredo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dual anti-platelet therapy with aspirin and a thienopyridine (DAT is used to prevent stent thrombosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. Low response to clopidogrel therapy (LR occurs, but laboratory tests have a controversial role in the identification of this condition. Methods We studied LR in patients with stable angina undergoing elective PCI, all on DAT for at least 7 days, by comparing: 1 Flow cytometry (FC to measure platelet membrane expression of P-selectin (CD62P and PAC-1 binding following double stimulation with ADP and collagen type I either in the presence of prostaglandin (PG E1; 2 VerifyNow-P2Y12 test, in which results are reported as absolute P2Y12-Reaction-Units (PRU or % of inhibition (% inhibition. Results Thirty controls and 52 patients were analyzed. The median percentage of platelets exhibiting CD62P expression and PAC-1 binding by FC evaluation after stimulation in the presence of PG E1 was 25.4% (IQR: 21.4–33.1% and 3.5% (1.7–9.4%, respectively. Only 6 patients receiving DAT (11.5% had both values above the 1st quartile of controls, and were defined as LR. Evaluation of the same patients with the VerifyNow-P2Y12 test revealed that the area under the receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC curve was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.84–0.98, p 213 PRU gave the maximum accuracy for the detection of patients defined as having LR by FC. Conclusion In conclusion our findings show that a cut-off value of ≤ 15% inhibition or > 213 PRU in the VerifyNow-P2Y12 test may provide the best accuracy for the identification of patients with LR.

  14. Receptor homodimerization plays a critical role in a novel dominant negative P2RY12 variant identified in a family with severe bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, S J; Rabbolini, D; Gabrielli, S; Chen, Q; Aungraheeta, R; Hutchinson, J L; Kilo, T; Mackay, J; Ward, C M; Stevenson, W; Morel-Kopp, M-C

    2018-01-01

    Essentials Three dominant variants for the autosomal recessive bleeding disorder type-8 have been described. To date, there has been no phenotype/genotype correlation explaining their dominant transmission. Proline plays an important role in P2Y12R ligand binding and signaling defects. P2Y12R homodimer formation is critical for the receptor function and signaling. Background Although inherited platelet disorders are still underdiagnosed worldwide, advances in molecular techniques are improving disease diagnosis and patient management. Objective To identify and characterize the mechanism underlying the bleeding phenotype in a Caucasian family with an autosomal dominant P2RY12 variant. Methods Full blood counts, platelet aggregometry, flow cytometry and western blotting were performed before next-generation sequencing (NGS). Detailed molecular analysis of the identified variant of the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) was subsequently performed in mammalian cells overexpressing receptor constructs. Results All three referred individuals had markedly impaired ADP-induced platelet aggregation with primary wave only, despite normal total and surface P2Y12R expression. By NGS, a single P2RY12:c.G794C substitution (p.R265P) was identified in all affected individuals, and this was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Mammalian cell experiments with the R265P-P2Y12R variant showed normal receptor surface expression versus wild-type (WT) P2Y12R. Agonist-stimulated R265P-P2Y12R function (both signaling and surface receptor loss) was reduced versus WT P2Y12R. Critically, R265P-P2Y12R acted in a dominant negative manner, with agonist-stimulated WT P2Y12R activity being reduced by variant coexpression, suggesting dramatic loss of WT homodimers. Importantly, platelet P2RY12 cDNA cloning and sequencing in two affected individuals also revealed three-fold mutant mRNA overexpression, decreasing even further the likelihood of WT homodimer formation. R265 located within extracellular loop 3 (EL3) is

  15. Rapid resensitization of purinergic receptor function in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, S J; Barton, J F; Mayo-Martin, M B; Hardy, A R; Poole, A W

    2008-08-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinergic receptors. Recently, we demonstrated that both receptors desensitize and internalize in human platelets by differential kinase-dependent mechanisms. To demonstrate whether responses to P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinergic receptors resensitize in human platelets and determine the role of receptor traffic in this process. These studies were undertaken either in human platelets or in cells stably expressing epitope-tagged P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinergic receptor constructs. In this study we show for the first time that responses to both of these receptors can rapidly resensitize following agonist-dependent desensitization in human platelets. Further, we show that in human platelets or in 1321N1 cells stably expressing receptor constructs, the disruption of receptor internalization, dephosphorylation or subsequent receptor recycling is sufficient to block resensitization of purinergic receptor responses. We also show that, in platelets, internalization of both these receptors is dependent upon dynamin, and that this process is required for resensitization of responses. This study is therefore the first to show that both P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, and it reveals that the underlying mechanism requires receptor trafficking as an essential part of this process.

  16. Immunohistochemical Expression of Vitamin-D Receptor in Oral and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Receptor in Oral and Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma of a Black African Subpopulation. *Corresponding Author ... Objective:The nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR) is involved in multiple pathways that have a role to .... Figure1: Sections A (++) and B (+++) of OSCC showing nuclear positivity (red arrows) for malignant nests of ...

  17. Expression of Ricinus communis receptors on epithelial cells in oral carcinomas and oral wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabelsteen, E; Mackenzie, I C

    1978-12-01

    The histological distribution of receptors for Ricinus communis Fraction 1 (RCA1) in oral carcinomas and in oral epithelial cells during wound healing has been studied by use of fluorescein-tagged RCA1. Biopsies from 15 human oral carcinomas and adjacent normal mucosa showed RCA1 receptors at the cell membranes in the basal and spinous layer of the normal epithelium, whereas receptors could not be demonstrated in invading islands of the tumors. In healing oral wounds from eight humans and three monkeys, RCA1 receptors were demonstrated both in normal epithelium adjacent to the wounds and in the epithelial outgrowth from the wound margin. Titrations, however, showed that the epithelial outgrowth reacted more weakly than did the normal adjacent epithelium. These results support previous in vitro studies showing changes in carbohydrate composition of moving normal cells and of malignant cells, a finding that may be of interest in relation to formation of metastases.

  18. Early clinical outcomes as a function of use of newer oral P2Yinhibitors versus clopidogrel in the EUROMAX trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Kurt; Ducrocq, Gregory; Hamm, Christian W

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain whether different oral P2Y12inhibitors might affect rates of acute stent thrombosis and 30-day outcomes after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). Methods: The European Ambulance Acute Coronary Syndrome Angiography (EUROMAX) randomised trial compared prehospi...

  19. ARF6-dependent regulation of P2Y receptor traffic and function in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Owens, Sian E; Saha, Keya; Pope, Robert J; Mundell, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) in the internalization and function of P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y(1) or P2Y(12) purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function.

  20. ARF6-dependent regulation of P2Y receptor traffic and function in human platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Kanamarlapudi

    Full Text Available Adenosine diphosphate (ADP is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y(1 and P2Y(12 purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y(1 and P2Y(12 purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6 in the internalization and function of P2Y(1 and P2Y(12 purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y(1 or P2Y(12 purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function.

  1. Histamine H4 receptor in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, A; Al-Samadi, A; Stegajev, V; Stark, H; Häyrinen-Immonen, R; Ainola, M; Hietanen, J; Konttinen, Y T

    2015-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by a band-like T-cell infiltrate below the apoptotic epithelial cells and degenerated basement membrane. We tested the hypothesis that the high-affinity histamine H4 receptors (H4 Rs) are downregulated in OLP by high histamine concentrations and proinflammatory T-cell cytokines. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining, image analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction of tissue samples and cytokine-stimulated cultured SCC-25 and primary human oral keratinocytes. H4 R immunoreactivity was weak in OLP and characterized by mast cell (MC) hyperplasia and degranulation. In contrast to controls, H4 R immunostaining and MC counts were negatively correlated in OLP (P = 0.003). H4 R agonist at nanomolar levels led to a rapid internalization of H4 Rs, whereas high histamine concentration and interferon-γ decreased HRH4 -gene transcripts. Healthy oral epithelial cells are equipped with H4 R, which displays a uniform staining pattern in a MC-independent fashion. In contrast, in OLP, increased numbers of activated MCs associate with increasing loss of epithelial H4 R. Cell culture experiments suggest a rapid H4 R stimulation-dependent receptor internalization and a slow cytokine-driven decrease in H4 R synthesis. H4 R may be involved in the maintenance of healthy oral mucosa. In OLP, this maintenance might be impaired by MC degranulation and inflammatory cytokines. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Mineralocorticoid receptor haplotype, oral contraceptives and emotional information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstra, D A; de Kloet, E R; van Hemert, A M; de Rijk, R H; Van der Does, A J W

    2015-02-12

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) affect mood in some women and may have more subtle effects on emotional information processing in many more users. Female carriers of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) haplotype 2 have been shown to be more optimistic and less vulnerable to depression. To investigate the effects of oral contraceptives on emotional information processing and a possible moderating effect of MR haplotype. Cross-sectional study in 85 healthy premenopausal women of West-European descent. We found significant main effects of oral contraceptives on facial expression recognition, emotional memory and decision-making. Furthermore, carriers of MR haplotype 1 or 3 were sensitive to the impact of OCs on the recognition of sad and fearful faces and on emotional memory, whereas MR haplotype 2 carriers were not. Different compounds of OCs were included. No hormonal measures were taken. Most naturally cycling participants were assessed in the luteal phase of their menstrual cycle. Carriers of MR haplotype 2 may be less sensitive to depressogenic side-effects of OCs. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. TRPA1 receptor is upregulated in human oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, J; Perkecz, A; Knie, L; Sétáló, G; Tornóczki, T; Pintér, E; Bán, Á

    2017-03-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with antigen-specific and non-specific mechanisms. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a non-selective cation channel activated by noxious stimuli such as oxidative stress products evoking pain and release of proinflammatory mediators from sensory nerve endings culminating in neurogenic inflammation. Extraneuronal TRPA1s, for example, on immune cells possess yet unknown functions. We studied the buccal mRNA expression (qPCR) and protein localization (immunohistochemistry) of TRPA1 receptors and key OLP mediator transcripts in oral mucosa samples of healthy volunteers (n = 9), OLP patients (n = 43), and OLP-like hyperkeratotic patients (n = 12). We measured 27.7- and 25.5-fold TRPA1 mRNA increase in OLP and OLP-like hyperkeratotic patients compared to healthy controls. TRPA1 transcripts elevated 2.4-fold in hypertensive OLP but not in hyperkeratotic patients compared to counterparts, reduced by 1.6-fold by angiotensin-convertase inhibitor intake. TRPA1 messenger RNA was more coexpressed with transcripts of tumor necrosis factor α than with interferon γ. Keratinocytes, macrophages but not T cells expressed TRPA1. We provided evidence for the extraneuronal presence and upregulation of the proinflammatory TRPA1 receptor in buccal samples of patients with OLP. This may implicate the ion channel in the pathomechanism of OLP. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Aspirin and P2Y12 inhibition attenuate platelet-induced ovarian cancer cell invasion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, Niamh M

    2015-09-09

    Platelet-cancer cell interactions play a key role in successful haematogenous metastasis. Disseminated malignancy is the leading cause of death among ovarian cancer patients. It is unknown why different ovarian cancers have different metastatic phenotypes. To investigate if platelet-cancer cell interactions play a role, we characterized the response of ovarian cancer cell lines to platelets both functionally and at a molecular level.

  5. Microglia P2Y13 Receptors Prevent Astrocyte Proliferation Mediated by P2Y1 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Quintas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral inflammation is a common feature of several neurodegenerative diseases that requires a fine interplay between astrocytes and microglia to acquire appropriate phenotypes for an efficient response to neuronal damage. During brain inflammation, ATP is massively released into the extracellular medium and converted into ADP. Both nucleotides acting on P2 receptors, modulate astrogliosis through mechanisms involving microglia-astrocytes communication. In previous studies, primary cultures of astrocytes and co-cultures of astrocytes and microglia were used to investigate the influence of microglia on astroglial proliferation induced by ADPβS, a stable ADP analog. In astrocyte cultures, ADPβS increased cell proliferation through activation of P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, an effect abolished in co-cultures (of astrocytes with ∼12.5% microglia. The possibility that the loss of the ADPβS-mediated effect could have been caused by a microglia-induced degradation of ADPβS or by a preferential microglial localization of P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors was excluded. Since ADPβS also activates P2Y13 receptors, the contribution of microglial P2Y13 receptors to prevent the proliferative effect of ADPβS in co-cultures was investigated. The results obtained indicate that P2Y13 receptors are low expressed in astrocytes and mainly expressed in microglia. Furthermore, in co-cultures, ADPβS induced astroglial proliferation in the presence of the selective P2Y13 antagonist MRS 2211 (3 μM and of the selective P2Y12 antagonist AR-C66096 (0.1 μM, suggesting that activation of microglial P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors may induce the release of messengers that inhibit astroglial proliferation mediated by P2Y1,12 receptors. In this microglia-astrocyte paracrine communication, P2Y12 receptors exert opposite effects in astroglial proliferation as a result of its cellular localization: cooperating in astrocytes with P2Y1 receptors to directly stimulate proliferation and in

  6. Discovery of OSI-906: a selective and orally efficacious dual inhibitor of the IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Mark J; Cooke, Andrew; Rosenfeld-Franklin, Maryland; Buck, Elizabeth; Foreman, Ken; Landfair, Darla; O'Connor, Matthew; Pirritt, Caroline; Sun, Yingchaun; Yao, Yan; Arnold, Lee D; Gibson, Neil W; Ji, Qun-Sheng

    2009-09-01

    The IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) has been implicated in the promotion of tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance to cancer therapies. Therefore, this receptor has become a major focus for the development of anticancer agents. Our lead optimization efforts that blended structure-based design and empirical medicinal chemistry led to the discovery of OSI-906, a novel small-molecule dual IGF-1R/insulin receptor (IR) kinase inhibitor. OSI-906 potently and selectively inhibits autophosphorylation of both human IGF-1R and IR, displays in vitro antiproliferative effects in a variety of tumor cell lines and shows robust in vivo anti-tumor efficacy in an IGF-1R-driven xenograft model when administered orally once daily. OSI-906 is a novel, potent, selective and orally bioavailable dual IGF-1R/IR kinase inhibitor with favorable preclinical drug-like properties, which has demonstrated in vivo efficacy in tumor models and is currently in clinical testing.

  7. Oral lipase activities and fat-taste receptors for fat-taste sensing in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Yuko; Kawabata, Fuminori; Nishimura, Shotaro; Tabata, Shoji

    2018-01-01

    It has been reported that a functional fat-taste receptor, GPR120, is present in chicken oral tissues, and that chickens can detect fat taste in a behavioral test. However, although triglycerides need to be digested to free fatty acids to be recognized by fat-taste receptors such as GPR120, it remains unknown whether lipase activities exist in chicken oral tissues. To examine this question, we first cloned another fat-taste receptor candidate gene, CD36, from the chicken palate. Then, using RT-PCR, we determined that GPR120 and CD36 were broadly expressed in chicken oral and gastrointestinal tissues. Also by RT-PCR, we confirmed that several lipase genes were expressed in both oral and gastrointestinal tissues. Finally, we analyzed the lipase activities of oral tissues by using a fluorogenic triglyceride analog as a lipase substrate. We found there are functional lipases in oral tissues as well as in the stomach and pancreas. These results suggested that chickens have a basic fat-taste reception system that incorporates a triglycerides/oral-lipases/free fatty acids/GPR120 axis and CD36 axis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of Neurokinin 3 Receptor Signaling in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Kyoichi; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Okui, Tatsuo; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Takada, Hiroyuki; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Kunisada, Yuki; Ibaragi, Soichiro; Yoshioka, Norie; Kishimoto, Koji; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Akira

    2017-11-01

    The neurokinin 3 receptor (NK-3R) is differentially expressed in the central nervous system including cases of human oral squamous cell carcinoma. However, the role of NK-3R signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma is not well known. NK-3R expression in surgically resected oral squamous cell carcinoma was examined immunohistochemically and the strength of the expression was quantified. We evaluated the function of NK-3R signaling using NK-3R antagonist in human oral squamous cell carcinoma bone invasion mouse model. NK-3R was significantly expressed in tumor cells that had invaded the bone matrix compared to the oral side tumor cells. SB222200, a selective antagonist of NK-3R, significantly suppressed the radiographic osteolytic lesion and tumorigenesis. NK-3R signaling is a potential target for the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma in cases of bone destruction. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. Low multiple electrode aggregometry platelet responses are not associated with non-synonymous variants in G-protein coupled receptor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jane E; Lee, Kurtis R; Walker, Mary E; Murden, Sherina L; Harris, Jessica; Mundell, Stuart; J Murphy, Gavin; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-10-01

    Multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) improves prediction of thrombosis and bleeding in cardiac patients. However, the causes of inter-individual variation in MEA results are incompletely understood. We explore whether low MEA results are associated with platelet G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) gene variants. The effects of P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12), thromboxane A2 receptor (TPα) and protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) dysfunction on the MEA ADP-test, ASPI-test and TRAP-test were determined using receptor antagonists. Cardiac surgery patients with pre-operative MEA results suggesting GPCR dysfunction were selected for P2Y12 (P2RY12), TPα (TBXA2R) and PAR1 (F2R) sequencing. In control blood samples, P2Y12, TPα or PAR1 antagonists markedly reduced ADP-test, ASPI-test and TRAP-test results respectively. In the 636 patients from a cohort of 2388 cardiac surgery patients who were not receiving aspirin or a P2Y12 blocker, the median ADP-test result was 75.1 U (range 4.8-153.2), ASPI-test 83.7 U (1.4-157.3) and TRAP-test 117.7 U (2.4-194.1), indicating a broad range of results unexplained by anti-platelet drugs. In 238 consenting patients with unexplained low MEA results, three P2RY12 variants occurred in 70/107 (65%) with suspected P2Y12 dysfunction and four TBXA2R variants occurred in 19/22 (86%) with suspected TPα dysfunction although the later group was too small to draw meaningful conclusions about variant frequency. All the variants were synonymous and unlikely to cause GPCR dysfunction. There were no F2R variants in the 109 cases with suspected PAR1 dysfunction. MEA results suggesting isolated platelet GPCR dysfunction were common in cardiac surgery patients, but were not associated with non-synonymous variants in P2RY12 or F2R. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Protease-activated receptor 2 modulates proliferation and invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eryani, Kamal; Cheng, Jun; Abé, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Babkair, Hamzah; Essa, Ahmed; Saku, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Based on our previous finding that protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) regulates hemophagocytosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells, which induces their heme oxygenase 1-dependent keratinization, we have formulated a hypothesis that PAR-2 functions in wider activities of SCC cells. To confirm this hypothesis, we investigated immunohistochemical profiles of PAR-2 in oral SCC tissues and its functional roles in cell proliferation and invasion in SCC cells in culture. The PAR-2 expression modes were determined in 48 surgical tissue specimens of oral SCC. Using oral SCC-derived cell systems, we determined both gene and protein expression levels of PAR-2. SCC cell proliferation and invasive properties were also examined in conditions in which PAR-2 was activated by the synthetic peptide SLIGRL. PAR-2 was immunolocalized in oral SCC and carcinoma in situ cells, especially in those on the periphery of carcinoma cell foci (100% of cases), but not in normal oral epithelia. Its expression at both gene and protein levels was confirmed in 3 oral SCC cell lines including ZK-1. Activation of PAR-2 induced ZK-1 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. PAR-2-activated ZK-1 cells invaded faster than nonactivated ones. The expression of PAR-2 is specific to oral malignancies, and PAR-2 regulates the growth and invasion of oral SCC cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Autoantibodies to folate receptor alpha during early pregnancy and risk of oral clefts in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Camilla; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether IgG and IgM autoantibodies to folate receptor alpha (FRalpha) in pregnant women are associated with an increased risk of oral cleft-affected offspring. A case-control study nested in the prospective Danish National Birth Cohort (100,418 pregnan...

  12. An Oral Selective Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Prevents Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Youn Beak, PhD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs play adaptive and protective roles in the heart. Dabuzalgron is an oral selective α1A-AR agonist that was well tolerated in multiple clinical trials of treatment for urinary incontinence, but has never been used to treat heart disease in humans or animal models. In this study, the authors administered dabuzalgron to mice treated with doxorubicin (DOX, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent with dose-limiting cardiotoxicity that can lead to heart failure (HF. Dabuzalgron protected against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, likely by preserving mitochondrial function. These results suggest that activating cardiac α1A-ARs with dabuzalgron, a well-tolerated oral agent, might represent a novel approach to treating HF. Key Words: alpha adrenergic receptors, anthracyclines, cardioprotection, catecholamines, heart failure

  13. Toll-Like Receptor 2 as a Regulator of Oral Tolerance in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Tunis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy, other adverse immune responses to foods, inflammatory bowel disease, and eosinophilic esophagitis have become increasingly common in the last 30 years. It has been proposed in the “hygiene hypothesis” that dysregulated immune responses to environmental microbial stimuli may modify the balance between tolerance and sensitization in some patients. Of the pattern recognition receptors that respond to microbial signals, toll-like receptors (TLRs represent the most investigated group. The relationship between allergy and TLR activation is currently at the frontier of immunology research. Although TLR2 is abundant in the mucosal environment, little is known about the complex relationship between bystander TLR2 activation by the commensal microflora and the processing of oral antigens. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between TLR2 and oral tolerance, with an emphasis on regulatory T cells, eosinophils, B cells, IgA, intestinal regulation, and commensal microbes.

  14. Role of atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 in experimental oral squamous cell carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna Moreira; Saraiva, Adriana Machado; Fernandes de Oliveira, Ana Laura; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Batista, Aline Carvalho; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; Russo, Remo Castro; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2018-03-14

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are critical in oral tumourigenesis. The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 is a scavenger of CC chemokines controlling the availability of these molecules at tumour sites, but the role of ACKR2 in the context of oral carcinogenesis is unexplored. In this study, wild-type (WT) and ACKR2 deficient mice (ACKR2 -/- ) were treated with chemical carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) for induction of oral carcinogenesis. Tongues were collected for macro and microscopic analysis and to evaluate the expression of ACKRs, CC chemokines and its receptors, inflammatory cytokines, angiogenic factors, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. An increased expression of ACKR2 in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) lesions of 4NQO-treated WT mice was observed. No significant differences were seen in the ACKR1, ACKR3 and ACKR4 mRNA expression comparing SCC lesions from WT and ACKR2 -/- treated mice. Significantly higher expression of CCL2, IL-6 and IL-17 was detected in ACKR2 -/- treated mice. In contrast, the expression of other CC-chemokines, and receptors, angiogenic factors, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components were similarly increased in SCC lesions of both groups. Clinical and histopathological analysis revealed no differences in inflammatory cell recruitment and in the SCC incidence comparing WT and ACKR2 -/- treated mice. The results suggest that ACKR2 expression regulates inflammation in tumour-microenvironment but the absence of ACKR2 does not impact chemically-induced oral carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuropilin 1 Receptor Is Up-Regulated in Dysplastic Epithelium and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Gallottini, Marina; Martins, Fabiana; Li, Erik; Mudge, Dayna R; Nakayama, Hironao; Hida, Kyoko; Panigrahy, Dipak; D'Amore, Patricia A; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2016-04-01

    Neuropilins are receptors for disparate ligands, including proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor and inhibitory class 3 semaphorin (SEMA3) family members. Differentiated cells in skin epithelium and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma highly express the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor. We examined the expression of NRP1 in human and mouse oral mucosa. NRP1 was significantly up-regulated in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). NRP1 receptor localized to the outer suprabasal epithelial layers in normal tongue, an expression pattern similar to the normal skin epidermis. However, dysplastic tongue epithelium and OSCC up-regulated NRP1 in basal and proliferating epithelial layers, a profile unseen in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. NRP1 up-regulation is observed in a mouse carcinogen-induced OSCC model and in human tongue OSCC biopsies. Human OSCC cell lines express NRP1 protein in vitro and in mouse tongue xenografts. Sites of capillary infiltration into orthotopic OSCC tumors correlate with high NRP1 expression. HSC3 xenografts, which express the highest NRP1 levels of the cell lines examined, showed massive intratumoral lymphangiogenesis. SEMA3A inhibited OSCC cell migration, suggesting that the NRP1 receptor was bioactive in OSCC. In conclusion, NRP1 is regulated in the oral epithelium and is selectively up-regulated during epithelial dysplasia. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester proangiogenic ligands within the neoplastic compartment, thereby recruiting neovessels toward tumor cells. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Optical Molecular Imaging of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression to Improve Detection of Oral Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Nitin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The development of noninvasive molecular imaging approaches has the potential to improve management of cancer. Methods: In this study, we demonstrate the potential of noninvasive topical delivery of an epidermal growth factor-Alexa 647 (EGF-Alexa 647 conjugate to image changes in epidermal growth factor receptor expression associated with oral neoplasia. We report a series of preclinical analyses to evaluate the optical contrast achieved after topical delivery of EGF-Alexa 647 in a variety of model systems, including cells, three-dimensional tissue cultures, and intact human tissue specimens using wide-field and high-resolution fluorescence imaging. Data were collected from 17 different oral cancer patients: eight pairs of normal and abnormal biopsies and nine resected tumors were examined. Results: The EGF-dye conjugate can be uniformly delivered throughout the oral epithelium with a penetration depth exceeding 500 µm and incubation time of less than 30 minutes. After EGF-Alexa 647 incubation, the presence of oral neoplasia is associated with a 1.5- to 6.9-fold increase in fluorescence contrast compared with grossly normal mucosa from the same patient with both wide-field and high-resolution fluorescence imaging. Conclusions: Results illustrate the potential of EGF-targeted fluorescent agents for in vivo molecular imaging, a technique that may aid in the diagnosis and characterization of oral neoplasia and allow real-time detection of tumor margins.

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in different subtypes of oral lichenoid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Ramírez, Dionisio-Alejandro; Rodríguez-Tojo, María-Jose; Coca-Meneses, Juan-Carlos; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Aguirre-Urizar, José-Manuel

    2014-09-01

    The oral lichenoid disease (OLD) includes different chronic inflammatory processes such as oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesions (OLL), both entities with controversial diagnosis and malignant potential. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EFGR) is an important oral carcinogenesis biomarker and overexpressed in several oral potentially malignant disorders. To analyze the EGFR expression in the OLD to find differences between OLP and OLL, and to correlate it with the main clinical and pathological features. Forty-four OLD cases were studied and classified according to their clinical (Group C1: only papular lesions / Group C2: papular and other lesions) and histopathological features (Group HT: OLP-typical / Group HC: OLP-compatible) based in previous published criteria. Standard immunohistochemical identification of EGFR protein was performed. Comparative and descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Thirty-five cases (79.5%) showed EGFR overexpression without significant differences between clinical and histopathological groups (p<0.05). Histological groups showed significant differences in the EGFR expression pattern (p=0.016). Conlusions: All OLD samples showed high EGFR expression. The type of clinical lesion was not related with EGFR expression; however, there are differences in the EGFR expression pattern between histological groups that may be related with a different biological profile and malignant risk.

  18. Reciprocal regulation of platelet responses to P2Y and thromboxane receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J F; Hardy, A R; Poole, A W; Mundell, S J

    2008-03-01

    Thromboxane A(2) and ADP are two major platelet agonists that stimulate two sets of G protein-coupled receptors to activate platelets. Although aggregation responses to ADP and thromboxane desensitize, there are no reports currently addressing whether activation by one agonist may heterologously desensitize responses to the other. To demonstrate whether responses to ADP or U46619 may be modulated by prior treatment of platelets with the alternate agonist, revealing a level of cross-desensitization between receptor systems. Here we show that pretreatment of platelets with either agonist substantially desensitizes aggregation responses to the other agonist. Calcium responses to thromboxane receptor activation are desensitized by preactivation of P2Y(1) but not P2Y(12) receptors. This heterologous desensitization is mediated by a protein kinase C (PKC)-independent mechanism. Reciprocally, calcium responses to ADP are desensitized by pretreatment of platelets with the thromboxane analogue, U46619, and P2Y(12)-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase is also desensitized by pretreatment with U46619. In this direction, desensitization is comprised of two components, a true heterologous component that is PKC-independent, and a homologous component that is mediated through stimulated release of dense granule ADP. This study reveals cross-desensitization between ADP and thromboxane receptor signaling in human platelets. Cross-desensitization is mediated by protein kinases, involving PKC-dependent and independent pathways, and indicates that alterations in the activation state of one receptor may have effects upon the sensitivity of the other receptor system.

  19. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-04-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1-3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents.

  20. Adenosine A2b receptor promotes progression of human oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasama, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Koyama, Tomoyoshi; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Ogawara, Katsunori; Yokoe, Hidetaka; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A2b receptor (ADORA2B) encodes an adenosine receptor that is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. This integral membrane protein stimulates adenylate cyclase activity in the presence of adenosine. Little is known about the relevance of ADORA2B to human malignancy including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We aimed to characterize the expression state and function of ADORA2B in OSCC. The ADORA2B expression levels in nine OSCC-derived cells were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses. Using an ADORA2B knockdown model, we assessed cellular proliferation and expression of hypoxia-inducible factor1α (HIF-1α). We examined the adenosine receptor expression profile under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions in the OSCC-derived cells. In addition to in vitro data, the clinical correlation between the ADORA2B expression levels in primary OSCCs (n = 100 patients) and the clinicopathological status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) also was evaluated. ADORA2B mRNA and protein were up-regulated significantly (p < 0.05) in seven OSCC-derived cells compared with human normal oral keratinocytes. Suppression of ADORA2B expression with shRNA significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited cellular proliferation compared with the control cells. HIF-1α also was down-regulated in ADORA2B knockdown OSCC cells. During hypoxia, ADORA2B expression was induced significantly (p < 0.05) in the mRNA and protein after 24 hours of incubation in OSCC-derived cells. IHC showed that ADORA2B expression in primary OSCCs was significantly (p < 0.05) greater than in the normal oral counterparts and that ADORA2B-positive OSCCs were correlated closely (p < 0.05) with tumoral size. Our results suggested that ADORA2B controls cellular proliferation via HIF-1α activation, indicating that ADORA2B may be a key regulator of tumoral progression in OSCCs. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1577-2) contains

  1. IL-17 Receptor Signaling in Oral Epithelial Cells Is Critical for Protection against Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Heather R; Bruno, Vincent M; Childs, Erin E; Daugherty, Sean; Hunter, Joseph P; Mengesha, Bemnet G; Saevig, Danielle L; Hendricks, Matthew R; Coleman, Bianca M; Brane, Lucas; Solis, Norma; Cruz, J Agustin; Verma, Akash H; Garg, Abhishek V; Hise, Amy G; Richardson, Jonathan P; Naglik, Julian R; Filler, Scott G; Kolls, Jay K; Sinha, Satrajit; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-11-09

    Signaling through the IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) is required to prevent oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in mice and humans. However, the IL-17-responsive cell type(s) that mediate protection are unknown. Using radiation chimeras, we were able to rule out a requirement for IL-17RA in the hematopoietic compartment. We saw remarkable concordance of IL-17-controlled gene expression in C. albicans-infected human oral epithelial cells (OECs) and in tongue tissue from mice with OPC. To interrogate the role of the IL-17R in OECs, we generated mice with conditional deletion of IL-17RA in superficial oral and esophageal epithelial cells (Il17ra ΔK13 ). Following oral Candida infection, Il17ra ΔK13 mice exhibited fungal loads and weight loss indistinguishable from Il17ra -/- mice. Susceptibility in Il17ra ΔK13 mice correlated with expression of the antimicrobial peptide β-defensin 3 (BD3, Defb3). Consistently, Defb3 -/- mice were susceptible to OPC. Thus, OECs dominantly control IL-17R-dependent responses to OPC through regulation of BD3 expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor correlates with prognosis in oral and mesopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, H; Fujieda, S; Sunaga, H; Noda, I; Saito, H

    1998-02-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptors (G-CSFRs) have been observed on the surface of not only hematopoietic cells but also several cancer cells. The stimulation of G-CSF has been demonstrated to induce proliferation and activation of G-CSFR-positive cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of G-CSFR on the surface of tumor cells and G-CSF production in oral and mesopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by an immunohistochemical approach. Of 58 oral and mesopharyngeal SCCs, 31 cases (53.4%) and 36 cases (62.1%) were positive for G-CSFR and G-CSF, respectively. There was no association between G-CSFR expression and G-CSF staining. In the group positive for G-CSFR expression, relapse was significantly more likely after primary treatment (P = 0.0069), whereas there was no association between G-CSFR expression and age, sex, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and clinical stage. Also, the G-CSFR-positive groups had a significantly lower disease-free and overall survival rate than the G-CSFR-negative groups (P = 0.0172 and 0.0188, respectively). However, none of the clinical markers correlated significantly with G-CSF staining, nor did the status of G-CSF production influence the overall survival. The results imply that assessment of G-CSFR may prove valuable in selecting patients with oral and mesopharyngeal SCC for aggressive therapy.

  3. Downregulation of TGF-beta receptor types II and III in oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Wenxia; Xia, Qingjie; Wu, Lanyan; Chen, Sixiu; He, Xin; Zhang, Lin; Gao, Qinghong; Zhou, Hongmei

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the expression levels for TβRI, TβRII, and TβRIII in epithelial layers of oral premalignant lesions (oral leukoplakia, OLK) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), as well as in oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), with the final goal of exploring the roles of various types of TβRs in carcinogenesis of oral mucosa. Normal oral tissues, OLK, and OSCC were obtained from 138 previously untreated patients. Seven primary human oral CAF lines and six primary normal fibroblast (NF) lines were established successfully via cell culture. The three receptors were detected using immunohistochemical (IHC), quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blot approaches. IHC signals for TβRII and TβRIII in the epithelial layer decreased in tissue samples with increasing disease aggressiveness (P < 0.05); no expression differences were observed for TβRI, in OLK and OSCC (P > 0.05); and TβRII and TβRIII were significantly downregulated in CAFs compared with NFs, at the mRNA and protein levels (P < 0.05). Exogenous expression of TGF-β1 led to a remarkable decrease in the expression of TβRII and TβRIII in CAFs (P < 0.05). This study provides the first evidence that the loss of TβRII and TβRIII expression in oral epithelium and stroma is a common event in OSCC. The restoration of the expression of TβRII and TβRIII in oral cancerous tissues may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of oral carcinoma

  4. Repression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL but not its receptors during oral cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller Susan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TRAIL plays an important role in host immunosurveillance against tumor progression, as it induces apoptosis of tumor cells but not normal cells, and thus has great therapeutic potential for cancer treatment. TRAIL binds to two cell-death-inducing (DR4 and DR5 and two decoy (DcR1, and DcR2 receptors. Here, we compare the expression levels of TRAIL and its receptors in normal oral mucosa (NOM, oral premalignancies (OPM, and primary and metastatic oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC in order to characterize the changes in their expression patterns during OSCC initiation and progression. Methods DNA microarray, immunoblotting and immunohistochemical analyses were used to examine the expression levels of TRAIL and its receptors in oral epithelial cell lines and in archival tissues of NOM, OPM, primary and metastatic OSCC. Apoptotic rates of tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL in OSCC specimens were determined by cleaved caspase 3 immunohistochemistry. Results Normal oral epithelia constitutively expressed TRAIL, but expression was progressively lost in OPM and OSCC. Reduction in DcR2 expression levels was noted frequently in OPM and OSCC compared to respective patient-matched uninvolved oral mucosa. OSCC frequently expressed DR4, DR5 and DcR1 but less frequently DcR2. Expression levels of DR4, DR5 and DcR1 receptors were not significantly altered in OPM, primary OSCC and metastatic OSCC compared to patient-matched normal oral mucosa. Expression of proapoptotic TRAIL-receptors DR4 and DR5 in OSCC seemed to depend, at least in part, on whether or not these receptors were expressed in their parental oral epithelia. High DR5 expression in primary OSCC correlated significantly with larger tumor size. There was no significant association between TRAIL-R expression and OSSC histology grade, nodal status or apoptosis rates of tumor cells and TIL. Conclusion Loss of TRAIL expression is an early event during oral

  5. Repression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) but not its receptors during oral cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Baucum, Darryl C; Wu, Jean; Lou, Yahuan; Bouquot, Jerry; Muller, Susan; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    TRAIL plays an important role in host immunosurveillance against tumor progression, as it induces apoptosis of tumor cells but not normal cells, and thus has great therapeutic potential for cancer treatment. TRAIL binds to two cell-death-inducing (DR4 and DR5) and two decoy (DcR1, and DcR2) receptors. Here, we compare the expression levels of TRAIL and its receptors in normal oral mucosa (NOM), oral premalignancies (OPM), and primary and metastatic oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) in order to characterize the changes in their expression patterns during OSCC initiation and progression. DNA microarray, immunoblotting and immunohistochemical analyses were used to examine the expression levels of TRAIL and its receptors in oral epithelial cell lines and in archival tissues of NOM, OPM, primary and metastatic OSCC. Apoptotic rates of tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in OSCC specimens were determined by cleaved caspase 3 immunohistochemistry. Normal oral epithelia constitutively expressed TRAIL, but expression was progressively lost in OPM and OSCC. Reduction in DcR2 expression levels was noted frequently in OPM and OSCC compared to respective patient-matched uninvolved oral mucosa. OSCC frequently expressed DR4, DR5 and DcR1 but less frequently DcR2. Expression levels of DR4, DR5 and DcR1 receptors were not significantly altered in OPM, primary OSCC and metastatic OSCC compared to patient-matched normal oral mucosa. Expression of proapoptotic TRAIL-receptors DR4 and DR5 in OSCC seemed to depend, at least in part, on whether or not these receptors were expressed in their parental oral epithelia. High DR5 expression in primary OSCC correlated significantly with larger tumor size. There was no significant association between TRAIL-R expression and OSSC histology grade, nodal status or apoptosis rates of tumor cells and TIL. Loss of TRAIL expression is an early event during oral carcinogenesis and may be involved in dysregulation of apoptosis and

  6. Development of a complete human anti-human transferrin receptor C antibody as a novel marker of oral dysplasia and oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Kentaro; Nakahata, Shingo; Shimosaki, Shunsuke; Tamura, Tomohiro; Kondo, Yuudai; Baba, Takashi; Taki, Tomohiko; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Kurosawa, Gene; Sudo, Yukio; Okada, Seiji; Sakoda, Sumio; Morishita, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Up to 20% of oral dysplasia cases have been suggested to undergo malignant transformation to OSCC; however, there are no methods to predict OSCC development. In this study, to identify the genes associated with oral dysplasia progression, we performed genomic copy number analyses of genomic DNA samples isolated from primary oral dysplasia and OSCC via the microdissection method and found elevated expression of transferrin receptor C (TfR1/TFRC) with genomic amplification in oral dysplasia and OSCC. The expression rate of TFRC in OSCC was significantly higher than that in dysplasia, suggesting that OSCC disease progression might be related to TFRC expression. Additionally, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo impacts of a newly established anti-human TFRC monoclonal antibody, which was isolated from a human cDNA library using the phage-display method, on cell proliferation and survival. The anti-TFRC antibody blocked the interaction between transferrin and TFRC and consequently inhibited iron uptake, leading to the iron deprivation-mediated suppression of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Moreover, we demonstrated that the anti-TFRC antibody efficiently inhibited tumor growth in a murine xenograft OSCC model. Therefore, we suggest our developed complete human anti-human TFRC antibody as a useful, novel treatment for oral dysplasia and OSCC

  7. Regulation of rat hepatocyte function by P2Y receptors: focus on control of glycogen phosphorylase and cyclic AMP by 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, C Jane; Hall, John F; Webb, Tania E; Boarder, Michael R

    2004-10-01

    Hepatocyte function is regulated by several P2Y receptor subtypes. Here we report that 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate (2-MeSADP), an agonist at P2Y(1), P2Y(12), and P2Y(13) receptors, potently (threshold 30 nM) stimulates glycogen phosphorylase in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Antagonism by N(6)-methyl 2'-deoxyadenosine 3',5'-bisphosphate (MRS 2179) confirms that this response is mediated by P2Y(1) receptors. In addition, in these cells, both 2-MeSADP and UTP inhibited glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation. This inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP was not reversed by the P2Y(1) antagonists, adenosine-3'-phosphate-5'-phosphate (A3P5P) or MRS 2179, both in the range 1 to 300 microM, indicating that it was not mediated by P2Y(1) receptors. This contrasts with the increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) induced by 2-MeSADP, which has shown to be inhibited by A3P5P. Pertussis toxin abolished the inhibitory effect of both UTP and 2-MeSADP. After culture of cells for 48 h, the ability of 2-MeSADP to inhibit cyclic AMP accumulation was greatly diminished. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that during this culture period, there was a decline in the ability to detect transcripts for P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptors, both of which are activated by 2-MeSADP and negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. However, in freshly isolated cells, the P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptor antagonist, 2-propylthio-beta,gamma-dichloromethylene-d-ATP (AR-C67085) (10 nM to 300 microM) did not alter the ability of 2-MeSADP to inhibit glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation. We conclude that 2-MeSADP regulates rat hepatocyte glycogen phosphorylase by acting on P2Y(1) receptors coupled to raised [Ca(2+)](c), and by inhibiting cyclic AMP levels by an unknown G(i)-coupled receptor subtype, distinct from P2Y(1), P2Y(12), or P2Y(13) receptors.

