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Sample records for oral burning symptoms

  1. Long standing intra oral acid burn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.V. Kumar; S. Ebenezer; F. Lobbezoo

    2015-01-01

    Oral burn due to ingestion of corrosive substances can bring about debilitating consequences. It often brings mortality, and the survivors can have severe impairment of functions, especially in relation to the stomatognathic and gastrointestinal systems. This article presents a long-standing case (2

  2. Diagnostic dilemma: the enigma of an oral burning sensation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klasser, Gary D; Epstein, Joel B; Villines, Dana

    2011-01-01

    ...) and secondary burning mouth syndrome. The primary form is characterized by a burning sensation in the oral mucosa and perioral areas, typically with bilateral, symmetric distribution and an absence of relevant clinical and laboratory findings...

  3. Oral Burning With Dysphagia and Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seccia, Teresa Maria; Rossitto, Giacomo; Calò, Lorenzo A; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by an abnormal pain regulation. Widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance are the prevalent symptoms. When unusual symptoms are overbearingly predominant at clinical presentation, the diagnosis becomes challenging.We report on the case of a patient with fibromyalgia, who presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and glossodynia as prevalent symptoms. Difficulty in swallowing gradually developed over a month prior hospitalization, and worsened progressively so that nourishment and fluid intake were impeded.Because anemia with mild iron deficiency was found, esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed, but no lesions were seen in the upper digestive tract. Levels of zinc and vitamin B12 were normal. Intense pain at pelvis and the inferior limbs, which was at a first glance referred to as osteoarthrosis, associated with oral symptoms and feeling of being in the clouds allowed us to diagnose fibromyalgia. Amitriptyline was used, with relief of symptoms.Although oropharyngeal symptoms were occasionally reported in fibromyalgia, they are often overlooked. The present case, therefore, testifies the need to consider the diagnosis of fibromyalgia when the patient presents with such symptoms that cannot be readily explained on other grounds.

  4. Oral Rehydration Therapy in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-24

    Burn Any Degree Involving 20-29 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 30-39 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 40-49 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 50-59 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 60-65 Percent of Body Surface

  5. Analgesic effect of topical oral capsaicin gel in burning mouth syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette Rose; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of repeated topical application of oral capsaicin gel in two different concentrations for relief of burning/stinging sensations in patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: This randomized double-blind cross-over study included 22...... improved the burning/stinging symptoms assessed on VAS compared with baseline (p = 0.002). There was no statistically significant difference between the two concentrations of the gels on relieving symptoms. Four patients dropped out during the intervention period due to gastrointestinal side...

  6. Predictors of PTSD symptoms in caregivers of pediatric burn survivors

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    Lucía Del Carmen Quezada Berumen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Facing a severe injury in the children is one of the most devastating experiences that parents may face. The aim of this study was to explore the role of resilience showed by fathers and mothers of children with burns, the TBSA burned, age at the time of the burn and time since the burn in PTSD symptoms in caregivers. It was a cross-sectional study where fathers, mothers and guardians of 51 burn patients were evaluated. Results showed that the higher strength and confidence in caregivers, less severity in PTSD symptoms. The post-burn reactions of parents and guardians can affect the responses and welfare of their children. Therefore, a better understanding of factors related to the adaptation in caregivers, better attention by health services.

  7. Current Treatment Options in Challenging Oral Diseases: Burning Mouth Syndrome

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    Bilgen Erdoğan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic condition characterized by burning pain without any signs of an oral mucosal pathology, that usually affects postmenopausal women. Burning sensation is often accompanied by dysgeusia and xerostomia. The pathogenesis of the disease is unknown and an effective treatment option for most of the patients has not been defined yet. The aim of this review is to present current pharmacological and physicological treatments of burning mouth syndrome.

  8. Accidental Chemical Burns of Oral Mucosa by Herbicide

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    S P Deo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate (GlySH is a broad spectrum, nonselective herbicide, widely used in agriculture. This case report describes a 25-year-old man presenting with extensive chemical burns and ulceration of the oral cavity as a result of accidental exposure to GlySH. This paper aims to illustrate the typical appearance of GlySH related chemical mucosal burn and to demonstrate the severity of the corrosive effect of GlySH which need team approach to prevent unfavorable sequelae such as microstomia. Keywords: Chemical burns, corrosive injury, glyphosate poisoning, herbicide, microstomia, oral mucosal burn.

  9. Burning sensation in oral cavity--burning mouth syndrome in everyday medical practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerlinger, Imre

    2012-01-01

    .... It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women. BMS is characterized by an intense burning or stinging sensation, typically on the tongue or in other areas of the oral mucosa...

  10. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Huisman, Paulien M.; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Methods Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or orophar

  11. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Huisman, Paulien M.; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    Purpose This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Methods Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or

  12. Co-occurrence of Pain Symptoms and Somatosensory Sensitivity in Burning Mouth Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisset, Xavier; Calbacho, Valentina; Torres, Pilar; Gremeau-Richard, Christelle; Dallel, Radhouane

    2016-01-01

    Background Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic and spontaneous oral pain with burning quality in the tongue or other oral mucosa without any identifiable oral lesion or laboratory finding. Pathogenesis and etiology of BMS are still unknown. However, BMS has been associated with other chronic pain syndromes including other idiopathic orofacial pain, the dynias group and the family of central sensitivity syndromes. This would imply that BMS shares common mechanisms with other cephalic and/or extracephalic chronic pains. The primary aim of this systematic review was to determine whether BMS is actually associated with other pain syndromes, and to analyze cephalic and extracephalic somatosensory sensitivity in these patients. Methods This report followed the PRISMA Statement. An electronic search was performed until January 2015 in PubMed, Cochrane library, Wiley and ScienceDirect. Searched terms included “burning mouth syndrome OR stomatodynia OR glossodynia OR burning tongue OR oral burning”. Studies were selected according to predefined inclusion criteria (report of an association between BMS and other pain(s) symptoms or of cutaneous cephalic and/or extracephalic quantitative sensory testing in BMS patients), and a descriptive analysis conducted. Results The search retrieved 1512 reports. Out of these, twelve articles met criteria for co-occurring pain symptoms and nine studies for quantitative sensory testing (QST) in BMS patients. The analysis reveals that in BMS patients co-occurring pain symptoms are rare, assessed by only 0.8% (12 of 1512) of the retrieved studies. BMS was associated with headaches, TMD, atypical facial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, post-herpetic facial pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, joint pain, abdominal pain, rectal pain or vulvodynia. However, the prevalence of pain symptoms in BMS patients is not different from that in the age-matched general population. QST studies reveal no or inconsistent evidence of abnormal cutaneous cephalic

  13. Epidemiological profile of elderly women with burning mouth symptoms - doi:10.5020/18061230.2011.p238

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vieira de Lima Saintrain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the epidemiological profile of elderly women with burning mouth symptoms. Methods: A cross sectional, quantitative, exploratory and descriptive study conducted in two phases: a determining the prevalence of burning mouth symptoms among 263 elderly women aged between 60 and 83 years who attended six public municipal community centers in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, b defining the epidemiological profile of respondents with burning mouth symptoms, through the variables: self-reported diseases, salivary flow, use of medications, dental prosthesis and oral hygiene habits. Data were organized by the Statistical Package for Social Sciences - SPSS version 15. Results: The prevalence of burning mouth symptoms in the group was 19% (n=50. Of these, 41 (82.0% reported the manifestation of the symptoms as a scalding sensation. Regarding the occurrence, the most referred sites were: tongue (48%; n=24 and gums (22%; n=11. Among elderly women, 24 (48.0% had daily symptoms. Regarding self-reported diseases and habits: 80.0% cited cardiovascular diseases, 74.0% (n=37 musculoskeletal illness and 62.0% (n=31 neurological disorders, besides 56.0% (n=28 present reduction of salivary flow; 70.0% (n=35 took medication, 66.0% (n=33 were users of dental prosthesis and 18.0% (n=9 did not brush their teeth. Conclusions: The prevalence of burning mouth symptoms in this group was 19%; scalding sensation was the main manifestation of the symptom and the tongue was the site of major symptomatology. The epidemiological profile of symptomatic elderly was distinguished by self-reported diseases and habits such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders, in addition to reduced salivary flow, as well as the use of medications and dental prosthesis.

  14. Correlation between Burning Mouth Syndrome and Psychological Symptoms in Patients Attending to Zahedan Dental School

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    NM Bakhshan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by an oral burning sensation , usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings. BMS is estimated to involve 1 to 5% of the adult population and is mostly reported within middle-aged women. The etiology of this disease is not thoroughly identified yet and there is a debate over the significance of Psychological factors in creating BMS. This study intended to examine the relationship between psychological factors with pain reports and psychosocial profiles of BMS patients to determine whether psychological factors are related to pain reports and burning mouth of patients. Therefore frequencies of psychological factors were analyzed. Methods: 30 patients with BMS participated in this study. They were homogenous regarding age, sex with the control group. In addition, education was possibly homogenized. The participants completed SCL-90 questionnaire for their anxiety, depression, somatic and psychotic symptoms to be scrutinized. Then, t-test was applied to analyze the research data. Results: Mean of anxiety(case20/8, control 9/53, depression(case 26/53, control 13/40, somatic(case 23/7, control 15/26 and psychotic(case 19/60, control 8/10 symptoms were higher in BMS group rather than in control groups. T-test results indicated there was no statically significant difference between BMS and control group in regard to psychological symptoms(p< 0.0001. Conclusion: The study findings indicate that psychological disorders may predispose the patients to the development of BMS.

  15. Carbachol promotes gastrointestinal function during oral resuscitation of burn shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sen Hu; Jin-Wei Che; Yi-Jun Tian; Zhi-Yong Sheng

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of carbachol on gastrointestinal function in a dog model of oral resuscitation for burn shock.METHODS: Twenty Beagle dogs with intubation of the carotid artery, jugular vein and jejunum for 24 h were subjected to 35% total body surface area fullthicknessburns, and were divided into three groups:no fluid resuscitation (NR, n = 10), in which animals did not receive fluid by any means in the first 24 h postburn;oral fluid resuscitation (OR, n = 8), in which dogs were gavaged with glucose-electrolyte solution (GES)with volume and rate consistent with the Parkland formula; and oral fluid with carbachol group (OR/CAR,n = 8), in which dogs were gavaged with GES containing carbachol (20 μg/kg), with the same volume and rate as the OR group. Twenty-four hours after burns, all animals were given intravenous fluid replacement, and 72 h after injury, they received nutritional support. Hemodynamic and gastrointestinal parameters were measured serially with animals in conscious and cooperative state.RESULTS: The mean arterial pressure, cardiac output and plasma volume dropped markedly, and gastrointestinal tissue perfusion was reduced obviouslyafter the burn injury in all the three groups. Hemodynamic parameters and gastrointestinal tissue perfusion in the OR and OR/CAR groupswere promoted to pre-injury level at 48 and 72 h,respectively, while hemodynamic parameters in the NR group did not return to pre-injury level till 72 h,and gastrointestinal tissue perfusion remained lower than pre-injury level until 120 h post-burn. CO2 of the gastric mucosa and intestinal mucosa blood flow of OR/CAR groups were 56.4 ± 4.7 mmHg and 157.7 ± 17.7 blood perfusion units (BPU) at 24 h postburn,respectively, which were significantly superior to those in the OR group (65.8 ± 5.8 mmHg and 127.7 ± 11.9 BPU, respectively, all P < 0.05). Gastricemptying and intestinal absorption rates of GES were significantly reduced to the lowest level (52.8% and23.7% of pre

  16. Exfoliative cytology of the oral mucosa in burning mouth syndrome: a cytomorphological and cytomorphometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandeur, Talita; de Moura, Sérgio Adriane Bezerra; de Medeiros, Ana Miryam Costa; Machado, Maria Ângela Naval; Alanis, Luciana Reis de Azevedo; Grégio, Ana Maria Trindade; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; de Lima, Antonio Adilson Soares

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate oral epithelial cells by exfoliative cytology in burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Oral smears were collected from clinically normal-appearing mucosa by liquid-based exfoliative cytology in 40 individuals (20 BMS patients and 20 healthy controls matched for age and gender) and analysed for cytological and cytomorphometric techniques. Mean values of nuclear area (NA) for experimental and control groups were, respectively, 67.52 and 55.64 μm² (p < 0.05). Cytoplasmic area (CA) showed the following mean values: 1258.0 (experimental) and 2069.0 μm² (control). Nucleus-to-cytoplasm area ratio for the experimental group was 0.07, besides the control group was 0.03 (p < 0.05). Morphologically, oral smears exhibited normal epithelial cells in both experimental and control groups. There was a significant predominance of nucleated cells of the superficial layer in the smears of BMS patients (p = 0.00001). This study revealed that oral mucosa of BMS patients exhibited significant cytomorphometric changes in the oral epithelial cells. These changes probably are associated with epithelial atrophy and a deregulated maturation process that may contribute to the oral symptoms of pain and discomfort in BMS. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Effect of Oral Care Gel for Burning Mouth Syndrome in a Patient with Hepatitis C: A Case Report

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    Yumiko Nagao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a burning sensation in the mouth with no underlying dental or medical cause. To date, there is no satisfactory treatment for BMS. Herein, we present the case of a 42-year-old female presenting with hepatitis C virus infection along with BMS. Despite two interferon therapies and a sustained virologic response, the discomfort in her oral mucosa persisted. At the age of 51, the patient complained of burning sensation and tingling pain in the tongue; a thin layer of REFRECARE-H®, an oral care gel (therapeutic dentifrice, was applied on the oral membrane after each meal for 60 days. Application of REFRECARE-H® decreased the various symptoms including tingling pain, oral discomfort, breath odor, sleep disorder, depressive mood, and jitteriness. The improvement in quality of life continued for 30 days after application of the gel. These findings indicate that REFRECARE-H® may be effective in reducing the symptoms associated with BMS. Long-term follow-up studies with larger number of patients are required to elucidate the therapeutic effects of this gel.

  18. Oral health and the symptoms of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, Ainara; Zumárraga, Mercedes; Díez-Altuna, Izaskun; Uriarte, Jose J; Moro, Juan; Pérez-Ansorena, Maria A

    2011-06-30

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the oral health of a group of schizophrenic outpatients and a control group without psychiatric illness. The study also aimed to assess the influence of positive and negative symptomatology on oral health among outpatients with schizophrenia. The DMF-T Index (sum of decayed, missing and filled teeth) and the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) were assessed in both groups. We evaluated the psychopathological state of the patient group using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The schizophrenic patients had higher scores than the control group with respect to decayed teeth (4.39 vs. 0.72), missing teeth (5.66 vs. 1.50), the DMF-T index (13.51 vs. 7.8) and CPITN (2.32 vs. 1.04); and lower scores for filled teeth (3.53 vs. 5.54). The PANSS negative subscale score correlated positively with the oral health variables studied, whereas the PANSS positive subscale score correlated negatively and exclusively with the number of missing teeth. Age and smoking status affected oral health in both groups, but even when the influence of these factors was considered, the oral health of the patients was poorer than that of the control group.

  19. The relationship between oral lichen planus and gastrointestinal symptoms

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    Mandana Khatibi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastrointestinal complications, followed by involvement of gastrointestinal tract with oral lichen planus, are one of the problems of the patients with oral lichen planus. Gastrointestinal symptoms should be evaluated to reject malignancy probability (1-5%. Given lack of information and different reported frequencies in Iran and other countries, this study was conducted in order to evaluate the relationship between oral lichen planus and gastrointestinal symptoms in Razi hospital in Tehran. Methods: This case-control study was performed on 50 patients with oral lichen planus and 50 controls by observation, clinical examination and biopsy, if necessary. Both groups were similar in sex, age, smoking, alcohol abuse and lack of systemic diseases. Gastrointestinal (GI symptoms such as dysphagia, odynophagia, hunger pain, heartburn, flatus, etc. Were evaluated. Data were analyzed by SPSS statistical software using chi–square, Exact Fisher and T-student tests. Results: Of 50 cases (OLP, 32(64% patients and among 50 controls, 16 (32% patients were found to have GI symptoms. Hunger pain (18% and heartburn (18% were the most common symptoms. Also, there was a significant difference in the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms between the two groups (P<0.005, Conclusion: Gastrointestinal complications can be a part of mifestations of lichen planus and OLP. Knowledge of gastrointestinal symptoms in OLP patients can be helpful in preventing the G.I tract obstruction and malignancy by on time treatment.

  20. Impact of facial burns: relationship between depressive symptoms, self-esteem and scar severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogewerf, Cornelis Johannes; van Baar, Margriet Elisabeth; Middelkoop, Esther; van Loey, Nancy Elisa

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the role of self-reported facial scar severity as a possible influencing factor on self-esteem and depressive symptoms in patients with facial burns. A prospective multicentre cohort study with a 6 months follow-up was conducted including 132 patients with facial burns. Patients completed the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Structural Equation Modeling was used to assess the relations between depressive symptoms, self-esteem and scar severity. The model showed that patient-rated facial scar severity was not predictive for self-esteem and depressive symptoms six months post-burn. There was, however, a significant relationship between early depressive symptoms and both patient-rated facial scar severity and subsequent self-esteem. The variables in the model accounted for 37% of the variance in depressive symptoms six months post-burn and the model provided a moderately well-fitting representation of the data. The study suggests that self-esteem and depressive symptoms were not affected by self-reported facial scar severity but that earlier depressive symptoms were indicative for a more severe self-reported facial scar rating. Therefore, routine psychological screening during hospitalisation is recommended in order to identify patients at risk and to optimise their treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K A Kamala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS.

  2. Effect of a local anesthetic lozenge in relief of symptoms in burning mouth syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treldal, Charlotte; Jacobsen, C B; Mogensen, Stine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS) often represent a clinical challenge as available agents for symptomatic treatment are few and often ineffective. The aim was to evaluate the effect of a bupivacaine lozenge on oral mucosal pain, xerostomia, and taste alterations in patients w...

  3. ORAL MUCOSA LESIONS AND ORAL SYMPTOMS IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE PATIENTS

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    Nuno LARANJEIRA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease is known for its extra intestinal manifestations, the oral cavity is no exception. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and oral mucosa lesions and symptoms, and complementary to evaluate their possible relation with oral hygiene, smoking habits, drug therapy, duration and activity of the disease. Methods Patients were selected from the Gastroenterology Clinic of a Portuguese tertiary referral hospital. This sample consisted of 113 patients previously diagnosed with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease along with a control group of 58 healthy individuals that were accompanying the study group patients to their appointments. Clinical interviews and clinical examinations were performed for data collection. Results The patients in the study group were more affected by oral symptoms (P=0.011, and showed a trend towards a higher incidence of oral mucosal lesions, even though statistical significance was not reached (8.8% versus 3.4% in the control group; P=0.159. Patients in active phase were the most affected. No differences were detected between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, or concerning smoking habits. The corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy seemed to increase the incidence of oral symptoms (P=0.052. The oral mucosa lesions increased and the oral symptoms decreased over the course of the disease, however without statistical significance. Conclusion Oral mucosa’s lesions and oral symptoms were positively associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, mainly during disease activity periods and conceivably, associated with corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy.

  4. Impact of facial burns : relationship between depressive symptoms, self-esteem and scar severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, Cornelis Johannes; van Baar, Margriet Elisabeth; Middelkoop, Esther; Van Loey, N.E.E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the role of self-reported facial scar severity as a possible influencing factor on self-esteem and depressive symptoms in patients with facial burns. METHOD: A prospective multicentre cohort study with a 6 months follow-up was conducted including 132 patients with faci

  5. Impact of facial burns : relationship between depressive symptoms, self-esteem and scar severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, Cornelis Johannes; van Baar, Margriet Elisabeth; Middelkoop, Esther; Van Loey, N.E.E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the role of self-reported facial scar severity as a possible influencing factor on self-esteem and depressive symptoms in patients with facial burns. METHOD: A prospective multicentre cohort study with a 6 months follow-up was conducted including 132 patients with

  6. Impact of facial burns : relationship between depressive symptoms, self-esteem and scar severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, Cornelis Johannes; van Baar, Margriet Elisabeth; Middelkoop, Esther; Van Loey, N.E.E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the role of self-reported facial scar severity as a possible influencing factor on self-esteem and depressive symptoms in patients with facial burns. METHOD: A prospective multicentre cohort study with a 6 months follow-up was conducted including 132 patients with faci

  7. [Improving myocardial mechanics parameters of severe burn rabbits with oral fluid resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jing; Zhang, Bing-qian; Wang, Guang; Luo, Zhong-hua; Zheng, Qing-yi; Zheng, Jian-sheng; Huang, Yue-sheng; Xiao, Rong

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the protective effect of oral fluid resuscitation on cardiac function in severe burn rabbits. One hundred and fifty rabbits were randomly divided into normal control group (NC group, n = 6, without treatment), burn group (B group, n = 42, without fluid therapy), immediate oral fluid resuscitation group (C group, n = 42), delayed oral fluid resuscitation group (D group, n = 30) and delayed and rapid oral fluid resuscitation group (E group, n = 30). The rabbits in B, C, D, E groups were subjected to 40% TBSA full-thickness burn, then were treated with fluid therapy immediately after burn (C group), at 6 hour after burn (D, E groups). The myocardial mechanics parameters including mean arterial pressure (MAP), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP), LV +/- dp/dt max were observed at 2, 6, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 post burn hour (PBH). Urine output was also examined. The level of LVSP, LV +/- dp/dt max in B roup were significantly lower than those in NC group. The level of LVSP, LV +/- dp/dt max in the C and E group were singnificantly increased during 24 hour after burn. The level of LV + dp/dt max and LV-dp/dt max in C group peaked at 8 PBH (892 +/- 116 kPa/s) and at 6PBH (724 +/- 149 kPa/s) respectively. The levels of LV +/- dp/dt max, LVSP in D group at each time point were similar to B group (P > 0.05). Both the levels of LV +/- dp/dt max in E group peaked at 8 PBH. The level of LVEDP was no obvious difference between B and other groups at each time point (P > 0.05). The changes of MAP and urine output on 24 PBH in each group were similar to above indices. Effective oral fluid therapy in severe burn rabbits during 24 hours after burn can ameliorate myocardial mechanics parameters. The amount of fluid resuscitation can be estimated according to relevant formula for delayed fluid resuscitation in burn rabbits.

  8. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    A burn is damage to your body's tissues caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight, or radiation. Scalds from hot ... and gases are the most common causes of burns. Another kind is an inhalation injury, caused by ...

  9. Comparison of unstimulated salivary flow rate and oral symptoms between premenopausal and postmenopausal women

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    M. Shirzaiy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dry mouth is one of the most common complications during menopause that affects quality of life as well as oral tissue dysfunction. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the unstimulated salivary flow rate and oral symptoms between premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Methods: This case-control study was conducted in 80 healthy women including 40 postmenopausal women as case group and 40 over 30-year-old premenopausal women as control group. Data were collected through a questionnaire including demographics, oral symptoms and examination. The subjects were asked to avoid eating and drinking 90 minutes before examination. The unstimulated salivary flow rate was measured by spitting method in milliliters per minute. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, Mann Whitney U test, T-test, and Spearman correlation coefficient. Findings: The mean unstimulated saliva was 0.182±0.149 ml/min and 0.304±0.129 ml/min in postmenopausal and premenopausal women, respectively and the difference was statistically significant. The prevalence of dry mouth was 45% in postmenopausal women and was 12.5% in premenopausal women. Burning sensation in mouth and change in taste sensation were 27.5% and 5% in postmenopausal women and were 2.5% and 0% in premenopausal women. There was negative significant correlation between the unstimulated salivary flow rate and age. Conclusion: The unstimulated salivary flow rate decreases after menopause. Oral symptoms are more prevalent in this period compared to before menopause. These differences may be due to hormonal changes (decreased estrogen and progesterone during menopause.

  10. Burning Mouth Syndrome and Other Oral Sensory Disorders: A Unifying Hypothesis

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    Miriam Grushka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS is a sensory disorder which results in constant, bilateral burning pain of the tongue, lips, and other oral mucous membranes. Atypical odontalgia (AO is another sensory disorder, usually defined as a toothache-like pain for which no dental cause can be identified. Previous literature has suggested that AO is often associated with a concomitant temporomandibular disorder (TMD. This hypothesis paper explores the possibility that BMS, AO and TMD can be related through hyperactivity of both the sensory and motor components of the trigeminal nerve following loss of central inhibition as a result of taste damage in the chorda tympani and/or the glossopharyngeal nerves.

  11. Comisuroplasty in a patient with microstomia caused by oral burn.

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    Nora Beatriz Sánchez

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 63 year old woman with microstomia caused by accidental swallowing of a chemical substance when she was a child is presented. The small mouth opening didn´t let her smile or receive dental services and decreased her life quality. She is remitted to Plastic Surgery Service, where an excision of scar contracture with W-plasty and bilateral commisuroplasty were made, improving oral opening from 2.5 to 4.8 cm and providing a better social environment and life quality.

  12. Burning Mouth Syndrome due to Television Moans, an Enigma for Oral Physician: Treatment with Counseling

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    Deepak Gupta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a relatively common disease that can severely affect the quality of life of the patient. It causes chronic orofacial pain or oral burning sensation even in the absence of any detectable organic cause. The etiology of BMS is complex and multifactorial. It has been associated with menopause, trigger events and even genetic polymorphisms. Although its etiology remains unclear, there is still much evidence that psychological elements like stress, anxiety or depression do play a significant role. There are several studies in the literature which only report the association of BMS with psychological factors. But to the best of our knowledge, there is no such case reported in the literature which has actually highlighted the management of such a case with psychogenic elements involved. In this case report, apart from discussing the role of psychological factors, the treatment of BMS with emphasis on counseling is also emphasized. Further, it is of interest to know that such patients with psychologically induced burning mouth syndrome have to be evaluated to their deepest details. Even their commonly overlooked gestures and habits like watching a particular television soap opera may be involved in their disease process. It can be concluded that psychological counseling in general dental practice can provide an effective cure for chronic oral burning sensation with psychological factors involved.

  13. Burning Mouth Syndrome due to Television Moans, an Enigma for Oral Physician: Treatment with Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepak; Sheikh, Soheyl; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Kasariya, Kartikaya; Buttan, Amit; Gupta, Maqul

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a relatively common disease that can severely affect the quality of life of the patient. It causes chronic orofacial pain or oral burning sensation even in the absence of any detectable organic cause. The etiology of BMS is complex and multifactorial. It has been associated with menopause, trigger events and even genetic polymorphisms. Although its etiology remains unclear, there is still much evidence that psychological elements like stress, anxiety or depression do play a significant role. There are several studies in the literature which only report the association of BMS with psychological factors. But to the best of our knowledge, there is no such case reported in the literature which has actually highlighted the management of such a case with psychogenic elements involved. In this case report, apart from discussing the role of psychological factors, the treatment of BMS with emphasis on counseling is also emphasized. Further, it is of interest to know that such patients with psychologically induced burning mouth syndrome have to be evaluated to their deepest details. Even their commonly overlooked gestures and habits like watching a particular television soap opera may be involved in their disease process. It can be concluded that psychological counseling in general dental practice can provide an effective cure for chronic oral burning sensation with psychological factors involved.

  14. Effect of curcumin in reducing burning sensation in potentially malignant disorders of oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Nigam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Curcumin, chemically named as diferuloylmethane is a yellow coloured pigment which shows anti inflammatory, antioxidant, pro apoptotic, antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activities. It suppresses cyclooxygenase, lipooxygenase and other inflammatory mediators and destroys free radicals. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of curcumin in reducing the burning sensation in potentially malignant disorders of oral cavity. Materials and Methods: 100 subjects diagnosed clinically with potentially malignant disorders of oral cavity were included in this study. The patients were administered commercially available turmeric systemically and topical application of turmeric and honey was advised. Their burning sensation on VAS scale was evaluated after 15 days, and the data was then statistically analysed by Wilcoxon sign rank test. Results: After the treatment there was a significant decrease in VAS scale. The median showed decrease from 7 to 4. The mean value also showed decrease from 6.91 to 3.98. Conclusion: Hence, it is concluded that turmeric and honey showed positive results in reducing burning sensation in potentially malignant disorders of oral cavity.

  15. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help prevent burns: Install smoke alarms in your home. Check and change batteries regularly. Teach children about fire safety and the danger of matches and fireworks. Keep children from climbing on top of a stove ...

  16. Cognitive emotion regulation strategies and neuroticism in relation to depressive symptoms following burn injury: a longitudinal study with a 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loey, Nancy E; Oggel, Anne; Goemanne, Anne-Sofie; Braem, Leen; Vanbrabant, Leonard; Geenen, Rinie

    2014-10-01

    Sustaining burns is considered a stressful life event that has the power to elicit depressive symptoms. This study aimed to identify predictors of depressive symptoms by investigating the role of demographic variables, the number of operations (burn severity), neuroticism, and cognitive emotion regulation styles as possible influencing factors. Data from 242 patients with burns were analyzed employing latent growth modeling. The level of depressive symptoms across the 2-year interval was associated with burn severity, higher levels of neuroticism and rumination, and lower levels of positive refocusing. Notably, rumination partly mediated the effect of neuroticism on the course of depressive symptoms. Correlational analysis suggested a specific effect of burn severity on rumination. The results indicate that screening for symptoms of depression, rumination, and neuroticism in burn patients is useful. Early interventions focusing on cognitive restructuring could assist in improving the cognitive emotional adaptation process following a burn event.

  17. [Oral medicine 1. Causes and clinical symptoms of dry mouth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissink, A; Visser, A; Spijkervet, F K L

    2012-10-01

    Healthcare providers do not always recognize dry mouth and the problems associated with it. The symptoms of dry mouth and the patterns of complaints associated with it are the feeling that the mouth is dry; foamy or very watery saliva; a red appearance of the mucosa under a denture and the excessive presence of remaining food particles on the mucosa or the denture. The most serious detrimental aspect of dry mouth complaints is a reduced secretion of saliva, but afeeling ofa dry mouth can also exist without an objectively assessed hyposalivation. The most important causes of dry mouth are the side effects ofmedications, systemic diseases, radiotherapy in the head and neck region and occasionally a psychiatric disorder. Early recognition of the symptoms and the establishment ofa precise diagnosis are essential for proper treatment and for optimizing the quality of life of the patient. Basic investigation consists of an extensive patient history, inspection of the head and neck region and the oral cavity, evaluation ofthefunctioning of the salivary glands, and, if necessary, additional investigations.

  18. Rethinking Individual Authorship: Robert Burns, Oral Tradition, and the Twenty-First Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Knezevich

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The songs of late-eighteenth-century Scottish poet Robert Burns provide a rich case study of literature that challenges existing notions of the author as an autonomous entity. Responding to twenty-first-century examples of contested issues of intellectual property and plagiarism in an age of digital media, this project illustrates the ways in which precepts of oral tradition can inform our thinking about cultural production within contexts seemingly permeated by ever-present literacy or text-based thinking in order to provide a new outlook on such situations of artistic borrowing or “plagiarism.”

  19. Oral symptoms and salivary findings in oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and stomatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Roen; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Reibel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    salivary concentration of total protein and sIgA than cases without contact allergy and healthy controls. METHODS: Forty-nine patients (42 women, aged 61.0 ± 10.3 years) and 29 healthy age- and gender-matched subjects underwent a standardised questionnaire on general and oral health, assessment......, but not associated with salivary gland hypofunction, numbers of systemic diseases or medications, contact allergy, age, or gender. Salivary sIgA levels were higher in patients than in healthy controls, but did not differ between patient groups. The total salivary protein concentration was lower in unstimulated...... in patients (46.9%) than in healthy controls, whereas the saliva flow rates did not differ. The patients had higher sIgA levels in unstimulated and chewing-stimulated saliva than the healthy controls. The total protein concentration in saliva was lower in the unstimulated saliva samples whereas it was higher...

  20. Oral symptoms and salivary findings in oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and stomatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Røn; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Reibel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    salivary concentration of total protein and sIgA than cases without contact allergy and healthy controls. Methods: 49 patients (42 women, aged 61.0±10.3 years) and 29 healthy age- and gender-matched subjects underwent a standardised questionnaire on general and oral health, assessment of xerostomia......, but not associated with salivary gland hypofunction, numbers of systemic diseases or medications, contact allergy, age, or gender. Salivary sIgA levels were higher in patients than in healthy controls, but did not differ between patient groups. The total salivary protein concentration was lower in unstimulated.......9%) than in healthy controls, whereas the saliva flow rates did not differ. The patients had higher sIgA levels in unstimulated and chewing-stimulated saliva than the healthy controls. The total protein concentration in saliva was lower in the unstimulated saliva samples whereas it was higher...

  1. Malnutrition in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer-prevalence and relationship with oral symptoms : an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess prevalence of malnutrition after treatment for oral/oropharyngeal cancer and to explore how oral symptoms relate to malnutrition after treatment. In this cross-sectional study, malnutrition (weight loss a parts per thousand yenaEuro parts per thousand 10% in 6 months or a

  2. Malnutrition in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer-prevalence and relationship with oral symptoms : an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess prevalence of malnutrition after treatment for oral/oropharyngeal cancer and to explore how oral symptoms relate to malnutrition after treatment. In this cross-sectional study, malnutrition (weight loss a parts per thousand yenaEuro parts per thousand 10% in 6 months or a

  3. Clinical questionnaire study of oral health care and symptoms in diabetic vs. non-diabetic predialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, Maarit; Ruokonen, Hellevi; Furuholm, Jussi; Honkanen, Eero; Meurman, Jukka H

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to study oral symptoms (burning mouth sensation, xerostomia, dysphagia, and dysgeusia) and background characteristics among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The hypothesis was that patients experience oral discomfort and show interest towards dental care differently depending on the origin of their kidney disease. One hundred thirty-eight CKD patients at predialysis stage (94 men, 44 women, mean age 54 years) at the Helsinki University Central Hospital participated in the study. The patients were divided into a diabetic nephropathy group and a group of patients with other kidney diseases. The patients had a clinical oral examination and filled in a structured questionnaire. The data were analyzed and compared between the groups (SPSS for Windows version 15.0). T test was used for parameters normally distributed while binomial data were analyzed with cross-tabulations and chi-square test. Contrary to our study hypothesis, no statistically significant differences were seen in the questionnaire study between the diabetic vs. non-diabetic CKD patients in any other study parameter except in the use of medication (10 ± 2.3 vs. 8 ± 3.1 drugs daily, p diabetic, 48.2% in non-diabetic patients). No difference was seen in the frequency of oral discomfort among the different groups of predialysis patients investigated. Clinicians should be aware of nephropathy patients who frequently suffer from oral discomfort, particularly xerostomia.

  4. Oral ketamine and dexmedetomidine in adults' burns wound dressing--A randomized double blind cross over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundra, Pankaj; Velayudhan, Savitri; Krishnamachari, Srinivasan; Gupta, Suman Lata

    2013-09-01

    Study was designed to compare analgesic efficacy and side effects of oral dexmedetomidine and ketamine in adults for burn wound dressing. Sixty healthy adults with thermal burns with burn area (20-50%) were randomly assigned into 2 groups. In Group K 5mg/kg ketamine and in Group D 4 mcg/kg dexmedetomidine was given orally. Patients crossed over to the other group the following day. Visual analogue score, sedation score, haemodynamic parameters were recorded from 30min after drug administration to 2h after procedure. Patients' preference was also recorded. Mean VAS score was significantly reduced from baseline in both the groups at all time points (Pdressing. Oral ketamine produced significantly better pain relief than dexmedetomidine but was associated with delirium and excessive salivation.

  5. Cognitive emotion regulation strategies and neuroticism in relation to depressive symptoms following burn injury: a longitudinal study with a 2-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loey, N.E.E.; Oggel, A.; Goemanne, A.S.; Braem, L.; Vanbrabant, L.; Geenen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Sustaining burns is considered a stressful life event that has the power to elicit depressive symptoms. This study aimed to identify predictors of depressive symptoms by investigating the role of demographic variables, the number of operations (burn severity), neuroticism, and cognitive emotion regu

  6. Injury-related fear-avoidance and symptoms of posttraumatic stress in parents of children with burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willebrand, M; Sveen, J

    2016-03-01

    Parents of children with burns experience a range of psychological reactions and symptoms, and parents' health is known to impact children's health. So far, there is little research into potential mechanisms that maintain parents' symptoms. The aim was to investigate parental injury-related fear-avoidance, and its associations with injury severity and health measures. Parents (n=107) of children aged 0.4-18 years that sustained burns 0.1-9.0 years previously completed questionnaires on fear-avoidance, posttraumatic stress, and health of the child. Analyses showed that the average level of fear-avoidance was low and positively associated with measures of injury severity and parents' symptoms of posttraumatic stress, and negatively associated with parents' ratings of their child's health. In two separate multiple regressions with parents' symptoms of PTSD and the child's health as dependent variables, fear-avoidance made the largest contribution in both models while injury severity was non-significant. Results were not related to comorbid conditions of the child, scarring, or parent-related socio-demographic variables. In summary, injury-related fear-avoidance is more likely among parents whose children sustain more severe burns. In turn, fear-avoidance contributes significantly to parents' symptoms of PTSD and to poorer health ratings regarding the child, irrespective of injury severity or child comorbidity.

  7. Symptoms of respiratory illness in young children and the use of wood-burning stoves for indoor heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honicky, R E; Osborne, J S; Akpom, C A

    1985-03-01

    The occurrence of symptoms of respiratory illness among preschool children living in homes heated by wood-burning stoves was examined by conducting an historical prospective study (n = 62) with an internal control group (matched for age, sex, and town of residence). Exposures of subjects were not significantly different (P greater than .05) with respect to parental smoking, urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, and use of humidifiers. The control group made significantly greater use of gas stoves for cooking whereas the study group made greater use of electric stoves for cooking and of air filters (P less than .05). Only one home used a kerosene space heater. During the winter of 1982, moderate and severe symptoms in all categories were significantly greater for the study group compared with the control group (P less than .001). These differences could not be accounted for by medical histories (eg, allergies, asthma), demographic or socioeconomic characteristics, or by exposure to sources of indoor air pollution other than wood-burning stoves. Present findings suggest that indoor heating with wood-burning stoves may be a significant etiologic factor in the occurrence of symptoms of respiratory illness in young children.

  8. Evaluation of oral-motor movements and facial mimic in patients with head and neck burns by a public service in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicarla Motta Magnani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to analyze the characteristics of oral-motor movements and facial mimic in patients with head and neck burns. METHODS: An observational descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with patients who suffered burns to the head and neck and who were referred to the Division of Orofacial Myology of a public hospital for assessment and rehabilitation. Only patients presenting deep partial-thickness and full-thickness burns to areas of the face and neck were included in the study. Patients underwent clinical assessment that involved an oral-motor evaluation, mandibular range of movement assessment, and facial mimic assessment. Patients were divided into two groups: G1 - patients with deep partial-thickness burns; G2 - patients with full-thickness burns. RESULTS: Our final study sample comprised 40 patients: G1 with 19 individuals and G2 with 21 individuals. The overall scores obtained in the clinical assessment of oral-motor organs indicated that patients with both second- and third-degree burns presented deficits related to posture, position and mobility of the oral-motor organs. Considering facial mimic, groups significantly differed when performing voluntary facial movements. Patients also presented limited maximal incisor opening. Deficits were greater for individuals in G2 in all assessments. CONCLUSION: Patients with head and neck burns present significant deficits related to posture, position and mobility of the oral myofunctional structures, including facial movements.

  9. A randomized trial of oral betamethasone to reduce ataxia symptoms in ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannolli, Raffaella; Buoni, Sabrina; Betti, Gianni; Salvucci, Sara; Plebani, Alessandro; Soresina, Annarosa; Pietrogrande, Maria C; Martino, Silvana; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Finocchi, Andrea; Micheli, Roberto; Rossi, Livia Nicoletta; Brusco, Alfredo; Misiani, Filippo; Fois, Alberto; Hayek, Joseph; Kelly, Colleen; Chessa, Luciana

    2012-09-01

    No controlled studies exist regarding the pharmaceutical reduction of ataxia symptoms in ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). In a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial, oral betamethasone (BETA) and placebo were compared in terms of their reduction of ataxia symptoms as assessed with the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS). In this study of 13 A-T children, betamethasone reduced the ICARS total score by a median of 13 points in the intent-to-treat population and 16 points in the per-protocol population (ie, median percent decreases of ataxia symptoms of 28% and 31%, respectively). In conclusion, Oral betamethasone could be a promising therapy to relieve ataxia symptoms in A-T patients; however, long-term effectiveness and safety must be established. (Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN08774933.) Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Oral health-related knowledge, attitudes and habits in relation to perceived oral symptoms among 12-year-old school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Marja-Leena; Tolvanen, Mimmi; Kivelä, Johanna; Pienihäkkinen, Kaisu; Lahti, Satu; Merne-Grafström, Marina

    2016-07-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate oral health-related knowledge, attitudes and habits and their relationship to perceived oral symptoms among 12-year-olds and differences between boys and girls. Material and methods The study population consisted of children (n = 588) in 15 randomly selected elementary schools in Turku, Finland. Associations between oral health-related habits, knowledge and attitudes with perceived oral symptoms and gender differences were evaluated with χ(2)-test, Mann-Whitney U-test and logistic regression analysis. Results Oral health promoting habits but not knowledge or attitudes associated significantly with absence of oral symptoms. Girls reported a higher percentage of several health promotional habits than boys. Girls reported more frequently gingival bleeding and less frequently dental calculus than boys did. The most common oral symptom was gingival bleeding. Conclusions The present findings suggest some gender-related differences in oral health habits, attitudes, as well as perceived oral symptoms in 12-year-olds. There seems, however, not to be gender differences in relation to knowledge or the association of health habits with perceived oral symptoms. It is important to maintain health promotion at schools and additional efforts should be aimed at translating knowledge into action.

  11. Efficacy of a new, oral estradiol acetate formulation for relief of menopause symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speroff, Leon; Haney, Arthur F; Gilbert, Richard D; Ellman, Herman

    2006-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of three doses of a new, oral formulation of estradiol acetate (EA) for alleviation of vasomotor and urogenital symptoms in postmenopausal women. Two separate 12-week studies were undertaken in postmenopausal women with moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms. In the first study, women were randomly assigned to EA 0.9 mg/day, EA 1.8 mg/day, or placebo (study 1; N = 293), and in the second study to oral EA 0.45 mg/day or placebo (study 2; N = 259). Women recorded the frequency and severity of vasomotor symptoms daily and urogenital symptoms weekly on diary cards. Investigators assessed signs of vaginal atrophy. Frequency of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms decreased significantly versus placebo, starting at week 2 in the EA 1.8-mg group (P = 0.005), week 3 in the EA 0.9-mg group (P = 0.003), and week 6 in the EA 0.45-mg group (P < 0.05). At week 12, mean percent reduction from baseline in vasomotor-symptom frequency was 91%, 78%, and 61%, respectively. Vasomotor-symptom severity decreased significantly versus placebo, starting at weeks 2 and 3 with EA 1.8 mg and 0.9 mg, respectively, and at week 5 with EA 0.45 mg. Vaginal pH and maturation index improved significantly in all EA groups versus placebo, and some signs and symptoms of vaginal atrophy improved at the EA 0.9- and 1.8-mg doses. Side effects were mild to moderate and consistent with estrogen therapy. Oral EA at all doses was well tolerated and significantly reduced the frequency and severity of postmenopause symptoms versus placebo.

  12. Analyzing small data sets using Bayesian estimation: the case of posttraumatic stress symptoms following mechanical ventilation in burn survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rens van de Schoot

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The analysis of small data sets in longitudinal studies can lead to power issues and often suffers from biased parameter values. These issues can be solved by using Bayesian estimation in conjunction with informative prior distributions. By means of a simulation study and an empirical example concerning posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS following mechanical ventilation in burn survivors, we demonstrate the advantages and potential pitfalls of using Bayesian estimation. Methods: First, we show how to specify prior distributions and by means of a sensitivity analysis we demonstrate how to check the exact influence of the prior (mis- specification. Thereafter, we show by means of a simulation the situations in which the Bayesian approach outperforms the default, maximum likelihood and approach. Finally, we re-analyze empirical data on burn survivors which provided preliminary evidence of an aversive influence of a period of mechanical ventilation on the course of PTSS following burns. Results: Not suprisingly, maximum likelihood estimation showed insufficient coverage as well as power with very small samples. Only when Bayesian analysis, in conjunction with informative priors, was used power increased to acceptable levels. As expected, we showed that the smaller the sample size the more the results rely on the prior specification. Conclusion: We show that two issues often encountered during analysis of small samples, power and biased parameters, can be solved by including prior information into Bayesian analysis. We argue that the use of informative priors should always be reported together with a sensitivity analysis.

  13. Knowledge of adults about the symptoms and risk factors of oral cancer in Zanjan city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Gholami

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion The score of knowledge of adults in Zanjan about the symptoms and risk factors of cancer was lower than the average required value in the community. It is absolutely necessary to enhance the public knowledge about oral cancer via the media.

  14. Esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms before and after oral IQoro(R) training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita; Franzén, Thomas

    2015-06-28

    To examine whether muscle training with an oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) improves esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms. A total of 43 adult patients (21 women and 22 men) were consecutively referred to a swallowing center for the treatment and investigation of long-lasting nonstenotic esophageal dysphagia. Hiatal hernia was confirmed by radiologic examination in 21 patients before enrollment in the study (group A; median age 52 years, range: 19-85 years). No hiatal hernia was detected by radiologic examination in the remaining 22 patients (group B; median age 57 years, range: 22-85 years). Before and after training with an oral IQS for 6-8 mo, the patients were evaluated using a symptom questionnaire (esophageal dysphagia and acid chest symptoms; score 0-3), visual analogue scale (ability to swallow food: score 0-100), lip force test (≥ 15 N), velopharyngeal closure test (≥ 10 s), orofacial motor tests, and an oral sensory test. Another twelve patients (median age 53 years, range: 22-68 years) with hiatal hernia were evaluated using oral IQS traction maneuvers with pressure recordings of the upper esophageal sphincter and hiatus canal as assessed by high-resolution manometry. Esophageal dysphagia was present in all 43 patients at entry, and 98% of patients showed improvement after IQS training [mean score (range): 2.5 (1-3) vs 0.9 (0-2), P dysphagia and reflux symptoms in adults, likely due to improved hiatal competence.

  15. N-acetylglucosamine increases symptoms and fungal burden in a murine model of oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishijima, Sanae A; Hayama, Kazumi; Takahashi, Miki; Holmes, Ann R; Cannon, Richard D; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    The amino sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is an in vitro inducer of the hyphal mode of growth of the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. The development of hyphae by C. albicans is considered to contribute to the pathogenesis of mucosal oral candidiasis. GlcNAc is also a commonly used nutritional supplement for the self-treatment of conditions such as arthritis. To date, no study has investigated whether ingestion of GlcNAc has an effect on the in vivo growth of C. albicans or the pathogenesis of a C. albicans infection. Using a murine model of oral candidiasis, we have found that administration of GlcNAc, but not glucose, increased oral symptoms of candidiasis and fungal burden. Groups of mice were given GlcNAc in either water or in a viscous carrier, i.e., 1% methylcellulose. There was a dose-dependent relationship between GlcNAc concentration and the severity of oral symptoms. Mice given the highest dose of GlcNAc, 45.2 mM, also showed a significant increase in fungal burden, and increased histological evidence of infection compared to controls given water alone. We propose that ingestion of GlcNAc, as a nutritional supplement, may have an impact on oral health in people susceptible to oral candidiasis.

  16. Severity of symptoms of depression among burned patients one week after injury, using Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrari, Farideh; Salehi, Seyyed Hamid; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Soltani, Madjid; Taghavi, Shahrzad; Samimi, Roghayeh

    2013-03-01

    This study was done to determine the severity of symptoms of depression in burned patients and to assess the effect of burn related factors on depression. This is a descriptive cross-sectional survey, performed in Burn center, Motahhari hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The population of the study included 300 hospitalized patients from April 2010 to May 2011 who were assessed for symptoms of depression one week after burn injury by Beck Depression Inventory-II. Three hundred subjects (50% female and 50% male) participated in the study. Age ranged from 13 to 75 with the mean of 35.06±12.79 years. 184 (61.3%) had symptoms of depression, 58 (19.3%) of them mild, 52 (17.3%) moderate and 74 (24.7%) severe depression symptoms. There was a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and age, gender, educational level, TBSA%, number of burn sites and amputation (p valueburned patients suggests that depression should be screened in such patients and treat if indicated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. [Burning mouth syndrome (glossalgia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (glossalgia) is manifested by oral pin and tingling sensations, numbness and even burning and severe pains, more frequently in the tongue. Unpleasant sensations may involve the anterior two thirds of the tongue or be extended to the front part of the hard palate and the mucous membrane of the lower lip. This condition is characterized by "mirror" and "food dominant" symptoms, disordered salivation, dysgeusia, or psychological disorders. The disease shows a chronic course. Its etiology may be multifactorial. There are no universally accepted diagnostic criteria; the diagnosis of glossalgia is made to rule out all other causes. A thorough examination should be conducted to establish a differential diagnosis. Glossalgia occurs primarily in middle-aged and elderly people. Women get sick much more frequently than men of the same age. Glossalgia remains difficult to treat. Continuous symptomatic treatment and follow-up help relieve its symptoms.