  8. Effects of the Oral Oxytocin Receptor Antagonist Tocolytic OBE001 on Reproduction in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Oliver; Perks, Deborah; Rhodes, Jon; Comotto, Laura; Baldrick, Paul; Chollet, André

    2016-04-01

    OBE001 is a novel, orally active nonpeptide oxytocin receptor antagonist under development for the treatment of preterm labor and improvement in embryo implantation and pregnancy rate in assisted reproductive technology (ART). The reproductive safety of OBE001 was evaluated in customized fertility embryonic development (FER)/early embryonic development (EED) and fetal development (FD) and pre/postnatal development (PPN) studies mimicking clinical exposure scenarios. Oral OBE001 was evaluated at doses of 37.5, 75, and 125 mg/kg/d in female rats during a FER/EED study (from premating to implantation) and throughout FD during a FD/PPN study. No OBE001 effects were observed during the FER/EED study. The FD/PPN study did not result in adverse OBE001 effects in females allowed to litter, their offspring, and second-generation fetuses. Females at 125 mg/kg/d who underwent cesarean section before term had slight reductions in body weights and food consumption, and associated fetuses had slightly delayed ossification of skull bones, which was not adverse in the absence of effects on live offspring. OBE001 at up to 125 mg/kg/d had no effects on EED and no adverse effects on FD and postnatal development of rats. These results constitute an important step toward the development of OBE001 in preterm labor and ART indications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Downregulation of toll-like receptor-mediated signalling pathways in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinon, Suraya H; Rich, Alison M; Parachuru, Venkata P B; Firth, Fiona A; Milne, Trudy; Seymour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLR) and TLR-associated signalling pathway genes in oral lichen planus (OLP). Initially, immunohistochemistry was used to determine TLR expression in 12 formalin-fixed archival OLP tissues with 12 non-specifically inflamed oral tissues as controls. RNA was isolated from further fresh samples of OLP and non-specifically inflamed oral tissue controls (n = 6 for both groups) and used in qRT(2)-PCR focused arrays to determine the expression of TLRs and associated signalling pathway genes. Genes with a statistical significance of ±two-fold regulation (FR) and a P-value < 0.05 were considered as significantly regulated. Significantly more TLR4(+) cells were present in the inflammatory infiltrate in OLP compared with the control tissues (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in the numbers of TLR2(+) and TLR8(+) cells between the groups. TLR3 was significantly downregulated in OLP (P < 0.01). TLR8 was upregulated in OLP, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. The TLR-mediated signalling-associated protein genes MyD88 and TIRAP were significantly downregulated (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05), as were IRAK1 (P < 0.05), MAPK8 (P < 0.01), MAP3K1 (P < 0.05), MAP4K4 (P < 0.05), REL (P < 0.01) and RELA (P < 0.01). Stress proteins HMGB1 and the heat shock protein D1 were significantly downregulated in OLP (P < 0.01). These findings suggest a downregulation of TLR-mediated signalling pathways in OLP lesions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Transcytosis of F4 fimbriae by villous and dome epithelia in F4-receptor positive pigs supports importance of receptor-dependent endocytosis in oral immunization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeck, Veerle; Van den Broeck, Wim; De Colvenaer, Veerle; Verdonck, Frank; Goddeeris, Bruno; Cox, Eric

    2008-07-15

    Very few antigens have been described that induce an intestinal immunity when given orally. Our laboratory demonstrated that oral administration of isolated F4 (K88) fimbriae of Escherichia coli to F4-receptor positive (F4R(+)) pigs induces protective mucosal immunity against challenge infection. However, presence of F4-receptors (F4R) on villous enterocytes is a prerequisite for inducing the immune response, as no F4-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) can be induced in F4R(-) pigs. In this study, the in vivo binding of isolated F4 fimbriae (F4) to the gut epithelium was examined in F4R(+) and F4R(-) pigs. It was further investigated whether binding of F4 to the F4R results in endocytosis in and translocation across the gut epithelium using microscopy. F4 did not adhere to the intestinal epithelium of F4R(-) pigs, whereas it strongly adhered to the villous epithelium and the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) of the jejunum and ileum of F4R(+) pigs. Following binding to F4R, F4 was endocytosed by villous enterocytes, follicle-associated enterocytes and M cells. Transcytosis of F4 across the epithelium resulted in the appearance of F4 in the lamina propria and dome region of the jejunal and ileal PP. This is the first study showing transcytosis of fimbriae across the gut epithelium. This receptor-dependent transcytosis can explain the success of F4 fimbriae as oral immunogen for inducing protective immunity in F4R(+) pigs strengthening the importance of receptor-dependent endocytosis and translocation in oral vaccine strategies. Further identification of the receptor responsible for this transport is in progress.

  11. Induction of ovulation by a potent, orally active, low molecular weight agonist (Org 43553) of the luteinizing hormone receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Lagemaat, R; Timmers, C M; Kelder, J; van Koppen, C; Mosselman, S; Hanssen, R G J M

    2009-03-01

    In assisted reproductive technology, human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) is administered subcutaneously for the induction of oocyte maturation and ovulation. Our efforts to develop orally bioavailable luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor agonists have led to the discovery of Org 43553, a low molecular weight (LMW) LH receptor (LH-R) agonist. Org 43553 was tested in vitro and in vivo in pre-clinical pharmacological models to demonstrate efficacy and oral availability. Org 43553 is a potent stimulator of the human LH-R in vitro (EC(50) 3.7 nM). In primary mouse Leydig cells, Org 43553 stimulated testosterone production. Pharmacokinetic analyses showed high oral bioavailability in rats (79%) and dogs (44%) with a shorter half-life compared with hCG (3.4 versus 5.6 h in the rat). Ovulation induction by Org 43553 was demonstrated in immature mice as well as in cyclic rats after single-dose oral administration (50 mg/kg). The ovulated oocytes were of good quality as demonstrated by successful fertilization and implantation of normal embryos. In male rats, testosterone production was substantially induced after oral administration. Org 43553 is the first LMW LH-R mimetic with demonstrated in vivo efficacy upon oral administration and could therefore replace subcutaneously administered hCG. The elimination half-life of Org 43553 is substantially shorter than hCG, which could potentially represent a clinical benefit in reducing the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS).

  12. Subcellular localisation of BAG-1 and its regulation of vitamin D receptor-mediated transactivation and involucrin expression in oral keratinocytes: Implications for oral carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, San San; Crabb, Simon J.; Janghra, Nari; Carlberg, Carsten; Williams, Ann C.; Cutress, Ramsey I.; Packham, Graham; Hague, Angela

    2007-01-01

    In oral cancers, cytoplasmic BAG-1 overexpression is a marker of poor prognosis. BAG-1 regulates cellular growth, differentiation and survival through interactions with diverse proteins, including the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a key regulator of keratinocyte growth and differentiation. BAG-1 is expressed ubiquitously in human cells as three major isoforms of 50 kDa (BAG-1L), 46 kDa (BAG-1M) and 36 kDa (BAG-1S) from a single mRNA. In oral keratinocytes BAG-1L, but not BAG-1M and BAG-1S, enhanced VDR transactivation in response to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3. BAG-1L was nucleoplasmic and nucleolar, whereas BAG-1S and BAG-1M were cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic in localisation. Having identified the nucleolar localisation sequence in BAG-1L, we showed that mutation of this sequence did not prevent BAG-1L from potentiating VDR activity. BAG-1L also potentiated transactivation of known vitamin-D-responsive gene promoters, osteocalcin and 24-hydroxylase, and enhanced VDR-dependent transcription and protein expression of the keratinocyte differentiation marker, involucrin. These results demonstrate endogenous gene regulation by BAG-1L by potentiating nuclear hormone receptor function and suggest a role for BAG-1L in 24-hydroxylase regulation of vitamin D metabolism and the cellular response of oral keratinocytes to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 . By contrast to the cytoplasmic BAG-1 isoforms, BAG-1L may act to suppress tumorigenesis

  13. Regulation of P2Y1 receptor traffic by sorting Nexin 1 is retromer independent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Shaista; Kelly, Eamonn; Cullen, Pete J; Mundell, Stuart J

    2010-04-01

    The activity and traffic of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is tightly controlled. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) responsiveness is rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets and that the underlying mechanism requires receptor trafficking as an essential part of this process. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying P2Y receptor traffic. Sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) has been shown to regulate the endosomal sorting of cell surface receptors either to lysosomes where they are downregulated or back to the cell surface. These functions may in part be due to interactions of SNX1 with the mammalian retromer complex. In this study, we investigated the role of SNX1 in P2Y receptor trafficking. We show that P2Y(1) receptors recycle via a slow recycling pathway that is regulated by SNX1, whereas P2Y(12) receptors return to the cell surface via a rapid route that is SNX1 independent. SNX1 inhibition caused a dramatic increase in the rate of P2Y(1) receptor recycling, whereas inhibition of Vps26 and Vps35 known to be present in retromer had no effect, indicating that SNX1 regulation of P2Y(1) receptor recycling is retromer independent. In addition, inhibition of SNX4, 6 and 17 proteins did not affect P2Y(1) receptor recycling. SNX1 has also been implicated in GPCR degradation; however, we provide evidence that P2Y receptor degradation is SNX1 independent. These data describe a novel function of SNX1 in the regulation of P2Y(1) receptor recycling and suggest that SNX1 plays multiple roles in endocytic trafficking of GPCRs.

  14. An Enantiomer of an Oral Small-Molecule TSH Receptor Agonist Exhibits Improved Pharmacologic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Susanne; Padia, Umesh; Cullen, Mary Jane; Eliseeva, Elena; Nir, Eshel A; Place, Robert F; Morgan, Sarah J; Gershengorn, Marvin C

    2016-01-01

    We are developing an orally available small-molecule, allosteric TSH receptor (TSHR) agonist for follow-up diagnostics of patients with thyroid cancer. The agonist C2 (NCGC00161870) that we have studied so far is a racemic mixture containing equal amounts of two enantiomers, E1 and E2. As enantiomers of many drugs exhibit different pharmacologic properties, we assessed the properties of E1 and E2. We separated the two enantiomers by chiral chromatography and determined E2 as the (S)-(+) isomer via crystal structure analysis. E1 and E2 were shown to bind differently to a homology model of the transmembrane domain of TSHR in which E2 was calculated to exhibit lower binding energy than E1 and was, therefore, predicted to be more potent than E1. In HEK293 cells expressing human TSHRs, C2, E1, and E2 were equally efficacious in stimulating cAMP production, but their potencies were different. E2 was more potent (EC50 = 18 nM) than C2 (EC50 = 46 nM), which was more potent than E1 (EC50 = 217 nM). In primary cultures of human thyrocytes, C2, E1, and E2 stimulated increases in thyroperoxidase mRNA of 92-, 55-, and 137-fold and in sodium-iodide symporter mRNA of 20-, 4-, and 121-fold above basal levels, respectively. In mice, C2 stimulated an increase in radioactive iodine uptake of 1.5-fold and E2 of 2.8-fold above basal level, whereas E1 did not have an effect. C2 stimulated an increase in serum T4 of 2.4-fold, E1 of 1.9-fold, and E2 of 5.6-fold above basal levels, and a 5-day oral dosing regimen of E2 increased serum T4 levels comparable to recombinant human TSH (rhTSH, Thyrogen(®)). Thus, E2 is more effective than either C2 or E1 in stimulating thyroid function and as efficacious as rhTSH in vivo. E2 represents the next step toward developing an oral drug for patients with thyroid cancer.

  15. An Enantiomer of an Oral Small Molecule TSH Receptor Agonist Exhibits Improved Pharmacologic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Neumann

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We are developing an orally available small molecule, allosteric TSH receptor (TSHR agonist for follow up diagnostics of patients with thyroid cancer. The agonist C2 (NCGC00161870 that we have studied so far is a racemic mixture containing equal amounts of two enantiomers, E1 and E2. As enantiomers of many drugs exhibit different pharmacologic properties, we assessed the properties of E1 and E2. We separated the two enantiomers by chiral chromatography and determined E2 as the (S-(+ isomer via crystal structure analysis. E1 and E2 were shown to bind differently to a homology model of the transmembrane domain of TSHR in which E2 was calculated to exhibit lower binding energy than E1 and was therefore predicted to be more potent than E1. In HEK293 cells expressing human TSHRs, C2, E1, and E2 were equally efficacious in stimulating cAMP production, but their potencies were different. E2 was more potent (EC50 = 18 nM than C2 (EC50 = 46 nM which was more potent than E1 (EC50 = 217 nM. In primary cultures of human thyrocytes, C2, E1, and E2 stimulated increases in thyroperoxidase mRNA of 92-, 55-, and 137-fold and in sodium-iodide symporter mRNA of 20-fold, 4-fold and 121-fold above basal levels, respectively. In mice, C2 stimulated an increase in radioactive iodine uptake of 1.5-fold and E2 of 2.8-fold above basal level, whereas E1 did not have an effect. C2 stimulated an increase in serum T4 of 2.4-fold, E1 of 1.9-fold, and E2 of 5.6-fold above basal levels, and a 5 day oral dosing regimen of E2 increased serum T4 levels comparable to recombinant human TSH (rhTSH, Thyrogen®. Thus, E2 is more effective than either C2 or E1 in stimulating thyroid function and as efficacious as rhTSH in vivo. E2 represents the next step toward developing an oral drug for patients with thyroid cancer.

  16. Involvement of transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 in intra-oral incisional pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, K; Shinoda, M; Ikutame, D; Iinuma, T; Iwata, K

    2018-03-05

    To examine whether transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) contributes to the changes in intra-oral thermal and mechanical sensitivity following the incision of buccal mucosa. Buccal mucosal pain threshold was measured after the incision. Changes in the number of TRPV2-immunoreactive (IR) trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons which innervate the whisker pad skin and buccal mucosa, changes in the number of isolectin B4-negative/isolectin B4-positive TRPV2-IR TG neurons which innervate the whisker pad skin and the buccal mucosa, and the effect of peripheral TRPV2 antagonism on the pain threshold of incisional whisker pad skin and buccal mucosa were examined after these injuries. Buccal mucosal pain hypersensitivities were induced on day 3 following the incision. The total number of TRPV2-IR TG neurons and the number of isolectin B4-negative TRPV2-IR TG neurons which innervate the whisker pad skin and buccal mucosa were increased. Buccal mucosal TRPV2 antagonism completely suppressed the heat and mechanical hypersensitivities, but not cold hypersensitivity. TRPV2 antagonist administration to the incisional whisker pad skin only partially suppressed pain hypersensitivities. The increased expression of TRPV2 in peptidergic TG neurons innervating the incisional buccal mucosa is predominantly involved in buccal mucosal heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia following buccal mucosal incision. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mineralocorticoid receptor haplotype moderates the effects of oral contraceptives and menstrual cycle on emotional information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstra, Danielle A; de Kloet, E Ronald; Tollenaar, Marieke; Verkuil, Bart; Manai, Meriem; Putman, Peter; Van der Does, Willem

    2016-10-01

    The processing of emotional information is affected by menstrual cycle phase and by the use of oral contraceptives (OCs). The stress hormone cortisol is known to affect emotional information processing via the limbic mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). We investigated in an exploratory study whether the MR-genotype moderates the effect of both OC-use and menstrual cycle phase on emotional cognition. Healthy premenopausal volunteers (n=93) of West-European descent completed a battery of emotional cognition tests. Forty-nine participants were OC users and 44 naturally cycling, 21 of whom were tested in the early follicular (EF) and 23 in the mid-luteal (ML) phase of the menstrual cycle. In MR-haplotype 1/3 carriers, ML women gambled more than EF women when their risk to lose was relatively small. In MR-haplotype 2, ML women gambled more than EF women, regardless of their odds of winning. OC-users with MR-haplotype 1/3 recognised fewer facial expressions than ML women with MR-haplotype 1/3. MR-haplotype 1/3 carriers may be more sensitive to the influence of their female hormonal status. MR-haplotype 2 carriers showed more risky decision-making. As this may reflect optimistic expectations, this finding may support previous observations in female carriers of MR-haplotype 2 in a naturalistic cohort study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Interactions between environmental factors and melatonin receptor type 1A polymorphism in relation to oral cancer susceptibility and clinicopathologic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Yan Lin

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the combined effect of melatonin receptor type 1A (MTNR1A gene polymorphisms and exposure to environmental carcinogens on the susceptibility and clinicopathological characteristics of oral cancer.Three polymorphisms of the MTNR1A gene from 618 patients with oral cancer and 560 non-cancer controls were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The CTA haplotype of the studied MTNR1A polymorphisms (rs2119882, rs13140012, rs6553010 was related to a higher risk of oral cancer. Moreover, MTNR1A gene polymorphisms exhibited synergistic effects of environmental factors (betel quid and tobacco use on the susceptibility of oral cancer. Finally, oral-cancer patients with betel quid-chewing habit who had T/T allele of MTNR1A rs13140012 were at higher risk for developing an advanced clinical stage and lymph node metastasis.These results support gene-environment interactions of MTNR1A polymorphisms with smoking and betel quid-chewing habits possibly altering oral-cancer susceptibility and metastasis.

  19. Discovery of an Acrylic Acid Based Tetrahydroisoquinoline as an Orally Bioavailable Selective Estrogen Receptor Degrader for ERα+ Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, Heather E.; Abrams, Tinya; Kirby, Christina A.; Baird, Jason; Fekete, Alexander; Hamann, Lawrence G.; Kim, Sunkyu; Lombardo, Franco; Loo, Alice; Lubicka, Danuta; Macchi, Kaitlin; McDonnell, Donald P.; Mishina, Yuji; Norris, John D.; Nunez, Jill; Saran, Chitra; Sun, Yingchuan; Thomsen, Noel M.; Wang, Chunrong; Wang, Jianling; Peukert, Stefan (Novartis); (Duke-MED)

    2017-03-15

    Tetrahydroisoquinoline 40 has been identified as a potent ERα antagonist and selective estrogen receptor degrader (SERD), exhibiting good oral bioavailability, antitumor efficacy, and SERD activity in vivo. We outline the discovery and chemical optimization of the THIQ scaffold leading to THIQ 40 and showcase the racemization of the scaffold, pharmacokinetic studies in preclinical species, and the in vivo efficacy of THIQ 40 in a MCF-7 human breast cancer xenograft model.

  20. Discovery and characterization of ACT-335827, an orally available, brain penetrant orexin receptor type 1 selective antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Michel A; Gatfield, John; Brisbare-Roch, Catherine; Dietrich, Hendrik; Treiber, Alexander; Jenck, Francois; Boss, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    Stress relief: Orexin neuropeptides regulate arousal and stress processing through orexin receptor type 1 (OXR-1) and 2 (OXR-2) signaling. A selective OXR-1 antagonist, represented by a phenylglycine-amide substituted tetrahydropapaverine derivative (ACT-335827), is described that is orally available, penetrates the brain, and decreases fear, compulsive behaviors and autonomic stress reactions in rats. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. p-Coumaric acid activates the GABA-A receptor in vitro and is orally anxiolytic in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepens, Arjan; Bisson, Jean-Francois; Skinner, Margot

    2014-02-01

    The increasing prevalence and social burden of subclinical anxiety in the western world represents a significant psychosocial and financial cost. Consumers are favouring a more natural and nonpharmacological approach for alleviating the effects of everyday stress and anxiety. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor is the primary mediator of central inhibitory neurotransmission, and GABA-receptor agonists are well known to convey anxiolytic effects. Using an in vitro screening approach to identify naturally occurring phytochemical GABA agonists, we discovered the plant secondary metabolite p-coumaric acid to have significant GABAergic activity, an effect that could be blocked by co-administration of the specific GABA-receptor antagonist, picrotoxin. Oral administration of p-coumaric acid to rodents induced a significant anxiolytic effect in vivo as measured using the elevated plus paradigm, in line with the effects of oral diazepam. Given that p-coumaric acid is reasonably well absorbed following oral consumption in man and is relatively nontoxic, it may be suitable for the formulation of a safe and effective anxiolytic functional food. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Receptor-mediated oral delivery of a bioencapsulated green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic chloroplasts into the mouse circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Arati; Koya, Vijay; Samsam, Mohtashem; Daniell, Henry

    2006-05-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutical proteins expressed in plant cells should reduce their cost of production, purification, processing, cold storage, transportation, and delivery. However, poor intestinal absorption of intact proteins is a major challenge. To overcome this limitation, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of chloroplast-expressed foreign proteins. Therefore, the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B-subunit and green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP), separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy. Immunoblot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of monomeric and pentameric forms of CTB-GFP, up to 21.3% of total soluble proteins. An in vitro furin cleavage assay confirmed integrity of the engineered furin cleavage site, and a GM1 binding assay confirmed the functionality of CTB-GFP pentamers. Following oral administration of CTB-GFP expressing leaf material to mice, GFP was observed in the mice intestinal mucosa, liver, and spleen in fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies, while CTB remained in the intestinal cell. This report of receptor-mediated oral delivery of a foreign protein into the circulatory system opens the door for low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins.

  3. Genotype-Specific Regulation of Oral Innate Immunity by T2R38 Taste Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Sucheol; Coldwell, Susan; Drury, Jeanie L.; Arroyo, Fabiola; Phi, Tran; Saadat, Sanaz; Kwong, Danny; Chung, Whasun Oh

    2015-01-01

    The bitter taste receptor T2R38 has been shown to regulate mucosal innate immune responses in the upper airway epithelium. Furthermore, SNPs in T2R38 influence the sensitivity to 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and are associated with caries risk/protection. However, no study has been reported on the role of T2R38 in the innate immune responses to oral bacteria. We hypothesize that T2R38 regulates oral innate immunity and that this regulation is genotype-specific. Primary gingival epithelial cells carrying three common genotypes, PAV/PAV (PROP super-taster), AVI/PAV (intermediate) and AVI/AVI (non-taster) were stimulated with cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans, periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis or non-pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum. QRT-PCR analyzed T2R38 mRNA, and T2R38-specific siRNA and ELISA were utilized to evaluate induction of hBD-2 (antimicrobial peptide), IL-1α and IL-8 in various donor-lines. Experiments were set up in duplicate and repeated three times. T2R38 mRNA induction in response to S. mutans was highest in PAV/PAV (4.3-fold above the unstimulated controls; p<0.05), while lowest in AVI/AVI (1.2-fold). In PAV/PAV, hBD-2 secretion in response to S. mutans was decreased by 77% when T2R38 was silenced. IL-1α secretion was higher in PAV/PAV compared to AVI/PAV or AVI/AVI with S. mutans stimulation, but it was reduced by half when T2R38 was silenced (p<0.05). In response to P. gingivalis, AVI/AVI showed 4.4-fold increase (p<0.05) in T2R38 expression, whereas the levels in PAV/PAV and AVI/PAV remained close to that of the controls. Secretion levels of IL-1α and IL-8 decreased in AVI/AVI in response to P. gingivalis when T2R38 was silenced (p<0.05), while the changes were not significant in PAV/PAV. Our data suggest that the regulation of gingival innate immunity by T2R38 is genotype-dependent and that the ability to induce a high level of hBD-2 by PAV/PAV carriers may be a reason for protection against caries in this group. PMID

  4. T1r3 taste receptor involvement in gustatory neural responses to ethanol and oral ethanol preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasser, Susan M; Norman, Meghan B; Lemon, Christian H

    2010-05-01

    Elevated alcohol consumption is associated with enhanced preference for sweet substances across species and may be mediated by oral alcohol-induced activation of neurobiological substrates for sweet taste. Here, we directly examined the contribution of the T1r3 receptor protein, important for sweet taste detection in mammals, to ethanol intake and preference and the neural processing of ethanol taste by measuring behavioral and central neurophysiological responses to oral alcohol in T1r3 receptor-deficient mice and their C57BL/6J background strain. T1r3 knockout and wild-type mice were tested in behavioral preference assays for long-term voluntary intake of a broad concentration range of ethanol, sucrose, and quinine. For neurophysiological experiments, separate groups of mice of each genotype were anesthetized, and taste responses to ethanol and stimuli of different taste qualities were electrophysiologically recorded from gustatory neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract. Mice lacking the T1r3 receptor were behaviorally indifferent to alcohol (i.e., ∼50% preference values) at concentrations typically preferred by wild-type mice (5-15%). Central neural taste responses to ethanol in T1r3-deficient mice were significantly lower compared with C57BL/6J controls, a strain for which oral ethanol stimulation produced a concentration-dependent activation of sweet-responsive NTS gustatory neurons. An attenuated difference in ethanol preference between knockouts and controls at concentrations >15% indicated that other sensory and/or postingestive effects of ethanol compete with sweet taste input at high concentrations. As expected, T1r3 knockouts exhibited strongly suppressed behavioral and neural taste responses to sweeteners but did not differ from wild-type mice in responses to prototypic salt, acid, or bitter stimuli. These data implicate the T1r3 receptor in the sensory detection and transduction of ethanol taste.

  5. Upregulated Expression of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Subfamily V Receptors in Mucosae of Patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Patients with a History of Alcohol Consumption or Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Akiko; Sakakibara, Shunsuke; Kusumoto, Junya; Takeda, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Takumi; Akashi, Masaya; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Terashi, Hiroto; Komori, Takahide

    2017-01-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel (subfamily V, members 1-4) (TRPV1-4) are expressed in skin and neurons and activated by external stimuli in normal mucosae of all oral cavity sites. The oral cavity is exposed to various stimuli, including temperature, mechanical stimuli, chemical substances, and changes in pH, and, notably, the risk factors for oncogenic transformation in oral squamous epithelium are the same as the external stimuli received by TRPV1-4 receptors. Hence, we examined the relationship between oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and TRPV1-4 expression. Oral SCC patients (n = 37) who underwent surgical resection were included in this study. We investigated the expression of TRPV1-4 by immunohistochemical staining and quantification of TRPV1-4 mRNA in human oral mucosa. In addition, we compared the TRPV1-4 levels in mucosa from patients with SCC to those in normal oral mucosa. The receptors were expressed in oral mucosa at all sites (tongue, buccal mucosa, gingiva, and oral floor) and the expression was stronger in epithelia from patients with SCC than in normal epithelia. Furthermore, alcohol consumption and tobacco use were strongly associated with the occurrence of oral cancer and were found to have a remarkable influence on TRPV1-4 receptor expression in normal oral mucosa. In particular, patients with a history of alcohol consumption demonstrated significantly higher expression levels. Various external stimuli may influence the behavior of cancer cells. Overexpression of TRPV1-4 is likely to be a factor in enhanced sensitivity to external stimuli. These findings could contribute to the establishment of novel strategies for cancer therapy or prevention.

  6. Prognostic value analysis of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in oral squamous cell carcinoma: an immunohistochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacchiocchi, Roberta; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Fazioli, Francesca; Rubini, Corrado; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Borghetti, Giulia; Procacci, Pasquale; Nocini, Pier Francesco; Santarelli, Andrea; Rocchetti, Romina; Ciavarella, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents the most common oral malignancy. Despite recent advances in therapy, up to 50% of the cases have relapse and/or metastasis. There is therefore a strong need for the identification of new biological markers able to predict the clinical behaviour of these lesions in order to improve quality of life and overall survival. Among tumour progression biomarkers, already known for their involvement in other neoplasia, a crucial role is ascribed to the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), which plays a multiple role in extracellular proteolysis, cell migration and tissue remodelling not only as a receptor for the zymogen pro-uPA but also as a component for cell adhesion and as a chemoattractant. The purpose of this study was to gain information on the expression of uPAR in OSCC and to verify whether this molecule can have a role as a prognostic/predictive marker for this neoplasia. In a retrospective study, a cohort of 189 OSCC patients was investigated for uPAR expression and its cellular localization by immunohistochemistry. As standard controls, 8 normal oral mucosal tissues free of malignancy, obtained from patients with no evidence or history of oral cavity tumours, were similarly investigated. After grouping for uPAR expression, OSCCs were statistically analyzed for the variables age, gender, histological grading (G), tumour size, recurrence, TNM staging and overall survival rate. In our immunohistochemical study, 74 cases (39.1%) of OSCC showed a mostly cytoplasmic positivity for uPAR, whereas 115 were negative. uPAR expression correlated with tumour differentiation grade and prognosis: percentage of positive cases was the greatest in G3 (70.4%) and patients positives for uPAR expression had an expectation of life lower than those for uPAR negatives. The results obtained in this study suggest a role of uPAR as a potential biomarker useful to identify higher risk subgroups of OSCC patients

  7. Discovery of a potent and selective free fatty acid receptor 1 agonist with low lipophilicity and high oral bioavailability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E; Urban, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1, also known as GPR40) mediates enhancement of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and is emerging as a new target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Several FFA1 agonists are known, but the majority of these suffer from high lipophilicity. We have previously...... reported the FFA1 agonist 3 (TUG-424). We here describe the continued structure-activity exploration and optimization of this compound series, leading to the discovery of the more potent agonist 40, a compound with low lipophilicity, excellent in vitro metabolic stability and permeability, complete oral...

  8. Functional expression of BMP7 receptors in oral epithelial cells. Interleukin-17F production in response to BMP7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Kensuke; Ozawa, Yasumasa; Ito, Hisanori; Kifune, Takashi; Narita, Tatsuya; Iinuma, Toshimitsu; Gionhaku, Nobuhito; Asano, Masatake

    2017-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily. Recently, BMP7 has been demonstrated to be produced by salivary glands and contribute to embryonic branching in mice. The BMP7 in saliva is thought to be delivered to the oral cavity and is expected to contact with stratified squamous epithelial cells which line the surface of oral mucosa. In this study, we attempted to investigate the effects of BMP7 on oral epithelial cells. The expression of BMP receptors was examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). OSCCs were stimulated with human recombinant BMP7 (hrBMP7) and the phosphorylation status of Smad1/5/8 was examined by western blotting. For microarray analysis, Ca9-22 cells were stimulated with 100 ng/mL of hrBMP7 and total RNA was extracted and subjected to real-time PCR. The 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IL-17 F gene was cloned to pGL4-basic vector and used for luciferase assay. Ca9-22 cells were pre-incubated with DM3189, a specific inhibitor of Smad1/5/8, for inhibition assay. All isoforms of type I and type II BMP receptors were expressed in both Ca9-22 and HSC3 cells and BMP7 stimulation resulted in the phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 in both cell lines. The microarray analysis revealed the induction of interleukin-17 F (IL-17 F), netrin G2 (NTNG2) and hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS1). Luciferase assay using the 5'-UTR of the IL-17 F gene revealed transcriptional regulation. Induced IL-17 F production was further confirmed at the protein level by ELISA. Smad1/5/8 inhibitor pretreatment decreased IL-17 F expression levels in the cells.

  9. Selectivity in progesterone and androgen receptor binding of progestagens used in oral contraceptives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloosterboer, H.J.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, C.A.; Turpijn, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    The relative binding affinities (RBAs) of four progestational compounds (norethisterone, levonorgestrel, 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene) for the human progesterone and androgen receptors were measured in MCF-7 cytosol and intact MCF-7 cells. For the binding to the progesterone receptor, both Org 2058 and Org 3236 (or 3-keto-desogestrel) were used as labelled ligands. The following ranking (low to high) for the RBA of the nuclear (intact cells) progesterone receptor irrespective of the ligand used is found: norethisterone much less than levonorgestrel less than 3-keto-destogestrel less than gestodene. The difference between the various progestagens is significant with the exception of that between 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene, when Org 2058 is used as ligand. For the cytosolic progesterone receptor, the same order is found with the exception that similar RBAs are found for gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel. The four progestagens clearly differ with respect to binding to the androgen receptor using dihydrotestosterone as labelled ligand in intact cells; the ranking (low to high) is: norethisterone less than 3 keto-desogestrel less than levonorgestrel and gestodene. The difference between 3-keto-desogestrel and levonorgestrel or gestodene is significant. The selectivity indices (ratio of the mean RBA for the progesterone receptor to that of androgen receptor) in intact cells are significantly higher for 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene than for levonorgestrel and norethisterone. From these results we conclude that the introduction of the 18-methyl in norethisterone (levonorgestel) increases both the binding to the progesterone and androgen receptors

  10. Inhibiting oral intoxication of botulinum neurotoxin A by carbohydrate receptor mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism manifested by flaccid paralysis that could be fatal to humans and animals. Oral ingestion of the toxin with contaminated food is one of the most common routes of BoNT intoxication, where BoNT assembles with several auxiliary proteins to surviv...

  11. Selective Killing Effects of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with NO Induced Dysfunction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hwan Lee

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP-induced radicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, which is overexpressed by oral squamous cell carcinoma, to determine the underlying mechanism of selective killing. CAP-induced highly reactive radicals were observed in both plasma plume and cell culture media. The selective killing effect was observed in oral squamous cell carcinoma compared with normal human gingival fibroblast. Degradation and dysfunction of EGFRs were observed only in the EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma and not in the normal cell. Nitric oxide scavenger pretreatment in cell culture media before CAP treatment rescued above degradation and dysfunction of the EGFR as well as the killing effect in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CAP may be a promising cancer treatment method by inducing EGFR dysfunction in EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma via nitric oxide radicals.

  12. Selective Killing Effects of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with NO Induced Dysfunction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Om, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP)-induced radicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed by oral squamous cell carcinoma, to determine the underlying mechanism of selective killing. CAP-induced highly reactive radicals were observed in both plasma plume and cell culture media. The selective killing effect was observed in oral squamous cell carcinoma compared with normal human gingival fibroblast. Degradation and dysfunction of EGFRs were observed only in the EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma and not in the normal cell. Nitric oxide scavenger pretreatment in cell culture media before CAP treatment rescued above degradation and dysfunction of the EGFR as well as the killing effect in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CAP may be a promising cancer treatment method by inducing EGFR dysfunction in EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma via nitric oxide radicals.

  13. Safety and effectiveness of the new P2Y12r inhibitor agents vs clopidogrel in ACS patients according to the geographic area: East Asia vs Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giordana, Francesca; Montefusco, Antonio; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Moretti, Claudio; Scarano, Silvia; Abu-Assi, Emad; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Henriques, Jose Paulo Simao; Saucedo, Jorge; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Wilton, Stephen B.; Kikkert, Wouter J.; Nuñez-Gil, Iván; Ariza-Sole, Albert; Song, Xiantao; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Liebetrau, Christoph; Kawaji, Tetsuma; Huczek, Zenon; Nie, Shao-Ping; Fujii, Toshiharu; Correia, Luis; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; García-Acuña, José María; Southern, Danielle; Alfonso, Emilio; Terol, Belén; Garay, Alberto; Zhang, Dongfeng; Chen, Yalei; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna; Osman, Neriman; Möllmann, Helge; Shiomi, Hiroki; Kowara, Michal; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Wang, Xiao; Yan, Yan; Fan, Jing-Yao; Ikari, Yuji; Nakahayshi, Takuya; Sakata, Kenji; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Kalpak, Oliver; Kedev, Sasko; Gaita, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the setting of the Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), differences in response to prasugrel and ticagrelor between East Asian and European patients have not been investigated yet. Methods: This is a sub-analysis of the "BleeMACS registry". Patients admitted for ACS and underwent PCI from

  14. Prasugrel but not high dose clopidogrel overcomes the lansoprazole neutralizing effect of P2Y12 inhibition: Results of the randomized DOSAPI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Jean-Philippe; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Abtan, Jérémie; Anzaha, Ghalia; Kerneis, Mathieu; Silvain, Johanne; Cayla, Guillaume; O'Connor, Stephen A; Barthélémy, Olivier; Beygui, Farzin; Galier, Sophie; Brugier, Delphine; Stanek, Eric J; Charland, Scott L; Gallois, Vanessa; Montalescot, Gilles

    2014-09-01

    The potential negative metabolic interaction between proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel is an unsolved issue. We hypothesized that doubling the clopidogrel maintenance dose (150 mg) would be less effective than switching to prasugrel 10 mg maintenance dose (MD) to overcome this negative interaction. In a randomized study with a factorial design, 82 stable coronary artery disease patients treated with 75 mg clopidogrel MD and aspirin were assigned to receive in a double blind fashion lansoprazole (30 mg/day) or placebo and to receive in an open fashion 150 mg clopidogrel MD or 10 mg prasugrel MD. The primary endpoint was the relative change in residual platelet reactivity over the 14-day study period [(RPA14day-RPAbaseline)/RPAbaseline]. The effect of doubling the clopidogrel MD on relative change in RPA was neutralized by lansoprazole (-53.6±48.4% versus +0.8±53.7% without and with lansoprazole, respectively, p = 0.02) whereas 10 mg of prasugrel MD dramatically reduced RPA irrespective of lansoprazole co-administration (-81.8 %±24.8% vs. -72.9%±32.9% without and with lansoprazole, respectively, p = NS). Lansoprazole exposure was the only parameter with a significant interaction with RPA among subgroups. The higher platelet inhibitory effect obtained by doubling the clopidogrel MD was totally neutralized by the co-administration of lansoprazole. This drug interaction was not observed with prasugrel 10 mg.

  15. A novel oral dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist (KBP-042) exerts antiobesity and antidiabetic effects in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Kim V; Feigh, Michael; Hjuler, Sara T

    2014-01-01

    -induced obese (DIO) and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. In vitro, KBP-042 demonstrated superior binding affinity and activation of amylin and calcitonin receptors, and ex vivo, KBP-042 exerted inhibitory action on stimulated insulin and glucagon release from isolated islets. In vivo, KBP-042 induced...... a superior and pronounced reduction in food intake in conjunction with a sustained pair-fed corrected weight loss in DIO rats. Concomitantly, KBP-042 improved glucose homeostasis and reduced hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia in conjunction with enhanced insulin sensitivity. In ZDF rats, KBP-042 induced...... antiobesity and antidiabetic efficacy by dual modulation of insulin sensitivity and directly decelerating stress on the pancreatic α- and β-cells. These results could provide the basis for oral KBP-042 as a novel therapeutic agent in type 2 diabetes....

  16. A randomized controlled non-inferiority study comparing the antiemetic effect between intravenous granisetron and oral azasetron based on estimated 5-HT3 receptor occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Junki; Iihara, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Maya; Yanase, Koumei; Kamiya, Fumihiko; Ito, Fumitaka; Funaguchi, Norihiko; Ohno, Yasushi; Minatoguchi, Shinya; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2012-09-01

    The acute antiemetic effect was compared between oral azasetron and intravenous granisetron based on the 5-hydroxytryptamine(3) (5-HT(3)) receptor occupancy theory. Receptor occupancy was estimated from reported data on plasma concentrations and affinity constants to 5-HT(3) receptor. A randomized non-inferiority study comparing acute antiemetic effects between oral azasetron and intravenous granisetron was performed in 105 patients receiving the first course of carboplatin-based chemotherapy for lung cancer. Azasetron exhibited the highest 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy among various first-generation 5-HT(3) antagonists. The complete response to oral azasetron was shown to be non-inferior to that of intravenous granisetron, in which the risk difference was 0.0004 (95% confidence interval: -0.0519-0.0527). The lower limit of the confidence intervals did not exceed the negative non-inferiority margin (-0.1). The complete response during the overall period was not different (68% versus 67%). Oral azasetron was found to be non-inferior to intravenous granisetron in the acute antiemetic effect against moderately emetogenic chemotherapy.

  17. A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of CCX282-B, an orally-administered blocker of chemokine receptor CCR9, for patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keshav, Satish; Vaňásek, Tomáš; Niv, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    CCX282-B, also called vercirnon, is a specific, orally-administered chemokine receptor CCR9 antagonist that regulates migration and activation of inflammatory cells in the intestine. This randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CCX282-B in 436...

  18. The Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Effects of LGD-4033, a Novel Nonsteroidal Oral, Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, in Healthy Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaria, Shehzad; Collins, Lauren; Dillon, E. Lichar; Orwoll, Katie; Storer, Thomas W.; Miciek, Renee; Ulloor, Jagadish; Zhang, Anqi; Eder, Richard; Zientek, Heather; Gordon, Gilad; Kazmi, Syed; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Concerns about potential adverse effects of testosterone on prostate have motivated the development of selective androgen receptor modulators that display tissue-selective activation of androgenic signaling. LGD-4033, a novel nonsteroidal, oral selective androgen receptor modulator, binds androgen receptor with high affinity and selectivity. Objectives. To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and effects of ascending doses of LGD-4033 administered daily for 21 days on lean body mass, muscle strength, stair-climbing power, and sex hormones. Methods. In this placebo-controlled study, 76 healthy men (21–50 years) were randomized to placebo or 0.1, 0.3, or 1.0 mg LGD-4033 daily for 21 days. Blood counts, chemistries, lipids, prostate-specific antigen, electrocardiogram, hormones, lean and fat mass, and muscle strength were measured during and for 5 weeks after intervention. Results. LGD-4033 was well tolerated. There were no drug-related serious adverse events. Frequency of adverse events was similar between active and placebo groups. Hemoglobin, prostate-specific antigen, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, or QT intervals did not change significantly at any dose. LGD-4033 had a long elimination half-life and dose-proportional accumulation upon multiple dosing. LGD-4033 administration was associated with dose-dependent suppression of total testosterone, sex hormone–binding globulin, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. follicle-stimulating hormone and free testosterone showed significant suppression at 1.0-mg dose only. Lean body mass increased dose dependently, but fat mass did not change significantly. Hormone levels and lipids returned to baseline after treatment discontinuation. Conclusions. LGD-4033 was safe, had favorable pharmacokinetic profile, and increased lean body mass even during this short period without change in prostate-specific antigen. Longer randomized trials should

  19. Fevipiprant, an oral prostaglandin DP2 receptor (CRTh2) antagonist, in allergic asthma uncontrolled on low-dose inhaled corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Eric D; Guerreros, Alfredo G; Brockhaus, Florian; Holzhauer, Björn; Pethe, Abhijit; Kay, Richard A; Townley, Robert G

    2017-08-01

    Dose-related efficacy and safety of fevipiprant (QAW039), an oral DP 2 (CRTh2) receptor antagonist, was assessed in patients with allergic asthma uncontrolled by low-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS).Adult patients were randomised to 12 weeks' treatment with once-daily (1, 3, 10, 30, 50, 75, 150, 300 or 450 mg q.d ) or twice-daily (2, 25, 75 or 150 mg b.i.d ) fevipiprant (n=782), montelukast 10 mg q.d (n=139) or placebo (n=137). All patients received inhaled budesonide 200 μg b.i.d Fevipiprant produced a statistically significant improvement in the primary end-point of change in pre-dose forced expiratory volume in 1 s at week 12 (p=0.0035) with a maximum model-averaged difference to placebo of 0.112 L. The most favourable pairwise comparisons to placebo were for the fevipiprant 150 mg q.d and 75 mg b.i.d groups, with no clinically meaningful differences between q.d and b.i.d Montelukast also demonstrated a significant improvement in this end-point. No impact on other efficacy end-points was observed. Adverse events were generally mild/moderate in severity, and were evenly distributed across doses and treatments.Fevipiprant appears to be efficacious and well-tolerated in this patient population, with an optimum total daily dose of 150 mg. Further investigations into the clinical role of fevipiprant in suitably designed phase III clinical trials are warranted. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  20. Early induction of cytokines/cytokine receptors and Cox2, and activation of NF-κB in 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced murine oral cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu-Ching [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ho, Heng-Chien; Lee, Miau-Rong [Department of Biochemistry, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Lai, Kuang-Chi [Department of Surgery, China Medical University Beigang Hospital, Yunlin 651, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chung-Min; Lin, Yueh-Min [Department of Pathology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Ho, Tin-Yun [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Hsiang, Chien-Yun, E-mail: cyhsiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chung, Jing-Gung, E-mail: jgchung@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genes induced early in murine oral carcinogenesis. Murine tongue tumors induced by the carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO), and paired non-tumor tissues were subjected to microarray analysis. Hierarchical clustering of upregulated genes in the tumor tissues revealed an association of induced genes with inflammation. Cytokines/cytokine receptors induced early were subsequently identified, clearly indicating their involvement in oral carcinogenesis. Hierarchical clustering also showed that cytokine-mediated inflammation was possibly linked with Mapk6. Cox2 exhibited the greatest extent (9–18 fold) of induction in the microarray data, and its early induction was observed in a 2 h painting experiment by RT-PCR. MetaCore analysis showed that overexpressed Cox2 may interact with p53 and transcriptionally inhibit expression of several downstream genes. A painting experiment in transgenic mice also demonstrated that NF-κB activates early independently of Cox2 induction. MetaCore analysis revealed the most striking metabolic alterations in tumor tissues, especially in lipid metabolism resulting from the reduction of Pparα and Rxrg. Reduced expression of Mapk12 was noted, and MetaCore analysis established its relationship with decreased efficiency of Pparα phosphorylation. In conclusion, in addition to cytokines/cytokine receptors, the early induction of Cox2 and NF-κB activation is involved in murine oral carcinogenesis.

  1. Early induction of cytokines/cytokine receptors and Cox2, and activation of NF-κB in 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced murine oral cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yu-Ching; Ho, Heng-Chien; Lee, Miau-Rong; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Yeh, Chung-Min; Lin, Yueh-Min; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genes induced early in murine oral carcinogenesis. Murine tongue tumors induced by the carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO), and paired non-tumor tissues were subjected to microarray analysis. Hierarchical clustering of upregulated genes in the tumor tissues revealed an association of induced genes with inflammation. Cytokines/cytokine receptors induced early were subsequently identified, clearly indicating their involvement in oral carcinogenesis. Hierarchical clustering also showed that cytokine-mediated inflammation was possibly linked with Mapk6. Cox2 exhibited the greatest extent (9–18 fold) of induction in the microarray data, and its early induction was observed in a 2 h painting experiment by RT-PCR. MetaCore analysis showed that overexpressed Cox2 may interact with p53 and transcriptionally inhibit expression of several downstream genes. A painting experiment in transgenic mice also demonstrated that NF-κB activates early independently of Cox2 induction. MetaCore analysis revealed the most striking metabolic alterations in tumor tissues, especially in lipid metabolism resulting from the reduction of Pparα and Rxrg. Reduced expression of Mapk12 was noted, and MetaCore analysis established its relationship with decreased efficiency of Pparα phosphorylation. In conclusion, in addition to cytokines/cytokine receptors, the early induction of Cox2 and NF-κB activation is involved in murine oral carcinogenesis.

  2. Functional transforming growth factor-β receptor type II expression by CD4+ T cells in Peyer's patches is essential for oral tolerance induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah S Gilbert

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown that Peyer's patches (PPs play a key role in the induction of oral tolerance. Therefore, we hypothesized that PPs are an important site for Transforming Growth Factor (TGF-β signaling and sought to prove that this tissue is of importance in oral tolerance induction. We found that expression of TGF-β type II receptor (TGFβRII by CD4(+ T cells increases and persists in the PPs of normal C57BL/6 mice after either high- or low-dose feeding of OVA when compared to mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs and spleen. Approximately one-third of these TGFβRII(+ CD4(+ T cells express the transcription factor Foxp3. Interestingly, the number of TGFβRII(+ CD4(+ T cells in PPs decreased when OVA-fed mice were orally challenged with OVA plus native cholera toxin (CT. In contrast, numbers of TGFβRII(+ CD4(+ T cells were increased in the intestinal lamina propria (iLP of these challenged mice. Further, these PP CD4(+ TGFβRII(+ T cells upregulated Foxp3 within 2 hours after OVA plus CT challenge. Mice fed PBS and challenged with OVA plus CT did not reveal any changes in TGFβRII expression by CD4(+ T cells. In order to test the functional property of TGFβRII in the induction of oral tolerance, CD4dnTGFβRII transgenic mice, in which TGFβRII signaling is abrogated from all CD4(+ T cells, were employed. Importantly, these mice could not develop oral tolerance to OVA. Our studies show a critical, dose-independent, role for TGFβRII expression and function by CD4(+ T cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, further underlining the vital role of PPs in oral tolerance.

  3. Mangiferin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-6 in human oral epithelial cells by suppressing toll-like receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Wang, Qi; Chen, Xinmin; Ding, Yi; Li, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Oral epithelial cells have currently been found to play an important role in inflammatory modulation in periodontitis. Mangiferin is a natural glucosylxanthone with anti-inflammatory activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulatory effect of mangiferin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in oral epithelial cells and the underlying mechanisms. The levels of LPS-induced IL-6 production in OKF6/TERT-2 oral keratinocytes were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 was determined using western blot analysis. And the phosphorylation of TLR downstream nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was examined using cell-based protein phosphorylation ELISA kits. We found that mangiferin reduced LPS-upregulated IL-6 production in OKF6/TERT-2 cells. Additionally, mangiferin inhibited LPS-induced TLR2 and TLR4 overexpression, and suppressed the phosphorylation of NF-κB, p38 MAPK and JNK. Moreover, mangiferin repressed IL-6 production and TLR signaling activation in a dose-dependent manner after 24h treatment. Mangiferin decreases LPS-induced production of IL-6 in human oral epithelial cells by suppressing TLR signaling, and this glucosylxanthone may have potential for the treatment of periodontitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Discovery of Indazoles as Potent, Orally Active Dual Neurokinin 1 Receptor Antagonists and Serotonin Transporter Inhibitors for the Treatment of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, Andrew P; Tora, George O; Huang, Hong; Conlon, David A; Davis, Carl D; Hanumegowda, Umesh M; Hou, Xiaoping; Hsiao, Yi; Hu, Joanna; Krause, Rudolph; Li, Yu-Wen; Newton, Amy E; Pieschl, Rick L; Raybon, Joseph; Rosner, Thorsten; Sun, Jung-Hui; Taber, Matthew T; Taylor, Sarah J; Wong, Michael K; Zhang, Huiping; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bronson, Joanne J; Macor, John E; Gillman, Kevin W

    2016-12-21

    Combination studies of neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonists and serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have shown promise in preclinical models of depression. Such a combination may offer important advantages over the current standard of care. Herein we describe the discovery and optimization of an indazole-based chemotype to provide a series of potent dual NK1 receptor antagonists/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors to overcome issues of ion channel blockade. This effort culminated in the identification of compound 9, an analogue that demonstrated favorable oral bioavailability, excellent brain uptake, and robust in vivo efficacy in a validated depression model. Over the course of this work, a novel heterocycle-directed asymmetric hydrogenation was developed to facilitate installation of the key stereogenic center.

  5. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF-2) and Its Receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 May Be Putative Biomarkers of Malignant Transformation of Potentially Malignant Oral Lesions into Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Seema; Goel, Madhu Mati; Makker, Annu; Bhatia, Vikram; Chandra, Saumya; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, S P

    2015-01-01

    There are several factors like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, genetic alterations, mutational factors that are involved in malignant transformation of potentially malignant oral lesions (PMOLs) to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is one of the prototypes of the large family of growth factors that bind heparin. FGF-2 induces angiogenesis and its receptors may play a role in synthesis of collagen. FGFs are involved in transmission of signals between the epithelium and connective tissue, and influence growth and differentiation of a wide variety of tissue including epithelia. The present study was undertaken to analyze expression of FGF-2 and its receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 in 72 PMOLs, 108 OSCC and 52 healthy controls, and their role in risk assessment for malignant transformation of Leukoplakia (LKP) and Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) to OSCC. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3. IHC results were validated by Real Time PCR. Expression of FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 was upregulated from PMOLs to OSCC. While 90% (9/10) of PMOLs which showed malignant transformation (transformed) expressed FGF-2, only 24.19% cases (15/62) of PMOLs which were not transformed (untransformed) to OSCC expressed FGF-2. Similarly, FGFR-2 expression was seen in 16/62 (25.81%) of untransformed PMOLs and 8/10 (80%) cases of transformed PMOLs. FGFR-3 expression was observed in 23/62 (37.10%) cases of untransformed PMOLs and 6/10 (60%) cases of transformed PMOLs. A significant association of FGF-2 and FGFR-2 expression with malignant transformation from PMOLs to OSCC was observed both at phenotypic and molecular level. The results suggest that FGF-2 and FGFR-2 may be useful as biomarkers of malignant transformation in patients with OSMF and LKP.

  6. Localization of integrin alpha(v)beta3 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (KDR/Flk-1) in cutaneous and oral melanomas of dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, N G; Simko, E; Bebchuk, T; Caldwell, S J; Singh, B

    2003-07-01

    Melanomas are common neoplasms of dogs and arise from pigment-producing cells called melanocytes or melanoblasts. Melanomas of skin are often easily cured by surgical excision, but those of oral mucosa are aggressive, metastasize to the regional lymph nodes and lungs, and respond poorly to conventional therapy. Tumor growth is sustained by proliferation of microvessels via a process called angiogenesis. Integrin alpha(v)beta3 is expressed in proliferating but not in quiescent microvessels suggesting a role in angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) manifests its mitogenic and angiogenic effects mainly via VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2/Flk-1). We conducted this immunocytochemical study to investigate the expression of integrin alpha(v)beta3 and VEGFR-2 in archival and fresh samples from cases of canine melanomas. Results show that integrin alpha(v)beta3 was expressed in 72% and 88% of cutaneous and oral melanomas, respectively, and the expression was restricted to and immediately around the melanocytes and endothelial cells. VEGFR-2 staining of selected cases of melanoma revealed that its expression overlapped with the alpha(v)beta3 integrin. Dual immuno-gold electron microscopy confirmed co-localization of integrin alpha(v)beta3 and VEGFR-2 in melanocytes and endothelial cells. These data demonstrate expression and co-localization of integrin alpha(v)beta3 and VEGFR-2 in cutaneous and oral melanomas of dogs.

  7. Systematic Design of Trypsin Cleavage Site Mutated Exendin4-Cysteine 1, an Orally Bioavailable Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Sai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Exendin-4 is a strong therapeutic candidate for the treatment of metabolic syndrome. Related receptor agonist drugs have been on the market since 2005. However, technical limitations and the pain caused by subcutaneous injection have severely limited patient compliance. The goal of the study is to investigate a biologically active exendin-4 analog could be administered orally. Using intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, we discovered that exendin4-cysteine administered by oral gavage had a distinct hypoglycemic effect in C57BL/6J mice. Using Rosetta Design and Amber, we designed and screened a series of exendin4-cysteine analogs to identify those that retained biological activity while resisting trypsin digestion. Trypsin Cleavage Site Mutated Exendin4-cysteine 1 (TSME-1, an analog whose bioactivity was similar to exendin-4 and was almost completely resistant to trypsin, was screened out. In addition, TSME-1 significantly normalized the blood glucose levels and the availability of TSME-1 was significantly higher than that of exendin-4 and exendin4-cysteine. Collectively orally administered TSME-1, a trypsin-resistant exendin-4 analog obtained by the system, is a strong candidate for future treatments of type 2 diabetes.

  8. Combined blockade of ADP receptors and PI3-kinase p110β fully prevents platelet and leukocyte activation during hypothermic extracorporeal circulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Krajewski

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal circulation (ECC and hypothermia are used to maintain stable circulatory parameters and improve the ischemia tolerance of patients in cardiac surgery. However, ECC and hypothermia induce activation mechanisms in platelets and leukocytes, which are mediated by the platelet agonist ADP and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K p110β. Under clinical conditions these processes are associated with life-threatening complications including thromboembolism and inflammation. This study analyzes effects of ADP receptor P(2Y(12 and P(2Y(1 blockade and PI3K p110β inhibition on platelets and granulocytes during hypothermic ECC. Human blood was treated with the P(2Y(12 antagonist 2-MeSAMP, the P(2Y(1 antagonist MRS2179, the PI3K p110β inhibitor TGX-221, combinations thereof, or PBS and propylene glycol (controls. Under static in vitro conditions a concentration-dependent effect regarding the inhibition of ADP-induced platelet activation was found using 2-MeSAMP or TGX-221. Further inhibition of ADP-mediated effects was achieved with MRS2179. Next, blood was circulated in an ex vivo ECC model at 28°C for 30 minutes and various platelet and granulocyte markers were investigated using flow cytometry, ELISA and platelet count analysis. GPIIb/IIIa activation induced by hypothermic ECC was inhibited using TGX-221 alone or in combination with P(2Y blockers (p<0.05, while no effect of hypothermic ECC or antiplatelet agents on GPIIb/IIIa and GPIbα expression and von Willebrand factor binding was observed. Sole P(2Y and PI3K blockade or a combination thereof inhibited P-selectin expression on platelets and platelet-derived microparticles during hypothermic ECC (p<0.05. P(2Y blockade alone or combined with TGX-221 prevented ECC-induced platelet-granulocyte aggregate formation (p<0.05. Platelet adhesion to the ECC surface, platelet loss and Mac-1 expression on granulocytes were inhibited by combined P(2Y and PI3K blockade (p<0.05. Combined blockade of P

  9. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  10. A Novel Orally Available Asthma Drug Candidate That Reduces Smooth Muscle Constriction and Inflammation by Targeting GABAA Receptors in the Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkuo, Gloria S; Nieman, Amanda N; Kodali, Revathi; Zahn, Nicolas M; Li, Guanguan; Rashid Roni, M S; Stephen, Michael Rajesh; Harris, Ted W; Jahan, Rajwana; Guthrie, Margaret L; Yu, Olivia B; Fisher, Janet L; Yocum, Gene T; Emala, Charles W; Steeber, Douglas A; Stafford, Douglas C; Cook, James M; Arnold, Leggy A

    2018-05-07

    We describe lead compound MIDD0301 for the oral treatment of asthma based on previously developed positive allosteric α 5 β 3 γ 2 selective GABA A receptor (GABA A R) ligands. MIDD0301 relaxed airway smooth muscle at single micromolar concentrations as demonstrated with ex vivo guinea pig tracheal rings. MIDD0301 also attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in an ovalbumin murine model of asthma by oral administration. Reduced numbers of eosinophils and macrophages were observed in mouse bronchoalveolar lavage fluid without changing mucous metaplasia. Importantly, lung cytokine expression of IL-17A, IL-4, and TNF-α were reduced for MIDD0301-treated mice without changing antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 levels. Automated patch clamp confirmed amplification of GABA induced current mediated by α 1-3,5 β 3 γ 2 GABA A Rs in the presence of MIDD0301. Pharmacodynamically, transmembrane currents of ex vivo CD4 + T cells from asthmatic mice were potentiated by MIDD0301 in the presence of GABA. The number of CD4 + T cells observed in the lung of MIDD0301-treated mice were reduced by an oral treatment of 20 mg/kg b.i.d. for 5 days. A half-life of almost 14 h was demonstrated by pharmacokinetic studies (PK) with no adverse CNS effects when treated mice were subjected to sensorimotor studies using the rotarod. PK studies also confirmed very low brain distribution. In conclusion, MIDD0301 represents a safe and improved oral asthma drug candidate that relaxes airway smooth muscle and attenuates inflammation in the lung leading to a reduction of AHR at a dosage lower than earlier reported GABA A R ligands.

  11. Roles of NMDA and dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in the acquisition and expression of flavor preferences conditioned by oral glucose in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Cruz, J A D; Coke, T; Icaza-Cukali, D; Khalifa, N; Bodnar, R J

    2014-10-01

    Animals learn to prefer flavors associated with the intake of sugar (sucrose, fructose, glucose) and fat (corn oil: CO) solutions. Conditioned flavor preferences (CFP) have been elicited for sugars based on orosensory (flavor-flavor: e.g., fructose-CFP) and post-ingestive (flavor-nutrient: e.g., intragastric (IG) glucose-CFP) processes. Dopamine (DA) D1, DA D2 and NMDA receptor antagonism differentially eliminate the acquisition and expression of fructose-CFP and IG glucose-CFP. However, pharmacological analysis of fat (CO)-CFP, mediated by both flavor-flavor and flavor-nutrient processes, indicated that acquisition and expression of fat-CFP were minimally affected by systemic DA D1 and D2 antagonists, and were reduced by NMDA antagonism. Therefore, the present study examined whether systemic DA D1 (SCH23390), DA D2 (raclopride) or NMDA (MK-801) receptor antagonists altered acquisition and/or expression of CFP induced by oral glucose that should be mediated by both flavor-flavor and flavor-nutrient processes. Oral glucose-CFP was elicited following by training rats to drink one novel flavor (CS+, e.g., cherry) mixed in 8% glucose and another flavor (CS-, e.g., grape) mixed in 2% glucose. In expression studies, food-restricted rats drank these solutions in one-bottle sessions (2 h) over 10 days. Subsequent two-bottle tests with the CS+ and CS- flavors mixed in 2% glucose occurred 0.5 h after systemic administration of vehicle (VEH), SCH23390 (50-800 nmol/kg), raclopride (50-800 nmol/kg) or MK-801 (50-200 μg/kg). Rats displayed a robust CS+ preference following VEH treatment (94-95%) which was significantly though marginally attenuated by SCH23390 (67-70%), raclopride (77%) or MK-801 (70%) at doses that also markedly reduced overall CS intake. In separate acquisition studies, rats received VEH, SCH23390 (50-400 nmol/kg), raclopride (50-400 nmol/kg) or MK-801 (100 μg/kg) 0.5 h prior to ten 1-bottle training trials with CS+/8%G and CS-/2%G training solutions that was

  12. Detección del receptor de factor de crecimiento epidérmico en lesiones orales premalignas por relaxometría

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Geli, Yamirka; De la Cruz, Enrique Reynaldo; Dutok Sánchez, Carlos M.; Álvarez Guerra, Eloy D

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: detectar la sobreexpresión del receptor de factor de crecimiento epidérmico en células epiteliales de lesiones premalignas de la mucosa bucal, marcadas magnéticamente por relaxometría. Métodos: las células exfoliadas de mucosa oral de individuos sanos y enfermos se marcaron con el sistema: IgG anti-EGF-R biotinilada/IgG anti-biotina conjugada con partículas superparamagnéticas y se midieron los tiempos de relajación T1 y T2. Resultados: disminuyeron los tiempos de relajación (T1 y T...

  13. Impact of obesity on taste receptor expression in extra-oral tissues : emphasis on hypothalamus and brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrera, Moro Chao D.; Argmann, C.; Eijk, van M.; Boot, R.G.; Ottenhoff, R.; Roomen, van C.; Foppen, E.; Siljee, J.E.; Unmehopa, U.A.; Kalsbeek, A.; Aerts, J.M.F.G.

    2016-01-01

    Sweet perception promotes food intake, whereas that of bitterness is inhibitory. Surprisingly, the expression of sweet G protein-coupled taste receptor (GPCTR) subunits (T1R2 and T1R3) and bitter GPCTRs (T2R116, T2R118, T2R138 and T2R104), as well as the α-subunits of the associated signalling

  14. Impact of obesity on taste receptor expression in extra-oral tissues: emphasis on hypothalamus and brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrera Moro Chao, D.; Argmann, C.; van Eijk, M.; Boot, R. G.; Ottenhoff, R.; van Roomen, C.; Foppen, E.; Siljee, J. E.; Unmehopa, U. A.; Kalsbeek, A.; Aerts, J. M. F. G.

    2016-01-01

    Sweet perception promotes food intake, whereas that of bitterness is inhibitory. Surprisingly, the expression of sweet G protein-coupled taste receptor (GPCTR) subunits (T1R2 and T1R3) and bitter GPCTRs (T2R116, T2R118, T2R138 and T2R104), as well as the alpha-subunits of the associated signalling

  15. Comparative Effects of Oral Chlorpyrifos Exposure on Cholinesterase Activity and Muscarinic Receptor Binding in Neonatal and Adult Rat Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Marcia D.; Mirajkar, Nikita; Karanth, Subramanya; Pope, Carey N.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the enzyme responsible for inactivating acetylcholine (ACh) at cholinergic synapses. A number of OP toxicants have also been reported to interact directly with muscarinic receptors, in particular the M2 muscarinic subtype. Parasympathetic innervation to the heart primarily regulates cardiac function by activating M2 receptors in the sinus node, atrial-ventricular node and conducting tissues. Thus, OP insecticides can potentially influence cardiac function in a receptor–mediated manner indirectly by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase and directly by binding to muscarinic M2 receptors. Young animals are generally more sensitive than adults to the acute toxicity of OP insecticides and age related differences in potency of direct binding to muscarinic receptors by some OP toxicants have been reported. We thus compared the effects of the common OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on functional signs of toxicity and cardiac ChE activity and muscarinic receptor binding in neonatal and adult rats. Dosages were based on acute lethality (i.e., 0.5 and 1 × LD10: neonates, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg; adults, 68 and 136 mg/kg). Dose- and time-related changes in body weight and cholinergic signs of toxicity (involuntary movements) were noted in both age groups. With 1 × LD10, relatively similar maximal reductions in ChE activity (95%) and muscarinic receptor binding (≈ 30%) were noted, but receptor binding reductions appeared earlier in adults and were more prolonged in neonates. In vitro inhibition studies indicated that ChE in neonatal tissues was markedly more sensitive to inhibition by the active metabolite of chlorpyrifos (i.e., chlorpyrifos oxon, CPO) than enzyme in adult tissues (IC50 values: neonates, 17 nM; adults, 200 nM). Chelation of free calcium with EDTA had relatively little effect on in vitro cholinesterase inhibition, suggesting that differential A-esterase activity was not

  16. Establishment of EMab-134, a Sensitive and Specific Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Monoclonal Antibody for Detecting Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Shunsuke; Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Chang, Yao-Wen; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a receptor tyrosine kinase, activates downstream signaling cascades in many tumors. In this study, we established novel anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and characterized their efficacy in flow cytometry, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses. We immunized mice with a combination of the extracellular domain of EGFR and EGFR-overexpressing LN229 glioblastoma cells (LN229/EGFR) and performed the first screening using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Next, we selected mAbs using flow cytometry. Among 156 established clones, two mAbs, EMab-51 (IgG 1 , kappa) and EMab-134 (IgG 1 , kappa), reacted with EGFR in Western blot analysis; EMab-134 showed a much higher sensitivity compared with EMab-51. We compared the binding affinities of EMab-51 and EMab-134 using flow cytometry; the calculated K D values for EMab-51 and EMab-134 against SAS cells/HSC-2 cells were 9.2 × 10 -9 M/9.9 × 10 -9 M and 2.6 × 10 -9 M/8.3 × 10 -9 M, respectively, indicating that EMab-134 has a higher affinity to EGFR-expressing cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of EMab-51 and EMab-134 showed sensitive and specific reactions against oral cancer cells; EMab-134 demonstrated a much higher sensitivity (36/38 cases; 94.7%) to oral squamous cell carcinomas compared with EMab-51 (6/38 cases; 15.8%). This novel anti-EGFR mAb, EMab-134, could be advantageous for detecting EGFR in the pathological analysis of EGFR-expressing cancers.

  17. Cediranib, an oral inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor kinases, is an active drug in recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulonis, Ursula A; Berlin, Suzanne; Ivy, Percy; Tyburski, Karin; Krasner, Carolyn; Zarwan, Corrine; Berkenblit, Anna; Campos, Susana; Horowitz, Neil; Cannistra, Stephen A; Lee, Hang; Lee, Julie; Roche, Maria; Hill, Margaret; Whalen, Christin; Sullivan, Laura; Tran, Chau; Humphreys, Benjamin D; Penson, Richard T

    2009-11-20

    Angiogenesis is important for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) growth, and blocking angiogenesis can lead to EOC regression. Cediranib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) -1, VEGFR-2, VEGFR-3, and c-kit. We conducted a phase II study of cediranib for recurrent EOC or peritoneal or fallopian tube cancer; cediranib was administered as a daily oral dose, and the original dose was 45 mg daily. Because of toxicities observed in the first 11 patients, the dose was lowered to 30 mg. Eligibility included 16 weeks, or CA-125 nonprogression > 16 weeks), which was the primary end point, was 30%; eight patients (17%; 95% CI, 7.6% to 30.8%) had a PR, six patients (13%; 95% CI, 4.8% to 25.7%) had SD, and there were no CRs. Eleven patients (23%) were removed from study because of toxicities before two cycles. Grade 3 toxicities (> 20% of patients) included hypertension (46%), fatigue (24%), and diarrhea (13%). Grade 2 hypothyroidism occurred in 43% of patients. Grade 4 toxicities included CNS hemorrhage (n = 1), hypertriglyceridemia/hypercholesterolemia/elevated lipase (n = 1), and dehydration/elevated creatinine (n = 1). No bowel perforations or fistulas occurred. Median PFS was 5.2 months, and median OS has not been reached; median follow-up time is 10.7 months. Cediranib has activity in recurrent EOC, tubal cancer, and peritoneal cancer with predictable toxicities observed with other TKIs.

  18. Role of toll-like receptor 4 on the immune escape of human oral squamous cell carcinoma and resistance of cisplatin-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zujun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is expressed on immune cells as a sensor that recognizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a microbial conserved component. It has recently been determined that the expression of TLR4 is also found in various types of tumor cells. Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC treatment. However, the mechanisms responsible for cisplatin resistance are not well understood. Results The present study was designed to elucidate the role of TLR4 expression in human OSCC regarding immune escape and apoptotic resistance to cisplatin. TLR4 and the myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88 were highly expressed in OSCC cell lines. Upon LPS stimulation both NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways were activated in OSCC cell lines, followed by the production of large quantities of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF compared with human immortalized oral epithelia cells (HIOECs. OSCC cell lines were found to be resistant to cisplatin-mediated apoptosis after pretreatment with LPS. Conclusions Our results suggested that TLR4 was functionally expressed in human OSCC cells and development of resistance to cisplatin in human OSCC might occur through the mechanism involving TLR4 and its signaling pathway. Suppression of TLR4 and its signaling pathway might thus elevate sensitivity to cisplatin and potentially help improve the prognosis of patients with OSCC.

  19. Effects of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen administered orally on normal food intake and intraperitoneally on fat intake in non-deprived rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Rasneer S; Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2013-01-05

    It has been previously reported that the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen decreases food intake after oral administration and fat intake after intraperitoneal administration. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of baclofen (1-4 mg/ kg) administered orally (Experiment 1) on food intake in non-deprived rats (n=6) and intraperitoneally (Experiment 2) on fat intake in non-deprived rats (n=8) that were naïve to baclofen (1st set of trials) and in the same group of rats after they were sub-chronically exposed to baclofen (2nd set of trials). The results from Experiment 1 show that baclofen had no effects on food intake during the 1st set of trials, but the 2 and 4 mg/kg doses significantly increased food consumption during the 2nd set of trials. Baclofen produced sedation during the 1st set of trials, but tolerance occurred to this effect and was not apparent during the 2nd set of trials. These observations suggest that the motor effects may have competed with the hyperphagic effects of baclofen during the 1st set of trials. The data from Experiment 2 show that baclofen had no effects on fat intake during either the 1st or 2nd set of trials. The results of the study thus indicate that orally administrated baclofen increases food intake and intraperitoneal administration has no effect on fat intake in non-deprived rats under the conditions used in this study. These findings may have important implications for research on the use of baclofen in studies concerned with ingestive behaviours. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute oral administration of the novel, competitive and selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34517 reduces the severity of ethanol withdrawal and related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Anna R; Saunders, Meredith A; Brewton, Honoree' W; Winchester, Sydney R; Elgumati, Ibrahim S; Prendergast, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    The development of ethanol dependence is associated with alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and activation of type II glucocorticoid receptors (GR). These effects may contribute to withdrawal-associated anxiety, craving and relapse to drinking. The present studies examined acute and oral administration of the novel, selective and competitive GR antagonist ORG 34517 on the severity of ethanol withdrawal. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered ethanol (4g/kg/i.g.) twice daily for 5 days followed by 2 days of withdrawal for 1, 2 or 3 consecutive cycles. Blood ethanol levels (BELs) were determined at 0930 on Day 4 of each week, while blood corticosterone levels (BCLs) were obtained at 11:00hours on the first day of each ethanol withdrawal. During early withdrawal, subjects received oral administration of ORG 345617 (60mg/kg/i.g.) or a placebo and withdrawal was monitored. Peak BELs of 225.52mg/dl were observed during the third week. Withdrawal from three cycles of the regimen produced marked behavioral abnormalities (e.g., aggression, rigidity, and hypoactivity) and significant increases in BCLs of ethanol-dependent subjects. Acute, oral administration of ORG 34517 during early withdrawal significantly reduced both the severity of ethanol withdrawal, as reflected in reduced rigidity, aggression, and hypoactivity, and elevations in BCL without producing any sedative-like effects. The present findings demonstrate that repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal is associated with significant behavioral abnormalities and dysregulation of HPA axis activation. Further these data suggest that selective GR antagonists should be further considered as putative pharmacotherapies for treatment of ethanol dependence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Human Papillomavirus and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Correlation With Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Seong; Park, Mina; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Koh, Yoon Woo; Lee, Seung-Koo; Kim, Jinna

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) parameters on the basis of the status of human papillomavirus (HPV) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarkers in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and oropharynx by use of histogram analysis. A total of 22 consecutive patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC underwent DCE-MRI before receiving treatment. DCE parameter maps of the volume transfer constant (K(trans)), the flux rate constant (kep), and the extravascular extracellular volume fraction (ve) were obtained. The histogram parameters were calculated using the entire enhancing tumor volume and were compared between the patient subgroups on the basis of HPV and EGFR biomarker statuses. The cumulative histogram parameters of K(trans) and kep showed lower values in the HPV-negative and EFGR-overexpression group than in the HPV-positive EGFR-negative group. These differences were statistically significant for the mean (p = 0.009), 25th, 50th, and 75th percentile values of K(trans) and for the 25th percentile value of kep when correlated with HPV status in addition to the mean K(trans) value (p = 0.047) and kep value (p = 0.004) when correlated with EGFR status. No statistically significant difference in ve was found on the basis of HPV and EGFR status. DCE-MRI is useful for the assessment of the tumor microenvironment associated with HPV and EGFR biomarkers before treatment of patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC.

  2. MicroRNA-375 Inhibits Growth and Enhances Radiosensitivity in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Targeting Insulin Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as key players in various human biological processes, including tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the roles of miR-375 in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Methods: We performed quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR to detect miR-375 expression in OSCC tissues and corresponding normal oral epithelial tissues and analyze the correlation of miR-375 expression with OSCC metastasis and patient’s survival. Then, the effects of miR-375 expression on proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and radiosensitivity in OSCC cells were determined by using MTT, flow cytometry and clonogenic survival assays. A dual-luciferase reporter assay was performed to test whether miR-375 binds to the 3’-untranslated region (3’-UTR of target mRNA. Results: The expression level of miR-375 in OSCC tissues was significantly lower than that in normal oral epithelial tissues, and low miR-375 expression was correlated with higher incidence of lymph node metastasis and poor survival of OSCC patients. Upregulation of miR-375 significantly inhibits growth, induces cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase, increases apoptosis and enhances radiosensitivity in OSCC cells. Analysis of luciferase activity demonstrated that miR-375 binds to the 3’-UTR of insulin like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R. Small interfering RNA (shRNA-mediated IGF-1R knockdown mimics the effects of miR-375 upregulation, while overexpression of IGF-1R partially reverses those effects in OSCC cells. Conclusion: It was obviously demonstrated that miRNA-375 inhibits growth and enhances radiosensitivity in OSCC cells by targeting IGF-1R, suggesting that miR-375 may be a potential therapeutic target for OSCC patients.

  3. R-268712, an orally active transforming growth factor-β type I receptor inhibitor, prevents glomerular sclerosis in a Thy1 nephritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Hideki; Kato, Mikio; Ebisawa, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Hideki; Suzuki, Kanae; Nezu, Yoshikazu; Sada, Toshio

    2014-07-05

    R-268712 is a novel and specific inhibitor of activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5), a transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) type I receptor. Evaluation of in vitro inhibition indicated that R-268712 is a potent and selective inhibitor of ALK5 with an IC50 of 2.5nM, an approximately 5000-fold more selectivity for ALK5 than p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Oral administration of R-268712 at doses of 1, 3 and 10mg/kg also inhibited the development of renal fibrosis in a dose-dependent manner in a unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model. Additionally, we evaluated the efficacy of R-268712 in a heminephrectomized anti-Thy1 glomerulonephritis model at doses of 0.3 and 1mg/kg. R-268712 reduced proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis significantly with improvement of renal function. Collectively, these results suggested that R-268712 and other ALK5 inhibitors could suppress glomerulonephritis as well as glomerulosclerosis by an inhibitory mechanism that involves suppression of TGF-β signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Oral administration of the 5-HT6 receptor antagonists SB-357134 and SB-399885 improves memory formation in an autoshaping learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-García, Georgina; Meneses, Alfredo

    2005-07-01

    In this work we aimed to re-examine the 5-HT6 receptor role, by testing the selective antagonists SB-357134 (1-30 mg/kg p.o.) and SB-399885 (1-30 mg/kg p.o.) during memory consolidation of conditioned responses (CR%), in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental learning task. Bioavailability, half-life and minimum effective dose to induce inappetence for SB-357134 were 65%, 3.4 h, and 30 mg/kg p.o., and for SB-399885 were 52%, 2.2 h, and 50 mg/kg p.o., respectively. Oral acute and chronic administration of either SB-357134 or SB-399885 improved memory consolidation compared to control groups. Acute administration of SB-357134, at 1, 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, produced a CR% inverted-U curve, eliciting the latter dose a 7-fold increase relative to saline group. Acute injection of SB-399885 produced significant CR% increments, being 1 mg/kg the most effective dose. Repeated administration (7 days) of either SB-357134 (10 mg/kg) or SB-399885 (1 mg/kg) elicited the most significant CR% increments. Moreover, modeling the potential therapeutic benefits of 5-HT6 receptor blockade, acute or repeated administration of SB-399885, at 10 mg/kg reversed memory deficits produced by scopolamine or dizocilpine, and SB-357134 (3 and 10 mg/kg) prevented amnesia and even improved performance. These data support the notion that endogenously 5-HT acting, via 5-HT6 receptor, improves memory consolidation.

  5. Oral haloperidol or olanzapine intake produces distinct and region-specific increase in cannabinoid receptor levels that is prevented by high fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, Foteini; Rosko, Lauren; Shroff, Aditya; Leonard, Kenneth E; Thanos, Panayotis K

    2017-10-03

    Clinical studies show higher levels of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1R) in the brain of schizophrenic patients while preclinical studies report a significant functional interaction between dopamine D2 receptors and CB1Rs as well as an upregulation of CB1Rs after antipsychotic treatment. These findings prompted us to study the effects of chronic oral intake of a first and a second generation antipsychotic, haloperidol and olanzapine, on the levels and distribution of CB1Rs in the rat brain. Rats consumed either regular chow or high-fat food and drank water, haloperidol drinking solution (1.5mg/kg), or olanzapine drinking solution (10mg/kg) for four weeks. Motor and cognitive functions were tested at the end of treatment week 3 and upon drug discontinuation. Two days after drug discontinuation, rats were euthanized and brains were processed for in vitro receptor autoradiography. In chow-fed animals, haloperidol and olanzapine increased CB1R levels in the basal ganglia and the hippocampus, in a similar, but not identical pattern. In addition, olanzapine had unique effects in CB1R upregulation in higher order cognitive areas, in the secondary somatosensory cortex, in the visual and auditory cortices and the geniculate nuclei, as well as in the hypothalamus. High fat food consumption prevented antipsychotic-induced increase in CB1R levels in all regions examined, with one exception, the globus pallidus, in which they were higher in haloperidol-treated rats. The results point towards the hypothesis that increased CB1R levels could be a confounding effect of antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia that is circumveneted by high fat feeding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by TAK-385 (relugolix), a novel, investigational, orally active, small molecule gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist: studies in human GnRH receptor knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Daisuke; Masaki, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Akira; Yoshimatsu, Mie; Akinaga, Yumiko; Asada, Mari; Sasada, Reiko; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Kusaka, Masami

    2014-01-15

    TAK-385 (relugolix) is a novel, non-peptide, orally active gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist, which builds on previous work with non-peptide GnRH antagonist TAK-013. TAK-385 possesses higher affinity and more potent antagonistic activity for human and monkey GnRH receptors compared with TAK-013. Both TAK-385 and TAK-013 have low affinity for the rat GnRH receptor, making them difficult to evaluate in rodent models. Here we report the human GnRH receptor knock-in mouse as a humanized model to investigate pharmacological properties of these compounds on gonadal function. Twice-daily oral administration of TAK-013 (10mg/kg) for 4 weeks decreased the weights of testes and ventral prostate in male knock-in mice but not in male wild-type mice, demonstrating the validity of this model to evaluate antagonists for the human GnRH receptor. The same dose of TAK-385 also reduced the prostate weight to castrate levels in male knock-in mice. In female knock-in mice, twice-daily oral administration of TAK-385 (100mg/kg) induced constant diestrous phases within the first week, decreased the uterus weight to ovariectomized levels and downregulated GnRH receptor mRNA in the pituitary after 4 weeks. Gonadal function of TAK-385-treated knock-in mice began to recover after 5 days and almost completely recovered within 14 days after drug withdrawal in both sexes. Our findings demonstrate that TAK-385 acts as an antagonist for human GnRH receptor in vivo and daily oral administration potently, continuously and reversibly suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. TAK-385 may provide useful therapeutic interventions in hormone-dependent diseases including endometriosis, uterine fibroids and prostate cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Agmatine attenuates reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia in mice: Role of oxidative stress, nitric oxide and glutamate NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Andréia S; Matheus, Filipe C; Moretti, Morgana; Sampaio, Tuane B; Poli, Anicleto; Santos, Danúbia B; Colle, Dirleise; Cunha, Mauricio P; Blum-Silva, Carlos H; Sandjo, Louis P; Reginatto, Flávio H; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Farina, Marcelo; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-10-01

    Dyskinesia consists in a series of trunk, limbs and orofacial involuntary movements that can be observed following long-term pharmacological treatment in some psychotic and neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease, respectively. Agmatine is an endogenous arginine metabolite that emerges as neuromodulator and a promising agent to manage diverse central nervous system disorders by modulating nitric oxide (NO) pathway, glutamate NMDA receptors and oxidative stress. Herein, we investigated the effects of a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of different agmatine doses (10, 30 or 100mg/kg) against the orofacial dyskinesia induced by reserpine (1mg/kg,s.c.) in mice by measuring the vacuous chewing movements and tongue protusion frequencies, and the duration of facial twitching. The results showed an orofacial antidyskinetic effect of agmatine (30mg/kg, i.p.) or the combined administration of sub-effective doses of agmatine (10mg/kg, i.p.) with the NMDA receptor antagonists amantadine (1mg/kg, i.p.) and MK801 (0.01mg/kg, i.p.) or the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI; 0.1mg/kg, i.p.). Reserpine-treated mice displayed locomotor activity deficits in the open field and agmatine had no effect on this response. Reserpine increased nitrite and nitrate levels in cerebral cortex, but agmatine did not reverse it. Remarkably, agmatine reversed the decrease of dopamine and non-protein thiols (NPSH) levels caused by reserpine in the striatum. However, no changes were observed in striatal immunocontent of proteins related to the dopaminergic system including tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, pDARPP-32[Thr75], dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. These results indicate that the blockade of NO pathway, NMDAR and oxidative stress are possible mechanisms associated with the protective effects of agmatine against the orofacial dyskinesia induced by reserpine in mice

  8. Effect of food on the oral bioavailability of the angiotensin receptor - neprilysin inhibitor sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) in healthy subjects
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Langenickel, Thomas H; Chandra, Priya; Wolfson, Edward D; Albrecht, Diego; Zhou, Wei; Pal, Parasar; Rajman, Iris; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2016-12-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) provides a novel therapeutic approach of neurohormonal modulation in heart failure via simultaneous inhibition of neprilysin and blockade of the angiotensin II type-1 receptor. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of food on the oral bioavailability of LCZ696 analytes. This was an open-label, randomized, 3-period crossover study in healthy subjects. Eligible subjects (N = 36) were randomized to 6 treatment sequences, each comprising 3 treatment periods during which subjects received a single oral dose of 400 mg LCZ696 under fasting condition and following a low- and high-fat meal. Following administration of LCZ696 after low- and high-fat meals, the mean Cmax of sacubitril and sacubitrilat (the active neprilysin inhibitor) decreased by 42 - 54% and 19 - 28%, respectively, while the tmax values increased. However, systemic exposure (AUCinf and AUClast) of sacubitril was slightly decreased (by 16% with low-fat meal) and that of sacubitrilat was unchanged in the presence of food. For valsartan, the Cmax decreased by ~ 40% when LCZ696 was administered after low- and high-fat meals. The systemic exposure of valsartan decreased by ~ 33% with a low-fat meal; however, it was unchanged with a high-fat meal. LCZ696 was generally safe and well tolerated in healthy subjects when administered under fasting or fed condition. Overall, administration of LCZ696 with meals decreased the rate and extent of absorption of sacubitril with little impact on the systemic exposure to sacubitrilat, its active metabolite. The systemic exposure to valsartan was decreased in the presence of food.
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  9. Stimulation of serotonin2C receptors elicits abnormal oral movements by acting on pathways other than the sensorimotor one in the rat basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyeler, A; Kadiri, N; Navailles, S; Boujema, M Ben; Gonon, F; Moine, C Le; Gross, C; De Deurwaerdère, P

    2010-08-11

    Serotonin2C (5-HT(2C)) receptors act in the basal ganglia, a group of sub-cortical structures involved in motor behavior, where they are thought to modulate oral activity and participate in iatrogenic motor side-effects in Parkinson's disease and Schizophrenia. Whether abnormal movements initiated by 5-HT(2C) receptors are directly consequent to dysfunctions of the motor circuit is uncertain. In the present study, we combined behavioral, immunohistochemical and extracellular single-cell recordings approaches in rats to investigate the effect of the 5-HT(2C) agonist Ro-60-0175 respectively on orofacial dyskinesia, the expression of the marker of neuronal activity c-Fos in basal ganglia and the electrophysiological activity of substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) neuron connected to the orofacial motor cortex (OfMC) or the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The results show that Ro-60-0175 (1 mg/kg) caused bouts of orofacial movements that were suppressed by the 5-HT(2C) antagonist SB-243213 (1 mg/kg). Ro-60-0175 (0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg) dose-dependently enhanced Fos expression in the striatum and the nucleus accumbens. At the highest dose, it enhanced Fos expression in the subthalamic nucleus, the SNr and the entopeduncular nucleus but not in the external globus pallidus. However, the effect of Ro-60-0175 was mainly associated with associative/limbic regions of basal ganglia whereas subregions of basal ganglia corresponding to sensorimotor territories were devoid of Fos labeling. Ro-60-0175 (1-3 mg/kg) did not affect the electrophysiological activity of SNr neurons connected to the OfMC nor their excitatory-inhibitory-excitatory responses to the OfMC electrical stimulation. Conversely, Ro-60-0175 (1 mg/kg) enhanced the late excitatory response of SNr neurons evoked by the mPFC electrical stimulation. These results suggest that oral dyskinesia induced by 5-HT(2C) agonists are not restricted to aberrant signalling in the orofacial motor circuit and demonstrate discrete

  10. Medicinal chemistry of adenosine, P2Y and P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kenneth A; Müller, Christa E

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological tool compounds are now available to define action at the adenosine (ARs), P2Y and P2X receptors. We present a selection of the most commonly used agents to study purines in the nervous system. Some of these compounds, including A1 and A3 AR agonists, P2Y1R and P2Y12R antagonists, and P2X3, P2X4 and P2X7 antagonists, are potentially of clinical use in treatment of disorders of the nervous system, such as chronic pain, neurodegeneration and brain injury. Agonists of the A2AAR and P2Y2R are already used clinically, P2Y12R antagonists are widely used antithrombotics and an antagonist of the A2AAR is approved in Japan for treating Parkinson's disease. The selectivity defined for some of the previously introduced compounds has been revised with updated pharmacological characterization, for example, various AR agonists and antagonists were deemed A1AR or A3AR selective based on human data, but species differences indicated a reduction in selectivity ratios in other species. Also, many of the P2R ligands still lack bioavailability due to charged groups or hydrolytic (either enzymatic or chemical) instability. X-ray crystallographic structures of AR and P2YRs have shifted the mode of ligand discovery to structure-based approaches rather than previous empirical approaches. The X-ray structures can be utilized either for in silico screening of chemically diverse libraries for the discovery of novel ligands or for enhancement of the properties of known ligands by chemical modification. Although X-ray structures of the zebrafish P2X4R have been reported, there is scant structural information about ligand recognition in these trimeric ion channels. In summary, there are definitive, selective agonists and antagonists for all of the ARs and some of the P2YRs; while the pharmacochemistry of P2XRs is still in nascent stages. The therapeutic potential of selectively modulating these receptors is continuing to gain interest in such fields as cancer, inflammation, pain

  11. Discovery of (1R,2S)-2-{[(2,4-Dimethylpyrimidin-5-yl)oxy]methyl}-2-(3-fluorophenyl)-N-(5-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclopropanecarboxamide (E2006): A Potent and Efficacious Oral Orexin Receptor Antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yu; Naoe, Yoshimitsu; Terauchi, Taro; Ozaki, Fumihiro; Doko, Takashi; Takemura, Ayumi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Sorimachi, Keiichi; Beuckmann, Carsten T; Suzuki, Michiyuki; Ueno, Takashi; Ozaki, Shunsuke; Yonaga, Masahiro

    2015-06-11

    The orexin/hypocretin receptors are a family of G protein-coupled receptors and consist of orexin-1 (OX1) and orexin-2 (OX2) receptor subtypes. Orexin receptors are expressed throughout the central nervous system and are involved in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle. Because modulation of these receptors constitutes a promising target for novel treatments of disorders associated with the control of sleep and wakefulness, such as insomnia, the development of orexin receptor antagonists has emerged as an important focus in drug discovery research. Here, we report the design, synthesis, characterization, and structure-activity relationships (SARs) of novel orexin receptor antagonists. Various modifications made to the core structure of a previously developed compound (-)-5, the lead molecule, resulted in compounds with improved chemical and pharmacological profiles. The investigation afforded a potential therapeutic agent, (1R,2S)-2-{[(2,4-dimethylpyrimidin-5-yl)oxy]methyl}-2-(3-fluorophenyl)-N-(5-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclopropanecarboxamide (E2006), an orally active, potent orexin antagonist. The efficacy was demonstrated in mice in an in vivo study by using sleep parameter measurements.