  18. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  19. A rapid, simple questionnaire to assess gastrointestinal symptoms after oral ferrous sulphate supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Dora I A; Couto Irving, Susana S; Lomer, Miranda C E; Powell, Jonathan J

    2014-06-04

    Oral iron supplementation is often associated with rapid onset of gastrointestinal side-effects. The aim of this study was to develop and trial a short, simple questionnaire to capture these early side-effects and to determine which symptoms are more discriminating. The study was a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized parallel trial with one week treatment followed by one week wash-out. Subjects were randomized into two treatment groups (n = 10/group) to receive either ferrous sulphate (200 mg capsules containing 65 mg of iron) or placebo, both to be taken at mealtimes twice daily during the treatment period. Subjects completed the questionnaires daily for 14 days. The questionnaire included gastrointestinal symptoms commonly reported to be associated with the oral intake of ferrous iron salts (i.e. nausea, vomiting, heartburn, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and constipation). Seventy five per cent of participants reporting the presence of one or more symptoms in the first week of the study were in the ferrous sulphate group. In the second week of the study (i.e. wash-out), 67% of the participants reporting one or more symptom(s) were in the ferrous sulphate group. In the first week of the study (treatment) the number of symptoms reported by participants in the ferrous sulphate group (mean ± SEM = 6.7 ± 1.7) was significantly higher than that for participants in the placebo group (1.2 ± 0.5) (p = 0.01). In the second week of the study (wash-out) the number of symptoms reported by participants in the ferrous sulphate group (4.6 ± 2.0) appeared higher than for participants in the placebo group (1.0 ± 0.7) although this did not reach significance (p = 0.12). Events for which the gastrointestinal symptom questionnaire was most discriminatory between ferrous sulphate and placebo groups were: heartburn, abdominal pain and the presence of black stools (all p ≤ 0.03). A tool for the detection of commonly-occurring side

  20. Effect of oral olive oil on healing of 10-20% total body surface area burn wounds in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmi, Mahtab; Vahdat Shariatpanahi, Zahra; Tolouei, Mohammad; Amiri, Zohreh

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of consumption of oral olive oil on clinical outcomes and wound healing of thermally injured patients with hospital stays. One hundred patients (mean age; 33.34±7 years) with 10-20% total body surface area, deep second degree and more burn wounds were randomized to receive either oral olive oil or sunflower oil as the oil in their diet. Patients were evaluated daily for occurrence of wound infection, sepsis and healing of the grafted skin. Also the duration of hospitalization and admission to the intensive care unit were compared in two groups. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the olive oil group and the control group in percent of TBSA involvement (14.28±0.53 vs. 13.02±0.48, P=0.7), albumin concentration (3.25±0.5 vs. 3.13±0.5, P=0.5) and mean calorie intake (2034±216.9 kcal vs2118±192.1 kcal, P=0.2). We found a significant difference in the duration of wound healing (7.2±0.5 vs. 8.7±0.5, P=0.04) and duration of hospitalization (7.4±0.5 vs. 8.9±0.4, P=0.05) in the olive oil group versus the control group. We did not find any difference in ICU admission, wound infection and occurrence of sepsis between two groups. This study showed that an oral diet provided with olive oil in patients with burn may accelerate wound healing and decrease the duration of hospitalization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Pediatric burn wound impetigo after grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikins, Kimberly; Prasad, Narayan; Menon, Seema; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    Modern burn care techniques have reduced the risk of infection of the acute burn wound, resulting in more rapid healing and a lower incidence of graft loss. Secondary breakdown may still occur. The loss of epithelium in association with multifocal superficial abscesses and ulceration has been termed burns impetigo. This may result in considerable morbidity and require prolonged treatment. The events preceding development, the impact on the patient, and the ideal treatment appear unclear and poorly reported. In 5 years, between 2006 and 2011, 406 pediatric burns were treated with skin grafts, with 7% developing burns impetigo. Time to resolution ranged from 5 to 241 days: the mean time to complete healing was greatest with conservative management (96 days), followed by antibacterial dressings (37 days), oral antibiotics (36 days), topical steroids (16 days), and oral antibiotics in combination with topical steroids (13.5 days). Burns impetigo resulted in significant morbidity, requiring multiple visits to the treatment center and prolonged symptoms. Delay in diagnosis and treatment resulted in worse outcomes. Prompt consideration of burns impetigo should occur when postgraft patients present with suggestive clinical signs and treatment with oral antibiotics plus topical steroids should be considered.

  2. Burnout symptom sub-types and cortisol profiles: what's burning most?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Alain; Juster, Robert-Paul; Durand, Pierre; Lupien, Sonia J

    2014-02-01

    The current study assessed which specific burnout symptoms were most predictive of distinct diurnal cortisol profiles. Participants included 401 day-shift workers employed in a random sampling of 34 Canadian workplaces. The 16-item Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to extract burnout sub-scales that included emotional exhaustion, cynicism, professional inefficacy, as well as a global burnout average. Consenting workers provided five saliva samples a day (awaking, 30 min after awaking, 1,400 h, 1,600 h, and bedtime) repeated three times over the course of a week (Saturday, Tuesday, Thursday) to capture workday and non-workday variations. Multilevel regression models were estimated from cortisol measurements at each occasion within a day at level-1, workers at level-2, and workplaces at level-3. Multilevel regression analyses found that emotional exhaustion and a global burnout showed the strongest and consistent negative associations to cortisol in the afternoon and evening. In a separate analysis using regression coefficients, emotional exhaustion and a global burnout average were associated with low cortisol levels 30 min upon awakening. By contrast, professional inefficacy was associated only with lower bedtime cortisol. No associations were detected for cynicism and sex did not emerge as a moderator in secondary analyses. Our findings are discussed in a theoretical framework postulating different pathophysiological stages of burnout development. Specifically, professional inefficacy may be the earliest warning signal culminating with emotional exhaustion that may dampen diurnal cortisol levels.

  3. Sex differences in upper respiratory symptoms prevalence and oral-respiratory mucosal immunity in endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cheng-Shiun; Bishop, Nicolette C; Handzlik, Michal K; Muhamad, Ayu S; Gleeson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine sex differences in oral-respiratory mucosal immunity and the incidence, severity and duration of upper respiratory symptoms (URS) episodes in endurance athletes during a 16-week winter training period. Blood was collected from 210 subjects (147 men and 63 women) at the start and end of the study for determination of differential leukocyte counts. Timed collections of unstimulated saliva were obtained at the start and at 4-week intervals during the study period. Saliva samples were analysed for salivary antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs). Weekly training and daily illness logs were kept using validated questionnaires. Training loads averaged 11 h/week of moderate-vigorous physical activity and were not different for males and females. The salivary concentration of lysozyme and lactoferrin (both P mucosal immunity may, in part, account for this.

  4. Comparing the Effects of Yoga & Oral Calcium Administration in Alleviating Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome in Medical Undergraduates

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta Bharati

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Medical undergraduates are heavily burdened by their curriculum. The females, in addition, suffer from vivid affective or somatic premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms such as bloating, mastalgia, insomnia, fatigue, mood swings, irritability, and depression. The present study was proposed to attenuate the symptoms of PMS by simple lifestyle measures like yoga and/or oral calcium. Methods: 65 medical female students (18-22 years) with a...

  5. MUC1 and Toll-like receptor-2 expression in burning mouth syndrome and oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Hong-Seop; Chang, Ji-Youn; Kim, Yoon-Young; Kim, Yongdae

    2013-07-01

    Expression levels of MUC1 and TLR-2 were evaluated in burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients and compared with those of controls and oral lichen planus (OLP) patients. The relationships between the expression levels of MUC1 and TLR-2 and levels of salivary pro-inflammatory cytokines were also investigated. Ten female BMS and ten female OLP patients were included. Ten female age-matched volunteers served as controls. RNA was isolated from stimulated whole saliva samples. Real-time PCR was used to quantify MUC1 and TLR-2 mRNA levels relative to β-actin and GAPDH mRNA levels. The clarified supernatants of saliva samples were used to measure IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α levels. The level of blood contamination in saliva samples was also determined. There were significant increases in MUC1 transcripts in BMS patients compared with OLP patients (1.766-fold) as well as controls (1.840-fold). There was no significant difference in TLR-2 expression among the groups. The OLP patients showed significantly higher levels of IL-6 and blood contamination in saliva than other groups. The levels of MUC1 or TLR-2 expression did not correlate significantly with the levels of cytokines or blood contamination in saliva. MUC1 may play a role in the development and/or progression of BMS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. De samenhang tussen werkstress, coping en burn-out bij fysiotherapeuten. / The relationship between work stress and concomitant symptoms of burn-out in physiotherapists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, T.A.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2000-01-01

    Studied (1) the relationship between active vs denial-focused coping strategies, work stress, and concomitant symptoms of burnout and (2) the relationship between work stress and burnout as moderated by coping. 444 male and female physiotherapists aged 24-62 yrs in the Netherlands completed the Dutc

  7. De samenhang tussen werkstress, coping en burn-out bij fysiotherapeuten. / The relationship between work stress and concomitant symptoms of burn-out in physiotherapists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, T.A.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2000-01-01

    Studied (1) the relationship between active vs denial-focused coping strategies, work stress, and concomitant symptoms of burnout and (2) the relationship between work stress and burnout as moderated by coping. 444 male and female physiotherapists aged 24-62 yrs in the Netherlands completed the

  8. Bulimia nervosa – its prevalence, symptoms and treatment with special attention to oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Osińska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bulimia nervosa is a serious and complex health problem encountered by many professionals, including general practitioners and dentists. The aim of the study was to describe the problem of bulimia (its prevalence, symptoms, special situations, treatment, with particular emphasis on the aspect of the oral health. The paper presents the causes and factors contributing to the disease, diagnostic criteria, the onset and the possible course of the disease, dental and oral mucosa pathologies due to bulimia as well as other comorbidities (including diabetes. The paper is of descriptive nature. The research method was based on the analysis of the available literature on bulimia nervosa supplemented by our own experience. It was concluded based on the analysed sources that appropriate diagnosis and treatment of bulimia nervosa is possible only with the cooperation of many specialists: psychiatrists or paediatric psychiatrists, dentists and general practitioners as well as other doctors if necessary. Psychotherapy is a necessary and integral aspect of treatment. Early treatment onset is essential for good treatment outcomes. Due to the low sense of illness, some patients would never meet a psychiatrist if not for the intervention of a family doctor or a dentist.

  9. Doxazosin oral intake therapy to relieve stent - related urinary symptoms and pain: a prospective, randomized, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Zhang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the impact of Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy on urinary symptoms and pain in patients with indwelling ureteral stents Patients and Methods: A total of 239 patients with ureteral stone-related hydronephrosis who underwent a double-J stent insertion after ureteroscopic lithotripsy were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive doxazosin cotrolled release 4 mg once daily for 4 weeks or matching placebo. Patients completed the brief-form Chinese version Ureteric Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ and quality of life (QoL score 2 weeks and 4 weeks after stent placement and 4 weeks after stent withdrawal. The analgesic use was also recorded during the stenting period. Results: Patients in Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy group, in the first 2 weeks and second 2 weeks with the stent in situ, expressed significant lower daytime frequency (p=0.028 and p=0.038, nocturia (p=0.021 and p=0.008 and urgency (p=0.012 and p=0.014, respectively. Similarly, flank pain score, QoL score and analgesic use were also significant less in the stenting period. There was no significant difference in scores of urinary symptoms, pain and QoL during the post-stent period between two cohorts. Conclusions: Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy reduced stent-related urinary symptoms, pain and the negative impact on QoL.

  10. Comparing the Effects of Yoga & Oral Calcium Administration in Alleviating Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome in Medical Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Bharati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical undergraduates are heavily burdened by their curriculum. The females, in addition, suffer from vivid affective or somatic premenstrual syndrome (PMS symptoms such as bloating, mastalgia, insomnia, fatigue, mood swings, irritability, and depression. The present study was proposed to attenuate the symptoms of PMS by simple lifestyle measures like yoga and/or oral calcium. Methods: 65 medical female students (18-22 years with a regular menstrual cycle were asked to self-rate their symptoms, along with their severity, in a validated questionnaire for two consecutive menstrual cycles. Fifty-eight students were found to have PMS. Twenty girls were given yoga training (45 minutes daily, five days a week, for three months. Another group of 20 was given oral tablets of calcium carbonate daily (500 mg, for three months and rest 18 girl served as control group. Data were analyzed by SPSS ver.13 software. Results: The yoga and calcium groups showed a significant decrease in number and severity of premenstrual symptoms whereas in the control group there was not the significant difference. Conclusion: Encouraging a regular practice of yoga or taking a tablet of calcium daily in the medical schools can decrease the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.

  11. Comparing the Effects of Yoga & Oral Calcium Administration in Alleviating Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome in Medical Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharati, Mehta

    2016-09-01

    Introduction: Medical undergraduates are heavily burdened by their curriculum. The females, in addition, suffer from vivid affective or somatic premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms such as bloating, mastalgia, insomnia, fatigue, mood swings, irritability, and depression. The present study was proposed to attenuate the symptoms of PMS by simple lifestyle measures like yoga and/or oral calcium. Methods: 65 medical female students (18-22 years) with a regular menstrual cycle were asked to self-rate their symptoms, along with their severity, in a validated questionnaire for two consecutive menstrual cycles. Fifty-eight students were found to have PMS. Twenty girls were given yoga training (45 minutes daily, five days a week, for three months). Another group of 20 was given oral tablets of calcium carbonate daily (500 mg, for three months) and rest 18 girl served as control group. Data were analyzed by SPSS ver.13 software. Results: The yoga and calcium groups showed a significant decrease in number and severity of premenstrual symptoms whereas in the control group there was not the significant difference. Conclusion: Encouraging a regular practice of yoga or taking a tablet of calcium daily in the medical schools can decrease the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.

  12. Orally administered novel cyclic pentapeptide P-317 alleviates symptoms of diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Marta; Chen, Chunqiu; Mokrowiecka, Anna; Cygankiewicz, Adam I; Zakrzewski, Piotr K; Sałaga, Maciej; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Krajewska, Wanda M; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-02-01

    The aim of our study was to characterize the effect of P-317, a novel cyclic derivative of morphiceptin, on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and abdominal pain in mouse models mimicking symptoms of diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). The effect of P-317 on mouse intestinal motility was characterized in vitro and in vivo in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The antinociceptive action of P-317 was characterized in the mustard oil-induced abdominal pain model and the writhing test. Locomotor activity and grip-strength tests were used to evaluate the effect of P-317 in the central nervous system (CNS). To translate our study to clinical conditions, the semi-quantitative expression of μ-opioid receptors (MOP) and κ-opioid receptors (KOP) messenger RNA (mRNA) in human colonic samples from IBS-D patients was quantified. In vitro, P-317 (10(-10) -10(-6) M) inhibited colonic and ileal smooth muscle contractions in a concentration-dependent, β-funaltrexamine and nor-binaltorphimine-reversible manner. In vivo, P-317 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p. and 1 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited GI transit, displayed a potent antinociceptive action in abdominal pain tests and did not influence the CNS. P-317 produced a potent analgesic and antidiarrhoeal action in the mouse GI tract after oral administration. Given lower expression of MOP and KOP mRNA in IBS-D patients, P-317 is a promising peptide-based drug candidate for IBS-D therapy. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. Oral habits and their association with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavish, A; Halachmi, M; Winocur, E; Gazit, E

    2000-01-01

    A group of 248 randomly selected high school girls, aged 15-16 years, completed a questionnaire and were examined clinically with regard to various oral habits and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Common habits reported in the literature, such as gum chewing, nail biting, biting foreign objects, clenching and bruxism, eating seeds and crushing ice, as well as two less reported habits, 'jaw play' and continuous arm leaning, were evaluated. The most outstanding finding was the high prevalence and intensity of gum chewing among our study group: 92% of the girls chewed daily and 48% chewed gum for more than 3 h a day (intensive gum chewing). Statistically significant associations were found between intensive gum chewing and muscle sensitivity (P<0.001) and joint noises (P<0. 05), and between crushing ice and muscle sensitivity to palpation (P<0.005). A positive association was found between 'jaw play' and joint disturbances: reported joint noises (P<0.01), catching of the joint (P<0.01) and joint tension (P<0.001). A positive association was also found between arm leaning and reported joint noises (P<0. 05), catching (P<0.05), and joint tension (P<0.005). There was no association between the presence of bruxism and muscle sensitivity to palpation or joint disturbances. The potential harmful effects of intensive gum chewing, 'jaw play', continuous arm leaning and ice crushing are presented in this study. In light of these findings, the professional community should address these habits with proper data gathering, examination and consultation.

  14. Association between psychosocial disorders and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a fact that mind and body share an intimate relationship. There are many ways in which mental and physical health impact each other. Psychosocial factors play a part in the pathogenesis of physical health, and oral health is no exception. Chronic and painful oral symptoms lead to psychosocial disorder and at the same time, some patients with psychosocial disorders experience painful oral and facial symptoms. Several investigators have concluded that psychosocial factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of an array of oral problems, ranging from poor oral hygiene to chronic pain disorders, such as temporomandibular joint disorders, burning mouth syndrome, and atypical pain. This review aims at the in-depth analysis of the correlation between psychosocial disorders and various oral symptoms.

  15. Recovery from Dysphagia Symptoms after Oral Endotracheal Intubation in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Survivors. A 5-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Martin B; Huang, Minxuan; Shanholtz, Carl; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Palmer, Jeffrey B; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Needham, Dale M

    2017-03-01

    Nearly 60% of patients who are intubated in intensive care units (ICUs) experience dysphagia after extubation, and approximately 50% of them aspirate. Little is known about dysphagia recovery time after patients are discharged from the hospital. To determine factors associated with recovery from dysphagia symptoms after hospital discharge for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) survivors who received oral intubation with mechanical ventilation. This is a prospective, 5-year longitudinal cohort study involving 13 ICUs at four teaching hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland. The Sydney Swallowing Questionnaire (SSQ), a 17-item visual analog scale (range, 0-1,700), was used to quantify patient-perceived dysphagia symptoms at hospital discharge, and at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months after ARDS. An SSQ score greater than or equal to 200 was used to indicate clinically important dysphagia symptoms at the time of hospital discharge. Recovery was defined as an SSQ score less than 200, with a decrease from hospital discharge greater than or equal to 119, the reliable change index for SSQ score. Fine and Gray proportional subdistribution hazards regression analysis was used to evaluate patient and ICU variables associated with time to recovery accounting for the competing risk of death. Thirty-seven (32%) of 115 patients had an SSQ score greater than or equal to 200 at hospital discharge; 3 died before recovery. All 34 remaining survivors recovered from dysphagia symptoms by 5-year follow-up, 7 (23%) after 6 months. ICU length of stay was independently associated with time to recovery, with a hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.96 (0.93-1.00) per day. One-third of orally intubated ARDS survivors have dysphagia symptoms that persist beyond hospital discharge. Patients with a longer ICU length of stay have slower recovery from dysphagia symptoms and should be carefully considered for swallowing assessment to help prevent complications related to dysphagia.

  16. Burn-Out and Depressive Symptoms in the Workforce of the Ational Institute of Eurology and Eurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Contreras, Guadalupe A.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available There are stressors arising in the workplace that influence emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and lack of personal fulfillment of workers; the most vulnerable populations are those who have contact with the public. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms and burnout syndrome in staff of the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery. The Burnout Inventory (MBI-HS and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were applied. Secretarial staff presented the higher rate of depressive symptoms. Concerning the MBI-HS differences were found regarding the lack of personal accomplishment and feelings towards patients according to the different categories of workers.

  17. Burn Pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Burn Pits Burn Pits Registry Studies Photo: U.S. Department ... the health of deployed Veterans. Health effects from burn pit smoke Toxins in burn pit smoke may ...

  18. Burn Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now Help keep local seniors safe from fire! Burn Survivor Support If you are reading this, chances ... year – a burn injury. Learn more Fire and Burn Prevention Each year, the Burn Institute provides fire ...

  19. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and oral parafunctions in urban Saudi arabian adolescents: a research report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feteih Rabab M

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and oral parafunction habits among Saudi adolescents in the permanent dentition stage. Methods A total of 385 (230 females and 155 males school children age 12–16, completed a questionnaire and were examined clinically. A stratified selection technique was used for schools allocation. Results The results showed that 21.3% of the subjects exhibited at least one sign of TMD and females were generally more affected than males. Joint sounds were the most prevalent sign (13.5% followed by restricted opening (4.7% and opening deviation (3.9%. The amplitude of mouth opening, overbite taken into consideration, was 46.5 mm and 50.2 mm in females and males respectively. TMJ pain and muscle tenderness were rare (0.5%. Reported symptoms were 33%, headache being the most frequent symptom 22%, followed by pain during chewing 14% and hearing TMJ noises 8.7%. Difficulty during jaw opening and jaw locking were rare. Lip/cheek biting was the most common parafunction habit (41% with females significantly more than males, followed by nail biting (29%. Bruxism and thumb sucking were only 7.4% and 7.8% respectively. Conclusion The prevalence of TMD signs were 21.3% with joint sounds being the most prevalent sign. While TMD symptoms were found to be 33% as, with headache being the most prevalent. Among the oral parafunctions, lip/cheek biting was the most prevalent 41% followed by nail biting 29%.

  20. [Oral symptoms and signs in patients with bulimia and anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, René L

    2006-01-01

    There are numerous general clinical manifestations in eating disorders, such as anorexia and nervous bulimia, which are fully described in the reading material. The objective of this study is to demonstrate that patients suffering from anorexia and nervous bulimia present manifestations in the oral mucosa and a proper anamnesis can lead to an early disease diagnosis. The clinical cases presented show some of the oral manifestations in patients suffering from these disorders. Abrasion of teeth enamel is a typical sign of this disease, specially in patients with nervous bulimia, caused by self-induced vomit acids. However, this sign does not help to make an early disease diagnosis, since the acid takes a long time to produce demineralization.

  1. Reversible worsening of Parkinson disease motor symptoms after oral intake of Uncaria tomentosa (cat's claw).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (UT), also known as cat's claw, isa Peruvian Rubiaceae species widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide range of health problems. There is no report about the use, safety, and efficacy of UT in neurological disorders. We describe reversible worsening of motor signs in a patient with Parkinson disease after oral intake of UT, and some possible explanations are discussed.

  2. [The pain from burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, J

    2002-03-01

    The painful events associated with the treatment of a severe burn can, because of their long-lasting and repetitive characteristics, be one of the most excruciating experiences in clinical practice. Moreover, burn pain has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Although nociception and peripheral hyperalgesia are considered the major causes of burn pain, the study of more hypothetical mechanisms like central hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain may lead to a better understanding of burn pain symptoms and to new therapeutic approaches. Continuous pain and intermittent pain due to therapeutic procedures are two distinct components of burn pain. They have to be evaluated and managed separately. Although continuous pain is by far less severe than intermittent pain, the treatment is, in both cases, essentially pharmacological relying basically on opioids. Because of wide intra- and inter-individual variations, protocols will have to leave large possibilities of adaptation for each case, systematic pain evaluation being mandatory to achieve the best risk/benefit ratio. Surprisingly, the dose of medication decreases only slowly with time, a burn often remaining painful for long periods after healing. Non pharmacological treatments are often useful and sometimes indispensable adjuncts; but their rationale and their feasibility depends entirely on previous optimal pharmacological control of burn pain. Several recent studies show that burn pain management is inadequate in most burn centres.

  3. Self-reported temporomandibular joint disorder symptoms, oral health, and quality of life of children in kindergarten through grade 5: Do sex, race, and socioeconomic background matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglehart, Marita R; Patel, Manan H; Widmalm, Sven-Erik; Briskie, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    The authors' objectives were to determine the percentage of children in kindergarten through grade 5 who reported symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD); to assess whether sex, race, and socioeconomic background mattered; and to explore the relationships between TMJD and children's oral health and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). The research team conducted face-to-face interviews with 8,302 children in kindergarten through grade 5 (51% female, 49% male; 53% African American, 42% white). They conducted oral health screenings with 7,439 children. Overall, 23.6% of the children reported pain when chewing tough food, and 18.8% reported pain when opening their mouth wide; 23.2% reported hearing a sound (clicking) when opening their mouth wide. Female students were more likely than male students and African American children were more likely than white children to report TMJD symptoms. The prevalence of TMJD symptoms did not correlate with whether the children had a need for oral health care services or whether they had an abscess or carious teeth with pulpal involvement. TMJD symptoms were associated significantly with children's OHRQoL. Considerable percentages of 4- to 12-year-old children reported TMJD symptoms, with girls and African American children being more likely than their counterparts to be affected. Experiencing TMJD symptoms was associated significantly with poorer OHRQoL. Dental practitioners need to be aware that substantial percentages of kindergarten and elementary school-aged children experience TMJD symptoms. Taking a dental history and conducting an oral examination, therefore, should include assessments of the signs and symptoms of TMJD; treatment recommendations should be provided for affected children. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms, Burn-Out, and Compassion Satisfaction Among Body Handlers: The Mediating Role of Sense of Coherence and Spirituality at Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerach, Gadi; Levin, Yafit

    2015-12-17

    This study assessed posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), burn-out (BO), and compassion satisfaction (CS) among Israeli body handlers. We aimed to explore differences between two groups of Orthodox Jewish male volunteers: the "ZAKA" body handlers (ZAs: n = 102), and a comparison group of charity workers (CWs: n = 101). Furthermore, we assessed the contribution of two potential resilience buffers-sense of coherence (SOC) and spirituality at the workplace (SAW)-to PTSS, BO, and CS among these volunteers via self-report measures. Surprisingly, results show that ZAs reported significantly lower levels of PTSS and BO as compared with CWs. ZAs also reported significantly higher levels of CS as compared with CWs. Importantly, SOC mediated the link between groups and PTSS and BO. Both SOC and SAW mediated the link between groups and CS. These findings suggest that "ZAKA" body handlers demonstrate substantial resilience following repeated exposure to death and atrocities. To reduce work-related psychological distress and improve CS, SOC and SAW should be taken into account in the process of recruitment and training of body handlers.

  5. Prospective study of the influence of psychological and medical factors on quality of life and severity of symptoms among patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, M; Kanatas, A; Herzberg, P Y; Khoschdell, M; Kokemueller, H; Gellrich, N-C; Rana, M

    2015-04-01

    About 400,000 people worldwide are diagnosed with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) annually, and the incidence is increasing. Many advanced carcinomas of the oral cavity require radical surgical treatment that can impair patient's quality of life (QoL) and severity of symptoms. We therefore aimed to identify coping strategies and disease-specific medical factors that affect QoL and severity of symptoms. Patients with oral SCC were asked to complete the Freiburg Questionnaire on Coping with Illness (FQCI), the University of Washington Quality of life Questionnaire (UW-QOL version 4), and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) to measure psychological stress. We also assessed the impact of various factors on QoL and severity of symptoms, including stage and site of tumour, method of reconstruction, time of diagnosis, and social structure (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, level of education, and employment). We enrolled a consecutive sample of 104 patients over a period of one year. Stepwise linear regression analyses indicated that both depressive coping and size of tumour had an adverse effect on QoL and severity of symptoms. Patients with high educational attainment and those who lived alone reported impaired QoL, and women experienced increased severity of symptoms. Impaired QoL and increased severity of symptoms were associated with a depressive style of coping, size of tumour, educational attainment, and living arrangements. It is important to identify these patients during treatment as they could benefit from psycho-oncological counselling.

  6. Driving under the influence of drugs -- evaluation of analytical data of drugs in oral fluid, serum and urine, and correlation with impairment symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toennes, Stefan W; Kauert, Gerold F; Steinmeyer, Stefan; Moeller, Manfred R

    2005-09-10

    A study was performed to acquire urine, serum and oral fluid samples in cases of suspected driving under the influence of drugs of abuse. Oral fluid was collected using a novel sampling/testing device (Dräger DrugTest System). The aim of the study was to evaluate oral fluid and urine as a predictor of blood samples positive for drugs and impairment symptoms. Analysis for cannabinoids, amphetamine and its derivatives, opiates and cocaine was performed in urine using the Mahsan Kombi/DOA4-test, in serum using immunoassay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmation and in oral fluid by GC-MS. Police and medical officer observations of impairment symptoms were rated and evaluated using a threshold value for the classification of driving inability. Accuracy in correlating drug detection in oral fluid and serum were >90% for all substances and also >90% in urine and serum except for THC (71.0%). Of the cases with oral fluid positive for any drug 97.1% of corresponding serum samples were also positive for at least one drug; of drug-positive urine samples this were only 82.4%. In 119 of 146 cases, impairment symptoms above threshold were observed (81.5%). Of the cases with drugs detected in serum, 19.1% appeared not impaired which were the same with drug-positive oral fluid while more persons with drug-positive urine samples appeared uninfluenced (32.7%). The data demonstrate that oral fluid is superior to urine in correlating with serum analytical data and impairment symptoms of drivers under the influence of drugs of abuse.

  7. Cow milk allergy symptoms are reduced in mice fed dietary synbiotics during oral sensitization with whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Bastiaan; van Esch, Betty C A M; Hofman, Gerard A; van Doorn, Suzan A C M; Knol, Jan; Nauta, Alma J; Garssen, Johan; Willemsen, Linette E M; Knippels, Léon M J

    2009-07-01

    Cow milk allergy is the most common food allergy in children. So far, no effective treatment is available to prevent or cure food allergy. The purpose of this study was to compare effects of dietary supplementation with a prebiotic mixture (Immunofortis), a probiotic strain [Bifidobacterium breve M-16V], or a synbiotic diet combining both on the outcome of the allergic response when provided during oral sensitization with whey in mice. Mice were fed diets containing 2% (wt:wt) Immunofortis and/or the B. breve M-16V (n = 6/group). The acute allergic skin response was determined by measuring ear swelling. Antigen-induced anaphylaxis was scored. Furthermore, whey-specific serum immunoglobulins and mouse mast cell protease-1 (mMCP-1) were determined. In mice fed the synbiotic mixture, the allergic skin response and the anaphylactic reaction were strongly reduced compared with whey-sensitized mice fed the control diet (P whey-specific IgE and IgG(1) responses were not affected; however, IgG(2a) was greater in all treated groups than in the control group (P < 0.05). Serum mMCP-1 concentrations, reflecting mucosal mast cell degranulation, were lower in mice fed synbiotics compared with those fed the control diet (P < 0.01). Dietary supplementation with Immunofortis, B. breve M-16V, and particularly the synbiotic mixture, provided during sensitization, reduces the allergic effector response in a murine model of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity that mimics the human route of sensitization. This model shows the potential for dietary intervention with synbiotics in reducing the allergic response to food allergens.

  8. Oral medicine and the ageing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, T; McCullough, M

    2015-03-01

    The oral cavity is subject to age related processes such as cellular ageing and immunosenescence. The ageing population bears an increased burden of intraoral pathology. In oral medicine, the majority of presenting patients are in their fifth to seventh decade of life. In this review, we discuss the ageing population's susceptibility to mucosal disorders and the increased prevalence of potentially malignant disorders and oral squamous cell carcinoma, as well as dermatoses including oral lichen planus and immunobullous conditions. We also address the ageing population's susceptibility to oral discomfort and explore salivary secretion, ulceration and the symptoms of oral burning. Finally, we will describe orofacial pain conditions which are more likely encountered in an older population. This update highlights clinical presentations which are more likely to be encountered in the ageing population in a general practice setting and the importance of screening both new and long-term patients.

  9. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in Childhood: Review, Symptoms in the Oral Cavity, Differential Diagnosis and Report of One Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shooriabi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disease in which monoclonal migration and proliferation of specific dendritic cells is seen. The disease primarily affects the bones and skin, but there is a possibility that involves other organs or appears as a multi-systemic disease. Case Report In oral examination of a nine-month girl, two deep wounds with a yellow membrane with approximate size of 1 × 1 cm on both sides of mandibular alveolar ridge were seen. The edges of the wounds were swollen and proliferated and redder than the surrounding mucosa. At the touch the edges of the wound were not indurated. The wound were created from the third-month and the size of wounds had become slightly larger within 6 months. According to the chronic wound and being non-responsive to various systemic and local treatments, incisional biopsy was taken from the wounds. Langerhans cell histiocytosis was confirmedhistologically and immune histochemically. Conclusion Mouth ulcers may be the only symptoms of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Therefore, the role of dentist could be important in diagnosis of this disease.

  10. Incidence and time course of extrapyramidal symptoms with oral and long-acting injectable paliperidone: a posthoc pooled analysis of seven randomized controlled studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Srihari Gopal,1 Yanning Liu,1 Larry Alphs,2 Adam Savitz,1 Isaac Nuamah,1 David Hough1 1Janssen Research and Development, LLC, Raritan, 2Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to compare incidence rates and time course of extrapyramidal symptom (EPS-related treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs between oral and long-acting injectable (LAI paliperidone. Methods: The analysis included pooled data (safety analysis set, 2,256 antipsychotic-treated and 865 placebo-treated patients with schizophrenia from seven randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled paliperidone studies (three oral [6 weeks each] and four LAI [9–13 weeks] and assessed comparable doses (oral, 3–15 mg; LAI, 25–150 mg eq. [US doses 39–234 mg]. We summarized incidence rates and time of onset for EPS-related TEAE, categorized by EPS group terms, ie, tremor, dystonia, hyperkinesia, parkinsonism, and dyskinesia, and use of anti-EPS medication. Mean scores over time for the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS, for dyskinesia, Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale (BARS, for akathisia, and Simpson Angus Rating Scale (SAS, for parkinsonism were graphed. Results: Incidence rates for all categories of spontaneously reported EPS-related TEAEs except for hyperkinesia, were numerically lower in pooled LAI studies than in pooled oral studies. Highest rates were observed in the first week of paliperidone-LAI (for all EPS symptoms except dyskinesia and oral paliperidone treatment (except parkinsonism and tremor. Anti-EPS medication use was significantly lower in LAI (12% versus oral studies (17%, P = 0.0035. Mean values for EPS scale scores were similar between LAI and oral treatment at endpoint, and no dose response was evident. Mean reductions (standard deviation from baseline to endpoint in EPS scale scores were larger for LAI (AIMS, −0.10 [1.27]; BARS, −0.09 [1.06]; SAS, −0.04 [0.20] versus oral studies (AIMS, −0.08 [1

  11. Scald Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safety Tips & Info Scald Burns Thousands of scald burns occur annually, and ALL are preventable! The two high-risk populations are children under the age ... the single most important factor in preventing scald burns. Increased awareness is the key to scald prevention! ...

  12. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 (VHNSS 2.0 for the assessment of oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Marçon Barroso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Patients submitted to radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer have several symptoms, predominantly oral. The Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 is an American tool developed to evaluate oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to translate the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 into Brazilian Portuguese and cross-culturally adapt this tool for subsequent validation and application in Brazil. METHODS: A method used for the translation and cultural adaptation of tools, which included independent translations, synthesis of the translations, back-translations, expert committee, and pre-test, was used. The pre-test was performed with 37 head and neck cancer patients, who were divided into four groups, to assess the relevance and understanding of the assessed items. Data were submitted to descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: The overall mean of the content validity index was 0.79 for semantic and idiomatic equivalence, and it was higher than 0.8 for cultural and conceptual equivalence. The cognitive interview showed that patients were able to paraphrase the items, and considered them relevant and easily understood. CONCLUSION: The tool was translated and cross-culturally adapted to be used in Brazil. The authors believe this translation is suited for validation.

  13. Oral administration of French maritime pine bark extract (Flavangenol® improves clinical symptoms in photoaged facial skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furumura M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Minao Furumura,1,2 Noriko Sato,1 Nobutaka Kusaba,3 Kinya Takagaki,3 Juichiro Nakayama11Department of Dermatology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, 2Department of Dermatology, Kurume University School of Medicine and Kurume University Institute of Cutaneous Cell Biology, Fukuoka, 3Toyo Shinyaku Co Ltd, Tosu City, Saga, JapanBackground: French maritime pine bark extract (PBE has gained popularity as a dietary supplement in the treatment of various diseases due to its polyphenol-rich ingredients. Oligometric proanthocyanidins (OPCs, a class of bioflavonoid complexes, are enriched in French maritime PBE and have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Previous studies have suggested that French maritime PBE helps reduce ultraviolet radiation damage to the skin and may protect human facial skin from symptoms of photoaging. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of French maritime PBE in the improvement of photodamaged facial skin, we conducted a randomized trial of oral supplementation with PBE.Methods: One hundred and twelve women with mild to moderate photoaging of the skin were randomized to either a 12-week open trial regimen of 100 mg PBE supplementation once daily or to a parallel-group trial regimen of 40 mg PBE supplementation once daily.Results: A significant decrease in clinical grading of skin photoaging scores was observed in both time courses of 100 mg daily and 40 mg daily PBE supplementation regimens. A significant reduction in the pigmentation of age spots was also demonstrated utilizing skin color measurements.Conclusion: Clinically significant improvement in photodamaged skin could be achieved with PBE. Our findings confirm the efficacy and safety of PBE.Keywords: polyphenols, pine bark extract, skin photoaging, antioxidants, antiaging

  14. Burn Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Aydemir

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are important in terms of causing serious disability and threatening life. With the establishment of modern burn treatment units and advances in acute care management contributed to a reduced mortality rate over the last decades. As a result of improved outcome, more attention has to be given to a comprehensive burn rehabilitation program. Burn rehabilitation is a process that starts from day of admission and continues for months or sometimes years after the initial event. The term ‘burn rehabilitation’ incorporates the physical, physiological and social aspects of care. Burns can leave a patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. Burn rehabilitation aims to prevent the possible complications, minimalize joint contractures and deformities, increase range of motion, control hypertrophic scarring, achieve the best possible functional capacity and to regain the patients vocational and recreational activities. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 70-7

  15. Use of the Beck Depression Inventory for assessing depression in patients hospitalized with severe burn. Disentangling symptoms of depression from injury and treatment factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Brett D

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) are biased by injury severity among hospitalized survivors of burn (N=262). A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) model was developed with a general depression factor that loaded on all items and somatic and cognitive factors that were orthogonal to the general factor and to each other. The model fit the data well and substantially better than an alternative three-factor model with correlated factors. Percent total body surface area burned (TBSA) was significantly associated with the general depression factor (p=.04), but also with the orthogonal somatic factor (pburn injury. Analysis of item communalities, however, suggested that only approximately 2% of total predicted item variance was associated with bias related to injury severity. It was concluded that, despite a small amount of bias, the BDI is a reasonably accurate clinical tool even in the context of severe burn. Appropriate adjustments for bias, however, should be made in research with the BDI among patients with acute burn.

  16. Rebamipide to Manage Stomatopyrosis in Oral Submucous Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptist, Joanna; Shakya, Shrijana; Ongole, Ravikiran

    2016-12-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) causes progressive debilitating symptoms, such as oral burning sensation (stomatopyrosis) and limited mouth opening. The standard of care (SOC) protocol includes habit cessation, intralesional steroid and hyaluronidase injections, and mouth opening exercises. The objective of the study was to evaluate efficacy of rebamipide in alleviating burning sensation of the oral mucosa in OSF in comparison with SOC intralesional steroid injections. Twenty OSF patients were divided into two groups [rebamipide (100 mg TID for 21 days) and betamethasone (4 mg/mL biweekly for 4 weeks)] of 10 each by random sampling. Burning sensation was assessed every week for 1 month. Burning sensation scores were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-test. Change in burning sensation score was significant (p 0.05). Our study has shown that rebamipide can be considered as an effective modality to manage burning sensation in patients suffering from OSF. Considering stomatopyrosis and trismus as a major cause for inability to eat in OSF, use of newer adjunctive modalities, such as rebamipide will ease patients suffering and also encourage them to consume food.

  17. Maintaining women's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  18. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  19. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  20. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order Publications ...

  1. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order Publications English and Spanish brochures available free ...

  2. Efficacy and safety of solifenacin plus tamsulosin oral controlled absorption system in men with lower urinary tract symptoms: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chao Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We performed a meta-analysis to compare treatment with a combination of solifenacin plus tamsulosin oral controlled absorption system (TOCAS with placebo or TOCAS monotherapy. The aim of the meta-analysis was to clarify the efficacy and safety of the combination treatments method for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. We searched for trials of men with LUTS that were randomized to combination treatment compared with TOCAS monotherapy or placebo. We pooled data from three placebo-controlled trials meeting inclusion criteria. Primary outcomes of interest included changes in International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS and urinary frequency. We also assessed postvoid residual, maximum urinary flow rate, incidence of urinary retention (UR, adverse events. Data were pooled using random or fixed effect models for continuous outcomes and the Mantel-Haenszel method to generate risk ratio. Reductions in IPSS storage subscore and total urgency and frequency score (TUFS were observed with solifenacin 6 mg plus TOCAS compared with placebo (P< 0.0001 and P< 0.0001, respectively. Reductions in IPSS storage subscore and TUFS were observed with solifenacin 9 mg plus TOCAS compared with placebo (P = 0.003 and P= 0.0006, respectively. Reductions in TUFS was observed with solifenacin 6 mg plus TOCAS compared with TOCAS (P = 0.01. Both combination treatments were well tolerated, with low incidence of UR. Solifenacin 6 mg plus TOCAS significantly improved total IPSS, storage and voiding symptoms compared with placebo. Solifenacin 6 mg plus TOCAS also improved storage symptoms compared with TOCAS alone. There was no additional benefit of solifenacin 9 mg compared with 6 mg when used in combination with TOCAS.

  3. Efficacy and safety of solifenacin plus tamsulosin oral controlled absorption system in men with lower urinary tract symptoms: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Chao; Wang, Zheng-Yun; Yang, Jun; Guo, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Shao-Gang; Liu, Ji-Hong; Ye, Zhang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    We performed a meta-analysis to compare treatment with a combination of solifenacin plus tamsulosin oral controlled absorption system (TOCAS) with placebo or TOCAS monotherapy. The aim of the meta-analysis was to clarify the efficacy and safety of the combination treatments method for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). We searched for trials of men with LUTS that were randomized to combination treatment compared with TOCAS monotherapy or placebo. We pooled data from three placebo-controlled trials meeting inclusion criteria. Primary outcomes of interest included changes in International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and urinary frequency. We also assessed postvoid residual, maximum urinary flow rate, incidence of urinary retention (UR), adverse events. Data were pooled using random or fixed effect models for continuous outcomes and the Mantel-Haenszel method to generate risk ratio. Reductions in IPSS storage subscore and total urgency and frequency score (TUFS) were observed with solifenacin 6 mg plus TOCAS compared with placebo (P< 0.0001 and P< 0.0001, respectively). Reductions in IPSS storage subscore and TUFS were observed with solifenacin 9 mg plus TOCAS compared with placebo (P = 0.003 and P= 0.0006, respectively). Reductions in TUFS was observed with solifenacin 6 mg plus TOCAS compared with TOCAS (P = 0.01). Both combination treatments were well tolerated, with low incidence of UR. Solifenacin 6 mg plus TOCAS significantly improved total IPSS, storage and voiding symptoms compared with placebo. Solifenacin 6 mg plus TOCAS also improved storage symptoms compared with TOCAS alone. There was no additional benefit of solifenacin 9 mg compared with 6 mg when used in combination with TOCAS.

  4. Treating burns caused by hydrofluoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is an ingredient of many common household and industrial solutions. Even seemingly minor burns caused by this acid can have catastrophic effects if they are treated inappropriately or late. This article describes the signs and symptoms, the pathophysiology and the emergency management of hydrofluoric acid burns.

  5. Trimethoprim-induced hyperkalemia in burn patients treated with intravenous or oral trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other infections: nature or nurture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Bruce H; Patton, Mary L; Guilday, Robert E; Haith, Linwood R; Stair-Buchmann, Megan; Reigart, Cynthia L

    2013-01-01

    Trimethoprim is well known to cause rashes; however, what is not commonly known is that it causes sudden and profound hyperkalemia in 10 to 20% of treated patients. The uniqueness of burn patients begs the question whether changes known to occur in these patients might also increase this trimethoprim effect. After institutional review board approval, a retrospective study evaluated 224 patients with thermal injury who had been treated with trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), 24 of whom had underlying renal impairment (creatinine clearances drug-induced hyperkalemia were used: 1) a ≥ 1 mEq/L rise, 2) a >0.8 mEq rise in potassium in hyperkalemia defined as serum potassium of ≥ 5.5 mEq/L within 48 hours. A potassium level before trimethoprim exposure (TxK) and after TxK were collected retrospectively. Demographic data were analyzed with Student's t-test and trimethoprim dose alone, demonstrating a significant difference. Analysis of 200 patients exposed to trimethoprim demonstrated an elevation of potassium (first definition) in 31 patients (15.5%), a rapid change in serum potassium in two patients (second definition), and marked hyperkalemia (>5.5 mEq/L) in 13 patients (6.5%). Hyperkalemia never occurred in 166 of 200 patients (82%; before TxK, 3.9 ± 0.4; after TxK, 4.3 ± 0.5 mEq/L). Change in serum potassium among patients with hyperkalemia was 4.0 ± 0.5 mEq/L before TxK and 5.3 ± 0.7 mEq/L after TxK. Twelve published hyperkalemia risk factors were reviewed in these 200 patients and only history of hypertension and need for intubation was more common in those with hyperkalemia. A nearly 20% incidence of hyperkalemia and 6% serious hyperkalemia in burn patients is consistent with reports in patients without burn injury. These data also suggest that the metabolic and hormonal changes associated with burn injury do not increase further the genetically predisposed hyperkalemia resulting from exposure to trimethoprim. These data suggest patients treated with

  6. Burns (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > Burns A A A What's ... outlets, etc.) overexposure to the sun Types of Burns Burns are often categorized as first-, second-, or ...

  7. Hibiscus sabdariffa increases hydroxocobalamin oral bioavailability and clinical efficacy in vitamin B12 deficiency with neurological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souirti, Zouhayr; Loukili, Mouna; Soudy, Imar D; Rtibi, Kaies; Özel, Aslihan; Limas-Nzouzi, Nicolas; El Ouezzani, Seloua; Eto, Bruno

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the bioavailability and clinical benefits of oral new formulation (HB12 ) of hydroxocobalamin (Hdrx) with Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS). First, in an observational study, a cohort of 30 vitamin B12 -deficient patients (vit B12 vitamin B12 level increased from 55.1 ± 36.9 to 1330 ± 335.5 pg/mL at day 10 and 431.0 ± 24.27 pg/mL at day 90, without overt adverse effects. In mice ileum, (i) intestinal bioavailability of Hdrx increased in dose-dependent manner with HB12 . The apparent permeability of Hdrx was Papp = 34.9 ± 4.6 × 10(-6) cm/s in the presence of 3 mg/mL (HB12 B) compared to the control Papp = 6.2 ± 0.7 × 10(-6) cm/s. (ii) Total transepithelial electrical conductance (Gt ) increased in dose-dependent manner with HB12 , Gt = 161.5 ± 10.8 mS/cm² with HB12 B (Hdrx 1 mg + HS 3 mg) compared to the control Hdrx, Gt = 28.7 ± 4.0 mS/cm². In conclusion, the clinical study suggests that injections are not required when Hdrx is given orally. Intestinal bioavailability of Hdrx increased in vitro when it was used concomitantly with HS. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  8. A Comparative Efficacy of Low-Dose Combined Oral Contraceptives Containing Desogestrel and Drospirenone in Premenstrual Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirath Wichianpitaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the efficacy of low-dose COC containing desogestrel (DSG with drospirenone (DRSP in the changes of premenstrual symptoms. Methods. In an open-label randomized controlled trial, 90 women with premenstrual syndrome who required COC were randomly recruited and allocated equally to receive either 6 cycles of 20 micrograms ethinyl estradiol (EE/150 micrograms DSG (DSG group or 20 micrograms EE/3 mg DRSP (DRSP group in 24/4 extended regimen. Analysis of covariance and repeated analysis of variance were used to determine the difference of mean Women's Health Assessment Questionnaire (WHAQ scores changes between groups, within group, and in premenstrual, menstrual, and postmenstrual phases. Results. Baseline characteristics and WHAQ scores were comparable. At the ends of the 3rd and the 6th cycles, mean WHAQ scores of all the 3 phases in DRSP group showed significant reduction and were significantly lower than those in DSG group. DSG group showed significant reduction in both premenstrual and menstrual phases after the 6th cycle. Adverse effects were comparable in both groups. In conclusion, low-dose COC containing either DSG or DRSP reduced premenstrual symptoms, but the latter showed greater efficacy and earlier reduction.

  9. Effects of Nasal Calcitonin vs. Oral Gabapentin on Pain and Symptoms of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Clinical Trial Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Kaveh; Asadian, Leila; Isazade, Ahdie

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a chronic and prevalent disease that occurs in 10.8% of the general population, mostly in old age. We designed the first clinical trial study to compare the effects of administering the nasal salmon calcitonin spray and gabapentin in patients with LSS. In this clinical trial, 90 patients with symptoms of neurogenic claudication and magnetic resonance imaging-proven LSS were randomly assigned to nasal salmon calcitonin, gabapentin, or placebo treatments for eight weeks (30 participants in each group). This was followed by a washout period of four weeks. After three months of study and after four weeks off the prescription, mean values of Oswestry Disability Index in the calcitonin, gabapentin, and control groups were 23 ± 12.05, 32 ± 16.08, and 38 ± 22.09, respectively (P ≤ 0.05, calcitonin group vs. gabapentin group, and P ≤ 0. 001, calcitonin group vs. control group with respect to pretreatment scores). Thus, three months after the treatment, although most of the patients in the control group had a satisfactory period of improvement, the improvement in the calcitonin group was more than the other two groups with a significant difference (P ≤ 0.05 when compared to gabapentin group and P ≤ 0.01 when compared to placebo group). We revealed that the 200 International Unit (IU) and nasal calcitonin spray daily are more effective compared to 300 mg gabapentin three times per day and the placebo effect for eight weeks of treatment of symptoms of patients with LSS.

  10. Burning vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Priyanka; Hobday, Dorian; O'Connor, Edmund Fitzgerald; D'Cruz, David

    2016-04-26

    We present the case of a 69-year-old man who was found collapsed close to a heat source and admitted to hospital for severe sepsis. He was also found to have widespread blistering and ulceration of his right leg; however, a history was unobtainable due to reduced consciousness levels. The leg lesions had the initial appearance of mixed depth burns and a management plan was made to transfer the patient to a burns unit for debridement. It was subsequently noted that the patient had a previous diagnosis of seropositive erosive rheumatoid arthritis. A biopsy of the leg lesion was performed and a diagnosis of rheumatoid vasculitis confirmed. Treatment with systemic steroids, intravenous antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for severe hypogammaglobulinaemia was started, and the patient was not transferred for surgical debridement. Rheumatoid vasculitis is a rare and extremely serious complication of rheumatoid arthritis that can manifest in a number of ways, occasionally mimicking other conditions. This case is essential to raise awareness of rare, severe rheumatoid vasculitis and of the potential for its misdiagnosis as a mixed depth burn.

  11. Epidemiological and etiological aspects of burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coculescu, E C; Tovaru, S; Coculescu, B I

    2014-09-15

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is defined as a chronic pain condition characterized by a burning sensation in clinically healthy oral mucosa. Incidence BMS diagnosed in the Department of Oral Medicine - Oral Pathology Dental Faculty of Medicine, "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy Bucharest is 16,23%. The etiology of BMS remains far less known. This article makes an overview of the latest theories about possible etiopathogenic factors involved in the occurrence of BMS.

  12. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected ...

  13. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected ...