  12. Differentiation of F4 receptor profiles in pigs based on their mucin 4 polymorphism, responsiveness to oral F4 immunization and in vitro binding of F4 to villi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V U; Goetstouwers, T; Coddens, A; Van Poucke, M; Peelman, L; Deforce, D; Melkebeek, V; Cox, E

    2013-03-15

    F4(+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (F4(+) ETEC) are an important cause of diarrhoea and mortality in piglets. F4(+) ETEC use their F4 fimbriae to adhere to specific receptors (F4Rs) on small intestinal brush borders, resulting in colonization of the small intestine. To prevent pigs from post-weaning diarrhoea, pigs should be vaccinated during the suckling period. Previously, we demonstrated that F4acR(+), but not F4acR(-) piglets could be orally immunized with purified F4 fimbriae resulting in a protective immunity against F4(+) ETEC infections, indicating that this immune response was F4R dependent. Recently, aminopeptidase N has been identified as a glycoprotein receptor important for this oral immune response. However, in some oral immunization experiments, a few F4acR(+) piglets did not show an antibody response upon oral immunization, suggesting additional receptors. Therefore, the binding profile of F4 to brush border membrane (glyco)proteins was determined for pigs differing in F4-specific antibody response upon oral immunization, in in vitro adhesion of F4(+)E. coli to small intestinal villi, and in Muc4 genotype. Six groups of pigs could be identified. Only two groups positive in all three assays showed two high molecular weight (MW) glycoprotein bands (>250kDa) suggesting that these high MW bands are linked to the MUC4 susceptible genotype. The fact that these bands were absent in the MUC4 resistant group which showed a positive immune response against F4 and was positive in the adhesion test confirm that at least one or perhaps more other F4Rs exist. Interestingly, two pigs that were positive in the villous adhesion assay did not show an immune response against F4 fimbriae. This suggests that a third receptor category might exist which allows the bacteria to adhere but does not allow effective immunization with soluble F4 fimbriae. Future research will be necessary to confirm or reveal the identity of these receptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B

  13. Understanding discontinuation of oral adjuvant endocrine therapy by women with hormone receptor-positive invasive breast cancer nearly 4 years from diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robin J; Fradkin, Pamela; Schwarz, Max; Davis, Susan R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of discontinuation of oral adjuvant endocrine therapy (OAET) in women nearly 4 years from the diagnosis of their first episode of invasive breast cancer and the reasons for such discontinuation. We used a large, prospective cohort study of women who had been diagnosed with their first episode of invasive breast cancer between 2004 and 2006, recruited through a state-based cancer registry. All participants completed an enrollment questionnaire (EQ) within 12 months of diagnosis and annual follow-up questionnaires (FQs) thereafter. The data in this report were obtained from the EQ and the first three FQs. A total of 1,370 women with hormone receptor-positive disease completed the EQ. At the completion of the third FQ nearly 4 years from diagnosis, 1,193 women remained in the study. Use of OAET peaked by 2 years postdiagnosis. At nearly 4 years from diagnosis, 18% of the 1,193 women remaining in the study were not taking OAET. Of these women, just more than half had ceased therapy mainly owing to a range of adverse effects, predominantly estrogen deficiency symptoms, but the remainder (8% of women remaining in the study) had never used OAET. Our study confirms that early discontinuation of OAET due to estrogen deficiency symptoms remains an important issue despite calls for strategies to address this problem. The number of women potentially suitable for OAET but not receiving it was almost as great as the number of those who have discontinued therapy.

  14. Comparative evaluation of three obturation techniques in primary incisors using digital intra-oral receptor and C.B.C.T-an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhil, Jose E J; Prashant, Babaji; Shashibushan, K K

    2018-05-10

    Successful pulpectomy in primary teeth depends on quality of obturation. It can be evaluated using digital intra-oral receptor (D.I.O.R) and cone beam computed tomography (C.B.C.T). The purposes of this study were to compare 3 different obturation techniques such as lentulospiral, insulin syringe, and endodontic plugger in primary incisors and to evaluate its quality of obturation using D.I.O.R and C.B.C.T technique. Thirty-three extracted primary incisors were biomechanically prepared and obturated with zinc oxide eugenol cement by 3 different obturation techniques. The obturation was evaluated for length of obturation and voids using D.I.O.R and C.B.C.T methods. There was a statistically significant difference between all the groups in length of obturation (P = 0.02) in both D.I.O.R and C.B.C.T. Significant differences (P = 0.03) were present in number of voids among 3 obturation techniques in C.B.C.T. Statistically more voids were observed with D.I.O.R in lentulospiral (P = 0.04) group and in insulin syringe (P = 0.02) group. Acceptable result was obtained with lentulospiral in length of obturation compared to insulin syringe and endodontic plugger technique. Insulin syringe technique resulted in increased underfilling with least number of voids. More number of voids were seen in middle one-third and least number of voids were observed at apical one third of the root among all the 3 techniques of obturation. The study concluded that void identification is improved with D.I.O.R compared to C.B.C.T. Lentulospiral reported effective length of obturation, while insulin syringe with least number of voids. D.I.O.R (2-Dimensional) is efficient in detecting voids compared to C.B.C.T (3-Dimensional) in obturated primary teeth.

  15. Oral candidosis in relation to oral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Chandran, R; Altini, M; Lemmer, J

    2014-09-01

    Symptomatic oral infection with Candida albicans is characterized by invasion of the oral epithelium by virulent hyphae that cause tissue damage releasing the inflammatory mediators that initiate and sustain local inflammation. Candida albicans triggers pattern-recognition receptors of keratinocytes, macrophages, monocytes and dendritic cells, stimulating the production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23. These cytokines induce the differentiation of Th17 cells and the generation of IL-17- and/or IL-22-mediated antifungal protective immuno-inflammatory responses in infected mucosa. Some immune cells including NKT cells, γδ T cells and lymphoid cells that are innate to the oral mucosa have the capacity to produce large quantities of IL-17 in response to C. albicans, sufficient to mediate effective protective immunity against C. albicans. On the other hand, molecular structures of commensal C. albicans blastoconidia, although detected by pattern-recognition receptors, are avirulent, do not invade the oral epithelium, do not elicit inflammatory responses in a healthy host, but induce regulatory immune responses that maintain tissue tolerance to the commensal fungi. The type, specificity and sensitivity of the protective immune response towards C. albicans is determined by the outcome of the integrated interactions between the intracellular signalling pathways of specific combinations of activated pattern-recognition receptors (TLR2, TLR4, Dectin-1 and Dectin-2). IL-17-mediated protective immune response is essential for oral mucosal immunity to C. albicans infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew L; Norman, Jane E; Morgan, Neil V; Mundell, Stuart J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Daly, Martina E; Simpson, Michael A; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70 % had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05 %. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21 %) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF< 1 % and 22 with MAF≥ 1 %). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes.

  17. Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  18. Identification and characterization of NDT 9513727 [N,N-bis(1,3-benzodioxol-5-ylmethyl)-1-butyl-2,4-diphenyl-1H-imidazole-5-methanamine], a novel, orally bioavailable C5a receptor inverse agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodbeck, Robbin M; Cortright, Daniel N; Kieltyka, Andrzej P; Yu, Jianying; Baltazar, Carolyn O; Buck, Marianne E; Meade, Robin; Maynard, George D; Thurkauf, Andrew; Chien, Du-Shieng; Hutchison, Alan J; Krause, James E

    2008-12-01

    The complement system represents an innate immune mechanism of host defense that has three effector arms, the C3a receptor, the C5a receptor (C5aR), and the membrane attack complex. Because of its inflammatory and immune-enhancing properties, the biological activity of C5a and its classical receptor have been widely studied. Because specific antagonism of the C5aR could have therapeutic benefit without affecting the protective immune response, the C5aR continues to be a promising target for pharmaceutical research. The lack of specific, potent and orally bioavailable small-molecule antagonists has limited the clinical investigation of the C5aR. We report the discovery of NDT 9513727 [N,N-bis(1,3-benzodioxol-5-ylmethyl)-1-butyl-2,4-diphenyl-1H-imidazole-5-methanamine], a small-molecule, orally bioavailable, selective, and potent inverse agonist of the human C5aR. NDT 9513727 was discovered based on the integrated use of in vitro affinity and functional assays in conjunction with medicinal chemistry. NDT 9513727 inhibited C5a-stimulated responses, including guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding, Ca(2+) mobilization, oxidative burst, degranulation, cell surface CD11b expression and chemotaxis in various cell types with IC(50)s from 1.1 to 9.2 nM, respectively. In C5a competition radioligand binding experiments, NDT 9513727 exhibited an IC(50) of 11.6 nM. NDT 9513727 effectively inhibited C5a-induced neutropenia in gerbil and cynomolgus macaque in vivo. The findings suggest that NDT 9513727 may be a promising new entity for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases.

  19. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  20. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... National Cancer Institute. PDQ lip and oral cavity cancer ... September 25, 2015. www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/hp/lip- ...

  1. Oral Ketamine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral Ketamine: A Four-years Experience in ... Key words: Oral Ketamine, Premedication and Oncology. .... form of a letter published in 19835. .... Acta. Anaesthesiol Scandinavica, 1998; 42: 750-758. 4. Murray P. Substitution of another opioid ...

  2. Contemporary Antithrombotic Treatment in Patients with Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Rationale and Design of the Greek AntiPlatElet Atrial Fibrillation (GRAPE-AF) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulou, Ioanna; Dragona, Vasiliki-Maria; Davlouros, Periklis; Tsioufis, Costas; Iliodromitis, Efstathios; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios

    2018-04-20

    Approximately 5 to 7% of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for the treatment of coronary artery disease require chronic oral anticoagulation (OAC) on top of aspirin and a P2Y 12 receptor antagonist, mainly due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). The advent of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) increased treatment options, while there is cumulative evidence that dual combination of a NOAC and a P2Y 12 receptor antagonist attenuates risk of bleeding, compared to traditional triple therapy, consisting of a vitamin K antagonist (VKA), aspirin, and a P2Y 12 receptor antagonist, without significantly compromising efficacy. Greek AntiPlatElet Atrial Fibrillation (GRAPE-AF, NCT 03362788) is an observational, nationwide study of non-valvular AF patients undergoing PCI, planning to enroll over 1-year period > 500 participants in 25 tertiary and non-tertiary PCI centers in Greece. Key data to be collected pre-discharge include demographics, detailed past medical history, and antithrombotic and concomitant treatment. Patients will be followed up at 1, 6, and 12 months post hospital discharge. Αt each follow-up visit, data on antithrombotic treatment, ischemic, bleeding, and adverse events will be collected. Study's primary endpoint is clinically significant bleeding (Bleeding Academic Research Consortium, BARC ≥ 2) at 12 months, between VKAs and NOACs-treated patients, analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models, by an intention-to-treat principle. An independent endpoint committee will adjudicate all clinical events. This study aims at providing "real-world" information on current antithrombotic treatment patterns and clinical outcome of patients with non-valvular AF undergoing PCI.

  3. Proteomic analysis of human oral verrucous carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-05

    Oct 5, 2011 ... This study is about proteomic analysis of oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC). The total proteins ..... receptor protein (recoverin) through autoimmunity ..... chromosome 8q21.1 and overexpressed in human prostate cancer. Cancer ...

  4. Early clinical outcomes as a function of use of newer oral P2Y inhibitors versus clopidogrel in the EUROMAX trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Kurt; Ducrocq, Gregory; Hamm, Christian W

    2017-01-01

    prehospital bivalirudin with heparin with optional glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor treatment in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction triaged to pPCI. Choice of P2Y12 inhibitor was at the investigator's discretion. In a prespecified analysis, we compared event rates with clopidogrel....... Logistic regression was used to adjust for differences in baseline characteristics. Results: Prasugrel or ticagrelor was given as the loading P2Y12 inhibitor in 49% of 2198 patients and as a maintenance therapy in 59%. No differences were observed in rates of acute stent thrombosis for clopidogrel versus...

  5. Expression of angiopoietin-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 correlates with lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis and affects survival of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Both Ang-2 and VEGFR-3 are major regulators of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, respectively, and thus may affect prognosis of OSCC. We sought to determine the associations between Ang-2 and VEGFR-3 expression and survival of OSCC. METHODS: Ang-2 and VEGFR-3 expression was determined immunohistochemically in tumor tissues from 112 patients with OSCC; OSCC-adjacent noncancerous oral tissue from 85 OSCC patients; and normal oral mucosa from 37 cancer-free individuals. A log-rank test and Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare survival among different groups with expression of Ang-2 and VEGFR-3. RESULTS: Ang-2 and VEGFR-3 expression was upregulated in OSCC compared to nontumor tissue (all P<0.05. High Ang-2 expression positively correlated with microvessel density (MVD (P<0.01, and high VEGFR-3 expression positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (P<0.01 and lymphatic vessel density (LVD (P<0.01. The patients with high expression of Ang-2 alone or in combination with VEGFR-3 had a significantly worse survival than in patients with low expression of Ang-2 or any other co-expression status (all P<0.05, respectively. Furthermore, multivariable analysis showed that patients with high expression of Ang-2 alone or in combination with VEGFR-3 had a significantly increased risk of death compared with those with low expression of Ang-2 or any other co-expression status (HR, 2.7, 95% CI, 1.1-6.2 and 5.0, 1.3-15.4, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that increased expression in tumors of Ang-2 may individually, or in combination with VEGFR-3, predict poor prognosis of OSCC.

  6. Communication among Oral Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenbrander, Paul E.; Andersen, Roxanna N.; Blehert, David S.; Egland, Paul G.; Foster, Jamie S.; Palmer, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Human oral bacteria interact with their environment by attaching to surfaces and establishing mixed-species communities. As each bacterial cell attaches, it forms a new surface to which other cells can adhere. Adherence and community development are spatiotemporal; such order requires communication. The discovery of soluble signals, such as autoinducer-2, that may be exchanged within multispecies communities to convey information between organisms has emerged as a new research direction. Direct-contact signals, such as adhesins and receptors, that elicit changes in gene expression after cell-cell contact and biofilm growth are also an active research area. Considering that the majority of oral bacteria are organized in dense three-dimensional biofilms on teeth, confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled probes provide valuable approaches for investigating the architecture of these organized communities in situ. Oral biofilms are readily accessible to microbiologists and are excellent model systems for studies of microbial communication. One attractive model system is a saliva-coated flowcell with oral bacterial biofilms growing on saliva as the sole nutrient source; an intergeneric mutualism is discussed. Several oral bacterial species are amenable to genetic manipulation for molecular characterization of communication both among bacteria and between bacteria and the host. A successful search for genes critical for mixed-species community organization will be accomplished only when it is conducted with mixed-species communities. PMID:12209001

  7. Characterization of Pharmacologic and Pharmacokinetic Properties of CCX168, a Potent and Selective Orally Administered Complement 5a Receptor Inhibitor, Based on Preclinical Evaluation and Randomized Phase 1 Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Pirow; Dairaghi, Daniel; Seitz, Lisa; Leleti, Manmohan; Wang, Yu; Ertl, Linda; Baumgart, Trageen; Shugarts, Sarah; Lohr, Lisa; Dang, Ton; Miao, Shichang; Zeng, Yibin; Fan, Pingchen; Zhang, Penglie; Johnson, Daniel; Powers, Jay; Jaen, Juan; Charo, Israel; Schall, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The complement 5a receptor has been an attractive therapeutic target for many autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. However, development of a selective and potent C5aR antagonist has been challenging. Here we describe the characterization of CCX168 (avacopan), an orally administered selective and potent C5aR inhibitor. CCX168 blocked the C5a binding, C5a-mediated migration, calcium mobilization, and CD11b upregulation in U937 cells as well as in freshly isolated human neutrophils. CCX168 retains high potency when present in human blood. A transgenic human C5aR knock-in mouse model allowed comparison of the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the molecule. CCX168 effectively blocked migration in in vitro and ex vivo chemotaxis assays, and it blocked the C5a-mediated neutrophil vascular endothelial margination. CCX168 was effective in migration and neutrophil margination assays in cynomolgus monkeys. This thorough in vitro and preclinical characterization enabled progression of CCX168 into the clinic and testing of its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles in a Phase 1 clinical trial in 48 healthy volunteers. CCX168 was shown to be well tolerated across a broad dose range (1 to 100 mg) and it showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. An oral dose of 30 mg CCX168 given twice daily blocked the C5a-induced upregulation of CD11b in circulating neutrophils by 94% or greater throughout the entire day, demonstrating essentially complete target coverage. This dose regimen is being tested in clinical trials in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. Trial Registration ISRCTN registry with trial ID ISRCTN13564773.

  8. Characterization of Pharmacologic and Pharmacokinetic Properties of CCX168, a Potent and Selective Orally Administered Complement 5a Receptor Inhibitor, Based on Preclinical Evaluation and Randomized Phase 1 Clinical Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirow Bekker

    Full Text Available The complement 5a receptor has been an attractive therapeutic target for many autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. However, development of a selective and potent C5aR antagonist has been challenging. Here we describe the characterization of CCX168 (avacopan, an orally administered selective and potent C5aR inhibitor. CCX168 blocked the C5a binding, C5a-mediated migration, calcium mobilization, and CD11b upregulation in U937 cells as well as in freshly isolated human neutrophils. CCX168 retains high potency when present in human blood. A transgenic human C5aR knock-in mouse model allowed comparison of the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the molecule. CCX168 effectively blocked migration in in vitro and ex vivo chemotaxis assays, and it blocked the C5a-mediated neutrophil vascular endothelial margination. CCX168 was effective in migration and neutrophil margination assays in cynomolgus monkeys. This thorough in vitro and preclinical characterization enabled progression of CCX168 into the clinic and testing of its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles in a Phase 1 clinical trial in 48 healthy volunteers. CCX168 was shown to be well tolerated across a broad dose range (1 to 100 mg and it showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. An oral dose of 30 mg CCX168 given twice daily blocked the C5a-induced upregulation of CD11b in circulating neutrophils by 94% or greater throughout the entire day, demonstrating essentially complete target coverage. This dose regimen is being tested in clinical trials in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. Trial Registration ISRCTN registry with trial ID ISRCTN13564773.

  9. Novel orally available salvinorin A analog PR-38 protects against experimental colitis and reduces abdominal pain in mice by interaction with opioid and cannabinoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sałaga, Maciej; Polepally, Prabhakar Reddy; Zakrzewski, Piotr K; Cygankiewicz, Adam; Sobczak, Marta; Kordek, Radzisław; Zjawiony, Jordan K; Krajewska, Wanda M; Fichna, Jakub

    2014-12-15

    Salvinorin A (SA) is a potent anti-inflammatory diterpene isolated from the Mexican plant S. divinorum. Recently we showed that the novel SA analog, PR-38 has an inhibitory effect on mouse gastrointestinal (GI) motility mediated by opioid and cannabinoid (CB) receptors. The aim of the study was to characterize possible anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive action of PR-38 in the mouse GI tract. Macro- and microscopic colonic damage scores and myeloperoxidase activity were determined after intraperitoneal (i.p.), intracolonic (i.c.), and per os (p.o.) administration of PR-38 in the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) models of colitis in mice. Additionally, MOP, KOP and CB1 protein expression was determined using Western blot analysis of mouse colon samples. The antinociceptive effect of PR-38 was examined based on the number of behavioral responses to i.c. instillation of mustard oil (MO). The i.p. (10 mg/kg, twice daily), i.c. (10 mg/kg, twice daily) and p.o. (20 mg/kg, once daily) administration of PR-38 significantly attenuated TNBS- and DSS-induced colitis in mice. The effect of PR-38 was partially blocked by the KOP antagonist nor-binaltorphimine and CB1 antagonist AM 251. Western blot analysis showed a significant increase of MOP, KOP and CB1 receptor expression during colonic inflammation, which was reversed to the control levels by the administration of PR-38. PR-38 significantly decreased the number of pain responses after i.c. instillation of MO in the TNBS-treated mice. Our results suggest that PR-38 has the potential to become a valuable anti-inflammatory and analgesic therapeutic for the treatment of GI inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cangrelor in Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Current Status and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Pappas, Christos; Sfantou, Danai; Lekakis, John

    2018-01-01

    Cangrelor is an intravenously administered P2Y 12 receptor antagonist with very fast, potent, and quickly reversible action. In the CHAMPION PHOENIX trial, cangrelor provided an improved anti-ischemic protection compared with clopidogrel, without increasing the risk of severe bleeding. Cangrelor is currently approved by drug regulating authorities for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) without prior treatment with a P2Y 12 receptor antagonist and not receiving a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor, while its use is endorsed with a class IIb recommendation by the European Society of Cardiology guidelines. Several subanalyses of CHAMPION PHOENIX trial have tried to elucidate the role of cangrelor in PCI, including its usefulness during a 2-hour landmark analysis, impact on intraprocedural stent thrombosis, and reduction in myocardial infarction (MI) rate. The influence of gender, geographic region, access site, and bivalirudin use on cangrelor's effects has also been reported. In patients with ST elevation MI and in clinical scenarios of disturbed absorption of oral antiplatelet agents or in need of an intravenous agent, cangrelor may surpass oral agents' drawbacks. Transitioning to an oral agent is mandatory following cangrelor infusion discontinuation, although ticagrelor may be administered earlier without any pharmacodynamic interaction. Nevertheless, the clinical role of cangrelor in conjunction with administration of prasugrel or ticagrelor remains unclear. Accruing real-life experience is expected to improve our understanding of cangrelor's role in everyday clinical practice.

  11. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl; Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom

    The aim of the study was to explore how adults with schizo- phrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  12. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom; Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how adults with schizophrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research ph...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  13. SCH-C (SCH 351125), an orally bioavailable, small molecule antagonist of the chemokine receptor CCR5, is a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 infection in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strizki, J M; Xu, S; Wagner, N E; Wojcik, L; Liu, J; Hou, Y; Endres, M; Palani, A; Shapiro, S; Clader, J W; Greenlee, W J; Tagat, J R; McCombie, S; Cox, K; Fawzi, A B; Chou, C C; Pugliese-Sivo, C; Davies, L; Moreno, M E; Ho, D D; Trkola, A; Stoddart, C A; Moore, J P; Reyes, G R; Baroudy, B M

    2001-10-23

    We describe here the identification and properties of SCH-C (SCH 351125), a small molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 entry via the CCR5 coreceptor. SCH-C, an oxime-piperidine compound, is a specific CCR5 antagonist as determined in multiple receptor binding and signal transduction assays. This compound specifically inhibits HIV-1 infection mediated by CCR5 in U-87 astroglioma cells but has no effect on infection of CXCR4-expressing cells. SCH-C has broad and potent antiviral activity in vitro against primary HIV-1 isolates that use CCR5 as their entry coreceptor, with mean 50% inhibitory concentrations ranging between 0.4 and 9 nM. Moreover, SCH-C strongly inhibits the replication of an R5-using HIV-1 isolate in SCID-hu Thy/Liv mice. SCH-C has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in rodents and primates with an oral bioavailability of 50-60% and a serum half-life of 5-6 h. On the basis of its novel mechanism of action, potent antiviral activity, and in vivo pharmacokinetic profile, SCH-C is a promising new candidate for therapeutic intervention of HIV infection.

  14. [Drug-induced oral ulcerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madinier, I; Berry, N; Chichmanian, R M

    2000-06-01

    Different side effects of drugs have been described in the oral cavity, including oral ulcerations. Direct contact between drugs and oral mucosa may induce chemical burn or local hypersensitivity. Less frequently, these drug-induced oral ulcerations are part of a complex reaction with cutaneous or systemic manifestations. Sometimes, one or more oral ulcerations appear as the main side-effect of a drug, or exceptionally as solitary lesions. Solitary oral ulcerations usually appear after few weeks of treatment. In most of cases, these lesions resist to conventional treatments, with a rapid healing following the suppression of the responsible drug. This diagnosis is usually difficult, particularly with patients receiving multiple drug therapy. Besides, special attention must be paid to new drugs. Oral ulcerations following symptoms of burning mouth, metallic taste, dysgueusia or agueusia are strongly suggestive of a pharmacological origin. Most of the molecules able to induce solitary oral ulcerations are commonly prescribed in a) rheumatology: NSAI (diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, naproxen), long-term rheumatoid arthritis therapy (azathioprine, methotrexate, penicillamine, gold compounds, tiopronin); b) cardiology: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril), angiotensin 2-receptor antagonist (losartan), anti-angorous (nicorandil), c) psychiatry: antidepressants (fluoxetine, lithium), d) AIDS therapy (foscarnet, zalcitabine).

  15. Toll-like Receptor 5 Agonist Protects Mice From Dermatitis and Oral Mucositis Caused by Local Radiation: Implications for Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdelya, Lyudmila G.; Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Toshkov, Ilia; Aygun-Sunar, Semra; Bapardekar, Meghana; Manderscheid-Kern, Patricia; Bellnier, David; Krivokrysenko, Vadim I.; Feinstein, Elena; Gudkov, Andrei V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Development of mucositis is a frequent side effect of radiotherapy of patients with head-and-neck cancer. We have recently reported that bacterial flagellin, an agonist of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), can protect rodents and primates from acute radiation syndrome caused by total body irradiation. Here we analyzed the radioprotective efficacy of TLR5 agonist under conditions of local, single dose or fractionated radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Mice received either single-dose (10, 15, 20, or 25 Gy) or fractioned irradiation (cumulative dose up to 30 Gy) of the head-and-neck area with or without subcutaneous injection of pharmacologically optimized flagellin, CBLB502, 30 min before irradiation. Results: CBLB502 significantly reduced the severity of dermatitis and mucositis, accelerated tissue recovery, and reduced the extent of radiation induced weight loss in mice after a single dose of 15 or 20 Gy but not 25 Gy of radiation. CBLB502 was also protective from cumulative doses of 25 and 30 Gy delivered in two (10 + 15 Gy) or three (3 × 10 Gy) fractions, respectively. While providing protection to normal epithelia, CBLB502 did not affect the radiosensitivity of syngeneic squamous carcinoma SCCVII grown orthotopically in mice. Use of CBLB502 also elicited a radiation independent growth inhibitory effect upon TLR5-expressing tumors demonstrated in the mouse xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma A549. Conclusion: CBLB502 combines properties of supportive care (radiotherapy adjuvant) and anticancer agent, both mediated via activation of TLR5 signaling in the normal tissues or the tumor, respectively.

  16. Toll-like Receptor 5 Agonist Protects Mice From Dermatitis and Oral Mucositis Caused by Local Radiation: Implications for Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdelya, Lyudmila G. [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Toshkov, Ilia [Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Aygun-Sunar, Semra [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Bapardekar, Meghana [Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Manderscheid-Kern, Patricia; Bellnier, David [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Krivokrysenko, Vadim I.; Feinstein, Elena [Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Gudkov, Andrei V., E-mail: andrei.gudkov@roswellpark.org [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Development of mucositis is a frequent side effect of radiotherapy of patients with head-and-neck cancer. We have recently reported that bacterial flagellin, an agonist of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), can protect rodents and primates from acute radiation syndrome caused by total body irradiation. Here we analyzed the radioprotective efficacy of TLR5 agonist under conditions of local, single dose or fractionated radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Mice received either single-dose (10, 15, 20, or 25 Gy) or fractioned irradiation (cumulative dose up to 30 Gy) of the head-and-neck area with or without subcutaneous injection of pharmacologically optimized flagellin, CBLB502, 30 min before irradiation. Results: CBLB502 significantly reduced the severity of dermatitis and mucositis, accelerated tissue recovery, and reduced the extent of radiation induced weight loss in mice after a single dose of 15 or 20 Gy but not 25 Gy of radiation. CBLB502 was also protective from cumulative doses of 25 and 30 Gy delivered in two (10 + 15 Gy) or three (3 Multiplication-Sign 10 Gy) fractions, respectively. While providing protection to normal epithelia, CBLB502 did not affect the radiosensitivity of syngeneic squamous carcinoma SCCVII grown orthotopically in mice. Use of CBLB502 also elicited a radiation independent growth inhibitory effect upon TLR5-expressing tumors demonstrated in the mouse xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma A549. Conclusion: CBLB502 combines properties of supportive care (radiotherapy adjuvant) and anticancer agent, both mediated via activation of TLR5 signaling in the normal tissues or the tumor, respectively.

  17. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The idea of identifying oral lesions with a precancerous nature, i.e. in the sense of pertaining to a pathologic process with an increased risk for future malignant development, of course is to prevent frank malignancy to occur in the affected area. The most common oral lesion with a precancerous...... nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  18. Oral treatment with essential oil of Hyptis spicigera Lam. (Lamiaceae) reduces acute pain and inflammation in mice: Potential interactions with transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Róli Rodrigues; Coelho, Igor Dos Santos; Junqueira, Stella Célio; Pigatto, Glauce Regina; Salvador, Marcos José; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; de Faria, Felipe Meira

    2017-03-22

    The genus Hyptis comprehends almost 400 species widespread in tropical and temperate regions of America. The use of Hyptis spicigera Lam. (Lamiaceae) is reported in traditional medicine due to its gastroprotective, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. The rationale of this study was to investigate the potential use of the essential oil of H. spicigera (EOHs) as analgesic. The antinociceptive effect of EOHs was verified analyzing acute nocifensive behavior of mice induced by chemical noxious stimuli [i.e., formalin and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels agonists]. We also verified the effects of EOHs on locomotor activity and motor performance in mice. Finally, we investigate the involvement of central afferent C-fibers with EOHs analgesic effect. EOHs presented antinociceptive effect at 300 and 1000mg/kg on formalin-induced pain behavior model, presenting 50% and 72% of inhibition during the first phase (ED 50 =292mg/kg), and 85% and 100% during de second phase (ED 50 =205mg/kg), respectively. Temperature of the hind paw was reduced by EOHs treatment in a dose-dependent manner; oedema was diminished only by EOHs 1000mg/kg. EOHs does not impaired locomotor activity or motor performance. For mice injected with capsaicin, a TRPV1 activator, EOHs (1000mg/kg, ED 50 =660mg/kg) showed decreased (63%) nociceptive behavior. When injected with cinnamaldehyde (TRPA1 activator), mice treated with EOHs showed 23%, 43% and 66% inhibition on nociceptive behavior (100, 300 and 1000mg/kg, respectively; ED 50 402mg/kg). When mice were injected with menthol (TRPM8 activator), EOHs showed 29%, 59% and 98% inhibition of nociceptive behavior (100, 300 and 1000mg/kg, respectively; with ED 50 =198mg/kg. Finally, when desensitized mice were injected with menthol, EOHs (300mg/kg) does not show antinociceptive effect. This study demonstrated the efficacy of EOHs on experimental models of nociception. We have found the involvement of TRP channels V1, A1 and M8 with EOHs

  19. Oral contraceptives and neuroactive steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, Andrea J; Biggio, Giovanni; Concas, Alessandra

    2006-08-01

    A deregulation in the peripheral and brain concentrations of neuroactive steroids has been found in certain pathological conditions characterized by emotional or affective disturbances, including major depression and anxiety disorders. In this article we summarize data pertaining to the modulatory effects of oral contraceptive treatment on neuroactive steroids in women and rats. Given that the neuroactive steroids concentrations are reduced by oral contraceptives, together with the evidence that a subset of women taking oral contraceptives experience negative mood symptoms, we propose the use of this pharmacological treatment as a putative model to study the role of neuroactive steroids in the etiopathology of mood disorders. Moreover, since neuroactive steroids are potent modulators of GABA(A) receptor function and plasticity, the treatment with oral contraceptives might also represent a useful experimental model to further investigate the physiological role of these steroids in the modulation of GABAergic transmission.

  20. Oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, S J

    1990-01-01

    In the U.S. oral cancer accounts for 2.1% of all cancers and 1% of cancer deaths. Two to three times as many males as females are affected. Blacks have more intra-oral cancer than whites, and their incidence and mortality rates have increased in recent years. The etiologic process very likely involves several factors. The major etiologic agents are tobacco (all types) and alcoholic beverages. Herpes simplex virus, human papilloma virus, and Candida have been implicated. Host factors include poor state of dentition, nutritional aberrations, cirrhosis of liver, lichen planus, and immunologic impairmant. Cellular changes include amplification of some oncogenes, alterations in antigen expression, production of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and disturbance of keratin and involucrin production. Experimentally, cancer is readily produced on the hamster cheek pouch and rat oral mucosa. Unlike oral cancer in humans, most experimental lesions are exophytic, and they rarely metastasize.

  1. Oral sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-05

    The Gay and Lesbian Medical Association urges HIV prevention specialists to regard male-to-male oral-genital sex as a low-risk activity and concentrate instead on the danger of unprotected anal intercourse. According to the association, the confusion and mixed messages surrounding oral sex are harming efforts to encourage gay men to make rational choices about truly risky behavior. The recommendations appear in the association's position paper issued March 19, 1996.

  2. Ticagrelor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Airoldi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Antiplatelet drugs are the cornerstone of treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention. Clopidogrel and aspirin improve long-term clinical outcomes in these patients and have become a standard of care. However, many patients still experience ischemic/thrombotic events, and it appears that insufficient response to both aspirin and clopidogrel contribute to this failure. Clopidogrel is a prodrug that is metabolized in the liver to its active form. It inhibits platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP by irreversibly binding to the ADP purinergic receptor (P2Y12 on the platelet surface. Prasugrel, a novel thienopyridine, exhibits more potent antiplatelet effects with lower interpatient variability and more rapid onsetof activity. All thienopyridines, however, have pharmacological limitations, which have fueled the search for more effective non-thienopyridine P2Y12 inhibitors. Promising results have been reported with ticagrelor, the first oral P2Y12 receptor antagonist with reversible effects. Ticagrelor does not require metabolic activation. In vivo one active metabolite is formed whose potency and pharmacokinetic properties are very similar to those of the parent compound, but it probably plays a minor role in ticagrelor’s antiplatelet effects. Ticagrelor offers more rapid and more pronounced platelet inhibition than other antiplatelet agents. Furthermore, the reversibility of its effects may allow shorter periods of suspension of antiplatelet treatment prior to surgery, reducing the risk of perioperative thrombotic and hemorrhagic events. Preliminary results show a trend toward protection from coronary events and no increased risk for major bleeding compared with clopidogrel. Further investigation is needed, however, to determine the optimal dosage for minimizing bleeding risks and to evaluate its impact on outcomes in various subsets of ACS patients.

  3. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  4. Oral Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decrease the risk of oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. Oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer are diseases in ... and treatment of oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer: Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Lip and Oral ...

  5. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a potent, orally bioavailable, and selective small-molecule inhibitor of chemokine receptor CCR5 with broad-spectrum anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony; Perros, Manos

    2005-11-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades and diverse geographic origin (geometric mean 90% inhibitory concentration of 2.0 nM). Maraviroc was active against 200 clinically derived HIV-1 envelope-recombinant pseudoviruses, 100 of which were derived from viruses resistant to existing drug classes. There was little difference in the sensitivity of the 200 viruses to maraviroc, as illustrated by the biological cutoff in this assay (= geometric mean plus two standard deviations [SD] of 1.7-fold). The mechanism of action of maraviroc was established using cell-based assays, where it blocked binding of viral envelope, gp120, to CCR5 to prevent the membrane fusion events necessary for viral entry. Maraviroc did not affect CCR5 cell surface levels or associated intracellular signaling, confirming it as a functional antagonist of CCR5. Maraviroc has no detectable in vitro cytotoxicity and is highly selective for CCR5, as confirmed against a wide range of receptors and enzymes, including the hERG ion channel (50% inhibitory concentration, >10 microM), indicating potential for an excellent clinical safety profile. Studies in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models predicted maraviroc to have human pharmacokinetics consistent with once- or twice-daily dosing following oral administration. Clinical trials are ongoing to further investigate the potential of using maraviroc for the treatment of HIV-1 infection and AIDS.