  14. Oral findings in postmenopausal women attending dental hospital in Western part of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, Patil; Nidhi, Sinha; Sumita, Kaswan; Farzan, Rahman; Bharati, Doni; Ashok, Kp

    2013-02-01

    To know the nature, incidence and severity of oral manifestations occurring in postmenopausal women. Oral changes were observed in 365 postmenopausal women and 365 age matched male individuals attending the department of Oral Medicine and Radiology. The patients were asked about complaints of dry mouth, taste and breath changes, mucosal and facial pain and were examined for oral changes such as ulceration, white and red lesions. The results obtained from the study were then correlated with various other similar studies. The important oral findings in postmenopausal women were mucosal burning/pain (25.8%), dry mouth (27.1%), altered taste (3.6%), altered breath (6.3%) and facial pain (3.6%). Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) was significantly more common in males (5.5%) as compared to postmenopausal females (1.9%). Results from the present study reveal that oral symptoms are common problems in postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal patients showed significantly more oral changes than the control. These changes could be related to the hormone alterations. Therefore, dentists need to refer postmenopausal women with oral symptoms to a gynaecologist for more careful examinations and medical interventions if necessary. Key words:Menopause; postmenopause; xerostomia; pallor; oral changes.

  15. Effects of oral fluid resuscitation on circulatory oxygen dynamic parameters in dogs with burn shock%口服补液对犬50%TBSA烧伤休克期循环氧动力学指标的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡森; 林凯; 车晋伟; 田易军; 盛志勇

    2009-01-01

    目的 研究口服补液对50%TBSA烧伤休克期循环氧动力学指标的影响,为提高烧伤休克口服补液的复苏效果提供依据.方法 成年雄性Beagle犬18只,先期无菌手术行颈动、静脉置管,24 h后用凝固汽油燃烧法造成50%体表面积Ⅲ度烧伤.随机分为不补液组(n=6)、口服补液组(n=6)和静脉补液组(n=6).伤后第一个24 h不补液组无治疗,口服补液组和静脉补液组根据Parkland公式分别从胃内或静脉输注葡萄糖-电解质溶液;伤后24 h起三组均实施延迟静脉补液.测定动物非麻醉状态下的平均动脉压(MAP)、红细胞压积(HCT)和血乳酸(LAC)含量,抽取动脉和混合静脉血测定动、静脉氧分压和血氧含量.计算氧供量(DO2)、氧耗量(VO2)和氧摄取(Oext),并统计3 d死亡率.结果 不补液组伤后8 h MAP比伤前降低77.1%,HCT和血乳酸分别升高48.5%和533.7%;DO2,VO2和Oext水平伤后进行性降低,24 h内动物全部死亡.两补液组上述指标逐渐恢复,伤后72 hMAP和HCT恢复至伤前(P>0.05),但血乳酸水平仍显著高于伤前(P<0.01).伤后24 h内同期比较,口服补液组MAP,DO2,VO2和Oext水平显著高于不补液组(P<0.01),但低于静脉补液组;血乳酸低于不补液组,但高于静脉补液组(P<0.01).伤后24 h起Do2与静脉补液组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),但VO2和Oext仍显著低于静脉补液组(P<0.01).72 h死亡率:不补液组100%、口服补液组50%(3/6),而静脉补液组为零.结论 50%TBSA烧伤休克期采用口服补液能显著改善动物循环氧动力学指标,减轻高乳酸血症,降低动物的病死率.%Objective To investigate the effect of oral fluid resuscitation on circulatory oxygen dynamic parameters in dogs with burn shock.Method Eighteen male Beagle dogs were surgically prepared for the cannulation of carotid cartery and jugular vein,subjected to flame injury 50%total body surface area(TBSA)with fullthick ness 24 hours later,and they then randomly

  16. First Aid: Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Burns A A A Scald burns from hot water and other liquids are the most common burns in early childhood. Because burns range from mild ...

  17. First Aid: Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Burns Print A A A Scald burns from hot water and other liquids are the most common burns in early childhood. Because burns range from mild to life threatening, ...

  18. Interventions for treating burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Roddy; Forssell, Heli; Buchanan, John Ag; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Weldon, Jo C; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2016-11-18

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a term used for oral mucosal pain (burning pain or discomfort in the tongue, lips or entire oral cavity) without identifiable cause. General population prevalence varies from 0.1% to 3.9%. Many BMS patients indicate anxiety, depression, personality disorders and impaired quality of life (QoL). This review updates the previous versions published in 2000 and 2005. To determine the effectiveness and safety of any intervention versus placebo for symptom relief and changes in QoL, taste, and feeling of dryness in people with BMS. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 31 December 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 11) in the Cochrane Library (searched 31 December 2015), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 31 December 2015), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 31 December 2015). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing any treatment against placebo in people with BMS. The primary outcomes were symptom relief (pain/burning) and change in QoL. Secondary outcomes included change in taste, feeling of dryness, and adverse effects. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Outcome data were analysed as short-term (up to three months) or long-term (three to six months). We included 23 RCTs (1121 analysed participants; 83% female). Interventions were categorised as: antidepressants and antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines, cholinergics, dietary supplements, electromagnetic radiation, physical barriers, psychological therapies, and topical treatments.Only one RCT was assessed at low risk of bias overall, four RCTs' risk of bias was unclear, and 18

  19. Burns (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child What Kids Say About: Handling Stress Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Community Service: A Family's Guide to Getting ... What's in this article? Common Causes Types of Burns First-Degree Burns Second-Degree Burns ...

  20. The initial management of acute burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treharne, L J; Kay, A R

    2001-06-01

    The initial management of burns, in common with all trauma, follows the ABCDE approach. The outline management plan detailed above assumes the availability of certain medical supplies but even simple measures are invaluable in burn care if they are all that are available. The most basic supplies required to resuscitate a casualty are oral salt and water in appropriate volumes. Similarly it should be possible in field conditions to monitor vital signs and urine output, dress the burns with clingfilm or plastic bags and wrap the casualty in absorbent materials.

  1. Burning mouth syndrome: A review on its diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    OpenAIRE

    R. Aravindhan; Santhanam Vidyalakshmi; Muniapillai Siva Kumar; C Satheesh; A Murali Balasubramanium; V Srinivas Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a chronic and intractable orofacial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of burning sensation of the oral mucosa in the absence of specific oral lesion. This condition affects chiefly of middle aged and elderly woman with hormonal changes or psychological disorders. In addition to burning sensation, patient with BMS also complains of oral mucosal pain, altered taste sensation, and dry mouth. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin, often idi...

  2. Comparisons of pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution profile of four major bioactive components after oral administration of Xiang-Fu-Si-Wu Decoction effective fraction in normal and dysmenorrheal symptom rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei; Li, Wei; Li, Zhen-hao; Qian, Da-wei; Guo, Jian-ming; Shang, Er-xin; Su, Shu-lan; Tang, Yu-ping; Duan, Jin-ao

    2014-07-03

    Xiang-Fu-Si-Wu Decoction (XFSWD) has been widely used to treat primary dysmenorrhea in clinical practice for hundreds of years and shown great efficacy. One fraction of XFSWD, which was an elution product by macroporous adsorption resin from aqueous extract solution with 60% ethanol (XFSWE), showed great analgesic effect. The present study was conducted to investigate the possible pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution profiles of four major bioactive constituents (berberine, protopine, tetrahydrocoptisine and tetrahydropalmatine) after oral administration of XFSWE in dysmenorrheal symptom rats, and to compare the difference between normal and dysmenorrheal symptom rats. Estradiol benzoate and oxytocin were used to produce dysmenorrheal symptom rat model. The experimental period was seven days. At the final day of experimental period, both normal and dysmenorrheal symptom rats were orally administrated with XFSWE, and then the blood and tissues samples were collected at different time points. Berberine, protopine, tetrahydrocoptisine and tetrahydropalmatine in blood and tissue samples were determined by LC-MS/MS. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated from the plasma concentration-time data using non-compartmental methods. The differences of pharmacokinetic parameters among groups were tested by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were statistically significant differences (Pnormal and dysmenorrheal symptom rats that orally administered with same dosage of XFSWE. In tissue distribution study, the results showed that the overall trend was C(Spleen)>C(Liver)>C(Kidney)>C(Uterus)>C(Heart)>C(Lung)>C(Ovary)>C(Brain)>C(Thymus), C(M-60 min)>C(M-120 min)>C(M-30 min)>C(C-60 min)>C(C-120 min)>C(C-30 min). The contents of protopine in liver, spleen and uterus were more than that in other tissues of dysmenorrheal symptom rats. Compared to normal rats, partial contents of the compounds in dysmenorrheal symptom rats׳ tissues at different time points had significant

  3. Burning mouth syndrome: pathogenic and therapeutic concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferensztajn, Ewa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic pain condition characterized by pain, burning sensations and dryness within an oral mucosa, without any clinical changes of the latter. It occurs approximately seven times more frequently in women, mostly in perimenopausal age. The psychiatric aspect of BMS is significant: the most frequent co-morbidities are depression and anxiety disorders, and a number of psychotropic drugs play an essential role in its treatment. In the present review, the most important pathogenic and treatment concepts of BMS have been discussed. The BMS may be similar to neuropathic pain and has some related pathogenic elements with fibromyalgia and the restless leg syndrome. In primary BMS, the features of presynaptic dysfunction of dopaminergic neurons and deficiency of endogenous dopamine levels have been demonstrated. Other neurotransmitters such as serotonin, noradrenaline, histamine as well as hormonal and inflammatory factors may also play a role in the pathogenesis of BMS. In the pharmacological treatment of BMS a variety of drugs have been used including benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, antidepressants and atypical antipsychotic drugs. In the final part of the paper, the possibility of using atypical antipsychotic drug, olanzapine, in the treatment of BMS has been discussed. In the context of the recent studies on this topic, a case of female patient with the BMS lasting more than ten years has been mentioned, in whom the treatment with olanzapine brought about a rapid and significant reduction of symptoms. The probable mechanism of the therapeutic effect of olanzapine in BMS can include its effect on dopaminergic receptors and probably also on histaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic ones.

  4. 以口腔症状首诊的干燥综合征34例临床分析%34 Cases of Sjogren’s Syndrome With Oral Symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    师爱萍

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨并分析以口腔症状为首诊的干燥综合征。方法回顾性分析我院于2012年4月~2013年7月收治的以口腔症状首诊的34例干燥综合征患者的临床资料,分析患者皮肤、关节以及眼等临床表现,实施抗核抗体谱、唇腺活检、角膜荧光素染色以及腮腺造影的检查。结果经检查分析,34例以口腔症状首诊的干燥综合征中,有30例患者为龋病,口干25例,腮腺肿大和口腔溃疡各为10例和7例,口腔外症状有18例患者为眼干。结论以口腔症状首诊的干燥综合征,在临床上主要表现为龋病和口干,抗核抗体谱、唇腺活检、角膜荧光素染色以及腮腺造影检查对于干燥综合征的临床诊断具有重要意义。%Objective To investigate and analyze the oral symptoms led to diagnosis of Sjogren syndrome. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on 34 patients with Sjogren syndrome whose first diagnosis was oral symptoms admitted to our hospital in 2012 April~2013 July admitted, analysed the manifestation of skin, joints and eyes, implemented the anti nuclear antibody spectrum, corneal fluorescein staining and parotid sialography examination, labial salivary gland biopsy. Results After examination and analysis, 34 cases of Sjogren syndrome had oral symptoms as first diagnosis, 30 patients had dental caries, dry mouth and 25 cases of parotid gland swelling and ulcer of oral cavity, each had 10 cases and 7 cases with oral symptoms, 18 patients had dry eye. Conclusion Sjogren's first diagnosed oral symptom syndrome include dental caries and dry mouth, antinuclear antibodies, labial gland biopsy and corneal fluorescein staining. Parotid sialography examination has important clinical significance for the diagnosis of Sjogren syndrome.

  5. Ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning mimicking burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heir, Gary M

    2005-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a condition in which the patient perceives a sensation of intraoral burning, typically of the anterior tongue. This article presents a case report of a patient presenting for orofacial pain evaluation in whom ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning is diagnosed. The clinician should be aware of neurotoxin poisoning as a possible cause of symptoms of burning mouth, especially among patients who have recently traveled to a tropical area. Recognition of this condition in this case highlights the need for a detailed and accurate patient history.

  6. "Burn catatonia": a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Davin Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Thermal injuries have been recognized to cause significant neuropsychiatric symptoms and disability in their sufferers since the middle of the 20th century, when Drs. Stanley Cobb and Erich Lindemann of the Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA) studied survivors of the Cocoanut Grove nightclub fire in Boston. Although "burn encephalopathy" or burn-induced delirium is a common occurrence in the acute phase, catatonia in burn patients is not often reported. This report describes a case of malignant catatonia occurring in a 51-year-old male patient acutely suffering from burns acquired in a chemical explosion, effectively treated with reinstitution of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. The literature on burn encephalopathy and catatonia in burns is reviewed. Few examples of burn catatonia exist. Burn encephalopathy is common, and may occur in patients with low TBSA burns such as described in the case above. Descriptions of burn encephalopathy are numerous, but have not included catatonia as a possible etiology. Catatonia in burn patients as an etiology of burn encephalopathy is likely underrecognized. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of catatonia when a patient's confusional state after a burn does not respond to usual care.

  7. Steam vaporizers: A danger for paediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonie, Sarah; Baker, Paul; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2016-12-01

    Steam vaporizers are used to humidify air in dry environments. They are marketed to moisten children's airway secretions and thus to help relieve symptoms associated with upper respiratory tract infections. Unfortunately the steam emitted from the unit can also pose a significant risk of burns to children. Our study aimed to ascertain patterns of injury and treatment outcomes from steam burns resulting from these devices. Potential preventative measures are discussed. Children who had sustained vaporizer scald burns were identified at the outpatient burns clinic over a 10-month period (November 2014-August 2015). Medical records were reviewed retrospectively and data collected on pattern of injury, management and outcomes. Ten children were treated for vaporizer steam burns over the study period. The mean age was 1.6 years and 8 (80%) patients were male. Operative intervention was undergone in 5 (50%) cases; four acutely and one as a secondary reconstructive procedure. Hand burns accounted for 8 (80%) of cases. Steam vaporizers can cause significant burns in the paediatric population. Toddlers were most at risk, frequently sustaining hand burns that underwent skin grafting. Greater public awareness of the danger is indicated and measures to prevent such injuries should be addressed by appropriate authorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. Burn Injuries: Burn Depth, Physiopathology and Type of Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemalettin Koltka

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A significant burn injury is a serious and mortal event. The most important threat to life is hypovolemic shock with complex pathophysiologic mechanisms. Burn depth is classified as first, second, or third degree. Local inflammatory response results a vasodilatation and an increase in vascular permeability. A burn injury is a three dimensional ischemic wound. Zone of coagulation is the zone with maximum damage. Zone of stasis consists of damaged but viable tissues, the tissue is salvageable. In zone of hyperemia tissue perfusion is increased. At the beginning, cardiac output falls and systemic vascular resistance increases; cardiac performance improves as hypovolemia is corrected with fluid resuscitation. While cardiac output increases systemic vascular resistance falls below normal values and a hypermetabolic state develops. Pulmonary vascular resistance increases immediately after thermal injury and this is more prolonged. To avoid secondary pulmonary complications, the smallest resuscitation volume of fluids that maintains adequate tissue perfusion should be given. Changes parallel to the cardiovascular response develop in other organ systems. The reasons of burn injury can be thermal, electrical, chemical or radiation. It is important to know the exact mechanism of burn injury because of different therapies for a specific cause. In this review information about burn depth, local and systemic responses to burn injury and major causes of burn injury are presented. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl:1-6

  9. Emergency in Burn; Burn in Emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Bayram

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Physicians who first meet with burned patients are often emergency service employees. When the patient was admitted to emergency service, especially in patients with major burn injury, is a matter should be dealt with strongly. Before sending the patients to a burn center, some interventions could became life saving which should be done as a first line treatment. Herein, review of the literature related to emergency burn treatment was performed and presented to all physicians as a summary guide. In addition, some questions such as how should be physician, who first meet with the burned patient, evaluated the patient, what should be physician paid attention, which principles should be employed for fluid replacement, how should be approached to burn wound are tried to be addressed. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(3.000: 365-368

  10. [Enteral nutrition in burn patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J L; Garrido, M; Gómez-Cía, T; Serrera, J L; Franco, A; Pumar, A; Relimpio, F; Astorga, R; García-Luna, P P

    1992-01-01

    Nutritional support plays an important role in the treatment of patients with burns. Due to the severe hypercatabolism that develops in these patients, oral support is insufficient in most cases, and this makes it essential to initiate artificial nutritional support (either enteral or parenteral). Enteral nutrition is more physiological than parenteral, and data exist which show that in patients with burns, enteral nutrition exercises a protective effect on the intestine and may even reduce the hypermetabolic response in these patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of enteral nutritional support with a hypercaloric, hyperproteic diet with a high content of branched amino acids in the nutritional support of patients suffering from burns. The study included 12 patients (8 males and 4 females), admitted to the Burns Unit. Average age was 35 +/- 17 years (range: 21-85 years). The percentage of body surface affected by the burns was 10% in two cases, between 10-30% in three cases, between 30-50% in five cases and over 50% in two cases. Initiation of the enteral nutrition was between twenty-four hours and seven days after the burn. The patients were kept in the unit until they were discharged, and the average time spent in the unit was 31.5 days (range: 17-63 days). Total energetic requirements were calculated based on Harris-Benedict, with a variable aggression factor depending on the body surface burned, which varied from 2,000 and 4,000 cal day. Nitrogenous balance was determined on a daily basis, and plasmatic levels of total proteins, albumin and prealbumin on a weekly basis. There was a significant difference between the prealbumin values at the initiation and finalization of the enteral nutrition (9.6 +/- 2.24 mg/dl compared with 19.75 +/- 5.48 mg/dl; p diet was very good, and only mild complications such as diarrhoea developed in two patients. Enteral nutrition is a suitable nutritional support method for patients with

  11. Association between depression, patient scar assessment and burn-specific health in hospitalized burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Chung, Hyun Soo; Kwon, Boeun; Kim, Giyon

    2012-06-01

    Depression is one of the most common psychological problems arising after a burn, but its relationship with patient scar assessment and burn-specific health are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of in-hospital symptoms of depression, compare level of patient scar assessment, and burn-specific health by depression cutoff point, and identify the relationship between depression and these variables. In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 113 burn patients from two inpatient burn centers were divided into two groups based on the cutoff point of the Korean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (Korean CES-D): ≥25 or Patient Scar Assessment Scale and Korean Burn-Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B-K) were used to identify associations with depression. Incidence of severe, definite depression as assessed by a score of 25 or above on the Korean CES-D was approximately 50% on an average at 60.9 days after injury. Burn patients with the Korean CES-D≥25 had significantly higher total mean patient scar assessment scores (43.34±11.49 vs. 36.84±9.56, t=3.265, p=.001), and lower burn-specific health subscale scores compared to patients with Korean CES-DPatient Scar Assessment, ranging from r=.196 to .335 except scar color. Depression was significantly correlated with all subscales of the BSHS-B-K, range from r=-.320 to -.725. Results indicate that incidence of symptoms of depression is relatively high, and depressed burn patients report worse burn scar or sensation and lower levels of burn-specific health. Early, timely recognition and management of depression in these patients are warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Zinc supplementation in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldis-Coutris, Nancy; Gawaziuk, Justin P; Logsetty, Sarvesh

    2012-01-01

    Micronutrient supplementation is a common practice throughout many burn centers across North America; however, uncertainty pertaining to dose, duration, and side effects of such supplements persists. The authors prospectively collected data from 23 hospitalized patients with burn sizes ranging from 10 to 93% TBSA. Each patient received a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement, 50 mg zinc (Zn) daily, and 500 mg vitamin C twice daily. Supplements were administered orally or enterally. Albumin, prealbumin, C-reactive protein, serum Zn, and serum copper were measured weekly during hospital admission until levels were within normal reference range. Our study concluded that 50 mg daily dose of Zn resulted in normal serum levels in 19 of 23 patients at discharge; 50 mg Zn supplementation did not interfere with serum copper levels; and Zn supplements, regardless of administration route, did not result in gastrointestinal side effects.

  13. Spirulina and Pentoxyfilline – A Novel Approach for Treatment of Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulk, Bhavana Sujana; Deshpande, Prasannasrinivas; Velpula, Nagalakshmi; Chappidi, Vani; Chintamaneni, Raja Lakshmi; Goyal, Stuti

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oral submucous fibrosis is a habit associated insidious precancerous condition of the oral cavity commonly found in Asian countries. Many treatment modalities have been attempted in treating the condition apart from steroids which have been the main stay. Hence the present study was designed to assess the efficacy of spirulina and pentoxyfilline and also to compare them in oral submucous fibrosis. Material and Methods: Fourty Patients with clinico-histological diagnosis of oral sub mucous fibrosis were selected and divided into two groups with 20 in each group by simple randomization method. Group I received Pentoxyfilline and Group II Spirulina for period of 3 months. The efficacy was assessed by parameters like mouth opening, burning sensation and tongue protrusion using vernier caliper, visual analog scale and a metric scale respectively along with the side effects. Results: Student’s t-test was applied to obtain the results. Both Pentoxyfilline and Spirulina groups showed statistically significant results (p=0.000) in all the three parameters namely mouth opening, burning sensation and tongue protrusion. On comparing both the drugs statistically insignificant results were obtained for mouth opening (p=0.35) and tongue protrusion (p=0.25) but statistically significant difference was seen in subjective parameter i.e burning sensation (p=0.04). Side effects like bloating of stomach, nausea and gastritis were noted in the pentoxyfilline group in contrast to Spirulina group. Conclusion: Newer drugs Pentoxyfilline and Spirulina showed promising results in treatment of Oral sub mucous fibrosis. Spirulina was used for the first time for treatment of Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and it proved to be superior than pentoxyfilline as no side effects were observed. Also it was superior in reducing burning sensation and hence can be advised in OSMF patients suffering from severe subjective symptoms. PMID:24551724

  14. Crude oil burning mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Malmquist, L.M.V.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve predictions for the burning efficiency and the residue composition of in-situ burning of crude oil, the burning mechanism of crude oil was studied in relation to the composition of its hydrocarbon mixture, before, during and after the burning. The surface temperature, flame...... to the predictions of four conceptual models that describe the burning mechanism of multicomponent fuels. Based on the comparisons, hydrocarbon liquids were found to be best described by the Equilibrium Flash Vaporization model, showing a constant gas composition and gasification rate. The multicomponent fuels...... followed the diffusion-limited gasification model, showing a change in the hydrocarbon composition of the fuel and its evaporating gases, as well as a decreasing gasification rate, as the burning progressed. This burning mechanism implies that the residue composition and burning efficiency mainly depend...

  15. Oral Manifestations of Menopause

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oral manifestations may vary for each patient in the form of burning mouth syndrome .... as chlorhexidine aids in reduction of the accumulation of dental plaque.[5,10 ... women with missing teeth may have a higher risk of hypertension and ...

  16. Coping with burns : The role of coping self-efficacy in the recovery from traumatic stress following burn injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Mark; Hofland, Helma; de jong, Alette; Van Loey, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a three-wave prospective study among patients with burns (N = 178) to examine the prospective influence of coping self-efficacy (CSE) perceptions on trajectories of posttraumatic stress symptoms in the first 12 months after burn injuries. Using linear growth curve modeling, we corrected

  17. Coping with burns : the role of coping self-efficacy in the recovery from traumatic stress following burn injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Mark W G; Hofland, Helma W.; De Jong, Alette E.; Van Loey, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a three-wave prospective study among patients with burns (N = 178) to examine the prospective influence of coping self-efficacy (CSE) perceptions on trajectories of posttraumatic stress symptoms in the first 12 months after burn injuries. Using linear growth curve modeling, we corrected

  18. Learn Not To Burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Nancy; Hendricks, Charlotte M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the "Learn Not to Burn Preschool Program," a low-cost fire safety awareness and burn prevention curriculum for young children. The program promotes eight burn prevention methods--including practicing an escape plan--using developmentally appropriate learning objectives to increase children's fire safety knowledge, skill, and…

  19. Economics of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Michael J; Phillips, Linda G

    2008-07-01

    Sustaining a burn injury sets in motion a cycle of pain, disfigurement, and a search for survival. In pediatric burns, the injury extends to the parents where fear, ignorance, and helplessness forever change their lives. Pediatric burn injuries are caused by fire, hot liquids, clothing irons, hair curlers, caustic substances like drain cleaner, the grounding of an electrical source, and exposure to radiation. Efficiency in the delivery of pediatric burn care is critical. Maximizing resource utilization means continual self-evaluation and economic analysis of therapeutic modalities. Griffiths et al found that most childhood burns are due to scalds, which can be treated for $1061 per percent burn. Paddock et al reduced the cost of treating superficial pediatric burns and reduced the length of stay in hospital using silver-impregnated gauze over traditional methods. Barrett et al found improved cosmesis of skin grafts using cultured epithelial autografts but at a substantially increased cost. Corpron et al showed that pediatric burn units that treat burns >10% total body surface area and operative treatment of pediatric burns regardless of size generate positive revenue. There is a paucity of evidentiary pediatric burn economic data. More research is needed to address areas of pediatric burn care inefficiency. Improving knowledge of cost in all health care endeavors will create competition and drive down expenditures.

  20. Minor burns - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the burn: Use cool water, not ice. The extreme cold from ice can injure the tissue even more. If possible, especially if the burn is caused by chemicals, hold the burned skin under cool running water for 10 to 15 minutes until it ...

  1. Optimization of burn referrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiband, Hanna K; Lundin, Kira; Alsbjørn, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Correct estimation of the severity of burns is important to obtain the right treatment of the patient and to avoid over- and undertriage. In this study we aimed to assess how often the guidelines for referral of burn injured patients are met at the national burn centre (NBC), Denmar...

  2. Epidemiology of burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokter, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand the epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of specialized burn care in The Netherlands. This thesis is mainly based on historical data of the burn centre in Rotterdam from 1986, combined with historical data from the burn centres in Groningen and Beverwijk from

  3. Galactorrhea and amenorrhea in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Navin; Gore, Madhuri A; Shankar, Ravi

    2008-09-01

    Galactorrhea and/or amenorrhea, although uncommonly reported in post-burn patients, is a complex problem to treat. Patient is reluctant to volunteer history of these symptoms, unless asked specifically. To study profile of adult female patients with galactorrhea and/or amenorrhea in post burn period. A prospective study of all adult female patients presenting with or detected to have galactorrhea and/or amenorrhea in post burn period was conducted over 6 month's period. Detailed clinical examination, estimation of LH, FSH, Prolactin levels and X-ray of skull was done in all patients. The data collected was analyzed. Patients with hyperprolactinemia and galactorrhea were treated with Bromocriptine for 3 weeks to 3 months. In all patients with amenorrhea, pregnancy was ruled out by gynecological examination and urine pregnancy test. During this period, 30 patients (15.15%) were detected to have galactorrhea and/or amenorrhoea. The extent of burn in these patients was 20-65%of body surface area. Out of 30 patients, 5 had galactorrhea and amenorrhea, 1 galactorrhea alone and 24 had amenorrhea alone. Analysis of voluntary disclosures and detection on interrogation was done. Till the end of study, 4 patients with galactorrhea had complete relief, 2 patients reported reduction in discharge. Galactorrhea was distressing for all and was always associated with high prolactine levels .The reverse was not true. All the patients had chest burns besides other body areas. Association was noted between menstrual aberration and ovulatory phase at the time of burn. Galactorrhea and menstrual disturbances do exist in female patients in reproductive age group in post burn period and patients should be especially interrogated for these symptoms by the burn care providers.

  4. Evaluation of Oral Health in Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathy Ravindran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral cav ity re flects the general health status of a person and diagnosing and treating oral manifestations of systemic disease pose a greater challenge. Even though there is strong evidence that supports the relationship between oral health and diabetes mellitus, oral health awareness is lacking among diabetic patients and health professionals. The present study was undertaken to determine the oral health status in type II diabetic patients and also to compare the oral changes in controlled diabetes and u ncontrolled diabetes. Materials and methods: Study population consists of 60 diabetic patients w hich is divided into 30 controlled and 30 uncontrolled diabetics; 60 healthy subjects. Each of these diabetic groups were again subdivided according to their duration as patients having a disease duration below 10 years 15 and patients having a disease duration above 10 years. 15 Various oral manifestations were examined and also CPI score and loss of attachment were recorded. Statistical analysis was done. Results: The most frequent oral signs and symptoms obser ved in both controlled and uncontrolled diabetic patients was perio­ dontitis followed by hyposalivation, taste dysfunction, halitosis, fissured tongue, burning mouth, angular cheilitis, ulcer and lichen planus. These oral manifestation showed an increase in distribution in diabetic patients when compared to nondia betic. Community periodo ntal index (CPI scores for assess ing periodontal status showed higher scores in diabetics than nondiabetics and also in uncontrolled diabetes than controlled diabetes. For periodontal s tatus assessment based on disease duration, patient with higher disease duration showed higher CPI scores than those with a lesser disease duration. Assess ment of loss of attachment in our study showed higher values in diabetic patients compared to healthy controls. Conclusion: From our present study, it was clear that oral manifestations in uncontrolled

  5. Burning mouth syndrome: a review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Francisco J; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; López-Jornet, Pía

    2015-05-16

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is mainly found in middle aged or elderly women and is characterized by intense burning or itching sensation of the tongue or other regions of the oral mucosa. It can be accompanied by xerostomia and dysgeusia. The syndrome generally manifests spontaneously, and the discomfort is typically of a continuous nature but increases in intensity during the evening and at night. Although BMS classically has been attributed to a range of factors, in recent years evidence has been obtained relating it peripheral (sensory C and/or trigeminal nerve fibers) or central neuropathic disturbances (involving the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system). The differential diagnosis requires the exclusion of oral mucosal lesions or blood test alterations that can produce burning mouth sensation. Patient management is based on the avoidance of causes of oral irritation and the provision of psychological support. Drug treatment for burning sensation in primary BMS of peripheral origin can consist of topical clonazepam, while central type BMS appears to improve with the use of antidepressants such as duloxetine, antiseizure drugs such as gabapentin, or amisulpride.

  6. [Trichomonosomycosis of the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnatowska, A J; Kurnatowski, P

    1999-01-01

    Protozoa and fungi of the oral cavity, although frequently occuring and connected with considerable clinical adverse effects, are as yet insufficiently known. The aims of the study were to estimate the prevalence of common invasions of Trichomonas tenax and fungi, to associate the symptoms with the diagnosis of trichomonosis complicated by mycosis and to determine trichomonacidal properties of ornidazole, tinidazole and metronidazole. 936 dentist patients with different diagnoses were included into the study. The collected material consisted of rinsings, with simultaneous application of selective media, different for protozoa and for fungi 6ultures. Among the examined patients T. tenax was found in 90 cases including 85 cases where it occurred together with fungi (11 species), on the basis of which the diagnosis of trichomonosomycosis of the oral cavity was established. It was the most often in patients with leukoplakia and Lichen Wilsoni. We received a statistically significant association (0.001 tenax with fungi and xerostomia, burning sensation, periodontal pockets and denuded teeth. Trichomonas tenax was not found in any patiem with caries and with aphthe recidivans.

  7. Burning Mouth Syndrome in Zahedan; the Southeast of Islamic Republic of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Heidari

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is characterized by a burning sensation in the tongue or other oral sites, usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the main epidemiological and clinical features involved in burning mouth syndrome in Zahedan; southeast of Iran.Materials and Methods: In this case series study, 89 BMS patients were selected from those referred to the Department of the Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, and Khatam-ol-anbia, central hospital, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, during2002 to 2003. The study group consisted of 62 female (69.7% and 27 male (30.3 %patients, with a mean age of 60.9 years, ranging from 40 to 89 years. In all cases a study protocol, specially designed for this disease was completed, including general, medical and oral information and an intraoral examination. Comparative and descriptivestatistical analysis was performed. The Chi-square test was considered significant at p<0.05.Results: The 50-59 years age group showed the highest prevalence among the studied cases (24.3%. The tongue was the most frequent location of symptoms, affected in 86 patients (96.6%. In addition to the burning sensation, 25.8% and 48.3% of the patientscomplained of oral dryness and dysgusia, respectively. Type III BMS was the most common subtype (50.6%. In women, 90.3% were postmenopausal. Type II diabetes was observed in 36% of the patients and 37.1% suffered from respiratory disease,23.6% from gastritis, 15.7% from liver diseases, 30.3% from renal disease, 40.4% fromhypertension and 43.8% had sleep disorders. Also, 52.8% revealed seasonal allergy,32.6% had temporomandibular joint disorders and 59.6% had poor oral hygiene.Conclusion: BMS is a complex and multifactorial disease process in which numerous possible etiologies must be eliminated before the proper treatment can be initiated.

  8. Partial Burn Laws in Propellant Erosive Burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Finjakov

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and computer methods were developed for investigating the combustion phenomena in the propellants which burn in streams of hot gas flowing along the burn surfaces of the propellants. The experimental investigations allowed establishment of different dependencies for erosive burning. Computer solutions of the problem for double-base (DB propellants showed a good agreement with the experimental results. The suggested variant of modified theory considers the change of heat release in solids, the real burn surface roughness, the nonisothermality of boundary layer and the effect of gas mass blow from the propellant burn surface into the gas stream. This modified theory was used for studying burn laws at 30-1000 atm and up to gas stream sound velocities for different DB propellants. It was found that gas stream leads to splitting of the propellant burn laws, m = bp/sup v/. Pressure power (v, in this case depends on gas stream velocity (W, diameter of the propellant tube canal (d and gas stream temperature (T/sub w/. It is because of this that these burn laws were named partial burn laws. They have the form (m = bp/sup w(omega/ w,d,T/sub w/ -const. The dependencies w(omega = f(w,d,T/sub w/ were obtained by the modified theory. It was found that omega values mainly decrease when pressure increases beginning from ~200 to 400 atm and they can decrease up to w(omega = 0,1- 0,3. Similar results can be obtained for composite propellants.

  9. Oral supplementation with a nutraceutical formulation containing omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants in a large series of patients with dry eye symptoms: results of a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatell-Tortajada J

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jordi Gatell-TortajadaOn behalf of the Large Dry Eye Clinical Study Group (LDECSGCornea and Ocular Surface Department, Institut Català de Retina, Barcelona, SpainPurpose: To assess the benefits and tolerability of a dietary supplement based on omega-3 fatty acids to relieve dry eye symptoms.Methods: A total of 1,419 patients (74.3% women, mean age 58.9 years with dry eye syndrome using artificial tears participated in a 12-week prospective study. Patients were instructed to take 3 capsules/day of the nutraceutical formulation (Brudysec® 1.5 g. Study variables were dry eye symptoms (scratchy and stinging sensation, eye redness, grittiness, painful and tired eyes, grating sensation, and blurry vision, conjunctival hyperemia, tear breakup time (TBUT, Schrimer I test, and Oxford grading scheme.Results: At 12 weeks, each dry eye symptom improved significantly (P<0.001, and the use of artificial tears decreased significantly from 3.77 (standard deviation [SD] =2.08 at baseline to 3.45 (SD =1.72 (P<0.01. In addition, the Schirmer test scores and the TBUT increased significantly, and there was an increase in patients grading 0–I in the Oxford scale and a decrease of those grading IV–V. Significant differences in improvements of dry eye symptoms were also found in compliant versus noncompliant patients as well as in those with moderate/severe versus none/mild conjunctival hyperemia.Conclusion: Oral ω-3 fatty acids supplementation was an effective treatment for dry eye symptoms.Keywords: dry eye symptoms, artificial tears, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, nutraceutical supplement, ocular inflammation, eye discomfort

  10. Periodontal (Gum) Disease: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for providing oral care. NIDCR > OralHealth > Topics > Gum (Periodontal) Diseases > Periodontal (Gum) Disease: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments Periodontal ( ... U.S. currently have some form of the disease. Periodontal diseases range from simple gum inflammation to serious disease ...

  11. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College ... signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. ...

  12. Oral Cancer Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College ... signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. ...

  13. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic response in patients with Burning Mouth Syndrome: accompanying 2 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Juliana Gomes CARVALHO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS is a condition characterized by burning symptom of the oral mucosa in the absence of clinical signs. Its etiology is still unknown and, and to date there is no effective treatment. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with BMS profile and the therapies results in a retrospective study. Material and method Clinical and therapeutic data were collected from records of patients with BMS diagnosed between January 2013 to April 2015 at the Clinic of Stomatology Clinic, Faculdade de Odontologia of Universidade de São Paulo, according to the criteria established by the International Headache Society in 2013. The therapies used for BMS control were also evaluated. Result Twelve patients were diagnosed with BMS at this period. All of them were women with a mean age of 61.18 years and the apex of the tongue was the most common affected site and the duration of the burning sensation ranged from 6 months to 25 years. Many therapies were prescribed for BMS control, such as topical capsaicin, topical clonazepan, low level laser therapy and homeopathy. Among the established therapies, capsaicin has immediate effect in reducing symptoms. Conclusion The present study showed that the challenges towards an effective treatment for BMS are varied and are mainly related to the lack knowing of the pathogenesis of this disease. The demographic profile of patients studied here was similar to that described in the available literature, however, the variables represented by secondary symptoms (medical history, anxiety and depression levels may be modifying factors of therapeutic response and the pathogenesis of the disease itself.

  14. Oral appliance therapy versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Maria; Byraki, Anna; Ahlberg, Jari; Heymans, Martijn W; Hamburger, H L; De Lange, Jan; Lobbezoo, Frank; Aarab, Ghizlane

    2017-03-10

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with several sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) with those of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. In this randomized placebo-controlled trial sixty-four OSAS patients (52.0± 9.6 years) were randomly assigned to an MAD, nCPAP or an intra-oral placebo appliance in a parallel design. All participants filled out the validated Dutch Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SDQ) twice: one before treatment and one after six months of treatment. With 88 questions, thirteen scales were constructed, representing common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Linear mixed model analyses were performed to study differences between the groups for the different SDQ scales over time. The MAD group showed significant improvements over time in symptoms corresponding with "insomnia", "excessive daytime sleepiness", "psychiatric sleep disorder", "periodic limb movements", "sleep apnea", "sleep paralysis", "daytime dysfunction", "hypnagogic hallucinations/dreaming", "restless sleep", "negative conditioning", and "automatic behaviour" (range of P values: 0.000-0.014). These improvements in symptoms were, however, not significantly different from the improvements in symptoms observed in the nCPAP and placebo groups (range of P values: 0.090-0.897). It can be concluded that there is no significant difference between MAD and nCPAP in their positive effects on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. These beneficial effects may be a result of placebo effects. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Burns and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, M

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of the first descriptive analytic study of a group of 183 burn patients, treated in the Burn Unit at the University Hospital of Cartagena, Colombia during the period since January 1985 until December 1990. There is presented experience with the selected group of 24 patients in whom the diagnosis of burn was associated with epilepsy. There is also analysed and described the gravity of the scars sequels, neurological disorders, the complication of the burn and an impact of this problem on the patient, his (her) family and the community. It is very important to report that there was found Neurocisticercosis in 66.6% of the group of burn patients with epilepsy, and it is probably the first risk factor of burn in this group.

  16. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected medical terms and ...

  17. Epilepsy and oral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Janice; Boyle, Carole

    2002-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common symptom of an underlying neurological disorder. The seizures can take a variety of forms. Both the condition and its medical management can affect oral health. Prevention of oral disease and carefully planned dental treatment are essential to the well-being of people with epilepsy.

  18. The Burning Saints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xygalatas, Dimitris

    . Carrying the sacred icons of the saints, participants dance over hot coals as the saint moves them. The Burning Saints presents an analysis of these rituals and the psychology behind them. Based on long-term fieldwork, The Burning Saints traces the historical development and sociocultural context......, The Burning Saints presents a highly original analysis of how mental processes can shape social and religious behaviour....

  19. Management of Hand Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Irmak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The hand is one of the most frequently affected body parts by burn injuries with a rate of 80% among all burn wounds. Early and effective treatment ensures the best chance of survival as well as a good functional prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology, variation, relationship between etiology and hospital stay, clinical features, and management of hand burns. Material and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted the University of Health Sciences; Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Application and Research Center, Departmant of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery and the Intensive Burn Care Unit between April 2009 and April 2014. Burns were assessed based on etiology, anatomical location, percentage of total body surface area affected, and depth of injury. Treatment was categorized as conservative, elective operative, or urgent operative. Results: In the study period, 788 patients were admitted to our Burn Unit. Of these, 240 were females (30.5% and 548 were males (69.5%. The most common type of burn injury in this study was thermal injury (695 cases; 88.2%, followed by electrical injury (67 cases; 8.5%, and chemical, frictional or unknown injuries (26 cases; 3.3%. Majority (more than 85% of the patients had second-degree burns, and some had third-degree burns. Conclusions: Burns commonly affect the hands, and many functional problems may develop if appropriate basic treatments are neglected. The best treatment for burns is prevention. Appropriate indoor arrangement and simple but effective measures that can be taken at home can significantly reduce burn trauma exposure.

  20. Management of Outpatient Burns

    OpenAIRE

    Waslen, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    The severity of burns depends on the depth and extent of body surface involved. The total body surface area (TBSA) involved can be estimated by the ‘rule of nines’; body locations are 9% of body surface or multiples of nine. Depth and TBSA can be used to classify burns as minor, moderate, or critical. Diagnosis depends on history and physical examination. Most burns can be treated in an outpatient setting. Treatment should include debriding necrotic tissue, preventing infection and encouragin...

  1. Measuring somatic symptoms with the CES-D to assess depression in cancer patients after treatment : Comparison among patients with oral/oropharyngeal, gynecological, colorectal, and breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stewart, R.E.; Ranchor, A.V.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.

    2006-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of depression after cancer treatment. In the literature, several authors have raised questions about assessing somatic symptoms to explore depression after cancer treatment. These somatic sequelae are a consequence of cancer treatment and should cause higher depression

  2. Measuring somatic symptoms with the CES-D to assess depression in cancer patients after treatment : Comparison among patients with oral/oropharyngeal, gynecological, colorectal, and breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stewart, R.E.; Ranchor, A.V.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.

    2006-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of depression after cancer treatment. In the literature, several authors have raised questions about assessing somatic symptoms to explore depression after cancer treatment. These somatic sequelae are a consequence of cancer treatment and should cause higher depression rat

  3. Longitudinal changes in menopausal symptoms comparing women randomized to low-dose oral conjugated estrogens or transdermal estradiol plus micronized progesterone versus placebo: the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Nanette; Allshouse, Amanda; Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Pal, Lubna; Lobo, Rogerio A; Naftolin, Frederick; Black, Dennis M; Brinton, Eliot A; Budoff, Matthew J; Cedars, Marcelle I; Dowling, N Maritza; Dunn, Mary; Gleason, Carey E; Hodis, Howard N; Isaac, Barbara; Magnani, Maureen; Manson, JoAnn E; Miller, Virginia M; Taylor, Hugh S; Wharton, Whitney; Wolff, Erin; Zepeda, Viola; Harman, S Mitchell

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the efficacy of two forms of menopausal hormone therapy in alleviating vasomotor symptoms, insomnia, and irritability in early postmenopausal women during 4 years. A total of 727 women, aged 42 to 58, within 3 years of their final menstrual period, were randomized to receive oral conjugated estrogens (o-CEE) 0.45 mg (n = 230) or transdermal estradiol (t-E2) 50 μg (n = 225; both with micronized progesterone 200 mg for 12 d each mo), or placebos (PBOs; n = 275). Menopausal symptoms were recorded at screening and at 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months postrandomization. Differences in proportions of women with symptoms at baseline and at each follow-up time point were compared by treatment arm using exact χ tests in an intent-to-treat analysis. Differences in treatment effect by race/ethnicity and body mass index were tested using generalized linear mixed effects modeling. Moderate to severe hot flashes (from 44% at baseline to 28.3% for PBO, 7.4% for t-E2, and 4.2% for o-CEE) and night sweats (from 35% at baseline to 19% for PBO, 5.3% for t-E2, and 4.7% for o-CEE) were reduced significantly by 6 months in women randomized to either active hormone compared with PBO (P < 0.001 for both symptoms), with no significant differences between the active treatment arms. Insomnia and irritability decreased from baseline to 6 months postrandomization in all groups. There was an intermittent reduction in insomnia in both active treatment arms versus PBO, with o-CEE being more effective than PBO at 36 and 48 months (P = 0.002 and 0.05) and t-E2 being more effective than PBO at 48 months (P = 0.004). Neither hormone treatment significantly affected irritability compared with PBO. Symptom relief for active treatment versus PBO was not significantly modified by body mass index or race/ethnicity. Recently postmenopausal women had similar and substantial reductions in hot flashes and night sweats with lower

  4. Burns in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Samnia, Roya; Garadaghi, Abasad; Kianvar, Hadi

    2006-03-01

    A 9-year prospective study of burns in pregnant women hospitalized at the Sina hospital burn center was conducted to determine the etiology and outcome of pregnant patients. Fifty-one patients (27.45% self-inflicted, 72.55% unintentional) were identified and stratified by age, burn size, presence or absence of inhalation injury, trimester of pregnancy, maternal and fetal mortality, and cause of burn. The mean patient age was 24.2 years. There were 20 maternal deaths and 23 fetal deaths. The majority of which (maternal: 13 and fetal: 13) were among self-inflicted burned pregnant women. The mean burn size was 37.7%, and was significantly larger for nonsurvivors of mother than survivors (68.8% versus 17.6%; pburned body surface area exceeds 40%, both maternal and fetal mortality reaches 100%. Inhalation injuries were strongly associated with large burns, and were presents in all suicide patients. Kerosene ignition (68.6% of all patients, 100% of self-inflicted patients) was the most common type of burn. Large burn size was the strongest predictor of mortality of mother and fetus followed by the presence of inhalation injury.

  5. Burns and military clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  6. Critical issues in burn care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, James H

    2008-01-01

    Burn care, especially for serious burn injuries, represents a considerable challenge for the healthcare system. The American Burn Association has established a number of strategies for the management of burn patients and dedicates its efforts and resources to promoting and supporting burn-related research, education, care, rehabilitation, and prevention, often in collaboration with other organizations. The American Burn Association has recommended that patients with serious burns be referred to a designated burn center, ie, a hospital outfitted with specialized personnel and equipment dedicated to burn care. Burn centers have been operational for over 50 years, but the complexity and costs of providing specialized burn care have given rise to a number of critical administrative and political issues. These include logistical limitations imposed by the uneven national distribution of burn centers and a potential shortage of burn beds, both during everyday conditions and in the event of a mass disaster. Burn surgeon shortages have also been identified, stemming, in part, from a lack of specialized burn care training opportunities. There is currently a lack of quality outcome data to support evidence-based recommendations for burn care, and burn care centers are compromised by problems obtaining reimbursement for the care of uninsured and publicly insured out-of-state burn patients. Initiatives are underway to maintain efficient burn care facilities that are fully funded, easily accessible, and most importantly, provide optimal, evidence-based care on a daily basis, and are well-equipped to handle a surge of patients during a disaster situation.

  7. Relationship between caesium (137Cs) load, cardiovascular symptoms, and source of food in 'Chernobyl' children -- preliminary observations after intake of oral apple pectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandazhevskaya, G S; Nesterenko, V B; Babenko, V I; Yerkovich, T V; Bandazhevsky, Y I

    2004-12-18

    Seventeen years after the nuclear power accident at Chernobyl, most of the radio-contamination among the population of Southern Belarus is caused by incorporation of long-lived radioisotopes. The varying levels of 137Cs observed among children in this area are explained by the source of their food, especially by the consumption of contaminated milk produced privately. We stratified children from rural areas of Belarus (caesium [137Cs] contamination >5 Ci/km(2)) by their 137Cs loads into three distinct groups (group 1, <5 Bq/kg body weight [BW]; group 2, 38.4 +/- 2.4 Bq/kg BW; group 3, 122 +/- 18.5 Bq/kg BW). We determined the relationship between the 137Cs load and the children's main source of food and recorded their cardiovascular symptoms. Cardiovascular symptoms, ECG alterations, and arterial hypertension were significantly more frequent in children with high 137Cs burden than in children with very low 137Cs burden. Children with moderate and high 137Cs loads (groups 2 and 3) received apple pectin, a food additive, for 16 days. Apple pectin significantly decreased 137Cs loads in these groups (39% and 28%, respectively). ECG alterations improved, while cardiovascular symptoms and hypertension did not change in any group.

  8. Randomized, 6-Week, Placebo-Controlled Study of Treatment for Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Individualized Dosing of Osmotic-Release Oral System (OROS) Methylphenidate With a Goal of Symptom Remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, David W; Starr, H Lynn; Ma, Yi-Wen; Rostain, Anthony L; Ascher, Steve; Armstrong, Robert B

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of individualized dosing within the approved dose range for osmotic-release oral system (OROS) methylphenidate hydrochloride in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A double-blind, 6-week trial was conducted between July 2009 and February 2010 at 35 US sites. Adults with ADHD (DSM-IV diagnostic criteria) and a screening ADHD Investigator Symptom Rating Scale (AISRS) score > 24 were randomly assigned to OROS methylphenidate 18 mg or matching placebo. Treatment dose could be increased at 18 mg increments, up to 72 mg/d, until an optimal dose was achieved. AISRS score changes from baseline to end point (primary outcome) were analyzed using analysis of covariance. At baseline, the intent-to-treat population of 169 OROS methylphenidate and 172 placebo subjects (mean age = 35.8 years) had mean (standard deviation [SD]) AISRS scores of 37.8 (6.94) and 37.0 (7.51), respectively. OROS methylphenidate-treated subjects exhibited a significantly greater mean (SD) AISRS score improvement than placebo subjects (-17.1 [12.44] vs -11.7 [13.30]; P methylphenidate-treated subjects experienced greater improvements than placebo subjects in secondary measures of symptom frequency, cognitive function, work productivity, and quality-of-life. Little effect of OROS methylphenidate was observed in exploratory sleep assessments. The adverse event pattern was similar to previous reports of stimulants in adults with ADHD. OROS methylphenidate treatment with individualized doses titrated to achieve symptom remission demonstrated greater ADHD symptom reduction than placebo treatment. These data support the overall efficacy of OROS methylphenidate treatment in the management of adults with ADHD and provide new possibilities for additional intervention. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00937040.

  9. Pain in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, J; Choinère, M

    1995-08-01

    While severe pain is a constant component of the burn injury, inadequate pain management has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Pain-generating mechanisms in burns include nociception, primary and secondary hyperalgesia and neuropathy. The clinical studies of burn pain characteristics reveal very clear-cut differences between continuous pain and pain due to therapeutic procedures which have to be treated separately. Some of the main features of burn pain are: (1) its long-lasting course, often exceeding healing time, (2) the repetition of highly nociceptive procedures which can lead to severe psychological disturbances if pain control is inappropriate. Pharmaco-therapy with opioids is the mainstay for analgesia in burned patients, but non-pharmacological techniques may be useful adjuncts. Routine pain evaluation is mandatory for efficient and safe analgesia. Special attention must be given to pain in burned children which remains too often underestimated and undertreated. More educational efforts from physicians and nursing staff are necessary to improve pain management in burned patients.

  10. Nutrition of burned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudaviciene, Daiva; Rimdeika, Rytis; Adamonis, Kestutis

    2004-01-01

    Burns form 5-12% of all traumas. About 2,200 of patients are annually hospitalized in Lithuania. In most cases people of the employable age get burned. The treatment is often long-lasting, and afterwards recovered patients often have invalidity from burn sequels. The mortality of hospitalized burned patients is about 10%. The most common causes of death are pulmonary edema, pneumonia, sepsis and multiorgan failure. All these complications are related with insufficient nutrition. These complications are extremely frequent and dangerous for patients with more than 20% of body burned. The nutritional support of burned patient gives a possibility to increase the survival probability, to decrease complication rate and hospitalization time. Currently in Lithuania there are no standards for burned patient nutrition. More attention is given to strategy of surgical strategy and techniques, as well as antibiotic therapy. This article is the review of the different aspects of artificial nutrition of burned patient: indications, modes of nutrition, mixtures and terms of nutritional support.

  11. Hand chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Elliot P; Chhabra, A Bobby

    2015-03-01

    There is a vast and ever-expanding variety of potentially harmful chemicals in the military, industrial, and domestic landscape. Chemical burns make up a small proportion of all skin burns, yet they can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Additionally, the hand and upper extremity are the most frequently involved parts of the body in chemical burns, and therefore these injuries may lead to severe temporary or permanent loss of function. Despite this fact, discussion of the care of these injuries is sparse in the hand surgery literature. Although most chemical burns require only first response and wound care, some require the attention of a specialist for surgical debridement and, occasionally, skin coverage and reconstruction. Exposure to certain chemicals carries the risk of substantial systemic toxicity and even mortality. Understanding the difference between thermal and chemical burns, as well as special considerations for specific compounds, will improve patient treatment outcomes.

  12. [Chickenpox, burns and grafts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Zegers, J; Fidel Avendaño, L

    1979-01-01

    An outbreak of chickenpox that occurred at the Burns Repair Surgery Unit, Department of Children's Surgery, Hospital R. del Río, between June and November, 1975, is reported. 27 cases of burned children were studied, including analysis of correlations of the stages and outcome of the disease (varicela), the trauma (burns) and the graft (repair surgery). As a result, the authors emphasize the following findings: 1. Burns and their repair are not aggravating factors for varicella. In a small number of cases the exanthema looked more confluent in the graft surgical areas and in the first degree burns healing spontaneously. 2. Usually there was an uneventful outcome of graft repair surgery on a varicella patient, either during the incubation period, the acme or the convalescence. 3. The fact that the outmost intensity of secondary viremia of varicella occurs before the onset of exanthemia, that is, during the late incubation period, is confirmed.

  13. Crude oil burning mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Malmquist, Linus Mattias Valdemar; Jomaas, Grunde

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve predictions for the burning efficiency and the residue composition of in-situ burning of crude oil, the burning mechanism of crude oil was studied in relation to the composition of its hydrocarbon mixture, before, during and after the burning. The surface temperature, flame...... height, mass loss rate and residues of three hydrocarbon liquids (n-octane, dodecane and hexadecane), two crude oils (DUC and REBCO) and one hydrocarbon liquid mixture of the aforementioned hydrocarbon liquids were studied using the Crude Oil Flammability Apparatus. The experimental results were compared...... to the predictions of four conceptual models that describe the burning mechanism of multicomponent fuels. Based on the comparisons, hydrocarbon liquids were found to be best described by the Equilibrium Flash Vaporization model, showing a constant gas composition and gasification rate. The multicomponent fuels...

  14. Study of Bacterial Infections among Burn Patients Hospitalized in Isfahan Burn Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Faghri

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Burn patients are at risk of acquiring infection because of destroy skin barrier, suppression of immunity, prolonged hospitalization, and invasive therapeutic and diagnostic procedure, risk of acquiring infection is high among burned patients. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence rate of bacterial etiology and infections among burn patients in the burn center of Isfahan. Materials & Methods: The study was conducted descriptive – cross sectional during a period of one year, (from august 2004 until September 2005. A total of 106 patients presenting with no signs and symptoms of infection within the first 48 hours of admission were included. CDC definition for nosocomial infections was applied. Each patient’s clinical examinations and records investigated daily. Swab culture, blood culture (during fever time, tissue culture from biopsy specimen of burn wound and urine culture obtained. The data were analyzed and interpreted using SPSS 10 Software, using Chi – square and Kappa Coefficient. P.value < 0.05 was significant. Results: One-hundred and six patients met the inclusion criteria, 91 (85/8% acquired at least one type of infection, including, urinary tract 28 (26/4%, blood stream 30 (28/3%, and burn wound 91(85/8%. Pseudomonas aeroginosa was the most common causative agent isolated from blood culture and swab culture, 27/42% and 54/4% respectively. Also, E.coli was the major casautive agent of urinary tract infections (6.4% isolated from urine culture of these burn patients.Conclusion: The results indicated that, biopsy from burn wounds and study of histopathologic specimen day by other day depends on blood and urine culture conditions overall can be effective for early detection of burn wounds infections.

  15. Initial evaluation and management of the critical burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivó, C; Galeiras, R; del Caz, Ma D P

    2016-01-01

    The major improvement in burn therapy is likely to focus on the early management of hemodynamic and respiratory failures in combination with an aggressive and early surgical excision and skin grafting for full-thickness burns. Immediate burn care by first care providers is important and can vastly alter outcomes, and it can significantly limit burn progression and depth. The goal of prehospital care should be to cease the burning process as well as prevent future complications and secondary injuries for burn shock. Identifying burn patients appropriate for immediate or subacute transfer is an important step in reducing morbidity and mortality. Delays in transport to Burn Unit should be minimized. The emergency management follows the principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support Guidelines for assessment and stabilization of airway, breathing, circulation, disability, exposure and environment control. All patients with suspected inhalation injury must be removed from the enclosure as soon as possible, and immediately administer high-flow oxygen. Any patient with stridor, shortness of breath, facial burns, singed nasal hairs, cough, soot in the oral cavity, and history of being in a fire in an enclosed space should be strongly considered for early intubation. Fibroscopy may also be useful if airway damage is suspected and to assess known lung damage. Secondary evaluation following admission to the Burn Unit of a burned patient suffering a severe thermal injury includes continuation of respiratory support and management and treatment of inhalation injury, fluid resuscitation and cardiovascular stabilization, pain control and management of burn wound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Recognizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bowel habits. Learn More About Pain in IBS Symptoms Won’t Stop Everyone suffers from bowel changes ... They can be constant or keep coming back. Symptoms Change Some or all of IBS symptoms can ...

  17. Variation in Placebo Effect Sizes in Clinical Trials of Oral Interventions for Management of the Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD): A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Anna J; May, Brian H; Xue, Charlie Changli; Zhang, Anthony L

    2017-09-01

    Increasing placebo effect sizes over time have been reported in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for outcomes related to psychiatric symptoms. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) is a key outcome measure in clinical trials of the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Accurate placebo effect size estimates for NPI are needed for sample size calculations in order to adequately power future studies. This study investigated variation in placebo effect sizes for NPI in RCTs testing oral interventions for BPSD. A search of PubMed was conducted in April 2016 for two-armed, double-blinded, placebo-controlled RCTs testing any oral intervention for management of BPSD using the NPI. Meta-analysis was conducted of baseline versus end of treatment placebo group data of included studies. Twenty-five RCTs published from 2000 to 2015 were included. Substantial variation in placebo effect sizes was detected. Participants in placebo groups showed greater improvements in recent studies compared with earlier studies. Subgroup analyses indicated robustness of this finding. From 2000 to 2008 there was no significant change in total NPI scores within placebo groups (12 studies; 1,056 participants), whereas from 2009 to 2015 there was significant improvement (mean difference: -2.68; 95% confidence interval: -4.38, -0.99; z = 3.10; p = 0.002, random effects; I(2) = 76%; 13 studies; 1,170 participants). This increase in NPI effect sizes in placebo groups has important implications for power calculations for future clinical trials of BPSD. Effect size estimates for NPI need to be based on more recent studies. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Menopause and the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Mutneja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is associated with a large number of symptoms ranging from physical to psychological. These symptoms may unfavorably affect oral health and treatment needs requiring dentists to be aware of the symptoms and health care needs of peri-menopausal/menopausal/postmenopausal women. This article attempts to provide an insight into the multifarious oral manifestations at menopause along with the relevant prosthodontic implications.

  19. Prescribed burning plan : Stillwater NWR : de Braga Burn Unit 67

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This 1991 Annual Prescribed Burning Plan for Stillwater NWR calls for all 67 acres of the de Braga burn unit to be burned. The objective of this burn is to remove...

  20. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of Biotène Oral Balance in patients with secondary Sjögren's syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliko, Ardita; Alushi, Adem; Tafaj, Argjend; Isufi, Ramazan

    2012-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of Oral Balance saliva substitute in alleviating dry mouth symptoms in a sample of patients with secondary Sjögren's syndrome. Twenty-one consecutive secondary Sjögren's syndrome patients with dry mouth complaints and hyposalivation were included in this study. Patients used a lactoperoxidase-system-containing gel (Biotène Oral Balance) for 4 weeks. The effects on subjective oral symptoms were recorded by means of a 7-items questionnaire which contained questions regarding dry mouth sensation and its effect on chewing, swallowing, taste, speech, burning sensation and denture retention. The severity of symptoms was assessed using a visual analogical scale. Oral symptom scores and unstimulated whole salivary flow were recorded at baseline and after 4 weeks' use of the product. Two patients withdrew from the study, because of nausea and unpleasant taste caused by the product. Nineteen patients (all women, mean age 52.7 years) participated throughout the entire study. Wilcoxon signed-ranked tests indicated significant improvements in visual analogical scale scores posttreatment for 5 of the 7 items on the oral dryness questionnaire, although no increase in salivary flow was found. However, the improvement in certain variables did not take a positive course in all cases. Patients with lower salivary flow at baseline tended to have greater improvement in oral symptoms. The study suggests that the use of Oral Balance gel is effective in alleviating the dry mouth symptoms in secondary Sjögren's syndrome patients, but a randomized controlled trial is needed to assess the placebo effect.

  1. PBXN-110 Burn Rate Estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, E

    2008-08-11

    It is estimated that PBXN-110 will burn laminarly with a burn function of B = (0.6-1.3)*P{sup 1.0} (B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is pressure in MPa). This paper provides a brief discussion of how this burn behavior was estimated.

  2. Management of burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Trop, Marija; Neuhaus, Kathrin

    2013-10-01

    Small and moderate scalds in toddlers are still the most frequent thermal injuries the pediatric surgeons have to face today. Over the last years, surgical treatment of these patients has changed in many aspects. Due to new dressing materials and new surgical treatment strategies that are particularly suitable for children, today, far better functional and aesthetic long-term results are possible. While small and moderate thermal injuries can be treated in most European pediatric surgical departments, the severely burned child must be transferred to a specialized, ideally pediatric, burn center, where a well-trained multidisciplinary team under the leadership of a (ideally pediatric) burn surgeon cares for these highly demanding patients. In future, tissue engineered full thickness skin analogues will most likely play an important role, in pediatric burn as well as postburn reconstructive surgery.

  3. Burn Wise Awareness Kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health and safety outreach materials in the form of an awareness kit. Designed specifically for state, local, and tribal air agencies working to reduce wood smoke pollution, it includes best burn tips, social media m

  4. Molten Metal Burns

    OpenAIRE

    Kahn, Arthur M.; McCrady-Kahn, Virginia L.

    1981-01-01

    Molten metal burns are a frequent industrial injury among workers in foundries. The injury is typically small but very deep. Usually the depth and seriousness of these injuries is not recognized immediately by emergency department or industrial clinic physicians.

  5. New Fashioned Book Burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Reports on results of a teacher's experiment in book burning as a lesson accompanying the teaching of Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451." Discusses student reactions and the purpose of or justification for the experimental lesson. (TB)

  6. Menopausal symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Rymer, Janice; Morris, Edward P.

    2011-01-01

    In the UK, the median age for onset of menopausal symptoms is 45.5 to 47.5 years. Symptoms associated with the menopause include vasomotor symptoms, sleeplessness, mood changes, reduced energy levels, loss of libido, vaginal dryness, and urinary symptoms.Many symptoms, such as hot flushes, are temporary, but those resulting from reduced hormone levels, such as genital atrophy, may be permanent.

  7. Coping with burns: the role of coping self-efficacy in the recovery from traumatic stress following burn injuries

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a three-wave prospective study among patients with burns (N = 178) to examine the prospective influence of coping self-efficacy (CSE) perceptions on trajectories of posttraumatic stress symptoms in the first 12 months after burn injuries. Using linear growth curve modeling, we corrected for demographics, the number of surgeries during initial admittance, trait coping styles, and changing levels of health-related quality of life. CSE during initial admission was by far the stronge...

  8. Accidental burns during surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Erhan; O'Dey, Dan Mon; Pallua, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to increase awareness of intraoperative burns during standard procedures, to discuss their possible causes and warning signs and to provide recommendations for prevention and procedures to follow after their occurrence. A total of 19 patients associated with intraoperative burn accidents were treated surgically and analyzed after a mean follow-up of 5 +/- 3.5 months. Review included retrospective patient chart analysis, clinical examination, and technical device and equipment testing. A total of 15 patients recently underwent cardiac surgery, and 4 pediatric patients recovered after standard surgical procedures. A total of 15 patients had superficial and 4 presented with deep dermal or full-thickness burns. The average injured TBSA was 2.1 +/- 1% (range, 0.5-4%). Delay between primary surgery and consultation of plastic surgeons was 4.5 +/- 3.4 days. A total of 44% required surgery, including débridment, skin grafting or musculocutaneous gluteus maximus flaps, and the remaining patients were treated conservatively. Successful durable soft-tissue coverage of the burn region was achieved in 18 patients, and 1 patient died after a course of pneumonia. Technical analysis demonstrated one malfunctioning electrosurgical device, one incorrect positioned neutral electrode, three incidents occurred after moisture under the negative electrode, eight burns occurred during surgery while fluid or blood created alternate current pathways, five accidents were chemical burns after skin preparation with Betadine solution, and in one case, the cause was not clear. The surgical team should pay more attention to the probability of burns during surgery. Early patient examination and immediate involvement of plastic and burn surgeons may prevent further complications or ease handling after the occurrence.

  9. Smartphone applications in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzer, Paul; Parvizi, Daryousch; Lumenta, David B; Giretzlehner, Michael; Branski, Ludwik K; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Tuca, Alexandru; Rappl, Thomas; Smolle, Christian; Kamolz, Lars P

    2015-08-01

    Since the introduction of applications (apps) for smartphones, the popularity of medical apps has been rising. The aim of this review was to demonstrate the current availability of apps related to burns on Google's Android and Apple's iOS store as well as to include a review of their developers, features, and costs. A systematic online review of Google Play Store and Apple's App Store was performed by using the following search terms: "burn," "burns," "thermal," and the German word "Verbrennung." All apps that were programmed for use as medical apps for burns were included. The review was performed from 25 February until 1 March 2014. A closer look at the free and paid calculation apps including a standardized patient was performed. Four types of apps were identified: calculators, information apps, book/journal apps, and games. In Google Play Store, 31 apps were related to burns, of which 20 were calculation apps (eight for estimating the total body surface area (TBSA) and nine for total fluid requirement (TFR)). In Apple's App Store, under the category of medicine, 39 apps were related to burns, of which 21 were calculation apps (19 for estimating the TBSA and 17 for calculating the TFR). In 19 out of 32 available calculation apps, our study showed a correlation of the calculated TFR compared to our standardized patient. The review demonstrated that many apps for medical burns are available in both common app stores. Even free available calculation apps may provide a more objective and reproducible procedure compared to manual/subjective estimations, although there is still a lack of data security especially in personal data entered in calculation apps. Further clinical studies including smartphone apps for burns should be performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third......-degree burn injury was induced with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear...... neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization of the skin showed an increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes dominated inflammation in the group of mice...

  11. Comparative effectiveness of oral drug therapies for lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghuan Wang

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH are common in elder men and a number of drugs alone or combined are clinically used for this disorder. But available studies investigating the comparative effects of different drug therapies are limited. This study was aimed to compare the efficacy of different drug therapies for LUTS/BPH with network meta-analysis.An electronic search of PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing different drug therapies for LUTS/BPH within 24 weeks. Comparative effects were calculated using Aggregate Data Drug Information System. Consistency models of network meta-analysis were created and cumulative probability was used to rank different therapies.A total 66 RCTs covering seven different therapies with 29384 participants were included. We found that α-blockers (ABs plus phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is ranked highest in the test of IPSS total score, storage subscore and voiding subscore. The combination therapy of ABs plus 5α-reductase inhibitors was the best for increasing maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax with a mean difference (MD of 1.98 (95% CI, 1.12 to 2.86 as compared to placebo. ABs plus muscarinic receptor antagonists (MRAs ranked secondly on the reduction of IPSS storage subscore, although monotherapies including MRAs showed no effect on this aspect. Additionally, PDE5-Is alone showed great effectiveness for LUTS/BPH except Qmax.Based on our novel findings, combination therapy, especially ABs plus PDE5-Is, is recommended for short-term treatment for LUTS/BPH. There was also evidence that PDE5-Is used alone was efficacious except on Qmax. Additionally, it should be cautious when using MRAs. However, further clinical studies are required for longer duration which considers more treatment outcomes such as disease progression, as well as basic research investigating mechanisms involving PDE5-Is and other

  12. Orally Administered Salacia reticulata Extract Reduces H1N1 Influenza Clinical Symptoms in Murine Lung Tissues Putatively Due to Enhanced Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A.; Egashira, Masayo; Harada, Yuri; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory tract infection. Although most cases do not require further hospitalization, influenza periodically causes epidemics in humans that can potentially infect and kill millions of people. To countermeasure this threat, new vaccines need to be developed annually to match emerging influenza viral strains with increased resistance to existing vaccines. Thus, there is a need for finding and developing new anti-influenza viral agents as alternatives to current treatments. Here, we tested the antiviral effects of an extract from the stems and roots of Salacia reticulata (SSRE), a plant rich in phytochemicals, such as salacinol, kotalanol, and catechins, on H1N1 influenza virus-infected mice. Following oral administration of 0.6 mg/day of SSRE, the incidence of coughing decreased in 80% of mice, and only one case of severe pulmonary inflammation was detected. Moreover, when compared with mice given Lactobacillus casei JCM1134, a strain previously shown to help increase in vitro natural killer (NK) cell activity, SSRE-administered mice showed greater and equal NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells, respectively, at high effector cell:target cell ratios. Next, to test whether or not SSRE would exert protective effects against influenza in the absence of gut microbiota, mice were given antibiotics before being inoculated influenza virus and subsequently administered SSRE. SSRE administration induced an increase in NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells at levels similar to those detected in mice not treated with antibiotics. Based on our results, it can be concluded that phytochemicals in the SSRE exerted protective effects against influenza infection putatively via modulation of the immune response, including enhancement of NK cell activity, although some protective effects were not necessarily through modulation of gut microbiota. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms

  13. Dopaminergic-like neurons derived from oral mucosa stem cells by developmental cues improve symptoms in the hemi-parkinsonian rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ganz

    Full Text Available Achieving safe and readily accessible sources for cell replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD is still a challenging unresolved issue. Recently, a primitive neural crest stem cell population (hOMSC was isolated from the adult human oral mucosa and characterized in vitro and in vivo. In this study we assessed hOMSC ability to differentiate into dopamine-secreting cells with a neuronal-dopaminergic phenotype in vitro in response to dopaminergic developmental cues and tested their therapeutic potential in the hemi-Parkinsonian rat model. We found that hOMSC express constitutively a repertoire of neuronal and dopaminergic markers and pivotal transcription factors. Soluble developmental factors induced a reproducible neuronal-like morphology in the majority of hOMSC, downregulated stem cells markers, upregulated the expression of the neuronal and dopaminergic markers that resulted in dopamine release capabilities. Transplantation of these dopaminergic-induced hOMSC into the striatum of hemi-Parkinsonian rats improved their behavioral deficits as determined by amphetamine-induced rotational behavior, motor asymmetry and motor coordination tests. Human TH expressing cells and increased levels of dopamine in the transplanted hemispheres were observed 10 weeks after transplantation. These results demonstrate for the first time that soluble factors involved in the development of DA neurons, induced a DA phenotype in hOMSC in vitro that significantly improved the motor function of hemiparkinsonian rats. Based on their neural-related origin, their niche accessibility by minimal-invasive procedures and their propensity for DA differentiation, hOMSC emerge as an attractive tool for autologous cell replacement therapy in PD.

  14. Orally administered Salacia reticulata extract reduces H1N1 influenza clinical symptoms in murine lung tissues putatively due to enhanced natural killer cell activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Romero-Pérez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a major cause of respiratory tract infection. Although most cases do not require further hospitalization, influenza periodically causes epidemics in humans that can potentially infect and kill millions of people. To countermeasure this threat, new vaccines need to be developed annually to match emerging influenza viral strains with increased resistance to existing vaccines. Thus, there is a need for finding and developing new anti-influenza viral agents as alternatives to current treatments. Here, we tested the antiviral effects of an extract from the stems and roots of Salacia reticulata (SSRE, a plant rich in phytochemicals such as salacinol, kotalanol and catechins, on H1N1 influenza virus-infected mice. Following oral administration of 0.6 mg/day of SSRE, the incidence of coughing decreased in 80% of mice, and only one case of severe pulmonary inflammation was detected. Moreover, when compared with mice given Lactobacillus casei JCM1134, a strain previously shown to help increase in vitro NK cell activity, SSRE-administered mice showed greater and equal NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells, respectively, at high effector cell:target cell ratios. Next, to test whether or not SSRE would exert protective effects against influenza in the absence of gut microbiota, mice were given antibiotics before being inoculated influenza virus and subsequently administered SSRE. SSRE administration induced an increase in NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells at levels similar to those detected in mice not treated with antibiotics. Based on our results, it can be concluded that phytochemicals in the SSRE exerted protective effects against influenza infection putatively via modulation of the immune response including enhancement of NK cell activity, although some protective effects were not necessarily through modulation of gut microbiota. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms

  15. Burns Caused by Medical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    fear of litigation, patients with such injuries, even if the injuries are minor, arc often referred to a burn center for care. Burn injury...the potential burn hazards found elsewhere in the hospital. Even fewer studies have addressed the burn risks posed by medical therapy administered...35. Mills GH, Ralph S). Bums due to pulse oximetry [ letter ]. Anaesthesia 1992j47:276·7. 36. Shdlock: FG, Kana! E. Burns associated with the use of

  16. Coping with burns: the role of coping self-efficacy in the recovery from traumatic stress following burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Mark W G; Hofland, Helma W; De Jong, Alette E; Van Loey, Nancy E

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a three-wave prospective study among patients with burns (N = 178) to examine the prospective influence of coping self-efficacy (CSE) perceptions on trajectories of posttraumatic stress symptoms in the first 12 months after burn injuries. Using linear growth curve modeling, we corrected for demographics, the number of surgeries during initial admittance, trait coping styles, and changing levels of health-related quality of life. CSE during initial admission was by far the strongest predictor of both initial PTSD symptoms and degree of symptom change with higher CSE levels associated with lower initial symptoms and a steeper decline of symptoms over time. Of the other variables only avoidant coping was associated with higher initial symptom levels, and only emotional expression associated with greater rate of recovery. Current findings suggest that CSE plays a pivotal role in recovery from posttraumatic stress after a burn injury, even when the role of burn-related impairments is taken into consideration. Implications of findings are discussed.

  17. Glutathione S-transferase, incense burning and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-J; Tsai, C-H; Chen, C-H; Tung, K-Y; Lee, Y L

    2011-06-01

    Incense burning is a popular practice in many family homes and temples. However, little is known about the effects of indoor incense burning and genetic polymorphisms on asthma. This study evaluated the effects of indoor incense burning and glutathione S-transferase (GST) genetic polymorphisms on asthma and wheeze. In 2007, 3,764 seventh-grade schoolchildren (mean±sd age 12.42±0.65 yrs) were evaluated using a standard questionnaire for information about respiratory symptoms and environmental exposures. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to assess the association between GST polymorphisms and incense burning frequency on asthma and wheeze, after adjusting for potential confounders. The frequency of incense burning at home was associated with increased risk of current asthma (p=0.05), medication use (p=0.03) and exercise wheeze (p=0.001). GST1 (GSTT1) null genotypes were associated with current asthma (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.00-2.04) and medication use (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.01-2.22). GSTT1 showed a significant interactive effect with incense burning on current asthma, current wheeze and nocturnal wheeze. The frequency of incense burning was associated with increased risk of current asthma, medication use, lifetime wheeze, nocturnal wheeze and exercise wheeze in an exposure-response manner among children with GSTT1 null genotype (pIncense burning is a risk factor for asthma and wheezing, especially in GSTT1 genetically susceptible children.

  18. Piracetam relieves symptoms in progressive myoclonus epilepsy: a multicentre, randomised, double blind, crossover study comparing the efficacy and safety of three dosages of oral piracetam with placebo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskiniemi, M.; Van Vleymen, B.; Hakamies, L.; Lamusuo, S.; Taalas, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To compare the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of three daily dosage regimens of oral piracetam in patients with progressive myoclonus epilepsy.
METHODS—Twenty patients (12 men, eight women), aged 17-43 years, with classical Unverricht-Lundborg disease were enrolled in a multicentre, randomised, double blind trial of crossover design in which the effects of daily doses of 9.6 g, 16.8 g, and 24 g piracetam, given in two divided doses, were compared with placebo. The crossover design was such that patients received placebo and two of the three dosage regimens of piracetam, each for two weeks, for a total treatment period of six weeks and thus without wash out between each treatment phase. The primary outcome measure was a sum score representing the adjusted total of the ratings of six components of a myoclonus rating scale in which stimulus sensitivity, motor impairment, functional disability, handwriting, and global assessments by investigators and patients were scored. Sequential clinical assessments were made by the same neurologist in the same environment at the same time of day.
RESULTS—Treatment with 24 g/day piracetam produced significant and clinically relevant improvement in the primary outcome measure of mean sum score (p=0.005) and in the means of its subtests of motor impairment (p=0.02), functional disability (p=0.003), and in global assessments by both investigator (p=0.002) and patient (p=0.01). Significant improvement in functional disability was also found with daily doses of 9.6 g and 16.8 g. The dose-effect relation was linear and significant. More patients showed clinically relevant improvement with the highest dosage and, in individual patients, increasing the dose improved response. Piracetam was well tolerated and adverse effects were few, mild, and transient.
CONCLUSIONS—This study provides further evidence that piracetam is an effective and safe medication in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease. In addition

  19. Clinical characteristics and treatment of burn wound sepsis in extensive burn patients: successful experience with eight cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴家科; 盛志勇; 杨红明

    2000-01-01

    Eight burn wound sepsis patients, in which 6 cases were diagnosed as MODS and two as septic shock, were treated consecutively in our hospital from September 1997 to October 1998. The plasma concentration of IL-6, IL-8, TNFα and LPS were assayed before and after surgical intervention, as well as when the patients' vital signs became stable. The results showed: ①The patients' conditions abruptly deteriorated when the burn wound sepsis emerged;②The major cause related to burn wound sepsis was extensive burn injuries, with large areas of deep burn remaining open; ③Although wound swabs taken on admission revealed the presence of colonization by many pathogenic bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was one of the most frequent bacteria isolated from the subeschar tissue; ④The plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, TNF and LPS before surgical intervention were significantly higher than that after surgical intervention (P<0.05) ;⑤The lowest level of the inflammatory mediators was observed when the patients' conditions became stable, as compared with before surgical intervention (P<0. 001).These findings suggest that the clinical characteristics of burn wound sepsis are abrupt deterioration of the general condition and prominent septic symptoms, often complicated by MODS. The main cause of burn wound sepsis is the presence of a large area of open deep burn wounds, which should be excised and covered early. LPS and pro-inflammatory mediators play an important role in the pathogenesis of burn wound sepsis. Although success in treating these patients is the result of appropriate application of multiple treatments, early, aggressive and thorough surgical excision of invasive burn infectious tissue and closure of wound play a crucial role in the successful treatment of patients complicated by burn wound sepsis. Other treatments are adjuvant but also important.

  20. Anthrax: Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EID Journal Articles Anthrax-Related MMWRs Medscape Commentaries Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cause severe illness and even death. Cutaneous anthrax symptoms can include: A group of small blisters or ...

  1. [Clinical and immunological criteria of burn sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyk, I V; Pivovarova, L P; Krylov, K M; Filippova, O V; Il'ina, V A; Krylov, P K

    2005-01-01

    A hundred and twenty-nine victims aged 16 to 60 years who had skin burns in the area of 15 to 60% of the body surface without severe concomitant somatic disease (SAPS less than 9 scores). The clinical symptoms of a systemic inflammatory response (SIR) and the signs of wound infection were recorded in all the examinees. The victims underwent a comprehensive clinical and laboratory examination, 55 of them were immunologically studied over time (on admission, on days 3 and 10). To reveal the predictive clinical and immunological criteria for sepsis, the examinees were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 comprised 33 burnt persons who were observed to have the symptoms of SIR and the signs of burn wound infections without impaired function of organs and systems. Group 2 included 46 victims with severe sepsis and a good outcome of burn disease. Group 3 consisted of 50 patients who had died from severe sepsis. Analysis of the results of the study has indicated that the count of formed blood elements by calculating the leukocytic intoxication index, the estimation of the level of lysosomal cation proteins in the neutrophilic granulocytes, the detection of populations of T helper cells, cytotoxic lymphocytes, as well as histomorphological and bacteriological findings are early and valid criteria for the development of infectious complications. Their use for the diagnosis and prediction of sepsis permits initiation of its treatment at early stages, without awaiting the appearance of the signs of a septic process.

  2. Psychiatric aspects of burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries and their subsequent treatment cause one of the most excruciating forms of pain imaginable. The psychological aspects of burn injury have been researched in different parts of the world, producing different outcomes. Studies have shown that greater levels of acute pain are associated with negative long-term psychological effects such as acute stress disorder, depression, suicidal ideation, and post-traumatic stress disorder for as long as 2 years after the initial burn injury. The concept of allostatic load is presented as a potential explanation for the relationship between acute pain and subsequent psychological outcomes. A biopsychosocial model is also presented as a means of obtaining better inpatient pain management and helping to mediate this relationship.

  3. Bacteriological profile of burn patients at Yekatit 12 Hospital Burn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    injuries, creating a formidable public health problem. (3). Despite major ... change with time. Thus, to have an in-depth knowledge .... Table 4: Antibiotic resistance pattern of bacterial isolates from burn wound at Yekatit 12 hospital burn center.

  4. Somatic Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Kreiner, Svend; Ebstrup, Jeanette F

    2016-01-01

    ) the associations between the symptoms, and 3) the associations between the somatic symptoms, self-perceived health and limitations due to physical health accounting for the co-occurrence of symptoms. Information on 19 somatic symptoms, self-perceived health and limitations due to physical health was achieved from...... a population-based questionnaire survey of 36,163 randomly selected adults in the Capital Region of Denmark in 2006/07. Chain graph models were used to transparently identify and describe the associations between symptoms, self-perceived health and limitations due to physical health. In total, 94...... all strongly directly associated with both of the outcomes (γ>0.30). Chest pain was strongly associated with self-perceived health, and other musculoskeletal symptoms and urinary retention were strongly associated with limitations due to physical health. Other symptoms were either moderate...

  5. A ten-year review of lower extremity burns in diabetics: small burns that lead to major problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsun, Alura; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina L; Greenhalgh, David G

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus with its resulting neurovascular changes may lead to an increased risk of burns and impaired wound healing. The purpose of this article is to review 10 years of experience with foot and lower leg burns in patients with diabetes at a single adult burn center. Patients with lower extremity burns and diabetes mellitus, between May 1999 and December 2009, were identified in the Trauma Registry of the American College of Surgeons database, and their charts were reviewed for data related to their outcomes. Sixty-eight diabetic patients, 87% male, with a mean age of 54 years, sustained foot or lower extremity burns with 37 having burns resulting from insensate feet. The pathogenesis included walking on a hot or very cold surface (8), soaking feet in hot water (22), warming feet on or near something hot such as a heater (13), or spilling hot water (7). The majority of patients were taking insulin (59.6%) or oral hyperglycemic medications (34.6%). Blood sugar levels were not well controlled (mean glucose, 215.8 mg/dl; mean hemoglobin A1c, 9.08%). Renal disease was common with admission serum blood urea nitrogen (27.5 mg/dl) and creatinine (2.21 mg/dl), and 13 were on dialysis preinjury. Cardiovascular problems were common with 39 (57%) having hypertension or cardiac disease, 3 having peripheral vascular disease, and 9, previous amputations. The mean burn size was 4.2% TBSA (range, 0.5-15%) with 57% being full thickness. Despite the small burn, the mean length of stay was 15.2 days (range, 1-95), with 5.65 days per 1% TBSA. Inability to heal these wounds was evident in 19 patients requiring readmission (one required 10 operative procedures). At least one patient sustained more than one burn. There were 62 complications with 30 episodes of infection (cellulitis, 28; osteomyelitis, 4; deep plantar infections, 2; ruptured Achilles tendon, 1) and 3 deaths. Eleven patients needed amputations (7 below-knee amputations, 4 transmetatarsal amputations, and 20 toe

  6. An assessment of burn care professionals' attitudes to major burn.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, A D

    2008-06-01

    The resuscitation of severe burn remains a controversial area within the burn care profession. There is ongoing debate as to what percentage burn is associated with a sufficient quality of life to support initial resuscitation efforts. We conducted a survey of delegates at the 39th Annual Meeting of the British Burns Association (2005), regarding attitudes towards resuscitation following major burns. Respondents were asked the maximum percentage total body surface area (TBSA) burn beyond which they would not wish to be resuscitated. They were also asked what maximum TBSA they perceived to be commensurate with an acceptable quality of life (QOL). One hundred and forty three of 300 delegates responded to the questionnaire. Thirty three percent of respondents would not wish to be resuscitated with 50-75% TBSA burns or greater. A further 35% would not wish to have life-sustaining intervention with 75-95% TBSA burns or greater. The remaining 32% indicated that they would not want resuscitation with TBSA burns>95%. Regardless of TBSA affected, 16% would not wish resuscitation if they had full thickness facial burns, a further 10% did not want resuscitation if both their hands and faces were affected. Our survey demonstrates the diversity of personal preference amongst burn care professionals. This would suggest that a unifying philosophy regarding the resuscitation of extensive burns will remain elusive.

  7. Itch in burn areas after skin transplantation : Patient characteristics, influencing factors and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Hester C.; Bremer, Marc; Braem, Lee; Goemanne, Anne Sofi; Middelkoop, Esthe; Van Loey, Nancy E E

    2015-01-01

    Pruritus is a frequently encountered symptom following burns. Higher intensity of itching has been associated with depth of the wounds and specific body locations but these differences are not well understood. Our aim was to investigate the intensity of post burn pruritus in grafted and non-grafted

  8. Itch in burn areas after skin transplantation : Patient characteristics, influencing factors and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Hester C.; Bremer, Marc; Braem, Lee; Goemanne, Anne Sofi; Middelkoop, Esthe; Van Loey, Nancy E E

    2015-01-01

    Pruritus is a frequently encountered symptom following burns. Higher intensity of itching has been associated with depth of the wounds and specific body locations but these differences are not well understood. Our aim was to investigate the intensity of post burn pruritus in grafted and non-grafted

  9. Back Bay Wilderness burning support

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a memorandum concerning prescribed burns between members of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife. It states that burning should be supported...

  10. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Professionals Phoenix Society is the leader in connecting the burn recovery community and creating resources for survivors. Since 1977, we have partnered with survivors, families, health care professionals, burn centers, and the fire ...

  11. Hair bleaching and skin burning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forster, K; Lingitz, R; Prattes, G; Schneider, G; Sutter, S; Schintler, M; Trop, M

    2012-01-01

    .... We report a unique case of a 16-yr-old girl who suffered full-thickness chemical and thermal burns to the nape of her neck and superficial burns to the occiput after her hair had been dyed blond...

  12. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  13. The year in burns 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steven E

    2009-12-01

    For 2008, approximately 1200 original burn research articles were published in scientific journals using the English language. This article reviews those with the most impact on burn treatment according to the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns). As in the previous year's review, articles were divided into the following topic areas: epidemiology, wound characterisation, critical care physiology, inhalation injury, infection, metabolism and nutrition, psychological considerations, pain management, rehabilitation, and burn reconstruction. Each selected article is mentioned briefly with editorial comment.

  14. TIRES, OPEN BURNING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chapter describes available information on the health effects from open burning of rubber tires. It concentrates on the three known sources of detailed measurements: (1) a small-scale emissions characterization study performed by the U.S. EPA in a facility designed to simulat...

  15. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000059.htm Chemical burn or reaction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ...

  16. PLASTIC SURGERY AND BURNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Objective Endotoxin as the inciting agentof cytokines and other mediators, whose highlevel expression correlates with the septicshock and MOF, has been the one of leadingcauses of death in ICU. Methods For treatingsepsis and MOF caused by endotoxin, the anti-lipid A of LPS antibody was used. 19 burned

  17. Pathways to PTSD, part I: Children with burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, Glenn N; Stoddard, Frederick; Hall, Erin; Chawla, Neharika; Lopez, Carlos; Sheridan, Robert; King, Daniel; King, Lynda; Yehuda, Rachel

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a model of risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a group of acutely burned children. Seventy-two children between the ages of 7 and 17 who were admitted to the hospital for an acute burn were eligible for study. Members of families who consented completed the Child PTSD Reaction Index, the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, and other self-report measures of psychopathology and environmental stress both during the hospitalization and 3 months following the burn. A path analytic strategy was used to build a model of risk factors for PTSD. Two pathways to PTSD were discerned: 1) from the size of the burn and level of pain following the burn to the child's level of acute separation anxiety, and then to PTSD, and 2) from the size of the burn to the child's level of acute dissociation following the burn, and then to PTSD. Together these pathways accounted for almost 60% of the variance in PTSD symptoms and constituted a model with excellent fit indices. These findings support a model of complex etiology for childhood PTSD in which two independent pathways may be mediated by different biobehavioral systems.

  18. Modern management of paediatric burns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... Jackson's. 3-dimensional burn wound model describes 3 zones: • a central zone ... the burn.7 Care must be taken not to induce hypothermia in larger burns – especially in .... Fluid therapy thereafter consists of 2 components ...

  19. SELECTIVE INTESTINAL DECONTAMINATION FOR PREVENTION OF WOUND COLONIZATION IN SEVERELY BURNED PATIENTS - A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANSON, WL; KLASEN, HJ; SAUER, EW; OLIEMAN, A

    1992-01-01

    In this study the effect of selective intestinal decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) on wound colonization was investigated. Ninety-one patients with at least 25 per cent total burned surface area (TBSA) were included in this study. All patients received oral polymyxin. In 63 patients oral

  20. Burn epidemiology and cost of medication in paediatric burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha; Sağlam, Zeynep

    2012-09-01

    Burns are common injuries that cause problems to societies throughout the world. In order to reduce the cost of burn treatment in children, it is extremely important to determine the burn epidemiology and the cost of medicines used in burn treatment. The present study used a retrospective design, with data collected from medical records of 140 paediatric patients admitted to a burn centre between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2009. Medical records were examined to determine burn epidemiology, medication administered, dosage, and duration of use. Descriptive statistical analysis was completed for all variables; chi-square was used to examine the relationship between certain variables. It was found that 62.7% of paediatric burns occur in the kitchen, with 70.7% involving boiling water; 55.7% of cases resulted in third-degree burns, 19.3% required grafting, and mean duration of hospital stay was 27.5 ± 1.2 days. Medication costs varied between $1.38 US dollars (USD) and $14,159.09, total drug cost was $46,148.03 and average cost per patient was $329.63. In this study, the medication cost for burn patients was found to be relatively high, with antibiotics comprising the vast majority of medication expenditure. Most paediatric burns are preventable, so it is vital to educate families about potential household hazards that can be addressed to reduce the risk of a burn. Programmes are also recommended to reduce costs and the inappropriate prescribing of medication.

  1. Notes on burn nursing : aspects of pain management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.E.E. de

    2013-01-01

    Adequate management of burn pain may influence pain resistance, analgesic requirements, sensitivity to pain over time, wound healing and the development of delirium and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Efforts should be made to optimize pain management. An important step is effect evaluation of interv

  2. Notes on burn nursing : aspects of pain management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.E.E. de

    2013-01-01

    Adequate management of burn pain may influence pain resistance, analgesic requirements, sensitivity to pain over time, wound healing and the development of delirium and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Efforts should be made to optimize pain management. An important step is effect evaluation of

  3. Oral Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  4. An understanding of burn infection%对烧伤感染的认识

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许伟石

    2008-01-01

    Burn infection occurs when pathogenic bacte-ria colonized on the burn wound surfate,and they then invaded the viable tissue causing sepsis or sepsis with blood stream inva-sion.This infection pattern is particular to burn injury.Both in a model of pseudomonas burn wound sepsis and a clinical study of early eschar excision for bacteria quantification indicate that the bacteria not only are located on the burn wound surface but also invaded the deeper tissues.Finally,the bacteria penetrate into the neighboring viable tissue and even blood ves-sels.Therefore,we can say that burn infection is from local wound infection to invasive infection.and finally sepsis is devel-oped,and it is termed as burn wound sepsis.The cutoff count of subeschar tissue bacteria is 105/g.However,the burn wound sepsis may not occur when the number of subeschar tissue bacteria reaches 105/g.The criteria for the diagnosis of burn wound sepsis are mainly listed as below:(1)The number of bacteria in the subes-char reaches≥105/g.(2)Bacteria can be detected in the biopsy specimen.(3)Sepsis associated symptoms and signs.However,the sepsis associated symptoms and signs must be obvious in patients to make the clinical diagnosis of burn wound sepsis.If the sepsis associated symptoms and signs do not ap-pear.we should not make the diagnosis of burn wound sepsis e-ven with the number of bacteria in the subeschar tissue reaching 105/g or bacteria can be found in the biopsy specimen.Sepsis has been defined as the body's response to bacteria and their products.The occurrence of sepsis depends primarily on immune function and stress response intensity.and it is closely related to wound infection degree such as bacteria density and invasion depth in the burn wound,or plasma endotoxin level to certain extent.

  5. Symptom-modifying effects of oral avocado/soybean unsaponifiables in routine treatment of knee osteoarthritis in Poland. An open, prospective observational study of patients adherent to a 6-month treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głuszko, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Observational studies provide insights into real-life situations. Therefore, we assessed the effects of oral avocado/soybean unsaponifiable (ASU) capsules on pain relief and functional ability in patients, while they were receiving a routine treatment for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Material and methods An open, prospective, observational 6-month study was conducted in 99 centers in Poland in a group of 4822 patients with symptomatic knee OA receiving one 300 mg ASU capsule/day as a routine medication. The patients had no diagnoses of other rheumatic diseases and were not treated with other symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs). Data on OA symptoms and therapy were collected from the initiation of ASU treatment (visit 0) and during 3 consecutive control visits performed every 2 months (visits 1–3). Functional Lequesne index, severity of joint pain of one symptomatic knee (Laitinen index and VAS), use of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), adherence to treatment and adverse events were evaluated and recorded using electronic Case Report Forms. Results Four thousand one hundred and eighty-six patients (86.8%) attended all 4 visits. In 94.2% of patients (mean age 60.7 ±11.6 years SD, 73.4% female) at least one OA risk factor was identified. There was a significant improvement in functional ability between the last and baseline visits as evidenced by the median Lequesne index decreasing from 8 to 4 points (p < 0.001). Measures of pain intensity also fell significantly (p < 0.001) throughout the study: median Laitinen score decreased from 6 to 3 points, median pain at rest VAS – from 1.8 to 0 cm and median pain during walking VAS – from 5.6 to 1.9 cm. The significant differences were also noted between consecutive visits. The proportion of patients using analgesics and NSAIDs declined from 58.8% at the baseline visit to 24.9% at the last visit 3 (p < 0.001). Defined daily dose of NSAIDs decreased

  6. The microbiome of the oral mucosa in irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    abstract Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disorder characterized by persistent symptoms, including visceral pain. Studies have demonstrated oral microbiome differences in inflammatory bowel diseases suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in the study of non-oral conditions. In this exploratory study we examine whether differences exist in the oral microbiome of IBS participants and healthy controls, and whether the oral microbiome relates to symptom severity. The...

  7. Oral myiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Thalaimalai Saravanan; Mathan A Mohan; Meera Thinakaran; Saneem Ahammed

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability ...

  8. Oral allergy syndrome--the need of a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelava, Nikolina; Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Duvancić, Tomislav; Romić, Renata; Situm, Mirna

    2014-06-01

    Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) is one of the most common types of food allergy. The syndrome includes itching and swelling of the lips, palate and tongue, usually after consuming fresh fruits and vegetables. The underlying pathogenic mechanism is cross-reactivity between IgE antibodies specific to pollen, and antigens in food, such as fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts that are structurally similar to pollen. Both pollen and food antigens can bind to IgE and trigger type I immune reaction. Diagnosis is primarily based on the patient's history, and confirmed by skin tests, in vitro tests, and oral provocation tests. Differential diagnoses include many diseases (such as burning mouth syndrome, angioedema, hay fever, various other oral diseases, etc.), and for this reason a multidisciplinary approach is necessary, as different specialists need to be involved in the diagnostic procedure. Therapy includes avoiding, or thermal processing of, fruit and vegetables known to trigger a reaction, and antihistamine medications. If a more severe anaphylactic reaction develops, more aggressive therapy is required. The goal of this article is to present OAS, its etiopathogenesis, clinical picture, and symptoms, diagnostic approach and therapy for OAS.

  9. "Tetracycline hydrochloride chemical burn" as self-inflicted mucogingival injury: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundoor Manjunath Dayakar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to oral soft tissue can be accidental, iatrogenic, and factitious trauma. Chemical, thermal, and physical agents are the main causative agents for oral soft-tissue burns. The present case describes the chemical burn of oral mucosa caused by tetracycline hydrochloride and its management. Diagnosis was made on the basis of definitive history elicited from the patient. The early detection of the lesion by the patient and immediate institution of therapeutic measures ensure a rapid cure and possible prevention of further mucogingival damage. In addition, we believe that proper guidance and education of the patient is an important prophylactic measure in preventing this self-inflicting injury.

  10. The year in burns 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steven E; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2012-12-01

    For 2011, approximately 1746 original research articles in burns were published in English in scientific journals. This article reviews those with the most potential impact on for burn therapeutics and outcomes according to the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and his colleague. As done previously, articles were found and divided into these topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterisation, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. Each selected article is mentioned briefly with editorial comment.

  11. Effects of oral versus transdermal menopausal hormone treatments on self-reported sleep domains and their association with vasomotor symptoms in recently menopausal women enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintron, Dahima; Lahr, Brian D; Bailey, Kent R; Santoro, Nanette; Lloyd, Robin; Manson, JoAnn E; Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Pal, Lubna; Taylor, Hugh S; Wharton, Whitney; Naftolin, Fredrick; Harman, S Mitchell; Miller, Virginia M

    2017-08-21

    This study determined whether two different formulations of hormone therapy (HT): oral conjugated equine estrogens (o-CEE; 0.45 mg/d, n = 209), transdermal 17β-estradiol (t-E2; 50 μg/d, n = 201) plus cyclic progesterone (Prometrium, 200 mg) or placebo (PBO, n = 243) affected sleep domains in participants of the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study. Participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index at baseline and during the intervention at 6, 18, 36, and 48 months. Global sleep quality and individual sleep domain scores were compared between treatments using analysis of covariance, and correlated with vasomotor symptom (VMS) scores using Spearman correlation coefficients. Global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores (mean 6.3; 24% with score >8) were similar across groups at baseline and were reduced (improved sleep quality) by both HT (average change -1.27 [o-CEE] and -1.32 [t-E2]) when compared with PBO (-0.60; P = 0.001 [o-CEE vs PBO] and P = 0.002 [t-E2 vs PBO]). Domain scores for sleep satisfaction and latency improved with both HT. The domain score for sleep disturbances improved more with t-E2 than o-CEE or PBO. Global sleep scores significantly correlated with VMS severity (rs = 0.170, P < 0.001 for hot flashes; rs = 0.177, P < 0.001 for night sweats). Change in scores for all domains except sleep latency and sleep efficiency correlated with change in severity of VMS. Poor sleep quality is common in recently menopausal women. Sleep quality improved with both HT formulations. The relationship of VMS with domains of sleep suggests that assessing severity of symptoms and domains of sleep may help direct therapy to improve sleep for postmenopausal women.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. http

  12. 1 case of megaloblastic anemia with the first symptom of oral candida infection%口腔念珠菌感染为首发症状的巨幼细胞性贫血1例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云霞; 杜劲

    2014-01-01

    通过分析1例口腔念珠菌感染为首发症状的巨幼细胞性贫血,总结得出:专科对症处理后病情仍反复时一定要重视全身情况;检查应由无创、简便至有创、复杂。针对该患者,详细询问病史及血涂片起了关键作用,如果早期作辅助内因子抗体试验、维生素B12吸收试验,就能更容易明确诊断。如果肿瘤指标单个升高,相关指标无异常,患肿瘤概率就低,但仍需再次复查;治疗中,如果单纯补充叶酸、维生素B12及铁剂效果不佳,就予肠道营养素,其对体质改善及症状缓解明显。%Through the analysis of 1 case of megaloblastic anemia with the first symptom of oral candida infection,we concluded:if the patient's conditions were still repeated after symptomatic treatment,we must pay attention to the general condition.The check order is non-invasive and easy to invasive and complex.For the patient,detailed history and blood smear play a key role.If patients early received auxiliary intrinsic factor antibody and vitamin B12 absorption test,the disease is more likely to be diagnosed in the early.In the tumor marker,single is elevated,correlation index is not abnormal.The risk of cancer is low,but the patient still need to be check again.During the treatment,the effect of simple supplement of folic acid,vitamin B12 and iron is poor,the constitution of the patient with intestinal nutrients is improvement,and symptom relief is obvious.