  6. Increased Insulin following an Oral Glucose Load, Genetic Variation near the Melatonin Receptor MTNR1B, but No Biochemical Evidence of Endothelial Dysfunction in Young Asian Men and Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Matuszek

    Full Text Available To identify biochemical and genetic variation relating to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease in young, lean male and female adults of different ethnicities.Fasting blood and urine and non-fasting blood following oral glucose intake were analysed in 90 Caucasians, South Asians and South East/East Asians.There were no differences in age, birthweight, blood pressure, body mass index, percent body fat, total energy, percentage of macronutrient intake, microalbumin, leptin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, nitric oxide metabolites, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, von Willebrand factor, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and tissue plasminogen activator. Fasting total cholesterol (P = .000, triglycerides (P = .050, low density lipoprotein (P = .009 and non-fasting blood glucose (15 min (P = .024 were elevated in South Asians compared with Caucasians, but there was no significant difference in glucose area under curve (AUC. Non-fasting insulin in South Asians (15-120 min, in South East/East Asians (60-120 min, and insulin AUC in South Asians and South East/East Asians, were elevated compared with Caucasians (P≤0.006. The molar ratio of C-peptide AUC/Insulin AUC (P = .045 and adiponectin (P = .037 were lower in South Asians compared with Caucasians. A significant difference in allele frequency distributions in Caucasians and South Asians was found for rs2166706 (P = 0.022 and rs10830963 (P = 0.009, which are both near the melatonin receptor MTNR1B.Elevated non-fasting insulin exists in young South Asians of normal fasting glucose and insulin. Hepatic clearance of insulin may be reduced in South Asians. No current biochemical evidence exists of endothelial dysfunction at this stage of development. MTNR1B signalling may be a useful therapeutic target in Asian populations in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Increased Insulin following an Oral Glucose Load, Genetic Variation near the Melatonin Receptor MTNR1B, but No Biochemical Evidence of Endothelial Dysfunction in Young Asian Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszek, Maria A; Anton, Angelyn; Thillainathan, Sobana; Armstrong, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    To identify biochemical and genetic variation relating to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease in young, lean male and female adults of different ethnicities. Fasting blood and urine and non-fasting blood following oral glucose intake were analysed in 90 Caucasians, South Asians and South East/East Asians. There were no differences in age, birthweight, blood pressure, body mass index, percent body fat, total energy, percentage of macronutrient intake, microalbumin, leptin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, nitric oxide metabolites, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, von Willebrand factor, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and tissue plasminogen activator. Fasting total cholesterol (P = .000), triglycerides (P = .050), low density lipoprotein (P = .009) and non-fasting blood glucose (15 min) (P = .024) were elevated in South Asians compared with Caucasians, but there was no significant difference in glucose area under curve (AUC). Non-fasting insulin in South Asians (15-120 min), in South East/East Asians (60-120 min), and insulin AUC in South Asians and South East/East Asians, were elevated compared with Caucasians (P≤0.006). The molar ratio of C-peptide AUC/Insulin AUC (P = .045) and adiponectin (P = .037) were lower in South Asians compared with Caucasians. A significant difference in allele frequency distributions in Caucasians and South Asians was found for rs2166706 (P = 0.022) and rs10830963 (P = 0.009), which are both near the melatonin receptor MTNR1B. Elevated non-fasting insulin exists in young South Asians of normal fasting glucose and insulin. Hepatic clearance of insulin may be reduced in South Asians. No current biochemical evidence exists of endothelial dysfunction at this stage of development. MTNR1B signalling may be a useful therapeutic target in Asian populations in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  10. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  11. Oral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Thrombin-receptor antagonist vorapaxar in acute coronary syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoci, Pierluigi; Huang, Zhen; Held, Claes

    2012-01-01

    Vorapaxar is a new oral protease-activated-receptor 1 (PAR-1) antagonist that inhibits thrombin-induced platelet activation.......Vorapaxar is a new oral protease-activated-receptor 1 (PAR-1) antagonist that inhibits thrombin-induced platelet activation....

  13. Oral Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  14. A Systematic Literature Review and Network Meta-Analysis Comparing Once-Weekly Semaglutide with Other GLP-1 Receptor Agonists in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Previously Receiving 1-2 Oral Anti-Diabetic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Michal; Wilkinson, Lars; Webb, Neil; Weids, Alan; Glah, Divina; Vrazic, Hrvoje

    2018-04-19

    Once-weekly semaglutide is a new glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue administered at a 1.0 or 0.5 mg dose. As head-to-head trials assessing once-weekly semaglutide as an add-on to 1-2 oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs) vs other GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) are limited, a network meta-analysis (NMA) was performed. The objective was to assess the relative efficacy and safety of once-weekly semaglutide vs GLP-1 RAs in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) inadequately controlled on 1-2 OADs. A systematic literature review (SLR) was conducted in order to identify trials of GLP-1 RAs in patients inadequately controlled on 1-2 OADs. Data at 24 ± 4 weeks were extracted for efficacy and safety outcomes (feasible for analysis in a NMA), which included the key outcomes of change from baseline in glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and weight, as well as discontinuation due to adverse events (AEs). Data were synthesized using a NMA and a Bayesian framework. In total, 26 studies were included across the base case analyses. Once-weekly semaglutide 1.0 mg was associated with significantly greater reductions in HbA 1c and weight vs all GLP-1 RA comparators. Once-weekly semaglutide 0.5 mg also achieved significantly greater reductions in HbA 1c and weight compared with the majority of other GLP-1 RAs. Both doses of once-weekly semaglutide were associated with similar odds of discontinuation due to AEs compared with other GLP-1 RAs. Overall, once-weekly semaglutide 1.0 mg as an add-on to 1-2 OADs is the most efficacious GLP-1 RA in terms of the reduction of HbA 1c and weight from baseline after 6 months of treatment. In addition, the analysis suggests that once-weekly semaglutide is well tolerated and not associated with an increase in discontinuations due to AEs compared with other GLP-1 RAs. Novo Nordisk.

  15. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), tissue factor (TF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders; Kiss, Katalin; Lelkaitis, Giedrius

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tumor-specific biomarkers are a prerequisite for the development of targeted imaging and therapy in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR), Tissue Factor (TF) and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) are three biomarkers that exhib...... with a reduced survival. uPAR seems to be a prognostic biomarker in oral cancer....

  16. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Burnstock

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990’s when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  17. Tools and drugs for uracil nucleotide-activated P2Y receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafehi, Muhammad; Müller, Christa E

    2018-04-13

    P2Y receptors (P2YRs) are a family of G protein-coupled receptors activated by extracellular nucleotides. Physiological P2YR agonists include purine and pyrimidine nucleoside di- and triphosphates, such as ATP, ADP, UTP, UDP, nucleotide sugars, and dinucleotides. Eight subtypes exist, P2Y 1 , P2Y 2 , P2Y 4 , P2Y 6 , P2Y 11 , P2Y 12 , P2Y 13 , and P2Y 14 , which represent current or potential future drug targets. Here we provide a comprehensive overview of ligands for the subgroup of the P2YR family that is activated by uracil nucleotides: P2Y 2 (UTP, also ATP and dinucleotides), P2Y 4 (UTP), P2Y 6 (UDP), and P2Y 14 (UDP, UDP-glucose, UDP-galactose). The physiological agonists are metabolically unstable due to their fast hydrolysis by ectonucleotidases. A number of agonists with increased potency, subtype-selectivity and/or enzymatic stability have been developed in recent years. Useful P2Y 2 R agonists include MRS2698 (6-01, highly selective) and PSB-1114 (6-05, increased metabolic stability). A potent and selective P2Y 2 R antagonist is AR-C118925 (10-01). For studies of the P2Y 4 R, MRS4062 (3-15) may be used as a selective agonist, while PSB-16133 (10-06) represents a selective antagonist. Several potent P2Y 6 R agonists have been developed including 5-methoxyuridine 5'-O-((R p )α-boranodiphosphate) (6-12), PSB-0474 (3-11), and MRS2693 (3-26). The isocyanate MRS2578 (10-08) is used as a selective P2Y 6 R antagonist, although its reactivity and low water-solubility are limiting. With MRS2905 (6-08), a potent and metabolically stable P2Y 14 R agonist is available, while PPTN (10-14) represents a potent and selective P2Y 14 R antagonist. The radioligand [ 3 H]UDP can be used to label P2Y 14 Rs. In addition, several fluorescent probes have been developed. Uracil nucleotide-activated P2YRs show great potential as drug targets, especially in inflammation, cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    functional units, receptors co-operate. The total receptor apparatus of individual cell types is composed of different-ligand receptors (e.g. SRIF and non-SRIF receptors) and co-expressed receptor subtypes (e.g. sst(2) and sst(5) receptors) in characteristic proportions. In other words, levels of individual......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  19. Antimicrobial Decapeptide KSL-W Attenuates Candida albicans Virulence by Modulating Its Effects on Toll-Like Receptor, Human Beta-Defensin, and Cytokine Expression by Engineered human Oral Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    against phytopathogenic fungi that cause postharvest decay in fruits . Mol Plant Microbe Interact 2000;13:837–46. [28] Montesinos E, Antimicrobial peptides...inactivated KSL-W did not affect epithelial cell proliferation (Fig. 2). 3.3. KSL-W pre-treatment reduced Candida growth in the infected oral mucosa tissue...against fungi , such as C. albi- cans, remains to be determined. Oral candidiasis is associatedwith gingival tissuewhere epithe- lial cells are the primary

  20. Identification and Characterization of Novel Variations in Platelet G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR Genes in Patients Historically Diagnosed with Type 1 von Willebrand Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Stockley

    Full Text Available The clinical expression of type 1 von Willebrand disease may be modified by co-inheritance of other mild bleeding diatheses. We previously showed that mutations in the platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor gene (P2RY12 could contribute to the bleeding phenotype in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease. Here we investigated whether variations in platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes other than P2RY12 also contributed to the bleeding phenotype. Platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes P2RY1, F2R, F2RL3, TBXA2R and PTGIR were sequenced in 146 index cases with type 1 von Willebrand disease and the potential effects of identified single nucleotide variations were assessed using in silico methods and heterologous expression analysis. Seven heterozygous single nucleotide variations were identified in 8 index cases. Two single nucleotide variations were detected in F2R; a novel c.-67G>C transversion which reduced F2R transcriptional activity and a rare c.1063C>T transition predicting a p.L355F substitution which did not interfere with PAR1 expression or signalling. Two synonymous single nucleotide variations were identified in F2RL3 (c.402C>G, p.A134 =; c.1029 G>C p.V343 =, both of which introduced less commonly used codons and were predicted to be deleterious, though neither of them affected PAR4 receptor expression. A third single nucleotide variation in F2RL3 (c.65 C>A; p.T22N was co-inherited with a synonymous single nucleotide variation in TBXA2R (c.6680 C>T, p.S218 =. Expression and signalling of the p.T22N PAR4 variant was similar to wild-type, while the TBXA2R variation introduced a cryptic splice site that was predicted to cause premature termination of protein translation. The enrichment of single nucleotide variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes among type 1 von Willebrand disease patients supports the view of type 1 von Willebrand disease as a polygenic disorder.

  1. Identification and Characterization of Novel Variations in Platelet G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Genes in Patients Historically Diagnosed with Type 1 von Willebrand Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Nisar, Shaista P; Leo, Vincenzo C; Sabi, Essa; Cunningham, Margaret R; Eikenboom, Jeroen C; Lethagen, Stefan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Goodeve, Anne C; Watson, Steve P; Mundell, Stuart J; Daly, Martina E

    2015-01-01

    The clinical expression of type 1 von Willebrand disease may be modified by co-inheritance of other mild bleeding diatheses. We previously showed that mutations in the platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor gene (P2RY12) could contribute to the bleeding phenotype in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease. Here we investigated whether variations in platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes other than P2RY12 also contributed to the bleeding phenotype. Platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes P2RY1, F2R, F2RL3, TBXA2R and PTGIR were sequenced in 146 index cases with type 1 von Willebrand disease and the potential effects of identified single nucleotide variations were assessed using in silico methods and heterologous expression analysis. Seven heterozygous single nucleotide variations were identified in 8 index cases. Two single nucleotide variations were detected in F2R; a novel c.-67G>C transversion which reduced F2R transcriptional activity and a rare c.1063C>T transition predicting a p.L355F substitution which did not interfere with PAR1 expression or signalling. Two synonymous single nucleotide variations were identified in F2RL3 (c.402C>G, p.A134 =; c.1029 G>C p.V343 =), both of which introduced less commonly used codons and were predicted to be deleterious, though neither of them affected PAR4 receptor expression. A third single nucleotide variation in F2RL3 (c.65 C>A; p.T22N) was co-inherited with a synonymous single nucleotide variation in TBXA2R (c.6680 C>T, p.S218 =). Expression and signalling of the p.T22N PAR4 variant was similar to wild-type, while the TBXA2R variation introduced a cryptic splice site that was predicted to cause premature termination of protein translation. The enrichment of single nucleotide variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes among type 1 von Willebrand disease patients supports the view of type 1 von Willebrand disease as a polygenic disorder.

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ...

  3. Towards understanding oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term ‘oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain

  4. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahija Janardhanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  5. Oral dirofilariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Mahija; Rakesh, S; Savithri, Vindhya

    2014-01-01

    Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  6. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  7. Molecular concept in human oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Akhilesh; Singh, Shraddha; Kumar, Vijay; Pal, U S

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high in both Asian and Western countries. Several risk factors associated with development of oral cancer are now well-known, including tobacco chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Cancerous risk factors may cause many genetic events through chromosomal alteration or mutations in genetic material and lead to progression and development of oral cancer through histological progress, carcinogenesis. Oral squamous carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which multiple genetic events occur that alter the normal functions of proto-oncogenes/oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Furthermore, these gene alterations can deregulate the normal activity such as increase in the production of growth factors (transforming growth factor-α [TGF-α], TGF-β, platelet-derived growth factor, etc.) or numbers of cell surface receptors (epidermal growth factor receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor, etc.), enhanced intracellular messenger signaling and mutated production of transcription factors (ras gene family, c-myc gene) which results disturb to tightly regulated signaling pathways of normal cell. Several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have been implicated in oral cancer especially cyclin family, ras, PRAD-1, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p53 and RB1. Viral infections, particularly with oncogenic human papilloma virus subtype (16 and 18) and Epstein-Barr virus have tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia. Worldwide, this is an urgent need to initiate oral cancer research programs at molecular and genetic level which investigates the causes of genetic and molecular defect, responsible for malignancy. This approach may lead to development of target dependent tumor-specific drugs and appropriate gene therapy.

  8. Receptor assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K; Ibayashi, H [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-05-01

    This paper summarized present status and problems of analysis of hormone receptor and a few considerations on clinical significance of receptor abnormalities. It was pointed that in future clinical field quantitative and qualitative analysis of receptor did not remain only in the etiological discussion, but that it was an epoch-making field of investigation which contained the possiblity of artificial change of sensitivity of living body on drugs and the development connected directly with treatment of various diseases.

  9. Oral sensations and secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Running, Cordelia A

    2018-04-10

    Sensations experienced in the mouth influence food choices, both immediately and in the long term. Such sensations are themselves influenced by experience with flavors, the chemical environment of the mouth, genetics of receptors for flavors, and individual behavior in the chewing of food. Gustation, the sense of taste, yields information about nutrients, influences palatability, and feeds into the human body's preparation to receive those nutrients. Olfaction, the sense of smell, contributes enormously to defining and identifying food flavors (and is experienced even after placing food inside the mouth). Another vital component of food flavor is texture, which contributes to palatability, especially if a food's texture violates a person's expectations. Next, chemesthesis is the sense of chemically induced irritancy and temperature, for example spiciness and stinging. All of these sensations are potentially modified by saliva, the chemical and physical media of the mouth. As a person experiences the culmination of these oral sensations, modified through an individual's own unique saliva, the flavors in turn influence both what and how a person eats. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LGD-3303 [9-chloro-2-ethyl-1-methyl-3-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3H-pyrrolo-[3,2-f]quinolin-7(6H)-one], an orally available nonsteroidal-selective androgen receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Eric G; López, Francisco J; Rix, Peter; Hill, Robert; Chen, Yanling; Lee, Kyoung-Jin; O'Brien, Z; Chang, William Y; Meglasson, Martin D; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2009-02-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a new class of molecules in development to treat a variety of diseases. SARMs maintain the beneficial effects of androgens, including increased muscle mass and bone density, while having reduced activity on unwanted side effects. The mechanisms responsible for the tissue-selective activity of SARMs are not fully understood, and the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) relationships are poorly described. Tissue-specific compound distribution potentially could be a mechanism responsible for apparent tissue selectivity. We examined the PK/PD relationship of a novel SARM, LGD-3303 [9-chloro-2-ethyl-1-methyl-3-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3H-pyrrolo[3,2-f]quinolin-7(6H)-one], in a castrated rat model of androgen deficiency. LGD-3303 has potent activity on levator ani muscle but is a partial agonist on the preputial gland and ventral prostate. LGD-3303 never stimulated ventral prostate above intact levels despite increasing plasma concentrations of compound. Tissue-selective activity was maintained when LGD-3303 was dosed orally or by continuous infusion, two routes of administration with markedly different time versus exposure profiles. Despite the greater muscle activity relative to prostate activity, local tissue concentrations of LGD-3303 were higher in the prostate than in the levator ani muscle. LGD-3303 has SARM properties that are independent of its pharmacokinetic profile, suggesting that the principle mechanism for tissue-selective activity is the result of altered molecular interactions at the level of the androgen receptor.

  11. Combination therapy of potential gene to enhance oral cancer therapeutic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-regulation related to uncontrolled cell division and promotes progression in tumor. Over-expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been detected in oral cancer cells. EGFR-targeting agents are potential therapeutic modalities for treating oral cancer based on our in vitro study. Liposome nanotechnology is used to encapsulate siRNA and were modified with target ligand to receptors on the surface of tumor cells. We used EGFR siRNA to treat oral cancer in vitro.

  12. Clinical pathways and management of antithrombotic therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS): a Consensus Document from the Italian Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO), Italian Society of Cardiology (SIC), Italian Society of Emergency Medicine (SIMEU) and Italian Society of Interventional Cardiology (SICI-GISE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colivicchi, Furio; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Pugliese, Francesco Rocco; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; Romeo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of the pharmacologic management of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Over the last years, several studies have evaluated old and new oral or intravenous antiplatelet agents in ACS patients. In particular, research was focused on assessing superiority of two novel platelet ADP P2Y12 receptor antagonists (i.e., prasugrel and ticagrelor) over clopidogrel. Several large randomized controlled trials have been undertaken in this setting and a wide variety of prespecified and post-hoc analyses are available that evaluated the potential benefits of novel antiplatelet therapies in different subsets of patients with ACS. The aim of this document is to review recent data on the use of current antiplatelet agents for in-hospital treatment of ACS patients. In addition, in order to overcome increasing clinical challenges and implement effective therapeutic interventions, this document identifies all potential specific care pathway for ACS patients and accordingly proposes individualized therapeutic options. PMID:28751840

  13. Oral contraceptives induced hepatotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Akshaya Srikanth; V. Manisree

    2013-01-01

    Oral Contraceptives are the pharmacological agents used to prevent pregnancy. These are divided as the combined and progestogen methods and are administered orally, transdermally, systemically and via vaginal route. All these methods contain both oestrogen and progestogen. Vigorous usage of oral contraceptives and anabolic steroids as associated with cholestasis, vascular lesions and hepatic neoplasm. Benign hepatic neoplasms are clearly associated with oral contraceptives. In this article we...

  14. Oral vaccination of fish

    OpenAIRE

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen breakdown in the harsh gastric environment, but also to the high tolerogenic gut environment and to inadequate vaccine design. In this review we discuss current approaches used to develop oral vaccines fo...

  15. Oral vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen

  16. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. Don't risk it. Perform an oral cancer ... oral cancer self-exam each month. An oral examination is performed using a bright light and a ...

  17. Increased melatonin in oral mucosal tissue of oral lichen planus (OLP) patients: A possible link between melatonin and its role in oral mucosal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengtrakoon, Kirawut; Wannakasemsuk, Worraned; Vichitrananda, Vilasinee; Klanrit, Poramaporn; Hormdee, Doosadee; Noisombut, Rajda; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham

    2017-06-01

    The existence of extra-pineal melatonin has been observed in various tissues. No prior studies of melatonin in human oral mucosal tissue under the condition of chronic inflammation have been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of melatonin in oral mucosal tissue of patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) which was considered as a chronic inflammatory immune-mediated disease causing oral mucosal damage and ulcerations. Sections from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded oral mucosal tissue of OLP patients (n=30), and control subjects (n=30) were used in this study. Immunohistochemical staining was performed and the semiquantitative scoring system was used to assess the levels of arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT: a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of melatonin), melatonin, and melatonin receptor 1 (MT1) in oral mucosa of OLP patients and normal oral mucosa of control subjects. AANAT, melatonin, and MT1were detected in oral mucosal tissue of OLP patients and control subjects. Immunostaining scores of AANAT, melatonin, and MT1 in oral mucosal tissue of OLP patients were significantly higher than those in control subjects (p=0.002, poral mucosal tissue of OLP patients imply that chronic inflammation may induce the local biosynthesis of melatonin via AANAT, and may enhance the action of melatonin via MT1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Essentials of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators.

  19. Screening for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitender, Solanki; Sarika, Gupta; Varada, Hiremath R; Omprakash, Yadav; Mohsin, Khan

    2016-11-01

    Oral cancer is considered as a serious health problem resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Early detection and prevention play a key role in controlling the burden of oral cancer worldwide. The five-year survival rate of oral cancer still remains low and delayed diagnosis is considered as one of the major reasons. This increases the demand for oral screening. Currently, screening of oral cancer is largely based on visual examination. Various evidence strongly suggest the validity of visual inspection in reducing mortality in patients at risk for oral cancer. Simple visual examination is accompanied with adjunctive techniques for subjective interpretation of dysplastic changes. These include toluidine blue staining, brush biopsy, chemiluminescence and tissue autofluorescence. This review highlights the efficacy of various diagnostic methods in screening of oral cancer. © 2016 Old City Publishing, Inc.

  20. Oral biopsy: Oral pathologist′s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K L Kumaraswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions.

  1. Korean ethnicity as compared with white ethnicity is an independent favorable prognostic factor for overall survival in non-small cell lung cancer before and after the oral epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Myung-Ju; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Seok; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zell, Jason A; Park, Keunchil; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2010-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated, using a regional California Cancer Registry database, that Asian ethnicity is an independent favorable prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Retrospective population-based analysis of Korean and US white patients with NSCLC with known smoking status from Samsung Cancer Center, Seoul, South Korea, and a Southern California Regional Cancer Registry between 1998 and 2005 with follow-up through February 2008 to allow for even case ascertainment periods before and after 2002, when epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors were introduced in Korea and considered as the year of reference. A total of 4622 Korean and 8846 US white patients were analyzed. Median age of diagnosis was 63 years versus 71 years for Korean and white patients, respectively (P white patients were never-smokers. There was significant OS improvement in never-smokers when compared with ever-smokers among either Korean patients (p white (p white patients (p = 0.5641). Except for stage II patients (p = 0.0723), univariate analysis revealed Korean patients had improved OS compared with US white patients among stages I, III, and IV, respectively (all p white; hazard ratio (HR) = 0.869; p white ethnicity improved during 2002-2005 (HR = 0.795; p white ethnicity is an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS in NSCLC. In addition, greater survival benefit among Korean patients with NSCLC was noted in the postepidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor era (2002 and after) compared with US white ethnicity.

  2. Oral manifestations of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, S; O'Shea, F; Galvin, S; Wynne, B

    2018-02-01

    Mucosal involvement is commonly seen in patients with lupus; however, oral examination is often forgotten. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within oral lupoid plaques has been described, emphasizing the importance of identifying and treating oral lupus. We undertook a retrospective single-centre study looking at oral findings in patients attending our multidisciplinary lupus clinic between January 2015 and April 2016. A total of 42 patients were included. The majority of patients were female (88%) and had a diagnosis of discoid lupus erythematosus (62%). Half of the patients had positive oral findings, 26% had no oral examination documented, and 24% had documented normal oral examinations. Our findings suggest that oral pathology is common in this cohort of patients. Regular oral examination is warranted to identify oral lupus and provide treatment. Associated diseases such as Sjogren's syndrome may also be identified. Patients should be encouraged to see their general dental practitioners on a regular basis for mucosal review. Any persistent ulcer that fails to respond to treatment or hard lump needs urgent histopathological evaluation to exclude malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma.

  3. Enhancing oral vaccine potency by targeting intestinal M cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Azizi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The immune system in the gastrointestinal tract plays a crucial role in the control of infection, as it constitutes the first line of defense against mucosal pathogens. The attractive features of oral immunization have led to the exploration of a variety of oral delivery systems. However, none of these oral delivery systems have been applied to existing commercial vaccines. To overcome this, a new generation of oral vaccine delivery systems that target antigens to gut-associated lymphoid tissue is required. One promising approach is to exploit the potential of microfold (M cells by mimicking the entry of pathogens into these cells. Targeting specific receptors on the apical surface of M cells might enhance the entry of antigens, initiating the immune response and consequently leading to protection against mucosal pathogens. In this article, we briefly review the challenges associated with current oral vaccine delivery systems and discuss strategies that might potentially target mouse and human intestinal M cells.

  4. Upregulation of angiogenesis in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassiny, A; Friedlander, L T; Parachuru, V P B; Seo, B; Hussaini, H M; Rich, A M

    2018-02-01

    As angiogenesis is fundamental to the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory disorders, this study investigated the expression of various vascular markers in oral lichen planus and non-specific oral mucosal inflammatory tissues. Archival specimens of oral lichen planus (n = 15) and inflamed tissues (n = 13) were stained using immunohistochemistry with antibodies to CD34, vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and vasohibin. Nine representative sites at the epithelial-connective tissue junction and through the fibrous connective tissue were selected, and automated analysis techniques were used to determine the extent of positivity expressed as the percentage of positive cells. Significance was denoted when P lichen planus samples compared with inflamed controls. A higher level of CD34 was observed in the deeper parts of the connective tissue of Oral lichen planus (OLP) (P = .04), whereas VEGF and VEGFR2 expressions were higher all through the tissues (respectively, P lichen planus in all sites evaluated (P oral lichen planus compared with inflamed controls, with increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors and decreased anti-angiogenic expression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  6. Oral microbiota and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Meurman, Jukka H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the...

  7. Towards understanding oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, I.; Tabak, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite impressive worldwide improvements in oral health, inequalities in oral health status among and within countries remain a daunting public health challenge. Oral health inequalities arise from a complex web of health determinants, including social, behavioral, economic, genetic, environmental, and health system factors. Eliminating these inequalities cannot be accomplished in isolation of oral health from overall health, or without recognizing that oral health is influenced at multiple individual, family, community, and health systems levels. For several reasons, this is an opportune time for global efforts targeted at reducing oral health inequalities. Global health is increasingly viewed not just as a humanitarian obligation, but also as a vehicle for health diplomacy and part of the broader mission to reduce poverty, build stronger economies, and strengthen global security. Despite the global economic recession, there are trends that portend well for support of global health efforts: increased globalization of research and development, growing investment from private philanthropy, an absolute growth of spending in research and innovation, and an enhanced interest in global health among young people. More systematic and far-reaching efforts will be required to address oral health inequalities through the engagement of oral health funders and sponsors of research, with partners from multiple public and private sectors. The oral health community must be “at the table” with other health disciplines and create opportunities for eliminating inequalities through collaborations that can harness both the intellectual and financial resources of multiple sectors and institutions. PMID:21490232

  9. Oral microbiota and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka H. Meurman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion.

  10. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Oral Health Sciences is devoted to research into oral diseases and encourages a multidisciplinary approach. Emphasis is on oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral medicine, oral physiology and biochemistry and related clinical sciences.

  11. Oral metiamide as an effective inhibitor of gastric acid secretion in man

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A method is described for the evaluation of the effect of oral therapy on gastric acid secretion. Metiamide, a histamine H2-receptor antagonist, produced a 51% inhibition of pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion during the third hour after a standard 200-mg oral dose in man. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 2018 (1974).

  12. Expression and associations of TRAF1, BMI-1, ALDH1, and Lin28B in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tian-Fu; Li, Yi-Cun; Ma, Si-Rui; Bing-Liu; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1, an adaptor protein of tumor necrosis factor 2, is involved in classical nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and lymphocyte recruitment. However, less is known about the expression and association of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1 with cancer stem cell markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma. This study aimed to investigate the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1 and stem cell characteristic markers (lin28 homolog B, B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1) in oral squamous cell carcinoma and analyze their relations. Paraffin-embedded tissues of 78 oral squamous cell carcinomas, 39 normal oral mucosa, and 12 oral dysplasia tissues were employed in tissue microarrays, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1, B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, and lin28 homolog B was measured by immunohistostaining and digital pathological analysis. The expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1 was higher in the oral squamous cell carcinoma group as compared with the expression in the oral mucosa (p oral dysplasia (p oral squamous cell carcinoma. The patient survival rate was lower in the highly expressed tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1 group, although the difference was not significant. The clustering analysis showed that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1 was most related to aldehyde dehydrogenase 1. These findings suggest that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1 has potential direct/indirect regulations with the cancer stem cell markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma, which may help in further analysis of the cancer stem cell characteristics.

  13. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  14. Oral cavity and jaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solntsev, A.M.; Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Radioanatome of oral cavity and jaw is described. Diseases of the teeth, jaw, large salivary glands, temporo-mandibular articulation are considered. Roentgenograms of oral cacity and jaw of healthy people are presented and analyzed as well as roentgenograms in the above-mentioned diseases

  15. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section...

  16. Brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio; Ajimu, Akira; Morikawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Shintarou; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Ikenaga, Kouji; Sakamoto, Ichirou.

    1988-01-01

    13 cases with oral cancer were treated using brachytherapy at the Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University Hospital from September 1985 to February 1988. Among 11 cases of tongue cancer, T1 and T2 cases were well controlled by radiation therapy using 226 Ra needles. Cancer of oral floor and buccal mucosa were controlled by the use of 192 Au grains. (author)

  17. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  18. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statements Newsletters AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands. We ...

  19. What Is an Oral Piercing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your desktop! more... What Is an Oral Piercing? Article Chapters What Is an Oral Piercing? print full article print this chapter email this article Oral piercing can cause pain, swelling, infection, drooling, taste loss, ...

  20. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  1. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-26

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth ... involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ...

  3. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  4. Podoplanin emerges as a functionally relevant oral cancer biomarker and therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retzbach, Edward P; Sheehan, Stephanie A; Nevel, Evan M; Batra, Amber; Phi, Tran; Nguyen, Angels T P; Kato, Yukinari; Baredes, Soly; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Shienbaum, Alan J; Goldberg, Gary S

    2018-03-01

    Oral cancer has become one of the most aggressive types of cancer, killing 140,000 people worldwide every year. Current treatments for oral cancer include surgery and radiation therapies. These procedures can be very effective; however, they can also drastically decrease the quality of life for survivors. New chemotherapeutic treatments are needed to more effectively combat oral cancer. The transmembrane receptor podoplanin (PDPN) has emerged as a functionally relevant oral cancer biomarker and chemotherapeutic target. PDPN expression promotes tumor cell migration leading to oral cancer invasion and metastasis. Here, we describe the role of PDPN in oral squamous cell carcinoma progression, and how it may be exploited to prevent and treat oral cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Disease: H01235 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion characterized by mild to moderate mucocutaneous bleeding. Patients are with platelet dysfunction but nor...et P2Y12 receptor of a patient with congenital bleeding. ... JOURNAL ... Proc Natl Ac...i J, Collins PW, Watson SP, Morgan NV ... TITLE ... SLFN14 mutations underlie thrombocytopenia with excessive bleeding

  6. Prevention of gingival trauma : Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderdos, N.L.

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining healthy teeth and soft oral tissues for life is important. Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings can damage the soft oral tissues. This thesis investigates the safety of manual toothbrushes, interdental brushes and rubber bristles interdental cleaners by analysing the gingival abrasion

  7. Cromolyn Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor.Cromolyn oral inhalation helps to prevent asthma attacks (sudden episodes of shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing) but will not stop an asthma attack that has already started. Your doctor will prescribe ...

  8. Intravenous versus oral etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Abir Salwa; Grönberg, Malin; Langer, Seppo W.

    2018-01-01

    High-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs, G3) are aggressive cancers of the digestive system with poor prognosis and survival. Platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide) is considered the first-line palliative treatment. Etoposide is frequently...... administered intravenously; however, oral etoposide may be used as an alternative. Concerns for oral etoposide include decreased bioavailability, inter- and intra-patient variability and patient compliance. We aimed to evaluate possible differences in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS......) in patients treated with oral etoposide compared to etoposide given as infusion. Patients (n = 236) from the Nordic NEC study were divided into three groups receiving etoposide as a long infusion (24 h, n = 170), short infusion (≤ 5 h, n = 33) or oral etoposide (n = 33) according to hospital tradition. PFS...

  9. Fostering oral presentation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van Stan; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Previous research revealed significant differences in the effectiveness of various feedback sources for encouraging students’ oral presentation performance. While former studies emphasised the superiority of teacher feedback, it remains unclear whether the quality of feedback actually differs

  10. Oral Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Get involved Understanding Dental Research People Resources About Understanding Events Get involved Dental Research Resources Contact Sitemap The Oral Cancer Foundation admin 2017-11-12T16:49:25+ ...

  11. Maintaining women's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  12. ON ORAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Svetitsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes a rise in the incidence of oral cancer in the Rostov Region since the 1990s. The study has indicated that this rise is associated with regional population growth due to the forced migrants after the collapse of the USSR. Financial problems, unbalanced nutrition, poor oral hygiene, and depression in this group of patients have contributed to the higher incidence of precancers and cancers.

  13. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  14. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect imm...

  15. Erlotinib and the Risk of Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, William N.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Lee, J. Jack; Mao, Li; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Lin, Heather Y.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Martin, Jack W.; Lingen, Mark W.; Boyle, Jay O.; Shin, Dong M.; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Shinn, Nancy; Heymach, John V.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Tang, Ximing; Kim, Edward S.; Saintigny, Pierre; Blair, Elizabeth A.; Meiller, Timothy; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Myers, Jeffrey; El-Naggar, Adel; Lippman, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Standard molecularly based strategies to predict and/or prevent oral cancer development in patients with oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) are lacking. OBJECTIVE To test if the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib would reduce oral cancer development in patients with high-risk OPLs defined by specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) profiles. Secondary objectives included prospective determination of LOH as a prognostic marker in OPLs. DESIGN The Erlotinib Prevention of Oral Cancer (EPOC) study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-bind trial. Accrual occurred from November 2006 through July 2012, with a median follow-up time of 35 months in an ambulatory care setting in 5 US academic referral institutions. Patients with OPLs were enrolled in the protocol, and each underwent LOH profiling (N = 379); they were classified as high-risk (LOH-positive) or low-risk (LOH-negative) patients based on their LOH profiles and oral cancer history. The randomized sample consisted of 150 LOH-positive patients. INTERVENTIONS Oral erlotinib treatment (150mg/d) or placebo for 12 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Oral cancer–free survival (CFS). RESULTS A total of 395 participants were classified with LOH profiles, and 254 were classified LOH positive. Of these, 150 (59%) were randomized, 75 each to the placebo and erlotinib groups. The 3-year CFS rates in placebo- and erlotinib-treated patients were 74%and 70%, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95%CI, 0.68–2.38; P = .45). The 3-year CFS was significantly lower for LOH-positive compared with LOH-negative groups (74%vs 87%, HR, 2.19; 95%CI, 1.25–3.83; P = .01). Increased EGFR gene copy number correlated with LOH-positive status (P < .001) and lower CFS (P = .01). The EGFR gene copy number was not predictive of erlotinib efficacy. Erlotinib-induced skin rash was associated with improved CFS (P = .01). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this trial, LOH was validated as a marker of oral cancer risk and

  16. Determinants of Oral Health: Does Oral Health Literacy Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Naghibi Sistani, Mohammad Mehdi; Yazdani, Reza; Virtanen, Jorma; Pakdaman, Afsaneh; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate oral health literacy, independent of other oral health determinants, as a risk indicator for self-reported oral health. Methods. A cross-sectional population-based survey conducted in Tehran, Iran. Multiple logistic regression analysis served to estimate the predictive effect of oral health literacy on self-reported oral health status (good versus poor) controlling for socioeconomic and demographic factors and tooth-brushing behavior. Results. In all, among 1031 partici...

  17. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takuji; Tanaka, Mayu; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important adv...

  18. Oral microbiome and oral and gastrointestinal cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Calvin Y.; Hayes, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates human oral bacteria in the etiology of oral and gastrointestinal cancers. Epidemiological studies consistently report increased risks of these cancers in men and women with periodontal disease or tooth loss, conditions caused by oral bacteria. More than 700 bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity, including at least 11 bacterial phyla and 70 genera. Oral bacteria may activate alcohol and smoking-related carcinogens locally or act systemically, through c...

  19. Ethnicity and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, C; Bedi, R

    2000-09-01

    Oral squamous-cell carcinoma, the main type of oral cancer, is among the ten most common cancers in the world. The aims of this paper were first, to consider whether there was evidence of marked ethnic variations in the incidence, management, and survival of oral cancer, and then, to review possible explanations for these variations. Evidence from the literature suggests that there is marked, inter-country variation in both the incidence and mortality from oral cancer. There is also growing evidence of intracountry ethnic differences, mostly reported in the UK and USA. These variations among ethnic groups have been attributed mainly to specific risk factors, such as alcohol and tobacco (smoking and smokeless), but dietary factors and the existence of genetic predispositions may also play a part. Variations in access to care services are also an apparent factor. The extent of ethnic differences in oral cancer is masked by the scarcity of information available. Where such data are accessible, there are clear disparities in both incidence and mortality of oral cancer between ethnic groups.

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  2. Leptin promotes wound healing in the oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeki, Hirochika; Tokuyama, Reiko; Ide, Shinji; Okubo, Mitsuru; Tadokoro, Susumu; Tezuka, Mitsuki; Tatehara, Seiko; Satomura, Kazuhito

    2014-01-01

    Leptin, a 16 kDa circulating anti-obesity hormone, exhibits many physiological properties. Recently, leptin was isolated from saliva; however, its function in the oral cavity is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the physiological role of leptin in the oral cavity by focusing on its effect on wound healing in the oral mucosa. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to examine the expression of the leptin receptor (Ob-R) in human/rabbit oral mucosa. To investigate the effect of leptin on wound healing in the oral mucosa, chemical wounds were created in rabbit oral mucosa, and leptin was topically administered to the wound. The process of wound repair was histologically observed and quantitatively analyzed by measuring the area of ulceration and the duration required for complete healing. The effect of leptin on the proliferation, differentiation and migration of human oral mucosal epithelial cells (RT7 cells) was investigated using crystal violet staining, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and a wound healing assay, respectively. Ob-R was expressed in spinous/granular cells in the epithelial tissue and vascular endothelial cells in the subepithelial connective tissue of the oral mucosa. Topical administration of leptin significantly promoted wound healing and shortened the duration required for complete healing. Histological analysis of gingival tissue beneath the ulceration showed a denser distribution of blood vessels in the leptin-treated group. Although the proliferation and differentiation of RT7 cells were not affected by leptin, the migration of these cells was accelerated in the presence of leptin. Topically administered leptin was shown to promote wound healing in the oral mucosa by accelerating epithelial cell migration and enhancing angiogenesis around the wounded area. These results strongly suggest that topical administration of leptin may be useful as a treatment to promote wound healing in the oral mucosa.

  3. Oral insulin delivery: existing barriers and current counter-strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedawy, Ahmed; Martinez, Jorge; Al-Salami, Hani; Dass, Crispin R

    2018-02-01

    The chronic and progressive nature of diabetes is usually associated with micro- and macrovascular complications where failure of pancreatic β-cell function and a general condition of hyperglycaemia is created. One possible factor is failure of the patient to comply with and adhere to the prescribed insulin due to the inconvenient administration route. This review summarizes the rationale for oral insulin administration, existing barriers and some counter-strategies trialled. Oral insulin mimics the physiology of endogenous insulin secreted by pancreas. Following the intestinal absorption of oral insulin, it reaches the liver at high concentration via the portal vein. Oral insulin on the other hand has the potential to protect pancreatic β-cells from autoimmune destruction. Structural modification, targeting a particular tissue/receptor, and the use of innovative pharmaceutical formulations such as nanoparticles represent strategies introduced to improve oral insulin bioavailability. They showed promising results in overcoming the hurdles facing oral insulin delivery, although delivery is far from ideal. The use of advanced pharmaceutical technologies and further research in particulate carrier system delivery predominantly nanoparticle utilization would offer useful tools in delivering insulin via the oral route which in turn would potentially improve diabetic patient compliance to insulin and the overall management of diabetes. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  4. Strengthening of oral health systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral...... diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work......Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care...