  13. 康复新液对终末期肾脏病血液透析患者氨性口臭和口腔黏膜烧灼性疼痛的治疗效果研究%Treatment Effect of Kangfuxin Solution on Ammoniac Halitosis and Burning Pain in Oral Mucosa of Hemodialysis Patients with End-stage Renal Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯锦红; 赵颖

    2016-01-01

    Objective To discuss the treatment effect of kangfuxin solution on ammoniac halitosis and burning pain in oral mucosa of hemodialysis patients with end-stage renal disease ( ESRD) .Methods Among the 110 ESRD patients who received hemodialysis in the Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical University, 63 patients with ammoniac halitosis ( OS≥2 ) were selected from January to October of 2013.The patients were divided into control group ( n=31 ) and experiment group ( n=32) by random number table method.Patients in both of the two groups received oral hygiene instruction and training of using mouthwash, patients in control group used compound chlorhexidine gargle, while patients in experiment group chose kangfuxin solution, and the treatment time lasted for 2 weeks.The ammoniac halitosis indicators 〔including OS, oral ammonia value (OAV), pH value of saliva〕, other oral examinations conditions 〔including thickness of the tongue (Tt), area of the tongue (Ta), staining index (SI)〕 of patients in two groups, and pain index 〔including pain rating scale (PRI), visual analogue scale (VAS), present pain index (PPI)〕 of those patients with burning pain in the oral mucosa (PPI≥1) were detected and compared before and after treatment in both groups.Results There was no significant difference in OS, OAV and pH of saliva between patients in two groups before and after treatment (P>0.05) .The number of patients with PPI≥1 were 41 in total, the difference before and after treatment of PRI and VAS of patients with PPI≥1 in experiment group were significantly higher thanthat in control group (P 0.05) .The differences before and after treatment of Ta, Tt and SI were not significantly different (P >0.05) .Conclusion Kangfuxin solution can alleviate burning pain in oral mucosal of ESRD hemodialysis patients with ESRD,and its effect is better than chlorhexidine solution; but it has no advantage in the treatment of ammonia halitosis compared withchlorhexidine solution.%

  14. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Assessing burn depth in tattooed burn lesions with LASCA Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezdorn, N; Limbourg, A; Paprottka, F J; Könneker; Ipaktchi, R; Vogt, P M

    2016-09-30

    Tattoos are on the rise, and so are patients with tattooed burn lesions. A proper assessment with regard to burn depth is often impeded by the tattoo dye. Laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) is a technique that evaluates burn lesions via relative perfusion analysis. We assessed the effect of tattoo skin pigmentation on LASCA perfusion imaging in a multicolour tattooed patient. Depth of burn lesions in multi-coloured tattooed and untattooed skin was assessed using LASCA. Relative perfusion was measured in perfusion units (PU) and compared to various pigment colours, then correlated with the clinical evaluation of the lesion. Superficial partial thickness burn (SPTB) lesions showed significantly elevated perfusion units (PU) compared to normal skin; deep partial thickness burns showed decreased PU levels. PU of various tattoo pigments to normal skin showed either significantly lower values (blue, red, pink) or significantly increased values (black) whereas orange and yellow pigment showed values comparable to normal skin. In SPTB, black and blue pigment showed reduced perfusion; yellow pigment was similar to normal SPTB burn. Deep partial thickness burn (DPTB) lesions in tattoos did not show significant differences to normal DPTB lesions for black, green and red. Tattoo pigments alter the results of perfusion patterns assessed with LASCA both in normal and burned skin. Yellow pigments do not seem to interfere with LASCA assessment. However proper determination of burn depth both in SPTB and DPTB by LASCA is limited by the heterogenic alterations of the various pigment colours.

  16. [Hydrofluoric acid burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holla, Robin; Gorter, Ramon R; Tenhagen, Mark; Vloemans, A F P M Jos; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is increasingly used as a rust remover and detergent. Dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid results in a chemical burn characterized by severe pain and deep tissue necrosis. It may cause electrolyte imbalances with lethal consequences. It is important to identify high-risk patients. 'High risk' is defined as a total affected body area > 3% or exposure to hydrofluoric acid in a concentration > 50%. We present the cases of three male patients (26, 31, and 39 years old) with hydrofluoric acid burns of varying severity and describe the subsequent treatments. The application of calcium gluconate 2.5% gel to the skin is the cornerstone of the treatment, reducing pain as well as improving wound healing. Nails should be thoroughly inspected and possibly removed if the nail is involved, to ensure proper healing. In high-risk patients, plasma calcium levels should be evaluated and cardiac monitoring is indicated.

  17. [Oral rehydration immediately after appendectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azabache, W; Johanson, L

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of 20 patients with appendicitis was carried out in order to know if after the appendectomy they tolerate the hidratation with rehidratant salts by mouth in place of endovenous hydratation. The oral hydratation was indicated in all the cases immediately after the operation and only was one failure (5%). In the 95% the oral hydratation was tolerated, 45% without gastric symptoms, 35% with mild gastric symptoms and in 15% with moderate gastric symptoms. The association of gentamycin-metronidazol administered by intramuscular and oral way respectively was used in 100% of the patients. In 80% as profilaxis and in 20% as treatment. Two cases had complication as sepsis of the wound one of the profilactic group (5.9%) and another of the treatment group. In conclusion the oral hydratation with rehydrating salts were tolerated for the patients immediately after the appendectomy.

  18. The hair color-highlighting burn: a unique burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, W

    2000-01-01

    A unique, preventable, 2.8 x 3.7-cm, full-thickness scalp burn resulted after a woman underwent a professional color-highlighting procedure at a hair salon. The burn appeared to result from scalp contact with aluminum foil that had been overheated by a hair dryer during the procedure. The wound required debridement and skin grafting and 3 subsequent serial excisions to eliminate the resulting area of burn scar alopecia. The preventive aspects of this injury are discussed.

  19. Diphtheria Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  20. Plague Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  1. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy for the treatment of burning mouth syndrome: a randomized, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; López, José López; de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro; Cherubini, Karen; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome (BMS). A diode laser was used in 78 BMS patients who were randomly assigned into four groups: IR1W, n=20 (830 nm, 100 mW, 5 J, 176 J/cm2, 50 s, LLLT weekly sessions, 10 sessions); IR3W, n=20 (830 nm, 100 mW, 5 J, 176 J/cm2, 50 s, three LLLT weekly sessions, 9 sessions); red laser, n=19 (685 nm, 35 mW, 2 J, 72 J/cm2, 58 s, three LLLT weekly sessions, 9 sessions); and control-group (CG), n=19. Symptoms were assessed at the end of the treatment and eight weeks later; quality of life related to oral health was assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Statistical analysis was carried out using repeated measures analysis of variance followed by the posthoc Tukey test. There was significant reduction of the symptoms in all groups at the end of the treatment, which was maintained in the follow-up. The scores of the IR1W and IR3W laser groups differed significantly from those of the CG. There was also a decrease in the OHIP-14 scores in the four groups. The IR3W laser group scores differed significantly from those of the CG. LLLT reduces the symptoms of BMS and may be an alternative therapeutic strategy for the relief of symptoms in patients with BMS.

  2. Assessment of burn depth and burn wound healing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monstrey, Stan; Hoeksema, Henk; Verbelen, Jos; Pirayesh, Ali; Blondeel, Phillip

    2008-09-01

    The depth of a burn wound and/or its healing potential are the most important determinants of the therapeutic management and of the residual morbidity or scarring. Traditionally, burn surgeons divide burns into superficial which heal by rapid re-epithelialization with minimal scarring and deep burns requiring surgical therapy. Clinical assessment remains the most frequent technique to measure the depth of a burn wound although this has been shown to be accurate in only 60-75% of the cases, even when carried out by an experienced burn surgeon. In this article we review all current modalities useful to provide an objective assessment of the burn wound depth, from simple clinical evaluation to biopsy and histology and to various perfusion measurement techniques such as thermography, vital dyes, video angiography, video microscopy, and laser Doppler techniques. The different needs according to the different diagnostic situations are considered. It is concluded that for the initial emergency assessment, the use of telemetry and simple burn photographs are the best option, that for research purposes a wide range of different techniques can be used but that, most importantly, for the actual treatment decisions, laser Doppler imaging is the only technique that has been shown to accurately predict wound outcome with a large weight of evidence. Moreover this technique has been approved for burn depth assessment by regulatory bodies including the FDA.

  3. Redução da densidade de extrassístoles e dos sintomas relacionados após administração de magnésio por via oral Successful improvement of frequency and symptoms of premature complexes after oral magnesium administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Nádja Muniz Lima De Falco

    2012-06-01

    categorical and a specific questionnaire for symptoms related to PVC and PsVC was made. Improvement in premature complex density (PCD per hour was considered significant if percentage reduction was >70% after treatment. The dose of MgP was 3.0 g/day for 30 days, equivalent to 260mg of Mg element. None of the patients had structural heart disease or renal failure. RESULTS: Of the 60 patients, 33 were female (55%. Ages ranged from 16 to 70 years old. In the MgP group, 76.6% of patients had a PCD reduction >70%, 10% of them >50% and only 13.4% <50%. In the P group, 40% showed slight improvement, <30%, in the premature complexes frequency (p < 0.001. Symptom improvement was achieved in 93.3% of patients in the MgP group, compared with only 16.7% in the P group (p < 0.001. CONCLUSION: Oral Mg supplementation decreases PCD, resulting in symptom improvement.

  4. [The organization of burn care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, Jacques

    2002-12-15

    In 2002, the organisation of burn care is confronted to a great deficiency in burn epidemiological datas. The main mechanisms of hospitalized burns are somehow wellknown in industrialized countries: about 60% scalds and 30% flame burns; as well as the place of occurrence (60% at home, and 20% at work), and the risk groups (3 times more important for the age group 0-4 years old). The incidence of burns needing medical care (all levels) (250/100,000 inh/yr) or hospitalization (15-20/100,000 inh/yr) is much more uncertain. The statistics of Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG), for hospitalized patients will allow in France very shortly to know more about the most rational ways of dispatching and treating them. They already show that only 30% of hospitalized burned patients are treated in specialized facilities.

  5. Low-energy laser in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: report of two cases; Laser de baixa intensidade no tratamento da mucosite oral induzida pela radioterapia: relato de casos clinicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelner, Natalie; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Disciplina de Patologia Oral]. E-mail: nataliekelner@yahoo.com.br

    2007-01-15

    Oral mucositis is a common, dose-limiting, and potentially serious complication of cancer therapy. Severe mucositis can lead to modifications of treatment planning and even suspension of therapy, with a negative impact on local tumor control and patient survival, increasing the risk of local and systemic infections. The lesions generally develop in non-keratinized mucosa, which is most vulnerable to this complication. Symptoms can range from a burning sensation to severe pain that impairs nutrient and fluid intake. Low-energy laser has been proposed for treatment of mucositis, with good clinical and functional results, accelerating the healing process and decreasing the pain. The aim of this article, illustrated by two clinical cases at the Pernambuco Cancer Hospital in Recife, Brazil, was to report on the efficacy of low-energy laser in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis.(author)

  6. [Epidemiology of burns in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, Jacques; Ravat, François

    2012-01-01

    As with most traumas, the epidemiology of the "burn" health-event has long been neglected by public health doctors and rarely considered by burns specialists. There were therefore few verified data and many approximations and preconceived ideas. The gathering of information recently undertaken in France enables the reliability of the data to be improved and the diagnostic and demographic elements relating to hospitalised patients with burns to be established.

  7. Genital burns and vaginal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, R; Manandhar, V; Wittgenstein, F; Fortney, J A; Fukushima, C

    1995-07-01

    Obstetric complications may result from burn scarring in the genital area. Women in developing countries typically squat around cooking fires, and burns are common. This recent case in Nepal describes obstructed labor in a young woman whose genital area had extensive scarring from a cooking fire injury. Proper antenatal assessment by health care providers can reduce the risk to mothers and infants of the consequences of a birth canal damaged or obstructed by burn scarring.

  8. Curbing Inflammation in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme A. Farina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients who suffer from severe burns develop metabolic imbalances and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS which can result in multiple organ failure and death. Research aimed at reducing the inflammatory process has yielded new insight into burn injury therapies. In this review, we discuss strategies used to curb inflammation in burn injuries and note that further studies with high quality evidence are necessary.

  9. Steroid sparing regimens for management of oral immune-mediated diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune-mediated mucocutaneous disease may present oral symptoms as a first sign of the disease. The primary etiology could be the cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against epithelial or connective tissue, in a chronic and recurrent pattern. Lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid are the most frequent immunologically mediated mucocutaneous diseases. More often than not, patients present with complaints of blisters, oral ulcers, pain, burning sensation, and bleeding from the various oral sites. Steroids, whether topical or systemic, are the treatment of choice as they have both anti-inflammatory and immune-suppressant properties; however, challenges in the treatment of autoimmune diseases are the complexity of symptoms, the need to manage long-term medications for preserving organ function, and the long-term adverse effects of steroids. In such situations steroid sparing agents, such as, tacrolimus, dapsone, azathioprine, cyclosporine, and so on, may be helpful. Here an attempt is made to review various treatment regimens that could be used as alternatives to steroids for management of such diseases.

  10. Efficacy of propranolol in wound healing for hospitalized burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Bakhshaeekia, Alireza; Alibeigi, Peyman; Hasheminasab, Mohammad Jalal; Tolide-ei, Hamid Reza; Tavakkolian, Ahmad Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad Kazem

    2009-01-01

    Burn patients have the highest metabolic rate among critically ill or injured patients. Because propranolol decreases energy expenditure and muscle protein catabolism, in this study, we hypothesized that propranolol would improve healing process and decrease wound-healing time. This study was a double-blind randomized clinical trial; a total of 79 burn patients who referred to this center from January 2006 to January 2007 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Thirty-seven patients were randomly placed in propranolol group and 42 in control group. The propranolol group received propranolol orally with the dose of 1 mg/kg/d and maximum dose of 1.98 mg/kg/d given in six divided doses. This dose was adjusted to decrease the resting heart rate by 20% from each patient's baseline value. The control group received placebo. The most common cause of burn in both groups was flame followed by flash. Patients with superficial burns in the propranolol group needed less time to heal for acceptable wound healing in superficial burns (16.13+/-7.40 days vs 21.52+/-7.94 days; P=.004). We also found that patients with deep burn injury needed less time to be ready for skin graft (28.23+/-8.43 days vs 33.46+/-9.17 days; P=.007) when compared to that of the control group. The use of propranolol decreased the size of the burn wound that finally needed skin graft. Patients in the propranolol group with an average burn size of 31.42% TBSA finally needed 13.75% of TBSA skin graft compared with that of control patients with an average burn size of 33.61% TBSA who needed 18.72% of TBSA skin graft, and patients in the control group with an average burn size of 33.61% TBSA finally needed 18.72% of TBSA skin graft (P=.006). Patients in the propranolol group had a shorter hospital stay period than the control group (30.95+/-8.44 days vs 24.41+/-8.11 days; P=.05). Administration of propranolol, improved burn wound healing, and decreased healing time and hospital stay period. The use of propranolol

  11. Two cases with nickel-induced oral mucosal hyperplasia: a rare clinical form of allergic contact stomatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkaya, Esen; Babuna, Goncagül

    2011-03-15

    Allergic contact stomatitis (ACS) can occur with variable clinical presentations such as erythematous, erosive, and lichenoid forms. Burning mouth symptoms may also be a result of allergic contact stomatitis. Additionally, gingival hyperplasia has been reported in exceptional cases of ACS caused by dental metals. Here, two rare cases are presented of nickel-induced oral mucosal hyperplasia with gingival and upper palatal involvement from metal-porcelain crowns and metal-acrylic upper denture, respectively. In both cases the diagnosis was made on the basis of the positive patch test results to nickel sulfate and the regression of the lesions after removing the nickel containing dental materials. Nickel-induced ACS should be borne in mind in every case of oral mucosal hyperplasia appearing after dental procedures, especially in the presence of previous allergies and sensitization risks such as ear piercing. It might be further suggested to include this variant within the clinical forms of ACS.

  12. Nutrition Support in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Aydoğan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Severe burn trauma causes serious metabolic derangements. Increased metabolic rate which is apart of a pathophysiologic characteristic of burn trauma results in protein-energy malnutrition. This situation causes impaired wound healing, muscle and fat tissue’s breakdown, growth retardation in children and infections. Nutrition support is vital in the treatment strategies of burn victims to prevent high mortal and disabling complications in this devastating trauma. Our aim in this study is to review management of nutrition in burn victims. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 74-83

  13. A primer on burn resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacomo Ferdinand

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1900s, the scope of burn resuscitation has evolved dramatically. Due to various advances in pre-hospital care and training, under-resuscitation of patients with severe burns is now relatively uncommon. Over-resuscitation, otherwise known as "fluid creep", has emerged as one of the most important problems during the initial phases of burn care over the past decade. To avoid the complications of over-resuscitation, careful hourly titration of fluid rates based on compilation of various clinical end points by a bedside provider is vital. The aim of this review is to provide a practical approach to the resuscitation of severely burned patients.

  14. Ice & Fire: the Burning Question

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    With the Arctic opening up to new shipping routes and increased oil exploration and production due to climate change, the risk of an Arctic oil spill is increasing. Of the classic oil spill response methods (mechanical recovery, dispersants and in-situ burning), in-situ burning is considered...... to be particularly a suitable response method in the Arctic. In-situ burning aims to remove the oil from the marine environment by burning it from the water surface. A recent Ph.D. thesis from the Technical University of Denmark has provided some new insights with respect to the fire science behind this response...

  15. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high-inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  16. Exercise following burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lateur, Barbara J; Shore, Wendy S

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue is a major barrier to recovery for burned individuals. Studies indicate that a slow return to normal or near-normal muscle strength is the natural course of recovery. With no special interventions, other than the "usual care" tailored to the needs of the individual, postburn patients will make gradual improvement in strength and aerobic capacity. Using the principle of initial condition (the worse the initial condition, the greater the response to exercise intervention) the authors outline an augmented exercise program that should result in a robust improvement in aerobic capacity.

  17. Clinical Assessment of the Efficiency of Low Level Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa M. Elshenawy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oral lichen planus (OLP is a chronic inflammatory disease of the oral mucosa of uncertain etiology. AIM: To evaluate the effect of using low level laser therapy (LLLT (970 nm Siro laser Advance for the treatment of symptomatic (OLP. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The present study was conducted on ten patients suffering from persistent oral lichen planus (OLP.Patients were treated with diode laser (970nm for the symptomatic relief of pain and burning sensation. The patients were assessed before, during and after the completion of the laser treatment which was done twice weekly for two successive months with maximum of ten sessions. The assessment was performed using visual analogue scale (VAS and clinical investigation for each patient. RESULTS: Detailed significant reduction in lesion size and showed complete remission of burning sensation and pain. No reported complications or therapy side effects were observed in any of the treated patients. CONCLUSION: Diode laser therapy seems to be an effective adjunctive treatment modality for relieving pain and clinical symptoms of OLP.

  18. Dental Fusion with Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dental Fusion is developmental anomaly due to the union of two tooth germs resulting in a single tooth. It is an infrequent phenomenon but may cause caries, periodontal, cosmetic and malocclusion abnormalities. Oral Submucous Fibrosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder and a precancerous condition affecting oral mucosa causing inability to open the mouth, burning sensation and leathery consistency. This manuscript describes a case of OSMF and dental fusion. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 308-310

  19. How to manage burns in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Waitzman, A. A.; Neligan, P C

    1993-01-01

    Burns are common injuries; more than 200,000 occur in Canada annually. Nearly all burn injuries can be managed on on outpatient basis. Appropriate treatment depends on burn depth, extent, and location. Special types of burns, such as chemical, tar, and electrical injuries, need specific management strategies. Prevention through education is important to reduce the incidence of burns.

  20. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  1. Bad advice; bad burn: a new problem in burn prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, L; Slater, H; Goldfarb, I W

    1990-01-01

    Deep partial-thickness burns had been inflicted on the perineal area of an infant who was recently treated in our Burn Center. The burns were a result of advice to the patient's mother by a pediatrician. The doctor told her to use a hair dryer to prevent diaper rash. We surveyed pediatricians, well-baby clinics, and pediatric nurse practitioners in our area and found that approximately half of them advised the use of hair dryers to treat or prevent diaper rash. We tested four widely available hand-held hair dryers to determine potential for inflicting burn injury. All of the dryers are capable of delivering air heated to at least 53 degrees C after 2 minutes of use. We believe that warnings against the use of hair dryers for perineal hygiene should be included in burn prevention programs.

  2. The use of botulinum toxin in the management of burns itching: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, N; Brooks, P

    2012-12-01

    Itching is a common and well recognised problem following burns. As the underlying pathways involved in burns itch have been identified, different pharmacological agents have been introduced to improve the effectiveness of management regimes. We present preliminary data from an on-going study in the use of botulinum toxin as a novel agent in the treatment of this problem. Patients with recalcitrant itching secondary to burns treated with Botox(©) were identified. Data pertaining to burn size, depth and management were recorded. The delay in the onset of the itch, its severity and the speed and duration of any improvement in symptoms were also noted. 10 patients were identified. 1 patient was excluded. Average follow-up was 11.3 months. All patients had deep partial thickness to full thickness burns. Eight patients underwent grafting. The average burn was 24% TBSA. 87.5% of patients rated their burns itch as being severe (>7 on the pain scale). Following the administration of Botox(©) this fell to 0 out of 10 at 4 weeks. The average duration of the symptom free period was nine months (range 3-18 months). Botox(©) can successfully be used to treat burns itch that are resistant to conventional therapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness of Aloe Vera and Antioxidant along with Physiotherapy in the Management of Oral Submucous Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nisha; Hebbale, Manjula; Mhapuskar, Amit; Ul Nisa, Shams; Thopte, Shameeka; Singh, Saumya

    2016-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a well-established precancerous condition affecting the oral mucosa. It is a disease that causes significant morbidity (in terms of loss of mouth function as tissues become rigid and mouth opening becomes difficult) and mortality (when transformation into squamous cell carcinoma occurs). The aim of the study is to compare the efficacy of Aloe vera with antioxidant when given along with physiotherapy in the management of OSMF. Forty patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of OSMF were included for the study after informed consent. Group A included 20 patients who received Aloe vera gel (forever living gel) along with physiotherapy. Group B included 20 patients who received antioxidant capsules twice daily for 3 months along with physiotherapy exercises four times in a day. The following parameters, that is, burning sensation, mouth opening, tongue protrusion and cheek flexibility were recorded at each visit. Majority of the participant enrolled were in the age range of 30 to 35 years. Improvement in all the parameters was seen with the individuals receiving Aloe vera gel in comparison to antioxidants. So, Aloe vera being a soothing, simple and safe mode of treatment along with proper habit restriction can be considered to be an effectual protocol in the management of OSMF. The analgesic effects of Aloe vera with the physiotherapy exercises provide better results in reducing burning sensation and improving mouth opening, tongue protrusion and cheek flexibility in comparison to antioxidants.

  4. Burning mouth syndrome: A review on its diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindhan, R; Vidyalakshmi, Santhanam; Kumar, Muniapillai Siva; Satheesh, C; Balasubramanium, A Murali; Prasad, V Srinivas

    2014-07-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a chronic and intractable orofacial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of burning sensation of the oral mucosa in the absence of specific oral lesion. This condition affects chiefly of middle aged and elderly woman with hormonal changes or psychological disorders. In addition to burning sensation, patient with BMS also complains of oral mucosal pain, altered taste sensation, and dry mouth. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin, often idiopathic and its exact etiopathogenesis remains unclear. So far, there is no definitive cure for this condition and most of the treatment approaches, medications remains unsatisfactory. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this article is to present a review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, classification, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management of BMS.

  5. Burning mouth syndrome: A review on its diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Aravindhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS, a chronic and intractable orofacial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of burning sensation of the oral mucosa in the absence of specific oral lesion. This condition affects chiefly of middle aged and elderly woman with hormonal changes or psychological disorders. In addition to burning sensation, patient with BMS also complains of oral mucosal pain, altered taste sensation, and dry mouth. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin, often idiopathic and its exact etiopathogenesis remains unclear. So far, there is no definitive cure for this condition and most of the treatment approaches, medications remains unsatisfactory. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this article is to present a review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, classification, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management of BMS.

  6. Oral Thrush

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feeding mothers In addition to the distinctive white mouth lesions, infants may have trouble feeding or be fussy ... candidiasis (yeast infection) patient information. American Academy of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology. http://www.aaomp.org/public/oral-candidiasis.php. ...

  7. Burn, thermal - close-up (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first degree burns cause only reddening of the epidermis (outer layer of the skin), as seen in this photograph. Second degree burns cause blistering and extend into the dermis (lower layer of skin). Third degree burns cause ...

  8. Nutritional management of the burn patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    role include: evaporative water loss from the burn wound, bacterial contamination of the burn ... leucocytes and fibroblasts in the burned area.2 Providing exogenous glucose ... immune function, poor wound healing and exacerbation of protein.

  9. Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nfpa.org Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen The air is normally 21% oxygen. Oxygen is not flammable, but fire needs it to burn. ¾ When more oxygen is present, any fire that starts will burn ...

  10. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Houston, TX Purpose:Patients with severe facial burns often suffer indirect damage to their eyes. Burn wound contracture of the periocular skin...periocular muscles , are injured and the protective blink reflex is lost. With loss of the blink reflex the patient quickly develops exposure keratitis

  11. Wanted: Clean Coal Burning Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    China is intent on developing clean coal burning technology, an objective it can achieve through installing desulfurization facilities at coal-burning power plants that will control SO2 emissions and environmental pollution. According to kuo Yi, deputy director general of the Department of Science and Technology of the State Environmental Protection Agency, China is a major coal-buming country:

  12. Oral Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 規子; スズキ, ノリコ; Noriko, SUZUKI

    2004-01-01

    The major oral functions can be categorized as mastication, swallowing, speech and respiratory functions. Dysfunction of these results in dysphagia, speech disorders and abnormal respiration (such as Sleep Apnea). These functions relate to dentistry in the occurrence of : (1) oral preparatory and oral phases, (2) articulation disorders and velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI), and (3) mouth breathing, respiratory and blowing disorders. These disorders are related to oral and maxillofacial diseas...

  13. The Fenix II study: A longitudinal study of psychopathology among burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidel-Kinori, Sara Guila; Eiroa-Orosa, Francisco Jose; Giannoni-Pastor, Anna; Tasqué-Cebrián, Ruth; Arguello, Jose Maria; Casas, Miguel

    2016-09-01

    Psychological symptoms are common among burn survivors. However, knowledge about epidemiology and predictors of psychopathology has shown great heterogeneity in this population. The Fenix-II Project was the first epidemiological study on the psychopathological consequences of burns developed in Spain, providing a detailed analysis of the progression of psychological symptoms during the first six months after injury. Three hundred and thirty-three patients were screened and 183 were included in this study. Posttraumatic, depression and anxiety symptoms showed a general decreasing tendency across time. At 6 months, 34 patients showed clinically significant Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms (20.5% of 166 patients reached at 6 months) as assessed with the MINI Neuropsychiatric Interview. Within this group of patients, anxiety, depression and hyperarousal increased at 30 days, and avoidance 90 days after injury. The most accurate predictors of PTSD were found to be being burned in a Motor Vehicle Crash, risk of social exclusion, low body-image adjustment, anterior trunk location of the burn and life threat perception during the burn-shock period. Considering these factors, clinicians may identify patients at risk of PTSD development, allowing an adequate follow up and preventive interventions which may minimize the psychological consequences of burns.

  14. The year in burns 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steven E; Phelan, Herbert A; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 3415 research articles were published with burns in the title, abstract, and/or keyword in 2013. We have continued to see an increase in this number; the following reviews articles selected from these by the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and colleagues that in their opinion are most likely to have effects on burn care treatment and understanding. As we have done before, articles were found and divided into the following topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterization, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. The articles are mentioned briefly with notes from the authors; readers are referred to the full papers for details.

  15. The biology of burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Lars H; Bhavsar, Dhaval; Mailänder, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Burn injury is a complex traumatic event with various local and systemic effects, affecting several organ systems beyond the skin. The pathophysiology of the burn patient shows the full spectrum of the complexity of inflammatory response reactions. In the acute phase, inflammation mechanism may have negative effects because of capillary leak, the propagation of inhalation injury and the development of multiple organ failure. Attempts to mediate these processes remain a central subject of burn care research. Conversely, inflammation is a necessary prologue and component in the later-stage processes of wound healing. In this review, we are attempting to present the current science of burn wound pathophysiology and wound healing. We also describe the evolution of innovative strategies for burn management.

  16. Low-level Laser Therapy: A Review of Its Applications in the Management of Oral Mucosal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro; Cherubini, Karen; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2016-11-01

    Due to its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and biostimulating effects, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been widely used for oral disorders, such as oral lichen planus (OLP), xerostomia, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), herpes labialis, burning mouth syndrome (BMS), and oral mucositis (OM). The research team for the present study has reviewed the literature on the subject, with an emphasis on the applicability of LLLT in general and of its various clinical protocols for the management of those oral disorders. In lesions such as the ones occurring in OM, RAS, herpes labialis, and OLP, the course of wound healing and the pain have been shown to decrease, with a few, or most often, no adverse side effects. The literature shows that LLLT can also be effective in reducing symptoms in patients with BMS. For the treatment of hyposalivation and xerostomia, the use of LLLT has been described in the literature, but no consensus has resulted. Very few controlled clinical studies with well-established therapeutic protocols have occurred, except for OM, for which LLLT has been widely researched. Although information on the use of the laser for some lesions has already been consolidated, further research is needed, especially randomized, controlled clinical trials with long-term follow-up. Those studies will allow the safe use of LLLT, permitting the creation of care protocols for the management of oral disorders.

  17. Burning feet syndrome: An old tropical syndrome revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Welch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burning feet syndrome (BFS has been described anecdotally in the literature for over 200 years. Described subjectively by patients as burning, prickling and unremitting with nocturnal exacerbations, the condition draws parallels with the burning dysaesthesia found in diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and appears to display a similar chronicity. Despite being a common symptom, especially among the elderly, its etiology in non-specific and often marked by a lack of objective clinical signs. Historically, burning feet syndrome has been recorded in situations of poor nutrition, including malnourished African populations in the early 20th century, South American plantation workers in the 1920s and during food shortages in the Spanish Civil War. Perhaps the best described and largest outbreak of burning feet occurred amongst prisoners of war (POWs of the Japanese during the 2nd World War in South East Asia and the Far East. In this review we summarise reports of the condition, in particular amongst Far East POWs (FEPOWs, using both the available literature as well as a unique and previously unknown contemporary study carried out in a POW camp. Materials and Methods: During his stay in the Tandjung Priok POW camp, Nowell Peach recorded 54 cases of burning feet seen over a 4 month period during captivity. This data was concealed from his captors and survived to return home with him. Results: 54 prisoners presented over a 4 month period with a mean age of 28 years and mean duration of symptoms of 12 weeks. Neurological signs were meticulously documented. All were on an inadequate diet, 20 (38% were on less than a full ration. Accompanying tropical infections were common including malaria (73%, dengue (45% and dysentery (41%. Discussions: The Peach survey confirmed the frequency of burning feet amongst FEPOWs and was unusual in that the neurological examination and conditions endured were documented in captivity. A paucity of physical signs was

  18. Efficacy of oxitard capsules in the treatment of oral submucous fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Patil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF is a high-risk premalignant condition predominantly seen in the Indian subcontinent. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of oxitard capsules in the management of OSMF. Materials and Methods: Total of 120 subjects with clinico-pathologically diagnosed OSMF were included in the study and divided equally in 2 groups; Group A (oxitard group and Group B (placebo group. Group A was administered 2 oxitard capsules twice daily and Group B was given placebo tablets twice daily, for 3 months. Evaluation for different clinical parameters was done at regular intervals and data was analyzed using the Student′s paired t test and Chi-square test. P < 0.001 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Clinical improvements in mouth-opening and tongue protrusion were significant in the Group A (P < 0.001. Subjective symptoms of burning sensation (P = 0.0001, pain associated with the lesion (P = 0.000, difficulty in swallowing (P = 0.0003 and speech (P = 0.0005 also significantly improved in the Group A. There was a mild to moderate decrease in the size of the lesion. Conclusion: Though there is no definitive treatment for the condition; however, oxitard capsules can bring about significant clinical improvements in the symptoms like mouth-opening, tongue protrusion, burning sensation, difficulty in swallowing and speech and pain associated with the lesion, thereby improving the quality of life of the affected individuals.

  19. Trichomonosis of the oral cavity complicated by mycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnatowska, A J; Kurnatowski, P

    1998-09-01

    Protozoa and fungi of the oral cavity, although frequently occurring and connected to considerable clinical adverse effects, are as yet insufficiently known. The aims of the study were (i) to estimate the prevalence of common invasions of Trichomonas tenax and fungi, (ii) to associate the symptoms with the diagnosis of trichomonosis complicated by mycosis, and (iii) to determine trichomonacidal properties of ornidazole, tinidazole and metronidazole. A sample of 936 dentist patients with different diagnoses were included in the study. The collected material consisted of rinsings, with simultaneous application of selective media, different for protozoa or fungi cultures. Using ornidazole, tinidazole and metronidazole, we examined in vitro their influence on 30 strains of T. tenax. Among the examined patients T. tenax was found in 90 cases including 85 cases where it occurred together with fungi, on the basis of which diagnosis of trichomonosis complicated by mycosis of the oral cavity was established. It was the most frequent in patients with leukoplakia and lichen Wilsoni. We recorded a statistically significant association for T. tenax with fungi and xerostomia, burning sensation, periodontal pockets and denuded teeth. T. tenax was never found in patients with caries and with aphtha recidivans. The curves of ornidazole activity were obtained within the solution range of 130-4350 micrograms/ml; the curves of tinidazole activity within the concentration range of 500-16870 micrograms/ml; metronidazole in the highest concentration killed from 5 to 100% of the population of all strains.

  20. Functional Outcomes Following Burn Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Colleen M; Parry, Ingrid; Richard, Reginald

    Major advances in functional recovery following burn injury over the last ten years include the development of conceptual framework for disability assessment and its application burn recovery, the description of the long-term outcomes in the burn population, and progress in basic science research leading to new treatments that improve long-term functional outcomes. Future tasks and challenges include the development of common data elements and standards for burn recovery in order to measure and optimize the path toward functional recovery. The development of patient-reported outcome measures with benchmarks for recovery over time has the potential to improve patient-provider communication and quality of patient-centered care. The study of burn recovery should include an examination of resiliency along with the study of disabilities following burn injury. Better understanding of the mechanisms, impact and modulation of hypermetabolism and inflammation following burn injury is essential to improve functional recovery. Continued basic science and clinical research must focus on scar modulation and skin replacements and address recalcitriant problems such as heterotopic ossification. Health tracking technologies should be leveraged to understand and optimize physical therapy interventions.

  1. Sedation and Analgesia in Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Akıncı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is one of the most serious injuries that mankind may face. In addition to serious inflammation, excessive fluid loss, presence of hemodynamic instability due to intercurrent factors such as debridements, infections and organ failure, very different levels and intensities of pain, psychological problems such as traumatic stress disorder, depression, delirium at different levels that occur in patient with severe burn are the factors which make it difficult to provide the patient comfort. In addition to a mild to moderate level of baseline permanent pain in burn patients, which is due to tissue damage, there is procedural pain as well, which occurs by treatments such as grafting and dressings, that are severe, short-term burst style 'breakthrough' pain. Movement and tactile stimuli are also seen in burn injury as an effect to sensitize the peripheral and central nervous system. Even though many burn centers have established protocols to struggle with the pain, studies show that pain relief still inadequate in burn patients. Therefore, the treatment of burn pain and the prevention of possible emergence of future psychiatric problems suc as post-traumatic stress disorder, the sedative and anxiolytic agents should be used as a recommendation according to the needs and hemodynamic status of individual patient. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 26-30

  2. Rehabilitation of the burn patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Procter Fiona

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation is an essential and integral part of burn treatment. It is not something which takes place following healing of skin grafts or discharge from hospital; instead it is a process that starts from day one of admission and continues for months and sometimes years after the initial event. Burns rehabilitation is not something which is completed by one or two individuals but should be a team approach, incorporating the patient and when appropriate, their family. The term ′Burns Rehabilitation′ incorporates the physical, psychological and social aspects of care and it is common for burn patients to experience difficulties in one or all of these areas following a burn injury. Burns can leave a patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. The aims of burn rehabilitation are to minimise the adverse effects caused by the injury in terms of maintaining range of movement, minimising contracture development and impact of scarring, maximising functional ability, maximising psychological wellbeing, maximising social integration

  3. Topical agents in burn care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momčilović Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Understanding of fluid shifts and recognition of the importance of early and appropriate fluid replacement therapy have significantly reduced mortality in the early post burn period. After the bum patient successfully passes the resuscitation period, the burn wound represents the greatest threat to survival. History Since the dawn of civilization, man has been trying to find an agent which would help burn wounds heal, and at the same time, not harm general condition of the injured. It was not until the XX century, after the discovery of antibiotics, when this condition was fulfilled. In 1968, combining silver and sulfadiazine, fox made silver-sulfadiazine, which is a 1% hydro-soluble cream and a superior agent in topical treatment of burns today. Current topical agents None of the topical antimicrobial agents available today, alone or combined, have the characteristics of ideal prophylactic agents, but they eliminate colonization of burn wound, and invasive infections are infrequent. With an excellent spectrum of activity, low toxicity, and ease of application with minimal pain, silver-sulfadiazine is still the most frequently used topical agent. Conclusion The incidence of invasive infections and overall mortality have been significantly reduced after introduction of topical burn wound antimicrobial agents into practice. In most burn patients the drug of choice for prophylaxis is silver sulfadiazine. Other agents may be useful in certain clinical situations.

  4. Oral medicine and the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCreary, Christine

    2011-03-15

    A focus often exists in dental practice on the maintenance and management of the dentition and the periodontium, however, conditions of the oral mucosa and orofacial pain can cause significant problems for older patients. Oral mucosal conditions are more prevalent in older patients and many orofacial pain disorders, such as burning mouth syndrome and trigeminal neuralgia, are more common in patients over the age of 50 years. Although these conditions may not be routinely managed in general practice, identification of these patients in primary care and appropriate referral will lead to more prompt and effective treatment. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Dental practitioners need to be able to identify what is considered to be within the normal physiological limits of the ageing oral tissue and hence what is abnormal and requires further investigation to facilitate appropriate referral.

  5. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hair bleaching and skin burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, K; Lingitz, R; Prattes, G; Schneider, G; Sutter, S; Schintler, M; Trop, M

    2012-12-31

    Hairdressing-related burns are preventable and therefore each case is one too many. We report a unique case of a 16-yr-old girl who suffered full-thickness chemical and thermal burns to the nape of her neck and superficial burns to the occiput after her hair had been dyed blond and placed under a dryer to accelerate the highlighting procedure. The wound on the nape of the neck required surgical debridement and skin grafting. The grafted area resulted in subsequent scar formation.

  7. [Reconstruction of facial burn sequelae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyatier, J L; Comparin, J P; Boulos, J P; Bichet, J C; Jacquin, F

    2001-06-01

    The deep burns of the face can lead to horrible scars functionally and aesthetically. Treatment of these scars need several surgical interventions frequently and during many years. In our region we deal with this type of wounds as team work, multidisciplinary approach carrying out many process starting by emergency treatment of acute burns till the social rehabilitation. The expansion technique was great help in improving the shape of scars, by using the expanding skin as full thickness grafts. Reconstruction of the anatomical units and application of aesthetic techniques (like rhinoplasty, lifting, tattooing and autologous fat injections) participate equally in improving the quality of results. Many examples of treatments of burns scars are shown.

  8. Excess of boron cause to tip burn of tulip leaves during the forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, E.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the cause of leaf tip burn which was observed when tulips (Rose Copland) were forced to open. Analyses of the plants and soil from Lammefjorden, Sweden, showed that the probable cause might be an excess of boron. When 0, 2.1, and 5.4 kg of boron per hectare were used, symptoms of leaf tip burn appeared on the leaves after administration of 5.4 kg of boron.

  9. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine: guidelines for oral pathology and oral medicine in the dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragelund, C; Reibel, J; Hietanen, J; Hadler-Olsen, E; Johannessen, A C; Kenrad, B; Nylander, K; Puranen, M; Salo, T; Syrjänen, S; Søland, T M; van der Waal, I; van der Wal, J E; Warfvinge, G

    2012-11-01

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must have knowledge of clinical symptoms, local and systemic signs and clinical differential diagnoses to make an accurate diagnosis. The dentist must be competent in selecting appropriate diagnostic tests, for example, tissue biopsy and microbiological samples, and conducting them correctly, as well as in interpreting test results and taking appropriate action accordingly. Furthermore, the dentist must be aware of diseases demanding multidisciplinary cooperation and be able to recognise his/her professional limitation, and to refer to other specialists when required. The dental curriculum changes over time as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide subject representatives in curriculum development and planning. We have created an advisory topic list in oral pathology and oral medicine.

  10. Hair dryer burns in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, P R

    1990-11-01

    Three children with burn injuries caused by home hair dryers are described. In one patient the injury was believed to be accidental, and in the other two cases the injuries were deliberately caused by a caretaker. The lack of prior experience with hair dryer burns initially led to suspicion of other causes. The characteristics of each case aided in the final determination of accidental vs nonaccidental injury. These cases prompted testing of home hair dryers to determine their heat output. At the highest heat settings, the dryers rapidly generated temperatures in excess of 110 degrees C. After the dryers were turned off, the protective grills maintained sufficient temperatures to cause full-thickness burns for up to 2 minutes. These cases and the results of testing demonstrate that hair dryers must be added to the list of known causes of accidental and nonaccidental burns in children.

  11. The Burning Truth(s)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pathophysiology caused by a severe burn is complicated and involves changes in all ... The interstitial pressure and intravascular oncotic pressures decrease while the ... South African Family Practice 2014; 56(6):24-26. Open Access ...

  12. Chemistry of Cigarette Burning Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen P

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette-burning and the smoke-formation processes and smoke composition are important topics for understanding cigarette performance. This paper proposes the molecular formulas representing the active components of bright, burley, and Oriental tobaccos and a basic chemistry model of the cigarette burning processes. Previous knowledge of the cigarette burning processes and smoke formation helped to establish parameters in deriving the basic chemistry equations. The proposed chemistry provides a brief view of the mechanisms of the cigarette burning during puffing and interpuff smoldering, and can be used to interpret and predict the smoke composition for cigarettes made from bright, burley, and Oriental tobaccos. Based on the proposed chemistry, the effect of ventilation on smoke component deliveries is discussed and the reaction heat of the puffing process is estimated.

  13. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-07-01

    An 18-year-old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected.She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients.

  14. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Karimi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs .At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected. She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients.

  15. Regimes Of Helium Burning

    CERN Document Server

    Timmes, F X

    2000-01-01

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and ZND detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts which start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star, and the thin shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial directions encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamlet regime at a density of 10^8 g cm^{-3}. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than 10^6 g cm^{-3}. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations travelling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarily, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at 10^7 g cm^{-3}, suggesting that a steady-state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into exista...

  16. Oral histoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Karthikeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal disease that takes various clinical forms, among which oral lesions are rare. The disseminated form of the disease that usually occurs in association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV is one of the AIDS-defining diseases. Isolated oral histoplasmosis, without systemic involvement, with underlying immunosuppression due to AIDS is very rare. We report one such case of isolated oral histoplasmosis in a HIV-infected patient.

  17. Oral traumatic neuroma with mature ganglion cells: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Marcio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic neuromas are characterized by the presence of pain, burning, or paresthesia, associated with a history of trauma, normally surgery, in the same site. In the oral cavity, the most commonly affected sites are the lip, tongue, and mental nerve area. Pressure on the suspected area usually provokes pain. They microscopically consist of a proliferation of nerve fascicles embedded in a background of collagen. We present a case of a 42-year-old Latin American female patient complaining of a painful solitary nodule erupting on the lingual surface of the mandibular body. Histopathological analysis showed a traumatic neuroma associated with mature ganglion cells, which is an extremely unusual finding. After complete removal of the lesion the symptoms disappeared. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a unique lesion with unusual clinical and histopathological features reported in the English language literature.

  18. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Amniotic Membrane for the Treatment of Severe Exposure Keratopathy in the New Zealand White Rabbit Introduction: Patients with severe facial burns...often suffer indirect damage to their eyes as a sequela of ocular surface exposure keratopathy. Burn wound contracture of the periocular skin causes...inflammatory properties, amniotic membrane has developed into a mainstay of treatment to help maintain the ocular surface when skin grafting is delayed

  19. Treatment of Palm Burns in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Argirova, M.; Hadzhiyski, O.

    2005-01-01

    The timing and methods of treatment of palm burns in children vary widely. From January 2002 to November 2004, 492 children with burns - 125 of them with hand burns or other body burns - were hospitalized and treated at the N.I. Pirogov Clinic for Burns and Plastic Surgery in Bulgaria. Fifty-four children (for a total of 73 burned hands) presented isolated palm burns.Twenty-two hands were operated on. In this review we present the incidence, causes, treatment methods, functional results, and ...

  20. Chemical and Common Burns in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shan

    2017-05-01

    Burns are a common cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in children. Thermal and chemical burns are the most common types of burns. Their clinical appearance can be similar and the treatment is largely similar. Thermal burns in children occur primarily after exposure to a hot surface or liquid, or contact with fire. Burns are typically classified based on the depth and total body surface area, and the severity and onset of the burn can also depend on the temperature and duration of contact. Chemical burns are caused by chemicals-most commonly acids and alkalis-that can damage the skin on contact. In children, the most common cause of chemical burns is from household products such as toilet bowl cleaners, drain cleaners, detergents, and bleaches. Mild chemical burns generally cause redness and pain and can look similar to other common rashes or skin infections, whereas severe chemical burns are more extreme and may cause redness, blistering, skin peeling, and swelling.

  1. Burn treatment in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, M; Lumenta, D B; Andel, H; Kamolz, L P; Frey, M

    2009-12-01

    The population of elderly patients is expected to rise continuously over the next decades due to global demographic changes. The elderly seem to be most vulnerable to burns and their management remains undoubtedly a challenge. A clear age margin for elderly patients is not yet defined, but most studies adhere to the inclusion of patients 65 years and above, but the general condition and social situation must be taken into account. The understanding of the physiological basis of aging and its related pathophysiological changes has only marginally influenced treatment and decision making in elderly burn patients. When looking at treatment regimens currently applied in elderly burn patients, the discussion of standards in intensive care as well as surgical strategies is ongoing. However, trends towards a moderate, non-aggressive resuscitation approach and careful inclusion of key parameters like physiological age, pre-burn functional status and premorbid conditions, seem to be useful guidelines for interdisciplinary treatment decisions. Once ordered for surgical treatment, the amount of body surface area operated in one session should be adapted to the general status of the patient. Even if older burn victims have a reported higher mortality rate than younger patients, improved therapeutic options have contributed to a reduced mortality rate even in the elderly over the last decades. As a result of improved outcome, more attention has to be given to a comprehensive rehabilitation program. This review will give an overview of the current literature and will draw attention to specific topics related to this important subpopulation of burn patients.

  2. Erosive burning of solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Merrill K.

    1993-01-01

    Presented here is a review of the experimental and modeling work concerning erosive burning of solid propellants (augmentation of burning rate by flow of product gases across a burning surface). A brief introduction describes the motor design problems caused by this phenomenon, particularly for low port/throat area ratio motors and nozzleless motors. Various experimental techniques for measuring crossflow sensitivity of solid propellant burning rates are described, with the conclusion that accurate simulation of the flow, including upstream flow development, in actual motors is important since the degree of erosive burning depends not only on local mean crossflow velocity and propellant nature, but also upon this upstream development. In the modeling area, a brief review of simplified models and correlating equations is presented, followed by a description of more complex numerical analysis models. Both composite and double-base propellant models are reviewed. A second generation composite model is shown to give good agreement with data obtained in a series of tests in which composite propellant composition and heterogeneity (particle size distribution) were systematically varied. Finally, the use of numerical models for the development of erosive burning correlations is described, and a brief discussion of scaling is presented.

  3. DIFFERENTIATING PERIMORTEM AND POSTMORTEM BURNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmaji Master

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging cases in forensic medicine is ascertaining the cause of death of burnt bodies under suspicious circumstances. The key questions that arise at the time of investigation include: 1  Was the person alive or dead prior to fire accident?  Did the victim die because of burn?  If death was not related to burns, could burns play a role in causing death?  Were the burns sustained accidentally, did the person commit suicide or was the person murdered?  Are the circumstances suggesting an attempt to conceal crime?  How was the fire started?  How was the victim identified?  In case of mass fatalities, who died first? Postmortem burning of corpses is supposed to be one of the ways to hide a crime. Differentiating the actual cause of death in burn patients is therefore important. Medical examiners usually focus on the defining the changes that occur in tissues while forensic anthropologists deal with the changes related to the bone with or without any the influence of other tissues. Under the circumstances of fire, differentiating the perimortem trauma from that of postmortem cause of bone fractures is vital in determining the cause and motive of death

  4. Iron metabolism in burned children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, J A; Ibáñez, L; Ras, M R; Aulesa, C; Vinzo, J; Iglesias, J; Carol, J

    1999-07-01

    The administration of iron supplementation in children with burns has been a subject of controversy. Recent studies argue against its use in the acute phase of stress. To assess whether iron metabolism parameters show significant differences in the acute phase and the recovery phase of burn, 21 patients (age range: 17 months to 13 years) with burns of more than 10% of body surface who had not received blood transfusions or iron supplementation were studied. Sideraemia, ferritin, transferrin, transferrin saturation index (TSI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were assessed both in the acute and the recovery phase after burn. Sideraemia, transferrin, and TSI were significantly lower in the acute than in the recovery phase (17.3 +/- 3 vs 53.8 +/- 6.6 microg/dL, 190.5 +/- 15 vs 287.9 +/- 14.3 mg/dL and 7.7 +/- 1.3 vs 15.4 +/- 1.6%, P 1.5 vs 0.7 +/- 0.2 mg/dL, P = 0.016 and P 2 years), the observed differences persisted. Hyposideraemia is a frequent finding in the acute phase of paediatric burns and is accompanied by increased ferritin levels and decreased transferrin concentrations. The low iron values tend to recover without the use of iron supplementation suggesting an endogenous block of iron release in the acute phase and indicates that iron therapy should be not recommended in the initial period of stress of the burned patient.