  5. ORAL MYIASIS CONVERTING TO ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oral Myiasis, a condition of infestation of the body by fly larvae (maggots is a rare pathology in humans. It is associated with poor oral hygiene, alcoholism, senility, suppurating lesions, severe halitosis. It is seen frequently in tropical countries and hot climatic regions. The reported cases in literature of oral Myiasis associated with oral cancer are few. The treatment is a mechanical removal of the maggots but a systemic treatment with Ivermectin, a semi - synthetic macrolide antibiotic, has been used successfully for treatment for oral m yiasis. We present a case of 55 yr old male alcoholic patient with oral myiasis with extensive proliferative growth of oral cavity. Our patient was managed with manual debridement and administration of systemic ivermect in along with antibiotic coverage. Incisional biopsy of the proliferative lesion showed well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Thus our patient showed presence of oral myiasis in association with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  6. The thermosensitive TRPV3 channel contributes to rapid wound healing in oral epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijima, Reona; Wang, Bing; Takao, Tomoka; Mihara, Hiroshi; Kashio, Makiko; Ohsaki, Yasuyoshi; Zhang, Jing-Qi; Mizuno, Atsuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Yamashita, Yoshio; Masuko, Sadahiko; Goto, Masaaki; Tominaga, Makoto; Kido, Mizuho A

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity provides an entrance to the alimentary tract to serve as a protective barrier against harmful environmental stimuli. The oral mucosa is susceptible to injury because of its location; nonetheless, it has faster wound healing than the skin and less scar formation. However, the molecular pathways regulating this wound healing are unclear. Here, we show that transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3), a thermosensitive Ca(2+)-permeable channel, is more highly expressed in murine oral epithelia than in the skin by quantitative RT-PCR. We found that temperatures above 33°C activated TRPV3 and promoted oral epithelial cell proliferation. The proliferation rate in the oral epithelia of TRPV3 knockout (TRPV3KO) mice was less than that of wild-type (WT) mice. We investigated the contribution of TRPV3 to wound healing using a molar tooth extraction model and found that oral wound closure was delayed in TRPV3KO mice compared with that in WT mice. TRPV3 mRNA was up-regulated in wounded tissues, suggesting that TRPV3 may contribute to oral wound repair. We identified TRPV3 as an essential receptor in heat-induced oral epithelia proliferation and wound healing. Our findings suggest that TRPV3 activation could be a potential therapeutic target for wound healing in skin and oral mucosa. © FASEB.

  7. Discovery and therapeutic promise of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiyun; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T

    2005-06-01

    Androgens are essential for male development and the maintenance of male secondary characteristics, such as bone mass, muscle mass, body composition, and spermatogenesis. The main disadvantages of steroidal androgens are their undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The recent discovery of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) provides a promising alternative for testosterone replacement therapies with advantages including oral bioavailability, flexibility of structural modification, androgen receptor specificity, tissue selectivity, and the lack of steroid-related side effects.

  8. [Oral health in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojević, Duska; Brkanić, Tatjana; Stojić, Sinisa

    2002-01-01

    Good oral health care during pregnancy is essential but often overlooked factor of dental growth as well as of other structures of oral cavity. Pregnancy is the time when conscious approach to preventive oral care should increase. Preventive measures during pregnancy mean usage of fluorides, special dietary measures and increased oral hygiene habits. Preventive measures in pregnant women have one goal: providing conditions for development of fetal teeth as well as preventing tooth decay in pregnant women. The optimal period for introducing preventive measures is the first trimester of pregnancy. Because of hormonal alterations there is an increased incidence of dental diseases: gingivitis and low salivary pH (inflammation and bleeding gums). Eating habits of pregnant women may lead to frequent snacking on candy or other decay-promoting foods, thereby increasing the risk of caries. However, very poor oral health, possible dental complications and their consequences to the health as well as emotional status represent very strong reasons for activation of dental health care in this period.

  9. The Oral Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arweiler, Nicole B; Netuschil, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The oral microbiota represents an important part of the human microbiota, and includes several hundred to several thousand diverse species. It is a normal part of the oral cavity and has an important function to protect against colonization of extrinsic bacteria which could affect systemic health. On the other hand, the most common oral diseases caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are based on microorganisms. While (medical) research focused on the planktonic phase of bacteria over the last 100 years, it is nowadays generally known, that oral microorganisms are organised as biofilms. On any non-shedding surfaces of the oral cavity dental plaque starts to form, which meets all criteria for a microbial biofilm and is subject to the so-called succession. When the sensitive ecosystem turns out of balance - either by overload or weak immune system - it becomes a challenge for local or systemic health. Therefore, the most common strategy and the golden standard for the prevention of caries, gingivitis and periodontitis is the mechanical removal of this biofilms from teeth, restorations or dental prosthesis by regular toothbrushing.

  10. Oral health during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Douglass, Alan B; Douglass, Joanna M; Silk, Laura

    2008-04-15

    Oral health care in pregnancy is often avoided and misunderstood by physicians, dentists, and patients. Evidence-based practice guidelines are still being developed. Research suggests that some prenatal oral conditions may have adverse consequences for the child. Periodontitis is associated with preterm birth and low birth weight, and high levels of cariogenic bacteria in mothers can lead to increased dental caries in the infant. Other oral lesions, such as gingivitis and pregnancy tumors, are benign and require only reassurance and monitoring. Every pregnant woman should be screened for oral risks, counseled on proper oral hygiene, and referred for dental treatment when necessary. Dental procedures such as diagnostic radiography, periodontal treatment, restorations, and extractions are safe and are best performed during the second trimester. Xylitol and chlorhexidine may be used as adjuvant therapy for high-risk mothers in the early postpartum period to reduce transmission of cariogenic bacteria to their infants. Appropriate dental care and prevention during pregnancy may reduce poor prenatal outcomes and decrease infant caries.

  11. Canine oral melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    Melanoma is the most common oral malignancy in the dog. Oral and/or mucosal melanoma has been routinely considered an extremely malignant tumor with a high degree of local invasiveness and high metastatic propensity. Primary tumor size has been found to be extremely prognostic. The World Health Organization staging scheme for dogs with oral melanoma is based on size, with stage I = or = 4cm tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, and stage IV = distant metastasis. Median survival times for dogs with oral melanoma treated with surgery are approximately 17 to 18, 5 to 6, and 3 months with stage I, II, and III disease, respectively. Significant negative prognostic factors include stage, size, evidence of metastasis, and a variety of histologic criteria. Standardized treatments such as surgery, coarse-fractionation radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have afforded minimal to modest stage-dependent clinical benefits and death is usually due to systemic metastasis. Numerous immunotherapeutic strategies have been employed to date with limited clinical efficacy; however, the use of xenogeneic DNA vaccines may represent a leap forward in clinical efficacy. Oral melanoma is a spontaneous syngeneic cancer occurring in outbred, immunocompetent dogs and appears to be a more clinically faithful therapeutic model for human melanoma; further use of canine melanoma as a therapeutic model for human melanoma is strongly encouraged. In addition, the development of an expanded but clinically relevant staging system incorporating the aforementioned prognostic factors is also strongly encouraged.

  12. The LDL receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its codiscoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life.

  13. Oral pregnancy tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh M Gondivkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granuloma is one of the inflammatory hyperplasias seen in the oral cavity. This term is a misnomer because the lesion is unrelated to infection and in reality arises in response to various stimuli such as low-grade local irritation, traumatic injury, or hormonal factors. It predominantly occurs in the second decade of life in young females, possibly because of the vascular effects of female hormones. Clinically, oral pyogenic granuloma is a smooth or lobulated exophytic lesion manifesting as small, red erythematous growth on a pedunculated or sometimes sessile base, which is usually hemorrhagic. Although excisional surgery is the treatment of choice , some other treatment protocols such as the use of Nd:YAG laser, flash lamp pulsed dye laser, cryosurgery, intralesional injection of ethanol or corticosteroids, and sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy have been proposed. We present the case of a 25-year-old pregnant woman with large oral pyogenic granuloma.

  14. Beneficial Oral Biofilms as Smart Bioactive Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Gutt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a very common health problem caused by formation of pathogenic bacterial biofilm that triggers inflammation resulting in either reversible gingivitis or irreversible periodontal hard and soft tissue damages, leading to loss of teeth when left untreated. Commensal bacteria play an important role in oral health in many aspects. Mainly by colonizing oral tissues, they (i contribute to maturation of immune response, and (ii foreclose attachment of pathobiont and, therefore, prevent from infection. The main goal of the study was to investigate if blocking of receptors on a commensal biofilm can prevent or reduce the attachment of pathogenic strains. To do so, biofilm produced by commensal Streptococcus sanguinis was treated with whole cell lysate of pathobionts Fusobacterium nucleatum or Porphyromonas gingivalis, followed by incubation with respective strain(s. The study revealed significant reduction in pathobiont adhesion to lysate-treated commensal biofilm. Therefore, adhesion of pathobionts onto the lysate-blocked biofilm was hindered; however, not completely eliminated supporting the idea that such approach in the oral cavity would benefit the production of a well-balanced and healthy bioactive interface.

  15. Shared Oral Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Børge; Elmelund Poulsen,, Johan; Christophersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Shared Oral Care - Forebyggelse af orale sygdomme på plejecentre Introduktion og formål: Mangelfuld mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre er et alment og veldokumenteret sundhedsproblem, der kan føre til massiv udvikling af tandsygdomme, og som yderligere kan være medvirkende årsag til alvorlige...... ressourceanvendelse er muligt at skabe en betydeligt forbedret mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre Key words: Geriatric dentistry, nursing home, community health services, prevention, situated learning...

  16. Oral lichen planus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, S.; Katpar, S.; Ali, A.

    2007-01-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous dermatological disorder, with intraoral manifestation. Skin lesions prevail with oral mucosal lesions. Prevalence of lichen planus, as an oral pre-malignant lesion, is 1-2 % population. Lateral border, dorsal tongue, gingiva, hard palate and vermilion border are common sites and lesions appear as reticular, plaque-like and papular intraoral types. Skin presents with pururitic, polygonal papules. Atrophic and erosive are the known intraoral pre-malignant types. A case report is presented, which responded well to steroid therapy. (author)

  17. Immunohistochemical Expression of Vitamin-D Receptor in Oral and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    positive while 80% of well-differentiated skin SCC was strongly positive for VDR. In a previous study,. Grimm et al [7] demonstrated low VDR expression as an adverse prognostic factor for the survival of patients with OSCC. This may imply a potentially higher response rate of well-differentiated skin SCC to VD therapy than ...

  18. ORAL INSECT REPELLENTS - INSECT TASTE RECEPTORS AND THEIR ACTION,

    Science.gov (United States)

    CULICIDAE, * CHEMORECEPTORS ), INSECT REPELLENTS, ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, STIMULATION(PHYSIOLOGY), ELECTROLYTES(PHYSIOLOGY), BLOOD, INGESTION(PHYSIOLOGY), REPRODUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY), NUTRITION, ENTOMOLOGY, AEDES, MOUTH

  19. Immunohistochemical Expression of Vitamin-D Receptor in Oral and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All slides were viewed with a Nikon ECLIPSE 80i microscope and microphotographs recorded. Results: Among 15 moderately differentiated OSCC 7 (46.7%) showed moderate to strong positivity for VDR, while 8 were weak or negative for VDR. Among 10 well-differentiated SCC of the skin, 8 (80%) cases showed moderate ...

  20. Introducing Cytology-Based Theranostics in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrikidou, Anna; Valeri, Rosalia Maria; Kitikidou, Kyriaki; Destouni, Charikleia; Vahtsevanos, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and reliability of brush cytology in the biomarker expression profiling of oral squamous cell carcinomas within the concept of theranostics, and to correlate this biomarker profile with patient measurable outcomes. Markers representative of prognostic gene expression changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma was selected. These markers were also selected to involve pathways for which commercially available or investigational agents exist for clinical application. A set of 7 markers were analysed by immunocytochemistry on the archival primary tumour material of 99 oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. We confirmed the feasibility of the technique for the expression profiling of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Furthermore, our results affirm the prognostic significance of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family and the angiogenic pathway in oral squamous cell carcinoma, confirming their interest for targeted therapy. Brush cytology appears feasible and applicable for the expression profiling of oral squamous cell carcinoma within the concept of theranostics, according to sample availability.

  1. Inequalities in oral health and oral health promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a critical review of the problem of inequalities in oral health and discusses strategies for disease prevention and oral health promotion. It shows that oral health is not merely a result of individual biological, psychological, and behavioral factors; rather, it is the sum of collective social conditions created when people interact with the social environment. Oral health status is directly related to socioeconomic position across the socioeconomic gradient in almost all...

  2. Probiotics as oral health biotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shyamali; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Tabrizian, Maryam; Prakash, Satya

    2012-09-01

    Oral health is affected by its resident microorganisms. Three prominent oral disorders are dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis, with the oral microbiota playing a key role in the initiation/progression of all three. Understanding the microbiota and the diseases they may cause is critical to the development of new therapeutics. This review is focused on probiotics for the prevention and/or treatment of oral diseases. This review describes the oral ecosystem and its correlation with oral health/disease. The pathogenesis and current prevention/treatment strategies of periodontal diseases (PD) and dental caries (DC) are depicted. An introduction of probiotics is followed by an analysis of their role in PD and DC, and their potential role(s) in oral health. Finally, a discussion ensues on the future research directions and limitations of probiotics for oral health. An effective oral probiotic formulation should contribute to the prevention/treatment of microbial diseases of the oral cavity. Understanding the oral microbiota's role in oral disease is important for the development of a therapeutic to prevent/treat dental diseases. However, investigations into clinical efficacy, delivery/dose optimization, mechanism(s) of action and other related parameters are yet to be fully explored. Keeping this in mind, investigations into oral probiotic therapies are proving promising.

  3. Oral hygiene practices and risk of oral leukoplakia | Macigo | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the influence of oral hygiene habits and practices on the risk of developing oral leukoplakia. Design: Case control study. Setting: Githongo sublocation in Meru District. Subjects: Eighty five cases and 141 controls identified in a house-to-house screening. Results: The relative risk (RR) of oral ...

  4. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Washio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  5. Oral Hygiene and Oral Flora Evaluation in Psychiatric Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: The oral hygiene of most patients was insufficient. The presence of Gram‑negative Bacilli growth in the oral flora can be explained by poor hand hygiene. These findings suggest that it is useful to educate individuals about oral hygiene and hand hygiene and to inform the staff and families about this issue.

  6. The New Orality: Oral Characteristics of Computer-Mediated Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; Montgomery, Maureen

    1996-01-01

    Considers the characteristics of orality and literacy developed in the work of scholars such as Walter Ong to consider computer-mediated communication (CMC) as the potential site of a "new orality" which is neither purely oral or literate. Notes that the medium of CMC is writing, which has traditionally represented the…

  7. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-02

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  8. Imaging in oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, Supreeta; Chaukar, Devendra; Pai, Prathamesh

    2012-01-01

    Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist

  9. IDEA: Stimulating Oral Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Jacob J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents daily activities that facilitate complete sentence response, promote oral production, and aid the learning of vocabulary in foreign-language classes. Because speech is the primary form of communication in the foreign-language classroom, it is important to stimulate students to converse as soon as possible. (Author/CK)

  10. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  11. Oral Health and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-12

    This women's health podcast focuses on the importance of maintaining good oral health during pregnancy.  Created: 5/12/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/12/2009.

  12. History of oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  13. Oral Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Daniela I; Setterfield, Jane F

    2016-02-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a relatively common autoimmune T-cell-mediated disease of unknown aetiology affecting the mucous membranes, skin and nails. Its prevalence varies between 0.5 and 2.2% of the population in epidemiological studies with a peak incidence in the 30-60 years range and with a female predominance of 2:1. Mucosal lichen planus tends to follow a chronic course with acute exacerbations. Spontaneous remission of oral lichen planus (OLP) is uncommon, and indeed mucosal LP may become worse with time. In contrast, cutaneous lichen planus may follow a milder clinical course though some variants may be severe such as those affecting the palms and soles and the scalp and the genital tract in females (vulvovaginal gingival LP) where scarring leads to significant complications. It is important to identify those cases that may be drug induced or be associated with a contact allergic or irritant reaction (lichenoid reaction) or the rarer oral presentation of discoid lupus erythematosus. There is a very small risk of malignancy (approximately 1:200 patients/year) associated with oral lichen planus; thus patients should be informed that long term monitoring via their general dental practitioner is appropriate. This review will focus on the clinical presentation and management of oral lichen planus.

  14. Oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šehalić Meliha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 29 - year Lichen planus is a chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune skin disease, that is often manifested, except on the skin, in the oral cavity in a variety of clinical forms. The prevalence of the disease in the general population is about 1-2%. Etiopathogenesis is not still well understood. Histopathology, in addition to the basic methods, anamnesis and physical examination, is vital for proper diagnosis of oral lichen planus (OLP. Very diverse and loaded histological findings are common for all forms of oral lichen planus. We reported the case of oral lichen planus in a 49 years old male patient, who presented to the Dentistry clinic of Medical faculty of Priština with burning and itching symptoms and changes in the buccal mucosa. Histopathological analysis of biopsy tissue conformed clinical diagnosis of lichen planus. Due to the possibility for malignant transformation of lesions, the long-term follow-up of patients with this disease is of great importance.

  15. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  16. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral ... Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral ...

  17. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  18. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ... mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ...

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We ... surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral ...

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this ... and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to ... tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to ...

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ... and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ...

  3. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ... and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ...

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to ... in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to ...

  5. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  6. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for further information Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) is the expert for diagnosing and surgically treating ... late in its development. Your family dentist or OMS is in the best position to detect oral ...

  7. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ...

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and ... education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and ...

  9. Age-related oral changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mckenna, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    Age-related oral changes are seen in the oral hard and soft tissues as well as in bone, the temporomandibular joints and the oral mucosa. As older patients retain their natural teeth for longer, the clinical picture consists of normal physiological age changes in combination with pathological and iatrogenic effects. Clinical Relevance: With an ageing population retaining more of its natural teeth for longer, dental professionals should expect to observe oral age changes more frequently.

  10. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rio, Rute; Sim?es-Silva, Liliana; Garro, Sofia; Silva, M?rio-Jorge; Azevedo, ?lvaro; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with n...

  11. Oral Lichen Planus in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan Das, Usha; JP, Beena

    2009-01-01

    Oral lichen planus which is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases in adults, it has been rarely described in children. There are very reports in the literature regarding oral lichen planus in children, here we report a case of intraoral lesions of lichen planus. Lichen planus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperkeratotic or erosive lesions of the oral mucosa in children.

  12. Oral Biopsy: A Dental Gawk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sir,. Dermatologists are often confronted with neoplasms and diseases of the oral cavity. Although many may be reluctant to perform oral surgical procedures, a biopsy is often needed to establish a definitive diagnosis, and biopsy of the oral cavity is a safe and useful technique that can be easily employed by dermatologists.

  13. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to 42,000 Americans ... diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ...

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ... OMS is in the best position to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. Don't risk ...

  15. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Smutzer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition.

  16. Oral health: equity and social determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwan, Stella; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter discusses the social determinants of oral health, and identifies interventions that have been, or can be, used in addressing oral health inequities (e.g. oral health promotion, education programmes, improving access to oral health care)....

  17. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, J; Hietanen, J

    2012-01-01

    as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral......In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must...... medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide...

  18. Effect of Fixed Metallic Oral Appliances on Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnazzawi, Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    There is a substantial proportion of the population using fixed metallic oral appliances, such as crowns and bridges, which are composed of various dental alloys. These restorations may be associated with a number of effects on oral health with variable degrees of severity, to review potential effects of using fixed metallic oral appliances, fabricated from various alloys. The MEDLINE/PubMed database was searched using certain combinations of keywords related to the topic. The search revealed that burning mouth syndrome, oral pigmentation, hypersensitivity and lichenoid reactions, and genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are the major potential oral health changes associated with fixed prosthodontic appliances. Certain oral disorders are associated with the use of fixed metallic oral appliances. Patch test is the most reliable method that can be applied for identifying metal allergy, and the simultaneous use of different alloys in the mouth is discouraged.

  19. O-GlcNAcylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkaew, Tassaporn; Aung, Win Pa Pa; Supanchart, Chayarop; Makeudom, Anupong; Langsa-Ard, Sarawat; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Krisanaprakornkit, Suttichai

    2018-03-01

    Two post-translational mechanisms commonly demonstrated in various cancers are protein phosphorylation and glycosylation by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). However, only phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/Akt pathway has been reported in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Therefore, we aimed to determine both post-translational modifications in OSCC tissues and in oral cancer cells compared to normal tissues and oral keratinocytes and to find correlations of these modifications with histological grading. Thirty-two OSCC and ten normal formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections were probed with the anti-O-GlcNAc, anti-O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), anti-phosphorylated-EGFR tyr1173 , and anti-phosphorylated-Akt ser473 antibodies following standard immunohistochemistry. The immunohistochemical (IHC) score was determined using the Fromowitz standard. Whole cell lysates of oral cancer cells and normal oral keratinocytes were immunoblotted with the anti-O-GlcNAc antibody. The median IHC scores of O-GlcNAc or OGT between OSCC and normal tissues were not different, whereas those of phosphorylated-EGFR tyr1173 and phosphorylated-Akt ser473 were significantly higher in OSCC than normal tissues (P O-GlcNAcylated proteins in oral cancer cells and normal oral keratinocytes did not differ. In the OSCC group, the median IHC scores of O-GlcNAc and OGT were significantly lower than those of phosphorylated-EGFR tyr1173 and phosphorylated-Akt ser473 (P O-GlcNAc or OGT were not determined to correlate with histological grading. Unlike other types of cancers, our findings demonstrate that the levels of O-GlcNAcylation are not significantly increased in OSCC tissues or in oral cancer cells and are not associated with the histological grading of OSCC. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Age-related alteration of expression and function of TLRs and NK activity in oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oouchi, M; Hasebe, A; Hata, H; Segawa, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, Y; Kitagawa, Y; Shibata, K-I

    2015-07-01

    Roles of aging or immune responses mediated by Toll-like receptors and natural killer cell in the onset or progression of human candidiasis remain unclear. This study was designed to elucidate the roles using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors and patients with oral candidiasis. Subjects tested were healthy volunteers and patients who visited Dental Clinical Division of Hokkaido University Hospital. The patients with oral candidiasis included 39 individuals (25-89 years of age) with major complaints on pain in oral mucosa and/or dysgeusia. Healthy volunteers include students (25-35 years of age) and teaching staffs (50-65 years of age) of Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine. Functions of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 were downregulated significantly and the natural killer activity was slightly, but not significantly downregulated in aged healthy volunteers compared with healthy young volunteers. Functions of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 and the natural killer activity were significantly downregulated in patients with oral candidiasis compared with healthy volunteers. Downregulation of functions of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 as well as natural killer activity is suggested to be associated with the onset or progression of oral candidiasis in human. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Role of the Sweet Taste Receptor in Enteroendocrine Cells and Pancreatic β-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itaru Kojima

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The sweet taste receptor is expressed in taste cells located in taste buds of the tongue. This receptor senses sweet substances in the oral cavity, activates taste cells, and transmits the taste signals to adjacent neurons. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein-coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. Recent studies have shown that this receptor is also expressed in the extragustatory system, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreatic β-cells, and glucose-responsive neurons in the brain. In the intestine, the sweet taste receptor regulates secretion of incretin hormones and glucose uptake from the lumen. In β-cells, activation of the sweet taste receptor leads to stimulation of insulin secretion. Collectively, the sweet taste receptor plays an important role in recognition and metabolism of energy sources in the body.

  2. An orthodontic oral appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Marie; Legrell, Per Erik

    2010-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to test the hypothesis that an orthodontic oral appliance (OA) that is designed to work against the backwardly directed forces on the upper incisors may counteract the reduction in overjet from these devices. Thirty patients with normal bites, good oral health, and milder sleep apnea were randomized to treatment with either OAs or orthodontic OAs. Bite changes were evaluated on plaster casts and radiographs and by questionnaires after a mean of 2.4 years in 19 frequent users. Four of nine patients in the orthodontic OA group increased their overjet by > or =0.4 mm, while none of the 10 patients in the OA group experienced that effect. Only the orthodontic OA increases the overjet; this design may therefore be beneficial to patients at risk of negative effects on their bite during OA treatment.

  3. Immunologically mediated oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N; Anita, N; Babu, R

    2015-04-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  4. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  5. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  6. Per-oral cholangioscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Monga, Amitabh; Ramchandani, Mohan; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2011-01-01

    Direct endoscopic views of bile duct have been described in literature since the 1970s. Since then rapid strides have been made with the advent of technologically advanced systems with better image quality and maneuverability. The single operator semi-disposable per-oral cholangioscope and other novel methods such as the cholangioscopy access balloon are likely to revolutionize this field. Even though cholangioscopy is currently used primarily for characterization of indeterminate strictures ...

  7. Challenges in Comparative Oral Epic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Miles Foley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Originally written in 2001 and subsequently published in China, this collaborative essay explores five questions central to comparative oral epic with regard to Mongolian, South Slavic, ancient Greek, and Old English traditions: “What is a poem in oral epic tradition?” “What is a typical scene or theme in oral epic tradition?” “What is a poetic line in oral epic tradition?” “What is a formula in an oral epic tradition?” “What is the register in oral epic poetry?” Now available for the first time in English, this essay reflects a foundational stage of what has become a productive and long-term collaboration between the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and the Institute of Ethnic Literature of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

  8. Fractal analysis in oral leukoplakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Bhai Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fractal analysis (FA quantifies complex geometric structures by generating a fractal dimension (FD, which can measure the complexity of mucosa. FA is a quantitative tool used to measure the complexity of self-similar or semi-self-similar structures. Aim and Objective: The study was done to perform the FA of oral mucosa with keratotic changes, as it is also made up of self-similar tissues, and thus, its FD can be calculated. Results: In oral leukoplakia, keratinization increases the complexity of mucosa, which denotes fractal geometry. We evaluated and compared pretreated and post-treated oral leukoplakia in 50 patients with clinically proven oral leukoplakia and analyzed the normal oral mucosa and lesional or keratinized mucosa in oral leukoplakia patients through FA using box counting method. Conclusion: FA using the fractal geometry is an efficient, noninvasive prediction tool for early detection of oral leukoplakia and other premalignant conditions in patients.

  9. Oral cancer screening practices of oral health professionals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Rodrigo; Haresaku, Satoru; McGrath, Roisin; Bailey, Denise; Mccullough, Michael; Musolino, Ross; Kim, Boaz; Chinnassamy, Alagesan; Morgan, Michael

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate oral cancer-related screening practices of Oral Health Professionals (OHPs - dentists, dental hygienists, dental therapists, and oral health therapists) practising in Victoria, Australia. A 36-item survey was distributed to 3343 OHPs. Items included socio-demographic and work-related characteristics; self-assessed knowledge of oral cancer; perceived level of confidence in discussing oral health behaviors with patients; oral cancer screening practices; and self-evaluated need for additional training on screening procedures for oral cancer. A total of 380 OHPs responded this survey, achieving an overall response rate of 9.4%. Forty-five were excluded from further analysis. Of these 335 OHP, 72% were dentists; (n = 241); either GDP or Dental Specialists; 13.7% (n = 46) were dental hygienists; 12.2% (n = 41) were oral health therapists, and the remaining 2.1% (n = 7) were dental therapists. While the majority (95.2%) agreed that oral cancer screening should be routinely performed, in actual practice around half (51.4%) screened all their patients. Another 12.8% "Very rarely" conducted screening examinations. The probability of routinely conducting an oral cancer screening was explored utilising Logistic Regression Analysis. Four variables remained statistically significant (p oral cancer screening rose with increasing levels of OHPs' confidence in oral cancer-related knowledge (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.09-1.67) and with higher levels of confidence in discussing oral hygiene practices with patients (OR = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.03-1.52). Results also showed that dental specialists were less likely to perform oral cancer screening examinations compared with other OHPs (OR = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.07-0.52) and the likelihood of performing an oral cancer screening decreased when the "patient complained of a problem" (OR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.10-0.44). Only half the study sample performed oral cancer screening examinations for all of their patients

  10. Oral CCR5 inhibitors: will they make it through?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Priscilla; Nozza, Silvia; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Lazzarin, Adriano; Tambussi, Giuseppe

    2006-05-01

    The therapeutic armamentarium against HIV has recently gained a drug belonging to a novel class of antiretrovirals, the entry inhibitors. The last decade has driven an in-depth knowledge of the HIV entry process, unravelling the multiple engagements of the HIV envelope proteins with the cellular receptorial complex that is composed of a primary receptor (CD4) and a co-receptor (CCR5 or CXCR4). The vast majority of HIV-infected subjects exhibit biological viral variants that use CCR5 as a co-receptor. Individuals with a mutated CCR5 gene, both homo- and heterozygotes, appear to be healthy. For these and other reasons, CCR5 represents an appealing target for treatment intervention, although certain challenges can not be ignored. Promising small-molecule, orally bioavailable CCR5 antagonists are under development for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  11. Receptor-receptor interactions within receptor mosaics. Impact on neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, K; Marcellino, D; Rivera, A; Diaz-Cabiale, Z; Filip, M; Gago, B; Roberts, D C S; Langel, U; Genedani, S; Ferraro, L; de la Calle, A; Narvaez, J; Tanganelli, S; Woods, A; Agnati, L F

    2008-08-01

    Future therapies for diseases associated with altered dopaminergic signaling, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and drug addiction or drug dependence may substantially build on the existence of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions within dopamine receptor containing receptor mosaics (RM; dimeric or high-order receptor oligomers) where it is believed that the dopamine D(2) receptor may operate as the 'hub receptor' within these complexes. The constitutive adenosine A(2A)/dopamine D(2) RM, located in the dorsal striato-pallidal GABA neurons, are of particular interest in view of the demonstrated antagonistic A(2A)/D(2) interaction within these heteromers; an interaction that led to the suggestion and later demonstration that A(2A) antagonists could be used as novel anti-Parkinsonian drugs. Based on the likely existence of A(2A)/D(2)/mGluR5 RM located both extrasynaptically on striato-pallidal GABA neurons and on cortico-striatal glutamate terminals, multiple receptor-receptor interactions within this RM involving synergism between A(2A)/mGluR5 to counteract D(2) signaling, has led to the proposal of using combined mGluR5 and A(2A) antagonists as a future anti-Parkinsonian treatment. Based on the same RM in the ventral striato-pallidal GABA pathways, novel strategies for the treatment of schizophrenia, building on the idea that A(2A) agonists and/or mGluR5 agonists will help reduce the increased dopaminergic signaling associated with this disease, have been suggested. Such treatment may ensure the proper glutamatergic drive from the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus to the prefrontal cortex, one which is believed to be reduced in schizophrenia due to a dominance of D(2)-like signaling in the ventral striatum. Recently, A(2A) receptors also have been shown to counteract the locomotor and sensitizing actions of cocaine and increases in A(2A) receptors have also been observed in the nucleus accumbens after extended cocaine self-administration, probably

  12. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brenda Y; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  13. Irradiation mucositis and oral flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spijkervet, F.K.L.

    1989-01-01

    This study, which is motivated by the substantial morbidity of local signs of mucositis and generalized symptoms that result from mucositis induced by therapeutic irradiation, has the following objectives: To investigate if it is possible to prevent irradiation mucositis via oral flora elimination, and, if it is true that flora plays a role in irradiation mucositis, what fraction of the oral flora may be involved; to evaluate oral Gram-negative bacillary carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate Gram-negative bacilli from the oral cavity; to evaluate oral yeast carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate yeasts stomatitis and the 'selectivity' of elimination of flora. Two methods are described for monitoring alterations of mucositis of the oral cavity and changes in oral flora. Chlorhexidine has been tested as the commonly used prophylaxis. The effect of chlorhexidine 0.1% rinses on oral flora and mucositis has been studied in a prospective placebo controlled double blind randomized programme. The results of the influence of saliva on the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine and the results of selective elimination of oral flora in irradiated patients who have head and neck cancer are reported. Salivary inactivation of the topical antimicrobials used for selective elimination of oral flora has been studied and the results are reported. Finally, the objectives that have been achieved (or not) are delineated. The significance of the results of the study are discussed in terms of published information and further lines of research are suggested. (author). 559 refs.; 29 figs.; 20 tabs

  14. VCAM1 and ICAM1 expression in oral lichen planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Shafaee, Shahryar; Bijani, Ali; Bagheri, Soodabeh

    2013-01-01

    Oral lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory immune-mediated disease. ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are vascular adhesion molecules that their receptors are located on endothelial cells and leukocytes. The aim of this study is the immunohistochemical evaluation of VCAM1 and ICAM1 in oral lichen planus and to compare these two markers with normal mucosa for evaluation of angiogenesis. This descriptive-analytical study was performed on 70 paraffined blocks of oral lichen planus and 30 normal mucosa samples taken from around the lesions. Samples were stained with H & E and then with Immunohistochemistry using monoclonal mouse anti human VCAM1 (CD106), & monoclonal mouse anti human ICAM1(CD54) for confirmation of diagnosis. Slides were evaluated under light microscope and VCAM1 and ICAM1 positive cells (endothelial cells and leukocytes) were counted. Data were analyzed with Mann-Whitney test, Wilcoxon and Chi-Square and poral lichen planus according to the percentage of stained cells (p=0.000& p=0.000, Mann-Whitney test). Thirty cases of oral normal mucosa associated with lichen planus showed that the VCAM1 has increased significantly in comparison to normal mucosa (plichen planus and normal mucosa, showed a significantly difference (plichen planus was not observed (p>0.05). Regarding the results, it seems that high expression of VCAM1 and ICAM1 is related to oral lichen planus. PMID:24551788

  15. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood of ...

  16. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Is a Potential Therapeutic Agent for Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yu Kuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancers, which affect 650,000 people and cause 350,000 deaths per year, is the sixth leading cancer by cancer incidence and eighth by cancer-related death worldwide. Oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancer. More than 90% of oral cancers are oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. The overall five-year survival rate of OSCC patients is approximately 63%, which is due to the low response rate to current therapeutic drugs. In this review we discuss the possibility of using caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE as an alternative treatment for oral cancer. CAPE is a strong antioxidant extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Recent studies indicate that CAPE treatment can effectively suppress the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of oral cancer cells. CAPE treatment inhibits Akt signaling, cell cycle regulatory proteins, NF-κB function, as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. Therefore, CAPE treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. According to the evidence that aberrations in the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt signaling, NF-κB function, COX-2 activity, and MMPs activity are frequently found in oral cancers, and that the phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR, and COX-2 correlates to oral cancer patient survival and clinical progression, we believe that CAPE treatment will be useful for treatment of advanced oral cancer patients.

  17. Cooperative ethylene receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qian; Wen, Chi-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    The gaseous plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a family of five ethylene receptor members in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis. Genetic and biochemical studies suggest that the ethylene response is suppressed by ethylene receptor complexes, but the biochemical nature of the receptor signal is unknown. Without appropriate biochemical measures to trace the ethylene receptor signal and quantify the signal strength, the biological significance of the modulation of ethylene responses ...

  18. The anticancer estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen impairs consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory through estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenfels, Martina; Dornelles, Arethuza da Silva; Petry, Fernanda Dos Santos; Blank, Martina; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2017-11-01

    Over two-thirds of women with breast cancer have positive tumors for hormone receptors, and these patients undergo treatment with endocrine therapy, tamoxifen being the most widely used agent. Despite being very effective in breast cancer treatment, tamoxifen is associated with side effects that include cognitive impairments. However, the specific aspects and mechanisms underlying these impairments remain to be characterized. Here, we have investigated the effects of tamoxifen and interaction with estrogen receptors on formation of memory for inhibitory avoidance conditioning in female rats. In the first experiment, Wistar female rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen (1, 3, or 10 mg/kg) or saline by gavage immediately after training and were tested for memory consolidation 24 h after training. In the second experiment, rats received a single dose of 1 mg/kg tamoxifen or saline by gavage 3 h after training and were tested 24 h after training for memory consolidation. In the third experiment, rats received a subcutaneous injection with estrogen receptor α agonist or estrogen receptor beta agonist 30 min before the training. After training, rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen 1 mg/kg or saline and were tested 24 h after training. In the fourth experiment, rats were trained and tested 24 h later. Immediately after test, rats received a single dose of tamoxifen (1 mg/kg) or saline by gavage and were given four additional daily test trials followed by a re-instatement. Tamoxifen at 1 mg/kg impaired memory consolidation when given immediately after training and the estrogen receptor alpha agonist improved the tamoxifen-related memory impairment. Moreover, tamoxifen impairs memory consolidation of the test. These findings indicate that estrogen receptors regulate the early phase of memory consolidation and the effects of tamoxifen on memory consolidation.

  19. Possible neuroimmunomodulation therapy in T-cell-mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus are local chronic inflammatory diseases which are implicated in T cell-mediated immunity. According to the systematic review, there is insufficient evidence to support any specific treatment for T-cell mediated oral diseases. The hypothesis: In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus can be treated with selective α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 -nAChR agonists. Our hypothesis is supported by the following two facts. First, the pathophysiological conditions, T h 1/T h 17 cell activation and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, are observed in T-cell mediated oral diseases as well as in T-cell mediated systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Second, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is inhibited in systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. On the other hand, treatment with α7 -nAChR agonists which activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway suppresses neuroinflammation via inhibition of T h 1/T h 17 responses in animal model of systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. We thus expect that selective α7 -nAChR agonists will be effective for the treatment of T-cell mediated oral diseases. Evaluation of the hypothesis: To test our hypothesis, we need to develop in vivo mouse model of T-cell mediated oral diseases. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of a selective α7 -nAChR agonist, we choose ABT-107 because of its safety and tolerability. We believe that the selective α7 -nAChR agonist, especially ABT-107, may be a therapeutic drug to treat T-cell mediated oral diseases.

  20. [New oral anticoagulant drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovits, Alejandro; Aizman, Andrés; Zúñiga, Pamela; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego

    2011-10-01

    Thromboembolic disease (TED) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The hallmark of oral long-term anticoagulant therapy has been the use of vitamin K antagonists, whose anticoagulant effect is exerted inhibiting vitamin K epoxide reductase. Warfarin and acenocoumarol are the most commonly used. In the last five years several new drugs for long term anticoagulation have been developed, which can inhibit single clotting factors with the purpose of improving drug therapeutic range and, ideally, minimizing bleeding risks. This review addresses the state of the art on the clinical use of inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin.

  1. Drug Transport Mechanism of Oral Antidiabetic Nanomedicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Evren; Yurdasiper, Aysu

    2014-01-01

    Context: Over the last few decades, extensive efforts have been made worldwide to develop nanomedicine delivery systems, especially via oral route for antidiabetic drugs. Absorption of insulin is hindered by epithelial cells of gastrointestinal tract, acidic gastric pH and digestive enzymes. Evidence Acquisition: Recent reports have identified and explained the beneficial role of several structural molecules like mucoadhesive polymers (polyacrylic acid, sodium alginate, chitosan) and other copolymers for the efficient transport and release of insulin to its receptors. Results: Insulin nanomedicines based on alginate-dextran sulfate core with a chitosan-polyethylene glycol-albumin shell reduced glycaemia in a dose dependent manner. Orally available exendin-4 formulations exerted their effects in a time dependent manner. Insulin nanoparticles formed by using alginate and dextran sulfate nucleating around calcium and binding to poloxamer, stabilized by chitosan, and subsequently coated with albumin showed a threefold increase of the hypoglycemic effect in comparison to free insulin in animal models. Solid lipid nanoparticles showed an enhancement of the bioavailability of repaglinide (RG) within optimized solid lipid nanoparticle formulations when compared with RG alone. Conclusions: Nanoparticles represent multiparticulate delivery systems designed to obtain prolonged or controlled drug delivery and to improve bioavailability as well as stability. Nanoparticles can also offer advantages like limiting fluctuations within therapeutic range, reducing side effects, protecting drugs from degradation, decreasing dosing frequency, and improving patient compliance and convenience PMID:24696697

  2. Drug transport mechanism of oral antidiabetic nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Evren; Yurdasiper, Aysu

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, extensive efforts have been made worldwide to develop nanomedicine delivery systems, especially via oral route for antidiabetic drugs. Absorption of insulin is hindered by epithelial cells of gastrointestinal tract, acidic gastric pH and digestive enzymes. Recent reports have identified and explained the beneficial role of several structural molecules like mucoadhesive polymers (polyacrylic acid, sodium alginate, chitosan) and other copolymers for the efficient transport and release of insulin to its receptors. Insulin nanomedicines based on alginate-dextran sulfate core with a chitosan-polyethylene glycol-albumin shell reduced glycaemia in a dose dependent manner. Orally available exendin-4 formulations exerted their effects in a time dependent manner. Insulin nanoparticles formed by using alginate and dextran sulfate nucleating around calcium and binding to poloxamer, stabilized by chitosan, and subsequently coated with albumin showed a threefold increase of the hypoglycemic effect in comparison to free insulin in animal models. Solid lipid nanoparticles showed an enhancement of the bioavailability of repaglinide (RG) within optimized solid lipid nanoparticle formulations when compared with RG alone. Nanoparticles represent multiparticulate delivery systems designed to obtain prolonged or controlled drug delivery and to improve bioavailability as well as stability. Nanoparticles can also offer advantages like limiting fluctuations within therapeutic range, reducing side effects, protecting drugs from degradation, decreasing dosing frequency, and improving patient compliance and convenience.

  3. Oral complications in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, W.

    1983-01-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications

  4. Drug Reactions in Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Derviş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Both immunologic and nonimmunologic drug reactions can be seen in oral mucosa. Since considerable number of these reactions heals spontaneously without being noticed by the patients, exact frequency of the lesions is unknown. Most common lesions are xerostomia, taste disorders, mucosal ulcerations and edema. In this article, oral lesions resulting from drug intake similar to those from oral lesions of local and systemic diseases, and diagnostic problems caused by these similarities, have been reviewed.

  5. Oral cancer: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanuthai, K; Rojanawatsirivej, S; Thosaporn, W; Kintarak, S; Subarnbhesaj, A; Darling, M; Kryshtalskyj, E; Chiang, C-P; Shin, H-I; Choi, S-Y; Lee, S-S; Aminishakib, P

    2018-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as between Asian and non-Asian oral cancer patients.

  6. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Miller

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue; (iv salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis

  7. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, R; Simões-Silva, L; Garro, S; Silva, M-J; Azevedo, Á; Sampaio-Maia, B

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment.

  8. Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge, Anticoagulation Control, and Demographic Characteristics of Patients Attending an Anticoagulation Clinic in Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Prospective Evaluation.