  5. [Oral candidiasis: clinical features and control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2010-10-01

    Candidiasis is the most commonly encountered fungal infection, and oral candidiasis is often observed as a local opportunistic infection. Oral candidiasis is clinically divided into three types: acute forms, chronic forms, and Candida-associated lesions. Candida adhesion and multiplication are largely regulated by the local and systemic factors of the host. The local factors include impairment of the oral mucosal integrity, which is usually impaired by hyposalivation, anticancer drugs/radiation for head and neck cancers, denture wearing, a decrease in the oral bacterial population, and poor oral hygiene. Among Candida species, oral candidiasis is mostly caused by Candida albicans (C. albicans), C. glabrata, or C. tropicalis. Oral Candida induces a variety of symptoms, such as oral mucosal inflammation manifesting as an uncomfortable feeling, pain, erythema, erosion, taste abnormalities, and hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. Candida overgrowth in the oral cavity may disseminate to distant organs. Therefore, in order to avoid the sequelae of systemic candidiasis, oral candidiasis should be rapidly controlled. Oral candidiasis is usually treated by the local application of antifungal drugs. However, oral candidiasis occasionally escapes the control of such local treatment due to the development of multi-drug resistant Candida strains and species or due to the suppression of salivation or cellular immune activity. When drug-resistant strains are suspected as the pathogens and when the host is generally compromised, the oral administration of combinations of antifungal drugs, enhancement of cellular immune activity, and improvement of the nutritional condition are recommended.

  6. Burn Injury Arise From Flying Balloon Toys

    OpenAIRE

    Yalcin Kulahci; Fatih Zor; Mehmet Bozkurt; Serdar Ozturk; Mustafa Sengezer

    2007-01-01

    Many of peoples are faced minor or major burn injuries in their life. Even the most widespread burn cause is flame injuries, too different burn cause pointed out in literature like Acetylen burns. The cases which imply in literature, mostly causes from explosion of high pressure acetylene tube, metal oxygene patch flame or carbide lamp using from cave explorers. An interesting acetylene burn cause in Turkey was publised by the authors. This cases was to come into being from flying toy balloon...

  7. Common oral lesions associated with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, M; Lucatorto, F

    1993-09-01

    More than 40 different lesions involving head and neck areas have been associated with HIV infection. The oral cavity may manifest the first sign of HIV infection. Early detection of these conditions can lead to early diagnosis of HIV infection and subsequent appropriate management. Signs, symptoms and management of the most common HIV-associated oral lesions are discussed.

  8. Effects of burn location and investigator on burn depth in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Adam J; Toussaint, Jimmy; Chung, Won Taek; Thode, Henry C; McClain, Steve; Raut, Vivek

    2016-02-01

    In order to be useful, animal models should be reproducible and consistent regardless of sampling bias, investigator creating burn, and burn location. We determined the variability in burn depth based on biopsy location, burn location and investigator in a porcine model of partial thickness burns. 24 partial thickness burns (2.5 cm by 2.5 cm each) were created on the backs of 2 anesthetized pigs by 2 investigators (one experienced, one inexperienced) using a previously validated model. In one of the pigs, the necrotic epidermis covering each burn was removed. Five full thickness 4mm punch biopsies were obtained 1h after injury from the four corners and center of the burns and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin and Masson's trichrome for determination of burn depth by a board certified dermatopathologist blinded to burn location and investigator. Comparisons of burn depth by biopsy location, burn location and investigator were performed with t-tests and ANOVA as appropriate. The mean (SD) depth of injury to blood vessels (the main determinant of burn progression) in debrided and non-debrided pigs pooled together was 1.8 (0.3)mm, which included 75% of the dermal depth. Non-debrided burns were 0.24 mm deeper than debrided burns (PBurn depth increased marginally from cephalic to caudal in non-debrided burns, but showed no statistical differences for these locations, in debrided burns. Additionally, there were also no statistical differences in burn depths from midline to lateral in either of these burn types. Burn depth was similar for both investigators and among biopsy locations. Burn depth was greater for caudal locations in non-debrided burns and overall non-debrided burns were deeper than debrided burns. However, burn depth did not differ based on investigator, biopsy site, and medial-lateral location. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. Tweens feel the burn: "salt and ice challenge" burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Lauren O; Bell, Derek E

    2016-05-01

    To review our institution's experience with frostbite injury secondary to "salt and ice challenge" (SIC) participation. We conducted a retrospective analysis of intentional freezing burns from 2012 to 2014. Demographics, depth and location of burn, total body surface area of burn, treatment, time to wound healing, length of stay, complications, and motives behind participation were analyzed. Five patients were seen in the emergency department for intentional freezing burns that resulted from SIC (all females; mean age: 12.3 years; range age: 10.0-13.2 years). Mean total body surface area was 0.408%. Salt and ice was in contact with skin for >10 min for two patients, >20 min for two patients, and an unknown duration for one patient. Complications included pain and burn scar dyschromia. Four patients cited peer pressure and desire to replicate SIC as seen on the Internet as their motivation in attempting the challenge. SIC has become a popular, self-harming behavior among youths. Increased public education, and provider and parent awareness of SIC are essential to address this public health concern.

  10. Symptoms of Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Primary Motor Symptoms Secondary Motor Symptoms Nonmotor Symptoms Causes Progression Medications & Treatments Clinical Trials Statistics on Parkinson's What's New In Parkinson's Research? What's in the ...

  11. Burn Patient Expectations from Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Yilmaz sahin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Burn is a kind of painful trauma that requires a long period of treatment and also changes patients body image. For this reason, nursing care of burn patients is very important. In this study in order to provide qualified care to the burned patients, patient and #8217;s expectations from nurses were aimed to be established. METHODS: Patients and #8217; expectations were evaluated on 101 patients with burn in Ministry of Health Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital Burn Service and Gulhane Military Medical Academy Education and Research Hospital Burn Center. A questionnaire which was developed by the researchers was used for collecting data. The questions on the questionnaire were classified into four groups to evaluate the patients and #8217; expectations about communication, information, care and discharge. Data was evaluated by using SPSS 12 package software. RESULTS: In this study, 48.5% of patients were at 18-28 age group, 79.2% were male and 51.5% of patients were employed. Almost all of patients expect nurses to give them confidence (98% and to give them information about latest developments with the disease. Patients prior expectation from nurses about care was to do their treatments regularly (100% and to take the necessary precautions in order to prevent infection (100%. 97% of patient expect nurses to give them information about the drugs, materials and equipment that they are going to use while discharge. CONCLUSION: As a result we found that burn patient expectations from nurses about communication, information, care and discharge were high. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(1.000: 37-46

  12. Harborview burns--1974 to 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren H Engrav

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burn demographics, prevention and care have changed considerably since the 1970s. The objectives were to 1 identify new and confirm previously described changes, 2 make comparisons to the American Burn Association National Burn Repository, 3 determine when the administration of fluids in excess of the Baxter formula began and to identify potential causes, and 4 model mortality over time, during a 36-year period (1974-2009 at the Harborview Burn Center in Seattle, WA, USA. METHODS AND FINDINGS: 14,266 consecutive admissions were analyzed in five-year periods and many parameters compared to the National Burn Repository. Fluid resuscitation was compared in five-year periods from 1974 to 2009. Mortality was modeled with the rBaux model. Many changes are highlighted at the end of the manuscript including 1 the large increase in numbers of total and short-stay admissions, 2 the decline in numbers of large burn injuries, 3 that unadjusted case fatality declined to the mid-1980s but has changed little during the past two decades, 4 that race/ethnicity and payer status disparity exists, and 5 that the trajectory to death changed with fewer deaths occurring after seven days post-injury. Administration of fluids in excess of the Baxter formula during resuscitation of uncomplicated injuries was evident at least by the early 1990s and has continued to the present; the cause is likely multifactorial but pre-hospital fluids, prophylactic tracheal intubation and opioids may be involved. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The dramatic changes include the rise in short-stay admissions; as a result, the model of burn care practiced since the 1970s is still required but is no longer sufficient. 2 Fluid administration in excess of the Baxter formula with uncomplicated injuries began at least two decades ago. 3 Unadjusted case fatality declined to ∼6% in the mid-1980s and changed little since then. The rBaux mortality model is quite accurate.

  13. Harborview burns--1974 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engrav, Loren H; Heimbach, David M; Rivara, Frederick P; Kerr, Kathleen F; Osler, Turner; Pham, Tam N; Sharar, Sam R; Esselman, Peter C; Bulger, Eileen M; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Honari, Shari; Gibran, Nicole S

    2012-01-01

    Burn demographics, prevention and care have changed considerably since the 1970s. The objectives were to 1) identify new and confirm previously described changes, 2) make comparisons to the American Burn Association National Burn Repository, 3) determine when the administration of fluids in excess of the Baxter formula began and to identify potential causes, and 4) model mortality over time, during a 36-year period (1974-2009) at the Harborview Burn Center in Seattle, WA, USA. 14,266 consecutive admissions were analyzed in five-year periods and many parameters compared to the National Burn Repository. Fluid resuscitation was compared in five-year periods from 1974 to 2009. Mortality was modeled with the rBaux model. Many changes are highlighted at the end of the manuscript including 1) the large increase in numbers of total and short-stay admissions, 2) the decline in numbers of large burn injuries, 3) that unadjusted case fatality declined to the mid-1980s but has changed little during the past two decades, 4) that race/ethnicity and payer status disparity exists, and 5) that the trajectory to death changed with fewer deaths occurring after seven days post-injury. Administration of fluids in excess of the Baxter formula during resuscitation of uncomplicated injuries was evident at least by the early 1990s and has continued to the present; the cause is likely multifactorial but pre-hospital fluids, prophylactic tracheal intubation and opioids may be involved. 1) The dramatic changes include the rise in short-stay admissions; as a result, the model of burn care practiced since the 1970s is still required but is no longer sufficient. 2) Fluid administration in excess of the Baxter formula with uncomplicated injuries began at least two decades ago. 3) Unadjusted case fatality declined to ∼6% in the mid-1980s and changed little since then. The rBaux mortality model is quite accurate.

  14. ORAL GLUCOSE TOLERANCE TEST REVISITED

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determinant for the usefulness or otherwise of oral glucose tolerance test for the diagnosis ... personnel, poverty and poor economic management, 8'9 that are known to .... Symptoms of diabetes plus casual plasma glucose ... WHO 2-hr plasma glucose criteria of 1l.1mmol/L .... Diagnostic criteria and performance revisited.

  15. Neuronal Plasticity Associated with Burn Injury and Its Relevance for Perception and Management of Pain in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence J Coderre

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the introduction of the gate control theory and various subsequent works, Ronald Melzack has inspired many investigators worldwide to realize two important facts about pain. First, incoming pain messages are subject to both negative and positive modulation, which significantly affect its perception. Second, the progression of knowledge about the basic mechanisms underlying persistent and chronic pain is critically dependent on the increased understanding of the complexity of the symptoms experienced by pain patients. The present paper examines these two very important issues in an effort to understand better the mechanisms that underlie the pain suffered by burn patients. The physiological responses to burn injury involve many different mediators and mechanisms, all of which contribute to pain perception and development of neuronal plasticity underlying short and long term changes in pain sensitivity. While experimental burn injuries in humans and animals are typically well controlled and mild, in burn victims, the severity is much more variable, and clinical care involves repeated traumas and manipulations of the injured sites. Recurrent inputs from damaged and redamaged tissue impinge on a nervous system that becomes an active participant in the initiation of changes in sensory perception and maintenance of long term sensory disturbances. Recently acquired experimental evidence on postburn hyperalgesia, central hyperexcitability and changes in opioid sensitivity provides strong support that burn patients need an analgesic approach aimed at preventing or reducing the 'neural' memory of pain, including the use of more than one treatment modality. Burn injuries offer a unique opportunity to combine experimental and clinical research to understand pain mechanisms better. Over the years, Ronald Melzack has insisted that one of the most laudable enterprises in research is to span the gap between these two often separate worlds.

  16. The challenges of dysphagia management and rehabilitation after extensive thermal burn injury: a complex case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbach, Anna F; Ward, Elizabeth C; Cornwell, Petrea L; Bassett, Lynell V; Muller, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The role of the speech pathologist in the burns population is still emerging, with detailed discussion of the assessment and management of dysphagia limited to date. This report describes the case of a 60-year-old man who developed severe contractures of the head and neck and oropharyngeal dysphagia after sustaining 53.5% deep partial- and full-thickness burns. Although some aspects of rehabilitation were confounded by a preexisting mild intellectual disability, the patient was able to participate in an intensive regimen of active and passive exercise to rehabilitate his oropharyngeal dysphagia. Significant oral contractures remained; however, the patient was discharged without tracheostomy and consuming a texture-modified diet with no signs of aspiration. To our knowledge, this is one of a small handful of reports that document speech pathology management of the burns population, and a first that identifies and outlines specific characteristics of, and rehabilitation strategies for, dysphagia in a burned individual.

  17. Outcomes of outpatient management of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew; Coffee, Tammy; Adenuga, Paul; Yowler, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    The literature surrounding pediatric burns has focused on inpatient management. The goal of this study is to characterize the population of burned children treated as outpatients and assess outcomes validating this method of burn care. A retrospective review of 953 patients treated the burn clinic and burn unit of a tertiary care center. Patient age, burn etiology, burn characteristics, burn mechanism, and referral pattern were recorded. The type of wound care and incidence of outcomes including subsequent hospital admission, infection, scarring, and surgery served as the primary outcome data. Eight hundred and thirty children were treated as outpatients with a mean time of 1.8 days for the evaluation of burn injury in our clinic. Scalds accounted for 53% of the burn mechanism, with burns to the hand/wrist being the most frequent area involved. The mean percentage of TBSA was 1.4% for the outpatient cohort and 8% for the inpatient cohort. Burns in the outpatient cohort healed with a mean time of 13.4 days. In the outpatient cohort, nine (1%) patients had subsequent admissions and three (0.4%) patients had concern for infection. Eight patients from the outpatient cohort were treated with excision and grafting. The vast majority of pediatric burns are small, although they may often involve more critical areas such as the face and hand. Outpatient wound care is an effective treatment strategy which results in low rates of complications and should become the standard of care for children with appropriate burn size and home support.

  18. LA50 in burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed-Forootan, K; Karimi, H; Motevalian, S A; Momeni, M; Safari, R; Ghadarjani, M

    2016-03-31

    Burn injuries put a huge financial burden on patients and healthcare systems. They are the 8th leading cause of mortality and the 13th most common cause of morbidity in our country. We used data from our Burn Registry Program to evaluate risk factors for mortality and lethal area fifty percent (LA50) in all burn patients admitted over two years. We used multiple logistic regressions to identify risk factors for mortality. LA50 is a reliable aggregate index for hospital care quality and a good measure for comparing results, also with those of other countries. 28,690 burn patients sought medical attention in the Emergency Department, and 1721 of them were admitted. Male to female ratio was 1,75:1. 514 patients were under 15 years old. Median age was 25 (range: 3 months - 93 years). Overall, probability of death was 8.4%. LA50 was 62.31% (CI 95%: 56.57-70.02) for patients aged 15 and over and 72.52% (CI 95%: 61.01-100) for those under 15. In the final model, we found that Adjusted OR was significant for age, female sex, TBSA and inhalation injury (P age and inhalation injury were the main risk factors for death. Authorities should pay special attention to these variables, especially in prevention programs, to reduce mortality and improve patient outcome. Children have better outcome than adults given equal burn size. Suicide rates are higher for women than men in our country.

  19. Topical management of facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Villapalos, Jorge; Jeschke, Marc G; Herndon, David N

    2008-11-01

    The face is the central point of the physical features of the human being. It transmits expressions and emotions, communicates feelings and allows for individual identity. It contains complex musculature and a pliable and unique skin envelope that reacts to the environment through a vast network of nerve endings. The face hosts vital areas that make phonation, feeding, and vision possible. Facial burns disrupt these anatomical and functional structures creating pain, deformity, swelling, and contractures that may lead to lasting physical and psychological sequelae. The management of facial burns may include operative and non-operative treatment or both, depending on the depth and extent of the burn. This paper intends to provide a review of the available options for topical management of facial burns. Topical agents will be defined as any agent applied to the surface of the skin that alters the outcome of the facial burn. Therefore, the classic concept of topical therapy will be expanded and developed within two major stages: acute and rehabilitation. Comparison of the effectiveness of the different treatments and relevant literature will be discussed.

  20. Telemedicine and burns: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyeh, B; Dibo, S A; Janom, H H

    2014-06-30

    Access to specialized burn care is becoming more difficult and is being restricted by the decreasing number of specialized burn centers. It is also limited by distance and resources for many patients, particularly those living in poverty or in rural medically underserved communities. Telemedicine is a rapidly evolving technology related to the practice of medicine at a distance through rapid access to remote medical expertise by telecommunication and information technologies. Feasibility of telemedicine in burn care has been demonstrated by various centers. Its use facilitates the delivery of care to patients with burn injuries of all sizes. It allows delivery of acute care and can be appropriately used for a substantial portion of the long-term management of patients after a burn by guiding less-experienced surgeons to treat and follow-up patients more appropriately. Most importantly, it allows better effective triage which reduces unnecessary time and resource demanding referrals that might overwhelm system capacities. However, there are still numerous barriers to the implementation of telemedicine, including technical difficulties, legal uncertainties, limited financial support, reimbursement issues, and an inadequate evidence base of its value and efficiency.

  1. Correlation between Burning Mouth Syndrome and Anxiety in the Elderly Inmates of Sanitaria in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Bakhtiari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic pain disorder characterized by a chief complaint of oral burning/pain with no clinically observable oral mucosal lesions. The prevalence of BMS has been reported to be 2.5- 5.1% in the general population and several psychological disorders have been reported as associated or predisposing factors for BMS. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between BMS and anxiety in the elderly residents of sanitaria in Tehran, Iran. Materials and methods. In a cross-sectional analytical study, 50 patients with BMS were included along with 50 healthy individuals as controls. Inclusion criteria were: age over 60 years, burning sensation in the mouth, normal oral mucosa, absence of diabetes, satisfactory prosthesis, absence of iron deficiency and other nutrients, and no heavy smoking habits. Similar inclusion criteria were considered for the control group without any oral complaints. Burning/pain severity was assessed by a 100-mm visual analog scale and the severity of anxiety (state, trait, and total was determined by Cattell's Anxiety Scale. Data was analyzed by t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results. Individuals with BMS assessed their burning/pain severity to be 27.4 mm (95% CI=25.2 - 29.6 mm. Standardized total anxiety scale in individuals with and without BMS (±SE for mean was 5.9±0.2 and 4.6±0.3 with significant differences (p=0.001. Similar significant differences were observed in state and trait anxiety between the two groups. Conclusion. It seems that both state and trait anxiety are associated with burning mouth syndrome.

  2. Multiple Myeloma Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Center Finder Home » About Multiple Myeloma » Symptoms Multiple Myeloma Symptoms Multiple myeloma symptoms may vary by patient, ... to be managed or prevented. The most common multiple myeloma symptoms may include: Bone pain or bone fractures ...

  3. General IC Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IC Symptoms of IC General IC Symptoms General IC Symptoms Symptoms of interstitial cystitis (IC) differ from ... news and events. Please leave this field empty Interstitial Cystitis Association 7918 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 300 McLean, ...

  4. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Programs & Services Search ANAUSA.org Connect with us! Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma Each heading slides to reveal more information. Early Symptoms Early Symptoms Early symptoms are easily overlooked, thus making diagnosis ...

  5. Ventilator-associated pneumonia after combined burn and trauma is caused by associated injuries and not the burn wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Wade, Terence E; Davis, Kimberly A; Luchette, Fred A; Esposito, Thomas J; Poulakidas, Stathis J; Santaniello, John M; Gamelli, Richard L

    2006-01-01

    An increased risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) has previously been demonstrated in trauma patients urgently intubated in the prehospital (ie, field) and emergency department (ED) settings. This study investigated the impact of urgent intubation on subsequent VAP in patients who sustained both a burn injury and a traumatic injury. We undertook a retrospective review of both trauma registry data and medical records for all patients with combined thermal and traumatic injuries admitted to a single verified burn center and level I trauma center. Patients undergoing field or ED intubation during the 5-year period ending December 2002 were identified and studied. Data abstracted included admission demographics and vital signs, presence of inhalation injury, location at the time of intubation, presence of associated injury, percentage TBSA burn, hospital and intensive care unit length of stay, and hospital day of VAP diagnosis. Seventy-eight of the 3388 patients (2.3%) admitted during the study period sustained a combination of burn wounds and trauma and underwent urgent field or ED intubation. The majority of patients were men (71%), with a mean age of 46 +/- 24 years. There was one failed oral intubation, which required cricothyroidotomy. The location of the patient at the time of intubation was ED, 66%; burn center ED, 17%; and field, 17%. Eighty percent of all patients were diagnosed with an inhalation injury. VAP was diagnosed in 39 patients (50%), with a mean time to diagnosis of 10 +/- 9 days. TBSA burn, smoke inhalation, and time (in days) to diagnosis of VAP were not independent risk factors for the occurrence of pneumonia in any of the 3 groups. However, those intubated at the initial ED were more likely to develop VAP (P = .028) compared to those intubated in the field or in the burn center. The incidence of associated injuries was significantly greater (P burn patients also sustain blunt trauma. VAP occurs in 50% of the patients requiring urgent

  6. Burn Wound Mucormycosis: A Case Study on Poor Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanistreet, Bryan; Bell, Derek

    Mucormycosis is a rare, rapidly progressive and often fatal fungal infection. The rarity of the condition lends itself to unfamiliarity, delayed treatment, and poor outcomes. Diagnosis of fungal infections early enough to enable appropriate treatment occurs in less than half of affected patients. A 56-year-old male with a history of diabetes mellitus II, hepatitis C, and intravenous drug abuse was involved in a rollover motor vehicle accident. He sustained circumferential partial and full-thickness burns to his lower extremities with 20% BSA burns. He ultimately required a below-knee amputation of his right lower extremity due to poor wound healing and nonviability of the soft tissue and foot. Debridement found muscle fibers that were necrotic and purulent. Pathology revealed Mucor species with extensive vascular invasion. This case and discussion highlights the importance of maintaining vigilance for mycotic infections and acting appropriately when there are concerning signs and symptoms of serious wound complications. Caretakers of severe trauma patients should have a high level of suspicion for complications and be cognizant of the American Burn Association's guidelines for systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. Progressive necrosis outside the confines of the original burn wound should raise concern for impaired wound healing, an immunocompromised state or an underlying infection.

  7. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-02-20

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  8. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The idea of identifying oral lesions with a precancerous nature, i.e. in the sense of pertaining to a pathologic process with an increased risk for future malignant development, of course is to prevent frank malignancy to occur in the affected area. The most common oral lesion with a precancerous...... nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  9. BACTERIOLOGICAL STUDY OF BURNS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shareen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A burn is a wound in which there is coagulative necrosis of the tissue, majority of which are caused by heat. Burn injury is a major public health problem in many areas of the world. Burns predispose to infection by damaging the protective barrier function of the skin, thus facilitating the entry of pa thogenic microorganisms and by inducing systemic immunosuppression . (1 OBJECTIVE : The present study was therefore undertaken to isolate and identify the aerobic bacterial flora in burn patients and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern. MATERIAL & METHODS : A total of 100 patients admitted with different degree of burns were studied. Wound swabs were taken with aseptic precautions by dry sterile cotton swab sticks. These swabs were transported to the microbiology laboratory and the isolates were identified based on standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done by Kirby Bauer’s disc diffusion method. RESULT : A total of 127 bacterial pathogens were isolated from 100 patients. Of these, 69% were monomicrobial in nature and 28% wer e polymicrobial. The most frequent cause of infection was found to be Staphylococcus aureus (39.4%, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (14.2%, Klebsiella pneumonia (13.4%, E.coli (8.7% and Acinetobacter species (7.9%.Out of the total Staphylococcus au reus isolates, 19 were Methicillin sensitive and 31 were Methicillin resistant (MRSA. All the MRSA strains were 100% sensitive to Vancomycin and Linezolid. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were most sensitive to Amikacin (9 4.4%, Fluroquinolones (61.1% . CONCLUSION : Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were major causes of infection in burn wounds. Therefore it is necessary to implement urgent measures for restriction of nosocomial infections, sensible limitation on the use of antimicrobial agents, strict disinfection and hygiene.

  10. Sintomas e sinais de respiração predominantemente oral em adolescentes com transtorno de déficit de atenção/hiperatividade e queixa de prejuízo escolar Symptoms and signs of mouth breathing in teenagers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and with complaints about school underachievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Leonel da Silva Costa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: caracterizar sintomas e sinais da Respiração Predominantemente Oral em adolescentes com Transtorno de Déficit de Atenção/Hiperatividade e queixa de prejuízo escolar e relacionar as características com os Tipos do Transtorno de Déficit de Atenção/Hiperatividade, gênero e faixa etária. MÉTODOS: realizada no ADOLESCENTRO, instituição pública do Distrito Federal, com 115 adolescentes de ambos os gêneros, faixa etária 10-18 anos, apresentando queixa de prejuízo escolar e Transtorno do Déficit de Atenção/Hiperatividade. Histórico dos sintomas diurnos e noturnos dos dois aos doze anos foi analisado e sinais da Respiração Predominantemente Oral. RESULTADOS: alta ocorrência (86,95% de sintomas e sinais da Respiração Predominantemente Oral. Registrou-se associação entre amigdalite e tipos do Transtorno de Déficit de Atenção/Hiperatividade com maior frequência no Tipo II hiperativo (60%, sialorreia no travesseiro com gênero predominando o masculino (65,5% e respiração oral diurna (64,7%, respiração oral noturna (82,4% e sialorreia no travesseiro (64,7% todas estas com a faixa etária de 10 a 12 anos. Houve associação entre lábios (54,3% e língua (54,3% não funcionais e faixa etária de 10 a 12 anos. Encontrou-se diferença estatisticamente significante para expulsões (20%, suspensões (70%, advertências (100% e tipos de Transtorno de Déficit de Atenção/Hiperatividade com maior freqüência no Tipo II hiperativo. CONCLUSÃO: avaliação da respiração em pacientes com Transtorno do Déficit de Atenção/Hiperatividade e queixa de prejuízo escolar é fundamental, pois dificuldades escolares podem estar associadas à história pregressa de respiração oral e Distúrbios Respiratórios do Sono comuns nestes quadros.PURPOSE: to characterize symptoms and signs of Mouth Breathing in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and with complaints about school underachievement. The specific

  11. Síndrome de ardor bucal: Actualización diagnóstica y terapéutica Burning mouth syndrome: Diagnostic and therapeutic actualisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ros Lluch

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de boca ardiente (SBA es una entidad patológica caracterizada por la presencia de síntomas crónicos de ardor o dolor en la mucosa bucal clínicamente normal. El SBA afecta principalmente a mujeres peri y posmenopáusicas. Su causa es desconocida, pero su relación con una compleja asociación de factores biológicos y psicológicos hace suponer una etiología multifactorial. Aunque se han encontrado tratamientos eficaces en casos particulares, se sigue buscando un tratamiento que resulte eficaz en la mayoría de los casos. Esta revisión hace especial referencia a los factores etiológicos y al tratamiento del síndrome.The burning mouth syndrome (BMS is characterized by the presence of chronic symptoms of burning or pain in clinically normal oral mucosa. This syndrome primarily affects peri and postmenopausal women. The cause is unknown, but the relationship between the BMS and a complex association of biological and psychological factors suggest a multifactorial etiology. Although some treatments have been found effective in particular cases, the clinical searchers are still looking for a treatment that can be effective in most cases. This review makes particular reference to the etiological factors and the treatment of the syndrome.

  12. Oral cancer knowledge among Turkish dental patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Misirlioglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the level of oral cancer awareness and knowledge among patients referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology in Central Anatolia. Settings and Design: The study was conducted with 1,125 patients who applied to the school of dentistry for routine dental examinations. The authors collect information with a 20-item written questionnaire from the participants about oral cancer risk factors, epidemiology, etiology, and signs and symptoms. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics of demographic variables and other data were reported as means and percentages. Statistical analysis was performed by means of SPSS +11.0 statistical package. Results: Overall, only 48.9% of all patients showed awareness of oral cancer, with awareness especially poor among lower socioeconomic groups. Awareness of oral cancer risk factors and signs and symptoms did not vary significantly between men and women (P > 0.5; however, older participants (aged 40-64 years were more familiar with oral cancer signs than younger participants. More than half of all participants (56.8% were unaware of the common clinical presentations of oral cancer. Conclusions: The results of this survey showed knowledge regarding oral cancer to be quite low. Thus, educational programs are needed to increase public awareness about oral cancer, and dentists should request patients undergo examinations for oral cancer to ensure early detection.

  13. Oral pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  14. Herpes - oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000606.htm Herpes - oral To use the sharing features on this page, ... 374. Read More Atopic dermatitis Cancer Fever Genital herpes Mouth ulcers Vesicles Review Date 8/14/2015 Updated ...

  15. American Burn Association Practice Guidelines: Burn Shock Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 01 JAN 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE American Burn Association...colloid or saline solutions. Clin Sci 1964; 26:429–43. 21. Markley K, Bocanegra M, Bazan A, et al. Clinical evaluation of saline solution therapy in

  16. [Accidental oral mercurochrome poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Curiel J; Nieto Conde C; Santana Rodríguez C; Urbón Artero A; Gracia Remiro R

    2000-11-01

    Neonatal mercury poisoning, especially that due to merbromin ingestion, is uncommon. We describe the case of a 10 day old newborn infant who was given mercurochrome orally for 7 days due to misunderstanding of medical instructions. Initial symptoms included loss of appetite and low weight increase. Elevated blood mercury concentrations were found. Chelating therapy with dimercaprol was initiated and the patient's evolution was good. We discuss the potential toxicity of mercury and emphasise the importance of the transmission of information by physicians, especially to the immigrant population.

  17. Disparities in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020: Oral Health Objectives Site Map Disparities in Oral Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Oral health ... to get and keep dental insurance. Disparities in Oral Health Some of the oral health disparities that exist ...

  18. Effects of early oral administration of mixed enteral nutritional agent on intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with severe burn injury%严重烧伤患者早期口服混合肠内营养剂对肠黏膜屏障的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙珂岱; 董志伟; 陈婧; 刘攀; 龚雅利; 彭毅志

    2015-01-01

    论 严重烧伤患者在常规治疗基础上早期服用混合肠内营养剂能促进肠黏膜屏障的修复并给予保护,具有减轻肠道损害和炎症反应的作用.%Objective To explore the effects of oral administration of mixed enteral nutritional agent on intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with severe burn injury at early stage.Methods Twenty-four pa tients with severe burn injury admitted to our burn ward from August 2013 to September 2014,conforming to the study criteria,were divided into conventional therapy group (n =12) and early enteral feeding group (n =12) according to the random number table.Patients in conventional therapy group received conventional treatment immediately after admission,while those in early enteral feeding group were orally given 100 mL of a mixture of glutamine,probiotics,and prebiotics once a day besides conventional treatment for 7 days.Serum levels of diamine oxidase (DAO) and procalcitonin (PCT) and plasma level of LPS were determined by ELISA before treatment and on treatment day (TD) 1,3,7,14,and 21.Wound secretion and blood samples were collected for bacterial culture within the 21 TD.The incidence of MODS within the 21 TD was observed.Data were processed with Fisher's exact test,rank sum test,analysis of variance for repeated measurement,and LSD-t test.Results (1) Serum levels of DAO in patients of early enteral feeding group on TD 7,14,and 21 were respectively (14.9 ±3.7),(12.4 ±3.1),and (9.5 ±0.7) ng/mL,which were significantly lower than those of conventional therapy group [(17.5 ± 4.0),(16.3 ± 3.3),and (13.0 ± 1.1) ng/mL,with t values from 2.913 to 15.304,P values below 0.01].Serum levels of DAO at the other time points were close between the two groups (with t values from-0.598 to 0.139,P values above 0.05).(2) Compared with serum levels of PCT in patients of conventional therapy group [(11.7 ±20.9) and (12.9 ± 23.9) ng/mL],those of early enteral feeding group were significantly lower on TD 7and 14

  19. Patients with burning mouth sensations. A clinical investigation of causative factors in a group of “compete denture wearers” Jordanian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadeer Elea Mukatash-Nimri

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Spontaneous symptoms of burning mouth without mucosal signs should be considered as a manifestation of undermind pathology and/or distress, and the multi-factorial causes of burning mouth syndrome and sensation need to be referred to the suitable specialist for better treatment results.

  20. Internet-based information and self-help program for parents of children with burns: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefin Sveen

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: We believe that this program will offer parents of children with burns information and support, decrease symptoms of stress, and that parents will perceive the program as useful. If the program is found to be beneficial, it could be implemented in burn care as it is accessible and cost-effective.

  1. Posttraumatic stress symptoms after exposure to two fire disasters: comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Van Loey

    Full Text Available This study investigated traumatic stress symptoms in severely burned survivors of two fire disasters and two comparison groups of patients with "non-disaster" burn injuries, as well as risk factors associated with acute and chronic stress symptoms. Patients were admitted to one out of eight burn centers in The Netherlands or Belgium. The Impact of Event Scale (IES was administered to 61 and 33 survivors respectively of two fire disasters and 54 and 57 patients with "non-disaster" burn etiologies at 2 weeks, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after the event. We used latent growth modeling (LGM analyses to investigate the stress trajectories and predictors in the two disaster and two comparison groups. The results showed that initial traumatic stress reactions in disaster survivors with severe burns are more intense and prolonged during several months relative to survivors of "non-disaster" burn injuries. Excluding the industrial fire group, all participants' symptoms on average decreased over the two year period. Burn severity, peritraumatic anxiety and dissociation predicted the long-term negative outcomes only in the industrial fire group. In conclusion, fire disaster survivors appear to experience higher levels of traumatic stress symptoms on the short term, but the long-term outcome appears dependent on factors different from the first response. Likely, the younger age, and several beneficial post-disaster factors such as psychosocial aftercare and social support, along with swift judicial procedures, contributed to the positive outcome in one disaster cohort.

  2. Posttraumatic stress symptoms after exposure to two fire disasters: comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loey, Nancy E; van de Schoot, Rens; Faber, Albertus W

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated traumatic stress symptoms in severely burned survivors of two fire disasters and two comparison groups of patients with "non-disaster" burn injuries, as well as risk factors associated with acute and chronic stress symptoms. Patients were admitted to one out of eight burn centers in The Netherlands or Belgium. The Impact of Event Scale (IES) was administered to 61 and 33 survivors respectively of two fire disasters and 54 and 57 patients with "non-disaster" burn etiologies at 2 weeks, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after the event. We used latent growth modeling (LGM) analyses to investigate the stress trajectories and predictors in the two disaster and two comparison groups. The results showed that initial traumatic stress reactions in disaster survivors with severe burns are more intense and prolonged during several months relative to survivors of "non-disaster" burn injuries. Excluding the industrial fire group, all participants' symptoms on average decreased over the two year period. Burn severity, peritraumatic anxiety and dissociation predicted the long-term negative outcomes only in the industrial fire group. In conclusion, fire disaster survivors appear to experience higher levels of traumatic stress symptoms on the short term, but the long-term outcome appears dependent on factors different from the first response. Likely, the younger age, and several beneficial post-disaster factors such as psychosocial aftercare and social support, along with swift judicial procedures, contributed to the positive outcome in one disaster cohort.

  3. Oral and craniofacial manifestations of multiple sclerosis: implications for the oral health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G-Q; Meng, Y

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex neurological condition affecting sensory and motor nerve transmission. Its progression and symptoms are unpredictable and vary from person to person as well as over time. Symptoms of orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, spasticity, spasms, tremor, fatigue, depression and progressive disability, impact on the individual's ability to maintain oral health, cope with dental treatment and access dental services. Also, many of the medications used in the symptomatic management of the condition have the potential to cause dry mouth and associated oral disease. There is no cure for multiple sclerosis, and treatment focuses on prevention of disability and maintenance of quality of life. The oral health care team plays an essential role in ensuring that oral health impacts positively on general health. This review highlights the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, oral and craniofacial manifestations and their management, and oral health care considerations in patients with MS.

  4. Protect the Ones You Love: Burns Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Youth Violence Prevention Burn Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir We ... to prevent leading causes of child injury, like burns, is a step toward this goal. Every day, ...

  5. Topical Pain Relievers May Cause Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Updates Topical Pain Relievers May Cause Burns Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... rare, have ranged from mild to severe chemical burns with use of such brand-name topical muscle ...

  6. A review of hydrofluoric acid burn management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Daniel; Thoma, Achilleas; Bailey, Kristy; Fish, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) causes a unique chemical burn. Much of the current treatment knowledge of HF burns is derived from case reports, small case series, animal studies and anecdotal evidence. The management can be challenging because clinical presentation and severity of these burns vary widely. Plastic surgeons managing burn patients must have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology, the range of severity in presentation and the current treatment options available for HF burns. The present article reviews the current understanding of the pathophysiology and systemic effects associated with severe HF burns. Furthermore, it distinguishes between minor and life-threatening HF burns and describes several of the basic techniques that are available to treat patients with HF burns.

  7. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch this video to learn ... know about burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. Read our burn prevention tips | ...

  8. Imaging acute thermal burns by photoacoustic microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hao F.; Maslov, Konstantin; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-01-01

    The clinical significance of a burn depends on the percentage of total body involved and the depth of the burn. Hence a noninvasive method that is able to evaluate burn depth would be of great help in clinical evaluation. To this end, photoacoustic microscopy is used to determine the depth of acute thermal burns by imaging the total hemoglobin concentration in the blood that accumulates along the boundaries of injuries as a result of thermal damage to the vasculature. We induce acute thermal ...

  9. Burns, metabolism and nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça Machado, N; Gragnani, A; Masako Ferreira, L

    2011-01-01

    To review the nutritional evaluation in burned patient, considering the literature descriptions of nutritional evaluation and energy requirements of these patients. Thermal injury is the traumatic event with the highest metabolic response in critically ill patients. Various mathematical formulas have been developed to estimate nutritional requirements in burned patient. Indirect Calorimetry is the only method considered gold standard for measuring caloric expenditure. A survey of the literature and data was collected based on official data bases, LILACS, EMBASE and PubMed. The metabolic changes involved in hypermetabolism are designed to supply energy to support immune function, brain activity, wound healing, and preservation of body tissues. Body weight is considered the easiest indicator and perhaps the best to assess the nutritional status. The most common formulas utilized in these patients are the Curreri, Pennisi, Schofield, Ireton-Jones, Harris-Benedict and the ASPEN recommendations. For children is the Mayes and World Health Organization formula. The majority of mathematical formulas overestimate the nutritional needs. The regular use of Indirect Calorimetry supplies adequate nutritional support to the burn patient. The traditional nutritional evaluation considers anthropometry, biochemical markers and estimation of nutritional requirements. The weight provides a basis for decisions that are established in the clinical context. Classic parameters can be adapted to intensive care environment. The use of Indirect Calorimetry is crucial to ensure the safety of the nutritional support of burn patients and this should be widely encouraged.

  10. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. Abdominal Complications after Severe Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    abdominal compartment syndrome, schemic bowel, biliary disease , peptic ulcer disease and astritis requiring laparotomy, small bowel obstruction, rimary fungal...complications in- luded trauma exploratory laparotomy, abdominal com- artment syndrome, ischemic bowel, biliary disease , peptic lcer disease and gastritis, large...because it was almost uniformly ssociated with serious lethal burns. This was in the period efore effective gastric acid control, explaining the high

  12. Neutral zone and oral submucous fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaista Afroz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral submucous fibrosis is a premalignant condition in which rigidity of the lip, tongue, and palate results in reduced mouth opening and tongue movement. Limited mouth opening, mucosal rigidity, and reduced salivary flow makes prosthodontic procedures difficult in these patients and affects the stability, retention, and the support of removable prostheses. The burning sensation in the mouth that these patients experience reduces the tolerance to prostheses. We report a case of oral submucous fibrosis where the conventional neutral zone technique with certain modifications was utilized to rehabilitate a completely edentulous patient with this condition.

  13. Use of previously burned skin as random cutaneous local flaps in pediatric burn reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Herndon, DN; McCauley, RL

    2002-01-01

    Reconstruction after post-burn scarring remains a challenge. It is especially true in the severely burned patient, who normally presents with a paucity of donor sites Healed skin from areas that had been burned and skin from grafted areas (termed as previously burned skin) have been occasionally use

  14. Use of previously burned skin as random cutaneous local flaps in pediatric burn reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Herndon, DN; McCauley, RL

    Reconstruction after post-burn scarring remains a challenge. It is especially true in the severely burned patient, who normally presents with a paucity of donor sites Healed skin from areas that had been burned and skin from grafted areas (termed as previously burned skin) have been occasionally

  15. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. 816.87 Section 816.87 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine...

  16. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. 817.87 Section 817.87 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine...

  17. MHD control in burning plasmas MHD control in burning plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donné, Tony; Liang, Yunfeng

    2012-07-01

    Fusion physics focuses on the complex behaviour of hot plasmas confined by magnetic fields with the ultimate aim to develop a fusion power plant. In the future generation of tokamaks like ITER, the power generated by the fusion reactions substantially exceeds the external input power (Pfusion}/Pin >= 10). When this occurs one speaks of a burning plasma. Twenty per cent of the generated fusion power in a burning plasma is carried by the charged alpha particles, which transfer their energy to the ambient plasma in collisions, a process called thermalization. A new phenomenon in burning plasmas is that the alpha particles, which form a minority but carry a large fraction of the plasma kinetic energy, can collectively drive certain types of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modes, while they can suppress other MHD modes. Both types of MHD modes can have desirable effects on the plasma, as well as be detrimental to the plasma. For example, the so-called sawtooth instability, on the one hand, is largely responsible for the transport of the thermalized alpha particles out of the core, but, on the other hand, may result in the loss of the energetic alphas before they have fully thermalized. A further undesirable effect of the sawtooth instability is that it may trigger other MHD modes such as neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). These NTMs, in turn, are detrimental to the plasma confinement and in some cases may even lead to disruptive termination of the plasma. At the edge of the plasma, finally, so-called edge localized modes or ELMs occur, which result in extremely high transient heat and particle loads on the plasma-facing components of a reactor. In order to balance the desired and detrimental effects of these modes, active feedback control is required. An additional complication occurs in a burning plasma as the external heating power, which is nowadays generally used for plasma control, is small compared to the heating power of the alpha particles. The scientific challenge

  18. Factors influencing perceived oral health of Japanese middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masayuki; Zaitsu, Takashi; Ohara, Satoko; Wright, Clive; Kawaguchi, Yoko

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the relationships between subjective oral health symptoms and clinical oral health conditions on the perceived oral health of 1799 Japanese middle-aged adults. A self-administered questionnaire together with dental examinations was administered. A structural equation modeling analysis with Bayesian estimation was used to examine the factors influencing perceived oral health as a latent variable with 4 other latent variables: subjective oral health symptoms, clinical tooth conditions, clinical periodontal conditions, and other clinical oral conditions. For perceived oral health as the endogenous variable, only subjective oral health symptoms and clinical tooth conditions showed significant relationship. Clinical periodontal conditions and other clinical oral conditions did not show significant effects on the perceived oral health.

  19. A review of hydrofluoric acid burn management

    OpenAIRE

    McKee, Daniel; Thoma, Achilleas; Bailey, Kristy; Fish, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation and severity of hydrofluoric acid burns vary considerably, making management particularly challenging. Given that current knowledge of HF burns is derived from small case series, case reports, animal studies and anecdotal evidence, this narrative review discusses the current understanding of the effects associated with severe hydrofluoric acid burns, describing the mechanism of injury, systemic toxicity and treatment options.

  20. Titanium tetrachloride burns to the eye.

    OpenAIRE

    Chitkara, D K; McNeela, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    We present eight cases of chemical burns of the eyes from titanium tetrachloride, an acidic corrosive liquid. However it causes severe chemical burns which have a protracted course and features more akin to severe alkali burns. Injuries related to titanium tetrachloride should be treated seriously and accordingly appropriate management is suggested.

  1. Autopsy report for chemical burns from cresol solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Shikata, Nobuaki; Tsubura, Airo; Nagasaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Cresol, which is used as a disinfectant and insecticide, has erosive effects on epidermal and epithelial tissues in the body. Oral exposure causes gastrointestinal corrosive injuries as a direct chemical burn. We report herein a case of suicidal poisoning by ingestion of cresol solution. An octogenarian man with depression was found dead approximately 14 h after exposure to less than 500 mL of saponated cresol solution. Macroscopically, corrosive lesions such as red-to-brown-colored epithelium and edematous thickening of walls were seen in the skin, mouth, oral cavity, esophagus, and stomach. Histopathologically, coagulative necrosis and vascular dilatation were detected from mucosal to muscular layers in the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. Congestive edema of the lungs, edematous changes in the brain, and proximal tubular necrosis of the kidneys were seen, suggesting acute circulatory disturbance due to shock. This human case offers valuable information on the direct irritation and shock induced by systemic exposure to corrosive substances.

  2. Oral submucous fibrosis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina,1 Shyam B Verma,2 Fareedi Mukram Ali,3 Kishor Patil4 1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Nirvana Skin Clinic, Vadodara, Gujarat, India; 3Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, SMBT Dental College, Sangamner, Maharashtra, India; 4Departments of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, SMBT Dental College, Sangamner, Maharashtra, India Abstract: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF is a premalignant condition caused by betel chewing. It is very common in Southeast Asia but has started to spread to Europe and North America. OSF can lead to squamous cell carcinoma, a risk that is further increased by concomitant tobacco consumption. OSF is a diagnosis based on clinical symptoms and confirmation by histopathology. Hypovascularity leading to blanching of the oral mucosa, staining of teeth and gingiva, and trismus are major symptoms. Major constituents of betel quid are arecoline from betel nuts and copper, which are responsible for fibroblast dysfunction and fibrosis. A variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways might be involved. Treatment of OSF is difficult, as not many large, randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The principal actions of drug therapy include antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxygen radical mechanisms. Potential new drugs are on the horizon. Surgery may be necessary in advanced cases of trismus. Prevention is most important, as no healing can be achieved with available treatments. Keywords: betel nut, betel quid, oral disease, squamous cell carcinoma, tobacco, fibrosis

  3. Intentional burns in Nepal: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Bir Bahadur; Duke, Janine M; Sharma, Narayan Prasad; Thapa, Buland; Dahal, Peeyush; Bariya, Nara Devi; Marston, Wendy; Wallace, Hilary J

    2015-09-01

    Intentional burns injuries are associated with high mortality rates, and for survivors, high levels of physical and psychological morbidity. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of intentional burn admissions to the adult Burns Unit at Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal, during the period 2002-2013. A secondary data analysis of de-identified data of patients hospitalized at Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, with a burn during the period of 1 January 2002 to 31 August 2013. Socio-demographic, injury and psychosocial factors of patients with intentional and unintentional burns are described and compared. Chi-square tests, Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used to determine statistical significance. There were a total of 1148 burn admissions of which 329 (29%) were for intentional burn, 293 (26%) were self-inflicted and 36 (3%) were due to assault. Mortality rates for intentional burns were approximately three times those for unintentional burns (60 vs. 22%). When compared to unintentional burns, patients with intentional burns were more likely to be female (79 vs. 48%), married (84 vs. 67%), younger (25 vs. 30 years), have more extensive burns (total body surface area, %: 55 vs. 25) and higher mortality (60 vs. 22%). Intentional burns were more likely to occur at home (95 vs. 67%), be caused by fire (96 vs. 77%), and kerosene was the most common accelerant (91 vs. 31%). A primary psychosocial risk factor was identified in the majority of intentional burn cases, with 60% experiencing adjustment problems/interpersonal conflict and 32% with evidence of a pre-existing psychological condition. A record of alcohol/substance abuse related to the patient or other was associated with a greater proportion of intentional burns when compared with unintentional burns (17 vs. 4%). The majority of intentional burn patients were female. Almost all intentional burns occurred in the home and were caused by fire, with kerosene the most common accelerant used. Underlying

  4. Burning mouth syndrome and associated factors: A case-control retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; de Luca-Monasterios, Fiorella; Schemel-Suárez, Mayra; Rodríguez de Rivera-Campillo, María E; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro M; López-López, José

    2017-02-23

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) can be defined as burning pain or dysesthesia on the tongue and/or other sites of the oral mucosa without a causative identifiable lesion. The discomfort is usually of daily recurrence, with a higher incidence among people aged 50 to 60 years, affecting mostly the female sex and diminishing their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between several pathogenic factors and burning mouth syndrome. 736 medical records of patients diagnosed of burning mouth syndrome and 132 medical records for the control group were studied retrospectively. The study time span was from January 1990 to December 2014. The protocol included: sex, age, type of oral discomfort and location, among other factors. Analysis of the association between pathogenic factors and BMS diagnosis revealed that only 3 factors showed a statistically significant association: triggers (P=.003), parafunctional habits (P=.006), and oral hygiene (P=.012). There were neither statistically significant differences in BMS incidence between sex groups (P=.408) nor association of BMS with the pathogenic factors of substance abuse (P=.915), systemic pathology (P=.685), and dietary habits (P=.904). Parafunctional habits like bruxism and abnormal movements of tongue and lips can explain the BMS main symptomatology. Psychological aspects and systemic factors should be always considered. As a multifactorial disorder, the treatment of BMS should be executed in a holistic way. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Eclipse burns: a prospective study of solar retinopathy following the 1999 solar eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S C; Eke, T; Ziakas, N G

    2001-01-20

    Looking at the sun can cause focal burns to the retina. We prospectively followed up all patients who presented to Eye Casualty of Leicester Royal Infirmary having observed the solar eclipse of August, 1999. 45 patients attended, of whom 20 had visual symptoms and five had visible changes in the retina; four patients were still symptomatic after 7 months.