  9. ORAL ALLERGY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sergeev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as a set of clinical manifestations caused by IgE-mediated allergic  reactions  that  occur  at  oral  and  pharyngeal  mucosae  in  the  patients  with  pollen  sensitization  after ingestion of certain fruits, vegetables, nuts and spices. OAS arises from cross-reactivity between specific pollen and food allergens, due to similarity of a configuration and amino acid sequence of allergenic molecules. OAS is considered as class II food allergy, being caused by thermo- and chemolabile allergens, and it is rarely combined with generalized manifestations of food allergy. Prevalence and spectrum of the causal allergens depend on a kind of pollen sensitization. In Moscow region, as well as in Northern Europe, allergic sensitization most commonly occurs to the pollen of leaf trees, whereas OAS is mostly connected with ingestion of fruits from Rosaceae family and nuts. Since last years, a newly developed technique of component-resolved molecular diagnosis (CR diagnostics allows of more precise detection of OAS-causing allergen molecules. These data are of extreme importance for administration of adequate nutritional therapy and prediction of SIT efficiency. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 1, pp 17-28

  10. Dark chocolate receptors: epicatechin-induced cardiac protection is dependent on delta-opioid receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerselvam, Mathivadhani; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M; Bonds, Jacqueline A; Horikawa, Yousuke T; Saldana, Michelle; Dalton, Nancy D; Head, Brian P; Patel, Piyush M; Roth, David M; Patel, Hemal H

    2010-11-01

    Epicatechin, a flavonoid, is a well-known antioxidant linked to a variety of protective effects in both humans and animals. In particular, its role in protection against cardiovascular disease has been demonstrated by epidemiologic studies. Low-dose epicatechin, which does not have significant antioxidant activity, is also protective; however, the mechanism by which low-dose epicatechin induces this effect is unknown. Our laboratory tested the hypothesis that low-dose epicatechin mediates cardiac protection via opioid receptor activation. C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to 1 of 10 groups: control, epicatechin, naloxone (nonselective opioid receptor antagonist), epicatechin + naloxone, naltrindole (δ-specific opioid receptor antagonist), epicatechin + naltrindole, norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI, κ-specific opioid receptor antagonist), epicatechin + nor-BNI, 5-hydroxydecanoic acid [5-HD, ATP-sensitive potassium channel antagonist], and epicatechin + 5-HD. Epicatechin (1 mg/kg) or other inhibitors (5 mg/kg) were administered by oral gavage or intraperitoneal injection, respectively, daily for 10 days. Mice were subjected to 30 min coronary artery occlusion followed by 2 h of reperfusion, and infarct size was determined via planimetry. Whole heart homogenates were assayed for downstream opioid receptor signaling targets. Infarct size was significantly reduced in epicatechin- and epicatechin + nor-BNI-treated mice compared with control mice. This protection was blocked by naloxone, naltrindole, and 5-HD. Epicatechin and epicatechin + nor-BNI increased the phosphorylation of Src, Akt, and IκBα, while simultaneously decreasing the expression of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and caspase-activated DNase. All signaling effects are consistent with opioid receptor stimulation and subsequent cardiac protection. Naloxone, naltrindole, and 5-HD attenuated these effects. In conclusion, epicatechin acts via opioid receptors and more specifically through the δ-opioid receptor to

  11. Role of oral microbiome on oral cancers, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Yousefi, Mehdi; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-12-01

    The oral cavity is inhibited by many of the bacterial species. Some of them have a key role in the development of oral disease. Interrelationships between oral microbiome and systemic conditions such as head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Emerging evidence also suggests a link between periodontal disease and oral cancer, and the explanation being that chronic inflammation could be a major factor in both diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma is that the most frequently occurring malignancy of the oral cavity and adjacent sites, representing over 90% of all cancers. The incidence of oral cancer is increasing, significantly among young people and women. Worldwide there are 350,000-400,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. In this review we will discuss the association between the development of oral cancer in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic periodontitis, chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, candida, other microbes and described mechanisms which may be involved in these carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 5. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral Delivery of Insulin. K Gowthamarajan Giriraj T Kulkarni. General Article Volume 8 Issue 5 May 2003 pp 38-46 ...

  13. Can the oral microflora affect oral ulcerative mucositis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; de Soet, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review: Oral mucositis is one of the most prevalent toxicities after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Mucositis is initiated by the chemotherapy or radiotherapy preceding the transplantation. It is commonly accepted that microorganisms play a role in the process of oral mucositis.

  14. Assessing Oral Hygiene in Hospitalized Older Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health for all older adults can result in higher risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and oral cancer. Findings from this study indicated older veterans needed to improve their oral hygiene habits but barriers to oral hygiene performance prevented them from receiving and performing oral hygiene measures.

  15. Will novel oral formulations change the management of inflammatory bowel disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Ainsworth, Mark Andrew

    2016-01-01

    the current approaches with promising new oral drugs with distinct modes of action, including: the Janus kinase inhibitors (i.e., tofacitinib, filgotinib and peficitinib); the immunomodulatory drug (laquinimod); a small α4 antagonist (AJM300); agonists for sphingosine-phosphate receptors (i.e., ozanimod, APD...

  16. Leptin acts on neoplastic behavior and expression levels of genes related to hypoxia, angiogenesis, and invasiveness in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrinho Santos, Eliane Macedo; Guimarães, Talita Antunes; Santos, Hércules Otacílio; Cangussu, Lilian Mendes Borborema; de Jesus, Sabrina Ferreira; Fraga, Carlos Alberto de Carvalho; Cardoso, Claudio Marcelo; Santos, Sérgio Henrique Souza; de Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Guimarães, André Luiz Sena; Farias, Lucyana Conceição

    2017-05-01

    Leptin, one of the main hormones controlling energy homeostasis, has been associated with different cancer types. In oral cancer, its effect is not well understood. We investigated, through in vitro and in vivo assays, whether leptin can affect the neoplastic behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Expression of genes possibly linked to the leptin pathway was assessed in leptin-treated oral squamous cell carcinoma cells and also in tissue samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral mucosa, including leptin, leptin receptor, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, E-cadherin, matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9, Col1A1, Ki67, and mir-210. Leptin treatment favored higher rates of cell proliferation and migration, and reduced apoptosis. Accordingly, leptin-treated oral squamous cell carcinoma cells show decreased messenger RNA caspase-3 expression, and increased levels of E-cadherin, Col1A1, matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and mir-210. In tissue samples, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha messenger RNA and protein expression of leptin and leptin receptor were high in oral squamous cell carcinoma cases. Serum leptin levels were increased in first clinical stages of the disease. In animal model, oral squamous cell carcinoma-induced mice show higher leptin receptor expression, and serum leptin level was increased in dysplasia group. Our findings suggest that leptin seems to exert an effect on oral squamous cell carcinoma cells behavior and also on molecular markers related to cell proliferation, migration, and tumor angiogenesis.

  17. Oral health in frail elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Ageing points towards increasing health problems and rising costs for the society. One of these health problems is the deteriorating oral health in care dependent elderly. The latter is related to the high need for care on many levels in these elderly. The lack of attention for oral care can be

  18. Oral health problems and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ki Kim

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease—were not related to mortality when sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral factors were considered, and there was no differential pattern between the three conditions. Multiple oral health problems were associated with a higher risk of dying.

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ... be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ...

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ... will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the cancer is often discovered late in its development. Your family dentist or OMS is in the best position to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. Don't risk it. Perform an oral cancer self-exam each month. Perform a Self-Exam Monthly ...

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. ...

  3. BETTER ORAL HEALTH TO ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Murtomaa

    2016-12-01

    The behavioral science experts are of opinion that only comprehensive and integrated common-risk-factor-based health promotion activities can enhance oral health and its equity as a part of general health. Are health professionals ready to assume their responsibility for promoting better oral health?

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ... more. TMJ and Facial Pain TMJ and Facial ... Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can ...

  5. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine: statement on oral pathology and oral medicine in the European Dental Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, C; Reibel, J; Hadler-Olsen, E S

    2010-01-01

    source in revisions of dental curricula throughout Europe converging towards a European Dental Curriculum. In order to render the best conditions for future curriculum revisions providing the best quality dentist we feel obliged to analyse and comment the outlines of oral pathology and oral medicine...

  6. Immunoreactive transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor in oral squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Bretlau, P

    1993-01-01

    Forty oral squamous cell carcinomas have been investigated immunohistochemically for the presence of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). The same cases were recently characterized for the expression of EGF-receptors. TGF-alpha was detected...... previous results confirms the existence of TGF-alpha, EGF, and EGF-receptors in the majority of oral squamous cell carcinomas and their metastases......., the cells above the basal cell layer were positive for both TGF-alpha and EGF. The same staining pattern was observed in oral mucosa obtained from healthy persons. In moderately to well differentiated carcinomas, the immunoreactivity was mainly confined to the cytologically more differentiated cells, thus...

  7. Orally active-targeted drug delivery systems for proteins and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuying; Yu, Miaorong; Fan, Weiwei; Gan, Yong; Hovgaard, Lars; Yang, Mingshi

    2014-09-01

    In the past decade, extensive efforts have been devoted to designing 'active targeted' drug delivery systems (ATDDS) to improve oral absorption of proteins and peptides. Such ATDDS enhance cellular internalization and permeability of proteins and peptides via molecular recognition processes such as ligand-receptor or antigen-antibody interaction, and thus enhance drug absorption. This review focuses on recent advances with orally ATDDS, including ligand-protein conjugates, recombinant ligand-protein fusion proteins and ligand-modified carriers. In addition to traditional intestinal active transport systems of substrates and their corresponding receptors, transporters and carriers, new targets such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and β-integrin are also discussed. ATDDS can improve oral absorption of proteins and peptides. However, currently, no clinical studies on ATDDS for proteins and peptides are underway, perhaps due to the complexity and limited knowledge of transport mechanisms. Therefore, more research is warranted to optimize ATDDS efficiency.

  8. The Oral Paradigm and Snapchat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Soffer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this short essay, I argue that the ephemeral nature of emerging instant-messaging applications, such as Snapchat, applies an oral paradigm. While online discourse of computer-mediated communication shares many qualities with oral communication, the case of ephemeral applications is unique, as the oral features are already integrated in the application technology design and as orality is often implemented on highly visual products. Snapchat applies technology that fades visual contents as if they were spoken words fading in the air after utterance. Moreover, Snapchat’s promise to delete all messages from its database after they are viewed echoes a key characteristic of primary oral culture: that is, the inability (and in our case, the obligation not to store knowledge. In this, Snapchat demonstrates counter-logic to the contemporary grammar of new media, which is based on information aggregation.

  9. Direct oral anticoagulants: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Moreno, Ana Isabel; Martín Díaz, Rosa María; García Navarro, María José

    2017-12-30

    Vitamin K antagonists were the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation for more than half a century. Over the past few years, direct oral anticoagulants have emerged, including one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran etexilate) and three factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban). In randomised controlled trials comparing direct oral anticoagulants with traditional vitamin K antagonists, the direct oral anticoagulants all showed a favourable benefit-risk balance in their safety and efficacy profile, in prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation and in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome. In 2008, dabigatran was the first direct oral anticoagulant approved by the European Medicine Agency. Subsequently, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban were also authorised. This article reviews the evidence related to the use of these drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  11. Oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnakulasuriya, S; Reibel, J; Bouquot, J

    2008-01-01

    At a workshop coordinated by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Cancer and Precancer in the United Kingdom issues related to potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity were discussed by an expert group. The consensus views of the Working Group are presented in a series of papers....... In this report, we review the oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems. The three classification schemes [oral epithelial dysplasia scoring system, squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and Ljubljana classification] were presented and the Working Group recommended epithelial dysplasia grading for routine...... use. Although most oral pathologists possibly recognize and accept the criteria for grading epithelial dysplasia, firstly based on architectural features and then of cytology, there is great variability in their interpretation of the presence, degree and significance of the individual criteria...

  12. Oral Pathology in Forensic Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2018-01-01

    Forensic odontology is the subdiscipline of dentistry which analyses dental evidence in the interest of justice. Oral pathology is the subdiscipline of dentistry that deals with the pathology affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions. This subdiscipline is utilized for identification through oral and maxillofacial pathologies with associated syndromes, enamel rod patterns, sex determination using exfoliative cytology, identification from occlusal morphology of teeth, and deoxyribonucleic acid profiling from teeth. This subdiscipline is also utilized for age estimation studies which include Gustafson's method, incremental lines of Retzius, perikymata, natal line formation in teeth, neonatal line, racemization of collagen in dentin, cemental incremental lines, thickness of the cementum, and translucency of dentin. Even though the expertise of an oral pathologist is not taken in forensic investigations, this paper aims to discuss the role of oral pathology in forensic investigation.

  13. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jayasri Krupaa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment.

  14. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Sankari, S. Leena; Masthan, K. M. K.; Rajesh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  15. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  16. GABA receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Doo

    2007-01-01

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA A -receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA B -receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA A -receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA A -receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with 11 C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, 18 F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome 11 C's short half-life. 18 F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1 1 C-FMZ PET instead of 18 F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA A receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas

  17. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why Is Oral Health Important for Women? Article Chapters Why Is Oral ...

  18. Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... your desktop! more... Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health Article Chapters Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral ...

  19. The Fungal Biome of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Organisms residing in the oral cavity (oral microbiota) contribute to health and disease, and influence diseases like gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral candidiasis (the most common oral complication of HIV-infection). These organisms are also associated with cancer and other systemic diseases including upper respiratory infections. There is limited knowledge regarding how oral microbes interact together and influence the host immune system. Characterizing the oral microbial community (oral microbiota) in health and disease represents a critical step in gaining insight into various members of this community. While most of the studies characterizing oral microbiota have focused on bacterial community, there are few encouraging studies characterizing the oral mycobiome (the fungal component of the oral microbiota). Our group recently characterized the oral mycobiome in health and disease focusing on HIV. In this chapter we will describe the methods used by our group for characterization of the oral mycobiome.

  20. Need for Oral Health Policy in India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    implementation of National Oral Health Policy in India in order to expand the oral health care to ... Professional dental organizations can also support government programs to .... who can play effective role in providing oral health care services.

  1. Oral candidiasis following steroid therapy for oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, D R; Bowers, L M; Stout, T L; Stewart, C M; Berg, K M; Sankar, V; DeRossi, S S; Thoppay, J R; Brennan, M T

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this multicentre study was to determine the incidence of oral candidiasis in patients treated with topical steroids for oral lichen planus (OLP) and to determine whether the application of a concurrent antifungal therapy prevented the development of an oral candidiasis in these patients. Records of 315 patients with OLP seen at four Oral Medicine practices treated for at least 2 weeks with steroids with and without the use of an antifungal regimen were retrospectively reviewed. The overall incidence of oral fungal infection in those treated with steroid therapy for OLP was 13.6%. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of oral candidiasis development in those treated with an antifungal regimen vs those not treated prophylactically (14.3% vs 12.6%) (P = 0.68). Despite the use of various regimens, none of the preventive antifungal strategies used in this study resulted in a significant difference in the rate of development of an oral candidiasis in patients with OLP treated with steroids. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Discovery, synthesis, selectivity modulation and DMPK characterization of 5-azaspiro[2.4]heptanes as potent orexin receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Luigi Piero; Artusi, Roberto; Bovino, Clara; Buzzi, Benedetta; Canciani, Luca; Caselli, Gianfranco; Colace, Fabrizio; Garofalo, Paolo; Giambuzzi, Silvia; Larger, Patrice; Letari, Ornella; Mandelli, Stefano; Perugini, Lorenzo; Pucci, Sabrina; Salvi, Matteo; Toro, PierLuigi

    2013-05-01

    Starting from a orexin 1 receptor selective antagonist 4,4-disubstituted piperidine series a novel potent 5-azaspiro[2.4]heptane dual orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptor antagonist class has been discovered. SAR and Pharmacokinetic optimization of this series is herein disclosed. Lead compound 15 exhibits potent activity against orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors along with low cytochrome P450 inhibition potential, good brain penetration and oral bioavailability in rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Activation of the TREM-1 pathway in human monocytes by periodontal pathogens and oral commensal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanat, M; Haase, E M; Kay, J G; Scannapieco, F A

    2017-08-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent disease caused in part by an aberrant host response to the oral multi-species biofilm. A balance between the oral bacteria and host immunity is essential for oral health. Imbalances in the oral microbiome lead to an uncontrolled host inflammatory response and subsequent periodontal disease (i.e. gingivitis and periodontitis). TREM-1 is a signaling receptor present on myeloid cells capable of acting synergistically with other pattern recognition receptors leading to amplification of inflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to investigate the activation of the TREM-1 pathway in the human monocyte-like cell line THP-1 exposed to both oral pathogens and commensals. The relative expression of the genes encoding TREM-1 and its adapter protein DAP12 were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The surface expression of TREM-1 was determined by flow cytometry. Soluble TREM-1 and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results demonstrate that both commensal and pathogenic oral bacteria activate the TREM-1 pathway, resulting in a proinflammatory TREM-1 activity-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokine production. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Nutrition and Oral Health: Experiences in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Zohre Sadat Sangsefidi; Amin Salehi-Abargouei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oral health is a crucial factor for overall well-being and there is a mutual relationship between nutrition and oral health. The aim of this study was to review the publications which have examined the association between nutrition or diet and oral health status or oral disease in Iran. Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, scientific information database (SID), and Magiran were searched using key words of diet, nutrition, oral health, oral disease, ...

  5. The oral microbiome - an update for oral healthcare professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilian, M; Chapple, I L C; Hannig, M

    2016-01-01

    disease-promoting bacteria to manifest and cause conditions such as caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. For practitioners and patients alike, promoting a balanced microbiome is therefore important to effectively maintain or restore oral health. This article aims to give an update on our current...... and health. The mouth houses the second most diverse microbial community in the body, harbouring over 700 species of bacteria that colonise the hard surfaces of teeth and the soft tissues of the oral mucosa. Through recent advances in technology, we have started to unravel the complexities of the oral...

  6. Oral cancer: A multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanawatsirivej, Somsri; Thosaporn, Watcharaporn; Kintarak, Sompid; Subarnbhesaj, Ajiravudh; Darling, Mark; Kryshtalskyj, Eugene; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Shin, Hong-In; Choi, So-Young; Lee, Sang-shin; Shakib, Pouyan-Amini

    2018-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Material and Methods Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Results Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Conclusions Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Onno C; Koorneef, Lisa L; Kroon, Jan

    2018-06-01

    The glucocorticoid hormone cortisol acts throughout the body to support circadian processes and adaptation to stress. The glucocorticoid receptor is the target of cortisol and of synthetic glucocorticoids, which are used widely in the clinic. Both agonism and antagonism of the glucocorticoid receptor may be beneficial in disease, but given the wide expression of the receptor and involvement in various processes, beneficial effects are often accompanied by unwanted side effects. Selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators are ligands that induce a receptor conformation that allows activation of only a subset of downstream signaling pathways. Such molecules thereby combine agonistic and antagonistic properties. Here we discuss the mechanisms underlying selective receptor modulation and their promise in treating diseases in several organ systems where cortisol signaling plays a role. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral symptoms and salivary findings in oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and stomatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Roen; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Reibel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine if patients with oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis and concomitant contact allergy have more frequent and severe xerostomia, lower unstimulated and chewing-stimulated saliva and citric-acid-stimulated parotid saliva flow rates, and higher...... of xerostomia, clinical examination, sialometry, mucosal biopsy and contact allergy testing. RESULTS: Nineteen patients had oral lichen planus, 19 patients had oral lichenoid lesions and 11 patients had generalised stomatitis. 38.8% had contact allergy. Xerostomia was significantly more common and severe...... in the chewing stimulated saliva samples from patients when compared to healthy controls. The differences were not significant and they were irrespective of the presence of contact allergy. CONCLUSION: Xerostomia is prevalent in patients with oral lichen planus, lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis...

  9. Amiloidosis bucal Oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A amiloidose é uma doença complexa rara de difícil diagnóstico que ocorre devido à deposição de substância amilóide no meio extracelular. Ao ser diagnosticado na cavidade bucal, deve-se monitorar o paciente a fim de avaliar possíveis complicações sistêmicas da doença. Diante disso, o objetivo do presente estudo é relatar um caso de amiloidose oral em uma paciente do gênero feminino de 72 anos de idade. Baseado nos sinais clínicos observados, a hipótese diagnóstica foi de fibroma traumático. Após realização de biópsia e exame histopatológico, o diagnóstico foi de amiloidose oral, o que foi confirmado com a coloração do espécime com o reagente vermelho congo. Depósitos de amilóide foram encontrados no tecido conjuntivo, na avaliação através da luz polarizada, que apresentou birrefringência. Tal achado foi preocupante, já que a amiloidose geralmente acomete diversos tecidos levando a comprometimentos sistêmicos. Por essa razão a paciente foi encaminhada a procurar atendimento médico. No entanto, houve abandono do tratamento e a mesma veio a óbito 6 meses após o diagnóstico da doença. Lesões orais aparentemente simples podem revelar doenças raras e de difícil tratamento. O diagnóstico preciso e acompanhamentos médicos são fundamentais na sobrevida do paciente.La amiloidosis es una enfermedad compleja, rara, de difícil diagnóstico, que ocurre debido al depósito de sustancia amiloidea en medio extracelular. Al ser diagnosticada en la cavidad bucal, el paciente debe tener supervisión médica para evaluar las posibles complicaciones sistémicas de la enfermedad. El objetivo del presente estudio fue presentar un caso de amiloidosis bucal en un paciente del género femenino de 72 años de edad. Basados en las señales clínicas observadas, la hipótesis diagnóstica fue de un fibroma traumático. Después de la realización de una biopsia y del examen histopatológico, el diagnóstico fue de amiloidosis

  10. Criteria for Evaluating Oral History Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsino, Frank J.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for establishing criteria for evaluating oral history interviews. Presents seven evaluation categories relating to oral history tapes and three categories relating to typescripts. (CK)

  11. Dengue virus receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hidari, Kazuya I.P.J.; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue virus causes fever and hemorrhagic disorders in humans and non-human primates. Direct interaction of the virus introduced by a mosquito bite with host receptor molecule(s) is crucial for virus propagation and the pathological progression of dengue diseases. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dengue virus and its receptor(s) in both humans and mosquitoes is essent...

  12. Genetic etiology of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Johar; Sabiha, Bibi; Jan, Hanif Ullah; Haider, Syed Adnan; Khan, Abid Ali; Ali, Saima S

    2017-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. It accounts for 2.5% of all new cancer cases and 1.9% of all cancer deaths annually. More than 90% of oral cancers (occurring in the mouth, lip, and tongue) are oral squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate of oral cancer varies widely throughout the world, with an evident prevalence in South Asian countries. This high incidence occurs in correlation with oral cancer-associated behaviors such as alcohol, tobacco use. Researchers have reported that these behaviors lead to genetic variations in tumor suppressor genes (APC, p53), proto-oncogenes (Myc), oncogene (Ras) and genes controlling normal cellular processes (EIF3E, GSTM1). Processes such as segregation of chromosomes, genomic copy number, loss of heterozygosity, telomere stabilities, regulations of cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA damage repairs and defects in notch signaling pathways are involved in causing oral cancer. In order to develop preventive and therapeutic options, it is necessary to comprehend the basic molecular mechanisms forcing oral tumorigenesis. This review examines, in detail, the mechanisms of genetic alteration which are considered to be responsible for the initiation of oral cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. EGFR status in oral squamous cell carcinoma: comparing immunohistochemistry, FISH and CISH detection in a case series study

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardes, Vanessa F?tima; Gleber-Netto, Frederico Omar; de Sousa, S?lvia Ferreira; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; de Aguiar, Maria C?ssia Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the immunohistochemistry (IHC) expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) with the gene amplification evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and their association with clinicopathological parameters. Additionally, we tested the sensibility and specificity of CISH in comparison with FISH. Design Case series study Setting Oral surgery and pathology department in ...

  14. ORAL HYGIENE PRACTICES AND RISK OF ORAL LEUKOPLAKIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-01

    Apr 1, 2006 ... EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL ... Faculty of Dental Sciences, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 19676 - 00202, Nairobi, ... Poor oral hygiene is a product of plaque and ..... University of Nairobi and Kenya Medical Research.

  15. Oral hygiene and oral flora evaluation in psychiatric patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Key words: Bacteria types, oral and dental illnesses, psychiatric patients. Date of Acceptance: .... patients, and difficulties such as insufficient sedation.[7]. This study .... Despite the general notion that stress triggers bruxism ...

  16. Oral lichen planus to oral lichenoid lesions: Evolution or revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhia, Bhavin B; Dudhia, Sonal B; Patel, Purv S; Jani, Yesha V

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis between different diseases may be impaired by clinical and histopathologic similarities, as observed in the oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesion (OLL). Inspite of similar clinicopathological features; etiology, diagnosis and prognosis differ which mandates separation of OLL from OLP. Hence, it is essential for the oral physician and oral pathologist to be familiarized with the individual variations among clinicopathological features of OLP and OLL as well as to obtain a thorough history and perform a complete mucocutaneous examination in addition to specific diagnostic testing. The difficulties faced to establish the diagnosis between these two pathologies are widely investigated in the literature with a lack of definite conclusion. This review is an attempt to throw some light on these clinicopathologic entities with the aim to resolve the diagnostic dilemma. PMID:26980966

  17. Novel Somatostatin Receptor Ligands Therapies for Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Paragliola

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is considered the treatment of choice in acromegaly, but patients with persistent disease after surgery or in whom surgery cannot be considered require medical therapy. Somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs octreotide (OCT, lanreotide, and the more recently approved pasireotide, characterized by a broader receptor ligand binding profile, are considered the mainstay in the medical management of acromegaly. However, in the attempt to offer a more efficacious and better tolerated medical approach, recent research has been aimed to override some limitations related to the use of currently approved drugs and novel SRLs therapies, with potential attractive features, have been proposed. These include both new formulation of older molecules and new molecules. Novel OCT formulations are aimed in particular to improve patients’ compliance and to reduce injection discomfort. They include an investigational ready-to-use subcutaneous depot OCT formulation (CAM2029, delivered via prefilled syringes and oral OCT that uses a “transient permeability enhancer” technology, which allows for OCT oral absorption. Another new delivery system is a long-lasting OCT implant (VP-003, which provide stable doses of OCT throughout a period of several months. Finally, a new SRL DG3173 (somatoprim seems to be more selective for GH secretion, suggesting possible advantages in the presence of hyperglycemia or diabetes. How much these innovations will actually be beneficial to acromegaly patients in real clinical practice remains to be seen.

  18. Recurrent oral angioleiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V G Mahima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioleiomyomas are vascular variant of leiomyomas which are benign tumors of smooth muscle. They are exceedingly rare in the oral cavity. Malignant transformation of these tumors has also been reported occasionally which warrants knowledge of this soft tissue tumor. A 57 year old male patient reported with a 15 day history of an asymptomatic growth that had started insidiously in his lower left back tooth region. Clinical examination revealed a solitary, oval, sessile growth in the mandibular left retro molar region. Excisional biopsy was suggestive of Angioleiomyoma. A recurrence of the same was noted two months later which was also histopathologically reported as Angioleiomyoma. The same was confirmed using special stains. This case reports an unusual presentation of Angioleiomyoma with regards to both recurrence as well as rapid growth. It is important to be well aware of this uncommon entity as these tumors often can mimic or transform into malignancy. Precise clinicopathological examinations are therefore invaluable in establishing an accurate diagnosis and delivering suitable treatment.

  19. Oral contraception following abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707). In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P abortion (P abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. PMID:27399060

  20. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  1. G protein-coupled receptor 39 deficiency is associated with pancreatic islet dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Jin, Chunyu

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-39 is a seven-transmembrane receptor expressed mainly in endocrine and metabolic tissues that acts as a Zn(++) sensor signaling mainly through the G(q) and G(12/13) pathways. The expression of GPR39 is regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1alpha and HNF-4...... tolerance both during oral and iv glucose tolerance tests, and Gpr39(-/-) mice had decreased plasma insulin response to oral glucose. Islet architecture was normal in the Gpr39 null mice, but expression of Pdx-1 and Hnf-1alpha was reduced. Isolated, perifused islets from Gpr39 null mice secreted less...

  2. Loggerhead oral cavity morphometry study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard external morphometrics and internal oral cavity morphometrics data were collected on wild and captive reared loggerhead sea turtles in size classes ranging...

  3. Oral candidosis in lichen planus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Kieffer-Kristensen, L; Reibel, J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen in humans, but other Candida species cause candidosis. Candida species display significant differences in their susceptibility to antimycotic drugs. Patients with symptomatic or erythematous oral lichen planus (OLP) commonly have...

  4. Hydroxyurea-induced oral ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Maha; Almazrooa, Soulafa; Azher, Fatima; Alsayes, Fatin

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyurea is an antimetabolite that is widely used in the treatment of many benign and malignant conditions. This drug is usually well tolerated but has a number of side effects that vary in incidence. In cases of clinically significant adverse events, hydroxyurea is usually discontinued either temporarily or permanently, depending on treatment need versus harm caused by side effects. Here, we report a case of oral ulceration associated with hydroxyurea treatment in a patient who had chronic myelogenous leukemia. The patient rapidly developed an oral ulcer 12 days after administration of the drug. Hydroxyurea was discontinued, and the oral lesion appreciably decreased in size and severity. Physicians and dentists should be aware of the association between hydroxyurea and oral lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find ... the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As a result, OMSs are uniqely qualified to ...

  6. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  7. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  8. Diabetes mellitus and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common non-communicable chronic diseases, which is the combined action of genetic factors, environmental factors and lifestyle. Specific conditions occur in the oral cavity in the course of diabetes that cause changes in all oral tissues with different symptoms and signs. Increased salivary glucose level is followed by increased accumulation of dental plaque and decreased resistance to noxious agents. The most common oral manifestations in diabetic patients include higher prevalence of periodontal desease, burning mouth syndrome, disruption in salivary flow, opportunistic infections, higher prevalence of denture stomatitis, oral lichen planus, fissured tongue, angular cheilitis etc. Dental interventions in patients with well-controlled diabetes are not different from those applied to nondiabetic patients. Regular monitoring of these patients is required because of the complications that can occur.

  9. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... one of your body's most important early warning systems. Don't ignore any suspicious lumps or sores. ... and maxillofacial surgeon. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons: The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery Contact Us ...

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Oral, Head ...

  11. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral ... of sedation and general anesthesia. Click here to find out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery ...

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Neck Pathology Download Download the ebook for further information Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) is the ... well be the key to complete recovery. The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  13. Oncofetal fibronectins in oral carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandel, U; Gaggero, B; Reibel, J

    1994-01-01

    -B-containing isoform and the oncofetal FN isoform derived by O-glycosylation, in oral squamous cell carcinomas, premalignant lesions, and normal oral mucosa. A selective expression of the ED-B-containing isoform was demonstrated in close relation to the invading carcinoma (38/38), whereas there was virtually...... no staining in submucosa underlying premalignant lesions (1/11) and normal epithelium (0/5). The ED-B-containing FN showed close co-distribution and staining pattern with the oncofetal isoform derived by O-glycosylation. These results demonstrate that accumulation of FN adjacent to oral carcinomas includes...... in breast and oral tumors. Another oncofetal FN isoform containing the ED-B sequence is derived by alternative splicing, and FN containing ED-B has been found to be a stromal marker of malignancies in various tissues. Here we report a comparative study by immunohistology of the distribution of the ED...

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... teeth or become infected. It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out ... and surgically treating cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to ...

  15. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ... or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here to find out more. ...

  16. Oral Insulin - Fact or Fiction?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    attempts have explored the following options, either singly, or together: • Protecting ... derivative of insulin has been seen to maintain its biological activity and also have .... that in the short future any oral preparation that can achieve consistent ...

  17. Small Molecule Drug Discovery at the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis S. Willard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic success of peptide glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus has inspired discovery efforts aimed at developing orally available small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. Although the GLP-1 receptor is a member of the structurally complex class B1 family of GPCRs, in recent years, a diverse array of orthosteric and allosteric nonpeptide ligands has been reported. These compounds include antagonists, agonists, and positive allosteric modulators with intrinsic efficacy. In this paper, a comprehensive review of currently disclosed small molecule GLP-1 receptor ligands is presented. In addition, examples of “ligand bias” and “probe dependency” for the GLP-1 receptor are discussed; these emerging concepts may influence further optimization of known molecules or persuade designs of expanded screening strategies to identify novel chemical starting points for GLP-1 receptor drug discovery.

  18. Angiotensin type 2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumners, Colin; de Kloet, Annette D; Krause, Eric G

    2015-01-01

    In most situations, the angiotensin AT2-receptor (AT2R) mediates physiological actions opposing those mediated by the AT1-receptor (AT1R), including a vasorelaxant effect. Nevertheless, experimental evidence vastly supports that systemic application of AT2R-agonists is blood pressure neutral...

  19. Oral phenoxymethylpenicillin treatment during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Olsen, Jørn

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the human teratogenic potential of oral penicillin V: phenoxymethylpenicillin treatment during pregnancy in the large population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980–1996. The dataset included 22......, i.e. in the critical period for most major congenital abnormalities in case-matched control pairs. Thus, treatment with oral phenoxymethylpenicillin during pregnancy presents very little if any teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  20. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  1. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player in the f......Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...... in the formation of memory. Hence, ligands affecting AMPARs are highly important for the study of the structure and function of this receptor, and in this regard polyamine-based ligands, particularly polyamine toxins, are unique as they selectively block Ca2+ -permeable AMPARs. Indeed, endogenous intracellular...

  2. Peran 'Oral Splint' pada Bruxisme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Tanzil

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral splints have been frequently used in the treatment of bruxism to protect teeth and periodontium from damage, but the mechanism of action and efficacy of oral splints remain controversial. It has been suggested that they can be used to treat bruxism, based on the assumption that the device can eliminate or remove occlusal interference. Currently there are no reliable data to support the assumption of occlusion as an etiologic factor for bruxism, because several other factors have a role in bruxism, such as psychiatric, neurological and systemic disorders. In this paper, the mechanism of action and efficacy of oral splints in bruxism are discussed. Conclusions: although oral splint may be beneficial in protecting the dentition, the efficacy of this device in reducing bruxism is still not confirmed. There are several aspects that would support the broad usage of oral splints in the treatment of bruxism, but there are also limitations associated with each of these aspects. In conclusion, oral splints can be considered as useful adjuncts in the management of sleep bruxism but not as a definitive treatment.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i1.82

  3. 31 CFR 103.83 - Oral communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oral communications. 103.83 Section... AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS Administrative Rulings § 103.83 Oral communications... response to oral requests. Oral opinions or advice by Treasury, the Customs Service, the Internal Revenue...

  4. Effect of different oral hygiene measures on oral malodor in children aged 7-15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Piyusha S; Pujar, Pallavi; Subbareddy, V V

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of various oral hygiene measures individually and in combination in reducing oral malodor. A total number of 120 children diagnosed as having oral malodor (oral malodor scores 2 and above) were included in the study. Children were then grouped under four oral hygiene categories (tooth brushing, tongue cleaning, mouth rinsing, and a combination group). There were 30 children in each group. The children were asked to perform oral hygiene methods individually and in combination. The children were then reassessed for oral malodor 2 h later. The results were analyzed and compared. Both individual oral hygiene measure or in combination of tooth brushing, tongue cleaning, and mouth rinsing; all were effective in reducing oral malodor. Significant reduction (P oral malodor was seen when all three oral hygiene measures performed together. Oral malodor was significantly reduced after performing oral hygiene measures individually, but reduced more when used in combination.

  5. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Director of ... function of the Lp is to deliver lipids throughout the insect body for metabolism ... Lipid is used as a major energy source for development as well as other metabolic .... LpR4 receptor variant was expressed exclusively in the brain and.

  6. Perceived oral health, oral self-care habits and dental attendance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived oral health, oral self-care habits and dental attendance among pregnant women in Benin-City, Nigeria. ... Results: The majority of the respondents (81.7%) rated their oral health as excellent/good using the global oral health rating scale. Seventy one percent of the respondents did not change their oral self-care ...

  7. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Huisman, Paulien M.; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    Purpose This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Methods Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or

  8. Oral Cryotherapy for Preventing Oral Mucositis in Patients Receiving Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Philip; McCabe, Martin G; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2016-10-01

    In patients receiving treatment for cancer, does oral cryotherapy prevent oral mucositis? Oral cryotherapy is effective for the prevention of oral mucositis in adults receiving fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for solid cancers, and for the prevention of severe oral mucositis in adults receiving high-dose melphalan-based chemotherapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  9. Understanding Carcinogenesis for Fighting Oral Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takuji; Ishigamori, Rikako

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. Oral cancer development is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are able to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will give us important advances for...

  10. Functional Analyses of Bitter Taste Receptors in Domestic Cats (Felis catus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Lei

    Full Text Available Cats are obligate carnivores and under most circumstances eat only animal products. Owing to the pseudogenization of one of two subunits of the sweet receptor gene, they are indifferent to sweeteners, presumably having no need to detect plant-based sugars in their diet. Following this reasoning and a recent report of a positive correlation between the proportion of dietary plants and the number of Tas2r (bitter receptor genes in vertebrate species, we tested the hypothesis that if bitter perception exists primarily to protect animals from poisonous plant compounds, the genome of the domestic cat (Felis catus should have lost functional bitter receptors and they should also have reduced bitter receptor function. To test functionality of cat bitter receptors, we expressed cat Tas2R receptors in cell-based assays. We found that they have at least 7 functional receptors with distinct receptive ranges, showing many similarities, along with some differences, with human bitter receptors. To provide a comparative perspective, we compared the cat repertoire of intact receptors with those of a restricted number of members of the order Carnivora, with a range of dietary habits as reported in the literature. The numbers of functional bitter receptors in the terrestrial Carnivora we examined, including omnivorous and herbivorous species, were roughly comparable to that of cats thereby providing no strong support for the hypothesis that a strict meat diet influences bitter receptor number or function. Maintenance of bitter receptor function in terrestrial obligate carnivores may be due to the presence of bitter compounds in vertebrate and invertebrate prey, to the necessary role these receptors play in non-oral perception, or to other unknown factors. We also found that the two aquatic Carnivora species examined had fewer intact bitter receptors. Further comparative studies of factors driving numbers and functions of bitter taste receptors will aid in

  11. Functional Analyses of Bitter Taste Receptors in Domestic Cats (Felis catus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Weiwei; Ravoninjohary, Aurore; Li, Xia; Margolskee, Robert F; Reed, Danielle R; Beauchamp, Gary K; Jiang, Peihua

    2015-01-01

    Cats are obligate carnivores and under most circumstances eat only animal products. Owing to the pseudogenization of one of two subunits of the sweet receptor gene, they are indifferent to sweeteners, presumably having no need to detect plant-based sugars in their diet. Following this reasoning and a recent report of a positive correlation between the proportion of dietary plants and the number of Tas2r (bitter receptor) genes in vertebrate species, we tested the hypothesis that if bitter perception exists primarily to protect animals from poisonous plant compounds, the genome of the domestic cat (Felis catus) should have lost functional bitter receptors and they should also have reduced bitter receptor function. To test functionality of cat bitter receptors, we expressed cat Tas2R receptors in cell-based assays. We found that they have at least 7 functional receptors with distinct receptive ranges, showing many similarities, along with some differences, with human bitter receptors. To provide a comparative perspective, we compared the cat repertoire of intact receptors with those of a restricted number of members of the order Carnivora, with a range of dietary habits as reported in the literature. The numbers of functional bitter receptors in the terrestrial Carnivora we examined, including omnivorous and herbivorous species, were roughly comparable to that of cats thereby providing no strong support for the hypothesis that a strict meat diet influences bitter receptor number or function. Maintenance of bitter receptor function in terrestrial obligate carnivores may be due to the presence of bitter compounds in vertebrate and invertebrate prey, to the necessary role these receptors play in non-oral perception, or to other unknown factors. We also found that the two aquatic Carnivora species examined had fewer intact bitter receptors. Further comparative studies of factors driving numbers and functions of bitter taste receptors will aid in understanding the forces

  12. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development

  13. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  14. Changes in Abundance of Oral Microbiota Associated with Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Brian L.; Kuczynski, Justin; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Huey, Bing; Corby, Patricia M.; Queiroz, Erica L. S.; Nightingale, Kira; Kerr, A. Ross; DeLacure, Mark D.; Veeramachaneni, Ratna; Olshen, Adam B.; Albertson, Donna G.

    2014-01-01

    Individual bacteria and shifts in the composition of the microbiome have been associated with human diseases including cancer. To investigate changes in the microbiome associated with oral cancers, we profiled cancers and anatomically matched contralateral normal tissue from the same patient by sequencing 16S rDNA hypervariable region amplicons. In cancer samples from both a discovery and a subsequent confirmation cohort, abundance of Firmicutes (especially Streptococcus) and Actinobacteria (especially Rothia) was significantly decreased relative to contralateral normal samples from the same patient. Significant decreases in abundance of these phyla were observed for pre-cancers, but not when comparing samples from contralateral sites (tongue and floor of mouth) from healthy individuals. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinates analysis based on 12 taxa separated most cancers from other samples with greatest separation of node positive cases. These studies begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence. PMID:24887397

  15. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  16. Oral submucous fibrosis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina,1 Shyam B Verma,2 Fareedi Mukram Ali,3 Kishor Patil4 1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Nirvana Skin Clinic, Vadodara, Gujarat, India; 3Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, SMBT Dental College, Sangamner, Maharashtra, India; 4Departments of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, SMBT Dental College, Sangamner, Maharashtra, India Abstract: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF is a premalignant condition caused by betel chewing. It is very common in Southeast Asia but has started to spread to Europe and North America. OSF can lead to squamous cell carcinoma, a risk that is further increased by concomitant tobacco consumption. OSF is a diagnosis based on clinical symptoms and confirmation by histopathology. Hypovascularity leading to blanching of the oral mucosa, staining of teeth and gingiva, and trismus are major symptoms. Major constituents of betel quid are arecoline from betel nuts and copper, which are responsible for fibroblast dysfunction and fibrosis. A variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways might be involved. Treatment of OSF is difficult, as not many large, randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The principal actions of drug therapy include antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxygen radical mechanisms. Potential new drugs are on the horizon. Surgery may be necessary in advanced cases of trismus. Prevention is most important, as no healing can be achieved with available treatments. Keywords: betel nut, betel quid, oral disease, squamous cell carcinoma, tobacco, fibrosis

  17. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    and the general public. WHO has developed global and regional oral health databanks for surveillance, and international projects have designed oral health indicators for use in oral health information systems for assessing the quality of oral health care and surveillance systems. Modern oral health information...... been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health...... programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers...