  6. Randomized-controlled trial of esomeprazole in functional dyspepsia patients with epigastric pain or burning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talley, N J; Vakil, N; Lauritsen, K;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early identification of true responders to acid suppression in functional dyspepsia patients with symptoms of epigastric pain or burning may enable clinicians to optimally tailor treatment. AIM: To evaluate whether a 1-w acid suppression trial is useful for identifying true responders...

  7. Oral Soft Tissue Pathologies among Diabetic Patients in Rasht- 2005

    OpenAIRE

    H Hassannia; Kalantari, S; Z Mohtasham Amiri; M Rabiei

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes can affect organs including the oral mucosa. There is a disagreement about the prevalence of oral mucosal disease in diabetic patients. We therefore decided to investigate more about that. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of soft tissue pathologies by assessing burning mouth and xerostomia in diabetic patients on the basis of type of diabetes and control status of diabetes. Methods: This descriptive, analytic study was done by visiting 486 known dia...

  8. Quinidine Oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormal activity. Quinidine is also used to treat malaria.This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ... effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: diarrhea ...

  9. Incidence and characteristics of chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Lee, Sang-Gil; Kim, Hwan-Cheol

    2017-05-01

    Chemical burns can lead to serious health outcomes. Previous studies about chemical burns have been performed based on burn center data so these studies have provided limited information about the incidence of chemical burns at the national level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns using nationwide databases. A cohort representing the Korean population, which was established using a national health insurance database, and a nationwide workers' compensation database were used to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns. Characteristics of the affected body region, depth of burns, industry, task, and causative agents were analyzed from two databases. The incidence of chemical burns was calculated according to employment status. The most common regions involving chemical burns with hospital visits were the skin followed by the eyes. For skin lesions, the hands and wrists were the most commonly affected regions. Second degree burns were the most common in terms of depth of skin lesions. The hospital visit incidence was 1.96 per 10,000 person-year in the general population. The compensated chemical burns incidence was 0.17 per 10,000 person-year. Employees and the self-employed showed a significantly increased risk of chemical burns undergoing hospital visits compared to their dependents. Chemical burns on the skin and eyes are almost equally prevalent. The working environment was associated with increased risk of chemical burns. Our results may aid in estimating the size of the problem and prioritizing prevention of chemical burns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Oral Allergy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuto Kondo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as the symptoms of IgE-mediated immediate allergy localized in the oral mucosa, and the characteristics depend on the lability of the antigen. Another term used for this syndrome is pollen-food allergy (PFS; the patient is sensitized with pollen via the airways and exhibits an allergic reaction to food antigen with a structural similarity to the pollen (class 2 food allergy. In addition to PFS, latex-fruit syndrome is also well-known as the disease exhibiting OAS. In treating the condition, it must be noted that most but not all symptoms of PFS are those of OAS. In many cases, antigens become edible by heating, but some are resistant to heating. Also, since the exacerbation of atopic dermatitis is occasionally observed after the intake of cooked antigens in asymptomatic individuals, careful inquiry of the history is important in designing the treatment. Immunotherapy against the cross-reacting pollen has also been attempted in PFS.

  11. Love burns: An essay about bride burning in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutla, Rajni K; Heimbach, David

    2004-01-01

    Each year in countries like India, thousands of young women are burned to death or afflicted with fatal burns. They are victims of dowry deaths. The husband and/or in-laws have determined that the dowry, a gift given from the daughter's parents to the husband, was inadequate and therefore attempt to murder the new bride to make the husband available to remarry or to punish the bride and her family. Unfortunately, this is a domestic issue that is often ignored or minimized, and the prosecution is often inadequate. This review article illustrates various scenarios of dowry deaths, investigates different predispositions, summarizes the current legislation, and proposes solutions to this problem. One hopes that the exposure of this problem may curtail its rampant, yet well-hidden, prevalence.

  12. Effects of LEDs on oral mucositis prevention in a patient with classic Hodgkin's lymphoma - a case report; Utilizacao de LEDs na prevencao de mucosite oral em paciente com linfoma de Hodgkin classico - estudo de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bicudo, Leticia Lang

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this case report was to evaluate the efficacy of therapy using LEDs (light-emitting diodes), at a wavelength of 880 nm, in the prevention of oral mucositis in a patient with Hodgkin's disease treated with ABVD regimen. Mucositis is a dose limiting complication of cancer treatment, of high incidence, which severity can lead to alterations of treatment planning or even to suspension of cancer therapy, with serious consequences in tumor response and even survival. Lesions develop most commonly on the nonkeratinized mucosa and present symptoms that begin like mild burning and evolve to severe pain. For this reason, low power laser and, recently, LEDs have been considered for preventing and management of oral mucositis, with great results. In this study, a 34-year-old male received intraoral irradiations with an infrared LEDs array (3,6 J/cm{sup 2}, 74 mW), for five consecutive days, starting on the day of chemotherapy. In each chemotherapy cycle, he received ABVD protocol on day 1 and day 15, and received LEDs treatment during five days on each ABVD infusion. To analyze results, the WHO (World Health Organization) scale was used for grading of mucositis and VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) for pain evaluation, on days 1, 3, 7, 10 and 13 post-chemotherapy. The results obtained showed the patient did not develop oral mucositis, during the five chemotherapy cycles and did not present any pain symptom. Therapy with LEDs was a safe and effective method for the prevention of oral mucositis in this case report. However, new studies are needed in order to prove the efficacy of this methodology with more patients, increasing their quality of life. (author)

  13. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options.

  14. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  15. Pediatric burn rehabilitation: Philosophy and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Ohgi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are a huge public health issue for children throughout the world, with the majority occurring in developing countries. Burn injuries can leave a pediatric patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. Rehabilitation is an essential and integral part of pediatric burn treatment. The aim of this article was to review the literature on pediatric burn rehabilitation from the Medline, CINAHL, and Web of Science databases. An attempt has been made to present the basic aspects of burn rehabilitation, provide practical information, and discuss the goals and conceptualization of rehabilitation as well as the development of rehabilitation philosophy and strategies.

  16. Management of post burn hand deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabapathy S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The hand is ranked among the three most frequent sites of burns scar contracture deformity. One of the major determinants of the quality of life in burns survivors is the functionality of the hands. Burns deformities, although largely preventable, nevertheless do occur when appropriate treatment is not provided in the acute situation or when they are part of a major burns. Reconstructive procedures can greatly improve the function of the hands. Appropriate choice of procedures and timing of surgery followed by supervised physiotherapy can be a boon for a burns survivor.

  17. New type of sauna-related burn: conductive contact burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Jun; Yoo, Heon; Park, Myong Chul

    2013-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman visited a Korean-style hot dry sauna room. The patient had a medical history of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. During the sauna, the patient slept for 30 minutes. During the sleep, the right medial thigh was covered with a fully wet towel. The patient sustained a second-degree burn on the right medial thigh area with multiple bullas. On physical examination, erythema, heating sensation, and swelling around the bullas were noted. The patient was admitted and received intravenous antibiotics for 7 days. A dressing with Silmazine 1% cream (sulfadiazine) was applied twice a day for prevention of local infection. The patient was discharged on day 14 without complication. In this case, the mechanism of the burn was different. Hot air has much thermal energy but is not conducted to the skin directly. A wet towel will have a relatively higher thermal capacity or heat capacity than a dry or damp towel, and the sodden water might be a medium for the conduction of thermal energy. Owing to the global popularity of sauna bathing, it is important to recognize all sources of sauna-related burns.

  18. Modelling burned area in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lehsten

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of current and projected wildfires is essential for predicting crucial aspects of vegetation patterns, biogeochemical cycling as well as pyrogenic emissions across the African continent. This study uses a data-driven approach to parameterize two burned area models applicable to dynamic vegetation models (DVMs and Earth system models (ESMs. We restricted our analysis to variables for which either projections based on climate scenarios are available, or that are calculated by DVMs, and we consider a spatial scale of one degree as the scale typical for DVMs and ESMs. By using the African continent here as an example, an analogue approach could in principle be adopted for other regions, for global scale dynamic burned area modelling.

    We used 9 years of data (2000–2008 for the variables: precipitation over the last dry season, the last wet season and averaged over the last 2 years, a fire-danger index (the Nesterov index, population density, and annual proportion of area burned derived from the MODIS MCD45A1 product. Two further variables, tree and herb cover were only available for 2001 as a remote sensing product. Since the effect of fires on vegetation depends strongly on burning conditions, the timing of wildfires is of high interest too, and we were able to relate the seasonal occurrence of wildfires to the daily Nesterov index.

    We parameterized two generalized linear models (GLMs, one with the full variable set (model VC and one considering only climate variables (model C. All introduced variables resulted in an increase in model performance. Model VC correctly predicts the spatial distribution and extent of fire prone areas though the total variability is underrepresented. Model VC has a much lower performance in both aspects (correlation coefficient of predicted and observed ratio of burned area: 0.71 for model VC and 0.58 for model C. We expect the remaining variability to be attributed to additional

  19. Methylated spirit burns: an ongoing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansbeken, J R H; Vloemans, A F P M; Tempelman, F R H; Breederveld, R S

    2012-09-01

    Despite many educational campaigns we still see burns caused by methylated spirit every year. We undertook a retrospective study to analyse the impact of this problem. We retrospectively collected data of all patients with burns caused by methylated spirit over twelve years from 1996 to 2008. Our main endpoints were: incidence, age, mechanism of injury, total body surface area (TBSA) burned, burn depth, need for surgery and length of hospital stay. Ninety-seven patients with methylated spirit burns were included. During the study period there was no decrease in the number of patients annually admitted to the burn unit with methylated spirit burns. 28% of the patients (n=27) were younger than eighteen years old, 15% (n=15) were ten years old or younger. The most common cause of burns was carelessness in activities involving barbecues, campfires and fondues. Mean TBSA burned was 16% (SD 12.4). 70% (n=68) had full thickness burns. 66% (n=64) needed grafting. Mean length of hospital stay was 23 days (SD 24.7). The use of methylated spirit is an ongoing problem, which continues to cause severe burns in adults and children. Therefore methylated spirit should be banned in households. We suggest sale only in specialised shops, clear labelling and mandatory warnings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. Occupational burns treated in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Audrey A; Konda, Srinivas; Jackson, Larry L

    2015-03-01

    Despite reported declines, occupational burn injuries remain a workplace safety concern. More severe burns may result in costly medical treatment and long-term physical and psychological consequences. We used the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-Occupational Supplement to produce national estimates of burns treated in emergency departments (EDs). We analyzed data trends from 1999 to 2008 and provided detailed descriptions of 2008 data. From 1999 to 2008 there were 1,132,000 (95% CI: ±192,300) nonfatal occupational burns treated in EDs. Burn numbers and rates declined approximately 40% over the 10 years. In 2008, men and younger workers 15-24 years old had the highest rates. Scalds and thermal burns accounted for more than 60% of burns. Accommodation and food service, manufacturing, and construction industries had the largest number of burns. Despite declining burn rates, emphasis is needed on reducing burn hazards to young food service workers and using job specific hazard analyses to prevent burns. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Perineal burn care: French working group recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, Julien; Le Floch, Ronan; Bourdais, Ludovic; Gamelin, Alexandre; Lebreton, Françoise; Perro, Gérard

    2014-06-01

    Burns to the perineum are frequently exposed to faeces. Diverting colostomy is often described to prevent faecal soiling. Because this technique is invasive with frequent complications, use of non-surgical devices including specifically designed faecal management systems has been reported in perineal burns. In order to standardise the faecal management strategy in patients with perineal burns, a group of French experts was assembled. This group first evaluated the ongoing practice in France by analysing a questionnaire sent to every French burn centre. Based on the results of this study and on literature data, the experts proposed recommendations on the management of perineal burns in adults. Specifically designed faecal management systems are the first-line method to divert faeces in perineal burns. The working group proposed recommendations and an algorithm to assist in decisions in the management of perineal burns in four categories of patients, depending on total burn skin area, depth and extent of the perineal burn. In France, non-surgical devices are the leading means of faecal diversion in perineal burns. The proposed algorithm may assist in decisions in the management of perineal burns. The expert group emphasises that large clinical studies are needed to better evaluate these devices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Symptoms, Treatment and Research Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... without any pain. Photo courtesy of NEI Glaucoma Symptoms At first, open-angle glaucoma has no symptoms. ...

  3. Symptoms and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Differential Disorders Frequently Asked Questions Glossary Downloadable Publications Symptoms and Diagnosis If you are new to dystonia, it can ... be accounted for: ► The age at which the symptoms started. The age at which symptoms begin is ...

  4. [Current treatment strategies for paediatric burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küntscher, M V; Hartmann, B

    2006-06-01

    Paediatric burns occupy the third place in the severe accident statistics in Germany after traffic injuries and drowning. The paper reviews current treatment concepts of pre-hospital management, fluid resuscitation and surgical therapy in paediatric burned patients. Specific features in the approximation of the total body surface area burn and indications for transfer of paediatric burn victims to specialized units are discussed. The therapy of severe paediatric burns requires an interdisciplinary team consisting of especially skilled plastic or paediatric surgeons,anaesthetists, psychiatrists or psychologists, specifically trained nurses, physiotherapists and social workers. The rehabilitation process starts basically with admission to the burn unit. A tight cooperation between therapists and the relatives of the paediatric burn victim is needed for psychological recovery and reintegration into society.'The adaptation to the suffered trauma resulting in life-long disability and disfigurement is the main task of psychotherapy.

  5. Septicemia: The Principal Killer of Burns Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Sharma

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is a major problem in many areas of the world and it has been estimated that 75% of all deaths following burns are related to infection. Burns impair the skin’s normal barrier function thus allowing microbial colonization of the burn wounds and even with the use of topical antimicrobial agents, contamination is almost unavoidable. It is therefore essential for every burn institution to determine its specific pattern of burn wound microbial colonization, time related changes in predominant flora and antimicrobial resistance profiles. This would allow early management of septic episodes with proper empirical systemic antibiotics before the results of microbiologic culture becomes available, thus improving the overall infection-related morbidity and mortality. We attempted to examine the factors affecting risk of infection; strategies for infection control and prevention in burn victims.

  6. Adult campfire burns: two avenues for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthew B; Heimbach, David M; Honari, Shari; Engrav, Loren H; Gibran, Nicole S

    2005-01-01

    Campfires are a common component of outdoor festivities. Pediatric campfire burns have been well described. Adult campfire injuries also are common and have several important distinguishing characteristics. We performed a retrospective review of adult patients admitted with campfire burns to our burn center from July 1998 to July 2003. Medical records were reviewed with attention to mechanism of injury, intoxication level, burn size, and surgeries performed. A total of 27 patients with this injury were treated as inpatients over the course of the study period. Two distinct mechanisms of injury emerged: 1) contact with the campfire and 2) flash/flame injuries from igniting the fire. Eighty-one percent (13/16) of patients who sustained contact burns were intoxicated, as compared with 11% (1/11) of those who sustained flash/flame injuries. Nearly half of the patients with contact burns and more than half the patients with flash/flame burns required excision and grafting.

  7. BURN SEVERITY MAPPING IN AUSTRALIA 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. McKinley

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment estimated approximately 430,000 hectares of Victoria Australia were burned by numerous bushfires. Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER teams from the United States were deployed to Victoria to assist local fire managers. The U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center (USGS/EROS and U.S. Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (USFS/RSAC aided the support effort by providing satellite-derived "soil burn severity " maps for over 280,000 burned hectares. In the United States, BAER teams are assembled to make rapid assessments of burned lands to identify potential hazards to public health and property. An early step in the assessment process is the creation of a soil burn severity map used to identify hazard areas and prioritize treatment locations. These maps are developed primarily using Landsat satellite imagery and the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR algorithm.

  8. Pre-hospital care in burn injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava Prabhat

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The care provided to the victims of burn injury immediately after sustaining burns can largely affect the extent and depth of the wound. Although standard guidelines have been formulated by various burn associations, they are still not well known to public at large in our country. In burn injuries, most often, the bystanders are the first care providers. The swift implementation of the measures described in this article for first aid in thermal, chemical, electrical and inhalational injuries in the practical setting, within minutes of sustaining the burn, plays a vital role and can effectively reduce the morbidity and mortality to a great extent. In case of burn disasters, triage needs to be carried out promptly as per the defined protocols. Proper communication and transport from the scene of the accident to the primary care centre and onto the burn care facility greatly influences the execution of the management plans

  9. Polarized Reflectance Measurement of Burned Skin Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pedro, Hector Michael; Chang, Chuan-I.; Zarnani, Faranak; Glosser, Robert; Maas, D.; Idris, A.

    2011-10-01

    In the US, there are over 400,000 burn victims with 3,500 deaths in 2010. Recent evidence suggests that early removal of burn tissues can significantly increase the success of their recovery, since burns continue to spread and damage surrounding tissues after hours of injury. The rationale behind this procedure is that burns trigger the body's immune system to overreact, causing additional damage. Therefore, it is important to distinguish burn areas so that it can be removed. The problem with this is that it is difficult to recognize the margins of the burn area. In our project, we use polarized reflectance as a tool to identify the burned tissues from unburned ones.

  10. Relevance of psychosocial factors to quality of life in oral cancer and oral lichen planus: a prospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Madiha; Kanatas, Anastasios; Herzberg, Philipp Y; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Rana, Majeed

    2015-09-01

    We can improve our understanding of how patients cope with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by making a comparison with their processes of coping and those used in other conditions. We have therefore compared quality of life (QoL), severity of symptoms, coping strategies, and factors that influence coping between patients with oral SCC and those with oral lichen planus. We asked 104 patients with oral SCC and 51 with oral lichen planus to complete questionnaires about their coping strategies, social support, locus of control, spirituality, QoL, and severity of symptoms. The outcome was that patients with oral SCC were far more likely to resort to coping strategies such as depressive coping, distraction, and self-motivation. The groups also differed regarding QoL and severity of symptoms. Patients with oral SCC had a poorer QoL and higher depression scores, whereas patients with oral lichen planus had better scores in the social support and spirituality categories. Patients with oral SCC generally had more distress than those with oral lichen planus. Not only did the former resort to depressive coping strategies, but they also had poorer QoL and higher values for depression. For the patients with oral lichen planus, social support and spirituality were protective, whereas they were associated with distress by patients with oral SCC.

  11. Fluconazole Pharmacokinetics in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Bradley A.; King, Stephen R.; Wandschneider, Heidi L.; Hickerson, William L.; Hanes, Scott D.; Herring, Vanessa L.; Canada, Todd W.; Hess, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in nine adult patients with severe (30 to 95% total body surface area) burns were studied. There was no significant difference in half-life (t1/2), clearance (CL), or volume of distribution (V) over time in five patients on days 3 and 8 of the study (P > 0.05). Combined parameter estimates (means ± standard deviations) for all nine patients for the two study periods were as follows: t1/2, 24.4 ± 5.8 h; CL, 0.36 ± 0.09 ml/min/kg; and V, 0.72 ± 0.12 liters/kg. These estimates of t1/2 and CL in burn patients were approximately 13% shorter and 30% more rapid, respectively, than the most extreme estimates reported for other populations. PMID:9559811

  12. Southeast U.S. burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Human beings were responsible for most of 12,000 forest fires in the southeastern United States that burned for 10 days in late October and early November 1987. 910 km2, mostly hardwood forest, were destroyed in the fires, with arson and carelessness as the primary causes, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.Measured in monetary terms, the toll was more than $40 million in resource and property damage. While the amount of forest burned did not rival the 3390 km2 lost to fires in the western United States last summer, the human impact was severe in the southeast and all along the East Coast. Favorable winds blew smoke from the southern and central Appalachians as far north as New England and as far east as Delaware, and cool fall air close to the ground prevented the smoke from rising, thickening the air in many northeastern cities on November 8 and 9.

  13. Wood-burning stoves worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo

    , the advanced gasifiers and automatic stoves (Digital and Forced air) were identified to be among the best performing technologies. In spite of the fact that the thermal efficiency of the most advanced type of heating stoves (Gasifier) is around twice larger than that achieved for the most advanced type......More than any time in our history, the wood-burning stove continues to be the most popular technology used for cooking and heating worldwide. According to the World Health Organization and recent scientific studies, the inefficient use of solid-fuels in traditional stoves constitutes the major...... global environmental health risk, since these sources are important contributors to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the ambient air that increase climate and health risks. This thesis explores the social-technical dimensions of both the use of wood-burning stoves (WBSs) and transition to the use...

  14. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  15. Corneoscleral burn during phacoemulsification surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, M A; Sharma, M K; Harding, S P

    1998-10-01

    We report a case in which a severe corneoscleral burn occurred during phacoemulsification surgery. The equipment-tuning process was uneventful and routine surgery was expected. Severe tissue injury occurred because the anterior chamber collapsed momentarily and the phaco tip touched corneoscleral tissue. We discuss mechanisms by which this type of injury may occur and the likely cause in our case. We also suggest methods to reduce the incidence.

  16. Burn injuries related to suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persley, G V; Pegg, S P

    1981-02-07

    Of 1060 admissions to the burns unit, Royal Brisbane Hospital, over a 12-year period, there were 30 cases (2.8%) of attempted suicide. Fourteen (47%) of these patients died. The psychosocial features of people using self-ignition as a method of suicide are consistent with those of suicide in general. The morbidity if high and the outcome is often fatal, especially for those using a flammable liquid.

  17. Candidemia in major burns patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renau Escrig, Ana I; Salavert, Miguel; Vivó, Carmen; Cantón, Emilia; Pérez Del Caz, M Dolores; Pemán, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Major burn patients have characteristics that make them especially susceptible to candidemia, but few studies focused on this have been published. The objectives were to evaluate the epidemiological, microbiological and clinical aspects of candidemia in major burn patients, determining factors associated with a poorer prognosis and mortality. We conducted a retrospective observational study of candidemia between 1996 and 2012 in major burn patients admitted to the La Fe University Hospital, Valencia, Spain. The study included 36 episodes of candidemia in the same number of patients, 55.6% men, mean age 37.33 years and low associated comorbidity. The incidence of candidemia varied between 0.26 and 6.09 episodes/1000 days stay in the different years studied. Candida albicans was the most common species (61.1%) followed by Candida parapsilosis (27.8%). Candidemia by C. krusei, C. glabrata or C. tropicalis were all identified after 2004. Central vascular catheter (CVC) was established as a potential source of candidemia in 36.1%, followed by skin and soft tissues of thermal injury (22.2%) and urinary tract (8.3%). Fluconazole was used in 19 patients (52.7%) and its in vitro resistance rate was 13.9%. The overall mortality was 47.2%, and mortality related to candidemia was 30.6%. Factors associated with increased mortality were those related to severe infection and shock. CVC was the most usual focus of candidemia. Fluconazole was the most common antifungal drug administered. The management of candidemia in major burn patients is still a challenge. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. American Burn Association Consensus Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    medications (eg, propranolol , morphine, sertraline)13,15,16 should be a research pri- ority. Improved pain management has also been sug- gested as a...2000;232:455–65. 2. Jeschke MG, Norbury WB, Finnerty CC, Branski LK, Herndon DN. Propranolol does not increase inflammation, sepsis, or infectious...SE, Matin S, Herndon DN, Wolfe RR. A submaximal dose of insulin promotes net skel- etal muscle protein synthesis in patients with severe burns. Ann

  19. Rehabilitation of the Burned Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    13 Mallet and swan-neck deformities Thermal injury to the terminal slip of the extensor tendon can result in loss of DIP joint extension or mallet...deformity. Injury to the terminal slip can be a result of direct thermal injury or tendon ischemia induced as the injured tendon is compressed between...elastic bandage or self-adherent wrap may be necessary. Cotton socks over the splint may prevent the child from removing the splint. Contact burns

  20. American Burn Association consensus conference to define sepsis and infection in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, David G; Saffle, Jeffrey R; Holmes, James H; Gamelli, Richard L; Palmieri, Tina L; Horton, Jureta W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Traber, Daniel L; Mozingo, David W; Deitch, Edwin A; Goodwin, Cleon W; Herndon, David N; Gallagher, James J; Sanford, Art P; Jeng, James C; Ahrenholz, David H; Neely, Alice N; O'Mara, Michael S; Wolf, Steven E; Purdue, Gary F; Garner, Warren L; Yowler, Charles J; Latenser, Barbara A

    2007-01-01

    Because of their extensive wounds, burn patients are chronically exposed to inflammatory mediators. Thus, burn patients, by definition, already have "systemic inflammatory response syndrome." Current definitions for sepsis and infection have many criteria (fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, leukocytosis) that are routinely found in patients with extensive burns, making these current definitions less applicable to the burn population. Experts in burn care and research, all members of the American Burn Association, were asked to review the literature and prepare a potential definition on one topic related to sepsis or infection in burn patients. On January 20, 2007, the participants met in Tucson, Arizona to develop consensus for these definitions. After review of the definitions, a summary of the proceedings was prepared. The goal of the consensus conference was to develop and publish standardized definitions for sepsis and infection-related diagnoses in the burn population. Standardized definitions will improve the capability of performing more meaningful multicenter trials among burn centers.

  1. [Treatment of burns in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyatier, J L; Latarjet, J; Comparin, J P; Zaragori, M; Robert, A; Braye, F; Weill, E; Masson, C L

    1995-10-01

    Because of the potential severity of their residual deformities, burn injuries in infants justify an early management in specialized centres when they cover more than 5% of body surface and in every case when hands, face, or external genitalia are concerned. Cooling with cold water is the first aid treatment to be performed as early as possible after the injury. The treatment in specialized centres must be both general and surgical. General treatment includes fluid and electrolyte therapy, temperature control, appropriate nutrition and pain suppression. Pain suppression is a major part of the treatment and morphine must be largely used. Surgical treatment starts as soon as the patient arrives in the centre and is eventually performed under general anesthesia: all the burned areas are covered with occlusive dressings. Infections are prevented by systematic cultures and adjusted antibiotic therapy. A vigorous rehabilitation program must be instituted as soon as possible: massages, compressive clothes, splints, physical therapy, plastic surgery. Primary prevention by sustained parental education is important in order to reduce the frequency of burn injuries in infants.

  2. Epidemiologic evaluation of patients with major burns and recommendations for burn prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftçi, Ilhan; Arslan, Kemal; Altunbaş, Zeynep; Kara, Fatih; Yilmaz, Hüseyin

    2012-03-01

    Burns are an important health problem in our country and in the world. In our study, we aimed to epidemiologically analyze the patients who were hospitalized in a burn unit that serves 3 million individuals in Central Anatolia. Records of 457 patients who had been hospitalized in the burn unit during the period 2008-2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were assessed in terms of gender, age, burn area, burn depth, admission time to the health center, burn region, and factors causing burns. Most (44.6%) of the patients were in the 0-5 age group. Burn surface area was detected as 11.6 +/- 8.5%. Patients had reached the health center in 252.8 +/- 892.5 minutes. While 82.7% of the patients had second degree bums, 17.3% had third degree burns. Most burns were on the extremities (39.6%). The most common burn agent was scalds with hot liquids (54.1%). In our study, children in the 0-5 age group were found to be the most commonly affected group with respect to indoor burns. The basic contributing factor is that children spend more time in the house and are more active. Scalding burns may be prevented when greater care is taken when using hot liquids that may lead to indoor burns. Informing parents on this issue is of first priority.

  3. Novel approach in the management of an oral premalignant condition - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaranarayanan S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral submucous fibrosis is a progressive oral disease first described by Pindborg and Sirsat 3 decades ago. It is a premalignant condition. The signs and symptoms depend on the involvement of the different sites in the oral cavity. The patient feels burning sensation for normal diet and trismus which may be so severe. If not properly treated the risk of malignant change in advanced cases of OSMF is relatively high. Wide ranges of treatment such as medical management, surgical therapy and physiotherapy have been attempted in the past, but none of them has proved to be a cure for this chronic fibrotic disease.Histopathologically as the disease progresses, (i change in the morphology of collagen, (ii increased accumulation of amorphous collagen, and (iii decreased collagen degradation results in decrease in number of blood vessels are observed in the affected area compared to the normal area. With an aim of bringing more blood supply to the affected area which is expected to bring ?more nutrients and help in collagen degradation, earlier application of vasodilators and studies with curcumin have been done, but still with - no significant outcome.As an alternative approach to improve the blood circulation, we have tried Autologous bone marrow stem cells which have been earlier applied in several diseases such as ischemic peripheral vascular diseases, ischemic heart diseases etc with proven improvement in angiogenesis. A 38 year old patient with oral submucosal fibrosis, proven by histopathology, and endothelial markers was injected 175 million BMMNCs into the area affected. The paramaters such as blanching, fibrous band have significantly improved, 4 weeks after the injection. We could observe positive changes clinically to prove the improvement. The mouth opening has improved to 35 mm from the previous 30.0 mm. Further histopathology and SEM studies with larger samples are done for establishing stem cell therapy’s safety and efficacy.

  4. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  5. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  6. Comparative study of effectiveness of oral acyclovir with oral erythromycin in the treatment of Pityriasis rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatya, A; Rajouria, E A; Karn, D K

    2012-01-01

    Pityriasis rosea is an acute, self-limiting disease, probably infective in origin, affecting mainly children and young adults, characterized by distinctive skin eruptions and minimal constitutional symptoms. Both oral Erythromycin and oral Acyclovir have been used in its management. To compare the effectiveness of oral Erythromycin and oral Acyclovir in the treatment of Pityriasis rosea. Forty two patients with clinical diagnosis of Pityriasis rosea were enrolled. They were randomized into two groups. One group was given high-dose oral Acyclovir and another group oral Erythromycin in standard dose. The participants were evaluated one, two, four, six and eight weeks and six months after commencement of the study. Forty two patients including 26 males and 16 females completed the study. After 8th week, all patients showed complete response in both the groups. The response to oral Acyclovir compared with that to oral Erythromycin was better and was statistically significant in 1st, 2nd, 4th and 6th weeks. Although it is a self-limiting disease which resolves within three weeks to three months, this study reveals that both oral Acyclovir and oral Erythromycin are helpful in decreasing the severity and duration of Pityriasis rosea. Moreover, the study also indicates that oral Acyclovir is more effective than oral Erythromycin in reducing the severity and duration of Pityriasis rosea.

  7. Self-inflicted burns in soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronovich, Yoav; Binenboym, Rami; Tuchman, Izhak; Eizenman, Nirit; Golan, Jacob

    2013-10-01

    Self-inflicted burns are a multidisciplinary medical challenge. In contrast to the more common motive of attempted suicide in self-infliction of a burn, usually of a serious degree, a second motive is malingering. Motivation of this nature has been exhibited among Israeli soldiers who inflict on themselves low- to moderate-degree burns to obtain dismissal from mandatory military service. The purpose of our study is to investigate and define this phenomenon. A retrospective analysis was performed on a population of 75 soldiers admitted to our Medical Center during the year 2010 with the diagnosis of any sort of burn. We set up a database including all relevant information about the burns including date and time of occurrence, cause, body location, depth of burn injury, area and shape of burn, etiology, and prescribed treatment. The summer was found to be the season with the highest incidence of burns. As far as the day of the week was influential, we found that the greater percentage of burns occurred at the beginning of the week. Most of the burns involved a minor surface area on the dorsal aspect of the foot. Scalding with hot water was the most common cause of burn. Eighty-one percent of the burns were atypical, being well demarcated.Most of the burn cases happened at home with no witnesses to the event. Sixty-one percent of the patients were not admitted to the hospital and were conservatively treated. Israeli soldiers tend to inflict burns on themselves for ulterior motives. Such burns are almost always minor with a small trauma area and sharp demarcations, and hence can be differentiated from other self-inflicted burns described in the literature. We found that most of the burns occur when the soldiers are on vacation at home. This is probably because the privacy allows them to carry out their act undisturbed. It is important to raise the awareness of attending physicians to the characteristics of these burns. Such patients should be evaluated by medical teams

  8. Increasing the utility of the Functional Assessment for Burns Score: Not just for major burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smailes, Sarah T; Engelsman, Kayleen; Rodgers, Louise; Upson, Clara

    2016-02-01

    The Functional Assessment for Burns (FAB) score is established as an objective measure of physical function that predicts discharge outcome in adult patients with major burn. However, its validity in patients with minor and moderate burn is unknown. This is a multi-centre evaluation of the predictive validity of the FAB score for discharge outcome in adult inpatients with minor and moderate burns. FAB assessments were undertaken within 48 h of admission to (FAB 1), and within 48 h of discharge (FAB 2) from burn wards in 115 patients. Median age was 45 years and median burn size 4%. There were significant improvements in the patients' FAB scores (pburns.

  9. Estudio de una muestra de pacientes con síndrome de boca ardiente Study of a sample of patients with burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ME Rodríguez de Rivera Campillo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de boca ardiente (SBA es una enfermedad que, a pesar de conocerse desde hace muchos años, sigue planteando problemas de diagnóstico y tratamiento. Se manifiesta clínicamente como sensación de ardor o escozor en alguna zona de la mucosa oral, no existiendo ninguna lesión que pueda justificar dicha sintomatología. Se presenta fundamentalmente en mujeres postmenopáusicas, que suelen presentar sus molestias durante periodos prolongados. El ardor bucal puede acompañarse de otras alteraciones sensitivas, como sensación de sequedad o alteraciones gustativas. Objetivos: Estudiar una muestra de pacientes con SBA y describir los factores epidemiológicos, las enfermedades que padecen y los fármacos que consumen. Pacientes y métodos: La muestra estaba formada por 83 pacientes que consultaban en la clínica odontológica por ardor bucal. Se efectuó en todos ellos una historia clínica detallada y se registraron todas las características en una hoja de protocolo. Resultados: El 90,4% de los pacientes de nuestro estudio eran mujeres y sólo el 9,6% eran hombres. La media de edad de la muestra fue de 64,9 años. Todos los pacientes presentaban ardor en la lengua y el 64% lo presentaban en los labios. La mayoría de los pacientes estudiados (76% presentaban una evolución de más de 12 meses, mientras que los de menos de 6 meses únicamente llegaban al 6%. De los 83 pacientes estudiados, 52 presentaban trastornos psicológicos (63% y más de la mitad de ellos consumía algún fármaco psicoactivo. Conclusiones: Nuestra muestra de pacientes es equiparable a las descritas en otros estudios. El SBA predomina en mujeres postmenopáusicas, que presentan con gran frecuencia ansiedad y/o depresión.The burning mouth syndrome (BMS is known since many years ago, but it is still difficult to be diagnosed and treated. The unique clinical manifestation is a kind of burning sensation on the oral mucosa, without any lesions justifying this symptom

  10. A control study of aripiprazole orally disintegrating tablet vs . sulpiride in the treatment of childbearing-age female schizo-phrenia characterized by negative symptoms%阿立哌唑口崩片与舒必利治疗以阴性症状为主的育龄期女性精神分裂症对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨银; 杨晶

    2013-01-01

    目的探讨阿立哌唑口崩片与舒必利治疗以阴性症状为主的育龄期女性精神分裂症患者的临床疗效和安全性。方法将120例以阴性症状为主的育龄期女性精神分裂症患者随机分为研究组和对照组,每组60例,分别口服阿立哌唑口崩片、舒必利治疗,观察8周。采用阴性症状量表、临床总体印象量表评定临床疗效,副反应量表评定不良反应。结果研究组显效率为70.7%、总有效率为91.4%,对照组分别为66.7%、89.5%,两组比较差异无显著性(χ2=0.22、0.12,P>0.05)。研究组未出现月经失调、泌乳及体质量增加等不良反应,不良反应发生率显著低于对照组(P<0.01)。结论阿立哌唑口崩片治疗以阴性症状为主的育龄期女性精神分裂症患者疗效显著且与舒必利相当,但阿立哌唑口崩片治疗安全性更高,依从性更好。%Objective To explore the efficacy and safety of aripiprazole orally disintegrating tablet (AODT ) vs .sulpiride in the treatment of childbearing-age female schizophrenia characterized by negative symptoms .Methods A total of 120 childbearing age female schizophrenics characterized by negative symptoms were randomly divided into research and control group of 60 ones each ,they respectively took o-rally AODT and sulpiride for 8 weeks .Efficacies were assessed with the Scale for the Assessment of Nega-tive Symptoms (SANS) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and adverse reactions with the Treatment E-mergent Symptom Scale (TESS) .Results The obvious and total effective rate were respectively 70 .7%and 91 .4% in research and 66 .7% and 89 .5% in control group ,which showed no significant group differ-ences (χ2 =0 .22 ,0 .12 ,P>0 .05) .Research group had no such adverse reactions as menstrual disorder , lactation ,weight gain and so on ,incidences of adverse reactions were significantly lower in research than control group (P<0 .01

  11. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Desai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dirofilaria is parasitic nematodes of domestic and wild animals that can infect humans accidentally via vectors. Its occurrence in the oral cavity is extremely rare. The most frequent presentation of human dirofilariasis is a single submucosal nodule without signs of inflammation. We hereby, report a case of human dirofilariasis affecting the buccal mucosa in a 32-year-old farmer caused by D. repens.

  12. Oral leiomyomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, D D; Neville, B W

    1979-04-01

    Oral leiomyomas are considered to be rare neoplasms, but they may be encountered more frequently than generally believed. Three types of leiomyomas are commonly described: solid leiomyomas, angiomyomas, and epithelioid leiomyomas. Three cases of solid leiomyoma are presented, all of which occurred in the anterior mandibular mucobuccal fold. Leiomyomas can be easily confused with other spindle-cell tumors. The necessity of using special stains, especially Mallory's phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin, is discussed.

  13. Methylergonovine Oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uterus that can happen after childbirth or an abortion.This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ... Methylergonovine may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: upset stomach vomiting diarrhea headache ...

  14. Acute pain management in burn patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst-Jensen, Hejdi; Vedel, Pernille Nygaard; Lindberg-Larsen, Viktoria Oline

    2014-01-01

    management addresses and alleviates these complications. The aim of our study was to compare clinical guidelines for pain management in burn patients in selected European and non-European countries. We included pediatric guidelines due to the high rate of children in burn units. METHOD: The study had...... patients. The most highly recommended guidelines provided clear and accurate recommendations for the nursing and medical staff on pain management in burn patients. We recommend the use of a validated appraisal tool such as the AGREE instrument to provide more consistent and evidence-based care to burn......OBJECTIVE: Burn patients suffer excruciating pain due to their injuries and procedures related to surgery, wound care, and mobilization. Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, chronic pain and depression are highly prevalent among survivors of severe burns. Evidence-based pain...

  15. Poluição da queima de cana e sintomas respiratórios em escolares de Monte Aprazível, SP Polución de la quema de caña y síntomas respiratorios en escolares de Monte Aprazível, Sureste de Brasil Sugar cane burning pollution and respiratory symptoms in schoolchildren in Monte Aprazível, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Riguera

    2011-10-01

    is a descriptive cross-sectional study with schoolchildren aged 10-14 from the city of Monte Aprazível (Southeastern Brazil. Questionnaires containing the asthma and rhinitis components of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood were administered. The questionnaires also approached sociodemographic characteristics, predisposing factors, and family and personal medical history. Repeated measures of peak expiratory flow in the children, and of black carbon and particulate matter (PM2,5 concentration levels were carried out. RESULTS: The prevalence of asthma and rhinitis symptoms was 11% and 33.2%, respectively. Among asthmatic children, 10.6% presented four or more wheezing attacks in the past 12 months. Past family history of bronchitis and rhinitis was associated with presence of asthma (p=0.002 and p <0.001 and rhinitis (p <0.001 and p<0.001, respectively. Regarding rhinitis, there was association with presence of mold or cracks on the house (p=0.009. Rhinitis was most frequent from June to October, a period that matches the sugarcane harvest season. Daily prevalence of peak expiratory flow below 20% of the median of each child's measurements was higher in days with greater PM2,5 concentration. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of asthma symptoms is below and that of rhinitis is above the national average. Although within acceptable levels, pollution in the cane trash burn season may contribute to the exacerbation of asthma and rhinitis episodes.

  16. Photobiomodulation in oral medicine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandeshwar, Padma; Roa, Mahesh Datta; Das, Reshma; Shastry, Shilpa P; Kaul, Rachna; Srinivasreddy, Mahesh B

    2016-05-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) or low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in dentistry is an evolving science, with an increasing number of controlled clinical studies exploring its potential as a treatment modality. The present study provides an outline of the biologic mechanism of PBM and summarizes the findings of clinical studies of PBM for specific applications in oral medicine. Controversies and drawbacks associated with PBM, which require further research, are also identified. Current literature reports the potential of PBM in various applications in oral medicine. Furthermore, well-documented research confirms its efficacy in certain conditions, such as oral mucositis, recurrent herpes simplex infection, and burning mouth syndrome. The absence of any reported adverse effects is an advantage over conventional therapeutic modalities. While PBM has proved to be effective for some specific applications, it is not a panacea. The paucity in standardized studies, coupled with ambiguity over the laser parameters, has limited its credibility as a therapeutic modality.

  17. Appropriateness of oral drugs for long-term treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms in older persons: results of a systematic literature review and international consensus validation process (LUTS-FORTA 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelke, Matthias; Becher, Klaus; Castro-Diaz, David; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Kirby, Mike; Wagg, Adrian; Wehling, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: we aimed to systematically review drugs to treat lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) regularly used in older persons to classify appropriate and inappropriate drugs based on efficacy, safety and tolerability by using the Fit fOR The Aged (FORTA) classification. Methods: to evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of drugs used for treatment of LUTS in older persons, a systematic review was performed. Papers on clinical trials and summaries of individual product characteristics were analysed regarding efficacy and safety in older persons (≥65 years). The most frequently used drugs were selected based on current prescription data. An interdisciplinary international expert panel assessed the drugs in a Delphi process. Results: for the 16 drugs included here, a total of 896 citations were identified; of those, only 25 reported clinical trials with explicit data on, or solely performed in older people, underlining the lack of evidence in older people for drug treatment of LUTS. No drug was rated at the FORTA-A-level (indispensable). Only three were assigned to FORTA B (beneficial): dutasteride, fesoterodine and finasteride. The majority was rated FORTA C (questionable): darifenacin, mirabegron, extended release oxybutynin, silodosin, solifenacin, tadalafil, tamsulosin, tolterodine and trospium. FORTA D (avoid) was assigned to alfuzosin, doxazosin, immediate release oxybutynin, propiverine and terazosin. Conclusions: dutasteride, fesoterodine and finasteride were classified as beneficial in older persons or frail elderly people (FORTA B). For most drugs, in particular those from the group of α-blockers and antimuscarinics, use in this group seems questionable (FORTA C) or should be avoided (FORTA D). PMID:26104505

  18. Fluid management in major burn injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haberal Mehmet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available It is a widely accepted fact that severe fluid loss is the greatest problem faced following major burn injuries. Therefore, effective fluid resuscitation is one of the cornerstones of modern burn treatment. The aim of this article is to review the current approaches available for modern trends in fluid management for major burn patients. As these current approaches are based on various experiences all over the world, the knowledge is essential to improve the status of this patient group.

  19. Vitamin E Supplementation in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0429 TITLE: Vitamin E Supplementation in Burn Patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Perenlei Enkhbaatar, MD., PhD...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Our recent findings demonstrate that burn injury significantly depleted stores of vitamin E in adipose tissue of children by nearly...oxidative stress. The objectives of our proposal were to a) attenuate alpha-tocopherol depletion in burn patients by vitamin E supplementation, b) to

  20. Infection control in severely burned patients

    OpenAIRE

    Coban, Yusuf Kenan

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, much progress has been made in the control of burn wound infection and nasocomial infections (NI) in severely burned patients. The continiually changing epidemiology is partially related to greater understanding of and improved techniques for burn patient management as well as effective hospital infection control measures. With the advent of antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, infection of the wound site is now not as common as, for example, urinary and blood strea...

  1. [Treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms and exacerbations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto González, José María

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, there has been an explosion of new drugs acting on the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) but less attention has been paid to better knowledge of the symptoms of this disease and their pathogenesis and treatment, which is essential to improve patients' quality of life. Because many patients have numerous concurrent symptoms during their clinical course, their management is complex and consequently it is important to know which symptoms are a direct result of the degenerative lesions of MS. The present article describes all the therapeutic options available for spasticity and its associated pain, paroxystic symptoms, fatigue, genitourinary disorders and sexual dysfunction, tremor, ataxia, gait disorder and cognitive impairment, with special emphasis on novel treatments. The article also defines exacerbations, how to recognize them and the available treatments, mainly oral administration of high-dose methylprednisolone and plasmapheresis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Managing burn patients in a fire disaster: Experience from a burn unit in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashreky, S R; Bari, S; Sen, S L; Rahman, A; Khan, T F; Rahman, F

    2010-09-01

    Although burn disaster is not a frequent event, with urbanisation and industrialisation, burn disaster is becoming an emerging problem in Bangladesh. On 3 June 2010, a fire disaster killed 124 people in Neemtali, Dhaka, Bangladesh. This paper narrates the management of burn patients of this disaster in the burn unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital. The burn unit managed 192 burn victims of the disaster. Forty-two victims were admitted and 150 of them received primary care at the emergency room and were sent back home. Ten patients among 42 in-patients died. The in-patient mortality was 23.8%. Burn unit in Dhaka Medical College Hospital is the only burn management centre in Bangladesh. Proper planning and coordinated effort by all sectors and persons concerned were the key elements in this successful management.

  3. Managing burn patients in a fire disaster: Experience from a burn unit in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashreky S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Although burn disaster is not a frequent event, with urbanisation and industrialisation, burn disaster is becoming an emerging problem in Bangladesh. On 3 June 2010, a fire disaster killed 124 people in Neemtali, Dhaka, Bangladesh. This paper narrates the management of burn patients of this disaster in the burn unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital. The burn unit managed 192 burn victims of the disaster. Forty-two victims were admitted and 150 of them received primary care at the emergency room and were sent back home. Ten patients among 42 in-patients died. The in-patient mortality was 23.8%. Burn unit in Dhaka Medical College Hospital is the only burn management centre in Bangladesh. Proper planning and coordinated effort by all sectors and persons concerned were the key elements in this successful management.

  4. The Hand Burn Severity (HABS) score: A simple tool for stratifying severity of hand burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bache, Sarah E; Fitzgerald O'Connor, Edmund; Theodorakopoulou, Evgenia; Frew, Quentin; Philp, Bruce; Dziewulski, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Hand burns represent a unique challenge to the burns team due to the intricate structure and unrivalled functional importance of the hand. The initial assessment and prognosis relies on consideration of the specific site involved as well as depth of the burn. We created a simple severity score that could be used by referring non-specialists and researchers alike. The Hand Burn Severity (HABS) score stratifies hand burns according to severity with a numerical value of between 0 (no burn) and 18 (most severe) per hand. Three independent assessors scored the photographs of 121 burned hands of 106 adult and paediatric patients, demonstrating excellent inter-rater reliability (r=0.91, pburn depth alone. The HABS score is a simple to use tool to stratify severity at initial presentation of hand burns which will be useful when referring, and when reporting outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Patient safety measures in burn care: do National reporting systems accurately reflect quality of burn care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Samuel P; Robinson, Ellen F; Cooper, Claudette L; Klein, Matthew B; Gibran, Nicole S

    2010-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been placed on quality of care metrics and patient safety. Groups such as the University Health-System Consortium (UHC) collect and review patient safety data, monitor healthcare facilities, and often report data using mortality and complication rates as outcomes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the UHC database to determine if it differentiates quality of care across burn centers. We reviewed UHC clinical database (CDB) fields and available data from 2006 to 2008 for the burn product line. Based on the September 2008 American Burn Association (ABA) list of verified burn centers, we categorized centers as American Burn Association-verified burn centers, self-identified burn centers, and other centers that are not burn units but admit some burn patients. We compared total burn admissions, risk pool, complication rates, and mortality rates. Overall mortality was compared between the UHC and National Burn Repository. The UHC CDB provides fields for number of admissions, % intensive care unit admission, risk pool, length of stay, complication profiles, and mortality index. The overall numbers of burn patients in the database for the study period included 17,740 patients admitted to verified burn centers (mean 631 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), 10,834 for self-identified burn centers (mean 437 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), and 1,487 for other centers (mean 11.5 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years). Reported complication rates for verified burn centers (21.6%), self-identified burn centers (21.3%), and others (20%) were similar. Mortality rates were highest for self-identified burn centers (3.06%), less for verified centers (2.88%), and lowest for other centers (0.74%). However, these outcomes data may be misleading, because the risk pool criteria do not include burn-specific risk factors, and the inability to adjust for injury severity prevents rigorous comparison across centers. Databases such as the

  6. Medical management of paediatric burn injuries: best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Leo K P; Martin, Hugh C O; Holland, Andrew J A

    2012-04-01

    Burns commonly occur in children and their first aid remains inadequate despite burn prevention programmes. While scald injuries predominate, contact and flame burns remain common. Although typically less severe injuries overall than those in adults, hypertrophic scarring complicating both the burn wound and even donor sites occur more frequently in children. The heterogeneous nature of burn wounds, coupled with the difficulties associated with the early clinical assessment of burn depth, has stimulated the application of novel technologies to predict burn wound outcome. This review explores current best practice in the management of paediatric burns, with a focus on prevention, optimal first aid, resuscitation, burn wound prediction and wound management strategies.

  7. Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-05-01

    This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

  8. Burn healing plants in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Fahimi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Burns are known as one of the most common forms of injury with devastating consequences. Despite the discovery of several antiseptics, burn wound healing has still remained a challenge to modern medicine. Herbal products seem to possess moderate efficacy with no or less toxicity and are less expensive compared to synthetic drugs. Burn is a well-known disorder in Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM. Iranian physicians have divided burns into various types based on the cause and recommended treatment for each type. According to ITM references, herbal therapy was the major treatment prescribed by Iranian physicians for burns. In the present study, seven ancient Iranian medical texts were screened for the herbs with burn healing effects along with their applied dosage forms. The medicinal herbs were listed and scored based on the frequency of their repetition. Moreover, the best scientific name that was suitable for each plant as well as surveying modern studies about their biological effects has been carried out. In our investigation eighteen plants with seven topical application categories have been obtained as the most frequent herbs for burn healing in ITM. Modern studies have revealed that these plants have shown some biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects which might establish the relationship between the mentioned activities and burn wound healing property. This list can provide a suitable resource for future researches in the field of burn treatment.

  9. Aeromonas hydrophila in a burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasti, Ahmet Cinar; Otan, Emrah; Doganay, Mutlu; Kama, Nuri A

    2009-01-01

    Infectious consequences are still a major problem and leading cause of mortality in burn patients. Among others, aeromonads need special concern because they mimic pseudomonal infections; however, they have a more rapid progression with considerable mortality if undiagnosed promptly. Here, we present a major burn case extinguished with tap water pooled in a tank. With the possibility of aeromonal infection in mind, the patient underwent aggressive debridement with proper antibiotic medication, which resulted in a successful patient management. Aeromonads should always be kept in mind in burn cases that contacted with tanked water or soil after the burn.

  10. Hospital costs associated with pediatric burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthew B; Hollingworth, William; Rivara, Frederick P; Kramer, C Bradley; Askay, Shelley W; Heimbach, David M; Gibran, Nicole S

    2008-01-01

    Modern burn care is a resource intensive endeavor requiring specialized equipment, personnel, and facilities in order to provide optimum care. The costs associated with burn injury to both patients and society as a whole can be multifaceted and large. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between hospital costs, patient characteristics, and injury factors in a cohort of pediatric patients admitted to a regional burn center. We performed a review of the hospital charges accrued by pediatric patients (age dollar costs using an inflation index and a cost to charge ratio. Univariate and multivariate regressions were performed to identify the factors most significantly associated with cost. In addition, we performed a subset cost analysis for patients with burns more than 20% TBSA. A total of 1443 pediatric patients (age dollars was dollars 9026 (SD = dollars 25,483; median = dollars 2138). Area of full thickness burn was the only patient or injury factor significantly associated with greater hospital costs (P < .05) on multivariate analysis. No single anatomic area was associated with increased hospital costs when adjusted for total overall burn size. Injury severity was the most significant factor impacting index hospitalization costs following pediatric burn injury. Further studies defining the long-term societal costs impact of burn injury are needed as are studies that evaluate the impact of burn injury on quality of life.

  11. Renal failure in burn patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emara, S S; Alzaylai, A A

    2013-03-31

    Burn care providers are usually challenged by multiple complications during the management of acute burns. One of the most common complications worldwide is renal failure. This article reviews the various aspects of renal failure management in burn patients. Two different types of renal failures develop in these patients. The different aetiological factors, incidence, suspected prognosis, ways of diagnosing, as well as prevention methods, and the most accepted treatment modalities are all discussed. A good understanding and an effective assessment of the problem help to reduce both morbidity and mortality in burn management.

  12. Cutaneous osteosarcoma arising from a burn scar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min A.; Yi, Jaehyuck [Kyungpook National University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Jong Min [Kyungpook National University, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Tumors that develop in old burn scars are usually squamous cell carcinomas. Sarcomas have also been reported, albeit rarely. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of an extraskeletal osteosarcoma arising in a prior burn scar reported in the English-language literature, mainly discussing the clinicopathological features. Herein, we present a case of cutaneous osteosarcoma visualized as a mineralized soft-tissue mass arising from the scar associated with a previous skin burn over the back. This seems to be the first report describing the imaging features of a cutaneous osteosarcoma from an old burn scar. (orig.)

  13. High burn rate solid composite propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manship, Timothy D.

    High burn rate propellants help maintain high levels of thrust without requiring complex, high surface area grain geometries. Utilizing high burn rate propellants allows for simplified grain geometries that not only make production of the grains easier, but the simplified grains tend to have better mechanical strength, which is important in missiles undergoing high-g accelerations. Additionally, high burn rate propellants allow for a higher volumetric loading which reduces the overall missile's size and weight. The purpose of this study is to present methods of achieving a high burn rate propellant and to develop a composite propellant formulation that burns at 1.5 inches per second at 1000 psia. In this study, several means of achieving a high burn rate propellant were presented. In addition, several candidate approaches were evaluated using the Kepner-Tregoe method with hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)-based propellants using burn rate modifiers and dicyclopentadiene (DCPD)-based propellants being selected for further evaluation. Propellants with varying levels of nano-aluminum, nano-iron oxide, FeBTA, and overall solids loading were produced using the HTPB binder and evaluated in order to determine the effect the various ingredients have on the burn rate and to find a formulation that provides the burn rate desired. Experiments were conducted to compare the burn rates of propellants using the binders HTPB and DCPD. The DCPD formulation matched that of the baseline HTPB mix. Finally, GAP-plasticized DCPD gumstock dogbones were attempted to be made for mechanical evaluation. Results from the study show that nano-additives have a substantial effect on propellant burn rate with nano-iron oxide having the largest influence. Of the formulations tested, the highest burn rate was a 84% solids loading mix using nano-aluminum nano-iron oxide, and ammonium perchlorate in a 3:1(20 micron: 200 micron) ratio which achieved a burn rate of 1.2 inches per second at 1000

  14. The effectiveness of using pictures in teaching young children about burn injury accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsueh-Fen; Lin, Fang-Suey; Chang, Chien-Ju

    2015-11-01

    This study utilized the "story grammar" approach (Stein and Glenn, 1979) to analyze the within-corpus differences in recounting of sixty 6- and 7-year-old children, specifically whether illustrations (5-factor accident sequence) were or were not resorted to as a means to assist their narration of a home accident in which a child received a burn injury from hot soup. Our investigation revealed that the message presentation strategy "combining oral and pictures" better helped young children to memorize the story content (sequence of events leading to the burn injury) than "oral only." Specifically, the content of "the dangerous objects that caused the injury", "the unsafe actions that people involved took", and "how the people involved felt about the severity of the accident" differed significantly between the two groups.

  15. Deciding Where to Burn: Stakeholder Priorities for Prescribed Burning of a Fire-Dependent Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Costanza

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiagency partnerships increasingly work cooperatively to plan and implement fire management. The stakeholders that comprise such partnerships differ in their perceptions of the benefits and risks of fire use or nonuse. These differences inform how different stakeholders prioritize sites for burning, constrain prescribed burning, and how they rationalize these priorities and constraints. Using a survey of individuals involved in the planning and implementation of prescribed fire in the Onslow Bight region of North Carolina, we examined how the constraints and priorities for burning in the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris ecosystem differed among three stakeholder groups: prescribed burn practitioners from agencies, practitioners from private companies, and nonpractitioners. Stakeholder groups did not differ in their perceptions of constraints to burning, and development near potentially burned sites was the most important constraint identified. The top criteria used by stakeholders to decide where to burn were the time since a site was last burned, and a site's ecosystem health, with preference given to recently burned sites in good health. Differences among stakeholder groups almost always pertained to perceptions of the nonecological impacts of burning. Prescribed burning priorities of the two groups of practitioners, and particularly practitioners from private companies, tended to be most influenced by nonecological impacts, especially through deprioritization of sites that have not been burned recently or are in the wildland-urban interface (WUI. Our results highlight the difficulty of burning these sites, despite widespread laws in the southeast U.S. that limit liability of prescribed burn practitioners. To avoid ecosystem degradation on sites that are challenging to burn, particularly those in the WUI, conservation partnerships can facilitate demonstration projects involving public and private burn practitioners on those sites. In summary

  16. Prebiotics and Probiotics and Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurman, J. H.

    The first part of this chapter describes the unique characteristics of the mouth with special emphasis on the oral microbiota. Next, the highly prevalent dental diseases are briefly described together with more rare but still important diseases and symptoms of the mouth. Prevention and treatment of oral and dental diseases are also discussed focusing on aspects considered important with respect to the potential application of prebiotics and probiotics. The second part of the chapter then concentrates on research data on prebiotics and probiotics in the oral health perspective, ending up with conclusions and visions for future research.

  17. How Disabling Are Pediatric Burns? Functional Independence in Dutch Pediatric Patients with Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseldorp, Laurien M.; Niemeijer, Anuschka S.; Van Baar, Margriet E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.; Mouton, Leonora J.; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K.

    2013-01-01

    Although the attention for functional outcomes after burn injury has grown over the past decades, little is known about functional independence in performing activities of daily living in children after burn injury. Therefore, in this prospective cohort study functional independence was measured by burn care professionals with the WeeFIM[R]…

  18. Survey of care and evaluation of East African burn unit feasibility: an academic burn center exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Katrina B; Giiti, Geofrey; Gallagher, James J

    2013-01-01

    Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, partnered with Weill Bugando Medical College and Sekou Toure Regional Referral Hospital, in Mwanza, Tanzania, to consider the development of a burn unit there. This institutional partnership provided a unique opportunity to promote sustainable academic exchange and build burn care capacity in the East African region. A Weill Cornell burn surgeon and burn fellow collaborated with the Sekou Toure department of surgery to assess its current burn care capabilities and potential for burn unit development. All aspects of interdisciplinary burn care were reviewed and institutional infrastructure evaluated. Sekou Toure is a 375-bed regional referral center and teaching hospital of Weill Bugando Medical College. In 2010-2011, it admitted 5244 pediatric patients in total; 100 of these patients were burn-injured children (2% of admissions). There was no specific data kept on percentage of body surface burned, degree of burn, length of stay, or complications. No adult, operative, or outpatient burn data were available. There are two operating theaters. Patient's families perform wound care with nursing supervision. Rehabilitation therapists consult as needed. Meals are provided three times daily by a central kitchen. Public health outreach is possible through village-based communication networks. Infrastructure to support the development of a burn care unit exists at Sekou Toure, but needs increased clinical focus, human resource capacity building, and record-keeping to track accurate patient numbers. A multidisciplinary center could improve record-keeping and outcomes, encourage referrals, and facilitate outreach through villages.

  19. [Influence of educational status, burn area and coping behaviors on the complication of psychological disorders in severely burned patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hua; Li, Xiao-jian; Cao, Wen-juan; Chen, Li-ying; Zhang, Zhi; Liu, Zhi-he; Yi, Xian-feng; Lai, Wen

    2013-04-01

    To discuss how the educational status, burn area and coping behaviors influence the psychological disorders in severely burned patients. Sixty-four severely burned patients hospitalized in Guangzhou Red Cross Hospital, Guangdong Provincial Work Injury Rehabilitation Center, and Guangdong General Hospital were enrolled with cluster random sampling method. Data of their demography and situation of burns were collected. Then their coping behavior, psychological disorders including anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) plus its core symptoms of flashback, avoidance, and hypervigilance were assessed by medical coping modes questionnaire, self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), self-rating depression scale (SDS), PTSD checklist-civilian version (PCL-C) respectively. Correlation was analyzed between demography, burn area, coping behavior and psychological disorders. The predictive powers of educational status, burn area and coping behaviors on the psychological disorders were analyzed. The qualitative variables were assigned values. Data were processed with t test, Spearman rank correlation analysis, and multiple linear regression analysis. (1) The patients scored (19.0 ± 3.4) points in confrontation coping behavior, which showed no statistically significant difference from the domestic norm score (19.5 ± 3.8) points (t = -1.13, P > 0.05). The patients scored (16.6 ± 2.4) and (11.0 ± 2.2) points in avoidance and resignation coping behaviors, which were significantly higher than the domestic norm score (14.4 ± 3.0), (8.8 ± 3.2) points (with t values respectively 7.06 and 7.76, P values both below 0.01). The patients' standard score of SAS, SDS, PCL-C were (50 ± 11), (54 ± 11), and (38 ± 12) points. Respectively 89.1% (57/64), 60.9% (39/64), 46.9% (30/64) of the patients showed anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms. (2) Four independent variables: age, gender, marital status, and time after burns, were correlated with the psychological disorders

  20. Oral manifestations of acute leukaemia

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    Ivanović Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukaemia is the most common form of chilhood cancer. The aim of this paper was to underline the importance of oral manifestations in children with acute leukaemia. The disease and its treatment can directly or indirectly affect oral health. Oral manifestations are gingival inflammation and enlargement. Leukaemic cells are capable of infiltrating the gingiva and the deeper periodontal tissues which leads to ulceration and infection of oral tissues. Gingival bleeding is a common sign in patients with leukaemia. Symptoms include local lymphadenopathy, mucous membrane Petechiae and ecchymoses. Cytotoxic drugs have direct effects like mucositis, involving atrophy, desquamation and ulceration of the mucosa, with increasing the risk for local and systemic infections. Leukaemia can directly influence dental care and dental treatment, while oral lesions may have life-threatening consequences. Knowledge and skills among dentists may also not be adequate to treat children with acute leukaemia. It is therefore imperative that all stomatologists be aware of dental problems that occur in leukaemia in order to be able to effectively carry out appropriate measures to mitigate these problems.

  1. Symptomatic oral lesions may be associated with contact allergy to substances in oral hygiene products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Røn; Johansen, J D; Reibel, J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dental materials and oral hygiene products may be responsible for oral contact allergic reactions. We aimed to determine the occurrence of allergies in patients with symptomatic oral lichen planus (OLP), oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs) and stomatitis and investigate if patch testing could...... identify contact allergies to dental materials and oral hygiene products in these patients. METHODS: Forty-nine patients (7 men, 42 women) aged 31 to 77 years (61 ± 10.3 years) with symptomatic OLP, OLL or stomatitis and 29 healthy age- and gender-matched control subjects were included. They underwent.......01). Avoidance cleared symptoms in all cases. CONCLUSION/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Allergic reactions to aroma substances in oral hygiene products are common in patients with symptomatic OLP, OLL and stomatitis....

  2. Oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  3. Oral and nasal microbiota in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Pedro A B; Aho, Velma T E; Paulin, Lars; Pekkonen, Eero; Auvinen, Petri; Scheperjans, Filip

    2017-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with neuropathological changes in olfactory and gastrointestinal tissues, and PD patients frequently suffer from hyposmia, hyposalivation, and dysphagia. Since hyposmia and gastrointestinal dysfunction are frequently premotor symptoms, it has been speculated that an external, for example microbial, agent could trigger the pathologic process in the corresponding organs, subsequently spreading to the central nervous system. We recently showed evidence for compositional differences between the fecal microbiota of PD patients and control subjects. In this study, our objective was to explore a possible connection between nasal and oral microbiota and PD. We compared the oral and nasal bacterial communities of PD patients (oral: n = 72, nasal: n = 69) and control subjects (oral: n = 76, nasal: n = 67) using a 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing approach. Oral and nasal microbiota differed markedly from each other, with no notable similarity within subjects. Oral microbiota of PD patients and control subjects had differences in beta diversity and abundances of individual bacterial taxa. An increase in the abundance of opportunistic oral pathogens was detected in males, both with and without PD. Our data did not reveal convincing differences between the nasal microbiota of control subjects and PD patients. The oral microbiome deserves additional research regarding its connection to PD and its biomarker potential. The higher abundance of oral pathogens in men underlines the importance of monitoring and promoting male dental health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrical burns of the abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old male farmer came in contact with 11,000 volts high tension electric wire and sustained full thickness burn wounds over scapula, upper limb and anterior abdominal wall along with perforation of the intestine. Patient was initially managed conservatively in general surgery ward and was referred to us after 3 days with necrosis of the burned skin and muscles over the shoulder and abdomen. Patient was initially managed conservatively and then thorough debridement of the necrotic skin over the left shoulder and upper arm was done and the area was split skin grafted. Patient developed enterocutaneous fistula, which healed over a period of 8 weeks. The granulating wound over the abdomen was also skin grafted and patient was discharged after 18 days. About 4 months, after the discharge patient presented with ventral hernia. Repair of ventral hernia by synthetic mesh application and reconstruction of the abdominal wall with a free tensor fascia lata flap was done over the mesh, but the flap failed. Then after debridement two random pattern transposition skin flaps, one from the right upper and another from the left lower abdomen were transposed over the abdominal wound and donor area was skin grafted. Patient was discharged after 17 days.

  5. Moderate systemic hypothermia decreases burn depth progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Julie A; Burgess, Pamela; Cartie, Richard J; Prasad, Balakrishna M

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been proposed to be beneficial in an array of human pathologies including cardiac arrest, stroke, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, and hemorrhagic shock. Burn depth progression is multifactorial but inflammation plays a large role. Because hypothermia is known to reduce inflammation, we hypothesized that moderate hypothermia will decrease burn depth progression. We used a second-degree 15% total body surface area thermal injury model in rats. Burn depth was assessed by histology of biopsy sections. Moderate hypothermia in the range of 31-33°C was applied for 4h immediately after burn and in a delayed fashion, starting 2h after burn. In order to gain insight into the beneficial effects of hypothermia, we analyzed global gene expression in the burned skin. Immediate hypothermia decreased burn depth progression at 6h post injury, and this protective effect was sustained for at least 24h. Burn depth was 18% lower in rats subjected to immediate hypothermia compared to control rats at both 6 and 24h post injury. Rats in the delayed hypothermia group did not show any significant decrease in burn depth at 6h, but had 23% lower burn depth than controls at 24h. Increased expression of several skin-protective genes such as CCL4, CCL6 and CXCL13 and decreased expression of tissue remodeling genes such as matrix metalloprotease-9 were discovered in the skin biopsy samples of rats subjected to immediate hypothermia. Systemic hypothermia decreases burn depth progression in a rodent model and up-regulation of skin-protective genes and down-regulation of detrimental tissue remodeling genes by hypothermia may contribute to its beneficial effects. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Epidemiology of hospitalized burns patients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wu-Chien; Pai, Lu; Lin, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Heng-Chang

    2003-09-01

    Previous studies based on either single hospital data or sampling of specific groups of hospitalized burns victims in Taiwan have provided only minimal epidemiological information. The study is designed to provide additional data on the epidemiology of hospitalized burns patients in Taiwan. Data were obtained from the Burn Injury Information System (BIIS), which brings together information supplied by 34 contracted hospitals. The study time course spanned a 2-year period from July 1997 to June 1999. Patient characteristics (age, sex, education level, etc.), causes and severity of injuries, and medical care measures were explored. A total of 4741 patients were registered with BIIS over the study period. The majority of hospitalized patients (67%) were male. The age distribution of burns patients showed peaks occurring at the age groups of 0-5 and 35-44 years. Over the time course of a day, burn injuries occurred more frequently from 10:00 to 12:00 h and 16:00 to 18:00 h. Injuries suspected as the result of suicide, homicide or child abuse accounted for 4.8% of hospitalized cases. More than 48% of the burns occurred in the home. The leading type of burn injury was scalding, followed by naked flame, explosion, electrical burns, and chemical burns due to caustic or corrosive substances. The mean percent total body surface area (%TBSA) for adults was 19%, and for young children was 12%. The average length of hospital stay was 18 days. In conclusion, children under 5 years and adults between 35 and 44 years of age are two high-risk groups for burn injuries. Corresponding to meal preparation time, hot substances such as boiling water, hot soup, etc. are the most common agents responsible for scalds. Prevention programs for reducing the risk of burn injuries during cooking and eating are required, especially for parents with young children.

  7. National programme for prevention of burn injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The estimated annual burn incidence in India is approximately 6-7 million per year. The high incidence is attributed to illiteracy, poverty and low level safety consciousness in the population. The situation becomes further grim due to the absence of organized burn care at primary and secondary health care level. But the silver lining is that 90% of burn injuries are preventable. An initiative at national level is need of the hour to reduce incidence so as to galvanize the available resources for more effective and standardized treatment delivery. The National Programme for Prevention of Burn Injuries is the endeavor in this line. The goal of National programme for prevention of burn injuries (NPPBI would be to ensure prevention and capacity building of infrastructure and manpower at all levels of health care delivery system in order to reduce incidence, provide timely and adequate treatment to burn patients to reduce mortality, complications and provide effective rehabilitation to the survivors. Another objective of the programme will be to establish a central burn registry. The programme will be launched in the current Five Year Plan in Medical colleges and their adjoining district hospitals in few states. Subsequently, in the next five year plan it will be rolled out in all the medical colleges and districts hospitals of the country so that burn care is provided as close to the site of accident as possible and patients need not to travel to big cities for burn care. The programme would essentially have three components i.e. Preventive programme, Burn injury management programme and Burn injury rehabilitation programme.

  8. Management of Critical Burn Injuries: Recent Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Dries

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Burn injury and its subsequent multisystem effects are commonly encountered by acute care practitioners. Resuscitation is the major component of initial burn care and must be managed to restore and preserve vital organ function. Later complications of burn injury are dominated by infection. Burn centers are often called to manage problems related to thermal injury, including lightning and electrical injuries. Methods A selected review is provided of key management concepts as well as of recent reports published by the American Burn Association. Results The burn-injured patient is easily and frequently over resuscitated, with ensuing complications that include delayed wound healing and respiratory compromise. A feedback protocol designed to limit the occurrence of excessive resuscitation has been proposed, but no new “gold standard” for resuscitation has replaced the venerated Parkland formula. While new medical therapies have been proposed for patients sustaining inhalation injury, a paradigm-shifting standard of medical therapy has not emerged. Renal failure as a specific contributor to adverse outcome in burns has been reinforced by recent data. Of special problems addressed in burn centers, electrical injuries pose multisystem physiologic challenges and do not fit typical scoring systems. Conclusion Recent reports emphasize the dangers of over resuscitation in the setting of burn injury. No new medical therapy for inhalation injury has been generally adopted, but new standards for description of burn-related infections have been presented. The value of the burn center in care of the problems of electrical exposure, both manmade and natural, is demonstrated in recent reports.

  9. Increased admissions for diabetes mellitus after burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Janine M; Randall, Sean M; Fear, Mark W; Boyd, James H; O'Halloran, Emily; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M

    2016-12-01

    Currently, limited long-term data on hyperglycaemia and insulin sensitivity in burn patients are available and the data that do exist are primarily related to paediatric severe burns. The aim of this study was to assess if burn is associated with increased post-burn admissions for diabetes mellitus. A population-based longitudinal study using linked hospital morbidity and death data from Western Australia was undertaken of all persons hospitalized for a first burn (n=30,997) in 1980-2012 and a frequency matched non-injury comparison cohort, randomly selected from Western Australia's birth registrations and electoral roll (n=123,399). Crude admission rates and summed length of stay for diabetes mellitus were calculated. Negative binomial and Cox proportional hazards regression modelling were used to generate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and hazard ratios (HR), respectively. After adjustment for socio-demographic factors and pre-existing health status, the burn cohort had 2.21 times (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.36-1.56) as many admissions and almost three times the number of days in hospital with a diabetes mellitus diagnosis (IRR, 95% CI: 2.94, 2.12-4.09) than the uninjured cohort. Admission rates were significantly elevated for those burned during childhood (diabetes mellitus in the burn cohort provide evidence that burns have longer term effects on blood glucose and insulin regulation after wound healing. The first five years after burn discharge appears to be a critical period with significantly elevated incident admissions for diabetes mellitus during this time. Results would suggest prolonged clinical management after discharge and or wound healing to minimise post-burn admissions for diabetes mellitus is required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Oral manifestations in type-2 diabetes and related complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Bajaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge of the wide spectrum of the oral markers of diabetes is imperative as one frequently encounters individuals with undetected, untreated or poorly controlled diabetes. Objectives: The objective was to study the oral manifestations in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and to establish an association between oral manifestations and associated microvascular and macrovascular complications. Materials and Methods: 50 cases of DM were selected who had oral complications. The control group comprised 50 age- and sex-matched diabetic patients without any oral complications. Results: Oral manifestations in DM included periodontal disease in 34%, oral candidiasis in 24%, tooth loss in 24%, oral mucosal ulcers in 22%, taste impairment in 20%, xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction in 14%, dental caries in 24%, and burning mouth sensation in 10% cases. Fasting [(FBG (P = 0.003] and postprandial blood glucose [(PPBG (P = 0.0003] levels were significantly higher among cases. The P values for neuropathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, and sepsis were 0.0156, 0.0241, 0.68, 0.4047, 0.0278, and 0.3149, respectively, which were significant for neuropathy, retinopathy, and dyslipidemia. Conclusions: Several oral complications are seen among diabetics. Association of oral markers in DM and microvascular complications suggests that there is a significant association between the two.

  11. Gout: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treament

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Detecting and Treating Gout Gout: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treament Past Issues / Winter 2012 Table of Contents ... Gout may be difficult to diagnose because the symptoms can be vague and could be from other ...

  12. Pertussis Signs & Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Kids with Infectious Diseases (PKIDs) Signs and Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... not for as long as 3 weeks. Early Symptoms In those who have been vaccinated: In most ...

  13. PTSD: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature PTSD Symptoms, Diagnosis , Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms As with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), PTSD ...

  14. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Support Guides Why no symptoms? Because prostate cancer hardly ever starts in the most convenient part of the prostate for symptoms to occur, near the urethra (the tube that carries urine through the prostate ...

  15. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch this video to learn what you need to know about burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. Read our burn prevention tips | Visit our YouTube ...

  16. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips Video Special Needs Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch ... learn what you need to know about burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. ...

  17. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips Video Special Needs Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch ... learn what you need to know about burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. ...

  18. How Does the Freezer Burn Our Food?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Shelly J.; Lee, Joo Won

    2009-01-01

    Freezer burn is a common problem that significantly affects the color, texture, and flavor of frozen foods. Food science students should be able to clearly explain the causes and consequences of freezer burn. However, it is difficult to find a modern, detailed, accurate, yet concise, explanation of the mechanism and factors influencing the rate of…

  19. Current approach to burn critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallioglu, A E; Haberal, M

    2007-10-01

    Burn trauma is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. Advancements in resuscitation, surgical tecniques, infection control and nutritional/metaolic support decreased mortality and morbidity. This article intends to review current outlines for initial treatment and resuscitation nutritional/metabolic support and wound management peculiar to burn patients.

  20. Pathophysiologic Response to Burns in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G; Patsouris, David; Stanojcic, Mile; Abdullahi, Abdikarim; Rehou, Sarah; Pinto, Ruxandra; Chen, Peter; Burnett, Marjorie; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decades advancements have improved survival and outcomes of severely burned patients except one population, elderly. The Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) burn size in elderly has remained the same over the past three decades, and so has morbidity and mortality, despite the increased demand for elderly burn care. The objective of this study is to gain insights on why elderly burn patients have had such a poor outcome when compared to adult burn patients. The significance of this project is that to this date, burn care providers recognize the extreme poor outcome of elderly, but the reason remains unclear. In this prospective translational trial, we have determined clinical, metabolic, inflammatory, immune, and skin healing aspects. We found that elderly have a profound increased mortality, more premorbid conditions, and stay at the hospital for longer, p 0.05, but a significant increased incidence of multi organ failure, p response, increased hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic responses, inversed inflammatory response, immune-compromisation and substantial delay in wound healing predominantly due to alteration in characteristics of progenitor cells, p responses to burns when compared to adults associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that these responses are complex and not linear, requiring a multi-modal approach to improve the outcome of severely burned elderly.

  1. Osteomyelitis in burn patients requiring skeletal fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Desai, MH; Herndon, DN

    2000-01-01

    Deep and severe burns often present with the exposure of musculoskeletal structures and severe deformities. Skeletal fixation, suspension and/or traction are part of their comprehensive treatment. Several factors put burn patients at risk for osteomyelitis, osteosynthesis material being one of them.

  2. Epidemiology of pediatric burn in southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsai-Ming; Wang, Kai-Hung; Lai, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Sin-Daw

    2005-03-01

    A 5-year retrospective review of 157 pediatric patients admitted to burn center of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital (Kaohsiung, Taiwan) was undertaken to identify the incidence, mechanism, and agents of pediatric burn. The highest incidence of pediatric burn was in children aged 1-6 years (57.3%), followed by age group 6-14 years (31.8%). Scald burn (75.2%) made up the major cause of this injury and was dominant in each age group compared to non-scald burn. The kitchen/dining area (57.3%) and living room (29.9%) accounted for the most frequent places where pediatric burns occurred. Among the agents of scald burn, hot drink (49.2%) and soup (32.2%) were the two leading causes. There were more pediatric burns reported in colder seasons (38.2% and 33.1% in winter and fall respectively) and during dining time (19.7% in 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and 35.0% in 5 p.m.-8 p.m.). The results of this report may be closely related to special culinary habits (use of chafing-dish and making hot tea) in the south of Taiwan.

  3. Eradicating Understory Hardwoods By Repeated Prescribed Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles X. Grano

    1970-01-01

    In a loblolly-shorleaf pine stand contained abundant litter, one winter fire killed 94 percent of the stems of understory hardwoods up to 3.5 inches in diameter at teh base. Prolific sprouting ensued. Eleven annual summer burns eliminated sprouting on 85 percent of the rootstocks, and seven biennial summer burns eliminated sprouting on 59 percent of them.

  4. Predictive Factors of Mortality in Burn Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fazeli; Karami-Matin; Kakaei; Pourghorban; Safari-Faramani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Burn injuries impose a considerable burden on healthcare systems in Iran. It is among the top ten causes of mortality and a main cause of disability. Objectives: This study aimed to examine factors influencing mortality in burn patients admitted to the main educational tertiary referral hospital in Kermanshah. Patients and Methods: All patients admitted to the Imam Khom...

  5. BURN WOUND HEALING ACTIVITY OF Euphorbia hirta

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiprakash, B.; Chandramohan,; Reddy, D. Narishma

    2006-01-01

    The Ethanolic extract of whole plant of Euphorbia hirta was screened for burn wound healing activity in rats as 2% W/W cream. The study was carried out based on the assessment of percentage reduction in original wound. It showed significant burn wound healing activity.

  6. 'Sabbath' electric plate burn: a ritual hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmeir, P; Sagi, A; Rosenberg, L; Picard, E; Ben Yakar, Y

    1989-02-01

    This report describes the burns caused by an electric hot plate which is used by orthodox Jews for keeping food and liquids warm during the Sabbath (Saturday). An illustrative case is presented and the preventable aspects of this particular burn are discussed.

  7. [Scalp burns due to hair bleach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenblast, Lene

    2011-02-28

    We present two cases of scalp burn or possible chemical reaction due to use of hair highlight products. One case was treated with serial excision of the scarred bald area after the burn, and the other case was treated with implantation of expanders and subsequent excision of the bald area.

  8. Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. S. Wagenbrenner; M. J. Germino; B. K. Lamb; R. B. Foltz; P. R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Wind erosion and aeolian transport processes are largely unstudied in the post-wildfire environment, but recent studies have shown that wind erosion can play a major role in burned landscapes. A wind erosion monitoring system was installed immediately following a wildfire in southeastern Idaho, USA to measure wind erosion from the burned area (Figure 1). This paper...

  9. Burn Injury Arise From Flying Balloon Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Kulahci

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Many of peoples are faced minor or major burn injuries in their life. Even the most widespread burn cause is flame injuries, too different burn cause pointed out in literature like Acetylen burns. The cases which imply in literature, mostly causes from explosion of high pressure acetylene tube, metal oxygene patch flame or carbide lamp using from cave explorers. An interesting acetylene burn cause in Turkey was publised by the authors. This cases was to come into being from flying toy balloons flame. 80 person was injured from flying toy ballons flame in a meeting in 2002. Although this potential risks of acetylene, helium have not any of some risk. But helium was provided from other countries and have more price. The injuries which caused from acetylene burns like 1st -2nd degree burns. Consequently that was known helium is more avaliable for using in toy sector, and never cause burn injuries like this. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 291-296

  10. STUDY ON PRETHROMBOTIC STATE IN BURNED PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鸿利; 邵慧珍; 支立民; 肖玉瑞; 杨丽英; 史济湘

    1992-01-01

    Seventy-eight burned patients (53 males and 25 females) were classified into 4 groups (mild type: 14 cases, moderate type: 13 cases, severe type: 17 cases and super-severe type: 34 cases) in accordence with criteria established by the Chinese Society for burns. Twenty-two parameters related to platelet, coagulant and anticoagulant factors, fibrinolysis system and hemorrheology were determined at first 24 hours, on third and fifth post-burn days. The results were as follow: Fibrinogen antigen, von Willebrand factor antigen, plasminogen activitor inhibitor activity, thromboxane B2 and hematocrit and whole blood viscosity significantly increased, however antithrombin Ⅲ, protein C antigen, free protein S and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α markedly decreased compared with normal control at first 24 hours post burn. In addition, fibrinogen antigen, von Willebrand factor antigen, plasminogen activitor inhibitor activity, thromboxane B2 and whole blood viscosity were persistently elevated, however, antithrombin Ⅲ, protein C, free protein S and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α declined on third and fifth post burn days. These changes resulted in a prethrombotic state, being an important factor in genesis of microthrombosis on burn site and the cause of the deepening and aggravation of burn wound on the third and fifth days in burned patients.

  11. 7 CFR 29.6004 - Burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Burn. 29.6004 Section 29.6004 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6004 Burn. The duration of combustion or length of time that a...

  12. Pathophysiologic Response to Burns in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc G. Jeschke

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades advancements have improved survival and outcomes of severely burned patients except one population, elderly. The Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 burn size in elderly has remained the same over the past three decades, and so has morbidity and mortality, despite the increased demand for elderly burn care. The objective of this study is to gain insights on why elderly burn patients have had such a poor outcome when compared to adult burn patients. The significance of this project is that to this date, burn care providers recognize the extreme poor outcome of elderly, but the reason remains unclear. In this prospective translational trial, we have determined clinical, metabolic, inflammatory, immune, and skin healing aspects. We found that elderly have a profound increased mortality, more premorbid conditions, and stay at the hospital for longer, p  0.05, but a significant increased incidence of multi organ failure, p < 0.05. These clinical outcomes were associated with a delayed hypermetabolic response, increased hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic responses, inversed inflammatory response, immune-compromisation and substantial delay in wound healing predominantly due to alteration in characteristics of progenitor cells, p < 0.05. In summary, elderly have substantially different responses to burns when compared to adults associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that these responses are complex and not linear, requiring a multi-modal approach to improve the outcome of severely burned elderly.

  13. Burn Injury Arise From Flying Balloon Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Kulahci

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Many of peoples are faced minor or major burn injuries in their life. Even the most widespread burn cause is flame injuries, too different burn cause pointed out in literature like Acetylen burns. The cases which imply in literature, mostly causes from explosion of high pressure acetylene tube, metal oxygene patch flame or carbide lamp using from cave explorers. An interesting acetylene burn cause in Turkey was publised by the authors. This cases was to come into being from flying toy balloons flame. 80 person was injured from flying toy ballons flame in a meeting in 2002. Although this potential risks of acetylene, helium have not any of some risk. But helium was provided from other countries and have more price. The injuries which caused from acetylene burns like 1st -2nd degree burns. Consequently that was known helium is more avaliable for using in toy sector, and never cause burn injuries like this. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(4: 291-296

  14. Burn Treatment: Annual Research Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-30

    positive for 127 a given species may be indicative of its importance in pathogenesis of pulmon - ary disease in burned patients. Table 6. Principal...pathogens. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is, of course, the conspicuous successful opportunist in burns, cancer wards, debilitated aged, newborns, and other

  15. Pentoxifylline therapy : A new adjunct in the treatment of oral submucous fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : This study was designed to determine the effect of pentoxifylline (Trental on the clinical and pathologic course of oral submucous fibrosis. This drug is a methylxanthine derivative that has vasodilating properties and was envisaged to increase mucosal vascularity. STUDY DESIGN : This investigation was conducted as a randomized clinical trial incorporating a control group (Standard drug group SDG, multivitamin, and local heat therapy in comparison to pentoxifylline test cases (Experimental drug group EDG, 400mg 3 times daily, as coated, sustained release tablets. The stipulated treatment period was 7 months and a total of 29 cases of advanced fibrosis (14 test subjects and 15 age and sex matched diseased controls were included in this study and 100% compliance was reported at the end ofthe test period. RESULTS : Mild gastric irritation that could be managed by diet protocols was the only untoward symptom reported during this trial. Review of the patients and controls was done at an interval of 30 days and subjective and objective measurements were recorded. The follow up data at each visit with respect to each other and to base-line values was calibrated using a nonparametric test of Mann-Whitney (Kruskal-Wallis test. Significant comparisons with regard to improvement were recorded as objective criteria of mouth opening (t=11.285, p= 0.000, tongue protrusion (t= 3.898, p = 0.002, and relief from perioral fibrotic bands (p = 0.0001554. Subjective symptoms of intolerance to spices (p = 0.0063218, burning sensation of mouth (p = 0.0005797, tinnitus (p=0.000042, difficulty in swallowing (p=0.0000714. and difficulty in speech (p=0.0000020 were also recorded significant improvement at the end of the trial period. CONCLUSION : This pilot investigation points to the effectiveness of pentoxifylline as an adjunct therapy in the routine management of oral submucous fibrosis.

  16. Crusted Scabies in the Burned Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jais Oliver; Alsbjørn, Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to describe a case of crusted scabies (CS) in a burned patient, which was primarily undiagnosed and led to a nosocomial outbreak in the burn unit; 2) to analyze and discuss the difficulties in diagnosing and treating this subset of patients with burn injury......; and 3) to design a treatment strategy for future patients. Case analysis and literature review were performed. The index patient had undiagnosed crusted scabies (sive Scabies norvegica) with the ensuing mite hyperinfestation when admitted to the department with minor acute dermal burns. Conservative...... healing and autograft healing were impaired because of the condition. Successful treatment of the burns was only accomplished secondarily to scabicide treatment. An outbreak of scabies among staff members indirectly led to diagnosis. CS is ubiquitous, and diagnosis may be difficult. This is the first...

  17. Modern trends in fluid therapy for burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricklebank, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    The majority of burn centres use the crystalloid-based Parkland formula to guide fluid therapy, but patients actually receive far more fluid than the formula predicts. Resuscitation with large volumes of crystalloid has numerous adverse consequences, including worsening of burn oedema, conversion of superficial into deep burns, and compartment syndromes. Resuscitation fluids influence the inflammatory response to burns in different ways and it may be possible, therefore to affect this response using the appropriate fluid, at the appropriate time. Starches are effective volume expanders and early use of newer formulations may limit resuscitation requirements and burn oedema by reducing inflammation and capillary leak. Advanced endpoint monitoring may guide clinicians in when to 'turn off' aggressive fluid therapy and therefore avoid the problems of over-resuscitation.

  18. Long hair, smoking, and deep facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koljonen, Virve

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe deep facial burn injuries by cigarette lighters in longhaired adults and to report our experience in their treatment. Eight consecutive cigarette lighter burn victims are treated in the Helsinki Burn Center in the year 2006. Seven of the patients were women; their mean age was 50 years. All were under the influence of alcohol at the time of injury. The mean burnt area was 3.5% TBSA. The burnt areas were primarily forehead, cheek, and ipsilateral ear. After a conservative treatment, all the patients underwent an operation, whereby the nonhealing burns were excised and covered with autologous split thickness skin grafts. Postoperative period was uneventful in all the patients. Besides having severe detrimental effects on general health status and wound healing, smoking is the leading cause of residential and total fire deaths worldwide. The patients in this article suffered deep facial burns because of cigarette lighters.

  19. Sexual Function Following Burn Injuries: Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Atisha A; Corkill, Helen A; Goutos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Sexual function is a profound facet of the human personality. Burns due their sudden and devastating nature can have longstanding effects on intimate function by virtue of physical sequelae as well as alterations in body image and perceived desirability. A considerable number of patients encounter problems with intimate function in burns rehabilitation; nevertheless, the topic appears to be poorly addressed in specialist centers worldwide. Review of the literature suggests that a number of parameters can affect the quality of sexual life following burn injuries including age at the time of injury, location, and severity of the burn as well as coping mechanisms employed by the individual survivor. Addressing issues of intimacy relies on awareness, education, and a holistic approach on behalf of the multidisciplinary team members and, to this effect, recommendations are made on managing sexual function concerns in burns rehabilitation.

  20. Psychosocial care of persons with severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeney, Patricia E; Rosenberg, Laura; Rosenberg, Marta; Faber, A W

    2008-06-01

    Treatment of people with burn injuries includes recovery of optimal function for survivors to fully participate in society, psychologically and physically. Increased likelihood of physical survival has led to greater concern for potential psychological morbidity for the burn survivor. Based on research and on many years of clinical experience in providing psychosocial care to burned children and adults, the authors outline their approach to assisting burn survivors and their families through the arduous process of recovery from admission through critical care, inpatient recuperation and reintegration upon hospital discharge. A philosophy of rehabilitation, a process that may occur for many months or years after patients' discharge from their acute hospitalization, is presented in the form of seven guidelines for working with burn survivors.

  1. Coping with severe burns in the early stage after burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bras, Marijana; Loncar, Zoran; Brajković, Lovorka; Gregurek, Rudolf; Micković, Vlatko

    2007-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between coping strategies, anxiety and depression levels and burn injury characteristics in the early phase of the treatment in burn-injured patients. Seventy patients with severe burns were interviewed within two weeks of their burn trauma. Coping strategies were measured by the coping with burns questionnaire (CBQ). Anxiety and depression levels were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory and the Beck Anxiety Inventory. There were no statistically significant gender differences in various coping strategies. Avoidance was associated with higher levels of anxiety, depression and hopelessness. The percentage of total body surface area (TBSA) and localization of burns were not associated with coping patterns. Implications for the assessment and management of burn injured patients were discussed.

  2. MANAGEMENT OF THE ORAL-FEATURES OF SJOGREN SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SGRAVENMADE, EJ; VISSINK, A

    In this paper the basis of the oral features of Sjogren's syndrome is described and guidelines for proper management of these features are given. The most pronounced oral symptoms are a dry sensation in the mouth and difficulties with swallowing and speech. Furthermore, these patients do not sleep

  3. MANAGEMENT OF THE ORAL-FEATURES OF SJOGREN SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SGRAVENMADE, EJ; VISSINK, A

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the basis of the oral features of Sjogren's syndrome is described and guidelines for proper management of these features are given. The most pronounced oral symptoms are a dry sensation in the mouth and difficulties with swallowing and speech. Furthermore, these patients do not sleep w

  4. Role of Dental Profession in Oral Cancer Prevention and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Q A; Awan, K H

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of oral cancer is increasing worldwide. Malignant neoplasms of the mouth and pharynx have been rated as the 10th most common cancer in men and 7th in women, though geographical variations exist.(1)Generally, in a society, oral cancer is not properly understood. The sign and symptoms are frequently overlooked in the initial stages when it is responsive to treat.

  5. Psychiatric symptoms as pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hout, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Disorders are typically seen as the causes of their symptoms. This makes sense in many fields of medicine, but not in psychiatry where symptoms constitute disorders: the notion that mental disorders cause symptoms is a tautology. Biological psychiatry tries to circumvent this logical fallacy by tryi

  6. Understanding medical symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Guassora, Ann Dorrit Kristiane; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present a conceptual review and analysis of symptom understanding. Subjective bodily sensations occur abundantly in the normal population and dialogues about symptoms take place in a broad range of contexts, not only in the doctor’s office. Our review of symptom unde...

  7. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause the following signs and symptoms— Vaginal ...

  8. Management of somatic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Andreas; Dimsdale, Joel

    2014-01-01

    on the recognition and effective management of patients with excessive and disabling somatic symptoms. The clinical presentation of somatic symptoms is categorized into three groups of patients: those with multiple somatic symptoms, those with health anxiety, and those with conversion disorder. The chapter provides...

  9. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research In Your Community Advocate Get Involved Donate Symptoms and Diagnosis En español Symptoms The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite ... the eyes and bladder are generally not affected. Diagnosis ALS is a difficult disease to diagnose. There ...

  10. Pediatric burns in Khuzestan Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyarikhah, Hojjat; Shayestehfard, Marzieh; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Cheraghian, Bahman; Latifzadeh, Shila; Madari, Zahra

    2012-04-01

    Burn injuries are the most frequently occurring injuries among pediatric populations worldwide, and they are significant pediatric injuries in Iran. This study was conducted to analyze the pattern of pediatric burns in Khuzestan province in the south-west of Iran from April 2006 to March 2007. The location of the study was Taleghani Hospital, a sole center for burn patients in Khuzestan province. The number of patients with burns admitted to the center in 1 year (from April 2006 to March 2007) was 211. Data were obtained by reviewing the medical records of patients hospitalized at the center. Of the patients, 85 (40.3%) were female and 126 (59.7%) were male. Of the 85 female patients, 50 were from urban areas and 35 were from rural areas. Of the 126 male patients, 68 (54%) were from urban areas and 58 (46%) were from rural areas. The mean ± SE age of the children ranging between 0 and 11 years was 3.20 ± 0.188. Scalding was the predominant cause of burns and caused 86.7% of the burns. The age of the patients with scald injuries (2.95 ± 2.56 years) was significantly lower than that of patients with flame injuries (4.28 ± 3.3 years) (P=0.007). Correlation analysis showed that younger children and urban residents are more vulnerable to scald injuries. The mean body surface area of burns was 20.5 ± 10.26 cm in all patients. Scalding was the most common cause of burns. Age burn accidents in children in Khuzestan. An appropriate burn prevention program, with focus on education, is needed to prevent this injury.

  11. Threshold age and burn size associated with poor outcomes in the elderly after burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G; Pinto, Ruxandra; Costford, Sheila R; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-03-01

    Elderly burn care represents a vast challenge. The elderly are one of the most susceptible populations to burn injuries, but also one of the fastest growing demographics, indicating a substantial increase in patient numbers in the near future. Despite the need and importance of elderly burn care, survival of elderly burn patients is poor. Additionally, little is known about the responses of elderly patients after burn. One central question that has not been answered is what age defines an elderly patient. The current study was conducted to determine whether there is a cut-off age for elderly burn patients that is correlated with an increased risk for mortality and to determine the burn size in modern burn care that is associated with increased mortality. To answer these questions, we applied appropriate statistical analyses to the Ross Tilley Burn Centre and the Inflammatory and Host Response to Injury databases. We could not find a clear cut-off age that differentiates or predicts between survival and death. Risk of death increased linearly with increasing age. Additionally, we found that the LD50 decreases from 45% total body surface area (TBSA) to 25% TBSA from the age of 55 years to the age of 70 years, indicating that even small burns lead to poor outcome in the elderly. We therefore concluded that age is not an ideal to predictor of burn outcome, but we strongly suggest that burn care providers be aware that if an elderly patient sustains even a 25% TBSA burn, the risk of mortality is 50% despite the implementation of modern protocolized burn care.

  12. [Quantification of crop residue burned areas based on burning indices using Landsat 8 image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian-hang; Song, Kai-shar; Wen, Zhi-dan; Shao, Tian-tian; Li, Bo-nan; Qi, Cai

    2015-11-01

    Crop residue burning leads to atmospheric pollution and is an enormous waste of crop residue resource. Crop residue burning can be monitored timely in large regions as the fire points can be recognized through remotely sensed image via thermal infrared bands. However, the area, the detailed distribution pattern and especially the severity of the burning areas cannot be derived only by the thermal remote sensing approach. The burning index, which was calculated with two or more spectral bands at where the burned and unburned areas have distinct spectral characteristics, is widely used in the forest fire investigation. However its potential application for crop residue burning evaluation has not been explored. With two Landsat 8 images that cover a part of the Songnen Plain, three burning indices, i.e., the normalized burned ratio (NBR), the normalized burned ratio incorporating the thermal band (NBRT), and the burned area index (BAI), were used to classify the crop residue burned and unburned areas. The overall classification accuracies were 91.9%, 92.3%, and 87.8%, respectively. The correlation analysis between the indices and the crop residue coverage indicated that the NBR and NBRT were positively correlated with the crop residue coverage (R2 = 0.73 and 0.64, respectively) with linear regression models, while the BAI was exponentially correlated with the crop residue coverage (R2 = 0.68). The results indicated that the use of burning indices in crop residue burning monitoring could quantify crop residue burning severity and provide valuable data for evaluating atmospheric pollution.

  13. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahija Janardhanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  14. The Ocular Surface Chemical Burns

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    Medi Eslani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular chemical burns are common and serious ocular emergencies that require immediate and intensive evaluation and care. The victims of such incidents are usually young, and therefore loss of vision and disfigurement could dramatically affect their lives. The clinical course can be divided into immediate, acute, early, and late reparative phases. The degree of limbal, corneal, and conjunctival involvement at the time of injury is critically associated with prognosis. The treatment starts with simple but vision saving steps and is continued with complicated surgical procedures later in the course of the disease. The goal of treatment is to restore the normal ocular surface anatomy and function. Limbal stem cell transplantation, amniotic membrane transplantation, and ultimately keratoprosthesis may be indicated depending on the patients’ needs.

  15. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  16. Oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    Full Text Available A amiloidose é uma doença complexa rara de difícil diagnóstico que ocorre devido à deposição de substância amilóide no meio extracelular. Ao ser diagnosticado na cavidade bucal, deve-se monitorar o paciente a fim de avaliar possíveis complicações sistêmicas da doença. Diante disso, o objetivo do presente estudo é relatar um caso de amiloidose oral em uma paciente do gênero feminino de 72 anos de idade. Baseado nos sinais clínicos observados, a hipótese diagnóstica foi de fibroma traumático. Após realização de biópsia e exame histopatológico, o diagnóstico foi de amiloidose oral, o que foi confirmado com a coloração do espécime com o reagente vermelho congo. Depósitos de amilóide foram encontrados no tecido conjuntivo, na avaliação através da luz polarizada, que apresentou birrefringência. Tal achado foi preocupante, já que a amiloidose geralmente acomete diversos tecidos levando a comprometimentos sistêmicos. Por essa razão a paciente foi encaminhada a procurar atendimento médico. No entanto, houve abandono do tratamento e a mesma veio a óbito 6 meses após o diagnóstico da doença. Lesões orais aparentemente simples podem revelar doenças raras e de difícil tratamento. O diagnóstico preciso e acompanhamentos médicos são fundamentais na sobrevida do paciente.

  17. Burning mouth syndrome associated with varicella zoster virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Maria A; Gilden, Don

    2016-07-05

    We present two cases of burning mouth syndrome (BMS)-of 8-month duration in a 61-year-old woman and of 2-year duration in a 63-year-old woman-both associated with increased levels of antivaricella zoster virus (VZV) IgM antibodies in serum and with pain that improved with antiviral treatment. Combined with our previous finding of BMS due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, we recommend evaluation of patients with BMS not only for VZV or HSV-1 DNA in the saliva, but also for serum anti-VZV and anti-HSV-1 IgM antibodies. Both infections are treatable with oral antiviral agents.

  18. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ... detection and treatment of oral cancers. Note: For materials specific to African American men, please see: Oral ...

  19. Oral Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral lichen planus Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Oral lichen planus (LIE-kun PLAY-nus) is an ongoing (chronic) ... that affects mucous membranes inside your mouth. Oral lichen planus may appear as white, lacy patches; red, ...

  20. Oral Health Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health Mouth Breathing Can Cause Major Health Problems Over ... news feeds delivered directly to your desktop! more... Oral Health Glossary Article Chapters Oral Health Glossary print full ...