  18. Mechanical Barriers Restrict Invasion of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 into Human Oral Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thier, Katharina; Petermann, Philipp; Rahn, Elena; Rothamel, Daniel; Bloch, Wilhelm; Knebel-Mörsdorf, Dagmar

    2017-11-15

    Oral mucosa is one of the main target tissues of the human pathogen herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). How the virus overcomes the protective epithelial barriers and penetrates the tissue to reach its receptors and initiate infection is still unclear. Here, we established an ex vivo infection assay with human oral mucosa that allows viral entry studies in a natural target tissue. The focus was on the susceptibility of keratinocytes in the epithelium and the characterization of cellular receptors that mediate viral entry. Upon ex vivo infection of gingiva or vestibular mucosa, we observed that intact human mucosa samples were protected from viral invasion. In contrast, the basal layer of the oral epithelium was efficiently invaded once the connective tissue and the basement membrane were removed. Later during infection, HSV-1 spread from basal keratinocytes to upper layers, demonstrating the susceptibility of the stratified squamous epithelium to HSV-1. The analysis of potential receptors revealed nectin-1 on most mucosal keratinocytes, whereas herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) was found only on a subpopulation of cells, suggesting that nectin-1 acts as primary receptor for HSV-1 in human oral mucosa. To mimic the supposed entry route of HSV-1 via microlesions in vivo , we mechanically wounded the mucosa prior to infection. While we observed a limited number of infected keratinocytes in some wounded mucosa samples, other samples showed no infected cells. Thus, we conclude that mechanical wounding of mucosa is insufficient for the virus to efficiently overcome epithelial barriers and to make entry-mediating receptors accessible. IMPORTANCE To invade the target tissue of its human host during primary infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV) must overcome the epithelial barriers of mucosa, skin, or cornea. For most viruses, the mechanisms underlying the invasion into the target tissues of their host organism are still open. Here, we established an ex vivo infection model of

  19. Safety and Tolerability of Transitioning from Cangrelor to Ticagrelor in Patients Who Underwent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badreldin, Hisham A; Carter, Danielle; Cook, Bryan M; Qamar, Arman; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2017-08-01

    The 3 phase 3 CHAMPION (Cangrelor vs Standard Therapy to Achieve Optimal Management of Platelet Inhibition) trials collectively demonstrated the safety of transitioning from cangrelor, a potent, parenteral rapidly-acting P2Y 12 inhibitor, to clopidogrel in patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, variation in timing of therapy, site-specific binding, and drug half-lives may theoretically complicate switching to other oral P2Y 12 inhibitors. Since regulatory approval, limited data are available regarding the "real-world" safety and tolerability of transitioning to these more potent oral P2Y 12 antagonists. From November 2015 to January 2017, we evaluated the clinical profiles and efficacy and safety outcomes in cangrelor-treated patients who underwent PCI transitioned to clopidogrel (n = 42) or ticagrelor (n = 82) at a large, tertiary care center. Most patients receiving cangrelor underwent PCI with a drug-eluting stent for acute coronary syndrome via a radial approach in the background of unfractionated heparin. Stent thrombosis within 48 hours was rare and occurred in 1 patient treated with ticagrelor. Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries-defined bleeding occurred in 20% of patients switched to ticagrelor and 29% of patients switched to clopidogrel, but none were severe or life-threatening. In conclusion, rates of stent thrombosis and severe/life-threatening bleeding were low and comparable with those identified in the CHAMPION program, despite use of more potent oral P2Y 12 inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An overview of once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists--available efficacy and safety data and perspectives for the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, S; Kielgast, U; Asmar, M

    2011-01-01

    Incretin-based therapies, such as the injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and orally administered dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, have recently been introduced into clinical practice. At present, the GLP-1 receptor agonists need to be administered once or twice...

  1. Comparison between narcotic 'receptors' in the guinea-pig ileum and the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terenius, L [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1975-01-01

    The receptors, i.e., specific binding molecules, for narcotic analgesics in the guinea-pig ileum and rat brain have been compared. The relative affinities of a number of narcotics for the two receptors were very similar and discrimination between stereoisomeric agents was identical. The dissociation constants for dihydromorphine binding were 0.78 nM for the ileum and 1.4 nM for the brain receptor, respectively. There was a good correspondance between receptor affinities on the ileum preparation and the literature data on biologic activity on the isolated ileum. Codeine, diphenoxylate, difenoxine and loperamide, which are used clinically for the treatment of diarrhoea showed no selectivity against the ileum receptor. The two latter drugs had a very high receptor affinity and their lack of narcotic activity after oral administration is probably attributable to lack of penetration of the CNS. Receptor binding in both ileum and brain preparations was inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide, Triton X-100, trypsin and phospholipase C. There were small quantitative differences in sensitivity to these agents but it is difficult to assess whether this is because of real differences between the receptor molecules or attributable to secondary effects. As previously described for the brain receptor, the ileum receptor appeared to be present in a fraction enriched in plasma membranes.

  2. Pharmacological profile of CS-3150, a novel, highly potent and selective non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kiyoshi; Homma, Tsuyoshi; Morikawa, Yuka; Ubukata, Naoko; Tsuruoka, Hiyoyuki; Aoki, Kazumasa; Ishikawa, Hirokazu; Mizuno, Makoto; Sada, Toshio

    2015-08-15

    The present study was designed to characterize the pharmacological profile of CS-3150, a novel non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. In the radioligand-binding assay, CS-3150 inhibited (3)H-aldosterone binding to mineralocorticoid receptor with an IC50 value of 9.4nM, and its potency was superior to that of spironolactone and eplerenone, whose IC50s were 36 and 713nM, respectively. CS-3150 also showed at least 1000-fold higher selectivity for mineralocorticoid receptor over other steroid hormone receptors, glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor and progesterone receptor. In the reporter gene assay, CS-3150 inhibited aldosterone-induced transcriptional activation of human mineralocorticoid receptor with an IC50 value of 3.7nM, and its potency was superior to that of spironolactone and eplerenone, whose IC50s were 66 and 970nM, respectively. CS-3150 had no agonistic effect on mineralocorticoid receptor and did not show any antagonistic or agonistic effect on glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor and progesterone receptor even at the high concentration of 5μM. In adrenalectomized rats, single oral administration of CS-3150 suppressed aldosterone-induced decrease in urinary Na(+)/K(+) ratio, an index of in vivo mineralocorticoid receptor activation, and this suppressive effect was more potent and longer-lasting than that of spironolactone and eplerenone. Chronic treatment with CS-3150 inhibited blood pressure elevation induced by deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/salt-loading to rats, and this antihypertensive effect was more potent than that of spironolactone and eplerenone. These findings indicate that CS-3150 is a selective and highly potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist with long-lasting oral activity. This agent could be useful for the treatment of hypertension, cardiovascular and renal disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral medicine and the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCreary, Christine

    2011-03-15

    A focus often exists in dental practice on the maintenance and management of the dentition and the periodontium, however, conditions of the oral mucosa and orofacial pain can cause significant problems for older patients. Oral mucosal conditions are more prevalent in older patients and many orofacial pain disorders, such as burning mouth syndrome and trigeminal neuralgia, are more common in patients over the age of 50 years. Although these conditions may not be routinely managed in general practice, identification of these patients in primary care and appropriate referral will lead to more prompt and effective treatment. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Dental practitioners need to be able to identify what is considered to be within the normal physiological limits of the ageing oral tissue and hence what is abnormal and requires further investigation to facilitate appropriate referral.

  4. Gastrophysics of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-01-01

    Gastrophysics is the science that pertains to the physical and physico-chemical description of the empirical world of gastronomy, with focus on sensory perception in the oral cavity and how it is related to the materials properties of food and cooking processes. Flavor (taste and smell), mouthfeel, chemesthesis, and astringency are all related to the chemical properties and the texture of the food and how the food is transformed in the oral cavity. The present topical review will primarily focus attention on the somatosensory perception of food (mouthfeel or texture) and how it interacts with basic tastes (sour, bitter, sweet, salty, and umami) and chemesthetic action. Issues regarding diet, nutrition, and health will be put into an evolutionary perspective, and some mention will be made of umami and its importance for (oral) health.

  5. Oral clonidine for proctalgia fugax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, R

    1987-08-01

    A report is made of the successful use of oral clonidine for proctalgia fugax by the author on himself. The author, a 30 year old otherwise healthy man, has been having attacks of proctalgia fugax for several years. He had hitherto left the condition untreated. Last year, in a severe attack, he tried oral clonidine 150 micrograms twice a day and found it to be dramatically effective. He was completely relieved in three days and tapered off the drug thereafter. A further attack of proctalgia fugax after a month was again treated successfully with oral clonidine. The presumed aetiology of proctalgia fugax is discussed and the possible mechanism of action of clonidine in this condition is outlined. Further trials of clonidine appear to be worthwhile for this condition which has been described as incurable.

  6. Combined oral contraceptives: venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bastos, Marcos; Stegeman, Bernardine H; Rosendaal, Frits R; Van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Stijnen, Theo; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2014-03-03

    Combined oral contraceptive (COC) use has been associated with venous thrombosis (VT) (i.e., deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism). The VT risk has been evaluated for many estrogen doses and progestagen types contained in COC but no comprehensive comparison involving commonly used COC is available. To provide a comprehensive overview of the risk of venous thrombosis in women using different combined oral contraceptives. Electronic databases (Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier and ScienceDirect) were searched in 22 April 2013 for eligible studies, without language restrictions. We selected studies including healthy women taking COC with VT as outcome. The primary outcome of interest was a fatal or non-fatal first event of venous thrombosis with the main focus on deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Publications with at least 10 events in total were eligible. The network meta-analysis was performed using an extension of frequentist random effects models for mixed multiple treatment comparisons. Unadjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were reported.Two independent reviewers extracted data from selected studies. 3110 publications were retrieved through a search strategy; 25 publications reporting on 26 studies were included. Incidence of venous thrombosis in non-users from two included cohorts was 0.19 and 0.37 per 1 000 person years, in line with previously reported incidences of 0,16 per 1 000 person years. Use of combined oral contraceptives increased the risk of venous thrombosis compared with non-use (relative risk 3.5, 95% confidence interval 2.9 to 4.3). The relative risk of venous thrombosis for combined oral contraceptives with 30-35 μg ethinylestradiol and gestodene, desogestrel, cyproterone acetate, or drospirenone were similar and about 50-80% higher than for combined oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. A dose related effect of ethinylestradiol was observed for gestodene

  7. Oral complications of HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair C. Leao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS.

  8. Oral History: Methodology for Dialogue

    OpenAIRE

    DAVID, Priscila [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    A história oral, como metodologia qualitativa de pesquisa, traz outras dimensões ao debate historiográfico. Por meio dela o historiador consegue visualizar diversos pontos de vista de um determinado fato histórico. Neste aspecto, cabe ressaltar que sua utilização depende da compreensão de que o diálogo entre pesquisador e entrevistado apresenta especificidades. Utilizar-se da história oral requer a compreensão de que a pesquisa somente é possível mediante a vontade do pesquisador, o qual deli...

  9. Dispensacion de anticonceptivos hormonales orales

    OpenAIRE

    Molinero Crespo, Ana María; Diego Martinez , Cristina de; Méndez Mora-Figueroa, Pilar; Esteso, Pilar; García Valiente, Paloma; González, Ana; Peiró Martínez, Alicia; Pérez Martín, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    El 80% de las mujeres españolas en edad fértil utilizan métodos anticonceptivos. Los anticonceptivos orales hormonales son los que obtienen mayor grado de satisfacción entre las usuarias siendo el segundo método utilizado. Método Estudio observacional descriptivo en 7 farmacias de la Comunidad de Madrid. Durante seis meses (enero-junio de 2009) se realizó una entrevista en el mostrador a las usuarias de métodos anticonceptivos hormonales orales para conocer qué tipo de paciente los dema...

  10. Cancer of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Pablo H; Patel, Snehal G

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Although early diagnosis is relatively easy, presentation with advanced disease is not uncommon. The standard of care is primary surgical resection with or without postoperative adjuvant therapy. Improvements in surgical techniques combined with the routine use of postoperative radiation or chemoradiation therapy have resulted in improved survival. Successful treatment is predicated on multidisciplinary treatment strategies to maximize oncologic control and minimize impact of therapy on form and function. Prevention of oral cancer requires better education about lifestyle-related risk factors, and improved awareness and tools for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oral clonidine for proctalgia fugax.

    OpenAIRE

    Swain, R

    1987-01-01

    A report is made of the successful use of oral clonidine for proctalgia fugax by the author on himself. The author, a 30 year old otherwise healthy man, has been having attacks of proctalgia fugax for several years. He had hitherto left the condition untreated. Last year, in a severe attack, he tried oral clonidine 150 micrograms twice a day and found it to be dramatically effective. He was completely relieved in three days and tapered off the drug thereafter. A further attack of proctalgia f...

  12. Staging N0 oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Grupe, Peter

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1......%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel...

  13. Oral fingolimod (FTY720) in multiple sclerosis: two-year results of a phase II extension study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, P; Comi, G; Montalban, X

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the results of a 24-month extension of a phase II trial assessing the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of the once-daily oral sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulator, fingolimod (FTY720), in relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: In the randomized, double-blind, pla...

  14. Oral Health and Experiences of Oral Care in Radiotherapy Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In spite of careful planning and modern techniques, radiotherapy inevitably involves side-effects due to exposure of surrounding normal tissues. Patients treated for head and neck cancer who experience oral symptoms do not always consider these symptoms to be related to their disease or its treatment.

  15. Oral history, trauma and September 11, comparative oral history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, S.; Pierre, P.

    2013-01-01

    It is argued in this article that the study of the trauma of september 11 can gain from other studies of disaster, Oral history is an excellent tool to study these trauma's, since traumatized stories are fragmented and layered. Listening will bring about a confrontation with the creaton of

  16. Oral cryotherapy reduced oral mucositis in patients having cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivakovsky, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CANCERLIT, CINAHL, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment compared to usual care, no treatment or other interventions to prevent mucositis. The primary outcome was incidence of mucositis and its severity.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers carried out study assessment and data extraction independently. Treatment effect for continuous data was calculated using mean values and standard deviations and expressed as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Meta-analysis was performed.ResultsFourteen studies with 1280 participants were included. Subgroup analysis was undertaken according to the main cancer treatment type. Cryotherapy reduced the risk of developing mucositis by 39% (RR = 0.61; 95%CI, 0.52 to 0.72) on patients treated with fluorouracil (5FU). For melphalan-based treatment the risk of developing mucositis was reduced by 41% (RR =0.59; 95%CI, 0.35 to 1.01). Oral cryotherapy was shown to be safe, with very low rates of minor adverse effects, such as headaches, chills, numbness/taste disturbance and tooth pain. This appears to contribute to the high rates of compliance seen in the included studies.ConclusionsThere is confidence that oral cryotherapy leads to a large reduction in oral mucositis in adults treated with 5FU. Although there is less certainty on the size of the reduction on patients treated with melphalan, it is certain there is reduction of severe mucositis.

  17. Colgajo lateral de brazo en reconstrucción de la cavidad oral Lateral arm flap in oral cavity reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dean Ferrer

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La posibilidad de emplear una piel fácilmente plegable ha permitido reconstruir defectos de la cavidad oral consiguiendo una gran funcionalidad. Aunque el colgajo radial es el colgajo que se utiliza con más frecuencia para reconstruir defectos de superficie de la cavidad oral, el colgajo lateral de brazo puede ser de elección en algunas situaciones. Objetivos. El objetivo del presente trabajo es mostrar las ventajas e inconvenientes y nuestras indicaciones y resultados del colgajo lateral de brazo en reconstrucción de defectos de la cavidad oral. Material y método. Se trata de un estudio prospectivo sobre la utilización del colgajo lateral de brazo en la reconstrucción de defectos de la cavidad oral tras cirugía ablativa. Se ha valorado: la viabilidad del colgajo, la morbilidad del lecho donante, la longitud del pedículo, la selección de vasos receptores, las complicaciones y los resultados funcionales de la zona reconstruida. Resultados. Hemos utilizado el colgajo lateral de brazo en 10 pacientes en reconstrucciones primarias tras cirugía ablativa por carcinoma epidermoide de la cavidad oral. Hubo un caso de necrosis por trombosis venosa. El defecto donante se cerró en 8 casos de modo directo y en 2 con un injerto libre de espesor parcial. La longitud media del pedículo ha sido de 8,75 cm. En 9 casos el resultado funcional de los pacientes ha sido satisfactorio. Conclusiones. El colgajo fasciocutáneo lateral de brazo permite la reconstrucción de la cavidad oral consiguiendo buenos resultados funcionales. Además la morbilidad de la zona donante es mínima y puede realizarse cierre directo del defecto cutáneo del brazo en la mayoría de los casos.Introduction. The availability of easily pliable skin has allowed the functional reconstruction of oral cavity defects. Although the radial forearm free flap is the most frequently used flap for the reconstruction of surface defects of the oral cavity, the lateral arm free

  18. Nutrition and Oral Health: Experiences in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Sadat Sangsefidi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral health is a crucial factor for overall well-being and there is a mutual relationship between nutrition and oral health. The aim of this study was to review the publications which have examined the association between nutrition or diet and oral health status or oral disease in Iran. Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, scientific information database (SID, and Magiran were searched using key words of diet, nutrition, oral health, oral disease, and Iran to reach the related articles published up to 2016. The English and Persian articles with cross-sectional, clinical trial, prospective, and case-control designs were selected. The Persian studies were then translated into English. The animal studies were not investigated. Results: The findings showed that nutrition and diet were associated with oral health. However, the majority of studies focused on evaluation of the relation between nutrition and dental caries. Further, a few studies were conducted on the association between nutrition and other oral problems such as periodontal disease or oral cancer. Moreover, the limited nutritional or dietary factors were investigated in the literature. Conclusions: Nutrition and diet are related to oral health and prevention of oral disease. Further studies are therefore recommended to evaluate the association between nutrition and oral health with considering various dietary or nutritional factors and different types of oral problems in Iran.

  19. Characteristics of Oral Problems and Effects of Oral Care in Terminally Ill Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Nobuhisa

    2017-06-01

    Various distresses appear in the terminal stage of cancer. Oral problems including dry mouth, stomatitis and candidiasis are one of the important problems which should be resolved. The purpose of this study was to investigate oral problems in this stage and improvement of dry mouth by oral care. The study subjects were consecutive terminally ill cancer patients admitted over the past 2 years. Patients were divided based on the status of oral food intake into good oral food intake group (≥30%) and poor oral food intake group. The following 3 items were retrospectively investigated: 1) The incidences of these oral problems, 2) Severity of dry mouth and complication with other oral problems, 3) Improvement of dry mouth using standard oral care by nursing staff and specialist oral care including dentists as needed. There were 115 and 158 patients in good and poor oral intake groups, respectively. 1) The incidences of dry mouth, stomatitis, and candidiasis were significantly higher in poor oral intake group ( p oral intake groups, respectively ( p oral intake group ( p = 0.0002). 3) The rate of dry mouth improvement by oral care was 100% in Grade-1, 86% in Grade-2 and 81% in Grade-3. Oral problems occur in many of terminally ill cancer patients. Accurate diagnosis of oral problems and corresponding appropriate interventions are important for improving quality of end-of-life care.

  20. Nonpeptidic angiotensin II AT₁ receptor antagonists derived from 6-substituted aminocarbonyl and acylamino benzimidazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jin-Liang; Yu, Wei-Fa; Zhou, Zhi-Ming; Tao, Wen-Chang; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Xue, Wei-Zhe; Xu, Di; Hao, Li-Ping; Han, Xiao-Feng; Fei, Fan; Liu, Ting; Liang, Ai-Hua

    2013-11-01

    Both 6-substituted aminocarbonyl and acylamino benzimidazole derivatives were designed and synthesized as nonpeptidic angiotensin II AT₁ receptor antagonists. Compounds 6f, 6g, 11e, 11f, 11g, and 12 showed nanomolar AT₁ receptor binding affinity and high AT₁ receptor selectivity over AT₂ receptor in a preliminary pharmacological evaluation. Among them, the two most active compounds 6f (AT₁ IC₅₀ = 3 nM, AT₂ IC₅₀ > 10,000 nM, PA₂ = 8.51) and 11g (AT₁ IC₅₀ = 0.1 nM, AT₂ IC₅₀ = 149 nM, PA₂ = 8.43) exhibited good antagonistic activity in isolated rabbit aortic strip functional assay. In addition, they were orally active AT₁ receptor antagonists in spontaneous hypertensive rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological behavior of oral and perioral mast cell tumors in dogs: 44 cases (1996-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Lorin A; Garrett, Laura D; de Lorimier, Louis-Philippe; Charney, Sarah C; Borst, Luke B; Fan, Timothy M

    2010-10-15

    To describe clinical outcome of dogs with mast cell tumors (MCTs) arising from the oral mucosa, oral mucocutaneous junction, or perioral region of the muzzle and evaluate the potential role of the chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7) in the biological behavior of these tumors. Retrospective case series. 44 dogs with MCTs of the oral mucosa (n=14), oral mucocutaneous junction (19), or perioral region of the muzzle (11). Medical records were reviewed for information on signalment, regional metastasis, treatments, cause of death, and survival time. Twenty of the 44 cases had stored histologic samples available for immunohistochemical staining for CCR7 For all dogs, median survival time was 52 months. Twenty-six (59%) dogs had regional lymph node metastasis on admission. Median survival time for dogs with lymph node metastasis was 14 months, whereas median survival time was not reached for dogs without lymph node metastasis. Intensity of staining for CCR7 was not significantly associated with the presence of regional lymph node metastasis or survival time. Results suggested that in dogs with MCTs arising from the oral mucosa, oral mucocutaneous junction, or perioral region of the muzzle, the presence of regional lymph node metastasis at the time of diagnosis was a negative prognostic factor. However, prolonged survival times could be achieved with treatment. In addition, CCR7 expression in the primary tumor was not significantly associated with the presence of regional lymph node metastasis or survival time.

  2. Purposeless oral activity induced by meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP): Undefined tic-like behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiss, Deborah S; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    The pathophysiological hypothesis underlying tic disorders in Tourette syndrome (TS) is that basal ganglia are not capable of properly filtering cortical information, leading patients with difficulties in inhibiting unwanted behaviors or impulses. One of the main challenges for furthering such a hypothesis is to find appropriate animal models summarizing some aspects of the disease. It has been established for more than 25 years in rodents that the prototypical serotonin (5-HT) agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) elicits purposeless oral movements including chewing behavior. These bouts of oral movements, originally thought to mimic human oral dyskinesia consequent to long-term administration of antipsychotic drugs or parkinsonian tremor, could correspond to an undefined form of tics. Here, we describe the nature of the purposeless oral movements triggered by m-CPP and other agonists which could be associated with obsessive compulsive disorders. We report the pharmacology of this response with a focus on the 5-HT 2C receptor subtype and the degree to which the dopaminergic and cholinergic systems are involved. The orofacial dyskinetic effects are related to the action of these compounds in associative/limbic territories of the basal ganglia, rather than sensorimotor ones, as expected from the human disease. In spite of the low translational value of these oral movements, the neurobiological analysis of these oral movements could help to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of tics and compulsive disorders often cormorbid with TS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral Communication across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2011-01-01

    Proficiency in oral communication is necessary in school and in society. To do well in the different curriculum areas, pupils must speak with clarity and understanding. For example, in a discussion group in the social studies involving the topic "the pros and cons of raising taxes," pupils need to express knowledgeable ideas with appropriate voice…

  4. What dentition assures oral function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus; Walls, Angus W G

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between dentition and oral function. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A search of the English literature was undertaken using PubMed and appropriate keywords. Citations were identified and hand sorted to confirm their validity against our inclusion criteria. Four spec...

  5. War, Journalism, and Oral History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Describes a project where students conducted oral history with either a war correspondent or a U.S. combat veteran for the course "War and the News Media: From Vietnam through Desert Storm and Beyond." Discusses how the students prepared for the interviews and the evaluation of their projects. (CMK)

  6. Oral Hygiene. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on oral hygiene is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, a list of definitions, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  7. Oral vaccination: where we are?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silin, Dmytro S; Lyubomska, Oksana V; Jirathitikal, Vichai; Bourinbaiar, Aldar S

    2007-07-01

    As early as 900 years ago, the Bedouins of the Negev desert were reported to kill a rabid dog, roast its liver and feed it to a dog-bitten person for three to five days according to the size and number of bites [1] . In sixteenth century China, physicians routinely prescribed pills made from the fleas collected from sick cows, which purportedly prevented smallpox. One may dismiss the wisdom of the Bedouins or Chinese but the Nobel laureate, Charles Richet, demonstrated in 1900 that feeding raw meat can cure tuberculous dogs - an approach he termed zomotherapy. Despite historical clues indicating the feasibility of oral vaccination, this particular field is notoriously infamous for the abundance of dead-end leads. Today, most commercial vaccines are delivered by injection, which has the principal limitation that recipients do not like needles. In the last few years, there has been a sharp increase in interest in needle-free vaccine delivery; new data emerges almost daily in the literature. So far, there are very few licensed oral vaccines, but many more vaccine candidates are in development. Vaccines delivered orally have the potential to take immunization to a fundamentally new level. In this review, the authors summarize the recent progress in the area of oral vaccines.

  8. Resúmenes Presentaciones Orales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor Gabriel Vargas Arana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se pueden encontrar los resúmenes de las presentaciones orales del III Congreso Latinoamericano de Plantas Medicinales, desarrollado del 12 al 14 de agosto de 2015 en la ciudad de Iquitos, Perú.

  9. Methamphetamine Use and Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOR THE DENTAL PATIENT ... Methamphetamine use and oral health M ethamphetamine is an inexpensive, easy-to-make illicit drug. It is known by several street ... and in ever-larger doses. The use of methamphetamine is on the rise in the United States, ...

  10. Correlates of oral contraception continuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewer, P A; Gibbs, J O

    1971-05-01

    A sample of 139 predominantly black, young, low-income patients who had accepted oral contraception at a publicly supported family planning clinic has been analyzed for correlates of oral contraception continuation. Interviews were conducted 10-12 months after the clinic visit; at this time 38% of the patients continued taking oral contraceptives. It was found that patients with the highest continuation rates were 18-24 years old, in the 2-3 parity group, living with their husbands, had low-parity mothers, and were able to fill prescriptions in less time with more convenient methods of transportation. Discontinuers tended to have high-parity mothers, live with parents or head their own households, and to be in the 13-17 or 25-45 year old age groups. Fear of long-term use of oral contraceptives and perceived side effects appeared to be implicated in discontinuation. The rate of discontinuation may be associated with irregular coital experience and less consistent exposure to pregnancy.

  11. Ecstasy (MDMA) and oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Dun, S.N.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), more commonly known as 'ecstasy' or XTC, is frequently used by young adults in the major cities. Therefore, it is likely that dentists might be confronted with individuals who use ecstasy. This review describes systemic and oral effects of ecstasy.

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lump in the neck Your mouth is one of your body's most important early warning systems. Don't ignore any suspicious lumps or sores. Should you discover something, make an appointment for a prompt examination. Early treatment may well be the key to complete ... Oral and maxillofacial ...

  13. Direct Oral Anticoagulants and Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Hannah; Arachchillage, Deepa R. J.; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Middeldorp, Saskia; Kadir, Rezan A.

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) provide an effective, safe, and convenient therapeutic alternative to warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), and are now established for a wide range of indications. The use of DOACs in women merits special consideration due to two main situations: first,

  14. African Journal of Oral Health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    b) Letters relating to materials previously published in AJOH or to topical issues relevant to the practice of dentistry. c) Update articles surveying the present state of knowledge in selected fields of Dentistry and oral health. d) Critical or analytical reviews in the area of theory, policy, or research in Dentistry. e) Reviews of ...

  15. Oral Assessment in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an oral assessment technique that has been used for over 20 years at the Centre of Maritime Studies and Engineering in the Faroe Islands. The technique has proven less laborious for the examiners and the students agree that this technique not only assesses their surface...

  16. Orality, Literacy, and Star Wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelock, Eric A.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the educational system should encourage "down to earth" language by including oral recitation in the curricula, particularly recitation of popular poetry with accompaniment. Using the shuttle disaster as a striking example, claims that the modern media overuses conceptual language to disguise the hard meaning of what is being…

  17. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lining of the uterus. Progestin-only oral contraceptives are a very effective method of birth control, but they do not prevent ... them late and had sex without a backup method of birth control.If you want to become ... Progestin-only contraceptives should not delay your ability ...

  18. Integrative review on oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Kelle Batista Moura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar estudos nacional e internacional sobre o câncer bucal. Método: Trata-se de uma revisão integrativa da literatura. Foram selecionados 28 artigos que atenderam aos critérios de inclusão da pesquisa. Os dados foram processados no software IRAMUTEC e analisados pela classificação hierárquica descendente com base no dendograma. Resultados: Foram apresentados em 05 classes, a saber: 1-A prevenção e o tratamento das morbidades orais. 2- A reabilitação do paciente com câncer de boca. 3-Qualidade de vida dos pacientes em terapia para câncer bucal. 4- A equipe profissional multidisciplinar de saúde nos cuidados de prevenção do câncer oral. 5- O rastreio do câncer oral para diminuição da prevalência. Conclusão: O câncer oral é um grave problema de saúde pública no Brasil e no mundo.  Há necessidade de maiores investimentos nas pesquisas relacionadas com o câncer bucal e implementação das políticas públicas para o rastreio do câncer oral e diminuição da prevalência.

  19. Partial oral treatment of endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper; Høst, Nis Baun; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for the treatment of left-sided infective endocarditis (IE) recommend 4 to 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics. Conversion from intravenous to oral antibiotics in clinically stabilized patients could reduce the side effects associated with intravenous treatment and shorten the length...

  20. Poetry as an oral outlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Arden Brill

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The text is inspired by some of Freud’s observations, regarding, among other things, the pleasure the child takes from playing with words as preliminary degree of wit. As zealous follower, Brill extends and intensifies the importance of Freud’s thought trying to establish a link, or at least a point of contact between the poetry in a generic sense and the various forms of oral gratification. This gives rise to unusual associations that are for the contemporary reader slightly comical: if poetry can be seen as an expression of the mysteries of oral Erotica, the relationship between poet and gourmet can only be the closest. To define and limit the scopes of fulfillment that is realized in oral poetry, Brill passes rapidly through the various forms this satisfaction takes in neurotics, in psychotics, in the child, in the primitive. The conclusions, unfortunately, are very general: many poets do not go beyond the oral stage and give clear signs of a fixation of libidinal development at this level.

  1. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine : guidelines for oral pathology and oral medicine in the dental curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kragelund, C.; Reibel, J.; Hietanen, J.; Hadler-Olsen, E.; Johannessen, A. C.; Kenrad, B.; Nylander, K.; Puranen, M.; Salo, T.; Syrjanen, S.; Soland, T. M.; van der Waal, I.; van der Wal, J. E.; Warfvinge, G.

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must

  2. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine: guidelines for oral pathology and oral medicine in the dental curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kragelund, C.; Reibel, J.; Hietanen, J.; Hadler-Olsen, E.; Johannessen, A.C.; Kenrad, B.; Nylander, K.; Puranen, M.; Salo, T.; Syrjänen, S.; Søland, T.M.; van der Waal, I.; van der Wal, J.E.; Warfvinge, G.

    2012-01-01

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must

  3. Oral Health and Older Adults

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-27

    This podcast discusses the importance of older adults maintaing good oral health habits. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 10/27/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/27/2008.

  4. Gaelic Singing and Oral Tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Mark; MacDonald, Iona; Byrne, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    A recent report by UNESCO placed Scots Gaelic on a list of 2500 endangered languages highlighting the perilous state of a key cornerstone of Scottish culture. Scottish Gaelic song, poems and stories have been carried through oral transmission for many centuries reflecting the power of indigenous peoples to preserve cultural heritage from…

  5. Oral Lactobacilli and Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caufield, P.W.; Schön, C.N.; Saraithong, P.; Li, Y.; Argimón, S.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli have been associated with dental caries for over a century. Here, we review the pertinent literature along with findings from our own study to formulate a working hypothesis about the natural history and role of lactobacilli. Unlike most indigenous microbes that stably colonize a host, lactobacilli appear to be planktonic, opportunistic settlers that can gather and multiply only in certain restrictive niches of the host, at least within the oral cavity. We postulate that the following essential requirements are necessary for sustained colonization of lactobacilli in humans: 1) a stagnant, retentive niche that is mostly anaerobic; 2) a low pH milieu; and 3) ready access to carbohydrates. Three sites on the human body meet these specifications: caries lesions, the stomach, and the vagina. Only a handful of Lactobacillus species is found in caries lesions, but they are largely absent in caries-free children. Lactobacilli present in caries lesions represent both a major contributor to caries progression and a major reservoir to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We extend the assertion from other investigators that lactobacilli found in the GI tract originate in the oral cavity by proposing that lactobacilli in the oral cavity arise from caries lesions. This, in turn, leads us to reflect on the health implications of the lactobacilli in the mouth and downstream GI and to ponder whether these or any of the Lactobacillus species are truly indigenous to the human GI tract or the oral cavity. PMID:25758458

  6. Improving the oral health of older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    changing burden of chronic diseases in old age. Chronic disease and most oral diseases share common risk factors. Globally, poor oral health amongst older people has been particularly evident in high levels of tooth loss, dental caries experience, and the prevalence rates of periodontal disease, xerostomia...... and oral precancer/cancer. The negative impact of poor oral conditions on the quality of life of older adults is an important public health issue, which must be addressed by policy-makers. The means for strengthening oral health programme implementation are available; the major challenge is therefore...... to translate knowledge into action programmes for the oral health of older people. The World Health Organization recommends that countries adopt certain strategies for improving the oral health of the elderly. National health authorities should develop policies and measurable goals and targets for oral health...

  7. [Oral films as perspective dosage form].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicová, Veronika; Gajdziok, Jan

    Oral films, namely buccal mucoadhesive films and orodispersible films represent innovative formulations for administration of a wide range of drugs. Oral films show many advantageous properties and are intended for systemic drug delivery or for local treatment of the oral mucosa. In both cases, the film represents a thin layer, which could be intended to adhere to the oral mucosa by means of mucoadhesion; or to rapid dissolution and subsequent swallowing without the need of liquid intake, in the case of orodispersible films. Main constitutive excipients are film-forming polymers, which must in the case of mucoadhesive forms remain on the mucosa within the required time interval. Oral films are currently available on the pharmaceutical market and could compete with conventional oral dosage forms in the future. oral cavity oral films buccal mucoadhesive films orodispersible films film-forming polymers.

  8. Why Is Oral Health Important for Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chronic pain, loss of function, irreparable facial and oral disfigurement following surgery and even death. More than 8,000 people die each year from oral and pharyngeal diseases. If you use tobacco, it ...

  9. Stress Related Oral Disorders - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Nagabhushana

    2004-01-01

    However, relatively few studies have been carried out on the relationship of emotional factors to diseases of the oral mucosa. So, here is an article which tries to briefly review the psychosomatic (stress related disorders related to the oral cavity.

  10. Leukemic Oral Manifestations and their Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisconi, Carolina Favaro; Caldas, Rogerio Jardim; Oliveira Martins, Lazara Joyce; Fischer Rubira, Cassia Maria; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common neoplastic disease of the white blood cells which is important as a pediatric malignancy. Oral manifestations occur frequently in leukemic patients and may present as initial evidence of the disease or its relapse. The symptoms include gingival enlargement and bleeding, oral ulceration, petechia, mucosal pallor, noma, trismus and oral infections. Oral lesions arise in both acute and chronic forms of all types of leukemia. These oral manifestations either may be the result of direct infiltration of leukemic cells (primary) or secondary to underlying thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, or impaired granulocyte function. Despite the fact that leukemia has long been known to be associated with oral lesions, the available literature on this topic consists mostly of case reports, without data summarizing the main oral changes for each type of leukemia. Therefore, the present review aimed at describing oral manifestations of all leukemia types and their dental management. This might be useful in early diagnosis, improving patient outcomes.

  11. Contraceptive applications of progesterone receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie; Ouzounian, Sophie; Kairis, Axelle Pintiaux; Bouchard, Philippe

    2008-09-01

    Currently developed progesterone receptor modulators (PRMs) are steroid-derived compounds with mild or potent antiprogestin activity. PRMs may exert a contraceptive activity by different mechanisms such as blockade of ovulation and endometrial desynchronization. Their potential clinical applications are manifold and are very promising in major public health areas, including emergency contraception, long term oestrogen-free contraception (administered alone, or in association with a progestin-only pill to improve bleeding patterns), endometriosis and myoma treatment. The mechanisms of their anti-ovulatory effects and of the endometrial modifications elicited during long term PRM treatment are still not fully elucidated. In future clinical applications, PRMs will be administered orally, via intrauterine systems or vaginal rings.

  12. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Corey

    Full Text Available The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs, the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling.

  13. Histopathological findings in the oral mucosa of celiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bardellini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible subjects. Although the small intestinal mucosa is the main site of the gut's involvement in CD, other mucosal surfaces belonging to the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue are known to be affected. Aim: Assuming that the oral mucosa could reflect the histopathological inflammatory alterations of the intestine in CD patients, this study wishes to assess the pattern of T-cell subsets in the oral mucosa of young adults with CD. Methods: A group of 37 patients (age range 20-38 years; female: male ratio 28:9 with CD were enrolled. Out of 37 patients, 19 patients (group A followed a gluten free diet (GFD -2 patients from less than one year; 6 patients between 1 and 5 years; 11 patients more than 5 years- while 18 patients (group B were still untreated. Fifteen healthy volunteers (age range 18-35 years, female: Male ratio 11:4 served as controls for the CD patients. Ethical approval for the research was granted by the Ethics Committee. Biopsy specimens were taken from normal looking oral mucosa. The immunohistochemical investigation was performed with monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD8, and γδ-chains T cell receptor (TCR. Results: The T-lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate was significantly (p < 0.0001 increased in group B (both compared with group A and with the control group. Conclusion: This study confirms the oral cavity to be a site of involvement of CD and its possible diagnostic potentiality in this disease.

  14. Disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis diagnosis based on oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Preto Webber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a deep mycosis with primary lung manifestations that may present cutaneous and oral lesions. Oral lesions mimic other infectious diseases or even squamous cell carcinoma, clinically and microscopically. Sometimes, the dentist is the first to detect the disease, because lung lesions are asymptomatic, or even misdiagnosed. An unusual case of PCM with 5 months of evolution presenting pulmonary, oral, and cutaneous lesions that was diagnosed by the dentist based on oral lesions is presented and discussed.

  15. Current stress and poor oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiliou, A.; Shankardass, K.; Nisenbaum, R.; Qui?onez, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychological stress appears to contribute to poor oral health systemically in combination with other chronic diseases. Few studies directly examine this relationship. Methods Data from a cross-sectional study of 2,412 participants between the ages of 25?64 years old living in the City of Toronto between 2009 and 2012 were used to examine the relationship between current stress and two self-rated oral health outcomes (general oral health and oral pain). Dental care utilization and ...

  16. Effects of nutrition on oral health

    OpenAIRE

    G A Agbelusi

    2010-01-01

    Nutrition represents a summation of intake, absorption, storage and utilization of foods by the tissues. Oral tissues are one of the most sensitive indicators of nutritional state of the body. Nutritional deficiencies are associated with changes in the integrity (health and appearance) of the oral structures/ tissues and these changes are frequently the first clinical signs of deficiency. Nutrition affects oral health and oral health affects nutrition. The effects of malnutrition can be s...

  17. Primary Oral Tuberculosis - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B N Praveen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is most common disease in developing countries because of lack of public health awareness, poverty, nutritional deficiencies, absence of medical facilities. Primary oral lesions in tuberculosis are still exceedingly rare. Oral involvement may be primary or secondary to systemic involvement. Involvement of oral cavity is rare accounting for 0.2-1.5% of cases. A rare case report of primary oral tuberculosis is presented.

  18. Molecular concept in human oral cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, Akhilesh; Singh, Shraddha; Kumar, Vijay; Pal, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high in both Asian and Western countries. Several risk factors associated with development of oral cancer are now well-known, including tobacco chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Cancerous risk factors may cause many genetic events through chromosomal alteration or mutations in genetic material and lead to progression and development of oral cancer through histological progress, carcinogenesis. Oral squamous carcinogenesis is a multistep process in...

  19. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relati...

  20. Oral Communicative Competence of Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Isabel Cantón; Barrioluengo, Elena Pérez

    2017-01-01

    Oral communicative competence enables speakers of a language to interact effectively with each other. Oral communicative competence includes a wide semantic field since the oral expression is a way of expression for the thought and it provides feedback and develops by means of the linguistic function (Vygotsky, 1992; Piaget, 1983a, 1983b; Pinker,…